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Sample records for californicus reveal historical

  1. Historical wildlife dynamics on Dugway Proving Ground: population and disease trends in jack rabbits over two decades. [Lepus californicus

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    Eberhardt, L.E.; Van Voris, P.

    1986-08-01

    In an effort to determine whether US Army activities on the Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) have had an impact on resident wildlife, intensive studies have been conducted on the biology and ecology of the black-tailed jack rabbit (Lepus californicus) since 1965. in addition, the incidence of endemic diseases in several species of resident wildlife on the DPG have been studied from the late 1950s through the mid-1970s. The objectives of this report are to: (1) compile and summarize the jack rabbit data and some of the disease information that is presently contained only in annual reports; (2) compare the DPG jack rabbit data to data available on other jack rabbit populations; and (3) analyze the data for unusual or unexplained fluctuations in population densities or in incidence of disease.

  2. A supplementary description of Brevipalpus californicus (Acari: Trombidiformes: Tenuipalpidae

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    Mohammad Raissi Ardali

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The false spider mite Brevipalpus californicus from the family Tenuipalpidae was collected from Caucasian alnus, White willow, Persian raspberry and a wild Chrysanthemum bush in Mazandaran province. This species is reported as a new record to the false spider mites-fauna of Iran here. Reviewing literatures revealed that it was briefly described in the original paper without any measures. So, a completed description is presented based on the Iranian specimens and different body segments are drawn for B. californicus. In addition, the above plants are new host records for B. californicus.

  3. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison.

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    David Forgacs

    Full Text Available Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06. Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76. However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae. Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions.

  4. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison

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    Derr, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06). Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76). However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites) from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae). Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions. PMID:27880780

  5. Historical Reconstruction Reveals Recovery in Hawaiian Coral Reefs

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    Kittinger, John N.; Pandolfi, John M.; Blodgett, Jonathan H.; Hunt, Terry L.; Jiang, Hong; Maly, Kepā; McClenachan, Loren E.; Schultz, Jennifer K.; Wilcox, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are declining worldwide, yet regional differences in the trajectories, timing and extent of degradation highlight the need for in-depth regional case studies to understand the factors that contribute to either ecosystem sustainability or decline. We reconstructed social-ecological interactions in Hawaiian coral reef environments over 700 years using detailed datasets on ecological conditions, proximate anthropogenic stressor regimes and social change. Here we report previously undetected recovery periods in Hawaiian coral reefs, including a historical recovery in the MHI (∼AD 1400–1820) and an ongoing recovery in the NWHI (∼AD 1950–2009+). These recovery periods appear to be attributed to a complex set of changes in underlying social systems, which served to release reefs from direct anthropogenic stressor regimes. Recovery at the ecosystem level is associated with reductions in stressors over long time periods (decades+) and large spatial scales (>103 km2). Our results challenge conventional assumptions and reported findings that human impacts to ecosystems are cumulative and lead only to long-term trajectories of environmental decline. In contrast, recovery periods reveal that human societies have interacted sustainably with coral reef environments over long time periods, and that degraded ecosystems may still retain the adaptive capacity and resilience to recover from human impacts. PMID:21991311

  6. Linking pollen quality and performance of Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae) in two-spotted spider mite management programmes.

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    Khanamani, Mostafa; Fathipour, Yaghoub; Talebi, Ali Asghar; Mehrabadi, Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    It has been shown that pollen as a dietary supplement may increase the establishment of generalist predatory mites, and therefore pest control by these mites can be provided. Life table studies were performed to evaluate the nutritional value of seven different pollens (almond, castor-bean, date-palm, maize, bitter-orange, sunflower and mixed bee pollen) as a supplementary food source for the spider mite predator Neoseiulus californicus McGregor. In addition, the nutritional quality of each pollen species was assessed through morphological and chemical analysis. Preadult duration was longer when the predator fed on castor-bean pollen (10.01 days) and bee pollen (9.94 days) compared with the others (5.58-7.27 days). The cohort reared on almond pollen had the highest intrinsic rate of increase (r) (0.231 day(-1) ), and those on mixed bee pollen had the lowest r (0.005 day(-1) ). The levels of nutritional content (sugar, lipid and protein) were significantly different among tested pollens. Comparison of N. californicus life table parameters on different diets revealed that the almond pollen (and after that the maize pollen) was a more suitable diet than the others. These findings will be useful in developing appropriate strategies for conservation of N. californicus to control spider mites. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. The pox in the North American backyard: Volepox virus pathogenesis in California mice (Peromyscus californicus.

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    Nadia F Gallardo-Romero

    Full Text Available Volepox virus (VPXV was first isolated in 1985 from a hind foot scab of an otherwise healthy California vole (Microtus californicus. Subsequent surveys in San Mateo County, CA, revealed serological evidence suggesting that VPXV is endemic to this area, and a second viral isolate from a Pinyon mouse (Peromyscus truei was collected in 1988. Since then, few studies have been conducted regarding the ecology, pathology, and pathogenicity of VPXV, and its prevalence and role as a potential zoonotic agent remain unknown. To increase our understanding of VPXV disease progression, we challenged 24 California mice (Peromyscus californicus intranasally with 1.6 × 10(3 PFU of purified VPXV. By day five post infection (pi we observed decreased activity level, conjunctivitis, ruffled hair, skin lesions, facial edema, and crusty noses. A mortality rate of 54% was noted by day eight pi. In addition, internal organ necrosis and hemorrhages were observed during necropsy of deceased or euthanized animals. Viral loads in tissues (brain, gonad, kidney, liver, lung, spleen, submandibular lymph node, and adrenal gland, bodily secretions (saliva, and tears, and excretions (urine, and/or feces were evaluated and compared using real time-PCR and tissue culture. Viral loads measured as high as 2 × 10(9 PFU/mL in some organs. Our results suggest that VPXV can cause extreme morbidity and mortality within rodent populations sympatric with the known VPXV reservoirs.

  8. Herbarium specimens reveal a historical shift in phylogeographic structure of common ragweed during native range disturbance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Michael David; Zimmer, Elizabeth A.; Olsen, Morten Tange

    2014-01-01

    Invasive plants provide ample opportunity to study evolutionary shifts that occur after introduction to novel environments. However, although genetic characters pre-dating introduction can be important determinants of later success, large-scale investigations of historical genetic structure have...... expanded rapidly as settlers deforested the landscape on a massive scale, later becoming an aggressive invasive with populations established globally. Towards a direct comparison of genetic structure now and during intense anthropogenic disturbance of the late 19th century, we sampled 45 natural...... populations of common ragweed across its native range as well as historical herbarium specimens collected up to 140 years ago. Bayesian clustering analyses of 453 modern and 473 historical samples genotyped at three chloroplast spacer regions and six nuclear microsatellite loci reveal that historical ragweed...

  9. Benthic surveys of the historic pearl oyster beds of Qatar reveal a dramatic ecological change.

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    Smyth, D; Al-Maslamani, I; Chatting, M; Giraldes, B

    2016-12-15

    The study aimed to confirm the presence of historic oyster banks of Qatar and code the biotopes present. The research also collated historical records and scientific publications to create a timeline of fishery activity. The oyster banks where once an extremely productive economic resource however, intense overfishing, extreme environmental conditions and anthropogenic impacts caused a fishery collapse. The timeline highlighted the vulnerability of ecosystem engineering bivalves if overexploited. The current status of the oyster banks meant only one site could be described as oyster dominant. This was unexpected as the sites were located in areas which once supported a highly productive oyster fishery. The research revealed the devastating effect that anthropogenic impacts can have on a relatively robust marine habitat like an oyster bed and it is hoped these findings will act as a driver to investigate and map other vulnerable habitats within the region before they too become compromised. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Historical comparisons reveal altered competitive interactions in a guild of crustose coralline algae.

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    McCoy, S J; Pfister, C A

    2014-04-01

    As the ocean environment changes over time, a paucity of long-term data sets and historical comparisons limits the exploration of community dynamics over time in natural systems. Here, we used a long-term experimental data set to present evidence for a reversal of competitive dominance within a group of crustose coralline algae (CCA) from the 1980s to present time in the northeast Pacific Ocean. CCA are cosmopolitan species distributed globally, and dominant space holders in intertidal and subtidal systems. Competition experiments showed a markedly lower competitive ability of the previous competitively dominant species and a decreased response of competitive dynamics to grazer presence. Competitive networks obtained from survey data showed concordance between the 1980s and 2013, yet also revealed reductions in interaction strengths across the assemblage. We discuss the potential role of environmental change, including ocean acidification, in altered ecological dynamics in this system. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  11. Historical data reveal 30-year persistence of benthic fauna associations in heavily modified waterbody

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    Ruth Callaway

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Baseline surveys form the cornerstone of coastal impact studies where altered conditions, for example through new infrastructure development, are assessed against a temporal reference state. They are snapshots taken before construction. Due to scarcity of relevant data prior to baseline surveys long-term trends can often not be taken into account. Particularly in heavily modified waterbodies this would however be desirable to control for changes in anthropogenic use over time as well as natural ecological variation. Here, the benthic environment of an industrialized embayment was investigated (Swansea Bay, Wales, UK where it is proposed to build a tidal lagoon that would generate marine renewable energy from the tidal range. Since robust long-term baseline data was not available, the value of unpublished historical benthos information from 1984 by a regional water company was assessed with the aim to improve certainty about the persistence of current benthic community patterns. A survey of 101 positions in 2014 identified spatially discrete benthic communities with areas of high and low diversity. Habitat characteristics including sediment properties and the proximity to a sewage outfall explained 17-35% of the variation in the community structure. Comparing the historical information from 1984 with 2014 revealed striking similarity in the benthic communities between those years, not just in their spatial distribution but also to a large extent in the species composition. The 30-year-old information confirmed spatial boundaries of discrete species associations and pinpointed a similar diversity hotspot. A group of five common species was found to be particularly persistent over time (Nucula nitidosa, Spisula elliptica, Spiophanes bombyx, Nephtys hombergii, Diastylis rathkei. According to the Infauna Quality Index (IQI linked to the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD the average ecological status for 2014 was ‘moderate’, but eleven samples

  12. Dental Pathology of the California Bobcat (Lynx rufus californicus).

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    Aghashani, A; Kim, A S; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2016-05-01

    Skulls from 277 California bobcats (Lynx rufus californicus) were examined macroscopically and by radiography. The majority of the skulls were from adult animals (79.8%). The skulls were from 128 male (46.2%) and 114 female (41.2%) animals and gender was unknown for the remainder. The majority (95.6%) of teeth were present for examination. Only 16 teeth were identified as absent congenitally and 15 of these were incisor teeth. Teeth with abnormal morphology were rare (0.5%). The two most common abnormalities were unusually large crowns of the maxillary first molar teeth and bigemination of the mandibular incisor teeth. Teeth with an abnormal number of roots were uncommon (n = 68). Sixty-three teeth had abnormal roots, mostly the presence of two roots instead of one for the maxillary first molar tooth. The most prevalent dental lesions found in the California bobcat were attrition/abrasion (85.2%), periodontitis (56.0%) and tooth fractures (50.9%). Less common dental lesions were endodontal disease (n = 114 teeth) and tooth resorption (n = 73 teeth). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prenatal Chemosensory Learning by the Predatory Mite Neoseiulus californicus

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    Peralta Quesada, Paulo C.; Schausberger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Prenatal or embryonic learning, behavioral change following experience made prior to birth, may have significant consequences for postnatal foraging behavior in a wide variety of animals, including mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, and molluscs. However, prenatal learning has not been previously shown in arthropods such as insects, spiders and mites. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined prenatal chemosensory learning in the plant-inhabiting predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus. We exposed these predators in the embryonic stage to two flavors (vanillin or anisaldehyde) or no flavor (neutral) by feeding their mothers on spider mite prey enriched with these flavors or not enriched with any flavor (neutral). After the predators reached the protonymphal stage, we assessed their prey choice through residence and feeding preferences in experiments, in which they were offered spider mites matching the maternal diet (neutral, vanillin or anisaldehyde spider mites) and non-matching spider mites. Predator protonymphs preferentially resided in the vicinity of spider mites matching the maternal diet irrespective of the type of maternal diet and choice situation. Across treatments, the protonymphs preferentially fed on spider mites matching the maternal diet. Prey and predator sizes did not differ among neutral, vanillin and anisaldehyde treatments, excluding the hypothesis that size-assortative predation influenced the outcome of the experiments. Conclusions/Significance Our study reports the first example of prenatal learning in arthropods. PMID:23300897

  14. Paleoparasitological remains revealed by seven historic contexts from "Place d'Armes", Namur, Belgium

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    Gino Chaves da Rocha

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Human occupation for several centuries was recorded in the archaeological layers of "Place d'Armes", Namur, Belgium. Preventive archaeological excavations were carried out between 1996/1997 and seven historical strata were observed, from Gallo-Roman period up to Modern Times. Soil samples from cesspools, latrines, and structures-like were studied and revealed intestinal parasite eggs in the different archaeological contexts. Ascaris lumbricoides, A. suum, Trichuris trichiura, T. suis. Taenia sp., Fasciola hepatica, Diphyllobothrium sp., Capillaria sp. and Oxyuris equi eggs were found. Paleoparasitology confirmed the use of structures as latrines or cesspit as firstly supposed by the archaeologists. Medieval latrines were not only used for rejection of human excrements. The finding of Ascaris sp. and Trichuris sp. eggs may point to human's or wild swine's feces. Gallo-Roman people used to eat wild boar. Therefore, both A. suum and T. suis, or A. lumbricoides and T. trichuris, may be present, considering a swine carcass recovered into a cesspit. Careful sediment analysis may reveal its origin, although parasites of domestic animals can be found together with those of human's. Taenia sp. eggs identified in latrine samples indicate ingestion of uncooked beef with cysticercoid larvae. F. hepatica eggs suggest the ingestion of raw contaminated vegetables and Diphyllobothrium sp. eggs indicate contaminated fresh-water fish consumption. Ascaris sp. and Trichuris sp. eggs indicate fecal-oral infection by human and/or animal excrements.

  15. Synergistic interaction in simultaneous exposure to Streptomyces californicus and Stachybotrys chartarum

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    Huttunen, K.; Pelkonen, J.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2004-01-01

    and their metabolites, although the cytotoxicity and inflammatory potential of certain individual microbes have been reported. In this study, we investigated the inflammatory responses of mouse RAW264.7 macrophages after exposure to six indoor air microbes (Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium spinulosum, Stachybotrys...... chartarum, Bacillus cereus, Mycobacterium terrae, and Pseudomonas fluorescens) alone and together with the actinomycete Streptomyces californicus. The production of nitric oxide, levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and cytotoxicity were......-hydroxytrichodermol. Finally, the synergistic inflammatory response caused by Str. californicus and trichodermin together was studied by analyzing for the presence of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) in nuclear extracts of the exposed cells. The exposure to Str. californicus induced the binding of NF-kappaB proteins...

  16. Spectrum-specific UV egg damage and dispersal responses in the phytoseiid predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

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    Tachi, Fuyuki; Osakabe, Masahiro

    2014-06-01

    Solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation is deleterious to plant-dwelling mites. Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) is a predominant predator of agriculturally important pest species of spider mite. However, phytoseiid mites are more vulnerable to UVB radiation than spider mites. Thus, the UVB radiation may influence decision making in foraging phytoseiid mites whether disperse or not. We tested the difference in impact and behavioral response among wavelengths of monochromatic UV radiation using a spectroscopic light source in N. californicus in the laboratory. We also examined whether the behavioral responses of N. californicus females to UV radiation varied based on the presence of prey (Tetranychus urticae Koch) eggs and residues (webs and excreta of T. urticae: foraging cue). The impact of UV radiation on the N. californicus egg hatchability varied drastically between wavelengths of ≤300 nm (0%) and ≥310 nm (100%). The N. californicus females escaped from UV radiation more quickly when they were irradiated with UV at shorter wavelength. Presence of T. urticae eggs had no effects arresting the escape of phytoseiid mites. In contrast, prey residues (including eggs) markedly detained N. californicus females from escaping under UV irradiation at ≥310 nm. However, N. californicus females quickly escaped when irradiated with UV at harmful 300 nm wavelength, regardless of prey cues. This indicates that the eyeless phytoseiid mite is capable of perceiving UV radiation, and whether escape or not is determined on the basis of harmful/harmless UV wavelength and presence/absence of foraging cues.

  17. Host-specific Dactylogyrus parasites revealing new insights on the historical biogeography of Northwest African and Iberian cyprinid fish.

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    Šimková, Andrea; Benovics, Michal; Rahmouni, Imane; Vukić, Jasna

    2017-11-28

    Host specificity in parasites represents the extent to which a parasite's distribution is limited to certain host species. Considering host-specific parasites of primarily freshwater fish (such as gill monogeneans), their biogeographical distribution is essentially influenced by both evolutionary and ecological processes. Due to the limited capacity for historical dispersion in freshwater fish, their specific coevolving parasites may, through historical host-parasite associations, at least partially reveal the historical biogeographical routes (or historical contacts) of host species. We used Dactylogyrus spp., parasites specific to cyprinid fish, to infer potential historical contacts between Northwest African and European and Asian cyprinid faunas. Using phylogenetic reconstruction, we investigated the origin(s) of host-specific Dactylogyrus spp. parasitizing Northwest African and Iberian cyprinid species. In accordance with hypotheses on the historical biogeography of two cyprinid lineages in Northwest Africa, Barbini (Luciobarbus) and Torini (Carasobarbus), we demonstrated the multiple origins of Northwest African Dactylogyrus. Dactylogyrus spp. of Carasobarbus spp. originated from Asian cyprinids, while Dactylogyrus spp. of Luciobarbus spp. originated from European cyprinids. This indicates the historical Northern route of Dactylogyrus spp. dispersion to Northwest African Luciobarbus species rather than the Southern route, which is currently widely accepted for Luciobarbus. In addition, both Northwest African cyprinid lineages were also colonized by Dactylogyrus marocanus closely related to Dactylogyrus spp. parasitizing African Labeo spp., which suggests a single host switch from African Labeonini to Northwest African Luciobarbus. We also demonstrated the multiple origins of Dactylogyrus spp. parasitizing Iberian Luciobarbus species. One Iberian Dactylogyrus group was phylogenetically closely related to Dactylogyrus of Moroccan Carasobarbus, while the second

  18. Predatory behaviors of Neoseiulus californicus and Galendromus helveolus (Acari: Phytoseiidae) attacking Oligonychus perseae (Acari: Tetranychidae).

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    Takano-Lee, M; Hoddle, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Predatory behaviors of Neosieulus californicus (McGregor) and Galendromus helveolus (Chant) attacking Oligonychus perseae Tuttle, Baker and Abbatiello on avocado leaves were videotaped and analyzed. Behaviors were recorded for "fresh" predators that were used < or = 48 hr post receipt from a commercial insectary and "cold stored" predators that were maintained at 12 degrees C for approximately 14 days. Fresh and cold stored G. helveolus were observed to attack O. perseae only after invading webbed nests. Conversely. fresh and cold stored N. californicus employed three different modes of predatory attack: (1) intercepting and attacking migrant O. perseae outside of web nests: (2) attacking prey through nest webbing; or (3) invading and attacking O. perseae inside nests. Predatory efficacy of both N. californicus and G. helveolus was reduced following cold storage. as both species engaged in certain predatory behaviors less frequently in comparison to predators that were not stored at low temperatures. Our observed results for N. californicus and G. helveolus attacking O. perseae are interpreted in relation to the chaetotaxy hypothesis, which proposes that phytoseiid invasion efficiency and propensity of webbed nests is facilitated by dorsal setal lengths.

  19. Gene expression and variation in social aggression by queens of the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex californicus.

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    Helmkampf, Martin; Mikheyev, Alexander S; Kang, Yun; Fewell, Jennifer; Gadau, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    A key requirement for social cooperation is the mitigation and/or social regulation of aggression towards other group members. Populations of the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex californicus show the alternate social phenotypes of queens founding nests alone (haplometrosis) or in groups of unrelated yet cooperative individuals (pleometrosis). Pleometrotic queens display an associated reduction in aggression. To understand the proximate drivers behind this variation, we placed foundresses of the two populations into social environments with queens from the same or the alternate population, and measured their behaviour and head gene expression profiles. A proportion of queens from both populations behaved aggressively, but haplometrotic queens were significantly more likely to perform aggressive acts, and conflict escalated more frequently in pairs of haplometrotic queens. Whole-head RNA sequencing revealed variation in gene expression patterns, with the two populations showing moderate differentiation in overall transcriptional profile, suggesting that genetic differences underlie the two founding strategies. The largest detected difference, however, was associated with aggression, regardless of queen founding type. Several modules of coregulated genes, involved in metabolism, immune system and neuronal function, were found to be upregulated in highly aggressive queens. Conversely, nonaggressive queens exhibited a striking pattern of upregulation in chemosensory genes. Our results highlight that the social phenotypes of cooperative vs. solitary nest founding tap into a set of gene regulatory networks that seem to govern aggression level. We also present a number of highly connected hub genes associated with aggression, providing opportunity to further study the genetic underpinnings of social conflict and tolerance. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Historical Y. pestis Genomes Reveal the European Black Death as the Source of Ancient and Modern Plague Pandemics.

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    Spyrou, Maria A; Tukhbatova, Rezeda I; Feldman, Michal; Drath, Joanna; Kacki, Sacha; Beltrán de Heredia, Julia; Arnold, Susanne; Sitdikov, Airat G; Castex, Dominique; Wahl, Joachim; Gazimzyanov, Ilgizar R; Nurgaliev, Danis K; Herbig, Alexander; Bos, Kirsten I; Krause, Johannes

    2016-06-08

    Ancient DNA analysis has revealed an involvement of the bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis in several historical pandemics, including the second plague pandemic (Europe, mid-14(th) century Black Death until the mid-18(th) century AD). Here we present reconstructed Y. pestis genomes from plague victims of the Black Death and two subsequent historical outbreaks spanning Europe and its vicinity, namely Barcelona, Spain (1300-1420 cal AD), Bolgar City, Russia (1362-1400 AD), and Ellwangen, Germany (1485-1627 cal AD). Our results provide support for (1) a single entry of Y. pestis in Europe during the Black Death, (2) a wave of plague that traveled toward Asia to later become the source population for contemporary worldwide epidemics, and (3) the presence of an historical European plague focus involved in post-Black Death outbreaks that is now likely extinct. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biosorption of Cr(III) and Pb(II) by Schoenoplectus californicus and Insights into the Binding Mechanism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomás Agustín Rearte; Patricia Beatriz Bozzano; Maria Luisa Andrade; Alicia Fabrizio de Iorio

    2013-01-01

      Biosorption and desorption of chromium and lead on shoots biomass of Schoenoplectus californicus were investigated by performing batch sorption tests in different conditions of pH, biosorbent dose...

  2. Pesticide-mediated displacement of a phytoseiid predator, Neoseiulus womersleyi, by another phytoseiid predator, N. californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

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    Ullah, Mohammad Shaef; Hanawa, Masumi; Gotoh, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Neoseiulus womersleyi and N. californicus are two predators that are frequently used to control spider mites in fruit-tree orchards. Neoseiulus womersleyi used to be the dominant predator species in Japan, but since the 1990s in central and southwestern Japan, N. californicus populations have been increasing and have displaced populations of N. womersleyi. We previously observed the same phenomenon under laboratory conditions when these species were released at a 1:1 ratio, and attributed the displacement to asymmetrical intraguild predation. However, the ratio in fruit-tree orchards could be different from 1:1. Therefore, we hypothesized that differential susceptibilities to pesticides might accelerate species displacement of N. womersleyi by N. californicus, even if the ratio between these two species was extremely skewed in favor of N. womersleyi and no species displacement occurred otherwise. We examined the effects of 21 pesticides on egg-to-adult and adult survivorship in N. womersleyi and N. californicus. Among these pesticides, two neonicotinoids (acetamiprid and imidacloprid) had much severer effects on N. womersleyi than on N. californicus and thus could possibly account for the species displacement. When the two species were released onto leaf arenas at an N. californicus: N. womersleyi ratio of 1:9 in the absence of insecticide, no displacement was observed. However, just after acetamiprid or imidacloprid application, the proportion of N. californicus increased, causing N. californicus to displace N. womersleyi. Our results indicate that displacement in predator complexes of fruit-tree orchards could be due to different degrees of pesticide susceptibility.

  3. Genetic models reveal historical patterns of sea lamprey population fluctuations within Lake Champlain

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    Cassidy C. D’Aloia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The origin of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus in Lake Champlain has been heavily debated over the past decade. Given the lack of historical documentation, two competing hypotheses have emerged in the literature. First, it has been argued that the relatively recent population size increase and concomitant rise in wounding rates on prey populations are indicative of an invasive population that entered the lake through the Champlain Canal. Second, recent genetic evidence suggests a post-glacial colonization at the end of the Pleistocene, approximately 11,000 years ago. One limitation to resolving the origin of sea lamprey in Lake Champlain is a lack of historical and current measures of population size. In this study, the issue of population size was explicitly addressed using nuclear (nDNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA markers to estimate historical demography with genetic models. Haplotype network analysis, mismatch analysis, and summary statistics based on mtDNA noncoding sequences for NCI (479 bp and NCII (173 bp all indicate a recent population expansion. Coalescent models based on mtDNA and nDNA identified two potential demographic events: a population decline followed by a very recent population expansion. The decline in effective population size may correlate with land-use and fishing pressure changes post-European settlement, while the recent expansion may be associated with the implementation of the salmonid stocking program in the 1970s. These results are most consistent with the hypothesis that sea lamprey are native to Lake Champlain; however, the credibility intervals around parameter estimates demonstrate that there is uncertainty regarding the magnitude and timing of past demographic events.

  4. Using historical and experimental data to reveal warming effects on ant assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Resasco

    Full Text Available Historical records of species are compared with current records to elucidate effects of recent climate change. However, confounding variables such as succession, land-use change, and species invasions make it difficult to demonstrate a causal link between changes in biota and changes in climate. Experiments that manipulate temperature can overcome this issue of attribution, but long-term impacts of warming are difficult to test directly. Here we combine historical and experimental data to explore effects of warming on ant assemblages in southeastern US. Observational data span a 35-year period (1976-2011, during which mean annual temperatures had an increasing trend. Mean summer temperatures in 2010-2011 were ∼ 2.7 °C warmer than in 1976. Experimental data come from an ongoing study in the same region, for which temperatures have been increased ∼ 1.5-5.5 °C above ambient from 2010 to 2012. Ant species richness and evenness decreased with warming under natural but not experimental warming. These discrepancies could have resulted from differences in timescales of warming, abiotic or biotic factors, or initial species pools. Species turnover tended to increase with temperature in observational and experimental datasets. At the species level, the observational and experimental datasets had four species in common, two of which exhibited consistent patterns between datasets. With natural and experimental warming, collections of the numerically dominant, thermophilic species, Crematogaster lineolata, increased roughly two-fold. Myrmecina americana, a relatively heat intolerant species, decreased with temperature in natural and experimental warming. In contrast, species in the Solenopsis molesta group did not show consistent responses to warming, and Temenothorax pergandei was rare across temperatures. Our results highlight the difficulty of interpreting community responses to warming based on historical records or experiments alone. Because some

  5. Amorphous silica biomineralizations in Schoenoplectus californicus (Cyperaceae): their relation with maturation stage and silica availability

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Honaine, Mariana; Borrelli, Natalia Lorena; Osterrieth, Margarita Luisa; del Río, Laura Sombra

    2015-01-01

    The factors involved on the silicification process in Cyperaceae are scarcely known. In this study we analyse the effect of maturation stage and silica availability on the production of amorphous silica biomineralizations in culms of Schoenoplectus californicus. Young and senescent culms were collected from ponds with different silica availability. Two complementary methodologies (calcination and staining techniques), light and scanning electron microscopy and EDS were applied for amorpho...

  6. Evolution of Conus Peptide Toxins: Analysis of Conus californicus Reeve, 1844

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Jason S.; Watkins, Maren; Puillandre, Nicolas; Ownby, John-Paul; Lopez-Vera, Estuardo; Christensen, Sean; Moreno, Karla Juarez; Navarro, Alexei Licea; Corneli, Patrice Showers; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2010-01-01

    Conus species are characterized by their hyperdiverse toxins, encoded by a few gene superfamilies. Our phylogenies of the genus, based on mitochondrial genes, confirm previous results that C. californicus is highly divergent from all other species. Genetic and biochemical analysis of their venom peptides comprise the fifteen most abundant conopeptides and over 50 mature cDNA transcripts from the venom duct. Although C. californicus venom retains many of the general properties of other Conus species, they share only half of the toxin gene superfamilies found in other Conus species. Thus, in these two lineages, approximately half of the rapidly diversifying gene superfamilies originated after an early Tertiary split. Such results demonstrate that, unlike endogenously acting gene families, these genes are likely to be significantly more restricted in their phylogenetic distribution. In concordance with the evolutionary duistance of C. californicus from other species, there are aspects of prey-capture behavior and prey preferences of this species that diverges significantly from all other Conus. PMID:20363338

  7. Response of Schoenoplectus acutus and Schoenoplectus californicus at different life-history stages to hydrologic regime

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    Sloey, Taylor M; Howard, Rebecca J.; Hester, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    For wetland restoration success to be maximized, restoration managers need better information regarding how the frequency, depth, and duration of flooding affect soil chemistry and the survival, growth, and morphology of targeted plant species. In a greenhouse study we investigated the impact of four different flooding durations (0 %, 40 %, 60 %, and 100 %) on soil physicochemistry and the responses of seedlings and adults of two species of emergent wetland macrophytes commonly used in restoration efforts (Schoenoplectus acutus and Schoenoplectus californicus). The longest flooding duration, which created more reducing soil conditions, resulted in significantly reduced survival of S. acutus adults (34 ± 21 % survival) and complete mortality of seedlings of both species. Schoenoplectus californicus adults exhibited higher flooding tolerance, showing little impact of flooding on morphology and physiology. A companion field study indicated that S. californicus maintained stem strength regardless of flooding duration or depth, supporting the greenhouse study results. This information serves to improve our understanding of the ecological differences between these species as well as provide restoration managers with better guidelines for targeted elevation and hydrologic regimes for these species in order to enhance the success of restoration plantings and better predict restoration site development.

  8. Eighteenth century Yersinia pestis genomes reveal the long-term persistence of an historical plague focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Kirsten I; Herbig, Alexander; Sahl, Jason; Waglechner, Nicholas; Fourment, Mathieu; Forrest, Stephen A; Klunk, Jennifer; Schuenemann, Verena J; Poinar, Debi; Kuch, Melanie; Golding, G Brian; Dutour, Olivier; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M; Holmes, Edward C; Krause, Johannes; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2016-01-21

    The 14th-18th century pandemic of Yersinia pestis caused devastating disease outbreaks in Europe for almost 400 years. The reasons for plague's persistence and abrupt disappearance in Europe are poorly understood, but could have been due to either the presence of now-extinct plague foci in Europe itself, or successive disease introductions from other locations. Here we present five Y. pestis genomes from one of the last European outbreaks of plague, from 1722 in Marseille, France. The lineage identified has not been found in any extant Y. pestis foci sampled to date, and has its ancestry in strains obtained from victims of the 14th century Black Death. These data suggest the existence of a previously uncharacterized historical plague focus that persisted for at least three centuries. We propose that this disease source may have been responsible for the many resurgences of plague in Europe following the Black Death.

  9. Evaluation of site-specific tactics using bifenazate and Neoseiulus californicus for management of Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae) in strawberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruohan; Nyoike, Teresia W; Liburd, Oscar E

    2016-10-01

    Greenhouse and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of site-specific tactics for management of the twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, a major pest of greenhouse and field-grown strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne). Two site-specific (spot) treatments, the miticide bifenazate (Acramite(®)) and the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus McGregor, were compared with whole-plot treatments of bifenazate or N. californicus to determine whether T. urticae could be effectively managed in field-grown strawberry using only site-specific tactics. Additionally, the cost of site-specific tactics was compared with whole-plot treatments to determine the economic value of using site-specific management tactics for T. urticae in strawberries. In the greenhouse, all treatments equivalently reduced the number of T. urticae below control. In the field during the 2011-2012 season, more T. urticae eggs and motiles were in the whole-plot treatments of both N. californicus and bifenazate in the mid-season and late season, respectively, compared with the spot treatments. With the exception of site-specific N. californicus during the 2011-2012 field season, there were no differences in marketable yields between plots with site-specific treatments and whole-plot management. An economic analysis demonstrated a significant cost savings (75.3 %) with site-specific treatments of N. californicus compared with whole-plot application of N. californicus. Similarly, a 24.7 % reduction in cost was achieved in using site-specific bifenazate compared with whole-plot application of bifenazate. The findings indicate that site-specific treatments with N. californicus and bifenazate are competitive alternatives to whole-field application for T. urticae management in strawberries.

  10. The Many Faces of Wisdom: An Investigation of Cultural-Historical Wisdom Exemplars Reveals Practical, Philosophical, and Benevolent Prototypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weststrate, Nic M; Ferrari, Michel; Ardelt, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Psychological research on wisdom has flourished in the last 30 years, much of it investigating laypeople's implicit theories of wisdom. In three studies, we took an exemplar and prototype approach to implicit wisdom theories by asking participants to nominate one or more cultural-historical figures of wisdom. Study 1 revealed that individuals draw from a wide range of wisdom exemplars, with substantial agreement on the most iconic figures. In Study 2, multidimensional scaling analysis of exemplars revealed practical, philosophical, and benevolent prototypes; follow-up analyses indicated that prototypes differed in familiarity, likability, and perceived wisdom. Study 3 showed that individuals nominated exemplars from the practical prototype more frequently than from the philosophical and benevolent prototypes and that prototype nomination depended in part on nominator characteristics. These studies suggest that exemplar- and prototype-based implicit wisdom theories are consistent with explicit psychological theories of wisdom. © 2016 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  11. Historical nectar assessment reveals the fall and rise of Britain in bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baude, Mathilde; Kunin, William E.; Boatman, Nigel D.; Conyers, Simon; Davies, Nancy; Gillespie, Mark A. K.; Morton, R. Daniel; Smart, Simon M.; Memmott, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Summary There is considerable concern over declines in insect pollinator communities and potential impacts on the pollination of crops and wildflowers1–4. Among the multiple pressures facing pollinators2–4, decreasing floral resources due to habitat loss and degradation has been suggested as a key contributing factor2–8. However, a lack of quantitative data has hampered testing for historical changes in floral resources. Here we show that overall floral rewards can be estimated at a national scale by combining vegetation surveys and direct nectar measurements. We find evidence for substantial losses in nectar resources in England and Wales between the 1930s and 1970s; however, total nectar provision in Great Britain as a whole had stabilised by 1978, and increased from 1998 to 2007. These findings concur with trends in pollinator diversity, which declined in the mid-20th century9 but stabilised more recently10. The diversity of nectar sources declined from 1978 to 1990 but stabilised thereafter at low levels, with four plant species accounting for over 50% of national nectar provision in 2007. Calcareous grassland, broadleaved woodland and neutral grassland are the habitats that produce the greatest amount of nectar per unit area from the most diverse sources, whereas arable land is the poorest in both respects. While agri-environment schemes add resources to arable landscapes, their national contribution is low. Due to their large area, improved grasslands could add substantially to national nectar provision if they were managed to increase floral resource provision. This national-scale assessment of floral resource provision brings new insights into the links between plant and pollinator declines, and offers considerable opportunities for conservation. PMID:26842058

  12. Historical nectar assessment reveals the fall and rise of floral resources in Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baude, Mathilde; Kunin, William E.; Boatman, Nigel D.; Conyers, Simon; Davies, Nancy; Gillespie, Mark A. K.; Morton, R. Daniel; Smart, Simon M.; Memmott, Jane

    2016-02-01

    There is considerable concern over declines in insect pollinator communities and potential impacts on the pollination of crops and wildflowers. Among the multiple pressures facing pollinators, decreasing floral resources due to habitat loss and degradation has been suggested as a key contributing factor. However, a lack of quantitative data has hampered testing for historical changes in floral resources. Here we show that overall floral rewards can be estimated at a national scale by combining vegetation surveys and direct nectar measurements. We find evidence for substantial losses in nectar resources in England and Wales between the 1930s and 1970s; however, total nectar provision in Great Britain as a whole had stabilized by 1978, and increased from 1998 to 2007. These findings concur with trends in pollinator diversity, which declined in the mid-twentieth century but stabilized more recently. The diversity of nectar sources declined from 1978 to 1990 and thereafter in some habitats, with four plant species accounting for over 50% of national nectar provision in 2007. Calcareous grassland, broadleaved woodland and neutral grassland are the habitats that produce the greatest amount of nectar per unit area from the most diverse sources, whereas arable land is the poorest with respect to amount of nectar per unit area and diversity of nectar sources. Although agri-environment schemes add resources to arable landscapes, their national contribution is low. Owing to their large area, improved grasslands could add substantially to national nectar provision if they were managed to increase floral resource provision. This national-scale assessment of floral resource provision affords new insights into the links between plant and pollinator declines, and offers considerable opportunities for conservation.

  13. Air temperature optimisation for humidity-controlled cold storage of the predatory mites Neoseiulus californicus and Phytoseiulus persimilis (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazy, Noureldin Abuelfadl; Suzuki, Takeshi; Amano, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Katsumi

    2014-03-01

    Humidity-controlled cold storage, in which the water vapour pressure is saturated, can prolong the survival of the predatory mites Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) and Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot (Acari: Phytoseiidae). However, information on the optimum air temperature for long-term storage by this method is limited. The authors evaluated the survival of mated adult females of N. californicus and P. persimilis at 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5 °C under saturated water vapour condition (vapour pressure deficit 0.0 kPa). N. californicus showed a longer survival time than P. persimilis at all the air temperatures. The longest mean survival time of N. californicus was 11 weeks at 7.5 °C, whereas that of P. persimilis was 8 weeks at 5.0 °C. After storage at 7.5 °C for 8 weeks, no negative effect on post-storage oviposition was observed in N. californicus, whereas the oviposition of P. persimilis stored at 5.0 °C for 8 weeks was significantly reduced. The interspecific variation in the response of these predators to low air temperature might be attributed to their natural habitat and energy requirements. These results may be useful for the long-term storage of these predators, which is required for cost-effective biological control. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Evaluation of the predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus, for spider mite control on greenhouse sweet pepper under hot arid field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, P; Palevsky, E

    2008-06-01

    The efficacy of Neoseiulus californicus (a generalist predatory mite) for the biological control of Tetranychus urticae, was compared to release of Phytoseiulus persimilis (a specialist predatory mite) and an acaricide treatment in sweet pepper plants grown in greenhouse tunnels in a hot and arid climate. To ensure uniform pest populations, spider mites were spread on pepper plants in two seasons; a natural infestation occurred in one season. Predators were released prophylactically and curatively in separate tunnels when plants were artificially infested with spider mites, and at low and moderate spider mite populations when infestations occurred naturally. Although spider mite populations did not establish well the first year, fewer spider mites were recovered with release of N. californicus than with all other treatments. In the second year, spider mites established and the prophylactic release of N. californicus compared favorably with the acaricide-treated plants. In the course of monitoring arthropod populations, we observed a significant reduction in western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) populations in tunnels treated with N. californicus as compared with non-treated control tunnels. Our field trials validate results obtained from potted-plant experiments and confirm that N. californicus is a superior spider mite predator at high temperatures and low humidities.

  15. Review on the Traditional Uses and Potential of Totora (Schoenoplectus Californicus) as Construction Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Cordero, Juan Fernando; García-Navarro, Justo

    2017-10-01

    The recent advances in the wood construction field have demonstrated the feasibility and advantages of using wood-based materials in tall buildings structures and other constructive uses, which could lead to a net reduction in CO2eq emissions of the construction sector by replacing high-energy consuming materials like concrete or steel, with wood and biomass-based materials. Among these biomass-based materials are the Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFP)which are plantsthat canprovide important contributionsto the construction sector and help to reduce the net CO2eq emissions of the building industry. One of these plants is the totora (Schoenoplectus Californicus) that has been long used by several communities for making handicrafts and as construction material. Recent studies on this plant have analyzed its properties and its feasibility to be used for producing materials of interest to the contemporary building industry. The totora is a bulrush that grows in lakes and marshes in America from California to Chile and some of the Pacific islands. It grows from the sea level to 4500maasl, it can grow in fresh water and estuaries, and it is resistant to water level changes and drought. This bulrush has been used by many cultures as medicine, food, forage, material for building houses, boats and different handicrafts. The most important examples of the use of totora in the world are the floating islands of the Uros in Lake Titicaca. The Uros people have developed traditional techniques for building their homes, boats, and even the artificial islands where they live on with methods based almost exclusively on the totora. This way of living and production system has been maintained for more than 500 years. This review is about the main constructive techniques that have been used for traditional construction in totora and some of therecent researches that have been made on this subject. Experiments in architecture and industrial design objects made with totora have shown its

  16. Uniparental Markers in Italy Reveal a Sex-Biased Genetic Structure and Different Historical Strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Stefania; Harmant, Christine; Useli, Antonella; Sanz, Paula; Yang-Yao, Daniele; Manry, Jeremy; Ciani, Graziella; Luiselli, Donata; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Comas, David; Pettener, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Located in the center of the Mediterranean landscape and with an extensive coastal line, the territory of what is today Italy has played an important role in the history of human settlements and movements of Southern Europe and the Mediterranean Basin. Populated since Paleolithic times, the complexity of human movements during the Neolithic, the Metal Ages and the most recent history of the two last millennia (involving the overlapping of different cultural and demic strata) has shaped the pattern of the modern Italian genetic structure. With the aim of disentangling this pattern and understanding which processes more importantly shaped the distribution of diversity, we have analyzed the uniparentally-inherited markers in ∼900 individuals from an extensive sampling across the Italian peninsula, Sardinia and Sicily. Spatial PCAs and DAPCs revealed a sex-biased pattern indicating different demographic histories for males and females. Besides the genetic outlier position of Sardinians, a North West–South East Y-chromosome structure is found in continental Italy. Such structure is in agreement with recent archeological syntheses indicating two independent and parallel processes of Neolithisation. In addition, date estimates pinpoint the importance of the cultural and demographic events during the late Neolithic and Metal Ages. On the other hand, mitochondrial diversity is distributed more homogeneously in agreement with older population events that might be related to the presence of an Italian Refugium during the last glacial period in Europe. PMID:23734255

  17. Biology of Neoseiulus californicus feeding on two-spotted spider mite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maicon Toldi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2013v26n2p105   Tetranychus urticae (Koch stands out as a polyphagous mite. In a strawberry plant, this mite develops on the underside of leaves, causing a significant injury. This study aimed to know the biological characteristics of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, from cultivated strawberry plants. The study started with thirty eggs isolated in arenas with different stages of T. urticae. The average length of egg-adult was higher for females (5.69±0.08 than for males (5.35±0.11. The sex ratio was 0.66 and the innate capacity for increase (rm was 0.15 female/female/day. The net reproductive rate (Ro was 17.10 times/generation, with an average to each generation (T of 19.35 days. Greater oviposition was observed at the 11th day after its onset, with 2.7 eggs/female/day and the average was 38.14±5.58 eggs/female. The finite increase rate (λ was 1.41 female/day. Neoseiulus californicus showed to reproduce properly when feeding on T. urticae.

  18. How do Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae) females penetrate densely webbed spider mite nests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat, M; de la Peña, F; Hormaza, J I; González-Fernández, J J

    2008-02-01

    The persea mite Oligonychus perseae is a pest of avocado trees that builds extremely dense webbed nests that protect them against natural enemies, including phytoseiid mites. Nests have one or two marginal entrances that are small and flattened. The predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus co-occurs with O. perseae in the avocado orchards of the south-east of Spain. Penetration inside nests through the entrances by this predator is thought to be hindered by its size and its globular-shaped body. However, in the field it has repeatedly been found inside nests that were clearly ripped. Perhaps penetration of the nests has been facilitated by nest wall ripping caused by some other species or by unfavourable abiotic factors. However, to assess whether N. californicus is also able to enter the nest of O. perseae by itself, we carried out laboratory experiments and made a short film. They show how this predator manages to overcome the webbed wall, and that it can penetrate and forage inside nests of O. perseae.

  19. Efeito do manejo de plantas daninhas sobre Neoseiulus californicus (Acari:Phytoseiidae em pomar de macieira Effect of weed management on Neoseiulus californicus (Acari:Phytoseiidae in apple orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lino Bittencourt Monteiro

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a influência do manejo de plantas daninhas sobre o deslocamento de ácaros tetraniquídeos (Panonychus ulmi e Tetranychus urticae e do ácaro predador Neoseiulus californicus em um pomar de macieira 'Gala', onde foi implantado o controle biológico do ácaro vermelho, P. ulmi, por meio de liberações massais de N. californicus. As parcelas tiveram as plantas daninhas manejadas de três formas: sem manejo, com roçadas manuais e com herbicidas. As populações de ácaros foram avaliadas sobre as plantas daninhas, Plantago tormentosa e Erigeron sp, e sobre as folhas de macieira. As maiores populações de N. californicus foram observadas nas parcelas onde os manejos proporcionaram desenvolvimento de plantas daninhas na linha de plantio. Na parcela manejada com herbicida, houve maior população de ácaros tetraniquídeos sobre as macieiras, provavelmente, devido ao reduzido número de N. californicus. P. tormentosa foi o hospedeiro preferencial do ácaro predador. Concluiu-se que o manejo de plantas daninhas, na linha de plantio das macieiras, assume um importante papel no equilíbrio entre as populações de ácaros.The influence of weed management on tetranychid mites (Panonychus ulmi and Tetranychus urticae and phytoseids movement was evaluated. Neoseiulus californicus populations were released in an apple orchard for biological control of tetranychid mites. Three kinds of weed management were used: no weed control at all, manual control and control with herbicide. The mites were evaluated in Plantago tormentosa, Erigeron sp, and apple tree leaves. The highest population of N. californicus was observed where weed was not controlled. Tetranychid mites populations were abundant on apple trees when herbicide was used, probably due to the low population of N. californicus. P. tormentosa was the preferred host of phytoseids. The conclusion was that weed management plays an important role in the regulation of mite species in apple

  20. Semi-claustral colony founding in the seed-harvester ant Pogonomyrmex californicus: a comparative analysis of colony founding strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert A

    2002-06-01

    The evolution of queens that rear their first brood solely using body reserves, i.e. fully claustral, is viewed as a major advance for higher ants because it eliminated the need for queens to leave the nest to forage. In an apparently unusual secondary modification, the seed-harvester ant Pogonomyrmex californicus displays obligate queen foraging, i.e. queens must forage to garner the resources necessary to survive and successfully rear their first brood. I examined the potential benefits of queen foraging by comparing ecological and physiological traits between P. californicus and several congeners in which the queen can rear brood using only body reserves. The primary advantage of foraging appears to lie in providing the queens of P. californicus with the energy to raise significantly more brood than possible by congeners that use only body reserves; the workers reared in the first brood were also heavier in mass than that predicted by their head width. Other correlates of queen foraging in P. californicus relative to tested congeners included a significantly lower total fat content for alate queens, a small queen body size, and a low queen to worker body mass ratio. Queens also forage in several other well-studied species of Pogonomyrmex, suggesting the possibility that queen foraging may be more common than previously thought in higher ants.

  1. Intraguild predation among Scolothrips longicornis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), Neoseiulus californicus and Typhlodromus bagdasarjani (Acari: Phytoseiidae) under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farazmand, Azadeh; Fathipour, Yaghoub; Kamali, Karim

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out on the ability of predatory thrips Scolothrips longicornis Priesner to feed on 2 phytoseiid species and vice versa. Also the effect of predation of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) on Typhlodromus bagdasarjani Wainstein and Arutunjan and vice versa was evaluated. The larvae, prepupae, and pupae of thrips and the eggs, larvae, and protonymphs of phytoseiids were selected as intraguild prey. The intraguild predation (IGP) among S. longicornis and 2 phytoseiid species was unidirectional and in favor of phytoseiids, i.e., S. longicornis was not able to feed on larval stages of 2 phytoseiids. However, N. californicus and T. bagdasarjani fed on the 1st instar larvae (1.39 and 0.80 per day), 2nd instar larvae (0.87 and 0.55 per day), prepupae (0.51 and 0.48 per day), and pupae of thrips (0.51 and 0.49 per day, respectively). Both phytoseiids fed on eggs, larvae, and protonymphal stages of each other. Females of N. californicus consumed more phytoseiid larvae (2.49 per day) than T. bagdasarjani, which consumed 1.08 N. californicus larvae per day. When Tetranychus urticae was presented as an extraguild prey, intensity of IGP between 2 species of phytoseiids and on larval stages of S. longicornis reduced significantly. Therefore, it is concluded that (i) IGP existed among the 3 examined species and lack of feeding of S. longicornis on 2 phytoseiid species can be justified by its feeding type (monophagy), (ii) N. californicus was much more prone to IGP than was T. bagdasarjani. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  2. Effect of pyroligneous extract of Acacia mearnsii on Tetranychus urticae (Koch, 1836 (Acari, Tetranychidae and Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, 1954 (Acari, Phytoseiidae

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    Adriana de Castro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to determine the effect of decanted pyroligneous extract (DPE of black Acacia mearnsii on the mites Tetranychus urticae (Koch, 1836 (Acari: Tetranychidae and Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, 1954 (Acari: Phytoseiidae. Six different concentrations were tested, namely, DPE: water 1:600, 1:300, 1:150, 1:75, 1:38 and 1:19 and a control treatment with distilled water. Five females of T. urticae and N. californicus were transferred to arenas, totaling 50 females per treatment, for a period of eight days. DPE caused high mortality in N. californicus, while in T. urticae, high mortality was observed only at high (1:75, 1:38 and 1:19 and intermediate (1:150 concentrations. Notably, DPE was slightly harmful to T. urticae at lower concentrations and harmful to N. californicus at all concentrations, indicating that it would have little efficacy in the control of T. urticae.

  3. Differences in ultrasonic vocalizations between wild and laboratory California mice (Peromyscus californicus.

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    Matina C Kalcounis-Rueppell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs emitted by muroid rodents, including laboratory mice and rats, are used as phenotypic markers in behavioral assays and biomedical research. Interpretation of these USVs depends on understanding the significance of USV production by rodents in the wild. However, there has never been a study of muroid rodent ultrasound function in the wild and comparisons of USVs produced by wild and laboratory rodents are lacking to date. Here, we report the first comparison of wild and captive rodent USVs recorded from the same species, Peromyscus californicus. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used standard ultrasound recording techniques to measure USVs from California mice in the laboratory (Peromyscus Genetic Stock Center, SC, USA and the wild (Hastings Natural History Reserve, CA, USA. To determine which California mouse in the wild was vocalizing, we used a remote sensing method that used a 12-microphone acoustic localization array coupled with automated radio telemetry of all resident Peromyscus californicus in the area of the acoustic localization array. California mice in the laboratory and the wild produced the same types of USV motifs. However, wild California mice produced USVs that were 2-8 kHz higher in median frequency and significantly more variable in frequency than laboratory California mice. SIGNIFICANCE: The similarity in overall form of USVs from wild and laboratory California mice demonstrates that production of USVs by captive Peromyscus is not an artifact of captivity. Our study validates the widespread use of USVs in laboratory rodents as behavioral indicators but highlights that particular characteristics of laboratory USVs may not reflect natural conditions.

  4. Chromosome-Wide Impacts on the Expression of Incompatibilities in Hybrids of Tigriopus californicus

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    Christopher S. Willett

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome rearrangements such as inversions have been recognized previously as contributing to reproductive isolation by maintaining alleles together that jointly contribute to deleterious genetic interactions and postzygotic reproductive isolation. In this study, an impact of potential incompatibilities merely residing on the same chromosome was found in crosses of populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus. When genetically divergent populations of this copepod are crossed, hybrids show reduced fitness, and deviations from expected genotypic ratios can be used to determine regions of the genome involved in deleterious interactions. In this study, a set of markers was genotyped for a cross of two populations of T. californicus, and these markers show widespread deviations from Mendelian expectations, with entire chromosomes showing marked skew. Despite the importance of mtDNA/nuclear interactions in incompatibilities in this system in previous studies, in these crosses the expected patterns stemming from these interactions are not widely apparent. Females lack recombination in this species, and a striking difference is observed between male and female backcrosses. This suggests that the maintenance of multiple loci on individual chromosomes can enable some incompatibilities, perhaps playing a similar role in the initial rounds of hybridization to chromosomal rearrangements in preserving sets of alleles together that contribute to incompatibilities. Finally, it was observed that candidate pairs of incompatibility regions are not consistently interacting across replicates or subsets of these crosses, despite the repeatability of the deviations at many of the single loci themselves, suggesting that more complicated models of Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities may need to be considered.

  5. Genetic analysis of historic western Great Lakes region wolf samples reveals early Canis lupus/lycaon hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeldon, Tyler; White, Bradley N

    2009-02-23

    The genetic status of wolves in the western Great Lakes region has received increased attention following the decision to remove them from protection under the US Endangered Species Act. A recent study of mitochondrial DNA has suggested that the recovered wolf population is not genetically representative of the historic population. We present microsatellite genotype data on three historic samples and compare them with extant populations, and interpret published genetic data to show that the pre-recovery population was admixed over a century ago by eastern wolf (Canis lycaon) and grey wolf (Canis lupus) hybridization. The DNA profiles of the historic samples are similar to those of extant animals in the region, suggesting that the current Great Lakes wolves are representative of the historic population.

  6. Consequences of Fatherhood in the Biparental California Mouse (Peromyscus californicus): Locomotor Performance, Metabolic Rate, and Organ Masses

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew, JR; Saltzman, W; Chappell, MA; Jr, GT

    2016-01-01

    Although effects of motherhood on mothers have been well documented in mammals, the effects of fatherhood on fathers are not well known. We evaluated effects of being a father on key metabolic and performance measures in the California mouse, Peromyscus californicus. California mice are genetically monogamous in the wild, and fathers show similar parental behavior to mothers, with the exception of lactation. To investigate the impact of fatherhood on fathers, focal males were paired with an i...

  7. Biosorption of Cr(III) and Pb(II) by Schoenoplectus californicus and Insights into the Binding Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Alicia Fabrizio de Iorio; Maria Luisa Andrade; Tomás Agustín Rearte; Patricia Beatriz Bozzano

    2013-01-01

    Biosorption and desorption of chromium and lead on shoots biomass of Schoenoplectus californicus were investigated by performing batch sorption tests in different conditions of pH, biosorbent dose, and initial concentration in simple and binary solutions. Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models were employed to describe sorption equilibrium. Filters and biomass were characterized before and after treatments by environmental scanning electron microscopy and X-ray...

  8. Genetic affinities among the historical provinces of Romania and Central Europe as revealed by an mtDNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocoş, Relu; Schipor, Sorina; Hervella, Montserrat; Cianga, Petru; Popescu, Roxana; Bănescu, Claudia; Constantinescu, Mihai; Martinescu, Alina; Raicu, Florina

    2017-03-07

    As a major crossroads between Asia and Europe, Romania has experienced continuous migration and invasion episodes. The precise routes may have been shaped by the topology of the territory and had diverse impacts on the genetic structure of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in historical Romanian provinces. We studied 714 Romanians from all historical provinces, Wallachia, Dobrudja, Moldavia, and Transylvania, by analyzing the mtDNA control region and coding markers to encompass the complete landscape of mtDNA haplogroups. We observed a homogenous distribution of the majority of haplogroups among the Romanian provinces and a clear association with the European populations. A principal component analysis and multidimensional scaling analysis supported the genetic similarity of the Wallachia, Moldavia, and Dobrudja groups with the Balkans, while the Transylvania population was closely related to Central European groups. These findings could be explained by the topology of the Romanian territory, where the Carpathian Arch played an important role in migration patterns. Signals of Asian maternal lineages were observed in all Romanian historical provinces, indicating gene flow along the migration routes through East Asia and Europe. Our current findings based on the mtDNA analysis of populations in historical provinces of Romania suggest similarity between populations in Transylvania and Central Europe, supported both by the observed clines in haplogroup frequencies for several European and Asian maternal lineages and MDS analyses.

  9. Toxicidade residual de alguns agrotóxicos recomendado na agricultura sobre Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae Residual toxicity of some pesticides recommended for citrus orchards on the predaceous mite Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: phytoseiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Zatti da Silva

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a toxicidade residual de alguns agrotóxicos utilizados em citros sobre Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor em condições de laboratório. O método de bioensaio adotado foi o de contato residual. Folhas de citros da variedade Pêra, acondicionadas em arenas, foram pulverizadas em torre de Potter. A toxicidade residual dos produtos foi avaliada duas horas e 1; 3; 5; 7; 10; 14 e 21 dias após a aplicação. Em cada arena, foram transferidas dez fêmeas adultas de N. californicus, juntamente com uma quantidade suficiente de Tetranychus urticae, como fonte de alimento. As avaliações de mortalidade foram realizadas 72 horas após a transferência dos ácaros para as arenas. Os agrotóxicos acrinathrin, deltamethrin, dinocap, enxofre, fenpropathrin, óxido de fenbutatin e propargite não causaram mortalidades significativas em adultos de N. californicus. Foram registradas mortalidades de 29,8; 24,0 e 34,1% para ácaros N. californicus expostos a resíduos de duas horas de idade de abamectim, azocyclotin e cyhexatin, respectivamente. Dicofol, pyridaben e chlorfenapyr causaram 100% de mortalidade aos ácaros predadores expostos aos resíduos tóxicos dos acaricidas, com duas horas de idade. Abamectin provocou mortalidade significativa por um período inferior a um dia. Resíduos dos acaricidas azocyclotin, cyhexatin, dicofol, pyridaben e chlorfenapyr provocaram mortalidades significativas por períodos de 1; 1; 10; 10 e 21dias, respectivamente. Os resultados obtidos no presente experimento servem de subsídio para a escolha adequada dos agrotóxicos a serem utilizados em pomares de citros nos quais N. californicus esteja presente ou naqueles em que o predador venha a ser liberado. Esses resultados também servem para a escolha do momento mais favorável para a liberação dos ácaros predadores dessa espécie no campo, após a aplicação de agrotóxicos nos pomares. Estudos conduzidos em condições de campo ainda s

  10. Seletividade de agrotóxicos usados na cultura da macieira a Neoseiulus Californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae1 Pesticide selectivity used in apple crops Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine de Andrade Meyer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar os efeitos secundários dos principais agrotóxicos utilizados em macieira sobre adultos e imaturos de Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae. Os testes foram conduzidos em laboratório, utilizando as doses dos produtos recomendadas para a cultura e o método de contato e residual com pulverização em superfície de folha. Foram testados tebufenozida, fosmete, metidationa, clorpirifós, abamectina, fenpiroximato, piridabem, captana, mancozebe (duas dosagens e ditianona. Para o cálculo do efeito total (E% sobre os adultos, avaliaram-se a mortalidade, a oviposição e a viabilidade dos ovos, e para os imaturos, somente a mortalidade. Os resultados do E% foram avaliados 96 horas após a pulverização. Os produtos foram classificados quanto ao efeito total (E% de toxicidade proposta pela IOBC/WPRS. Fosmete, tebufenozida e metidationa foram inócuos; abamectina, fenpiroximato, clorpirifós, captana, mancozebe (nas duas dosagens testadas e ditianona foram levemente nocivos, e piridabem foi moderadamente nocivo aos adultos de N. californicus. O fungicida mancozebe, na maior dosagem (320g,i.a./100L, foi o que mais afetou o ácaro predador. Quanto à seletividade dos agrotóxicos aos imaturos, constatouse que abamectina e piridabem foram moderadamente nocivos, e os demais foram inócuos. Nenhum produto foi classificado como nocivo, evidenciando a tolerância de N. californicus a estes agrotóxicos. Estes resultados permitem uma escolha e manejo mais adequado para os agrotóxicos utilizados nos pomares comerciais de macieira, de forma que a presença deste ácaro predador exerça pressão de controle do ácaro-vermelho.The objective of this study was to evaluate the side effects of the main pesticides used in adult and immature Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae. The tests were carried out in the laboratory by using the contact and residual spraying method on the leaf surface. It was tested

  11. Effects of cutting disturbance in Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Mey.) Soják on the benthic macroinvertebrates = Efeito do distúrbio de corte em Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Mey.) Soják sobre a fauna de macroinvertebrados bentônicos

    OpenAIRE

    Thiago Cesar Lima Silveira; Gilberto Gonçalves Rodrigues; Gabriela Peixoto Coelho de Souza; Norma Luiza Würdig

    2011-01-01

    Lagoons are considered protected areas because these systems play a key ecological role. However, the extraction of macrophyte Schoenoplectus californicus is held for manufacture of handcrafts, being an alternative income for riverbank communities. This studyevaluated the impact of S. californicus experimental cutting on benthic macroinvertebrates trough a field experiment. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 1, 12, 26 and 60 days after themacrophyte cutting in demarked plots (1 m²), as well a...

  12. Mortalidade do ácaro predador Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae em testes de toxicidade residual de inseticidas e acaricidas usuais em pomáceas Mortality of predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae in residual toxicity persistence tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Gustavo Ruiz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Os ácaros fitoseídeos, especialmente Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, são importantes agentes de controle biológico de ácaros tetraniquídeos-praga nas culturas de pomáceas no "Alto Valle del Río Negro y Neuquén", Argentina. Neste trabalho, avaliou-se a mortalidade de N. californicus quando exposto a resíduos dos inseticidas azimphos-methyl, carbaryl e cyfluthrin, e dos acaricidas cyhexatin e propargite. Os produtos foram aplicados às concentrações recomendadas em plantas de pereira. Um, três, seis e dez dias após a aplicação (DAA, folhas tratadas foram retiradas das plantas para a preparação de unidades experimentais. Cinco adultos de N. californicus, provenientes de criação-estoque, foram transferidos para cada unidade, onde pólen de taboa foi fornecido como alimento. As unidades foram mantidas a 25 ± 2 ºC, 60 ± 10% de umidade relativa e fotoperíodo de 14 h. A mortalidade do ácaro foi avaliada 24 h após o confinamento. As médias de mortalidade foram comparadas pelo teste de Dunnett, a 5% de probabilidade. A progressão do declínio do efeito dos produtos testados foi submetida à análise de regressão. Nas duas primeiras datas de avaliação, todos os produtos apresentaram valores de mortalidade significativamente diferentes da testemunha tratada com água. Seis dias após a aplicação, propargite, cyhexatin e cyfluthrin apresentaram mortalidade de aproximadamente 30%, enquanto a mortalidade nos tratamentos azimphos-methyl e carbaryl apresentou níveis estatisticamente similares aos da testemunha. Dez dias após a aplicação, a mortalidade em todos os tratamentos não diferiu significativamente da testemunha. O efeito de todos os produtos apresentou declínio progressivo ao longo do período de observação, sendo significativa a 1% de probabilidade a regressão linear negativa para os valores obtidos. Os maiores efeitos negativos sobre a sobrevivência de N. californicus corresponderam aos acaricidas testados

  13. Amino acid composition and functional properties of giant red sea cucumber ( Parastichopus californicus) collagen hydrolysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zunying; Su, Yicheng; Zeng, Mingyong

    2011-03-01

    Giant red sea cucumber ( Parastichopus californicus) is an under-utilized species due to its high tendency to autolysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional properties of collagen hydrolysates from this species. The degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition, SDS-PAGE, emulsion activity index (EAI), emulsion stability index (ESI), foam expansion (FE), and foam stability (FS) of hydrolysates were investigated. The effects of pH on the EAI, ESI FE and FS of hydrolysates were also investigated. The results indicated that the β and α 1 chains of the collagen were effectively hydrolyzed by trypsin at 50°c with an Enzyme/Substrate (E/S) ration of 1:20 (w:w). The DH of collagen was up to 17.3% after 3 h hydrolysis with trypsin. The hydrolysates had a molecular weight distribution of 1.1-17 kDa, and were abundant in glycine (Gly), proline (Pro), glutamic acid (Glu), alanine (Ala) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) residues. The hydrolysates were fractionated into three fractions ( 10 kDa), and the fraction of 3-10 kDa exhibited a higher EAI value than the fraction of > 10 kDa ( P 10 kDa had higher FE and FS values than other fractions ( P 10 kDa showed higher FE value, respectively. They are hoped to be utilized as functional ingredients in food and nutraceutical industries.

  14. Historical DNA reveals the demographic history of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in medieval and early modern Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsdóttir, Guðbjörg Ásta; Westfall, Kristen M; Edvardsson, Ragnar; Pálsson, Snæbjörn

    2014-02-22

    Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) vertebrae from archaeological sites were used to study the history of the Icelandic Atlantic cod population in the time period of 1500-1990. Specifically, we used coalescence modelling to estimate population size and fluctuations from the sequence diversity at the cytochrome b (cytb) and Pantophysin I (PanI) loci. The models are consistent with an expanding population during the warm medieval period, large historical effective population size (NE), a marked bottleneck event at 1400-1500 and a decrease in NE in early modern times. The model results are corroborated by the reduction of haplotype and nucleotide variation over time and pairwise population distance as a significant portion of nucleotide variation partitioned across the 1550 time mark. The mean age of the historical fished stock is high in medieval times with a truncation in age in early modern times. The population size crash coincides with a period of known cooling in the North Atlantic, and we conclude that the collapse may be related to climate or climate-induced ecosystem change.

  15. Effects of air temperature and water vapor pressure deficit on storage of the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazy, Noureldin Abuelfadl; Suzuki, Takeshi; Amano, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Katsumi

    2012-10-01

    To determine the optimum air temperature and water vapor pressure deficit (VPD) for the storage of the predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus, 3-day-old mated females were stored at air temperatures of 0, 5, 10, or 15 °C and VPDs of 0.1, 0.3, or 0.5 kPa for 10, 20, or 30 days. At 10 °C and 0.1 kPa, 83 % of females survived after 30 days of storage; this percentage was the highest among all conditions. VPDs of 0.3 and 0.5 kPa regardless of air temperature, and an air temperature of 0 °C regardless of VPD were detrimental to the survival of the females during storage. Since the highest survival was observed at 10 °C and 0.1 kPa, the effect of the storage duration on the post-storage quality of the stored females and their progeny was investigated at 25 °C to evaluate the effectiveness of the storage condition. The oviposition ability of the stored females, hatchability, and sex ratio of their progeny were not affected even when the storage duration was extended to 30 days. Although a slight decrease in the survival during the immature stages of progeny was observed when the storage duration was ≥20 days, the population growth of N. californicus may not be affected when individuals stored in these conditions are applied to greenhouses and agricultural fields. The results indicate that mated N. californicus females can be stored at 10 °C and 0.1 kPa VPD for at least 30 days.

  16. NET ABOVEGROUND PRIMARY PRODUCTION AND BIOMASS DYNAMICS OF SCHOENOPLECTUS CALIFORNICUS (CYPERACEAE) MARSHES GROWING UNDER DIFFERENT HYDROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Pratolongo; Patricia Kandus; Brinson, Mark M.

    2008-01-01

    Se estudiaron diferentes atributos funcionales de 2 pajonales de Schoenoplectus californicus (C. A. Mey) Sójak que son muy similares en su estructura y especie dominante, pero aparecen en los extremos opuestos a lo largo de un gradiente de influencia fluvial-mareal en el Bajo Delta del río Paraná. Los resultados mostraron una productividad primaria neta aérea (PPNA) significativamente más alta en el pajonal afectado directamente por la marea (1999.41 ± 211.97 g m-2 año-1). En el sitio aguas a...

  17. Habitat use and movement of the endangered Arroyo Toad (Anaxyrus californicus) in coastal southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Elizabeth; Lyren, Lisa M.; Lovich, Robert E.; Mitrovich, Milan J.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    Information on the habitat use and movement patterns of Arroyo Toads (Anaxyrus californicus) is limited. The temporal and spatial characteristics of terrestrial habitat use, especially as it relates to upland use in coastal areas of the species' range, are poorly understood. We present analyses of radiotelemetry data from 40 individual adult toads tracked at a single site in coastal southern California from March through November of 2004. We quantify adult Arroyo Toad habitat use and movements and interpret results in the context of their life history. We show concentrated activity by both male and female toads along stream terraces during and after breeding, and, although our fall sample size is low, the continued presence of adult toads in the floodplain through the late fall. Adult toads used open sandy flats with sparse vegetation. Home-range size and movement frequency varied as a function of body mass. Observed spatial patterns of movement and habitat use both during and outside of the breeding period as well as available climatological data suggest that overwintering of toads in floodplain habitats of near-coastal areas of southern California may be more common than previously considered. If adult toads are not migrating out of the floodplain at the close of the breeding season but instead overwinter on stream terraces in near-coastal areas, then current management practices that assume toad absence from floodplain habitats may be leaving adult toads over-wintering on stream terraces vulnerable to human disturbance during a time of year when Arroyo Toad mortality is potentially highest.

  18. Identification of the molecular components of a Tigriopus californicus (Crustacea, Copepoda) circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Katherine T; Christie, Andrew E

    2014-12-01

    Copepods of the genus Tigriopus have been proposed as marine models for investigations of environmental perturbation. One rapidly increasing anthropogenic stressor for intertidal organisms is light pollution. Given the sensitivity of circadian rhythms to exogenous light, the genes/proteins of a Tigriopus circadian pacemaker represent a potential system for investigating the influences of artificial light sources on circadian behavior in an intertidal species. Here, the molecular components of a putative Tigriopus californicus circadian clock were identified using publicly accessible transcriptome data; the recently deduced circadian proteins of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus were used as a reference. Transcripts encoding homologs of all commonly recognized ancestral arthropod core clock proteins were identified (i.e. CLOCK, CRYPTOCHROME 2, CYCLE, PERIOD and TIMELESS), as were ones encoding proteins likely to modulate the core clock (i.e. CASEIN KINASE II, CLOCKWORK ORANGE, DOUBLETIME, PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 1, PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A, SHAGGY, SUPERNUMERARY LIMBS and VRILLE) or to act as inputs to it (i.e. CRYPTOCHROME 1). PAR DOMAIN PROTEIN 1 was the only circadian-associated protein not identified in Tigriopus; it appears absent in Calanus too. These data represent just the third full set of molecular components for a crustacean circadian pacemaker (Daphnia pulex and C. finmarchicus previously), and only the second obtained from transcribed sequences (C. finmarchicus previously). Given Tigriopus' proposed status as a model for investigating the influences of anthropogenic stressors in the marine environment, these data provide the first suite of gene/protein targets for understanding how light pollution may influence circadian physiology and behavior in an intertidal organism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Citizen science data reveal ecological, historical and evolutionary factors shaping interactions between woody hosts and wood-inhabiting fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann-Clausen, Jacob; Maruyama, Pietro K; Bruun, Hans Henrik; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Laessøe, Thomas; Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg; Dalsgaard, Bo

    2016-12-01

    Woody plants host diverse communities of associated organisms, including wood-inhabiting fungi. In this group, host effects on species richness and interaction network structure are not well understood, especially not at large geographical scales. We investigated ecological, historical and evolutionary determinants of fungal species richness and network modularity, that is, subcommunity structure, across woody hosts in Denmark, using a citizen science data set comprising > 80 000 records of > 1000 fungal species on 91 genera of woody plants. Fungal species richness was positively related to host size, wood pH, and the number of species in the host genus, with limited influence of host frequency and host history, that is, time since host establishment in the area. Modularity patterns were unaffected by host history, but largely reflected host phylogeny. Notably, fungal communities differed substantially between angiosperm and gymnosperm hosts. Host traits and evolutionary history appear to be more important than host frequency and recent history in structuring interactions between hosts and wood-inhabiting fungi. High wood acidity appears to act as a stress factor reducing fungal species richness, while large host size, providing increased niche diversity, enhances it. In some fungal groups that are known to interact with live host cells in the establishment phase, host selectivity is common, causing a modular community structure. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Historical and Contemporary Geographic Data Reveal Complex Spatial and Temporal Responses of Vegetation to Climate and Land Stewardship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel L. Villarreal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation and land-cover changes are not always directional but follow complex trajectories over space and time, driven by changing anthropogenic and abiotic conditions. We present a multi-observational approach to land-change analysis that addresses the complex geographic and temporal variability of vegetation changes related to climate and land use. Using land-ownership data as a proxy for land-use practices, multitemporal land-cover maps, and repeat photography dating to the late 19th century, we examine changing spatial and temporal distributions of two vegetation types with high conservation value in the southwestern United States: grasslands and riparian vegetation. In contrast to many reported vegetation changes, notably shrub encroachment in desert grasslands, we found an overall increase in grassland area and decline of xeroriparian and riparian vegetation. These observed change patterns were neither temporally directional nor spatially uniform over the landscape. Historical data suggest that long-term vegetation changes coincide with broad climate fluctuations while fine-scale patterns are determined by land-management practices. In some cases, restoration and active management appear to weaken the effects of climate on vegetation; therefore, if land managers in this region act in accord with on-going directional changes, the current drought and associated ecological reorganization may provide an opportunity to achieve desired restoration endpoints.

  1. Historical collections reveal patterns of diffusion of sweet potato in Oceania obscured by modern plant movements and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roullier, Caroline; Benoit, Laure; McKey, Doyle B; Lebot, Vincent

    2013-02-05

    The history of sweet potato in the Pacific has long been an enigma. Archaeological, linguistic, and ethnobotanical data suggest that prehistoric human-mediated dispersal events contributed to the distribution in Oceania of this American domesticate. According to the "tripartite hypothesis," sweet potato was introduced into Oceania from South America in pre-Columbian times and was then later newly introduced, and diffused widely across the Pacific, by Europeans via two historically documented routes from Mexico and the Caribbean. Although sweet potato is the most convincing example of putative pre-Columbian connections between human occupants of Polynesia and South America, the search for genetic evidence of pre-Columbian dispersal of sweet potato into Oceania has been inconclusive. Our study attempts to fill this gap. Using complementary sets of markers (chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites) and both modern and herbarium samples, we test the tripartite hypothesis. Our results provide strong support for prehistoric transfer(s) of sweet potato from South America (Peru-Ecuador region) into Polynesia. Our results also document a temporal shift in the pattern of distribution of genetic variation in sweet potato in Oceania. Later reintroductions, accompanied by recombination between distinct sweet potato gene pools, have reshuffled the crop's initial genetic base, obscuring primary patterns of diffusion and, at the same time, giving rise to an impressive number of local variants. Moreover, our study shows that phenotypes, names, and neutral genes do not necessarily share completely parallel evolutionary histories. Multidisciplinary approaches, thus, appear necessary for accurate reconstruction of the intertwined histories of plants and humans.

  2. Rectification of historical topographic maps: a tool revealing the course changes and dynamics of Lower Gaula River, South Trondelag, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timár, Gábor; Baranya, Sándor; Rüther, Nils; Kvarteig, Sidsel; Galambos, Csilla; Biszak, Előd; Nagy, Diána

    2017-04-01

    The 1:50,000 and 1:100,000 scale historical sheets of the Norwegian topographic 'Rektangelkart' map series were georeferenced, in order to obtain the original hydrography of the Gaula River, at a ca 50 kilometer long section between Støren and the estuary to the Gulosen Bay. The 1:50,000 scale sheets are the earliest systematic topographic works of the area, surveyed in 1866-9, while the smaller scale sheets were surveyed forty years later, in 1906-8. Both series represent a river status before the extensive control works. Thus, together with the modern, present-day cartographic and GIS products, these two 'snapshots' from 100 and 150 years ago show not only the original, uncontrolled status of the river but also some elements of the natural changes of the course/thalweg. To make the georeference, instead of using terrain points, the geodetic parameters of the Norwegian 'Rektangelkart' series were defined in GIS environment. The Cassini map projection was defined with a projection center in the fortress of Kongsvinger, Eastern Norway, some 350 kilometers from the study area. Knowing the sheet labeling system and the terrain position of the sheets in this Cassini projection, only their four corner points were defined in all sheets. The accuracy of the horizontal control of georeferenced was less than half map millimeter (25/50 meters). The sheets show an interesting meander cutoff process between Ler and Kvål. In 1869, the meander curve is still active and fully operating. A cutoff channel is clearly mapped in 1906, together with the old one. Nowadays, almost no map signs show the old channel course, however in the field, it is still traceable. Another interesting map element shows the complete bar structure in the channel. These gravel bars showed a different pattern in the old maps, as there were more gravel sediments in the time before the building of upspring reservoirs. Gravel bars are important in some environmental processes, eg. as salmon habitats, This

  3. Effect of temperature on the life-history traits of Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae) fed on Panonychus ulmi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Taj, H F; Jung, Chuleui

    2012-03-01

    The developmental rate and reproductive biology of Neoseiulus californicus, a generalist predator on spider mites and small insects, was investigated in the laboratory at five constant temperatures: 15, 20, 25, 30, and 34°C. The European red mite, Panonychus ulmi, an important pest in Korean apple orchards, was used as prey. Mean developmental time and adult longevity were inversely related to temperature from 15 to 30°C. Lifetime fecundity was greatest at 25°C, whereas daily fecundity was highest at 30°C. The sex ratio (female to male) was highest (0.77) at 25°C and lowest (0.67) at 34°C. Survivorship during immature development varied from 74.3 to 92.9%, with the lowest rate at 34°C. Life table parameters were analyzed and pseudo-replicates for the generation time (t ( G )), the intrinsic rate of natural increase (r (m)), finite rate of increase (λ), net reproductive rate (R (0)), and doubling time (t ( D )) were generated using the Jackknife method. Generation time (t ( G )) was lowest (10.7 days) at 34°C, R (0) was highest (49.2) at 25°C, and both r (m) (0.29) and λ (1.34) were highest at 30°C. In conclusion, the development and adult life-history traits obtained for N. californicus fed on P. ulmi indicated significant potential for biological control.

  4. Biofilms coating Schoenoplectus californicus as indicators of water quality in the Río de la Plata Estuary (Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Delia E; Gómez, Nora; Hualde, Paula R

    2007-10-01

    Community composition, structure, biomass and tolerance to pollution of biofilms growing on Schoenoplectus californicus were assessed, together with physico-chemical parameters of the water, to evaluate their usefulness as water quality indicators along the Argentinian shore of the freshwater zone of the Río de la Plata Estuary. Monthly sampling was carried out at three sites, one of which, located in a nature reserve, was considered as the reference site while the others were affected by sewage outlets and port activity. The reference site had higher dissolved oxygen and turbidity values, the polluted sites greater conductivity, oxygen demands, phosphate, ammonium and nitrite values. Diatoms dominated the biofilms at the reference site; ciliates reached higher densities at the polluted sites. Significant differences were found in species numbers, species diversity index, biomass, tolerance to pollution of the taxa, and the Pampean Diatom Index, between the reference and the impacted sites. This study shows that the biofilms growing on Schoenoplectus californicus are good indicators of the changes in the water quality of their environment.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the world's sheep breeds reveals high levels of historic mixture and strong recent selection.

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    James W Kijas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Through their domestication and subsequent selection, sheep have been adapted to thrive in a diverse range of environments. To characterise the genetic consequence of both domestication and selection, we genotyped 49,034 SNP in 2,819 animals from a diverse collection of 74 sheep breeds. We find the majority of sheep populations contain high SNP diversity and have retained an effective population size much higher than most cattle or dog breeds, suggesting domestication occurred from a broad genetic base. Extensive haplotype sharing and generally low divergence time between breeds reveal frequent genetic exchange has occurred during the development of modern breeds. A scan of the genome for selection signals revealed 31 regions containing genes for coat pigmentation, skeletal morphology, body size, growth, and reproduction. We demonstrate the strongest selection signal has occurred in response to breeding for the absence of horns. The high density map of genetic variability provides an in-depth view of the genetic history for this important livestock species.

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of the World's Sheep Breeds Reveals High Levels of Historic Mixture and Strong Recent Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijas, James W.; Lenstra, Johannes A.; Hayes, Ben; Boitard, Simon; Porto Neto, Laercio R.; San Cristobal, Magali; Servin, Bertrand; McCulloch, Russell; Whan, Vicki; Gietzen, Kimberly; Paiva, Samuel; Barendse, William; Ciani, Elena; Raadsma, Herman; McEwan, John; Dalrymple, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Through their domestication and subsequent selection, sheep have been adapted to thrive in a diverse range of environments. To characterise the genetic consequence of both domestication and selection, we genotyped 49,034 SNP in 2,819 animals from a diverse collection of 74 sheep breeds. We find the majority of sheep populations contain high SNP diversity and have retained an effective population size much higher than most cattle or dog breeds, suggesting domestication occurred from a broad genetic base. Extensive haplotype sharing and generally low divergence time between breeds reveal frequent genetic exchange has occurred during the development of modern breeds. A scan of the genome for selection signals revealed 31 regions containing genes for coat pigmentation, skeletal morphology, body size, growth, and reproduction. We demonstrate the strongest selection signal has occurred in response to breeding for the absence of horns. The high density map of genetic variability provides an in-depth view of the genetic history for this important livestock species. PMID:22346734

  7. Effect of pyroligneous extract of Acacia mearnsii on Tetranychus urticae (Koch, 1836 (Acari, Tetranychidae and Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, 1954 (Acari, Phytoseiidae

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    Adriana de Castro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2015v28n4p99 This work aimed to determine the effect of decanted pyroligneous extract (DPE of black Acacia mearnsii on the mites Tetranychus urticae (Koch, 1836 (Acari: Tetranychidae and Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, 1954 (Acari: Phytoseiidae. Six different concentrations were tested, namely, DPE: water 1:600, 1:300, 1:150, 1:75, 1:38 and 1:19 and a control treatment with distilled water. Five females of T. urticae and N. californicus were transferred to arenas, totaling 50 females per treatment, for a period of eight days. DPE caused high mortality in N. californicus, while in T. urticae, high mortality was observed only at high (1:75, 1:38 and 1:19 and intermediate (1:150 concentrations. Notably, DPE was slightly harmful to T. urticae at lower concentrations and harmful to N. californicus at all concentrations, indicating that it would have little efficacy in the control of T. urticae.

  8. Effects of cutting disturbance in Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Mey. Soják on the benthic macroinvertebrates - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v33i1.6383 Effects of cutting disturbance in Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Mey. Soják on the benthic macroinvertebrates - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v33i1.6383

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    Norma Luiza Würdig

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Lagoons are considered protected areas because these systems play a key ecological role. However, the extraction of macrophyte Schoenoplectus californicus is held for manufacture of handcrafts, being an alternative income for riverbank communities. This study evaluated the impact of S. californicus experimental cutting on benthic macroinvertebrates trough a field experiment. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 1, 12, 26 and 60 days after the macrophyte cutting in demarked plots (1 m², as well at control plots. The families number was not statistically different (ANOVA, p > 0.05, but the total density of invertebrates, and the density of Ceratopogonidae were significant (ANOVA, p S. californicus, in this area, as the intensity of the cut held, did not affect considerably the aquatic macroinvertebrates. The results suggest that the small-scale extractivism in these regions carries little effect because the fauna of adjacent areas probably can quickly colonize the disturbed areas.Lagoons are considered protected areas because these systems play a key ecological role. However, the extraction of macrophyte Schoenoplectus californicus is held for manufacture of handcrafts, being an alternative income for riverbank communities. This study evaluated the impact of S. californicus experimental cutting on benthic macroinvertebrates trough a field experiment. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 1, 12, 26 and 60 days after the macrophyte cutting in demarked plots (1 m², as well at control plots. The families number was not statistically different (ANOVA, p > 0.05, but the total density of invertebrates, and the density of Ceratopogonidae were significant (ANOVA, p S. californicus, in this area, as the intensity of the cut held, did not affect considerably the aquatic macroinvertebrates. The results suggest that the small-scale extractivism in these regions carries little effect because the fauna of adjacent areas probably can quickly colonize the disturbed

  9. Risk assessment of Cry toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis on the predatory mites Euseius concordis and Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Thiago Rodrigues; Ausique, John Jairo Saldarriaga; Nunes, Daiane Heloisa; Ibanhes, Fernando Henrique; Delalibera Júnior, Italo

    2013-04-01

    Genetically modified plants carrying Cry toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used for pest control. Possible adverse effects as a result of the use of this control technique to non-target organisms is still a concern; however, few studies have addressed the effects of Bt crops on phytoseiid predatory mites. Phytoseiids are important for the natural control of phytophagous mites, but they can also feed on pollen, plant exudates, etc. Thus, phytoseiids may ingest Bt toxins through several pathways. In this paper, we evaluate the direct effect of Bt-toxins by feeding the predators on Bt cell suspensions, on solution of a Bt toxin and the tri-trophic effect by Bt expressed in transgenic plants. We present a method of conducting toxicological tests with Phytoseiidae which can be useful in studies of risk analysis of toxins to be expressed by genetically engineered plants. This method was used to evaluate the potential effect of ingestion of suspensions of Bt (1.25 × 10(8) spores/ml) and of purified protein Cry1Ia12 (0.006 mg/ml and 0.018 mg/ml) on Euseius concordis, a predatory mite that develops and reproduces best on pollen. The effects of genetically modified Bollgard(®) cotton, which carries the Cry1Ac protein, on Neoseiulus californicus, a selective predator that feeds more on spider mites than on pollen or insects, was determined by feeding them with Tetranychus urticae reared in Bollgard(®) cotton and on the non-transgenic isoline. When E. concordis was fed with suspension of Bt isolate derived from product Dipel(®) PM, no significant effects were detected. Similarly, Cry1Ia12 Bt toxin, at a concentration of 0.006 mg/ml, did not affect E. concordis. At a concentration of 0.018 mg/ml, however, the intake of this protein reduced the reproduction of E. concordis. There were no effects of Bollgard(®) cotton on the biological traits and on the predatory capacity of N. californicus. Results indicate that the Cry toxins of B. thuringiensis

  10. Probable epizootic chlamydiosis in wild California (Larus californicus) and ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) gulls in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J C; Pearson, J E

    1995-07-01

    During the summer of 1986, more than 400 California gulls (Larus californicus) and ring-billed gulls (Larvus delawarensis), primarily fledglings, died on an island in Lake Sakakawea near New Town, North Dakota (USA). Mortality was attributed largely to chlamydiosis. Necropsy findings in nine carcasses included splenomegaly (n = 9), hepatomegaly (n = 4), and pericarditis (n = 1). Livers from three California gulls and two ring-billed gulls, and spleens from the same five birds plus a third ring-billed gull were positive for Chlamydia psittaci by the direct immunofluorescence test. Chlamydia psittaci was isolated from separate pools of liver and spleen from one California gull and one ring-billed gull. This is believed to be the first record of epizootic chlamydiosis in gulls and the second report of epizootic chlamydial mortality in wild birds in North America.

  11. NET ABOVEGROUND PRIMARY PRODUCTION AND BIOMASS DYNAMICS OF SCHOENOPLECTUS CALIFORNICUS (CYPERACEAE MARSHES GROWING UNDER DIFFERENT HYDROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

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    Paula Pratolongo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron diferentes atributos funcionales de 2 pajonales de Schoenoplectus californicus (C. A. Mey Sójak que son muy similares en su estructura y especie dominante, pero aparecen en los extremos opuestos a lo largo de un gradiente de influencia fluvial-mareal en el Bajo Delta del río Paraná. Los resultados mostraron una productividad primaria neta aérea (PPNA significativamente más alta en el pajonal afectado directamente por la marea (1999.41 ± 211.97 g m-2 año-1. En el sitio aguas arriba, menos proclive a la inundación por mareas, S. californicus tuvo una menor PPNA (1299.17 ± 179.48 g m-2 año-1 y el sistema mostró una mayor capacidad para retener la biomasa producida dentro del pajonal, con cantidades significativamente mayores de biomasa muerta en pie (1316.00 ± 336.01 vs. 112.40 ± 55.05 g m-2 y mayores contenidos de materia orgánica en el suelo (16.20 ± 0.12 % vs. 0.70 ± 0.08 %. Los resultados obtenidos en este trabajo sugieren que los flujos superficiales de alta energía pueden cambiar el funcionamiento de estos pajonales, de un sistema estable acumulador de materia orgánica a un pajonal de rápido crecimiento, con altas tasas de acumulación de sedimentos minerales.

  12. Effects of cutting disturbance in Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Mey.) Soják on the benthic macroinvertebrates - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v33i1.6383 Effects of cutting disturbance in Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Mey.) Soják on the benthic macroinvertebrates - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v33i1.6383

    OpenAIRE

    Norma Luiza Würdig; Gabriela Peixoto Coelho de Souza; Gilberto Gonçalves Rodrigues; Thiago Cesar Lima Silveira

    2011-01-01

    Lagoons are considered protected areas because these systems play a key ecological role. However, the extraction of macrophyte Schoenoplectus californicus is held for manufacture of handcrafts, being an alternative income for riverbank communities. This study evaluated the impact of S. californicus experimental cutting on benthic macroinvertebrates trough a field experiment. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 1, 12, 26 and 60 days after the macrophyte cutting in demarked plots (1 m²), as well...

  13. Organochlorine pesticides sequestered in the aquatic macrophyte Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Meyer) Soják from a shallow lake in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglioranza, Karina S B; de Moreno, Julia E A; Moreno, Víctor J

    2004-04-01

    This study was conducted in Los Padres Lake from Argentina in order to assess the ability of Schoenoplectus californicus to bioconcentrate organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). Bulrush tissues, superficial and near root sediments were collected from the input and the output creek areas. OCP analyses were carried out by GC-ECD. Samples from the input creek area showed the higher OCP levels as a result of contaminants washed down from upstream agricultural fields. Bulrush roots accumulated the highest concentrations of pollutants (30.2-45.7ngg(-1) dry weight). DDTs and chlordanes predominated in sediments and roots besides endosulfan sulfate. The sediments constitute the main source for these OCPs partitioning to bulrush. Stems mainly exposed to water column accumulated preferentially the less hydrophobic pesticides, such as HCHs and endosulfans. We have confirmed the important role of S. californicus in the contaminant removal from sediments. Therefore, this macrophyte can be used as a tool for field studies of OCP pollution monitoring and remediation.

  14. Impacto de produtos fitossanitários utilizados na cultura do morangueiro sobre a população do predador Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae

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    Juliano Antonio de Freitas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dentre as pragas prejudiciais à cultura do morangueiro, destaca-se o ácaro-rajado (Tetranychus urticae Koch, 1836, principal praga da cultura, cujo controle é, comumente, feito por meio do método químico. Neoseiulus californicus é um eficiente predador no controle desta praga. No presente estudo objetivou-se avaliar a seletividade de alguns produtos fitossanitários, utilizados na cultura do morangueiro  em sistemas de produção integrada (PIMo sobre o predador  N. californicus em condições de laboratório, à exposição máxima, e semi-campo. O bioensaio foi conduzido no Laboratório de Entomologia do Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia do Sul de Minas Gerais (IFSULDEMINAS, Campus Inconfidentes. Os produtos testados para os indivíduos de N. californicus, em g de i.a. L-1 de água, foram: abamectina (0,072, enxofre (2,400, fempropatrina (0,195, propargito (0,195, milbemectina (0,009, cihexatina (0,250, iprodiona (0,750 e água. No presente bioensaio experimental foi realizada a aplicação direta das caldas dos produtos, por meio de pulverizadores calibrados, diretamente sobre predadores, sendo avaliada a mortalidade dos indivíduos. Abamectina foi considerada nociva, milbemectina e iprodiona apresentaram efeito prejudicial após 48 horas, porém com baixa toxicidade, enxofre, fempropatrina e propargito apresentaram baixa toxicidade, e Cihexatina não diferiu da testemunha ao predador N. californicus. Em termos de semi-campo, o composto Abamectina foi considerado seletivo.

  15. Comparative toxicity of pesticides in three phytoseiid mites with different life-style occurring in citrus: Euseius stipulatus, Neoseiulus californicus and Phytoseiulus persimilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argolo, Poliane Sá; Jacas, Josep A; Urbaneja, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Conservation and augmentative biological control strategies have been developed to take full advantage of the natural enemies that occur in Spanish citrus orchards. Among them, the predatory mites Euseius stipulatus, Neoseiulus californicus and Phytoseiulus persimilis play an important role in the biological control of tetranychid mites. However, these predatory mites are often affected by pesticides and information about the side-effects of these products against these beneficial arthropods is essential to guarantee their efficacy. The side-effects of some pesticides remain unknown and the primary aim of this study was to fill this gap. We have further used this information and that collected from other sources to compare the response of these three mite species to pesticides. Based on this information, E. stipulatus has the most tolerant species, followed by N. californicus and P. persimilis. Therefore, using E. stipulatus as an indicator species in citrus may have led to the paradox of selecting presumed selective pesticides resulting in excessive impact on N. californicus and, especially on P. persimilis. Because these two latter species are considered key for the biological control of T. urticae in citrus, especially clementines, in Spain, we propose to use P. persimilis as the relevant indicator of such effects on predacious mites occurring in citrus instead of E. stipulatus. This change could have a dramatic impact on the satisfactory control of tetranychid mites in citrus in the near future.

  16. Life history of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, 1954) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) fed with castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) pollen in laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafeli, P P; Reis, P R; Silveira, E C da; Souza-Pimentel, G C; de Toledo, M A

    2014-08-01

    The predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, 1954) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is one of the principal natural enemies of tetranychid mites in several countries, promoting efficient control of those mites in several food and ornamental crops. Pest attacks such as that of the spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, 1836 (Acari: Tetranychidae), is one of the problems faced by farmers, especially in the greenhouse, due to the difficulty of its control with the use of chemicals because of the development of fast resistance making it hard to control it. The objective of this work was to study the life history of the predatory mite N. californicus as a contribution to its mass laboratory rearing, having castor bean plant [Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiaceae)] pollen as food, for its subsequent use as a natural enemy of T. urticae on a cultivation of greenhouse rosebushes. The studies were carried out in the laboratory, at 25 ± 2°C of temperature, 70 ± 10% RH and a 14 hour photophase. The biological aspects and the fertility life table were appraised. Longevity of 32.9 days was verified for adult females and 40.4 days for males. The intrinsic rate of increase (rm) was 0.2 and the mean generation time (T) was 17.2 days. The population doubled every 4.1 days. The results obtained were similar to those in which the predatory mite N. californicus fed on T. urticae.

  17. Evaluation of dry-adapted strains of the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus for spider mite control on cucumber, strawberry and pepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palevsky, E; Walzer, A; Gal, S; Schausberger, P

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate spider mite control efficacy of two dry-adapted strains of Neoseiulus californicus. Performance of these strains were compared to a commercial strain of Phytoseiulus persimilis on whole cucumber, pepper and strawberry plants infested with Tetranychus urticae at 50 +/- 5% RH. Under these dry conditions predators' performance was very different on each host plant. On cucumber, spider mite suppression was not attained by any of the three predators, plants 'burnt out' within 4 weeks of spider mite infestation. On strawberry, all predators satisfactorily suppressed spider mites yet they differed in short term efficacy and persistence. Phytoseiulus persimilis suppressed the spider mites more rapidly than did the BOKU and SI N. californicus strains. Both N. californicus strains persisted longer than did P. persimilis. The BOKU strain was superior to SI in population density reached, efficacy in spider mite suppression and persistence. On pepper, in the first 2 weeks of the experiment the BOKU strain was similar to P. persimilis and more efficacious in spider mite suppression than strain SI. Four weeks into the experiment the efficacy of P. persimilis dropped dramatically and was inferior to the SI and BOKU strains. Overall, mean predator density was highest on plants harbouring the BOKU strain, lowest on plants with P. persimilis and intermediate on plants with the SI strain. Implications for biocontrol of spider mites using phytoseiid species under dry conditions are discussed.

  18. Life history of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, 1954 (Acari: Phytoseiidae fed with castor bean (Ricinus communisL. pollen in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PP Marafeli

    Full Text Available The predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus(McGregor, 1954 (Acari: Phytoseiidae is one of the principal natural enemies of tetranychid mites in several countries, promoting efficient control of those mites in several food and ornamental crops. Pest attacks such as that of the spider mite, Tetranychus urticaeKoch, 1836 (Acari: Tetranychidae, is one of the problems faced by farmers, especially in the greenhouse, due to the difficulty of its control with the use of chemicals because of the development of fast resistance making it hard to control it. The objective of this work was to study the life history of the predatory mite N. californicus as a contribution to its mass laboratory rearing, having castor bean plant [Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiaceae] pollen as food, for its subsequent use as a natural enemy of T. urticae on a cultivation of greenhouse rosebushes. The studies were carried out in the laboratory, at 25 ± 2°C of temperature, 70 ± 10% RH and a 14 hour photophase. The biological aspects and the fertility life table were appraised. Longevity of 32.9 days was verified for adult females and 40.4 days for males. The intrinsic rate of increase (rm was 0.2 and the mean generation time (T was 17.2 days. The population doubled every 4.1 days. The results obtained were similar to those in which the predatory mite N. californicus fed on T. urticae.

  19. Annotated Draft Genome Assemblies for the Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) and the Scaled Quail (Callipepla squamata) Reveal Disparate Estimates of Modern Genome Diversity and Historic Effective Population Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldeschulte, David L; Halley, Yvette A; Wilson, Miranda L; Bhattarai, Eric K; Brashear, Wesley; Hill, Joshua; Metz, Richard P; Johnson, Charles D; Rollins, Dale; Peterson, Markus J; Bickhart, Derek M; Decker, Jared E; Sewell, John F; Seabury, Christopher M

    2017-09-07

    Northern bobwhite ( Colinus virginianus ; hereafter bobwhite) and scaled quail ( Callipepla squamata ) populations have suffered precipitous declines across most of their US ranges. Illumina-based first- (v1.0) and second- (v2.0) generation draft genome assemblies for the scaled quail and the bobwhite produced N50 scaffold sizes of 1.035 and 2.042 Mb, thereby producing a 45-fold improvement in contiguity over the existing bobwhite assembly, and ≥90% of the assembled genomes were captured within 1313 and 8990 scaffolds, respectively. The scaled quail assembly (v1.0 = 1.045 Gb) was ∼20% smaller than the bobwhite (v2.0 = 1.254 Gb), which was supported by kmer-based estimates of genome size. Nevertheless, estimates of GC content (41.72%; 42.66%), genome-wide repetitive content (10.40%; 10.43%), and MAKER-predicted protein coding genes (17,131; 17,165) were similar for the scaled quail (v1.0) and bobwhite (v2.0) assemblies, respectively. BUSCO analyses utilizing 3023 single-copy orthologs revealed a high level of assembly completeness for the scaled quail (v1.0; 84.8%) and the bobwhite (v2.0; 82.5%), as verified by comparison with well-established avian genomes. We also detected 273 putative segmental duplications in the scaled quail genome (v1.0), and 711 in the bobwhite genome (v2.0), including some that were shared among both species. Autosomal variant prediction revealed ∼2.48 and 4.17 heterozygous variants per kilobase within the scaled quail (v1.0) and bobwhite (v2.0) genomes, respectively, and estimates of historic effective population size were uniformly higher for the bobwhite across all time points in a coalescent model. However, large-scale declines were predicted for both species beginning ∼15-20 KYA. Copyright © 2017 Oldeschulte et al.

  20. Sex differences in social interaction behavior following social defeat stress in the monogamous California mouse (Peromyscus californicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C Trainor

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Stressful life experiences are known to be a precipitating factor for many mental disorders. The social defeat model induces behavioral responses in rodents (e.g. reduced social interaction that are similar to behavioral patterns associated with mood disorders. The model has contributed to the discovery of novel mechanisms regulating behavioral responses to stress, but its utility has been largely limited to males. This is disadvantageous because most mood disorders have a higher incidence in women versus men. Male and female California mice (Peromyscus californicus aggressively defend territories, which allowed us to observe the effects of social defeat in both sexes. In two experiments, mice were exposed to three social defeat or control episodes. Mice were then behaviorally phenotyped, and indirect markers of brain activity and corticosterone responses to a novel social stimulus were assessed. Sex differences in behavioral responses to social stress were long lasting (4 wks. Social defeat reduced social interaction responses in females but not males. In females, social defeat induced an increase in the number of phosphorylated CREB positive cells in the nucleus accumbens shell after exposure to a novel social stimulus. This effect of defeat was not observed in males. The effects of defeat in females were limited to social contexts, as there were no differences in exploratory behavior in the open field or light-dark box test. These data suggest that California mice could be a useful model for studying sex differences in behavioral responses to stress, particularly in neurobiological mechanisms that are involved with the regulation of social behavior.

  1. Effects of developmental bisphenol A exposure on reproductive-related behaviors in California mice (Peromyscus californicus): a monogamous animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Scott A; Jasarevic, Eldin; Vandas, Gregory M; Warzak, Denise A; Geary, David C; Ellersieck, Mark R; Roberts, R Michael; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a pervasive, endocrine disrupting compound (EDC), acts as a mixed agonist-antagonist with respect to estrogens and other steroid hormones. We hypothesized that sexually selected traits would be particularly sensitive to EDC. Consistent with this concept, developmental exposure of males from the polygynous deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, to BPA resulted in compromised spatial navigational ability and exploratory behaviors, while there was little effect on females. Here, we have examined a related, monogamous species, the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus), where we predicted that males would be less sensitive to BPA in terms of navigational and exploratory behaviors, while displaying other traits related to interactions with females and territorial marking that might be vulnerable to disruption. As in the deer mouse experiments, females were fed either a phytoestrogen-free CTL diet through pregnancy and lactation or the same diet supplemented with BPA (50 mg/kg feed weight) or ethinyl estradiol (EE) (0.1 part per billion) to provide a "pure" estrogen control. After weaning, pups were maintained on CTL diet until they had reached sexual maturity, at which time behaviors were evaluated. In addition, territorial marking was assessed in BPA-exposed males housed alone and when a control male was visible in the testing arena. In contrast to deer mice, BPA and EE exposure had no effect on spatial navigational skills in either male or female California mice. While CTL females exhibited greater exploratory behavior than CTL males, BPA exposure abolished this sex difference. BPA-exposed males, however, engaged in less territorial marking when CTL males were present. These studies demonstrate that developmental BPA exposure can disrupt adult behaviors in a sex- and species-dependent manner and are consistent with the hypothesis that sexually selected traits are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption and should be a consideration in risk

  2. Effects of developmental bisphenol A exposure on reproductive-related behaviors in California mice (Peromyscus californicus: a monogamous animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Williams

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA, a pervasive, endocrine disrupting compound (EDC, acts as a mixed agonist-antagonist with respect to estrogens and other steroid hormones. We hypothesized that sexually selected traits would be particularly sensitive to EDC. Consistent with this concept, developmental exposure of males from the polygynous deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, to BPA resulted in compromised spatial navigational ability and exploratory behaviors, while there was little effect on females. Here, we have examined a related, monogamous species, the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus, where we predicted that males would be less sensitive to BPA in terms of navigational and exploratory behaviors, while displaying other traits related to interactions with females and territorial marking that might be vulnerable to disruption. As in the deer mouse experiments, females were fed either a phytoestrogen-free CTL diet through pregnancy and lactation or the same diet supplemented with BPA (50 mg/kg feed weight or ethinyl estradiol (EE (0.1 part per billion to provide a "pure" estrogen control. After weaning, pups were maintained on CTL diet until they had reached sexual maturity, at which time behaviors were evaluated. In addition, territorial marking was assessed in BPA-exposed males housed alone and when a control male was visible in the testing arena. In contrast to deer mice, BPA and EE exposure had no effect on spatial navigational skills in either male or female California mice. While CTL females exhibited greater exploratory behavior than CTL males, BPA exposure abolished this sex difference. BPA-exposed males, however, engaged in less territorial marking when CTL males were present. These studies demonstrate that developmental BPA exposure can disrupt adult behaviors in a sex- and species-dependent manner and are consistent with the hypothesis that sexually selected traits are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption and should be a

  3. Consequences of Fatherhood in the Biparental California Mouse (Peromyscus californicus): Locomotor Performance, Metabolic Rate, and Organ Masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Jacob R; Saltzman, Wendy; Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Although effects of motherhood on mothers have been well documented in mammals, the effects of fatherhood on fathers are not well known. We evaluated effects of being a father on key metabolic and performance measures in the California mouse, Peromyscus californicus. California mice are genetically monogamous in the wild, and fathers show similar parental behavior to mothers, with the exception of lactation. To investigate the impact of fatherhood on fathers, focal males were paired with an intact female (breeding males), a tubally ligated female (nonbreeding males), or another male (virgins). Starting 3-5 d after the birth of each breeding pair's first litter, males were tested for locomotor performance (maximum sprint speed, treadmill endurance), basal metabolic rate (BMR), and maximum oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]). At the end of the 11-d test period, mice were euthanized, hematocrit was determined, and organs were weighed. Speed, endurance, and [Formula: see text] were significantly repeatable between two replicate measurement days but did not differ among groups, nor did BMR. Breeding males had significantly larger hind limb muscles than did nonbreeding males, whereas virgin males had heavier subcutaneous fat pads than did nonbreeding and breeding males. Several correlations were observed at the level of individual variation (residuals from ANCOVA models), including positive correlations for endurance with [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] with testes mass, and some of the digestion-related organs with each other. These results indicate that fatherhood may not have pronounced performance, metabolic, or morphological effects on fathers, at least under standard laboratory conditions and across a single breeding cycle.

  4. Effects of a physical and energetic challenge on male California mice (Peromyscus californicus): modulation by reproductive condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng; Garland, Theodore; Chappell, Mark A; Andrew, Jacob R; Harris, Breanna N; Saltzman, Wendy

    2018-01-11

    Reproduction strongly influences metabolism, morphology and behavior in female mammals. In species in which males provide parental care, reproduction might have similar effects on fathers. We examined effects of an environmental challenge on metabolically important physiological, morphological and behavioral measures, and determined whether these effects differed between reproductive and non-reproductive males in the biparental California mouse (Peromyscus californicus). Males were paired with an ovary-intact female, an ovariectomized female treated with estrogen and progesterone to induce estrus, or an untreated ovariectomized female. Within each group, half of the animals were housed under standard laboratory conditions and half in cages requiring them to climb wire towers to obtain food and water; these latter animals were also fasted for 24 h every third day. We predicted that few differences would be observed between fathers and non-reproductive males under standard conditions, but that fathers would be in poorer condition than non-reproductive males under challenging conditions. Body and fat mass showed a housing condition×reproductive group interaction: the challenge condition increased body and fat mass in both groups of non-reproductive males, but breeding males were unaffected. Males housed under the physical and energetic challenge had higher blood lipid content, lower maximal aerobic capacity and related traits (hematocrit and relative triceps surae mass), increased pain sensitivity and increased number of fecal boli excreted during tail-suspension tests (a measure of anxiety), compared with controls. Thus, our physical and energetic challenge paradigm altered metabolism, morphology and behavior, but these effects were largely unaffected by reproductive condition. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Effects of cutting disturbance in Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Mey. Soják on the benthic macroinvertebrates = Efeito do distúrbio de corte em Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Mey. Soják sobre a fauna de macroinvertebrados bentônicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Cesar Lima Silveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lagoons are considered protected areas because these systems play a key ecological role. However, the extraction of macrophyte Schoenoplectus californicus is held for manufacture of handcrafts, being an alternative income for riverbank communities. This studyevaluated the impact of S. californicus experimental cutting on benthic macroinvertebrates trough a field experiment. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 1, 12, 26 and 60 days after themacrophyte cutting in demarked plots (1 m², as well at control plots. The families number was not statistically different (ANOVA, p > 0.05, but the total density of invertebrates, and the density of Ceratopogonidae were significant (ANOVA, p No Brasil, as margens de lagoas são consideradas áreas protegidas por desempenharem importante papel ecológico. No entanto, a extração da macrófita Schoenoplectus californicus é realizada para a fabricação de artesanato, sendo alternativa de renda para as comunidades ribeirrinhas. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o impacto do corte de S. californicus sobre os macroinvertebrados bentônicos por meio de um experimento de campo. Os macroinvertebrados foram amostrados um dia, 12, 26 e 60 dias após o corte em macrófitas em parcelas demarcadas (1 m², bem como nas parcelas-controle. As famílias de macroinvertebrados mais abundantes não apresentaram diferenças significativas (ANOVA, p < 0,05, mas a densidade total de invertebrados e a densidade de Ceratopogonidae foram significativas (ANOVA, p < 0,05 para a interação entre a data de amostragem e tratamento. A Análise de Componentes Principais identificou que a profundidade no local do experimento foi a variável que influenciou a variabilidade entre as amostras coletadas no experimento. Concluiu-seque o corte de S. californicus, nessa área, como a intensidade do corte realizado, não afeta drasticamente a composição de macroinvertebrados aquáticos. Os resultados sugerem que o extrativismo em pequenas

  6. In Vitro Effect of the Synthetic cal14.1a Conotoxin, Derived from Conus californicus, on the Human Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. De León-Nava

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxins that are secreted by cone snails are small peptides that are used to treat several diseases. However, their effects on parasites with human and veterinary significance are unknown. Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic parasite that affects approximately 30% of the world’s population and can be lethal in immunologically compromised individuals. The conventional treatment for this parasitic infection has remained the same since the 1950s, and its efficacy is limited to the acute phase of infection. These findings have necessitated the search for new drugs that specifically target T. gondii. We examined the effects of the synthetic toxin cal14.1a (s-cal14.1a from C. californicus on the tachyzoite form of T. gondii. Our results indicate that, at micromolar concentrations, s-cal14.1a lowers viability and inhibits host cell invasion (by 50% and 61%, respectively on exposure to extracellular parasites. Further, intracellular replication decreased significantly while viability of the host cell was unaffected. Our study is the first report on the antiparasitic activity of a synthetic toxin of C. californicus.

  7. Influencia de la estación y de las especies Phragmites australis y Schoenoplectus californicus en la eliminación de materia orgánica y nutrientes contenidos en aguas servidas durante la operación de puesta en marcha de humedales construidos de flujo horizontal subsuperficial/Influence of season and species Phragmites australis and Schoenoplectus californicus on the removal of organic matter and nutrients contained in sewage wastewater during the start up operation of the horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karen Rojas; Ismael Vera; Gladys Vidal

    2013-01-01

      The objective of this work is to evaluate the influence of season and plant species Phragmites australis and Schoenoplectus californicus in removal of organic matter and nutrients in horizontal subsurface (HSS...

  8. Effect of the combined addition of Zn and Pb on partitioning in sediments and their accumulation by the emergent macrophyte Schoenoplectus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreghini, Silvana; de Cabo, Laura; Serafini, Roberto; de Iorio, Alicia Fabrizio

    2017-03-01

    Wetlands usually provide a natural mechanism that diminishes the transport of toxic compounds to other compartments of the ecosystem by immobilization and accumulation in belowground tissues and/or soil. This study was conducted to assess the ability of Schoenoplectus californicus growing in natural marsh sediments, with zinc and lead addition, to tolerate and accumulate these metals, taking account of the metal distribution in the sediment fractions. The Zn and Pb were mainly found in available (exchangeable) and potentially available (bound to organic matter) forms, respectively. The absorption of Zn and Pb by plants increased in sediments with added metals. Both metals were largely retained in roots (translocation factor Pb concentrations in roots were high, but they were not sufficient to reduce biomass growth.

  9. Chronic variable stress in fathers alters paternal and social behavior but not pup development in the biparental California mouse (Peromyscus californicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Breanna N; de Jong, Trynke R; Yang, Vanessa; Saltzman, Wendy

    2013-11-01

    Stress and chronically elevated glucocorticoid levels have been shown to disrupt parental behavior in mothers; however, almost no studies have investigated corresponding effects in fathers. The present experiment tested the hypothesis that chronic variable stress inhibits paternal behavior and consequently alters pup development in the monogamous, biparental California mouse (Peromyscus californicus). First-time fathers were assigned to one of three experimental groups: chronic variable stress (CVS, n=8), separation control (SC, n=7), or unmanipulated control (UC, n=8). The CVS paradigm (3 stressors per day for 7 days) successfully stressed mice, as evidenced by increased baseline plasma corticosterone concentrations, increased adrenal mass, decreased thymus mass, and a decrease in body mass over time. CVS altered paternal and social behavior of fathers, but major differences were observed only on day 6 of the 7-day paradigm. At that time point, CVS fathers spent less time with their pairmate and pups, and more time autogrooming, as compared to UC fathers; SC fathers spent more time behaving paternally and grooming the female mate than CVS and UC fathers. Thus, CVS blocked the separation-induced increase in social behaviors observed in the SC fathers. Nonetheless, chronic stress in fathers did not appear to alter survival or development of their offspring: pups from the three experimental conditions did not differ in body mass gain over time, in the day of eye opening, or in basal or post-stress corticosterone levels. These results demonstrate that chronic stress can transiently disrupt paternal and social behavior in P. californicus fathers, but does not alter pup development or survival under controlled, non-challenging laboratory conditions. © 2013.

  10. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus): Changes in baseline activity, reactivity, and fecal excretion of glucocorticoids across the diurnal cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Breanna N; Saltzman, Wendy; de Jong, Trynke R; Milnes, Matthew R

    2012-12-01

    The California mouse, Peromyscus californicus, is an increasingly popular animal model in behavioral, neural, and endocrine studies, but little is known about its baseline hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity or HPA responses to stressors. We characterized plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations in P. californicus under baseline conditions across the diurnal cycle, in response to pharmacological manipulation of the HPA axis, and in response to a variety of stressors at different times of day. In addition, we explored the use of fecal samples to monitor adrenocortical activity non-invasively. California mice have very high baseline levels of circulating CORT that change markedly over 24h, but that do not differ between the sexes. This species may be somewhat glucocorticoid-resistant in comparison to other rodents as a relatively high dose of dexamethasone (5mg/kg, s.c.) was required to suppress plasma CORT for 8h post-injection. CORT responses to stressors and ACTH injection differed with time of day, as CORT concentrations were elevated more readily during the morning (inactive period) than in the evening (active period) when compared to time-matched control. Data from (3)H-CORT injection studies show that the time course for excretion of fecal CORT, or glucocorticoid metabolites, differs with time of injection. Mice injected in the evening excreted the majority of fecal radioactivity 2-4h post-injection whereas mice injected during the morning did so at 14-16h post-injection. Unfortunately, the antibody we used does not adequately bind the most prevalent fecal glucocorticoid metabolites and therefore we could not validate its use for fecal assays. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. História de vida de Neoseiulus californicus(McGregor, 1954) (Acari: Phytoseiidae), alimentado com pólen de mamoneira (Ricinus communis L.) em condição de laboratório

    OpenAIRE

    PP Marafeli; PR, Reis; EC. da Silveira; GC Souza-Pimentel; MA. de Toledo

    2014-01-01

    The predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus(McGregor, 1954) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is one of the principal natural enemies of tetranychid mites in several countries, promoting efficient control of those mites in several food and ornamental crops. Pest attacks such as that of the spider mite, Tetranychus urticaeKoch, 1836 (Acari: Tetranychidae), is one of the problems faced by farmers, especially in the greenhouse, due to the difficulty of its control with the use of chemicals because of the de...

  12. Historically Black

    OpenAIRE

    Pennington, Whitney

    2012-01-01

    Historically Black is a short documentary that looks at recruitment of non-black students at Texas Southern University, one of the nation’s largest Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). By chronicling Texas Southern’s efforts to diversify and its impact on the campus community, the film explores the changing role of HBCUs in post-segregated America and addresses what this might mean for the future of these deep-rooted institutions. 

  13. Historical Paper

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 23; Issue 1. Historical Paper: On Simple Gas Reactions by H Eyring and M Polanyi. Classics Volume 23 Issue 1 January 2018 pp 103-128. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/023/01/0103-0128 ...

  14. Bioensayo para evaluar la compatibilidad de adultos de Neoseiulus californicus (Parasitiformes: Phytoseiidae con algunos pesticidas de uso comercial en condiciones semicontroladas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forero Patiño Jennifer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Neoseiulus californicus es un depredador de Tetranychus urticae
    en cultivos comerciales de rosa. Sin embargo, en este cultivo
    se aplican agroquímicos que no permiten usarlo como controlador.
    Debido a que no existe un protocolo para evaluar la
    compatibilidad de ácaros depredadores con productos químicos
    y a que es necesario definir cuáles de estos productos podrían
    emplearse en controles fitosanitarios sin afectar al depredador,
    el presente trabajo buscó determinar una metodología para
    evaluar la compatibilidad de algunos de estos agroquímicos con
    adultos del depredador. Para ello se estandarizó tanto la aplicación
    de los productos como sus métodos de aspersión (superficie
    tratada y aspersión directa, e igualmente se estableció la planta
    sustrato más recomendable para su evaluación. Finalmente, se
    determinó la compatibilidad de algunos productos químicos
    con los ácaros depredadores. Se encontró que la especie más
    apropiada para los ensayos es la rosa, y que la distancia ideal de
    aspersión es de 1 m, con tres pases de aplicación del producto.
    No se encontraron diferencias significativas entre los métodos
    de aspersión (P = 0,15222. Por último, se determinó que metomil
    (0,5 g L-1 no es compatible con N. californicus, mientras
    que los productos procloraz (0,6 cm3 L-1, bupirimato (1,0 g
    L-1 y bifenazate (0,3 g L-1 sí lo son (mortalidad promedio±SE:
    17±3%, por lo que se recomienda el empleo de estos últimos
    junto con el depredador en el manejo del cultivo.

  15. Efeitos do nim sobre tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae e os predadores Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks e Neoseiulus californicus (Mcgregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cristine Hoffmann Schlesener

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência de controle e os efeitos adversos de dois produtos à base de nim Azamax® (Azadiractina A/B 12g/L e Neemseto® (Azadiractina A/B, Nimbina e Salanina 2,389 g/L sobre o ácaro-rajado Tetranychus urticae e os predadores Phytoseiulus macropilis e Neoseiulus californicus em laboratório. Para o ácaro-rajado, foram consideradas as variáveis mortalidade, fecundidade, efeito ovicida e persistência biológica, enquanto para os fitoseídeos consideraram-se mortalidade e fecundidade. A mortalidade máxima observada para o ácaro-rajado foi de 89,7% e 91,5% para Azamax® e Neemseto®, respectivamente, na concentração de 0,5% após a reaplicação do produto no sétimo dia. Também foram observados efeitos adversos sobre a fecundidade e a viabilidade dos ovos quando tratados com os produtos comerciais (p.c.. A persistência biológica dos produtos foi de aproximadamente três dias após a pulverização. As formulações apresentaram seletividade em relação aos fitoseídeos, porém causaram redução da fecundidade dos mesmos.

  16. Anatomy and histochemistry of spread-wing posture in birds. 2. Gliding flight in the California gull, Larus californicus: a paradox of fast fibers and posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, R A; Mathias, E

    1997-09-01

    Gliding flight is a postural activity which requires the wings to be held in a horizontal position to support the weight of the body. Postural behaviors typically utilize isometric contractions in which no change in length takes place. Due to longer actin-myosin interactions, slow contracting muscle fibers represent an economical means for this type of contraction. In specialized soaring birds, such as vultures and pelicans, a deep layer of the pectoralis muscle, composed entirely of slow fibers, is believed to perform this function. Muscles involved in gliding posture were examined in California gulls (Larus californicus) and tested for the presence of slow fibers using myosin ATPase histochemistry and antibodies. Surprisingly small numbers of slow fibers were found in the M. extensor metacarpi radialis, M. coracobrachialis cranialis, and M. coracobrachialis caudalis, which function in wrist extension, wing protraction, and body support, respectively. The low number of slow fibers in these muscles and the absence of slow fibers in muscles associated with wing extension and primary body support suggest that gulls do not require slow fibers for their postural behaviors. Gulls also lack the deep belly to the pectoralis found in other gliding birds. Since bird muscle is highly oxidative, we hypothesize that fast muscle fibers may function to maintain wing position during gliding flight in California gulls.

  17. Evaluación del efecto de 30 agroquímicos en las poblaciones del ácaro benéfico (Ambiyselus californicus), y proponer una rotación de ingredientes activos, en la finca Florycampo, Cayambe-Ecuador 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Mármol Sarmiento, David Fernando

    2013-01-01

    El objetivo fue evaluar el efecto de los 30 agroquímicos en las poblaciones del ácaro benéfico (Amblyseius californicus), para proponer una rotación de los ingredientes activos en el control de plagas y enfermedades en el cultivo de rosas. El Diseño Experimental utilizado fue un Diseño Completamente al Azar (DCA). La variable evaluada fue Porcentaje de individuos sobrevivientes de Amblyseius californicus en cada una de las aplicaciones de agroquímicos. Resultados obtenidos: Co...

  18. Efeitos do nim sobre tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae e os predadores Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks e Neoseiulus californicus (Mcgregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae Effects of neem on tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae and the predators Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks and Neoseiulus Californicus (Mcgregor (Acari: phytoseiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cristine Hoffmann Schlesener

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência de controle e os efeitos adversos de dois produtos à base de nim Azamax® (Azadiractina A/B 12g/L e Neemseto® (Azadiractina A/B, Nimbina e Salanina 2,389 g/L sobre o ácaro-rajado Tetranychus urticae e os predadores Phytoseiulus macropilis e Neoseiulus californicus em laboratório. Para o ácaro-rajado, foram consideradas as variáveis mortalidade, fecundidade, efeito ovicida e persistência biológica, enquanto para os fitoseídeos consideraram-se mortalidade e fecundidade. A mortalidade máxima observada para o ácaro-rajado foi de 89,7% e 91,5% para Azamax® e Neemseto®, respectivamente, na concentração de 0,5% após a reaplicação do produto no sétimo dia. Também foram observados efeitos adversos sobre a fecundidade e a viabilidade dos ovos quando tratados com os produtos comerciais (p.c.. A persistência biológica dos produtos foi de aproximadamente três dias após a pulverização. As formulações apresentaram seletividade em relação aos fitoseídeos, porém causaram redução da fecundidade dos mesmos.The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of control and adverse effects of two neem based products: Azamax TM (Azadirachtin A/B 12g/L and Neemseto TM (Azadirachtin A/B, Nimbin and Salanin 2,389 g/L over two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae and the predators Phytoseiulus macropilis and Neoseiulus californicus in laboratory. Effects over the mortality, fecundity, eggs and biological persistence of the two-spotted spider mite when treated with neem based products were evaluated. For the phytoseiids the effects on mortality and fecundity were evaluated. The maximum mortality of two-spotted spider mites rates observed were 89.7% and 91.5% for Azamax TM and Neemseto TM respectively, on the 0.5% concentration after reapplying the product on the seventh day. Adverse effects were also observed over the fecundity and viability of the eggs when treated with

  19. Historical somersaults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, R

    1993-01-01

    The author and his youngest sister attended a mass at the Mission San Diego in California where the Monsignor discussed the life of Father Serra who founded the Mission in 1769. A letter to Father Serra from another priest showed the priest's distress over an abortion done to an Indian woman living at the Mission. Recollecting this historical letter was used to express the Monsignor's views on abortion today. He then reminded the congregation of the upcoming presidential election. He claimed that either Indians or people claiming to be Indians are trying to prevent the canonization of Father Serra without explaining why these people objected. He argued that the secular world cannot judge this man by contemporary standards. Yet, he had earlier implored the congregants to make secular political choices based on the absolute standards of the church. The objections to Father Serra by various secular people where he had been a member of the Spanish Inquisition and the missions he established served as forced confinement for the Indians. Supposedly, Father Serra and other priests kept Indian women in the missions to protect them from the brutality of Spanish soldiers. In fact, the pregnant Indian mentioned in the Monsignor's sermon was most likely raped by a Spaniard. Women in the missions were forced to stay in the missions while men could at least go to the fields. Unsanitary conditions were very unhealthy for the women, leading to considerable mortality. The child mortality rate was higher than 20%. Women who tried to control their fertility were harshly punished. The Catholic Church would do better if it canonized Father de las Casas who defended the autonomy and intellectual credibility of Indian culture. The author concludes that it is indeed unfair to judge Father Serra by contemporary standards, just as it is unfair and unreasonable to force Catholic standards on others.

  20. National Register Historic Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The National Register Historic District layer is a shape file showing the boundaries of Historic Districts that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

  1. historical narrative and wisdom. towards preaching esther

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article considers the problem of preaching OT historical narrative from the point of view of the depiction of God's participation in the drama. It suggests that historical narrative in general depicts a God who reveals himself infrequently, that his presence is normally veiled, and that the reader often has more information ...

  2. Applied Historical Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, F. Richard

    2014-01-01

    rotation -- as revealed by both timed and untimed eclipse observations -- and (ii) historical supernovae. These subjects will form the main theme of his AAS lecture.

  3. Impacto do corte das macrófitas aquáticas Schoenoplectus californicus e Typha domingensis sobre a fauna de macroinvertebrados : subsídios para o extrativismo sustentável

    OpenAIRE

    Thiago Cesar Lima Silveira

    2007-01-01

    Este estudo foi conduzido em um banhado palustre dominado por Typha domingensis na várzea do rio Maquine e na beira da lagoa dos Quadros, colonizada do Schoenoplectus californicus. Ambos os locais estão situados bacia hidrográfica do rio Maquiné, Planície costeira do Rio Grande do Sul, Sul do Brasil. Nestes locais são coletados rametes destas macrófitas como matéria prima para a confecção de artesanato, tendo importância econômica para as famílias da região. Áreas de banhado e beiras de lagoa...

  4. Historical Arctic Rawinsonde Archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Note: This data set is now on FTP so references to CD-ROM are historic and no longer applicable. The Historical Arctic Rawinsonde Archive is on FTP, and it contains...

  5. Exploring Historical Illiteracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, L. Allen

    1992-01-01

    Finds that powerlessness, social isolation, dogmatic nationalism, age, and gender significantly predict historical illiteracy (unfamiliarity with historical facts) and that a completed college history course reduced the effects of the predicting factors. (SR)

  6. VT Historic Preservation Grant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The State-funded Historic Preservation Grant Program helps municipalities and non-profit organizations rehabilitate the historic buildings that are a vital part of...

  7. Democracy and Historical Writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, we try to clarify the relationship between democracy and historical writing. The strategy is first exploring the general relationship between democracy and historical awareness, and then, studying the relationship between democracy and historical writing itself to find out whether

  8. Inheriting the past: Exploring historical consciousness across generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Clark

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant research into the meaning and operation of historical consciousness, there is still much to be understood about its hereditary function. For example, what does historical inheritance look like? How does it influence our individual and collective historical consciousnesses? And, just as critically, what happens to historical consciousness when history is deliberately withheld, when that inheritance is suspended or severed? As a way into some of these questions about passing on the past, this paper draws on a qualitative research project into historical consciousness in Australia to explore how so-called ‘ordinary people’ see themselves as part of a historical narrative. It reveals that historical inheritance is critical to our historical consciousness, and it notes the profound impact of forgetting on participants, raising important questions about the role of ‘silence’ and ‘absence’ in the formation of historical consciousness.

  9. Cancer risk assessment foundation unraveling: new historical evidence reveals that the US National Academy of Sciences (US NAS), Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation (BEAR) Committee Genetics Panel falsified the research record to promote acceptance of the LNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2015-04-01

    The NAS Genetics Panel (1956) recommended a switch from a threshold to a linear dose response for radiation risk assessment. To support this recommendation, geneticists on the panel provided individual estimates of the number of children in subsequent generations (one to ten) that would be adversely affected due to transgenerational reproductive cell mutations. It was hoped that there would be close agreement among the individual risk estimates. However, extremely large ranges of variability and uncertainty characterized the wildly divergent expert estimates. The panel members believed that sharing these estimates with the scientific community and general public would strongly undercut their linearity recommendation, as it would have only highlighted their own substantial uncertainties. Essentially, their technical report in the journal Science omitted and misrepresented key adverse reproductive findings in an effort to ensure support for their linearity recommendation. These omissions and misrepresentations not only belie the notion of an impartial and independent appraisal by the NAS Panel, but also amount to falsification and fabrication of the research record at the highest possible level, leading ultimately to the adoption of LNT by governments worldwide. Based on previously unexamined correspondence among panel members and Genetics Panel meeting transcripts, this paper provides the first documentation of these historical developments.

  10. Historical Dictionaries and Historical Dictionary Research: Papers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    The papers collected in this volume were originally presented at an Interna- tional Conference on Historical Lexicography and Lexicology organized by. Julie Coleman, and meant to fill the gap created by the two International. Round Table Conferences in Florence and Leyden in 1971 and 1977 respec- tively. The purpose ...

  11. Lagos Historical Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Lagos Historical Review is an international and interdisciplinary journal publishing papers with a historical focus. The journal generates and participates in debates to advance the discipline of history and promote its relevance to development. The journal aims to serve the academic community with a bias towards ...

  12. Historizing epistemology in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Gordana

    2010-12-01

    The conflict between the psychometric methodological framework and the particularities of human experiences reported in psychotherapeutic context led Michael Schwarz to raise the question whether psychology is based on a methodological error. I take this conflict as a heuristic tool for the reconstruction of the early history of psychology, which bears witness to similar epistemological conflicts, though the dominant historiography of psychology has largely forgotten alternative conceptions and their valuable insights into complexities of psychic phenomena. In order to work against the historical amnesia in psychology I suggest to look at cultural-historical contexts which decisively shaped epistemological choices in psychology. Instead of keeping epistemology and history of psychology separate, which nurtures individualism and naturalism in psychology, I argue for historizing epistemology and for historical psychology. From such a historically reflected perspective psychology in contemporary world can be approached more critically.

  13. History of Historical Archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Schuyler

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available On Sunday April 19, 1998 Jean Carl Harrington (known to the profession as J.C. or "Pinky" Harrington passed away at his home in Richmond, Virginia. At 96 Harrington's life almost spanned the 20th century and did encompass the rise and establishment of professional Historical Archaeology in North America. Many consider Harrington to be the founder or "father" of Americanist Historical Archaeology. In 1936 he took over the newly created NPS-CCC project at Jamestown, Virginia and that event is arguably the inception of Historical Archaeology as an organized, scholarly discipline.

  14. The historical supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, David H

    1977-01-01

    The Historical Supernovae is an interdisciplinary study of the historical records of supernova. This book is composed of 12 chapters that particularly highlight the history of the Far East. The opening chapter briefly describes the features of nova and supernova, stars which spontaneously explode with a spectacular and rapid increase in brightness. The succeeding chapter deals with the search for the historical records of supernova from Medieval European monastic chronicles, Arabic chronicles, astrological works etc., post renaissance European scientific writings, and Far Eastern histories and

  15. Historical Climatology Series

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Historical Climatology Series (HCS) is a set of climate-related publications published by NOAA's National Climatic Data Center beginning in 1978. HCS is...

  16. Iowa Historic Cemeteries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This shape file represents Iowa Historic Cemeteries. Originally it was based on an Iowa DNR point file marking cemetery locations as found on 7.5 min. USGS quad...

  17. Premier Hospital Historical Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — To provide a historical overview of the participating hospitals, before the first project report, Premier Healthcare Informatics has used data already available for...

  18. VT Roadside Historic Markers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Roadside Historic Site Marker program has proven an effective way to commemorate Vermont’s many people, events, and places of regional, statewide, or national...

  19. Historical Survey Data Archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To preserve NEFSC historical data, images of biological and oceanographic data sheets (1948-1975) were scanned to digital format and can be queried through a portal...

  20. Historically defined autobiographical periods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Norman R.; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Lee, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    over time and theoretical implications are discussed, notably by introducing a new approach to autobiographical memory, Transition Theory, which assumes that autobiographical memory is organized by transitional events that can be selfinitiated or externally imposed - historically defined...

  1. Historic center of Oporto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Gómez-Ferrer

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available At the last General Assembly of the World Heritage Committee, held in Mérida, Mexico, the Historic Centre of Porto was included in the list of World Heritage ensembles. The architect Álvaro Gómez-Ferrer, who presented the report submitted by Porto Municipal Corporation, makes some points about its historic, patrimonial and urbanistic value, putting special emphasis on the legal protection and management of the rehabilitation works

  2. Historic center of Oporto

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Gómez-Ferrer

    1997-01-01

    At the last General Assembly of the World Heritage Committee, held in Mérida, Mexico, the Historic Centre of Porto was included in the list of World Heritage ensembles. The architect Álvaro Gómez-Ferrer, who presented the report submitted by Porto Municipal Corporation, makes some points about its historic, patrimonial and urbanistic value, putting special emphasis on the legal protection and management of the rehabilitation works

  3. Historical Documents Modernization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Miguel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Historical documents are mostly accessible to scholars specialized in the period in which the document originated. In order to increase their accessibility to a broader audience and help in the preservation of the cultural heritage, we propose a method to modernized these documents. This method is based in statistical machine translation, and aims at translating historical documents into a modern version of their original language. We tested this method in two different scenarios, obtaining very encouraging results.

  4. Mayan Historical drought trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Hererra, V.; Mendoza, B. E.; García-Acosta, V.

    2007-05-01

    In this work we present a more objective and general cycle-length determination of catalogues of past drought data for the Yucatan Peninsula between 1502 and 1900 coming from historical written documentation. We use the wavelet transformation based on the Morlet wavelet, and found that the most prominent frequencies of the historical drought series are ~ 3,4, 7, 12, 20, 43 and 70 years. We studied the relation between historical droughts and several large-scale climate phenomena represented by the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). Our results indicate that historical droughts and the cold phase of the AMO coincide, while the influence of the SOI is less clear. The strongest coincidences between historical droughts and AMO occurred around periodicities of 40 yrs. A further study of wavelet coherence shows that there are also common signal along time between droughts and various solar activity phenomena, in particular Be10, a proxy of cosmic rays. Comparing natural terrestrial and solar phenomena, we realize that the most sustained and strongest modulation of historical drought occurrence is at ~ 60-64 yrs and is between droughts and the solar proxy Be10.

  5. Consideration of historical authenticity in heritage tourism planning and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Wiles; Gail Vander Stoep

    2008-01-01

    A review of heritage tourism literature reveals a fundamental tension over the use, function, and degree of authenticity of historic resources used for tourism development. Using a case study approach, this paper explores how stakeholder beliefs regarding historical authenticity influence the heritage tourism products, services, and experiences created for visitors and...

  6. Influencia de la estación y de las especies Phragmites australis y Schoenoplectus californicus en la eliminación de materia orgánica y nutrientes contenidos en aguas servidas durante la operación de puesta en marcha de humedales construidos de flujo horizontal subsuperficial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Rojas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Las plantas de tratamiento de aguas servidas basadas en humedales construidos de flujo horizontal subsuperficial (HSS, logran su etapa de madurez después de dos años de operación. La eficiencia de operación de los sistemas depende de la estacionalidad, tipo de plantas y periodo de madurez del sistema. El objetivo de este trabajo es evaluar la influencia de la estación y de las especies Phragmites australis y Schoenoplectus californicus, en la eficiencia de depuración en materia orgánica y nutrientes de unidades de HSS, durante la etapa operativa de puesta en marcha. Con esta finalidad, se implementaron cuatro unidades de HSS bajo condiciones climáticas mediterráneas australes. Dos unidades fueron plantadas con Phragmites australis y las otras dos, con Schoenoplectus californicus. En este trabajo se presentan los resultados de la etapa de puesta en marcha, que cubre los primeros 193 días de operación. Se evaluó la influencia de la especie de planta y la estación (invierno y primavera, en la eficiencia de depuración de materia orgánica (Demanda Biológica de Oxígeno, DBO5, y Demanda Química de Oxígeno, DQO y nutrientes (nitrógeno (N-NH4+, N-NO3- y NT y fósforo (P-PO4-3 y PT. Las unidades de HSS plantadas con Phragmites australis mostraron mejor adaptación temprana que las unidades de HSS plantadas con Schoenoplectus californicus. Sin embargo, las eficiencias de eliminación fueron similares en todas las unidades. Estacionalmente, se pudo evidenciar una diferencia de eliminación para DQO (invierno: 18 a 30%, primavera: 45 a 55% y NT (invierno: 25 a 65%, primavera: 25 a 35%.

  7. Historical sampling reveals dramatic demographic changes in western gorilla populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guschanski Katerina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today many large mammals live in small, fragmented populations, but it is often unclear whether this subdivision is the result of long-term or recent events. Demographic modeling using genetic data can estimate changes in long-term population sizes while temporal sampling provides a way to compare genetic variation present today with that sampled in the past. In order to better understand the dynamics associated with the divergences of great ape populations, these analytical approaches were applied to western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and in particular to the isolated and Critically Endangered Cross River gorilla subspecies (G. g. diehli. Results We used microsatellite genotypes from museum specimens and contemporary samples of Cross River gorillas to infer both the long-term and recent population history. We find that Cross River gorillas diverged from the ancestral western gorilla population ~17,800 years ago (95% HDI: 760, 63,245 years. However, gene flow ceased only ~420 years ago (95% HDI: 200, 16,256 years, followed by a bottleneck beginning ~320 years ago (95% HDI: 200, 2,825 years that caused a 60-fold decrease in the effective population size of Cross River gorillas. Direct comparison of heterozygosity estimates from museum and contemporary samples suggests a loss of genetic variation over the last 100 years. Conclusions The composite history of western gorillas could plausibly be explained by climatic oscillations inducing environmental changes in western equatorial Africa that would have allowed gorilla populations to expand over time but ultimately isolate the Cross River gorillas, which thereafter exhibited a dramatic population size reduction. The recent decrease in the Cross River population is accordingly most likely attributable to increasing anthropogenic pressure over the last several hundred years. Isolation of diverging populations with prolonged concomitant gene flow, but not secondary admixture, appears to be a typical characteristic of the population histories of African great apes, including gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos.

  8. Historical sampling reveals dramatic demographic changes in western gorilla populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Today many large mammals live in small, fragmented populations, but it is often unclear whether this subdivision is the result of long-term or recent events. Demographic modeling using genetic data can estimate changes in long-term population sizes while temporal sampling provides a way to compare genetic variation present today with that sampled in the past. In order to better understand the dynamics associated with the divergences of great ape populations, these analytical approaches were applied to western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) and in particular to the isolated and Critically Endangered Cross River gorilla subspecies (G. g. diehli). Results We used microsatellite genotypes from museum specimens and contemporary samples of Cross River gorillas to infer both the long-term and recent population history. We find that Cross River gorillas diverged from the ancestral western gorilla population ~17,800 years ago (95% HDI: 760, 63,245 years). However, gene flow ceased only ~420 years ago (95% HDI: 200, 16,256 years), followed by a bottleneck beginning ~320 years ago (95% HDI: 200, 2,825 years) that caused a 60-fold decrease in the effective population size of Cross River gorillas. Direct comparison of heterozygosity estimates from museum and contemporary samples suggests a loss of genetic variation over the last 100 years. Conclusions The composite history of western gorillas could plausibly be explained by climatic oscillations inducing environmental changes in western equatorial Africa that would have allowed gorilla populations to expand over time but ultimately isolate the Cross River gorillas, which thereafter exhibited a dramatic population size reduction. The recent decrease in the Cross River population is accordingly most likely attributable to increasing anthropogenic pressure over the last several hundred years. Isolation of diverging populations with prolonged concomitant gene flow, but not secondary admixture, appears to be a typical characteristic of the population histories of African great apes, including gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos. PMID:21457536

  9. Influencia de la estación y de las especies Phragmites australis y Schoenoplectus californicus en la eliminación de materia orgánica y nutrientes contenidos en aguas servidas durante la operación de puesta en marcha de humedales construidos de flujo horizontal subsuperficial

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Rojas; Ismael Vera; Gladys Vidal

    2013-01-01

    Las plantas de tratamiento de aguas servidas basadas en humedales construidos de flujo horizontal subsuperficial (HSS), logran su etapa de madurez después de dos años de operación. La eficiencia de operación de los sistemas depende de la estacionalidad, tipo de plantas y periodo de madurez del sistema. El objetivo de este trabajo es evaluar la influencia de la estación y de las especies Phragmites australis y Schoenoplectus californicus, en la eficiencia de depuración en materia orgánica y nu...

  10. The Ellipse A Historical and Mathematical Journey

    CERN Document Server

    Mazer, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Explores the development of the ellipse and presents mathematical concepts within a rich, historical context The Ellipse features a unique, narrative approach when presenting the development of this mathematical fixture, revealing its parallels to mankind's advancement from the Counter-Reformation to the Enlightenment. Incorporating illuminating historical background and examples, the author brings together basic concepts from geometry, algebra, trigonometry, and calculus to uncover the ellipse as the shape of a planet's orbit around the sun. The book begins with a discussion that tells the st

  11. Biblical Interpretation Beyond Historicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biblical Interpretation beyond Historicity evaluates the new perspectives that have emerged since the crisis over historicity in the 1970s and 80s in the field of biblical scholarship. Several new studies in the field, as well as the ‘deconstructive’ side of literary criticism that emerged from...... East leads to the need for an evidence-based history of Palestine. This volume analyses the consequences of the question: “If the Bible is not history, what is it then?” The editors, Hjelm and Thompson are members of the Copenhagen School, which was formed in the light of this question...

  12. Fairy image in legends and their historical bases

    OpenAIRE

    Kalbaeva G.

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the artistic role of fairy image in the epical interpretation and its social and historical backgrounds. Ways of artistic perfection in the result of mythological evolution are revealed.

  13. Historical centres: changing definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Lazzarotti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the end of the Second World War, the architectural and planning culture has been showing a fluctuating attention to the theme of historical centres and their enhancement. First of all this uneven progress explains the difficulty to reach a homogeneous definition and this is still lacking. During a long phase of this period, the historical parts of the town were considered as objects to be preserved in an integral way, as urban monuments. This is mostly due to the high symbolic value of these settlements, that represent fundamental landmarks. Identity building and empowerment of local communities are indispensable conditions for any development programme, especially in the case of centres or other historic environments at risk of abandonment. The progressive evolution of this concept brings awareness of the impossibility of separating – either in analytical or in planning terms ­ historical centres from their urban and territorial contexts, which are linked by mutual, deep relationships. This article attempts to retrace the steps signaled by the publication of international documents and conventions, from the Charter of Gubbio (1960 to the Charter of Krakow and the European Landscape Convention (2000; they obviously represent particular points of view, not exhaustive of the richness of the positions in the debate, but extremely significant in terms of diffusion and consensus.

  14. Historicity in development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyra, Maria C. D. P.; Valsiner, Jaan

    2011-01-01

    Human development entails the establishment, widening, and abbreviation of new behavioural and psychological phenomena. This leads to the central role of historicity in developmental science—a look at presently happening events in terms of their constructive borrowing from the past and anticipati...

  15. Fort Monroe Historic Viewsheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    chives in Philadelphia, PA. During these visits, researchers collected ar- chival information such as historic photographs, art work, maps, and ar...John Johns of the Diocese of the Protestant Episcopal Church of Virginia in 1858. The Chapel (Building 166) is a Carpenter Gothic structure expanded

  16. Why Digitise Historical Television?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, John

    2012-01-01

    abstractDigitisation of historic TV material is driven by the widespread perception that archival material should be made available to diverse users. Yet digitisation alters the material, taking away any lingering sense of presence. Digitisation and online access, however, offer startling new

  17. Historical dictionary of librarianship

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The Historical Dictionary of Librarianship focuses on librarianship as a modern, organized profession, emphasizing the period beginning in the mid-nineteenth century. Author Mary Ellen Quinn relates the history of this profession through a chronology, an introductory essay, appendixes, and an extensive bibliography.

  18. Lagos Historical Review: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submissions can be made by sending a word processing computer file in MS Word format by e-mail to sarlek@yahoo.com, or by mailing three paper copies to the Editorial Office. Authors should keep a computer file version of their manuscript, as Lagos Historical Review will require a disk version upon acceptance for ...

  19. ICT and historical skills

    OpenAIRE

    De Keyser, Raphael; Rogiers, Kathleen; Truyen, Fred

    2008-01-01

    The rapidly changing present-day information society creates new needs and opportunities for the history teacher. He can help young people to develop the skills necessary for life-long learning. The heuristic methods and the critical analyses of texts (written texts but also images, moving pictures etc.) characteristic for the historical discipline are easy transferable to other domains of knowledge acquisition. The use of information and communication technology in history instruction can he...

  20. Why Digitise Historical Television?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ellis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Digitisation of historic TV material is driven by the widespread perception that archival material should be made available to diverse users. Yet digitisation alters the material, taking away any lingering sense of presence. Digitisation and online access, however, offer startling new possibilities. The article offers three: use of material in language teaching and learning; use in dementia therapy; and applications as data in medical research. All depend on ordinary TV for their effectivity.

  1. Historical Variable Star Catalogs

    OpenAIRE

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Graur, Or; Murray, Zachary; Kruk, Julia; Christie-Dervaux, Lucien; Chen, Dong Yi

    2015-01-01

    Slides from my talk during one of the Historical Astronomy Division sessions at AAS 225 in Seattle, WA (January 2015). A brief history of the variable star catalogs Henrietta Swan Leavitt and Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin assembled at Harvard, and the update to them that some of our students at AMNH have done.(Figshare only previews the first few slides. Download the PDF to see all of them!)

  2. The Historical Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Green, D.A.; F. R. Stephenson

    2003-01-01

    The available historical records of supernovae occurring in our own Galaxy over the past two thousand years are reviewed. These accounts include the well-recorded supernovae of AD 1604 (Kepler's SN), 1572 (Tycho's SN), 1181, 1054 (which produced the Crab Nebula) and 1006, together with less certain events dating back to AD 185. In the case of the supernovae of AD 1604 and 1572 it is European records that provide the most accurate information available, whereas for earlier supernovae records a...

  3. APFO Historical Availability of Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The APFO Historical Availability ArcGIS Online web map provides an easy to use reference of what historical imagery is available by county from the Aerial...

  4. Colorado statewide historic bridge inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the Colorado statewide historic bridge inventory was to document and evaluate the National : Register of Historic Places eligibility all on-system highway bridges and grade separation structures built in : Colorado between 1959 and 196...

  5. The Historical Justification of Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, Matti

    2008-01-01

    The article deals with various aspects of justifying music historically. In Matti Huttunen's opinion Western music culture has been strongly historical since the nineteenth century. The article attempts to elucidate the historical nature of music, as well as the canon of music, the selective nature of music history, and the influence of aesthetic…

  6. Retrieving Historical Electrorefining Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Meagan Daniella [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-18

    Pyrochemical Operations began at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) during 1962 (1). Electrorefining (ER) has been implemented as a routine process since the 1980’s. The process data that went through the ER operation was recorded but had never been logged in an online database. Without a database new staff members are hindered in their work by the lack of information. To combat the issue a database in Access was created to collect the historical data. The years from 2000 onward were entered and queries were created to analyze trends. These trends will aid engineering and operations staff to reach optimal performance for the startup of the new lines.

  7. Expiration of Historical Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toman, David

    2001-01-01

    We present a technique for automatic expiration of data in a historical data warehouse that preserves answers to a known and fixed set of first-order queries. In addition, we show that for queries with output size bounded by a function of the active data domain size (the number of values that have...... ever appeared in the warehouse), the size of the portion of the data warehouse history needed to answer the queries is also bounded by a function of the active data do-main size and therefore does not depend on the age of the warehouse (the length of the history)....

  8. Einstein: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormos-Buchwald, Diana

    2015-04-01

    In late 1915, Albert Einstein (1879-1955) completed as series of papers on a generalized theory of gravitation that were to constitute a major conceptual change in the history of modern physics and the crowning achievement of his scientific career. But this accomplishment came after a decade of intense intellectual struggle and was received with muted enthusiasm. Einstein's previously unpublished writings and massive correspondence, edited by the Einstein Papers Project, provide vivid insights into the historical, personal, and scientific context of the formulation, completion, and reception of GR during the first decades of the 20th century.

  9. Historical Slovenian Language Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Erjavec

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXTENDED ABSTRACT:The paper presents three language resources enabling better full-text access to digitised printed historical Slovenian texts: a hand-annotated corpus, a hand-annotated lexicon of historical words and a collection of transcribed texts. The aim of the resources is twofold: on one hand they support empirical linguistic research (corpus, collection and represent a reference tool for the research of historical Slovenian (lexicon while on the other hand they may serve as training data for the development of Human Language Technologies enabling better full-text search in digital libraries containing Slovenian written cultural heritage, modernisation of historical texts, and the development of better technological solutions for text recognition and scanning. The hand annotated corpus of historical Slovenian contains the text from 1,000 pages sampled from the years 1750 to 1900, two texts date to the end of the 16th or 17th century. The corpus contains a little more than 250,000 word tokens; each of them being annotated with hand validated linguistic features: modernised form, lemma or base form, and morhpo-syntactic description. Thus the word token »ajfram« is annotated with the normalised form »ajfrom«, by the lemma »ajfer« and morphosyntactic description »Som« or »Samostalnik« (noun, »občni« (common, »moški« (masculine and a modernised form »gorečnost« (fervour. At first the corpus was annotated automatically and then manually verified and corrected. The lexicon was created automatically from the hand-annotated corpus. It contains only attested word-forms and examples of use. The word-forms are ordered under their modern equivalents. All the modern forms of a particular word constitute a dictionary entry, defined by its lemma with conjoint information i.e. the morpho-syntactic description and the closest contemporary synonyms. Thus the entry »ajfrer/Som/gorečnost« is annotated by two modernised words »ajfra

  10. Critique of historical reason

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Richardson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available El enfoque aquí desarrollado presupone una nueva visión del mundo civilizado (Weltanschauungen. La idea del historiador de los hechos históricos presupone una visión global del mundo, a excepción de las sociedades que carecen de un lenguaje escrito. Por eso, la razón histórica discutida aquí se limita al tipo de historia que trata de civilizaciones más elevadas. El análisis de visiones del mundo aquí utilizado presupone que los símbolos son muy importantes y que pierden su poder simbólico si se cristalizan en un único sentido. Como en la teoría de Jung, un símbolo tiene la capacidad de estar activo en la mente como un transformador de la conciencia, libre de asociarse con nuevas experiencias y pensamientos. Esta teoría presta especial atención al problema de Dilthey: es decir, el problema de la calidad racional de los hechos históricos. Las visiones del mundo, que dan un significado profundo a muchos hechos históricos, se componen de símbolos y metáforas, incluyendo ideas, imágenes, valores y emociones. Estos tipos de visiones son casi todos instintivos. Es cierto que los historiadores pueden haber formulado, consciente definiciones de estos tipos de visiones del mundo así como ocurrió por las civilizaciones griega y china. Dado que la actual Weltbilt es mucho más compleja e inconsciente, se necesita algo más que una definición lógica para entenderla. Este artículo indica la forma en que puede ser alcanzada una comprensión racional de estas visiones del mundo._____________ABSTRACT:The approach here entertained presupposes a fresh theory of world pictures (Weltanschauungen of higher civilizations. For the historian's idea of historical facts presupposes a world picture, except for societies which lack a written language. That is why the historical reason discussed here is limited to the kind of history which deals with higher civilizations. The analysis of world pictures used here itself presupposes that symbols are

  11. Basavarajeeyam: A historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishteswar, K

    2011-10-01

    Basavarajeeyam is an important handbook for an Ayurvedic physician of Andhra region. It is a bilingual work and the content was presented in Sanskrit and Telugu languages. With regard to the place and date of Basavarajeeyam there is no common opinion among the present day scholars. Pt Govardhana Sharma Changani in his introduction to the Sanskrit version of Basavarajeeyam exposed a historical profile of Basavrajeeyam picturising him as Basava who was a staunch follower of Veerashaivism and a contemporary of king Bijjala (end of 12(th) cent. AD). The same statement is carried out in the works of Ayurvedic Itihasa written by Atredeva Vidyawalkan and Acharya Priyavrata Sharma. It appears that the historical evidence shown by these scholars is one sided and cannot stand any reason. Basavraju stated that he had started writing this work after a thorough study of many works such as Charaka, Nithyanatheeyam (1360 AD), Revenakalpam, Pujyapadiyam, Bahatam, Kashikhandam (1435 AD) etc. Basavraju has faithfully reproduced certain chapter of Vaidyachintamani, which is considered to be a work of 15(th) century. Basavraju not only mentioned Phirangiroga in the index of diseases described by him at the end of the book, but also indicated Phirangichekka (Madhusnuhi) in the management of Meharoga and Granthi. By this evidence Basavarajiyam should be considered as the work of post Bhavaprakasha period. Basavraju indicates in the Gulmaroga Chikitsa that Sankhadravaka should be administered in the dose of 'Ekanni'. The name Ekanni was given for a copper coin which came in to circulation of money during British India produced from Madras mint (1794 AD). Based on these internal evidences, it can be safely concluded that Basavraju belong to 18(th)century.

  12. Historic Preservation Information CFM Website

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA Historic Preservation Office keeps information about VA's programs to comply with Federal preservation requirements, and also interesting information about VA...

  13. Mapping historians: historians' orientations and historical production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Muszynski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Narrative historians have long exhibited greater or lesser awareness of their own agency as authors, where absolute objectivity is precluded. Indeed, historians' reports of the past include their own orientations or attitudes, which can also be examined in historians' autobiographies. In this article we present a study in which a questionnaire was used to ask historians about their orientations toward their subject matter. How do historians approach their work as agents and what might this reveal about the nature of historical production? In our model, we have distinguished four criteria, sorted the answers using statistical analysis and weighed the results in the light of our expectations. Indeed, by exploring historians' presuppositions (exemplified in examining historians' autobiographies, historical production can be seen as an institutional process also steered by historians' orientations and agency with important philosophical implications for the integral relationship between historians' public and private roles.

  14. Historicity and theology, and the quest for historical Jesus1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Geyser

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of history and historicity is reviewed in this article. The efforts of New Historicism is brought to bear on this question in an effort to find a way out of the impasse created by the modernist demand for objectivity and the postmodern resignation to radical relativism. The possibility of historiography is explored in conjunction with the pragmatic approach and leads to the conclusion that a kind of historical knowledge is attainable which can be described as useful even if not perfect. The author concurs with Crossan and his working definition of history as the past reconstructed interactively by the present through argued evidence in public discourse. The intersubjective nature of any historical enterprise leads the author to the conclusion that the search for the historical Jesus can only be done in the dialectical approach of a both ... and: both the historical Jesus and the kerygmatic Christ

  15. A Model of Historical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, Peter

    2017-01-01

    "Historical thinking" has a central role in the theory and practice of history education. At a minimum, history educators must work with a model of historical thinking if they are to formulate potential progression in students' advance through a school history curriculum, test that progression empirically, and shape instructional…

  16. What is Linked Historical Data?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meroño-Peñuela, A.; Hoekstra, R.; Janowicz, K.; Schlobach, S.; Lambrix, P.; Hyvönen, E.

    2014-01-01

    Datasets that represent historical sources are relative newcomers in the Linked Open Data (LOD) cloud. Following the standard LOD practices for publishing historical sources raises several questions: how can we distinguish between RDF graphs of primary and secondary sources? Should we treat archived

  17. What Is Linked Historical Data?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meroño-Peñuela, Albert; Hoekstra, Rinke; Janowicz, Krzysztof; Schlobach, Stefan; Lambrix, Patrick; Hyvönen, Eero

    2014-01-01

    Datasets that represent historical sources are relative new- comers in the Linked Open Data (LOD) cloud. Following the standard LOD practices for publishing historical sources raises several questions: how can we distinguish between RDF graphs of primary and secondary sources? Should we treat

  18. The Return of Historical Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycik, Mary Taylor; Rosler, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Recently, historical fiction has begun to dominate major children's book awards. This article describes the values of using high-quality historical fiction in the classroom and presents different ways to respond to this genre including using modern technology. Two tables, one of picture books and one of novels, with paired nonfiction texts, are…

  19. Lagos Historical Review: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Lagos Historical Review is an international and interdisciplinary journal publishing papers with a historical focus. The journal generates and participates in debates to advance the discipline of history and promote its relevance to development. The journal aims to serve the academic community with a bias towards ...

  20. READING THE PSALMS HISTORICALLY. ANTIOCHENE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HISTORICALLY. ANTIOCHENE. EXEGESIS AND A HISTORICAL. READING Of PSALM 46. ABSTRACT. The Antiochene exegetes, most notably Diodore of Tarsus and Theodore of Mopsuestia read the ..... tation is often informed by the heading. In 2001 .... that it was given to them for meditation and performance. As Hill ...

  1. HISTORICAL ASPECTS OF PHALLOPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Kyzlasov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of the penis in transgender operations, amputation of the penis, congenital deformities and anomalies of the penis was and remains today an important issue in plastic surgery of the urogenital region. The only method to restore the penis is phalloplasty. In general, over the past decades, generations of clinicians have different ways and flaps for total fallouretheral reconstruction. Thus was formulated the characteristics of an ideal flap for the formation of neophallos, which should be safe, sensitive, without hair, and with long leg. However, despite the fact that the characteristics of a perfect flap, nowadays there is no “gold standard” in the formation of neophallos, as phalloplasty is a fairly complicated surgery, and the choice of method depends on many factors. The choice of methodology is determined by the plastics surgeon and to each patient is individual, depends on the etiology of the disease and the possibility of choosing the form of the donor’s transplant. This article presents a literature review devoted to the historical aspects of phalloplasty. In the article, in chronological order reflected the evolution of the different forming methods neofallos, phallourethrоplasty, describes their advantages and disadvantages.

  2. Scientific and historical archive

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    : International Archives Day, 9 June, is an opportunity to discover a little-known CERN resource. Unlike libraries, archives tend to be hidden away. You can’t browse among the shelves, or borrow files to use in the workplace, but sometimes they contain just the information you need. CERN’s rich heritage has many parts: its scientific data, the black and white photos recently put online by the Library, the audio-visual collection, currently being digitized by the IT department, historic objects in the care of the IR-ECO group, and much more - not least the memory of its people. The CERN Archive exists in the background, supporting other endeavours and preserving our documentary heritage for future generations. About 1000 shelf metres of files filled with letters, notes, reports, rough drafts, memos such as this report, by Miss Steel, are preserved. You can browse more examples on our timeline. It is a place for information on all aspects of CERN’s history. Sometimes documents pro

  3. The HISTMAG database: combining historical, archaeomagnetic and volcanic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneitz, Patrick; Leonhardt, Roman; Schnepp, Elisabeth; Heilig, Balázs; Mayrhofer, Franziska; Kovacs, Peter; Hejda, Pavel; Valach, Fridrich; Vadasz, Gergely; Hammerl, Christa; Egli, Ramon; Fabian, Karl; Kompein, Niko

    2017-09-01

    Records of the past geomagnetic field can be divided into two main categories. These are instrumental historical observations on the one hand, and field estimates based on the magnetization acquired by rocks, sediments and archaeological artefacts on the other hand. In this paper, a new database combining historical, archaeomagnetic and volcanic records is presented. HISTMAG is a relational database, implemented in MySQL, and can be accessed via a web-based interface (http://www.conrad-observatory.at/zamg/index.php/data-en/histmag-database). It combines available global historical data compilations covering the last ∼500 yr as well as archaeomagnetic and volcanic data collections from the last 50 000 yr. Furthermore, new historical and archaeomagnetic records, mainly from central Europe, have been acquired. In total, 190 427 records are currently available in the HISTMAG database, whereby the majority is related to historical declination measurements (155 525). The original database structure was complemented by new fields, which allow for a detailed description of the different data types. A user-comment function provides the possibility for a scientific discussion about individual records. Therefore, HISTMAG database supports thorough reliability and uncertainty assessments of the widely different data sets, which are an essential basis for geomagnetic field reconstructions. A database analysis revealed systematic offset for declination records derived from compass roses on historical geographical maps through comparison with other historical records, while maps created for mining activities represent a reliable source.

  4. "Confused by Multiple Deities, Ancient Egyptians Embraced Monotheism": Analysing Historical Thinking and Inclusion in Egyptian History Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Ehaab D.

    2016-01-01

    Egyptian history textbooks are examined through the prism of historical thinking dimensions and skills, utilizing a critical discourse analysis. The analysis focuses on how the textbooks portray two historically significant events: the advent of Christianity (ca. 33 CE) and Islam (ca. 641 CE) to Egypt. It reveals that the historical narrative…

  5. FEMA Historical Disaster Declarations - shp

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Historical Disaster Declarations provides geospatial view to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (referred to as the Stafford Act...

  6. Historical and Documentary Data Sets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past climate and environment from historical references and documentary evidence such as church records, harvest dates, and diaries. Parameter keywords...

  7. GDOT historic landscape mitigation evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-29

    Historic Landscapes are our nations finger prints of the past. They provide us a glimpse into the way people worked, lived, and admired : the land. As the earths population continues to grow, so does the need for infrastructure improvements suc...

  8. Historical sources and watershed evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stanley W. Trimble

    2012-01-01

    Historical data, including structures, documents, photographs and eyewitness reports, allow changes in some drainage basins to be documented in fine detail over time periods ranging from a few days to several decades...

  9. 2nd Historic Mortars Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, John; Groot, Caspar; Historic Mortars : Characterisation, Assessment and Repair

    2012-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues connected with mortars on historic structures. The book is divided into four sections: Characterisation of Historic Mortars, Repair Mortars and Design Issues, Experimental Research into Properties of Repair Mortars, and Assessment and Testing. The papers present the latest work of researchers in their field. The individual contributions were selected from the contributions to the 2nd Historic Mortars Conference, which took place in Prague, September, 22-24, 2010. All papers were reviewed and improved as necessary before publication. This peer review process by the editors resulted in the 34 individual contributions included in here. One extra paper reviewing and summarising State-of-the-Art knowledge covered by this publication was added as a starting and navigational point for the reader. The editors believe that having these papers in print is important and they hope that it will stimulate further research into historic mortars and related subjects. 

  10. Feminism and nursing: historical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, S; Campbell, J C

    1990-07-01

    Feminists have often criticized nursing for lack of commitment to women's movements. This article addresses the contradictions and conflicts in the relationship of feminism and nursing from a historical perspective. Different feminist epistemologies, those of enlightened liberal, cultural, and radical feminism, are examined historically and their relevance to nursing is discussed. A reflexive theory, proposed by Harding, is used to conceptualize the differing responses, feminist and nonfeminist, of women and nurses, as alternative reactions to the many types of patriarchy they have encountered.

  11. The revival and preservation of historical memory: national and regional aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Svitlenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the urgency of the problems of revitalization and preservation of historical memory in the national and regional contexts at different stages of the past and in the present. It is shown that the historical memory of our region, like most other regions of the country, reflected the five main periods, in particular Russian, Cossack, Imperial, Soviet, modern Ukrainian. Noted that the heterogeneity of the historical memory caused rather substantial differences in the individual and collective media, despite the fact that the inhabitants of the region were a territorial community which were distinguishable features: social, ethnic, political, religious, linguistic, cultural, professional, age, sex, etc. are Focused on those key features, which caused quite stable signs of historical memory inherent in our region in different historical periods. Value is defined revival and preservation of historical memory in the development of modern national identity, the modern historical consciousness and thinking.

  12. Sustainable technologies, Aesthetics and diffusion; a historical perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, Wouter

    2017-01-01

    This paper reflects on the diffusion of sustainable technologies in comparison with other successful technologies from a design history perspective. Historic case studies of three successful technologies (the automobile, the television, and the personal computer) revealed that there is a strong

  13. Theories of the Middle Range in Historical Studies of Writing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazerman, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Recent historical examinations of nonliterary, nontheoretical texts within their activity settings have aimed to identify the historically developed communicative and rhetorical resources currently available to writers and to reveal the dynamics of the formation, use, and evolution of those resources. These studies, in examining communal literate…

  14. Historical narrative and wisdom. Towards preaching Esther “for such ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article considers the problem of preaching OT historical narrative from the point of view of the depiction of God's participation in the drama. It suggests that historical narrative in general depicts a God who reveals himself infrequently, that his presence is normally veiled, and that the reader often has more information ...

  15. Historical Dictionaries and Card Assembly as the Sources of Semanticisms of Slavonicisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Жанар Кабдыляшымовна Киынова

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present the lexicographical description of Slavonicisms. In the examples are excerpts from these historical dictionaries and cards of the ancient/old Russian dictionary, author that reveal historical-cultural information which are enclosed in the semantics of Slavonicisms.

  16. Historical earthquake research in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerl, Christa

    2017-12-01

    Austria has a moderate seismicity, and on average the population feels 40 earthquakes per year or approximately three earthquakes per month. A severe earthquake with light building damage is expected roughly every 2 to 3 years in Austria. Severe damage to buildings ( I 0 > 8° EMS) occurs significantly less frequently, the average period of recurrence is about 75 years. For this reason the historical earthquake research has been of special importance in Austria. The interest in historical earthquakes in the past in the Austro-Hungarian Empire is outlined, beginning with an initiative of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the development of historical earthquake research as an independent research field after the 1978 "Zwentendorf plebiscite" on whether the nuclear power plant will start up. The applied methods are introduced briefly along with the most important studies and last but not least as an example of a recently carried out case study, one of the strongest past earthquakes in Austria, the earthquake of 17 July 1670, is presented. The research into historical earthquakes in Austria concentrates on seismic events of the pre-instrumental period. The investigations are not only of historical interest, but also contribute to the completeness and correctness of the Austrian earthquake catalogue, which is the basis for seismic hazard analysis and as such benefits the public, communities, civil engineers, architects, civil protection, and many others.

  17. “FEATRON OR HISTORICAL SHAME” W. STRATEMANA – MEMO BOOK CYRILLIC PRINTING: HISTORICAL AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Ю. Соколов

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author offers a historical and bibliographic analysis Cyrillic edition works of the German Protestant Bishop William Stratemanna "Featron or historical Shame" (SPb.: typography Alexander Nevsky Monastery, 1724 against the background of the Russian literary culture, historical thought and publishing the first quarter of XVIII c. The study revealed that the publication of secular books, in particular, historical themes, in Russia during this period was the state character and largely depended on the reform efforts of Peter I, who initiated the civil publishing, publishing repertoire, organization of translation and the formation of a secular book culture in general. It was found that the main goal of a secular publishing was the dissemination of ideas of education, science and education, the formation of readers' needs, in particular with regard to the book of historical subjects. Stated that the theme of historical publications in the study period was determined by socio-political factors, public policy, as well as increased attention to the achievements of Western historical thought. The article defines the main directions of development of Russian historical thought, as well as the thematic repertoire of publications on the history of the industry in the context of the formation of printing. The characteristic features of the development of Western Protestant and Catholic historiography XVI-XVII centuries. The analysis found that due to the socio-economic and cultural reforms, with the development of education and science, the need for a secular book, in particular historical themes have evolved relatively slowly. The demand for scientific, educational, industrial and secular book as a whole lagged behind the proposal, which is artificially supported by the state. Study of sources and scientific material allowed to disclose the value of the product W. Stratemanna - as the first Russian edition of the textbook on world

  18. Historical earthquake investigations in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Makropoulos

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The active tectonics of the area of Greece and its seismic activity have always been present in the country?s history. Many researchers, tempted to work on Greek historical earthquakes, have realized that this is a task not easily fulfilled. The existing catalogues of strong historical earthquakes are useful tools to perform general SHA studies. However, a variety of supporting datasets, non-uniformly distributed in space and time, need to be further investigated. In the present paper, a review of historical earthquake studies in Greece is attempted. The seismic history of the country is divided into four main periods. In each one of them, characteristic examples, studies and approaches are presented.

  19. Systematic musicology meets historical musicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Chr.

    , however, a post-hoc hypothesis (VanHandel, 2005), and since we cannot perform controlled experiments on historical data, replication with more sensitive methods and new repertoires is required. Turning to French music, we hypothesise both an initial increase and a subsequent decrease in nPVI, based......PVI while stress-timed languages like German have higher nPVI. Recent analyses of historical developments have ascribed linearly increasing nPVI in Austro-German, but not Italian music to waning Italian and increasing German influence on Austro-German music after the Baroque (Daniele & Patel, 2013). This is...... and investigating the advantage of more sophisticated analytical strategies to detect non-linear historical developments. Methods. Mean nPVIs were computed for 34 French composers (midpoint years: 1700-1941); previous data (Daniele & Patel, 2013) were available for 21 Austro-German (1672-1929) and 15 Italian...

  20. Real Analysis A Historical Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Stahl, Saul

    2011-01-01

    A provocative look at the tools and history of real analysis This new edition of Real Analysis: A Historical Approach continues to serve as an interesting read for students of analysis. Combining historical coverage with a superb introductory treatment, this book helps readers easily make the transition from concrete to abstract ideas. The book begins with an exciting sampling of classic and famous problems first posed by some of the greatest mathematicians of all time. Archimedes, Fermat, Newton, and Euler are each summoned in turn, illuminating the utility of infinite, power, and trigonome

  1. Cultural-Historical Psychology of L.S. Vygotsky: Exploring the Logic of Multidimensionality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klochko Vitaliy Y

    2010-01-01

      Cultural-historical theory of LS. Vygotsky is viewed in the paper through the prism of tendencies of psychology development, which are revealed by the trans-spective analysis understood as a tool of cognition of regularities...

  2. Exploring historical trends using taxonomic name metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Indra Neil; Schenk, Ryan; Norton, Catherine N

    2008-05-13

    Authority and year information have been attached to taxonomic names since Linnaean times. The systematic structure of taxonomic nomenclature facilitates the ability to develop tools that can be used to explore historical trends that may be associated with taxonomy. From the over 10.7 million taxonomic names that are part of the uBio system 4, approximately 3 million names were identified to have taxonomic authority information from the years 1750 to 2004. A pipe-delimited file was then generated, organized according to a Linnaean hierarchy and by years from 1750 to 2004, and imported into an Excel workbook. A series of macros were developed to create an Excel-based tool and a complementary Web site to explore the taxonomic data. A cursory and speculative analysis of the data reveals observable trends that may be attributable to significant events that are of both taxonomic (e.g., publishing of key monographs) and societal importance (e.g., world wars). The findings also help quantify the number of taxonomic descriptions that may be made available through digitization initiatives. Temporal organization of taxonomic data can be used to identify interesting biological epochs relative to historically significant events and ongoing efforts. We have developed an Excel workbook and complementary Web site that enables one to explore taxonomic trends for Linnaean taxonomic groupings, from Kingdoms to Families.

  3. Exploring historical trends using taxonomic name metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schenk Ryan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Authority and year information have been attached to taxonomic names since Linnaean times. The systematic structure of taxonomic nomenclature facilitates the ability to develop tools that can be used to explore historical trends that may be associated with taxonomy. Results From the over 10.7 million taxonomic names that are part of the uBio system 4, approximately 3 million names were identified to have taxonomic authority information from the years 1750 to 2004. A pipe-delimited file was then generated, organized according to a Linnaean hierarchy and by years from 1750 to 2004, and imported into an Excel workbook. A series of macros were developed to create an Excel-based tool and a complementary Web site to explore the taxonomic data. A cursory and speculative analysis of the data reveals observable trends that may be attributable to significant events that are of both taxonomic (e.g., publishing of key monographs and societal importance (e.g., world wars. The findings also help quantify the number of taxonomic descriptions that may be made available through digitization initiatives. Conclusion Temporal organization of taxonomic data can be used to identify interesting biological epochs relative to historically significant events and ongoing efforts. We have developed an Excel workbook and complementary Web site that enables one to explore taxonomic trends for Linnaean taxonomic groupings, from Kingdoms to Families.

  4. Vesicoureteral reflux: A historical perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    K.N. DeCotiis

    2016-12-28

    Dec 28, 2016 ... Vesicoureteral reflux: A historical perspective. K.N. DeCotiisa,∗. , F.J. Pennab, M.A. Koylec, A.A. Caldamonea a The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 2 Dudley Street, Suite 174, Providence, RI 02905, USA b Dartmouth | Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, ...

  5. Collaborative Action Research: Historical Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulyan, Lisa

    This paper presents a historical overview of the use of action research in education and describes the basic assumptions and expectations that continue to characterize collaborative research projects today. Action research was initiated in the 1930's by Kurt Lewin and adapted by educators in the 1940's. Interest in action research declined between…

  6. Fort Monroe Historic Image Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Figure 308: Mural in Coast Artillery Board Building, 1940 (NARA RG 111-SC Box 9 117168). .......................... 157 Figure 309: Mural in Coast...Artillery Board Building, 1940 (NARA RG 111-SC Box 9 117167). .......................... 158 Figure 310: Mural in Coast Artillery Board Building, 1940...Archives in Philadelphia, PA. During these visits researchers collected archival information such as historic photo- graphs, art work, maps, and

  7. A Historical Profile of the Higgs Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John; Gaillard, Mary K.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2012-01-31

    The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964, and phenomenological studies of its possible production and decays started in the early 1970s, followed by studies of its possible productionin e{sup +} e{sup -}, {anti p}p and pp collisions, in particular. Until recently, the most sensitive searches for the Higgs boson were at LEP between 1989 and 2000, which have been complemented bysearches at the Fermilab Tevatron. The LHC has recently entered the hunt, excluding a Higgs boson over a large range of masses and revealing a tantalizing hint in the range 119 to125 GeV, and there are good prospects that the existence or otherwise of the Higgs boson will soon be established. One of the most attractive possibilities is that the Higgs bosonis accompanied by supersymmetry, though composite options have yet to be excluded. This article reviews some of the key historical developments in Higgs physics over the past half-century.

  8. Leadership in British nursing: a historical dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzon, M; Bryant, J

    1997-09-01

    A historical overview of nurse leadership in the late 19th and late 20th centuries is presented, supported by relevant material from the literature. The 19th century material revealed the following main themes: emphasis on practical and domestic aspects of management; prominent input of religious ideals and social conscience and, autocratic and feminized style of leadership. The main themes in the contemporary literature examined were: role models in history, dysfunctional leadership styles, importance of knowledge, gender as an influencing factor on nurse leadership and threats to the autonomy of nurse leaders. It was concluded that formal nurse professionalization has progressed steadily during the past hundred years with associated evolution of nurse leaders to fit in with contemporary needs. It is hoped that future policies for nursing will encourage decision-making nearer the 'bed-side', more resource-driven care and value-based leadership.

  9. [Historic malignant tumour: 27 observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparsa, A; Doffoel-Hantz, V; Durox, H; Gaston, J; Delage-Core, M; Bédane, C; Labrousse, F; Sannajust, J P; Bonnetblanc, J-M

    2012-03-01

    When used in the French medical literature to describe a pathological state, the word "historic" normally refers to tumours of startling appearance because of their size. It is difficult to understand how a patient can allow such tumours to continue to grow. We attempt to define this concept. Two dermatologists carried out a retrospective, independent and comparative selection of photographs taken between 1978 and 2008 of malignant cutaneous tumours of unusual size given the histological diagnosis. Socio-professional, demographic, clinical, histological psychological data, and details of treatment history and progress were collected. Twenty-seven patients (11 M, 16 F) of mean age 74 years (34-99 years) presented a "historic" tumour. Twelve patients lived in rural regions. Five patients were company executives. The average duration of development of the "historic" tumours was 4.5 years (6-420 months). The tumours were classed histologically as epidermoid carcinomas (nine) and melanomas (seven). The mean size was 13 cm (6-30 cm). Psychiatric problems, membership of sects or dementia were noted for 13 patients. Treatment consisted of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or, less frequently, surgery. Eighteen patients died on average 13 months after diagnosis. "Historic" malignant tumour (also described in the literature as "giant" tumour) is a real-life fact. No studies have been made of a series of such patients. Despite histological diagnosis, the size was associated with slow tumoral progress and/or late treatment, chiefly accounted for by psychiatric disorders. Socio-professional data indicate that "historic" tumours are equally common in urban and rural areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Information field for historical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sviatets, Yu. A.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the main information collision of historical knowledge, which consists in physical inaccessibility of events and phenomena of the past as an object of historical science for a historian as an investigator. The aim of the research is to formulate and discuss a working hypothesis about the information field of historical science. The article provides an analytical background on the main ideas and approaches in the field of modern information field theory. The author carries out the projection of the main provisions of the information field theory on historical research. It is shown that the information field is a really existing information carrier that provides its acquisition, transportation, storage and visualization, as well as provides information and knowledge recorded in various forms, realizes cultural communications. One of the manifestations of such a culture is the sign systems, which determine certain contexts. Signs are characterized by polysemy. Despite artificial origin, semiotic reality is objective. Simultaneously, signs provide intellectual activity of people. Mental signs in the historical process of use by society acquire additional meanings, generating new symbols. Polysemy shapes the problem of epistemological uncertainty of two stages – identifying the problem and solving it. Historians as researchers resort to cognitive models, which, thanks to the translational function, ensure the transfer of information from the known to the unknown. One of the explanations of polysemy is the theory of conceptual integration, according to which the structures of the original mental spaces are projected onto a new, constructed, mental space – blend. This is the result of a personʼs intellectual ability to create new meanings on the basis of the available ones. Since signs and symbols are multi-valued, they form a multiplicity of retrospective scenarios of historical research at the stage of problem formulation

  11. Historical Tensions in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew; Heymann, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Ever since institutions for educating engineers first began to be ­established in Europe, there have been a number of fundamental tensions as to how that ­educating should best be conducted, what it should consist of, and who should do the educating. These tensions are based on different styles...... or approaches to ­engineering education that have developed historically in different parts of Europe and which have led to what we characterize as “theory-driven,” “practice-driven,” and “technology-driven” approaches. This chapter explores some of the historical roots of these tensions in medieval Europe...... and briefly traces their developmental trajectories through the subsequent formation of institutions of engineering ­education. It has been written as part of PROCEED (Program of Research on Opportunities and Challenges in Engineering Education in Denmark)....

  12. Statics of historic masonry constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments of its architectural heritage. Given the age of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant; still within the broad studies in the subject it is not yet recognised, in particular within the seismic area, a unitary approach to deal with Masonry structures. This successful book contributes to clarify the issues with a rigorous approach offering a comprehensive new Statics of Masonry Constructions. This third edition has been driven by some recent developments of the research in the field, and it gives the fundamentals of Statics with an original and rigorous mathematical formulation, further in-depth inquired in this new version. With many refinements and improvements, the book investigates the static behaviour of many historic monuments, such as the Gothic Cathedrals, the Mycenaean Tholoi, the Pantheon, the Colosseum, the dome...

  13. Statics of Historic Masonry Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments in its architectural heritage. Given the age of much of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant. This book aims to help fill this demand presenting a comprehensive new statics of masonry constructions. The book, result of thirty years of research and professional experience, gives the fundamentals of statics of the masonry solid, then applied to the study of statics of arches, piers and vaults. Further, combining engineering and architecture and through an interdisciplinary approach, the book investigates the statical behaviour of many historic monuments, as the Pantheon, the Colosseum,  the domes of S. Maria del Fiore in Florence and of St. Peter in Rome, the Tower of Pisa, the Gothic Cathedrals and the Masonry Buildings under seismic actions.

  14. Historical Development of Origins Research

    OpenAIRE

    Lazcano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Following the publication of the Origin of Species in 1859, many naturalists adopted the idea that living organisms were the historical outcome of gradual transformation of lifeless matter. These views soon merged with the developments of biochemistry and cell biology and led to proposals in which the origin of protoplasm was equated with the origin of life. The heterotrophic origin of life proposed by Oparin and Haldane in the 1920s was part of this tradition, which Oparin enriched by transf...

  15. Psychoanalytic Schools in Historical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Yuzuru

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the historical evolution of major psychoanalytic schools. Because Sigmund Freud founded psychoanalysis, we start with the description of the Freudian model. Freud proposed his libido theory as an answer to the fundamental question in psychology, i.e. "What drives the human mind?" Many of the psychoanalytic schools came into existence from criticism of Freud's libido theory. Although they all disagree with the libido theory in one way or another, each school formulated a ...

  16. Japan 2006 in historical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Tanaka Nishishima

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Readings of the current Japanese politics with the historic and social insight through analysis of four facts registered in 2006: the visit of the prime minister Koizumi to the Yasukuni shrine; the election of Abe Shinzo as the president of Liberal Democratic Party and the formation of Abe cabinet; the Atomic bomb experimentation by the North Corea; the publication of the book of feminist counteroffensive against the numerous rightist conservative harassment.

  17. Historical Medical Value of Donguibogam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Keun Song

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Oriental medicine, since its origin in China, has had a long history extending over 2000 years. Today, it comprises several types of medicine predominately practiced in East Asia, including traditional Chinese, traditional Korean, and Kampo medicine. The distinctive medical system of traditional Korean medicine was established shortly after the publication of Donguibogam by Dr. Heo Jun in 1613. Donguibogam is highly acclaimed across East Asia; in 2009, in light of its historical medical value, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization registered the book on its cultural heritage list. Here, we review the historical medical value of Donguibogam. The findings confirm that Donguibogam developed a unique and independent form of traditional Korean medicine and innovatively reformed the disease classification system. Moreover, Donguibogam emphasized the importance of disease prevention and medical pragmatism. This book also accelerated the development of folk medicine. Owing to its historical medical value, Donguibogam is now considered the 'bible' of Oriental medicine. Its wide acceptance has contributed to the expansion of Korean medicine utilization among the general public. Donguibogam has also played an important role in the establishment of traditional Korean medicine as a universally valid and original form of medicine, independent of traditional Chinese medicine.

  18. Historical Medical Value of Donguibogam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bong-Keun; Won, Jin-Hee; Kim, Sungchul

    2016-03-01

    Oriental medicine, since its origin in China, has had a long history extending over 2000 years. Today, it comprises several types of medicine predominately practiced in East Asia, including traditional Chinese, traditional Korean, and Kampo medicine. The distinctive medical system of traditional Korean medicine was established shortly after the publication of Donguibogam by Dr. Heo Jun in 1613. Donguibogam is highly acclaimed across East Asia; in 2009, in light of its historical medical value, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization registered the book on its cultural heritage list. Here, we review the historical medical value of Donguibogam. The findings confirm that Donguibogam developed a unique and independent form of traditional Korean medicine and innovatively reformed the disease classification system. Moreover, Donguibogam emphasized the importance of disease prevention and medical pragmatism. This book also accelerated the development of folk medicine. Owing to its historical medical value, Donguibogam is now considered the 'bible' of Oriental medicine. Its wide acceptance has contributed to the expansion of Korean medicine utilization among the general public. Donguibogam has also played an important role in the establishment of traditional Korean medicine as a universally valid and original form of medicine, independent of traditional Chinese medicine.

  19. Historical Analyses of Disordered Handwriting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiegg, Markus; Thorpe, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Handwritten texts carry significant information, extending beyond the meaning of their words. Modern neurology, for example, benefits from the interpretation of the graphic features of writing and drawing for the diagnosis and monitoring of diseases and disorders. This article examines how handwriting analysis can be used, and has been used historically, as a methodological tool for the assessment of medical conditions and how this enhances our understanding of historical contexts of writing. We analyze handwritten material, writing tests and letters, from patients in an early 20th-century psychiatric hospital in southern Germany (Irsee/Kaufbeuren). In this institution, early psychiatrists assessed handwriting features, providing us novel insights into the earliest practices of psychiatric handwriting analysis, which can be connected to Berkenkotter’s research on medical admission records. We finally consider the degree to which historical handwriting bears semiotic potential to explain the psychological state and personality of a writer, and how future research in written communication should approach these sources. PMID:28408774

  20. Anesthesiology — Reanimatology: Historical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Editorial Board of the journal «Obshchaya Reanimatologiya» intends to publish a series of papers dedicated to the history of the science «Anesthesiology and Reanimatology». In the first paper, the authors attempted to gather historical facts concerning the development of anesthesia. This makes it possible to analyze the course of development of the thought of scientists and physicians, the time of striking discoveries in our specialty, to reflect the most important points that impulses the expansion and optimization of methods of anesthesia and resuscitation. The authors understand clearly that they have no sufficient number of factors associated with the history of anesthesiology and reanimatology and they will be grateful in receiving any comments and additional information on historical aspects, specialized sections of the science, bibliographic data of Russian and foreign sciences dealing with this specialty. The to offer apologies for possible inaccuracies since controversial questions occasionally arise as to authorship and priority of ideas and usage of any methods in practice. There are not sometimes coincidences in the dates of the same events in different references used by us. The authors believe that the proposed historical analysis will generally provide a keen insight into the overall picture of development of world anesthesiology and reanimatology.

  1. International Polar Year Historical Data and Literature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Polar Year Historical Data and Literature collection (formerly known as the Discovery and Access of Historic Literature from the IPYs (DAHLI)...

  2. Andries van Aarde as historical Jesus scholar

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    2010-08-12

    Aug 12, 2010 ... This article focuses on Andries van Aarde's work on the historical Jesus and especially his book, Fatherless in Galilee, which made an important contribution to historical Jesus study in. South Africa. In the first part of the article Van Aarde's historical and social approaches are highlighted, his ongoing ...

  3. Principles Of Researching In The Historical Places

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamatmusaev Tokhir Shaydulovich

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is dedicated to researches of historical places also are seen the special phrases used in town planning and architecture component of historical cities historical framework linear system and the significance of centers in the development of cities also researches of dwellings which are the basic component of cities.

  4. Issues in Designing Assessments of Historical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercikan, Kadriye; Seixas, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Similar to educators in mathematics, science, and reading, history educators around the world have mobilized curricular reform movements toward including complex thinking in history education, advancing historical thinking, developing historical consciousness, and teaching competence in historical sense making. These reform movements, including…

  5. Historical Studies of Social Mobility and Stratification

    OpenAIRE

    Leeuwen, Marco H.D. van; Maas, Ineke

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses historical studies of social mobility and stratification. The focus is on changes in social inequality and mobility in past societies and their determinants. It discusses major historical sources, approaches, and results in the fields of social stratification (ranks and classes in the past), marriage patterns by social class or social endogamy, intergenerational social mobility, and historical studies of the career.

  6. Historical ecology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Péter

    2015-11-01

    The term 'historical ecology' has been used with various meanings since the first half of the 20th century. Studies labelled as historical ecology have been produced in at least four academic disciplines: history, ecology, geography and anthropology. Although all those involved seem to agree that historical ecology concerns the historical interconnectedness of nature and human culture, this field of study has no unified methodology, specialized institutional background and common publication forums. Knowledge of the development of historical ecology is also limited. As a result, the current multitude of definitions of historical ecology is accompanied by divergent opinions as to where the origins of the field are to be sought. In this review, I follow the development of historical ecology from the 18th century to the present. In the first part, I briefly describe some early examples of historical ecological investigations, followed by a description of the various scientific strands in the 20th century that contributed to the formation of historical ecology. In the second part, I discuss the past five decades of historical ecological investigations in more detail, focusing mostly (but not exclusively) on works that their respective authors identified as historical ecology. I also examine the appearance and interconnectedness of the two main trends (ecological and anthropological) in historical ecological research. In the last part, I attempt to outline the future of historical ecology based on common features in existing research. It appears that at present historical ecology is at a crossroads. With rapidly growing interest in historical ecological research, it may move towards institutionalization or remain an umbrella term. © 2014 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2014 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  7. Historical ecology: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Péter

    2017-01-01

    The term ‘historical ecology’ has been used with various meanings since the first half of the 20th century. Studies labelled as historical ecology have been produced in at least four academic disciplines: history, ecology, geography and anthropology. Although all those involved seem to agree that historical ecology concerns the historical interconnectedness of nature and human culture, this field of study has no unified methodology, specialized institutional background and common publication forums. Knowledge of the development of historical ecology is also limited. As a result, the current multitude of definitions of historical ecology is accompanied by divergent opinions as to where the origins of the field are to be sought. In this review, I follow the development of historical ecology from the 18th century to the present. In the first part, I briefly describe some early examples of historical ecological investigations, followed by a description of the various scientific strands in the 20th century that contributed to the formation of historical ecology. In the second part, I discuss the past five decades of historical ecological investigations in more detail, focusing mostly (but not exclusively) on works that their respective authors identified as historical ecology. I also examine the appearance and interconnectedness of the two main trends (ecological and anthropological) in historical ecological research. In the last part, I attempt to outline the future of historical ecology based on common features in existing research. It appears that at present historical ecology is at the crossroads. With rapidly growing interest in historical ecological research, it may move towards institutionalization or remain an umbrella term. PMID:25174685

  8. Political Institutions and Their Historical Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Mikael; Lundberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, political scientists define political institutions deductively. This approach may prevent from discovery of existing institutions beyond the definitions. Here, a principal component analysis was used for an inductive extraction of dimensions in Polity IV data on the political institutions of all nations in the world the last two centuries. Three dimensions of institutions were revealed: core institutions of democracy, oligarchy, and despotism. We show that, historically and on a world scale, the dominance of the core institutions of despotism has first been replaced by a dominance of the core institutions of oligarchy, which in turn is now being followed by an increasing dominance by the core institutions of democracy. Nations do not take steps from despotic, to oligarchic and then to democratic institutions, however. Rather, nations hosting the core democracy institutions have succeeded in historically avoiding both the core institutions of despotism and those of oligarchy. On the other hand, some nations have not been influenced by any of these dimensions, while new institutional combinations are increasingly influencing others. We show that the extracted institutional dimensions do not correspond to the Polity scores for autocracy, “anocracy” and democracy, suggesting that changes in regime types occur at one level, while institutional dynamics work on another. Political regime types in that sense seem “canalized”, i.e., underlying institutional architectures can and do vary, but to a considerable extent independently of regime types and their transitions. The inductive approach adds to the deductive regime type studies in that it produces results in line with modern studies of cultural evolution and memetic institutionalism in which institutions are the units of observation, not the nations that acts as host for them. PMID:23056219

  9. Political institutions and their historical dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Sandberg

    Full Text Available Traditionally, political scientists define political institutions deductively. This approach may prevent from discovery of existing institutions beyond the definitions. Here, a principal component analysis was used for an inductive extraction of dimensions in Polity IV data on the political institutions of all nations in the world the last two centuries. Three dimensions of institutions were revealed: core institutions of democracy, oligarchy, and despotism. We show that, historically and on a world scale, the dominance of the core institutions of despotism has first been replaced by a dominance of the core institutions of oligarchy, which in turn is now being followed by an increasing dominance by the core institutions of democracy. Nations do not take steps from despotic, to oligarchic and then to democratic institutions, however. Rather, nations hosting the core democracy institutions have succeeded in historically avoiding both the core institutions of despotism and those of oligarchy. On the other hand, some nations have not been influenced by any of these dimensions, while new institutional combinations are increasingly influencing others. We show that the extracted institutional dimensions do not correspond to the Polity scores for autocracy, "anocracy" and democracy, suggesting that changes in regime types occur at one level, while institutional dynamics work on another. Political regime types in that sense seem "canalized", i.e., underlying institutional architectures can and do vary, but to a considerable extent independently of regime types and their transitions. The inductive approach adds to the deductive regime type studies in that it produces results in line with modern studies of cultural evolution and memetic institutionalism in which institutions are the units of observation, not the nations that acts as host for them.

  10. Political institutions and their historical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Mikael; Lundberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, political scientists define political institutions deductively. This approach may prevent from discovery of existing institutions beyond the definitions. Here, a principal component analysis was used for an inductive extraction of dimensions in Polity IV data on the political institutions of all nations in the world the last two centuries. Three dimensions of institutions were revealed: core institutions of democracy, oligarchy, and despotism. We show that, historically and on a world scale, the dominance of the core institutions of despotism has first been replaced by a dominance of the core institutions of oligarchy, which in turn is now being followed by an increasing dominance by the core institutions of democracy. Nations do not take steps from despotic, to oligarchic and then to democratic institutions, however. Rather, nations hosting the core democracy institutions have succeeded in historically avoiding both the core institutions of despotism and those of oligarchy. On the other hand, some nations have not been influenced by any of these dimensions, while new institutional combinations are increasingly influencing others. We show that the extracted institutional dimensions do not correspond to the Polity scores for autocracy, "anocracy" and democracy, suggesting that changes in regime types occur at one level, while institutional dynamics work on another. Political regime types in that sense seem "canalized", i.e., underlying institutional architectures can and do vary, but to a considerable extent independently of regime types and their transitions. The inductive approach adds to the deductive regime type studies in that it produces results in line with modern studies of cultural evolution and memetic institutionalism in which institutions are the units of observation, not the nations that acts as host for them.

  11. HARMONIZATION, HISTORICAL COST AND INVESTMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Gabriel CRISTEA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Choosing depreciation of assets; revaluation of tangible or keeping their historical cost; registration, whilst the tangible assets are entered in the conservation of amortization expenses or a corresponding adjustment to depreciation expense ascertained; choosing the method of evaluating stocks is accounting policies. IAS 40 is significant because it was the first time the International Accounting Standards Board has introduced a fair value accounting model for non-financial assets. All firms must provide fair value for their real estate assets either directly in the balance sheet in accordance with the fair value model choice, either in the footnotes below cost model selection.

  12. Historical Astrolexicography and Old Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Terry J.

    I describe how the principles of lexicography have been applied in limited ways in astronomy and look at the revision work under way for the third edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, which, when completed, will contain the widest and most detailed coverage of the astronomical lexicon in the English language. Finally, I argue the need for a dedicated historical dictionary of astronomy based rigorously on a corpus of quotations from sources published in English from the beginnings of written English to the present day.

  13. Summary inside IBM's historic turnaround

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This work offers a summary of the book "WHO SAYS ELEPHANTS CAN'T DANCE? Inside IBM's Historic Turnaround" by Louis Gerstner.In nine years as the chairman and CEO of International Business Machine Corporation (IBM), Louis Gerstner brought about a dramatic change in the company's fortunes. When he took charge, IBM was on the verge of extinction as the victim of rapid changes in the computer industry. However, instead of breaking up IBM as most analysts were suggesting, Gerstner and his management team turned the company around and restored it to a position of power and influence within the indu

  14. Analysis of Traditional Historical Clothing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten; Schmidt, A. L.; Petersen, A. H.

    2013-01-01

    A recurrent problem for scholars who investigate traditional and historical clothing is the measuring of items of clothing and subsequent pattern construction. The challenge is to produce exact data without damaging the item. The main focus of this paper is to present a new procedure...... for establishing a three-dimensional model and the corresponding two-dimensional pattern for items of skin clothing that are not flat. The new method is non-destructive, and also accurate and fast. Furthermore, this paper presents an overview of the more traditional methods of pattern documentation and measurement...

  15. On Decarbonization: Historically and Perspectively

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, C.

    2005-01-01

    The possibility that CO2 emitted as a consequence of burning fossil fuels may have an impact on climate stimulated a lot of research on the evolution of the emissions and the possibility of remedies. Here we analyze first the evolution of CO2 emission historically, by looking at the mix and quantity of fuels used. This mix evolves from wood to nuclear energies with an intermezzo of coal, oil and gas, the fossils. The intermezzo lasts about 400 years. These fuels are made of carbon a...

  16. Analysis of Critical Factors and Difficulties in Maintaining Historical Building - A Current Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baharuddin M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Historic buildingis one of the highly valuable assets to the country especially in a way to shows its history for the next generation instead to make a profit through the excellent promotion in tourism purpose.The Malaysian Government has allocated a huge of financial support in order to conserve and preserve the historic building. However, the majority of the historic building is still in ‘poor’ condition without any improvement regarding to the pro-active approach.This paper presents part of this research which investigates the key components consists of issues and difficulties in term of critical factors. The findings reveal that there are several difficulties in maintaining a historic building. The identification of key components will facilitate the stakeholders to focus on the variable and resources to make the success in maintaining and managing the historic building.

  17. Historical transformation and epistemological discontinuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Močnik Rastko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from recent formulas of EU bureaucracy for subordinating scientific and educational apparatuses to the needs of the capital and to the requests of its political representatives, the article analyses the interconnection between the historical transformation of the ideological state apparatuses (universities, higher education institutions, research institutes etc. and the epistemological discontinuity provoked by the triumph of technosciences. The hypothesis to be tested is the following: While the crisis of West European-North American capitalism requires an ever tighter submission of ideological state apparatuses, and especially of scientific and academic apparatuses to the needs of the capital, theoretical practices in the humanities and social sciences have come to the point where they entered into an open conflict with the domination of the capital and have, as a consequence, started to subvert their own institutional supports in the ideological apparatuses of the capitalist state. For this purpose, the article reconsiders social sciences as a compromise formation and, eventually, reassesses the historical materialism as a non-Cartesian modern science.

  18. Evaluation of the Historic Triangle Wayfinding Sign System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The "Historic Triangle" in Virginia is named for the historic areas comprising and surrounding Williamsburg, Jamestown, and Yorktown, Virginia. A Historic Triangle Wayfinding Sign System was designed to lead travelers from I-64 to historic sites in W...

  19. Historical Evolution of Spatial Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ardila

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical evolution and cross-cultural differences in spatial abilities are analyzed. Spatial abilities have been found to be significantly associated with the complexity of geographical conditions and survival demands. Although impaired spatial cognition is found in cases of, exclusively or predominantly, right hemisphere pathology, it is proposed that this asymmetry may depend on the degree of training in spatial abilities. It is further proposed that spatial cognition might have evolved in a parallel way with cultural evolution and environmental demands. Contemporary city humans might be using spatial abilities in some new, conceptual tasks that did not exist in prehistoric times: mathematics, reading, writing, mechanics, music, etc. Cross-cultural analysis of spatial abilities in different human groups, normalization of neuropsychological testing instruments, and clinical observations of spatial ability disturbances in people with different cultural backgrounds and various spatial requirements, are required to construct a neuropsychological theory of brain organization of spatial cognition.

  20. Group identification and historical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahdra, Baljinder; Ross, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Differences in ingroup identification can influence the accessibility of historical memories. In Study 1, the authors examined individual differences in identity; in Study 2 they experimentally manipulated identity. In Study 1, high identifiers recalled fewer incidents of ingroup violence and hatred than did low identifiers. High and low identifiers did not differ in their recall of ingroup suffering. In Study 2, participants in the high-identity condition recalled fewer incidents of violence and hatred by members of their group than did those in the low-identity condition but a similar number of good deeds. Control participants recalled more positive than negative group actions; this bias was exaggerated in the high-identity condition and eliminated in the low-identity condition. The authors interpret the results as indicating the effects of social identity on individual-level memory processes, especially schema-consistent recall. They evaluate other explanations of the bias, including collective censorship of negative histories.

  1. Piezoelectric Transformers: An Historical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Vazquez Carazo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric transformers (PTs are solid-state devices that transform electrical energy into electrical energy by means of a mechanical vibration. These devices are manufactured using piezoelectric materials that are driven at resonance. With appropriate design and circuitry, it is possible to step up and step down the voltages between the input and output sections of the piezoelectric transformer, without making use of magnetic materials and obtaining excellent conversion efficiencies. The initial concept of a piezoelectric ceramic transformer was proposed by Charles A. Rosen in 1954. Since then, the evolution of piezoelectric transformers through history has been linked to the relevant work of some excellent researchers as well as to the evolution in materials, manufacturing processes, and driving circuit techniques. This paper summarizes the historical evolution of the technology.

  2. Analyzing and Interpreting Historical Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kipping, Matthias; Wadhwani, Dan; Bucheli, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    This chapter outlines a methodology for the interpretation of historical sources, helping to realize their full potential for the study of organization, while overcoming their challenges in terms of distortions created by time, changes in context, and selective production or preservation. Drawing...... on social scientific methods as well as the practice and reflections of historians, the chapter describes analytical and interpretive process based on three basic elements, illustrating them with exemplars from management research: source criticism to identify possible biases and judge the extent to which...... a source can be trusted to address the research question; triangulation with additional sources to confirm or question an interpretation and strengthen the overall findings; hermeneutics to relate sources to their original contexts and make their interpretation by a researcher today more robust...

  3. Training Analysis: A Historical View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Sarracino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The obligatory nature of training analysis, i.e. of the personal analysis of every candidate analyst, was adopted by all psychoanalytic institutes in Freud’s lifetime. But what had initially been a not particularly burdensome addition to training was subsequently transformed into something quite different. Years of analysis: hundreds of hours at vast expense to the candidate, in the face of a basic unconcern on the part of the schools about undertaking empirical studies or even just examining more closely the theoretical justification (apart from the constantly reasserted need for completeness for such a commitment. The considerable resistance to questioning this practice goes hand in hand with the persistent circulation of a series of legends about its origin. An accurate historical review should offer interesting matter for consideration, showing how the custom of requiring training analysis is underpinned by reasons of an institutional nature rather than by theoretical necessity or empirical findings.

  4. The historical contingency of bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevles, D J

    2000-01-01

    The principles of bioethics have been historically contingent, a product of social values, circumstances, and experience. During the early twentieth century, they rested on a doctor-knows-best autonomy that permitted physicians to perform research on human subjects with a minimum degree, if any, of informed consent. The eugenics movement of the period embraced an implicit bioethics by presuming to sterilize individuals for the sake of a larger social benefit, a practice and doctrine that helped lead to the Nazi medical experiments and death camps. After World War II, the promulgation of the Nuremberg Code failed to halt eugenic sterilization and risky human experimentation without informed consent either in civilian or military venues. However, beginning in the 1960s, these practices came under mounting critical scrutiny, partly because of the increasing attention given to individual rights. By now, it is widely understood that concern for individual rights rather than an appeal to some national good belongs at the heart of bioethics.

  5. Historical Techniques of Lie Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicianova, Martina

    2015-08-01

    Since time immemorial, lying has been a part of everyday life. For this reason, it has become a subject of interest in several disciplines, including psychology. The purpose of this article is to provide a general overview of the literature and thinking to date about the evolution of lie detection techniques. The first part explores ancient methods recorded circa 1000 B.C. (e.g., God's judgment in Europe). The second part describes technical methods based on sciences such as phrenology, polygraph and graphology. This is followed by an outline of more modern-day approaches such as FACS (Facial Action Coding System), functional MRI, and Brain Fingerprinting. Finally, after the familiarization with the historical development of techniques for lie detection, we discuss the scope for new initiatives not only in the area of designing new methods, but also for the research into lie detection itself, such as its motives and regulatory issues related to deception.

  6. Historical Techniques of Lie Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Vicianova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Since time immemorial, lying has been a part of everyday life. For this reason, it has become a subject of interest in several disciplines, including psychology. The purpose of this article is to provide a general overview of the literature and thinking to date about the evolution of lie detection techniques. The first part explores ancient methods recorded circa 1000 B.C. (e.g., God’s judgment in Europe. The second part describes technical methods based on sciences such as phrenology, polygraph and graphology. This is followed by an outline of more modern-day approaches such as FACS (Facial Action Coding System, functional MRI, and Brain Fingerprinting. Finally, after the familiarization with the historical development of techniques for lie detection, we discuss the scope for new initiatives not only in the area of designing new methods, but also for the research into lie detection itself, such as its motives and regulatory issues related to deception.

  7. Historical developments in singular perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Malley, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    This engaging text describes the development of singular perturbations, including its history, accumulating literature, and its current status. While the approach of the text is sophisticated, the literature is accessible to a broad audience. A particularly valuable bonus are the historical remarks. These remarks are found throughout the manuscript. They demonstrate the growth of mathematical thinking on this topic by engineers and mathematicians. The book focuses on detailing how the various methods are to be applied. These are illustrated by a  number and variety of examples. Readers are expected to have a working knowledge of elementary ordinary differential equations, including some familiarity with power series techniques, and of some advanced calculus. Dr. O'Malley  has written a number of books on singular perturbations.  This book has developed from many of his works in the field of perturbation theory.

  8. Democracy is a historical urgency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synek, Miroslav

    2015-03-01

    Survival of humanity, on this planet, may depend, heavily, on coping with advancing technology of nuclear missiles. Let us consider critical alternatives of powerful governments: democracy, as an alternative to dictatorship. Democracy is based on free elections, as a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Democracy is a historical urgency, in the age of inter-continental nuclear missiles, computerized on a push-button, conceivably controllable by a very powerful, miscalculating and/or insane, dictator, capable of producing global nuclear holocaust, on our entire planet. Diplomacy, together with supporting activities, should be utilized, to help, in important steps, at this time, for achieving democracy in critical areas.

  9. Statics of historic masonry constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2016-01-01

    This successful book, which is now appearing in its second edition, presents a comprehensive new Statics of Masonry Constructions. Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments in its architectural heritage. Given the age of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant. The book you hold in hands contributes to fill this demand. The second edition integrates the original text of the first edition with new developments, widening and revisions, due to recent research studies achievements. The result is a book that gives a complete picture of the behaviour of the Masonry Constructions. First of all, it gives the fundamentals of its Statics, based on the no-tension assumption, and then it develops the Limit Analysis for the Masonry Constructions. In this framework, through an interdisciplinary approach combining Engineering and Architecture, the book also investigates the sta...

  10. Historical Gypsy Moth Defoliation Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gypsy moth populations may exist for many years at low densities such that it may be difficult to find any life stages. Then, for reasons that are not completely understood, populations may rise to very high densities and substantial defoliation of the canopy may occur. These data shows the historical frequency (1972-2002) pattern of gypsy moth defoliation as it spreads south and west from the New England states. forested areas with repeated annual defoliation become more stressed and are at increased risk of permanent damage. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  11. Historical Topographic Map Collection bookmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, Kristin A.; Allord, Gregory J.

    2017-06-29

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program is scanning published USGS 1:250,000-scale and larger topographic maps printed between 1884, the inception of the topographic mapping program, and 2006. The goal of this project, which began publishing the historical scanned maps in 2011, is to provide a digital repository of USGS topographic maps, available to the public at no cost. For more than 125 years, USGS topographic maps have accurately portrayed the complex geography of the Nation. The USGS is the Nation’s largest producer of printed topographic maps, and prior to 2006, USGS topographic maps were created using traditional cartographic methods and printed using a lithographic printing process. As the USGS continues the release of a new generation of topographic maps (US Topo) in electronic form, the topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, land management planning, and leisure.

  12. Construct on Digital Rights Management for Historical Newspaper Archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shien-chiang Yu

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Newspaper is one of the most important media as it contains the records that input the cultural data and social events, progress of national and international economical and political developments, the world’s circumstances of the time, so as transmitting information and sharing knowledge of particular regions or around the globe. However, the copyright is limited to cover the transformed entity to digital contents. In order to protect the rights of digitized-contents and restrict the scope of on-line grant of historical newspaper, it is necessary to clarify the concepts and practices. This study reveals the concepts of digital rights management via literature review that will work on both mentioned issues, so as to identify the fair use to assure the profit of digitized archive of historical newspaper. [Article content in Chinese

  13. Urban science education: examining current issues through a historical lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Cheryl A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper reviews and synthesizes urban science education studies published between 2000 and 2013 with a view to identifying current challenges faced by both teachers and students in urban classrooms. Additionally, this paper considers the historical events that have shaped the conditions, bureaucracies, and interactions of urban institutions. When the findings from these urban science education studies were consolidated with the historical overview provided, it was revealed that the basic design and regulatory policies of urban schools have not substantively changed since their establishment in the nineteenth century. Teachers in urban science classrooms continue to face issues of inequality, poverty, and social injustice as they struggle to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse student population. Furthermore, persistent concerns of conflicting Discourses, cultural dissonance, and oppression create formidable barriers to science learning. Despite the many modifications in structure and organization, urban students are still subjugated and marginalized in systems that emphasize control and order over high-quality science education.

  14. Location of Historical Buildings (points) at Fort Davis National Historic Site, Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is a point shapefile showing where historic buildings were located at Fort Davis National Historic Site. The remnants or foundations of these buildings where...

  15. Using Augmented Reality and Virtual Environments in Historic Places to Scaffold Historical Empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Sara K.; Newbill, Phyllis; Ogle, Todd; Terry, Krista

    2018-01-01

    The authors explore how 3D visualizations of historical sites can be used as pedagogical tools to support historical empathy. They provide three visualizations created by a team at Virginia Tech as examples. They discuss virtual environments and how the digital restoration process is applied. They also define historical empathy, explain why it is…

  16. ACCOUNTING HARMONIZATION AND HISTORICAL COST ACCOUNTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Gabriel CRISTEA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a huge interest in accounting harmonization and historical costs accounting, in what they offer us. In this article, different valuation models are discussed. Although one notices the movement from historical cost accounting to fair value accounting, each one has its advantages.

  17. Internationalisation of Law: Historical and Cultural Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lev, Amnon

    2011-01-01

    The article provides a historical overview of the stages in the internationalisation of Danish law and the implication of regional and global legal settings in this process......The article provides a historical overview of the stages in the internationalisation of Danish law and the implication of regional and global legal settings in this process...

  18. 18 CFR 420.45 - Historical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Historical use. 420.45... MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-WATER SUPPLY CHARGES Charges; Exemptions § 420.45 Historical use. A person who or which could not for any reason use, take, withdraw or divert waters of the basin from the place in...

  19. Negotiating the Process of Historical Empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endacott, Jason L.

    2014-01-01

    Historical empathy scholarship has evolved to the point where further progress necessitates empirical examinations from a variety of perspectives. Prior studies on historical empathy have largely focused on teachers' pedagogical approach and student outcomes. This qualitative study focuses on students as they engage in the process of historical…

  20. Historical sites at the Prince Edward islands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, J

    1986-07-01

    Full Text Available This report gives the results of a workshop held on historical sites at the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward islands, southern Indian Ocean. All known visits and sojourns on the Prince Edward islands up to 1948 are tabulated. All known historical sites...

  1. ORAL TRADITION AND HISTORICAL RECONSTRUCTION IN IGBO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FBL

    Fire, war and ravages of time have robbed posterity of most of the rest, and the restitutions that archaeologists and palaeographers could achieve ... the historical validity of Homer‟s epic poems. The historicity of the Homer‟s iliad led to the finding and excavation of Troy as an archaeological site. As McCall had further aptly.

  2. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection…

  3. Historical and Conceptual Foundation of Diagrammatical Ontology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Uckelman, Sara L.; Schärfe, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    During the Renaissance there was a growing interest for the use of diagrams within conceptual studies. This paper investigates the historical and philosophical foundation of this renewed use of diagrams in ontology as well as the modern relevance of this foundation. We discuss the historical...

  4. Art and Historical Truth: The Boston Massacre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agresto, John

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the inaccuracy of Revere's "Boston Massacre" print as a description of historical fact. Notes, however, that the print is still a description of truth, a correct understanding of the meaning and portent of the occurrence in a way that historical accuracy (rather than art) might well have distorted. (JMF)

  5. Representing Historical Knowledge in Geographic Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossner, Karl Eric

    2010-01-01

    A growing number of historical scholars in social science and humanities fields are using geographic information systems (GIS) to help investigate spatial questions and map their findings. The nature of historical data and historiographic practices present several challenges in using GIS that have been addressed only partially to date. For…

  6. Historical Studies of Social Mobility and Stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, Marco H.D. van; Maas, Ineke

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses historical studies of social mobility and stratification. The focus is on changes in social inequality and mobility in past societies and their determinants. It discusses major historical sources, approaches, and results in the fields of social stratification (ranks and classes

  7. Historic Preservation Vocabulary, Designations, and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stacy D.

    2011-01-01

    Preservationists use a common language that had its beginnings in the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. This act created the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties, which defined the terms and treatments that have become the standard for preservation projects and plans. These terms have been used…

  8. Escaping Myopia: Teaching Students about Historical Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    There are so many aspects to teaching history that are vital to creating well-rounded historical thinkers, but one of the most fundamental and most overlooked elements is the idea of causality. Far too many students do not understand the idea of causation, that there are multiple reasons for why historical events occurred and transpired in the way…

  9. 49 CFR 1105.8 - Historic Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... resources (such as swampy conditions or the presence of toxic wastes), and the surrounding terrain. (9... modified when the information is not necessary to determine the presence of historic properties and the effect of the proposed action on them. (f) Historic preservation conditions imposed by the Board in rail...

  10. SN 1006 and other historical supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, F. Richard

    2007-08-01

    The supernova which appeared in AD 1006 is unique in history for its brilliance, duration of visibility, and the interest it aroused. Almost thirty separate records of the star are preserved from various parts of the world. This paper briefly summarizes historical records of SN 1006 and discusses the prospects of uncovering further historical records of supernovae.

  11. Patriotic and Historical Plays for Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerman, Sylvia E., Ed.

    The one-act, royalty-free plays in this book dramatize notable events in United States history. Historical selections include dramatizations of the Declaration of Independence, the Boston Tea Party, the Continental Army at Valley Forge, the birth of the Constitution, and George Washington crossing the Delaware and feature such historic figures as…

  12. Microchemical investigations of historical coins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridi, F.; Fazio, E.; Scibilia, S.; Sabatino, G.; Mezzasalma, A. M.; Neri, F.; Castrizio, D.

    2015-07-01

    Microchemical investigations were carried out on ancient silver coins originated from the same country but of different historical periods between the fifth and the second centuries B.C. Energy-Dispersive X-ray microanalysis in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM-EDX) was employed to obtain qualitative and semi-quantitative information about the chemical composition of these coins. SEM-EDX analyses employ an electron beam of 20 keV, which interacts with the sample leading to the emission of characteristic X-rays, to determine elements present in the surface patina, closely related to the sample preservation. In the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis a monochromatic Al Kα radiation (1486.6 eV) interacts with the sample and photoelectrons are detected as secondary radiation, to investigate about coins elemental composition. Moreover a beam of Ar+ ions with an energy of 3 keV was used for the sputtering procedure in order to perform depth profile measurements, from the surface (patina composition) down to deeper layers. Useful information about production, chronological period and utilization places of coins are obtained to support a correct dating of these samples.

  13. Historical characterization of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eboli, Paula; Stone, James L; Aydin, Sabri; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2009-06-01

    TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA IS a well known clinical entity characterized by agonizing, paroxysmal, and lancinating facial pain, often triggered by movements of the mouth or eating. Historical reviews of facial pain have attempted to describe this severe pain over the past 2.5 millennia. The ancient Greek physicians Hippocrates, Aretaeus, and Galen, described kephalalgias, but their accounts were vague and did not clearly correspond with what we now term trigeminal neuralgia. The first adequate description of trigeminal neuralgia was given in 1671, followed by a fuller description by physician John Locke in 1677. André described the convulsive-like condition in 1756, and named it tic douloureux; in 1773, Fothergill described it as "a painful affection of the face;" and in 1779, John Hunter more clearly characterized the entity as a form of "nervous disorder" with reference to pain of the teeth, gums, or tongue where the disease "does not reside." One hundred fifty years later, the neurological surgeon Walter Dandy equated neurovascular compression of the trigeminal nerve with trigeminal neuralgia.

  14. Historical Drawbacks of Limited Liability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Boyle

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Limited liability is a human invention which has facilitated enormous economic growth around the world, particularly since the time of its general application in advanced countries during the nineteenth century. The individual legal identity of companies, coupled with the limited liability of their owners, has provided protection for investors from the risks associated with their investments. It has thus contributed to increase the sources of capital available to finance projects which might otherwise have been considered unviable. However, the legal protection offered to investors has negative consequences for other participants in economies. Speculation in stock markets often damages society. It is very important to study the drawbacks of limited liability and to suggest modifications to achieve a more stable, less volatile, economic growth in the world. Although this article goes to some lengths to recognise the work of authors who emphasise the positive historical economic contribution of limited lability, its main objective is to provoke a reflection around texts which point out the drawbacks and propose solutions.

  15. Historical aspects of Mexican psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayardo, Sergio Javier Villaseñor

    2016-04-01

    Mexican psychiatry initiated since pre-Hispanic times. Historically, treatments were a mixture of magic, science and religion. Ancient Nahuas had their own medical concepts with a holistic view of medicine, considering men and cosmos as a whole. The first psychiatric hospital appeared in 1566 and a more modern psychiatric asylum emerged until 1910. International exchanges of theoretical approaches started in the National University with the visit of Pierre Janet. There were other important figures that influenced Mexican psychiatry, such as Erich Fromm, Henri Ey, Jean Garrabé and Yves Thoret. Regarding Mexican psychiatrists, some of the most important contributors to Mexican psychiatry were José Luis Patiño Rojas, Manuel Guevara Oropeza and Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz. This article includes excerpts from "Clinical Psychiatry", a book by Patiño Rojas where he tries to understand and describe the inner world experienced by patients with schizophrenia; also, the thesis conducted by Guevara Oropeza ("Psychoanalisis"), which is a critical comparison between the theories of Janet and Freud. Finally, we include "The study of consciousness: current status" by Ramón de la Fuente, which leads us through the initial investigations concerning consciousness, its evolution, and the contributions made by psychology, philosophy and neurobiology.

  16. Historic physics reprints come home

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    In a surprise happy ending, six boxes of historic reprints have returned home to CERN - more than 30 years after they went missing! The 146 items had been part of the personal library of the Nobel prize-winning physicist, Wolfgang Pauli. After his death in 1958, Pauli's widow bequeathed his scientific legacy to CERN, and part of this valuable archival collection was stored in Salle Pauli, the room dedicated to his memory. In those trustful days the room was always left open so that Pauli's Library could be freely consulted; but then 170 preprints by Born, Bohr, Heisenberg and others - some with dedications to Pauli from the author - disappeared in 1972. Regretfully, the room was then locked. Use of the collection was henceforth ‘by appointment only', but it was assumed that the damage was done and the missing items had gone forever. However, in 2002 the CERN Archivist was surprised by a phone call from a representative of Christie's, New York, who explained that some reprints bearing the stamp of the CERN...

  17. Fermented beverages of pre- and proto-historic China

    OpenAIRE

    McGovern, Patrick E.; Zhang, Juzhong; Tang, Jigen; Zhang, Zhiqing; Hall, Gretchen R.; Moreau, Robert A.; Nuñez, Alberto; Butrym, Eric D.; Richards, Michael P.; Wang, Chen-shan; Cheng, Guangsheng; Zhao, Zhijun; Wang, Changsui

    2004-01-01

    Chemical analyses of ancient organics absorbed into pottery jars from the early Neolithic village of Jiahu in Henan province in China have revealed that a mixed fermented beverage of rice, honey, and fruit (hawthorn fruit and/or grape) was being produced as early as the seventh millennium before Christ (B.C.). This prehistoric drink paved the way for unique cereal beverages of the proto-historic second millennium B.C., remarkably preserved as liquids inside sealed bronze vessels of the Shang ...

  18. Dead sea asphalts: historical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissenbaum, A.

    1978-05-01

    Asphalts are present in the Dead Sea basin in three forms: (1) huge blocks, up to 100 tons in weight, composed of extremely pure (>99.99%) solid asphalt occasionally found floating on the lake, (2) veins, seepages, and cavity and fissure fillings in Lower Cretaceous to Holocene rocks, and (3) ozocerite veins on the eastern shore of the lake. Dead Sea asphalts probably have been documented over a longer period of time than any other hydrocarbon deposit--from antiquity to the 19th century. Major uses of asphalt from the Dead Sea have been as an ingredient in the embalming process, for medicinal purposes, for fumigation, and for agriculture. The first known war for control of a hydrocarbon deposit was in the Dead Sea area in 312 B.C. between the Seleucid Syrians and the Nabatean Arabs who lived around the lake. Surface manifestations of asphalt are linked closely to tectonic activity. In the lake itself, the asphalt is associated with diapirs During certain historic periods, tectonic and diapiric activity caused frequent liberation to the Dead Sea surface of semiliquid asphalt associated with large amounts of hydrogen sulfide gas. When the tectonic activity was attenuated, as in the 19th and 20th centuries, the rate of asphalt seepage to the bottom sediments of the Dead Sea was much slower and the asphalt solidified on the lake bottom. The release of asphalt to the surface became much more sporadic, and may have resulted in part from earthquakes. Thus, future asphalt prospecting in the Dead Sea area should be conducted along the boundaries of diapirs or their associated faults.

  19. Quantitative historical hydrology in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, G.; Brázdil, R.; Herget, J.; Machado, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    In recent decades, the quantification of flood hydrological characteristics (peak discharge, hydrograph shape, and runoff volume) from documentary evidence has gained scientific recognition as a method to lengthen flood records of rare and extreme events. This paper describes the methodological evolution of quantitative historical hydrology under the influence of developments in hydraulics and statistics. In the 19th century, discharge calculations based on flood marks were the only source of hydrological data for engineering design, but were later left aside in favour of systematic gauge records and conventional hydrological procedures. In the last two decades, there has been growing scientific and public interest in understanding long-term patterns of rare floods, in maintaining the flood heritage and memory of extremes, and developing methods for deterministic and statistical application to different scientific and engineering problems. A compilation of 46 case studies across Europe with reconstructed discharges demonstrates that (1) in most cases present flood magnitudes are not unusual within the context of the last millennium, although recent floods may exceed past floods in some temperate European rivers (e.g. the Vltava and Po rivers); (2) the frequency of extreme floods has decreased since the 1950s, although some rivers (e.g. the Gardon and Ouse rivers) show a reactivation of rare events over the last two decades. There is a great potential for gaining understanding of individual extreme events based on a combined multiproxy approach (palaeoflood and documentary records) providing high-resolution time flood series and their environmental and climatic changes; and for developing non-systematic and non-stationary statistical models based on relations of past floods with external and internal covariates under natural low-frequency climate variability.

  20. Contemporary and historic factors influence differently genetic differentiation and diversity in a tropical palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Carvalho, C; Ribeiro, M C; Côrtes, M C; Galetti, M; Collevatti, R G

    2015-09-01

    Population genetics theory predicts loss in genetic variability because of drift and inbreeding in isolated plant populations; however, it has been argued that long-distance pollination and seed dispersal may be able to maintain gene flow, even in highly fragmented landscapes. We tested how historical effective population size, historical migration and contemporary landscape structure, such as forest cover, patch isolation and matrix resistance, affect genetic variability and differentiation of seedlings in a tropical palm (Euterpe edulis) in a human-modified rainforest. We sampled 16 sites within five landscapes in the Brazilian Atlantic forest and assessed genetic variability and differentiation using eight microsatellite loci. Using a model selection approach, none of the covariates explained the variation observed in inbreeding coefficients among populations. The variation in genetic diversity among sites was best explained by historical effective population size. Allelic richness was best explained by historical effective population size and matrix resistance, whereas genetic differentiation was explained by matrix resistance. Coalescence analysis revealed high historical migration between sites within landscapes and constant historical population sizes, showing that the genetic differentiation is most likely due to recent changes caused by habitat loss and fragmentation. Overall, recent landscape changes have a greater influence on among-population genetic variation than historical gene flow process. As immediate restoration actions in landscapes with low forest amount, the development of more permeable matrices to allow the movement of pollinators and seed dispersers may be an effective strategy to maintain microevolutionary processes.

  1. Implementing Solar PV Projects on Historic Buildings and in Historic Districts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Walker, A.; Buddenborg, J; Lindberg, J.

    2011-09-01

    Many municipalities, particularly in older communities of the United States, have a large amount of historic buildings and districts. In addition to preserving these historic assets, many municipalities have goals or legislative requirements to procure a certain amount of energy from renewable sources and to become more efficient in their energy use; often, these requirements do not exempt historic buildings. This paper details findings from a workshop held in Denver, Colorado, in June 2010 that brought together stakeholders from both the solar and historic preservation industries. Based on these findings, this paper identifies challenges and recommends solutions for developing solar photovoltaic (PV) projects on historic buildings and in historic districts in such a way as to not affect the characteristics that make a building eligible for historic status.

  2. Gendered Obstacles Faced by Historical Women in Physics and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kristen M.

    2007-12-01

    A gender gap still exists in modern science; this is especially evident in the fields of physics and astronomy. The cause of such a gap is the center of debate. Is this discrepancy the result of inherent ability or socialization? Most studies have focused on modern issues and how women are socialized today. The role of historical gender perspectives and social opinions in creating the field of modern science and any discrepancies within it has not yet been explored in depth. This project investigates the obstacles faced by historical women in physics and astronomy that stem from the officialized gender biases that accompanied the establishment of modern science. Such obstacles are both formal and informal. Four women were chosen to span the three hundred year period between the standardization of the field and the modern day: Laura Bassi, Mary Somerville, Lise Meitner, and Jocelyn Bell Burnell. The investigation reveals that formal obstacles significantly decreased over the time period, while informal obstacles eroded more gradually. Obstacles also reflected historical events such as the World Wars and the Enlightenment. Trends in obstacles faced by four prominent women physicists indicate that education, finances, support networks, and social opinion played a large role in determining success in the field. The applicability to modern day physics issues and the gender gap is discussed. Many thanks to the Pathways Scholars Program and the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program for funding for this project.

  3. Pattern-oriented memory interpolation of sparse historical rainfall records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, J. P.; Cohen Liechti, T.; Portela, M. M.; Schleiss, A. J.

    2014-03-01

    The pattern-oriented memory (POM) is a novel historical rainfall interpolation method that explicitly takes into account the time dimension in order to interpolate areal rainfall maps. The method is based on the idea that rainfall patterns exist and can be identified over a certain area by means of non-linear regressions. Having been previously benchmarked with a vast array of interpolation methods using proxy satellite data under different time and space availabilities, in the scope of the present contribution POM is applied to rain gauge data in order to produce areal rainfall maps. Tested over the Zambezi River Basin for the period from 1979 to 1997 (accurate satellite rainfall estimates based on spaceborne instruments are not available for dates prior to 1998), the novel pattern-oriented memory historical interpolation method has revealed itself as a better alternative than Kriging or Inverse Distance Weighing in the light of a Monte Carlo cross-validation procedure. Superior in most metrics to the other tested interpolation methods, in terms of the Pearson correlation coefficient and bias the accuracy of POM's historical interpolation results are even comparable with that of recent satellite rainfall products. The new method holds the possibility of calculating detailed and performing daily areal rainfall estimates, even in the case of sparse rain gauging grids. Besides their performance, the similarity to satellite rainfall estimates inherent to POM interpolations can contribute to substantially extend the length of the rainfall series used in hydrological models and water availability studies in remote areas.

  4. The Blind Spot. Borderline Questions of Historical Semantics between Reinhart Koselleck and Niklas Luhmann

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Merlo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the wide critical reviews that the enterprise of Begriffsgeschichte has triggered, the difficult relationship that conceptual history – in its Koselleckian declination – entertains with systemic theory has remained maybe underexposed until now. Moving from the tension between experience and historicity in Koselleck, the article reflects on the tensions that the historical-conceptual structure reveals as soon as it comes into contact with the problems of historical semantics that accompany the Luhmannian attempt of operating, in the register of second order observation, a temporal dislocation and a de-paradoxification of the paradox activated by Derrida’s différance, as constitutive of historicity. The blind spot at the bottom of Luhmannian gaze cuts out the borders of the “history” continent along the lines of the shipwreck of the classic semantics of modernity.

  5. Men nurses: a historical and feminist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Joan

    2004-08-01

    The history of nursing is almost exclusively a history of women's accomplishments despite the fact that, as early as the fourth and fifth centuries, men have worked as nurses. This perpetuates the notion of men nurses as anomalies. It also provides insight into the gendered nature of nursing and nurses' work within patriarchal culture. This paper examines the history of men in nursing in Canada, Britain and the United States of America, and offer insights into the ways in which gender relations and the ideological designation of nursing as women's work have excluded, limited and, conversely, advanced the careers of men nurses. A search of the literature was carried out using CINAHL, PubMed and Sociological Abstracts databases. Search words included: male nurses, history, nursing, Canada, Britain, United Kingdom and USA. Men's participation in nursing reveals that prevailing definitions of masculinity have acted as a powerful barrier to men crossing the gender divide and entering the profession. At extraordinary times such as war and acute nursing shortages, gender boundaries are negotiable. For those men who have crossed over into nursing, a gendered division of labour is evidenced by men nurses' long-standing association with mental health nursing and, more recently, with their disproportionate attainment of masculine-congruent leadership and specialty positions. Failure to recognize men's participation in nursing leaves men nurses with little information about their professional background and historical position. It also maintains the invisibility of gender relations that have shaped the experience of men and women nurses alike. Such relations, understood within their broader social context, remain poorly understood and hence uninterrupted, to the detriment of nurses and the profession of nursing.

  6. Historical development of origins research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    Following the publication of the Origin of Species in 1859, many naturalists adopted the idea that living organisms were the historical outcome of gradual transformation of lifeless matter. These views soon merged with the developments of biochemistry and cell biology and led to proposals in which the origin of protoplasm was equated with the origin of life. The heterotrophic origin of life proposed by Oparin and Haldane in the 1920s was part of this tradition, which Oparin enriched by transforming the discussion of the emergence of the first cells into a workable multidisciplinary research program. On the other hand, the scientific trend toward understanding biological phenomena at the molecular level led authors like Troland, Muller, and others to propose that single molecules or viruses represented primordial living systems. The contrast between these opposing views on the origin of life represents not only contrasting views of the nature of life itself, but also major ideological discussions that reached a surprising intensity in the years following Stanley Miller's seminal result which showed the ease with which organic compounds of biochemical significance could be synthesized under putative primitive conditions. In fact, during the years following the Miller experiment, attempts to understand the origin of life were strongly influenced by research on DNA replication and protein biosynthesis, and, in socio-political terms, by the atmosphere created by Cold War tensions. The catalytic versatility of RNA molecules clearly merits a critical reappraisal of Muller's viewpoint. However, the discovery of ribozymes does not imply that autocatalytic nucleic acid molecules ready to be used as primordial genes were floating in the primitive oceans, or that the RNA world emerged completely assembled from simple precursors present in the prebiotic soup. The evidence supporting the presence of a wide range of organic molecules on the primitive Earth, including membrane

  7. Historical change and evolutionary theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Roger D

    2007-09-01

    Despite advances in fields like genetics, evolutionary psychology, and human behavior and evolution--which generally focus on individual or small group behavior from a biological perspective--evolutionary biology has made little impact on studies of political change and social history. Theories of natural selection often seem inapplicable to human history because our social behavior is embedded in language (which makes possible the concepts of time and social identity on which what we call "history" depends). Peter Corning's Holistic Darwinism reconceptualizes evolutionary biology, making it possible to go beyond the barriers separating the social and natural sciences. Corning focuses on two primary processes: "synergy" (complex multivariate interactions at multiple levels between a species and its environment) and "cybernetics" (the information systems permitting communication between individuals and groups over time). Combining this frame of reference with inclusive fitness theory, it is possible to answer the most important (and puzzling) question in human history: How did a species that lived for millennia in hunter-gatherer bands form centralized states governing large populations of non-kin (including multi-ethnic empires as well as modern nation-states)? The fragility and contemporary ethnic violence in Kenya and the Congo should suffice as evidence that these issues need to be taken seriously. To explain the rise and fall of states as well as changes in human laws and customs--the core of historical research--it is essential to show how the provision of collective goods can overcome the challenge of self-interest and free-riding in some instances, yet fail to do so in others. To this end, it is now possible to consider how a state providing public goods can--under circumstances that often include effective leadership--contribute to enhanced inclusive fitness of virtually all its members. Because social behavior needs to adapt to ecology, but ecological

  8. The historical nature of the human being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alvarez Maia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the human condition under a historical perspective. The classical proposal of human being originated from the illuminist – rational substantialism conflicts with the historical thought, both  in the phylogenetic  instance of its anthropologic hominization  which builds up the species, and in the ontogenetics of its  humanization given by the living historicity of each biological individual in his/her human cycle. I think of the human being as an entity made in the symbolic instance of the language in his/her interactive practice between nature and society. Keywords: Historical constitution of the human being; The language and the human being; History and language.

  9. Electric Vehicles--A Historical Snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Most people don't realize that the history of electric vehicles (EVs) predates the Civil War. This article provides a historical snapshot of EVs to spark the interest of both teachers and students in this important transportation technology.

  10. Special Stamps:Historical Relic Beacons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In May 2002, the State Postal Bureau issued a set of five stamps picturing historical relic beacons. They are the Mao Beacon, the Jiangxinyu Twin Beacon, the Huaniaoshan Beacon, the Laotieshan Beacon, and

  11. Historical Aspects in Tolerance Phenomenon Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janat A. Karmanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the historical aspect of the tolerance phenomenon research, particularly the study of tolerance in the age of Antiquity, Middle Ages, New Times, Enlightenment. It is remarkable that the problem of tolerance, emerged in Western civilization on religious grounds, laid the foundation for all other freedoms, attained in many countries. Besides, the article attaches special attention to the researchers of the East, such as Abu Nasr al-Farabi, Khoja Ahmed Yasawi, studies the historical aspect of works by Kazakhstan thinkers A. Kunanbayev, C. Valikhanova, K.B. Zharikbayev, S.K. Kaliyev, A.N. Nysanbayev, A.I. Artemev and others. The analysis of historical research of the tolerance phenomenon brings the author to the conclusion that religious freedom was the starting point for the emergence of new areas of tolerance display. The content of this phenomenon changed according to the historical peculiarities of the societies’ development

  12. Assigning historic responsibility for extreme weather events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Friederike E. L.; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Fuglestvedt, Jan S.; Berntsen, Terje; Allen, Myles R.

    2017-11-01

    Recent scientific advances make it possible to assign extreme events to human-induced climate change and historical emissions. These developments allow losses and damage associated with such events to be assigned country-level responsibility.

  13. Historical Tsunami Event Locations with Runups

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Global Historical Tsunami Database provides information on over 2,400 tsunamis from 2100 BC to the present in the the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans; and...

  14. Quantitative Pathology: Historical Background, Clinical Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative Pathology: Historical Background, Clinical Research and Application of Nuclear Morphometry and DNA Image Cytometry. A Buhmeida. Abstract. No Abstract Keywords: quantitative, pathology, nuclear, morphometry, cytometry, histogram. Libyan Journal of Medicine Vol. 1 (2) 2006: pp. 126-139.

  15. Historical Development of Computer Assisted Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The scope of this historical overview includes the salient contributions from the several scientific and engineering disciplines which made CAI possible during the late 1950's. The time span covered runs from Plato to PLATO. (Author/BD)

  16. Historical Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Historical Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory contains measured and estimated data on ambient air pollution for use in assessing air quality, assisting in...

  17. METALLOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF SELECTED HISTORICAL STEEL KNIVES BLADES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Pašák

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microstructural and metallurgic analysis of historical steel knives can reveal the technology which was used for their manufacturing and the used heat treatment. The subjects of research were two knife blades found near Čierna Lehota and Cígeľ, Slovak Republic, located in central Europe. The microstructure of the samples was observed in order to explain the technology of heat treatment of the blades. To gain more complex information about properties of the structure the hardness tests and tests of phosphorus segregation were performed along with the chemical analysis by GDOES and EDX. Observation of the polished samples revealed non-metallic impurities and texture after hand forging of the material.

  18. Ecology of Alpine Macrofungi - Combining Historical with Recent Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Ivano; Frey, Beat; Hartmann, Martin; Zimmermann, Stephan; Graf, Frank; Suz, Laura M; Niskanen, Tuula; Bidartondo, Martin I; Senn-Irlet, Beatrice

    2017-01-01

    Historical datasets of living communities are important because they can be used to document creeping shifts in species compositions. Such a historical data set exists for alpine fungi. From 1941 to 1953, the Swiss geologist Jules Favre visited yearly the region of the Swiss National Park and recorded the occurring fruiting bodies of fungi >1 mm (so-called "macrofungi") in the alpine zone. Favre can be regarded as one of the pioneers of alpine fungal ecology not least because he noted location, elevation, geology, and associated plants during his numerous excursions. However, some relevant information is only available in his unpublished field-book. Overall, Favre listed 204 fungal species in 26 sampling sites, with 46 species being previously unknown. The analysis of his data revealed that the macrofungi recorded belong to two major ecological groups, either they are symbiotrophs and live in ectomycorrhizal associations with alpine plant hosts, or they are saprotrophs and decompose plant litter and soil organic matter. The most frequent fungi were members of Inocybe and Cortinarius, which form ectomycorrhizas with Dryas octopetala or the dwarf alpine Salix species. The scope of the present study was to combine Favre's historical dataset with more recent data, either with the "SwissFungi" database or with data from major studies of the French and German Alps, and with the data from novel high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques of soils from the Swiss Alps. Results of the latter application revealed, that problems associated with these new techniques are manifold and species determination remains often unclear. At this point, the fungal taxa collected by Favre and deposited as exsiccata at the "Conservatoire et Jardin Botaniques de la Ville de Genève" could be used as a reference sequence dataset for alpine fungal studies. In conclusion, it can be postulated that new improved databases are urgently necessary for the near future, particularly, with regard to

  19. Rural and historical tourism in Dobrogea

    OpenAIRE

    Sima, Elena

    2014-01-01

    By its geographical location, the rural area from Dobrudgea has a diversified tourism potential, provided by the contrasting natural environmental factors, ranging from the oldest to the youngest relief units, natural protected areas, balneary resources and cultural, historical, religious sites, as well as multicultural local customs and traditions of the rural area. This potential can be used under various forms in the rural area: cultural tourism, historical tourism, religious tourism, e...

  20. Rural and historical tourism in Dobrugea

    OpenAIRE

    Sima, Elena

    2014-01-01

    By its geographical location, the rural area from Dobrudgea has a diversified tourism potential, provided by the contrasting natural environmental factors, ranging from the oldest to the youngest relief units, natural protected areas, balneary resources and cultural, historical, religious sites, as well as multicultural local customs and traditions of the rural area. This potential can be used under various forms in the rural area: cultural tourism, historical tourism, religious tourism, ecot...

  1. The potential of historical hydrology in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Wetter, O.

    2017-01-01

    Historical hydrology is based on data derived from historical written, pictorial and epigraphic documentary sources. It lies at the interface between hydrology and environmental history, using methodologies from both disciplines basically with the goal of significantly extending the instrumental measurement period with experience from the pre-instrumental past. Recently this field of research has gained increased recognition as a tool to improve current flood risk estimation...

  2. Adapting a parser to historical English

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Gerold

    2012-01-01

    The automatic syntactic analysis of natural language texts has made impressive progess. But when applied to historical linguistic texts, parser performance drops considerably. We first report parsing performance on several time periods in the Archer corpus. Second, we implement and evalutate a variety of adaptations to historical texts. We address spelling issues, adapt local grammar rules, and conduct an analysis of errors. Parser performance increases due to our adaptations. This pilot stud...

  3. Pluto Revealed: First Results from the Historic 1st Fly-By Space Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kimberly Ennico

    2015-01-01

    On July 14, 2015, after a 9.5 year trek across the solar system, NASAs New Horizons spacecraft successfully flew by the dwarf planet Pluto and its system of moons, taking imagery, spectra and in-situ particle data. Data obtained by New Horizons will address numerous outstanding questions on the geology and composition of Pluto and Charon, plus measurements of Plutos atmosphere, and provide revised understanding of the formation and evolution of Pluto and Charon and its smaller moons. This data set is an invaluable glimpse into the outer Third Zone of the Solar System. Data from the intense July 14th fly-by sequence will be downlinked to Earth over a period of 16 months, the duration set by the large data set (over 60 GBits), tempered by limited transmission bandwidth rates (1-2 kbps) and sharing the three 70m DSN assets. This presentation summarizes the New Horizons mission and early science results.

  4. Unfolding Leonardo DA Vinci's Globe (ad 1504) to Reveal its Historical World Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, G. J.; Missinne, S. J.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports in detail on the image-based modelling and unwrapping approach used to create a two-dimensional projected map of an astonishing ostrich egg globe from AD 1504. This miniature egg globe is not only the oldest extant engraved globe, but it is also the oldest post-Columbian globe of the world and the first ever to depict Newfoundland and many other territories. The intention of digitally recording the surface geometry and colour of this unique artefact was to portray the original layout of the world map used by the Florentine Renaissance artist to make this globe. In addition, it was expected to substantiate iconographical details, which are hard to study at its scale of 1:80,000,000. The ostrich egg globe is the prototype of the Lenox Globe kept at the New York Public Library. The latter is very beneficial to examine how the egg globe looked like before being glued together at its equator. On the other hand, unfolding the map engraved in the ostrich egg halves enables a more detailed study of the remarkable details visible on both globes, since the engravings on the quasi-white egg surface are much easier to discern than those of the highly reflective red copper Lenox Globe. Finally, a detailed study of the unwrapped 3D surface is essential to learn more about the world vision of its creator and the incredible efforts that went into making this globe. Thanks to some particular pictographic details as well as the way in which the engravings are applied (by a left-handed person), the globe artist can be identified as Leonardo da Vinci.

  5. UNFOLDING LEONARDO DA VINCI’S GLOBE (AD 1504 TO REVEAL ITS HISTORICAL WORLD MAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Verhoeven

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports in detail on the image-based modelling and unwrapping approach used to create a two-dimensional projected map of an astonishing ostrich egg globe from AD 1504. This miniature egg globe is not only the oldest extant engraved globe, but it is also the oldest post-Columbian globe of the world and the first ever to depict Newfoundland and many other territories. The intention of digitally recording the surface geometry and colour of this unique artefact was to portray the original layout of the world map used by the Florentine Renaissance artist to make this globe. In addition, it was expected to substantiate iconographical details, which are hard to study at its scale of 1:80,000,000. The ostrich egg globe is the prototype of the Lenox Globe kept at the New York Public Library. The latter is very beneficial to examine how the egg globe looked like before being glued together at its equator. On the other hand, unfolding the map engraved in the ostrich egg halves enables a more detailed study of the remarkable details visible on both globes, since the engravings on the quasi-white egg surface are much easier to discern than those of the highly reflective red copper Lenox Globe. Finally, a detailed study of the unwrapped 3D surface is essential to learn more about the world vision of its creator and the incredible efforts that went into making this globe. Thanks to some particular pictographic details as well as the way in which the engravings are applied (by a left-handed person, the globe artist can be identified as Leonardo da Vinci.

  6. Origin of the Zika virus revealed: a historical journey across the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlacker, Stephanie; Shafa, Golsa; Aldahan, Adam S; Shah, Vidhi V; Samarkandy, Sahal; Nouri, Keyvan

    2016-12-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus within the Flaviviridae family, the recent spread of which has promoted public concern. This study outlines the clinical features, potential for teratogenicity, diagnosis, and treatment of ZIKV infection. Zika virus is transmitted through the bite of an infected Stegomyia (= Aedes) mosquito, blood transfusion, sexual intercourse, and perinatal routes. Infection has been characterized as mildly symptomatic. Symptoms include mild fever, headache, arthralgia, myalgia, non-purulent conjunctivitis, and a pruritic maculopapular rash. It is rarely life-threatening, but both Guillain-Barré syndrome and fetal microcephaly have been reported. ZIKV belongs to the same family as bovine viral diarrhea virus, which causes hydrocephalus and microcephaly in newborn calves, and hepatitis C virus, which can be vertically transmitted in human pregnancies, and hence there remains concern for potential similarities. Diagnostic methods include polymerase chain reaction performed in blood samples during infection, and in urine and saliva. Pregnant women undergo antibody testing for immunoglobulin M. Treatment involves supportive care, and acetaminophen and antihistamines to control symptoms. Although there was no evidence of the circulation of ZIKV in the Western hemisphere prior to 2014, the global spread of Stegomyia aegypti and increases in urban populations and international travel have fostered its evolution. Adherence to current guidelines for the prevention of ZIKV transmission is especially relevant in regions experiencing ongoing outbreaks. Concern for microcephaly in newborns warrants further investigation into the potential long-term effects of ZIKV infection, especially in relation to reproductive health and mother-fetus transmission. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  7. Population genetic structure and historical demography of Oratosquilla oratoria revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D; Ding, Ge; Ge, B; Zhang, H; Tang, B

    2012-12-01

    Genetic diversity, population genetic structure and molecular phylogeographic pattern of mantis shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria in Bohai Sea and South China Sea were analyzed by mitochondrial DNA sequences. Nucleotide and haplotype diversities were 0.00409-0.00669 and 0.894-0.953 respectively. Neighbor-Joining phylogenetic tree clustered two distinct lineages. Both phylogenetic tree and median-joining network showed the consistent genetic structure corresponding to geographical distribution. Mismatch distributions, negative neutral test and "star-like" network supported a sudden population expansion event. And the time was estimated about 44000 and 50000 years ago.

  8. Genomics reveals historic and contemporary transmission dynamics of a bacterial disease among wildlife and livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Pauline L.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Drees, Kevin P.; Luikart, Gordon; Quance, Christine; Anderson, Neil J.; Clarke, P. Ryan; Cole, Eric K.; Drew, Mark L.; Edwards, William H.; Rhyan, Jack C.; Treanor, John J.; Wallen, Rick L.; White, Patrick J.; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Cross, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing has provided fundamental insights into infectious disease epidemiology, but has rarely been used for examining transmission dynamics of a bacterial pathogen in wildlife. In the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), outbreaks of brucellosis have increased in cattle along with rising seroprevalence in elk. Here we use a genomic approach to examine Brucella abortus evolution, cross-species transmission and spatial spread in the GYE. We find that brucellosis was introduced into wildlife in this region at least five times. The diffusion rate varies among Brucella lineages (B3 to 8 km per year) and over time. We also estimate 12 host transitions from bison to elk, and 5 from elk to bison. Our results support the notion that free-ranging elk are currently a self-sustaining brucellosis reservoir and the source of livestock infections, and that control measures in bison are unlikely to affect the dynamics of unrelated strains circulating in nearby elk populations.

  9. An Interactive Program on Digitizing Historical Seismograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Xu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Retrieving information from historical seismograms is of great importance since they are considered the unique sources that provide quantitative information of historical earthquakes. Modern techniques of seismology require digital forms of seismograms that are essentially a sequence of time-amplitude pairs. However, the historical seismograms, after scanned into computers, are two dimensional arrays. Each element of the arrays contains the grayscale value or RGB value of the corresponding pixel. The problem of digitizing historical seismograms, referred to as converting historical seismograms to digital seismograms, can be formulated as an inverse problem that generating sequences of time-amplitude pairs from a two dimension arrays. This problem has infinite solutions. The algorithm for automatic digitization of historical seismogram presented considers several features of seismograms, including continuity, smoothness of the seismic traces as the prior information, and assumes that the amplitude is a single-valued function of time. An interactive program based on the algorithm is also presented. The program is developed using Matlab GUI and has both automatic and manual modality digitization. Users can easily switch between them, and try different combinations to get the optimal results. Several examples are given to illustrate the results of digitizing seismograms using the program, including a photographic record and a wide-angle reflection/refraction seismogram. Digitized result of the program (redrawn using Golden Software Surfer for high resolution image). (a) shows the result of automatic digitization, and (b) is the result after manual correction.

  10. Historical development of modern anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daniel H; Toledo, Alexander H

    2012-06-01

    Of all milestones and achievements in medicine, conquering pain must be one of the very few that has potentially affected every human being in the world. It was in 1846 that one of mankind's greatest fears, the pain of surgery, was eliminated. This historical review article describes how the various elements of anesthesiology (gasses, laryngoscopes, endotracheal tubes, intravenous medications, masks, and delivery systems) were discovered and how some brilliant entrepreneurs and physicians of the past two centuries have delivered them to humanity. One name stands out amongst all others when the founder of modern anesthesia is discussed, William T.G. Morton (1819-1868). A young Boston Dentist, Dr. Morton had been in the search for a better agent than what had been used by many dentists: nitrous oxide. With Dr. Morton's tenacity driven by enthusiasm and discovery, he and renowned surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital, John Collins Warren (1778-1856) made history on October 16, 1846 with the first successful surgical procedure performed with anesthesia. Dr. Morton had single-handedly proven to the world that ether is a gas that when inhaled in the proper dose, provided safe and effective anesthesia. One of the first accounts of an endotracheal tube being used for an airway comes from the pediatrician Joseph O'Dwyer (1841-1898). He used the metal "O'dwyer" tubes in diphtheria cases and passed them into the trachea blindly. Adding a cuff to the tube is credited to Arthur Guedel (1883-1956) and Ralph M. Waters (1883-1979) in 1932. This addition suddenly gave the practitioner the ability to provide positive pressure ventilation. The anesthesiologist Chevalier Jackson (1865-1958) promoted his handheld laryngoscope for the insertion of endotracheal tubes and its popularity quickly caught hold. Sir Robert Reynolds Macintosh's (1897-1989) breakthrough technique of direct laryngoscopy came after being appointed Nuffield professor of anesthetics at the University of Oxford

  11. Liberal vs. Useful Education: Reevaluating the Historical Appeals to Benjamin Franklin and Aristotle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    In a long-standing debate, those who argue that "useful" studies are liberal have often appealed to Franklin, while those who oppose this have usually appealed to Aristotle. Both of these historical appeals are flawed, however, a fact revealing deeper misunderstanding in the contemporary debate. (Author/MSE)

  12. The essence and historical genesis of public-private partnership in the tourism sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajkova Anastasija Ivanovna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In article historical stages of emergence and state-private partnership (SPP development as tool of the public relations are investigated, the main lines of process of its formation are revealed, potential subjects of business - "participants of SPP" in economic system "tourism" are considered.

  13. Creative Heritage of S. N. Semanov as a Historical Source on the Political History USSR of the 1970th – the 1980th

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Kudrina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In work is considered various works of the prominent Soviet writer and journalist, the convinced Russian national patriot as a historical source. There are revealed the reason of the importance of memoirs and reflections of public figures of the late Soviet era as historical sources. The most significant aspects of a creative heritage of S.N. Semanov for modern historians are defined. The important historical events which found reflections in S. N. Semanov's works are specified.

  14. Android Emotions Revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Schärfe, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    in which case an android robot like the Geminoid|DK –a duplicate of an Original person- reveals emotions convincingly; when following an empirical perspective, or when following a theoretical one. The methodology includes the processes of acquiring the empirical data, and gathering feedback on them. Our...

  15. Historical Museums in Israel: Semiotics of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Mayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tiny by physical size, the State of Israel retains some of the world’s most important cultural treasures, along with many other great cultural institutions. Archeological treasures have yielded much information as far as biblical history and have been well adapted to a Zionist narrative by both the Jewish press and international news organizations, such as the New York Times whose archives are replete with reports of Jewish history being dug up by the Jewish people. Once the State of Israel gained independence in 1948, the course was set for the development of historical museums whose discourse would reflect the most significant events in Jewish history, most especially the Holocaust and the state of constant warfare that continues to imbue the cultural consciousness of its citizens. In this paper we outline, through categorization, the various historical museums, which are currently operating. Furthermore, this article hopes to shed some light upon the cultural sensibilities conveyed through these institutions. This paper is about Israeli culture, mythology, and collective needs, as formed by and informed through a variety of historical museums. The working assumption is that in a historical museum culture is partially formed and at the same time the culture is influencing the contents and narratives on display inside the museum. It should be clear from the start that the discussion is held about Israeli museums as viewed by a Jewish population and created by and for Jews. Notwithstanding the multifaceted collective of Israeli society, this work is confined to and circumscribed by this demarcation. In the following sections, I intend to provide an explanation for this viewpoint from a historical perspective and also provide a framework of what constitutes a historical museum and justify the methodology of its employ. This will be followed by a discussion of the main categorical types of historical museums present in Israel, and finally a

  16. Historical Meadow Dynamics in Southwest British Columbia: a Multidisciplinary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Lepofsky

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent encroachment of woody species threatening many western North American meadows has been attributed to diverse factors. We used a suite of methods in Chittenden Meadow, southwestern British Columbia, Canada, to identify the human, ecological, and physical factors responsible for its historical dynamics and current encroachment by woody vegetation. We evaluated three hypotheses about the origin and processes maintaining the meadow: the meadow is (1 of recent human origin; (2 of ancient human origin, maintained by aboriginal burning; and (3 of ancient non-human origin, not maintained by aboriginal burning. Our data supported the idea that the meadow had ancient non-human origins and its recent history and current status have resulted from complex interactions among landform, climate, and fire. Soil properties (both horizonation and charcoal content indicate that the meadow is of ancient, non-human origin. Tree ages in the meadow and surrounding forest indicate that encroachment is recent, not related to a variety of recent human activities, and is probably a result of increasing spring temperature and decreasing spring snow depth. Although ethnographic surveys and historical documents revealed indigenous use of the general area over millennia, including the use of fire as a management tool, we found little direct evidence of indigenous use of the meadow. However, there was no proxy record of fire frequency in the meadow that we could have used to determine the role of fire in maintaining the meadow in the past, or the role of humans in igniting those fires. Thus, the historical role of humans in the maintenance of the meadow by prescribed fire remains indeterminate. Based on these conclusions, we combined hypotheses (2 and (3 into an a posteriori hypothesis that reflects changing interactions among people, fire, and climate over time. Without management intervention, we expect that tree encroachment will continue. Several general lessons

  17. Chandra Associates Pulsar and Historic Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have found new evidence that a pulsar in the constellation of Sagittarius was created when a massive star exploded, witnessed by Chinese astronomers in the year 386 AD. If confirmed, this will be only the second pulsar to be clearly associated with a historic event. These results were presented today by Victoria Kaspi and Mallory Roberts of McGill University at the American Astronomical Society meeting. Also participating in the research were Gautum Vasisht from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Eric Gotthelf from Columbia University, Michael Pivovaroff from Therma-Wave, Inc., and Nobuyuki Kawai from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan. The scientists used Chandra to locate the pulsar exactly at the geometric center of the supernova remnant known as G11.2-0.3. This location provides very strong evidence that the pulsar, a neutron star that is rotating 14 times a second, was formed in the supernova of 386 AD, and therefore has an age of 1615 years. "Determining the true ages of astronomical objects is notoriously difficult, and for this reason, historical records of supernovas are of great importance,"said Kaspi."In roughly the past 2,000 years, fewer than 10 reports of probable supernovae have been archived mostly by Asian astronomers. Of those handful, the remnant of 1054 AD, the Crab Nebula, was until now the only pulsar whose birth could be associated with a historic event - and, hence, the only neutron star that has a firm age." Between mid-April and mid-May in the year 386 AD, a young "guest star", presumably a supernova, was recorded by Chinese observers in the direction of the sky now known as the constellation of Sagittarius. In the 1970s, radio astronomers discovered an expanding nebula of gas and high-energy particles, called G11.2-0.3, that is believed to be the remnant of that explosion. In 1997, a team of X-ray astronomers used Japan’s ASCA satellite to discover a pulsar

  18. Historical perspectives on literacy in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleeck, Anne; Schuele, C Melanie

    2010-11-01

    To more fully understand current trends in preliteracy research, as well as controversies that continue to surround best teaching practices, it is essential to have an understanding of the historical evolution of ideas and practices relevant to preparing young children for learning to read. Several interrelated historical movements relevant to placing current research and practices related to preliteracy development in context are reviewed. These ideas play out in the interrelated and changing ideas regarding the role of the family in children's literacy development, as well as in the appropriate curriculum for preschoolers. Both historical reviews and original documents pertinent to the various historical trends are used to provide the current synthesis. The roots of most current practices during, and controversies regarding, the preliteracy period of development can be traced to a variety of different historical events, as well as to prominent philosophers and educators. Familiarity with these events, philosophers, and educators provides the perspective needed to effectively evaluate new information and approaches that come to the forefront, or that are currently being practiced by different groups or in different settings.

  19. A short history of Japanese historical seismology: past and the present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsu'ura, Ritsuko S.

    2017-12-01

    Since seismicity in Japan is fairly high, Japanese interest in historical seismicity can be traced back to the nineth century, only a few centuries after the formation of the ancient ruling state. A 1000 years later, 2 years earlier than the modern seismological society was founded, the research on historical seismology started in Japan in 1878. By the accumulation for the recent 140 years, the present Japanese seismologists can read many historical materials without reading cursive scripts. We have a convenient access to the historical information related to earthquakes, in the modern characters of 27,759 pages. We now have 214 epicenters of historical earthquakes from 599 ad to 1872. Among them, 134 events in the early modern period were assigned hypocentral depths and proper magnitudes. The intensity data of 8700 places by those events were estimated. These precise intensity data enabled us to compare the detailed source areas of pairs of repeated historical earthquakes, such as the 1703 Genroku earthquake with the 1923 Kanto earthquake, and the 1707 Hoei earthquake with the summation of the 1854 Ansei Tokai and Ansei Nankai earthquakes. It is revealed that the focal area of the former larger event cannot completely include those of the latter smaller earthquakes, although those were believed to be typical sets of characteristic interplate earthquakes at the Sagami trough and at the Nankai trough. Research on historical earthquakes is very important to assess the seismic hazard in the future. We still have one-fifth events of the early modern period to be analyzed in detail. The compilation of places experienced high intensities in the modern events is also necessary. For the ancient and medieval periods, many equivocal events are still left. The further advance of the interdisciplinary research on historical seismology is necessary.

  20. Narrowing Historical Uncertainty: Probabilistic Classification of Ambiguously Identified Tree Species in Historical Forest Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Mladenoff; Sally E. Dahir; Eric V. Nordheim; Lisa A. Schulte; Glenn G. Gutenspergen

    2002-01-01

    Historical data have increasingly become appreciated for insight into the past conditions of ecosystems, Uses of such data include assessing the extent of ecosystem change; deriving ecological baselines for management, restoration, and modeling; and assessing the importance of past conditions on the composition and function of current systems. One historical data set...

  1. 75 FR 10814 - National Register of Historic Places; Weekly Listing of Historic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service National Register of Historic Places; Weekly Listing of Historic Properties Pursuant...., Lothian, 09001094, LISTED, 12/18/09 Scott, Lula G., Community Center, 6243 Shady Side Rd., Shady Side...

  2. 7 CFR 1901.255 - Historical and archeological assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Historical and archeological assessments. 1901.255... Historical and Archeological Properties § 1901.255 Historical and archeological assessments. (a) The FmHA or... preapplication/application review, prepare a historical and archeological assessment of the undertaking. In...

  3. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; /Marne la Vallee U.; Haddi, Amine; /Marne la Valle U.; Trocellier,; /Saclay; Curti, Enzo; /PSI, Villigen; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  4. Desiccation Resistance in Tigriopus californicus(Copepoda, Harpacticoida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powlik, James J.; Lewis, Alan G.

    1996-10-01

    In field populations and controlled laboratory microcosms, the supralittoral copepod Tigriopus californicusdemonstrated the ability to recover populations from evaporated splashpools. The response to either seawater or rainwater introduction occurred mainly within 24 h, regardless of copepod abundance or substrate material (mixed sediment or dried samples of the alga Enteromorpha compressa). As a proportion of available individuals, the response was quite consistent over all life-history stages. However, egg-carrying females andadult males showed the greatest net increase in individual numbers due to their abundance in source (dried) materials. Enteromorpha compressatreatments hydrated with seawater yielded significantly greater re-animation ( Pdried splashpools probably still yields sufficient numbers of effective intra-pool recolonization. Such a response may be more practical for population endurance in ephemeral supralittoral habitats than reliance on environmental influences (waves, precipitation or transport on coincident invertebrates) or the deposition of encysted eggs.

  5. Teaching Historical Memories in an Intercultural Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibel, Katrine Vinther; Wrochem, Oliver

    How can we approach historical remembrance in history teaching? This question lies at the heart of the three-year, EU-funded project TeacMem,which involves partners from Denmark, Germany and Norway. The participants (teacher trainers, historians, teachers, memorial educators, disseminators...... and students) have studied the memory cultures regarding the Nazi era and World War II in the three countries. Together, they have developed and tested a range of educational methods focusing on the development of historical and intercultural competence in memorials and schools...

  6. Causality and Time in Historical Institutionalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahoney, James; Mohamedali, Khairunnisa; Nguyen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores the dual concern with causality and time in historical institutionalism using a graphical approach. The analysis focuses on three concepts that are central to this field: critical junctures, gradual change, and path dependence. The analysis makes explicit and formal the logic...... underlying studies that use these “causal-temporal” concepts. The chapter shows visually how causality and temporality are linked to one another in varying ways depending on the particular pattern of change. The chapter provides new tools for describing and understanding change in historical- institutional...

  7. The potential of historical hydrology in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetter, Oliver

    2017-11-01

    Historical hydrology is based on data derived from historical written, pictorial and epigraphic documentary sources. It lies at the interface between hydrology and environmental history, using methodologies from both disciplines basically with the goal of significantly extending the instrumental measurement period with experience from the pre-instrumental past. Recently this field of research has gained increased recognition as a tool to improve current flood risk estimations when EU guidelines regulated by law the quantitative consideration of previous floods.1 Awareness to consider pre-instrumental experience in flood risk analysis seems to have risen at the level of local and federal authorities in Switzerland as well. The 2011 Fukushima catastrophe probably fostered this rethinking process, when pressure from the media, society and politics as well as the regulations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) forced the authorities to reassess the current flood risk analysis for Swiss nuclear power plants. In 2015 a historical hydrological study was commissioned by the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN) to assess the magnitudes of pre-instrumental Aare River flood discharges, including the most important tributaries (the Saane, Emme, Reuss and Limmat rivers). The results of the historical hydrological study serve now as the basis for the main study, EXAR (commissioned under the lead of FOEN in cooperation with the Swiss Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI), the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE), the Federal Office for Civil Protection (FOCP), and the Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology (MeteoSwiss)), which combines historical and climatological analysis with statistical approaches and mathematical models with the goal of better understanding the hazards and possible interactions that can be caused by extreme flood events. In a second phase the catchment of the River Rhine will be targeted as well. More recently several local historical

  8. Introductory modern algebra a historical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Stahl, Saul

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition ""Stahl offers the solvability of equations from the historical point of view...one of the best books available to support a one-semester introduction to abstract algebra.""-CHOICE Introductory Modern Algebra: A Historical Approach, Second Edition presents the evolution of algebra and provides readers with the opportunity to view modern algebra as a consistent movement from concrete problems to abstract principles. With a few pertinent excerpts from the writings of some of the greatest mathematicians, the Second Edition uniquely facilitates the understanding of pi

  9. Evocations of a Historical Night in Venice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Anna Marie; Hvejsel, Marie Frier

    Venice is a big dream, at once ineffably meaningful and yet still intangible; not merely to the authors of this paper but to many others as well. Why? Not only are we drawn by its mystery and romance; Venice, this otherworldly city, unfolds an architectural nocturne that in many ways makes histor...... are unfolded by NoRA, an example of how to understand the taste, smell, sound and feeling of the historical city as a point of departure for learning about the contemporary city and importantly; Architecture’s Nocturne....

  10. The potential of historical hydrology in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Wetter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Historical hydrology is based on data derived from historical written, pictorial and epigraphic documentary sources. It lies at the interface between hydrology and environmental history, using methodologies from both disciplines basically with the goal of significantly extending the instrumental measurement period with experience from the pre-instrumental past. Recently this field of research has gained increased recognition as a tool to improve current flood risk estimations when EU guidelines regulated by law the quantitative consideration of previous floods.1 Awareness to consider pre-instrumental experience in flood risk analysis seems to have risen at the level of local and federal authorities in Switzerland as well. The 2011 Fukushima catastrophe probably fostered this rethinking process, when pressure from the media, society and politics as well as the regulations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA forced the authorities to reassess the current flood risk analysis for Swiss nuclear power plants. In 2015 a historical hydrological study was commissioned by the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN to assess the magnitudes of pre-instrumental Aare River flood discharges, including the most important tributaries (the Saane, Emme, Reuss and Limmat rivers. The results of the historical hydrological study serve now as the basis for the main study, EXAR (commissioned under the lead of FOEN in cooperation with the Swiss Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI, the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE, the Federal Office for Civil Protection (FOCP, and the Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology (MeteoSwiss, which combines historical and climatological analysis with statistical approaches and mathematical models with the goal of better understanding the hazards and possible interactions that can be caused by extreme flood events. In a second phase the catchment of the River Rhine will be targeted as well. More recently several local

  11. THE CONCEPTION CULTURAL-HISTORICAL OF LITERACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meire dos Santos Dangió

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article on screen calls into question the cultural-historical conception of literacy in order to point out the relationship between it and the psychic development process of individuals, arguing - in accordance with the theoretical assumptions of historical-cultural psychology, that literacy takes place within a broader process of cultural development and, consequently, a developmental education from an early age. Thus, we defend the thesis that the teacher literacy needs to know the internal connections between literacy, oral language development and the abstractive leap required for its conversion into written language.

  12. [Clinical cases and historical-medical didactics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Giuseppina Bock

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of remarkable documents dating back to the thirties and coming from the Policlinico Surgical Clinic of Milan, offers the possibility to be read in a historical clue too and to compare the constant discordances with the clinical contemporary practice. The aim is to point out the relationship between yesterday knowledges and critical today interpretations. The analysis can be suggested because certainly instructive and formative, also within the historical-medical didactics students of the courses of degree in Medicine and Nursing since the first match with the Medical Faculty.

  13. Historical Network Analysis of the Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2013-01-01

    of the online web has for a number of years gained currency within Internet studies. However, the combination of these two phenomena—historical network analysis of material in web archives—can at best be characterized as an emerging new area of study. Most of the methodological challenges within this new area...... at the Danish parliamentary elections in 2011, 2007, and 2001. As the Internet grows older historical studies of networks on the web will probably become more widespread and therefore it may be about time to begin debating the methodological challenges within this emerging field....

  14. [Vygotsky's Social-Historic Constructivism and nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thofehrn, Maira Buss; Leopardi, Maria Tereza

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to reflect, in the theoretical scope, about the Vygotsky's socio-historical constructivism and the contributions from this Russian researcher to build the nursing knowledge. The Vygotskian approach has as its philosophical, epistemological and methodological purposes, the principles of the historical materialism, it emphasizes the social and cultural context in the working process, also in the use of instruments and in the dialectical interaction between human beings and environment. We understand that the ideas preconized by Vygotsky can represent an alternative method to the practical and theoretical studies, specially, as the subjective dimension of the working process near by the nursing staff.

  15. Revealing the programming process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens; Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important goals of an introductory programming course is that the students learn a systematic approach to the development of computer programs. Revealing the programming process is an important part of this; however, textbooks do not address the issue -- probably because...... the textbook medium is static and therefore ill-suited to expose the process of programming. We have found that process recordings in the form of captured narrated programming sessions are a simple, cheap, and efficient way of providing the revelation.We identify seven different elements of the programming...

  16. TypeScript revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Maharry, Dan

    2013-01-01

    TypeScript Revealed is a quick 100-page guide to Anders Hejlsberg's new take on JavaScript. With this brief, fast-paced introduction to TypeScript, .NET, Web and Windows 8 application developers who are already familiar with JavaScript will easily get up to speed with TypeScript and decide whether or not to start incorporating it into their own development. TypeScript is 'JavaScript for Application-scale development'; a superset of JavaScript that brings to it an additional object-oriented-like syntax familiar to .NET programmers that compiles down into simple, clean JavaScript that any browse

  17. Mysterious Blob Galaxies Revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3 This image composite shows a giant galactic blob (red, figure 2) and the three merging galaxies NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope discovered within it (yellow, figure 3). Blobs are intensely glowing clouds of hot hydrogen gas that envelop faraway galaxies. They are about 10 times as large as the galaxies they surround. Visible-light images like the one shown in figure 2, reveal the vast extent of blobs, but don't provide much information about their host galaxies. Using its heat-seeking infrared eyes, Spitzer was able to see the dusty galaxies tucked inside one well-known blob located 11 billion light-years away. The findings reveal three monstrously bright galaxies, trillions of times brighter than the Sun, in the process of merging together (figure 3). Spitzer also observed three other blobs located in the same cosmic neighborhood, all of which were found to be glaringly bright. One of these blobs is also known to be a galactic merger, only between two galaxies instead of three. It remains to be seen whether the final two blobs studied also contain mergers. The Spitzer data were acquired by its multiband imaging photometer. The visible-light image was taken by the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile.

  18. A mathematical model for the occurrence of historical events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Teruaki

    2017-12-01

    A mathematical model was proposed for the frequency distribution of historical inter-event time τ. A basic ingredient was constructed by assuming the significance of a newly occurring historical event depending on the magnitude of a preceding event, the decrease of its significance by oblivion during the successive events, and an independent Poisson process for the occurrence of the event. The frequency distribution of τ was derived by integrating the basic ingredient with respect to all social fields and to all stake holders. The function of such a distribution was revealed as the forms of an exponential type, a power law type or an exponential-with-a-tail type depending on the values of constants appearing in the ingredient. The validity of this model was studied by applying it to the two cases of Modern China and Northern Ireland Troubles, where the τ-distribution varies depending on the different countries interacting with China and on the different stage of history of the Troubles, respectively. This indicates that history is consisted from many components with such different types of τ-distribution, which are the similar situation to the cases of other general human activities.

  19. Historical tsunami database for France and its overseas territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lambert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A search and analysis of a large number of historical documents has made it possible: (i to discover so-far unknown tsunamis that have hit the French coasts during the last centuries, and (ii conversely, to disprove the tsunami nature of several events referred to in recent catalogues. This information has been structured into a database and also made available as a website (http://www.tsunamis.fr that is accessible in French, English and Spanish. So far 60 genuine ("true" tsunamis have been described (with their dates, causes, oceans/seas, places observed, number of waves, flood and ebb distances, run-up, and intensities and referenced against contemporary sources. Digitized documents are accessible online. In addition, so as to avoid confusion, tsunamis revealed as "false" or "doubtful" have been compiled into a second catalogue.

    Both the database and the website are updated annually corresponding to the state of knowledge, so as to take into account newly discovered historical references and the occurrence of new tsunamis on the coasts of France and many of its overseas territories: Guadeloupe, Martinique, French Guiana, New Caledonia, Réunion, and Mayotte.

  20. Materials, used in historical buildings, analysis methods and solutions puroposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döndüren, M. Sami; Sişik, Ozlem

    2017-10-01

    Most of historical buildings are built with pressure principle and have the characteristics of masonry structures. Therefore, the structure components of buildings are constituted bearing walls, columns, buttresses, vaults and domes. Natural stone, cut stone, rubble stone brick or alternate materials were used in the bearing elements. Brick-dust and mortar with more binding feature were used as combination elements. In time, some problems were occurred in used materials and in structure as a result of various effects. Therefore, it is necessary to apply various applications in framework of repair and strengthening of buildings. In this study, restoration of historic buildings and the control of the adequacy of the bearing systems as one most important part of structure were examined. For this purpose, static analysis of Edirne-Merkez Demirtaş (Timurtaş) mosque located in Edirne was tested. Testes could give suggestions and be applied if buildings needed be revealed. The structure was modelled with finite element model of sap2000 package program and the forces generated under various loads and stresses, the occurred deformation due to that, overflow of allowable stress of this deformation and stresses were investigated. As the results of this study can be note that the maximum compressive stress at the construction is calculated as 1.1 MPa.

  1. Bitcoin and Potosí Silver: Historical Perspectives on Cryptocurrency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Zac

    Bitcoin, the digital cryptocurrency, has been celebrated as the future of money on the Internet. Although Bitcoin does present several forward-looking innovations, it also integrates a very old concept into its digital architecture: the mining of precious metals. Even though Bitcoin explicitly invokes mining as a metaphor and gold as an example for understanding the cryptocurrency, there has been little critical work on the connections between Bitcoin and previous metalist currency regimes. The following essay proposes a historical comparison with colonial South American silver mining and the global currency regime based on the New World silver peso it created as a way to interrogate Bitcoin. The comparison with colonial South America, and specifically the silver mining economy around the Cerro Rico de Potosí, will help to develop a historical and political understanding of Bitcoin's stakes, including questions of resources, labor, energy, and ecology. Mining and the extractive apparatus that accompanies it always imply massive-scale earthworks that reshape the planet itself, a process known as terraforming. The Potosí comparison will reveal Bitcoin to form part of a similar process of digital primitive accumulation we can provisionally name cryptoforming.

  2. Inferring contemporary and historical genetic connectivity from juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feutry, Pierre; Berry, Oliver; Kyne, Peter M; Pillans, Richard D; Hillary, Richard M; Grewe, Peter M; Marthick, James R; Johnson, Grant; Gunasekera, Rasanthi M; Bax, Nicholas J; Bravington, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Measuring population connectivity is a critical task in conservation biology. While genetic markers can provide reliable long-term historical estimates of population connectivity, scientists are still limited in their ability to determine contemporary patterns of gene flow, the most practical time frame for management. Here, we tackled this issue by developing a new approach that only requires juvenile sampling at a single time period. To demonstrate the usefulness of our method, we used the Speartooth shark (Glyphis glyphis), a critically endangered species of river shark found only in tropical northern Australia and southern Papua New Guinea. Contemporary adult and juvenile shark movements, estimated with the spatial distribution of kin pairs across and within three river systems, was contrasted with historical long-term connectivity patterns, estimated from mitogenomes and genome-wide SNP data. We found strong support for river fidelity in juveniles with the within-cohort relationship analysis. Male breeding movements were highlighted with the cross-cohort relationship analysis, and female reproductive philopatry to the river systems was revealed by the mitogenomic analysis. We show that accounting for juvenile river fidelity and female philopatry is important in population structure analysis and that targeted sampling in nurseries and juvenile aggregations should be included in the genomic toolbox of threatened species management. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Historic Bim: a New Repository for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfi, F.; Barazzetti, L.; Previtali, M.; Roncoroni, F.

    2017-05-01

    Recent developments in Building Information Modelling (BIM) technologies are facilitating the management of historic complex structures using new applications. This paper proposes a generative method combining the morphological and typological aspects of the historic buildings (H-BIM), with a set of monitoring information. This combination of 3D digital survey, parametric modelling and monitoring datasets allows for the development of a system for archiving and visualizing structural health monitoring (SHM) data (Fig. 1). The availability of a BIM database allows one to integrate a different kind of data stored in different ways (e.g. reports, tables, graphs, etc.) with a representation directly connected to the 3D model of the structure with appropriate levels of detail (LoD). Data can be interactively accessed by selecting specific objects of the BIM, i.e. connecting the 3D position of the sensors installed with additional digital documentation. Such innovative BIM objects, which form a new BIM family for SHM, can be then reused in other projects, facilitating data archiving and exploitation of data acquired and processed. The application of advanced modeling techniques allows for the reduction of time and costs of the generation process, and support cooperation between different disciplines using a central workspace. However, it also reveals new challenges for parametric software and exchange formats. The case study presented is the medieval bridge Azzone Visconti in Lecco (Italy), in which multi-temporal vertical movements during load testing were integrated into H-BIM.

  4. Integration of Jeddah Historical BIM and 3D GIS for Documentation and Restoration of Historical Monument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baik

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This work outlines a new approach for the integration of 3D Building Information Modelling and the 3D Geographic Information System (GIS to provide semantically rich models, and to get the benefits from both systems to help document and analyse cultural heritage sites. Our proposed framework is based on the Jeddah Historical Building Information Modelling process (JHBIM. This JHBIM consists of a Hijazi Architectural Objects Library (HAOL that supports higher level of details (LoD while decreasing the time of modelling. The Hijazi Architectural Objects Library has been modelled based on the Islamic historical manuscripts and Hijazi architectural pattern books. Moreover, the HAOL is implemented using BIM software called Autodesk Revit. However, it is known that this BIM environment still has some limitations with the non-standard architectural objects. Hence, we propose to integrate the developed 3D JHBIM with 3D GIS for more advanced analysis. To do so, the JHBIM database is exported and semantically enriched with non-architectural information that is necessary for restoration and preservation of historical monuments. After that, this database is integrated with the 3D Model in the 3D GIS solution. At the end of this paper, we’ll illustrate our proposed framework by applying it to a Historical Building called Nasif Historical House in Jeddah. First of all, this building is scanned by the use of a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS and Close Range Photogrammetry. Then, the 3D JHBIM based on the HOAL is designed on Revit Platform. Finally, this model is integrated to a 3D GIS solution through Autodesk InfraWorks. The shown analysis presented in this research highlights the importance of such integration especially for operational decisions and sharing the historical knowledge about Jeddah Historical City. Furthermore, one of the historical buildings in Old Jeddah, Nasif Historical House, was chosen as a test case for the project.

  5. Integration of Jeddah Historical BIM and 3D GIS for Documentation and Restoration of Historical Monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, A.; Yaagoubi, R.; Boehm, J.

    2015-08-01

    This work outlines a new approach for the integration of 3D Building Information Modelling and the 3D Geographic Information System (GIS) to provide semantically rich models, and to get the benefits from both systems to help document and analyse cultural heritage sites. Our proposed framework is based on the Jeddah Historical Building Information Modelling process (JHBIM). This JHBIM consists of a Hijazi Architectural Objects Library (HAOL) that supports higher level of details (LoD) while decreasing the time of modelling. The Hijazi Architectural Objects Library has been modelled based on the Islamic historical manuscripts and Hijazi architectural pattern books. Moreover, the HAOL is implemented using BIM software called Autodesk Revit. However, it is known that this BIM environment still has some limitations with the non-standard architectural objects. Hence, we propose to integrate the developed 3D JHBIM with 3D GIS for more advanced analysis. To do so, the JHBIM database is exported and semantically enriched with non-architectural information that is necessary for restoration and preservation of historical monuments. After that, this database is integrated with the 3D Model in the 3D GIS solution. At the end of this paper, we'll illustrate our proposed framework by applying it to a Historical Building called Nasif Historical House in Jeddah. First of all, this building is scanned by the use of a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) and Close Range Photogrammetry. Then, the 3D JHBIM based on the HOAL is designed on Revit Platform. Finally, this model is integrated to a 3D GIS solution through Autodesk InfraWorks. The shown analysis presented in this research highlights the importance of such integration especially for operational decisions and sharing the historical knowledge about Jeddah Historical City. Furthermore, one of the historical buildings in Old Jeddah, Nasif Historical House, was chosen as a test case for the project.

  6. Non-destructive testing on historical monuments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heruc, S.

    1997-01-01

    Historic monuments are more than just old buildings or architectural importance. They are a symbol of our cultural indentity and in continuity a part of our heritage, and as such it is generally accepted that they should be maintained for so long as possible and without materially altering the

  7. ACCOUNTING PARADIGMS WHICH FAVOR HISTORICAL COST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Gabriel CRISTEA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Henning Kirkegaard shows that the evolution of accounting is to shift from one paradigm to another . Business continuity perspective should guide the company into the future , without confine it exclusively in the past. Accounting in its classical form , however, can not be dissociated from the historical cost evaluation .

  8. Historic magmatism on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peate, David W.; Baker, Joel A.; Jakobssen, Sveinn P.

    2009-01-01

    We present new compositional data on a suite of historic lava flows from the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland. They were erupted over a short time period between c. 940 and c. 1340 AD and provide a snap-shot view of melt generation and evolution processes beneath this onshore, 65 km long, ridge segment...

  9. Electronic Repository of Russian Historical Statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessler, G.C.; Markevich, Andrei

    The Electronic Repository for Russian Historical Statistics brings together data extracted from various published and unpublished sources in one place. Its principal focus is Russian economic and social history of the last three centuries (18th-21st). The repository caters to the needs of the

  10. ASERA: brief histor(y/ies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard; Gardner, Paul; Carr, Malcolm; Jones, Alister; Appleton, Ken; Fleer, Marilyn; Redman, Christine; Dawson, Vaille; Chang, Wen-Hua; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2009-06-01

    This collection of historical accounts provides diverse perspectives on the structure and culture of the community of researchers who participate in activities of the Australasian Science Education Research Association (ASERA). It describes the formation of the Association, and identifies major changes and challenges for the ever growing and internationalisation of its membership.

  11. Electrochemical desalination of historic Portuguese tiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble salts cause severe decay of historic Portuguese tiles. Treatment options for removal of the salts to stop the decay are few. The present paper deals with development of a method for electrochemical desalination, where an electric DC field is applied to the tiles. Laboratory experiments were...

  12. Historical Approaches in German Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heering, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Particularly in the second half of the 20th century, historical approaches became relevant in science education. This development can at least in part be explained with the growing awareness of the importance to address Nature of Science aspects in science education. In comparison to the international publications, some particularities can be…

  13. Electronic Repository of Russian Historical Statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tykhonov, Vyacheslav; Kessler, Gijs; Markevich, Andrei; de Vries, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The Electronic Repository for Russian Historical Statistics brings together data extracted from various published and unpublished sources in one place. Its principal focus is Russian economic and social history of the last three centuries (18th-21st). The repository caters to the needs of the

  14. Historic landscapes in Europe: highlights and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Londen, H.; Ruiz del Árbol, M.; Orejas, A.; Orejas, A.; Mattingly, D.; Clavel-Lévêque, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) of the scientific collaboration developed through the COST A27 meetings and common projects concerning the two major themes of our Action: the close relation between historical-archaeological research and its application

  15. Intercultural Historical Learning: A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Kenneth; Johansson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines a conceptual framework in order to systematically discuss the meaning of intercultural learning in history education and how it could be advanced. We do so by bringing together theories of historical consciousness, intercultural competence and postcolonial thinking. By combining these theories into one framework, we identify…

  16. Supporting Exploration of Historical Perspectives across Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odijk, Daan; Garbacea, Cristina; Schoegje, Thomas; Hollink, Laura; de Boer, Victor; Ribbens, Kees; van Ossenbruggen, Jacco

    2015-01-01

    The ever growing number of textual historical collections calls for methods that can meaningfully connect and explore these. Different collections offer different perspectives, expressing views at the time of writing or even a subjective view of the author. We propose to connect heterogeneous

  17. Supporting Exploration of Historical Perspectives Across Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odijk, D.; Gârbacea, C.; Schoegje, T.; Hollink, L.; de Boer, V.; Ribbens, K.; van Ossenbruggen, J.; Kapidakis, S.; Mazurek, C.; Werla, M.

    2015-01-01

    The ever growing number of textual historical collections calls for methods that can meaningfully connect and explore these. Different collections offer different perspectives, expressing views at the time of writing or even a subjective view of the author. We propose to connect heterogeneous

  18. Naval Postgraduate School Historical Highlights 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, John

    2010-01-01

    The Dudley Knox Library provides historical highlights for the monthly publication, Update NPS. These "caption stories" blend archival photos and documents into a concise storyline to showcase the origin and evolution of NPS as well as achievements of the institution's leaders, faculy and alumni.

  19. Naval Postgraduate School Historical Highlights 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, John

    2009-01-01

    The Dudley Knox Library provides historical highlights for the monthly publication, Update NPS. These "caption stories" blend archival photos and documents into a concise storyline to showcase the origin and evolution of NPS as well as achievements of the institution's leaders, faculy and alumni.

  20. Naval Postgraduate School Historical Highlights 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, John

    2008-01-01

    The Dudley Knox Library provides historical highlights for the monthly publication, Update NPS. These "caption stories" blend archival photos and documents into a concise storyline to showcase the origin and evolution of NPS as well as achievements of the institution's leaders, faculy and alumni.

  1. Naval Postgraduate School Historical Highlights 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, John

    2012-01-01

    The Dudley Knox Library provides historical highlights for the monthly publication, Update NPS. These "caption stories" blend archival photos and documents into a concise storyline to showcase the origin and evolution of NPS as well as achievements of the institution's leaders, faculy and alumni.

  2. Historical understanding and rethinking the foundations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    the disregard for historical information); the method to be applied (structural analysis and the ... Can a method. (consisting of definite steps) be of any use in this regard? In the case of structural analysis the text was viewed as a system of signs wherein the individual sign ..... The life of Jesus. New York: Prometheus Books.

  3. Ideological and Historical Challenges in Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nino, Lana

    2011-01-01

    Business schools bear a central mission in our society and are responsible for training business managers who work in, lead, and indeed control our corporations and drive our economy's wealth. Historical and ideological challenges have influenced business education and steered it off the expected path. Several theoretical frameworks such as…

  4. The Policy Dispositif: Historical Formation and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Patrick L. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a new way of conceptualising education policy and also begins to develop a new method of policy analysis. In both instances, it draws on the theoretical and conceptual tools of Foucault, and in particular his concept "dispositif." It posits an historical and ontological formation -- a policy dispositif -- with…

  5. Robotic Autonomous Observatories: A Historical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Javier Castro-Tirado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a historical introduction to the field of Robotic Astronomy, from the point of view of a scientist working in this field for more than a decade. The author discusses the basic definitions, the differing telescope control operating systems, observatory managers, as well as a few current scientific applications.

  6. Simple Analysis of Historical Lime Mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Joa~o

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which a simple characterization of a historical lime mortar is made by the determination of its approximate composition by a gravimetric method. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are also used for the qualitative characterization of the lime mortar components. These…

  7. Historical memory as an ethnopolitical phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribanov Valeriy Vladimirovich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Historical memory turns out to be an important ethnopolitical phenomenon, when the events of the past of the peoples are used as an argument in the political activities of any entity. The example of the Finno-Ugric peoples of the Russian Federation is used to show the practice of using facts of the past for political purposes.

  8. The Historical Significance of the Universal Declaration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Asbjorn

    1998-01-01

    Explains the historical significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Focuses on the initiative for the Declaration and its elaboration, the precursors to modern human rights, the foundation of the Declaration, the rights contained in the Universal Declaration, three modes of human rights analysis, and global governance and human…

  9. Some Historical Antecedents of Humanistic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Antecedents of humanistic education appear to be economic affluence and technological advancement. Historically, this phenomena occurred in classical Greece; the Renaissance; the agricultural and industrial revolutions in England; the Romantic period; the revolutions in the consciousness created by Marx, Freud, and the existentialists; and the…

  10. Developing Children's Books on Historical Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byford, Jeffrey M.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the creation of children's books as a form of alternative assessment in the history classroom. Describes a project in which high school students developed children's books of historic persons. Incorporates three of Howard Gardner's multiple intelligences: linguistic, spatial, and personal. Provides the assignment, the grading rubric,…

  11. Using Historical Simulations to Teach Political Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorton, William; Havercroft, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    As teachers of political theory, our goal is not merely to help students understand the abstract reasoning behind key ideas and texts of our discipline. We also wish to convey the historical contexts that informed these ideas and texts, including the political aims of their authors. But the traditional lecture-and-discussion approach tends to…

  12. Child Language Disability: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Montfort Supple, Marie; Soderpalm, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    This article traces the historical foundations of the identification of language disorders in childhood through an international perspective. It describes the development of the profession of speech-language pathology, initially in Western Europe and later in North America. The roles played by key researchers in the area of child language are…

  13. Historical Review of Environmental Education in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Tian

    2004-01-01

    This article presents the historical review of environmental education in China. As China's economy began to grow, environmental pollution and ecological destruction initially appeared locally in the early 1980s. These local environmental issues were primarily managed and controlled by state and local environmental protection agencies. In…

  14. Historic Hydroclimatic Variability in Northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Villanueva-Diaz; J. Cerano-Paredes; D.W. Stahle; B. H. Luckman; M.D. Therrell; M.K. Cleaveland; G. Gutierrez-Garcia

    2006-01-01

    The understanding of historic hydroclimatic variability is basic to plan for a proper management of limited water resources in northern Mexico. The objective of this study was to develop a network of tree-ring chronologies for climate reconstruction and to analyze the influence of circulatory patterns, such as ENSO. Climatic sensitive treering chronologies were...

  15. Important Historical Events in Reading Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    This paper lists and dates important historical happenings related to reading instruction. John Locke (1632-1704) was an early advocate that school should be a pleasant place to learn. He believed in the "tabula rasa" theory whereby a student had a mind like a blank sheet with nothing printed initially. Starting from the conception that…

  16. Natural resource management: historical lessons from Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henley, D.E.F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses a variety of historical evidence from Indonesia to explore the conditions for sustainable management of natural resources. In the agricultural sphere, history gives reason for optimism regarding the ability of individuals to conserve and improve soil resources on an uncoordinated,

  17. Comprehension Strategies for Reading Historical Fiction Picturebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Suzette; Serafini, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As the texts readers encounter in and out of school grow in complexity, the strategies that teachers demonstrate and encourage students to employ need to expand to accommodate the changing nature of these texts. In this article, the authors present a three-part framework for utilizing historical fiction picturebooks as instructional resources.…

  18. Historical Consciousness and Sustainable Development in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development studies have become very strategic in charting the way forward for most Third World countries including Nigeria. A historical approach, which is the main thrust of this paper, intends to provide the building blocks, not only for economic advancement but for sustainable development in Nigeria that is ...

  19. Historical trends in physics bachelor degree output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Robert

    1998-09-01

    This article examines long-term historical trends in physics B.S. production, and possible factors responsible for those trends. The factors considered include: a changing profile of college entrants, the increasing lure of engineering, differential grade inflation, old-fashioned pedagogy, and poor teaching. Finally, the article considers whether it matters to society whether physics major enrollments continue to decline.

  20. Perfumed historic buildings: Issues of authenticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tošić Jovana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary historical preservation practice includes olfactory preservation as an experimental method of architectural preservation. The implementation of manufactured scents in historic buildings raises important issues of authenticity. This paper focuses on three important issues in the relation between olfactory preservation and authenticity: the importance of phenomenology in memory evocation; the relative character of the authenticity concept; and the significance of social values in historic preservation. This requires a critical examination of charters, documents and theoretical interpretations which reflect a broader concept of authenticity. The paper discusses certain articles of the Venice Charter, the Nara Document on Authenticity, as well as the sense of smell in architectural experience through critical analysis of the theories of John Ruskin, Viollet-le-Duc, Roger Scruton and Juhani Pallasmaa and their concepts of authenticity. Authenticity issues are illustrated by the examples of olfactory preservation: olfactory reconstruction of Philip Johnson’s Glass House; interior restoration and olfactory reconstruction of the Arts Club in Mayfair, London; and the creation process of the perfume brand Arquiste, a meaningful example which relocates the olfactory reconstruction context. These critical analyses raise the question of scent in historic buildings as a value in itself.

  1. Lexicography in Kenya: A Historical Survey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: This paper traces the historical development of lexicography in Kenya. Attempts are made to show that although Kenya's linguistic landscape boasts with about SO indigenous African languages, very little has been done in the field of compiling their dictionaries, especially by. Kenyans themselves. Particular ...

  2. The Time Machine: Writing Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Kathleen

    2000-01-01

    Discusses historical fiction for children and young adults from a writer's point of view and equates it to a time machine into the past. Considers the books that influenced the writer; larger-than-life characters; story ideas; and research to really know and feel the setting. (LRW)

  3. Historical growth plots in the Pacific Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence A. Rabin; William W. Oliver; Robert F. Powers; Martin W. Ritchie; Matt D. Busse; Eric E. Knapp

    2009-01-01

    In the past, researchers from the Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) undertook forest growth studies to evaluate how best to manage timber resources. However, historical and future data collected at PSW growth plots also have the potential to increase our understanding of the ecological processes occurring in our forests and shed light on national issues of...

  4. Book Review: Insurance in Ethiopia: Historical Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review: Insurance in Ethiopia: Historical Development, Present Status and Future Challenges. ... Journal of Business and Administrative Studies ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would ...

  5. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of thes...

  6. Puerto Rican Gangs: A Historical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Rivera, Edil; Phan, Loan T.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the problem of gangs on the island of Puerto Rico from a historical, economical, and political perspective. Some Puerto Rican historians are convinced that the gang problem in Puerto Rico is due to the political ambiguity and human rights violations of prison inmates (F. Pico, 1998). Some social scientists believe that gangs…

  7. Recent trends in Brazilian Historical Linguistics

    OpenAIRE

    SILVA, Rosa Virgínia Mattos e

    1999-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the new directions taken by Historical Linguistics in Brazil, which gives special attention to Brazilian Portuguese, studying dialectal and sociolinguistic aspects. A special reference is made to projects that bring together researchers from several universities in the country.

  8. Evaluation of the instability problems in rock slopes surrounding historical Safranbolu by kinematic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnan Keskin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Safranbolu which has high probability for slope-induced disasters is a very worthwhile settlement for our country and also for the world with its historical and cultural heritage. Finding out potential hazards that may affect the wealth of this world heritage city is very crucial. The historic Safranbolu is surrounded by very steep rock slopes, and occasionally instability occurs in the rock mass that forms these slopes. The rock blocks that are relaesed in various causes and shapes can damage the historic town living spaces by creating a source for the rock fallings and moving down the slope in these very steep slopes. The rock slopes were evaluated by kinematic analysis in order to reduce the mentioned damages and to reveal potential hazards. In the study, characteristics of mass that causes rock fallings are analysed, kinematic controlled instability types are determined considering the obtained data and characteristic of slopes.

  9. Conceptual Terminological Structure of Pedagogy as the Subject of Historical Pedagogic Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Koshkina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the formation and development of pedagogic terminology. The author theoretically substantiates the potential of the historical pedagogic research concerning the conceptual and terminological structure of the Russian pedagogy. The research is based on the following ideas: correlation between the scientific terminology formation and scientific knowledge genesis; philosophic concept as a form and result of reality reflection; linguistic concept of the term as a functional unit of a scientific language; specifics of pedagogic knowledge reflection in conceptual form. The main research findings include identifying methodological requirements for analyzing the conceptual scientific formation in historical context; substantiating the resource basis; revealing the investigation principles; describing the tools and their implementation peculiarities with regard to the specifics of pedagogical concepts and terms. The acquired results can be used while exploring the pedagogic history problems, pedagogic methodology and terminology. In conclusion, the actual research trends of pedagogic terminology formation are reviewed from the historical pedagogic perspective. 

  10. Conceptual Terminological Structure of Pedagogy as the Subject of Historical Pedagogic Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Koshkina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the formation and development of pedagogic terminology. The author theoretically substantiates the potential of the historical pedagogic research concerning the conceptual and terminological structure of the Russian pedagogy. The research is based on the following ideas: correlation between the scientific terminology formation and scientific knowledge genesis; philosophic concept as a form and result of reality reflection; linguistic concept of the term as a functional unit of a scientific language; specifics of pedagogic knowledge reflection in conceptual form. The main research findings include identifying methodological requirements for analyzing the conceptual scientific formation in historical context; substantiating the resource basis; revealing the investigation principles; describing the tools and their implementation peculiarities with regard to the specifics of pedagogical concepts and terms. The acquired results can be used while exploring the pedagogic history problems, pedagogic methodology and terminology. In conclusion, the actual research trends of pedagogic terminology formation are reviewed from the historical pedagogic perspective. 

  11. Fermented beverages of pre- and proto-historic China

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Patrick E.; Zhang, Juzhong; Tang, Jigen; Zhang, Zhiqing; Hall, Gretchen R.; Moreau, Robert A.; Nuñez, Alberto; Butrym, Eric D.; Richards, Michael P.; Wang, Chen-shan; Cheng, Guangsheng; Zhao, Zhijun; Wang, Changsui

    2004-01-01

    Chemical analyses of ancient organics absorbed into pottery jars from the early Neolithic village of Jiahu in Henan province in China have revealed that a mixed fermented beverage of rice, honey, and fruit (hawthorn fruit and/or grape) was being produced as early as the seventh millennium before Christ (B.C.). This prehistoric drink paved the way for unique cereal beverages of the proto-historic second millennium B.C., remarkably preserved as liquids inside sealed bronze vessels of the Shang and Western Zhou Dynasties. These findings provide direct evidence for fermented beverages in ancient Chinese culture, which were of considerable social, religious, and medical significance, and help elucidate their earliest descriptions in the Shang Dynasty oracle inscriptions. PMID:15590771

  12. The Cultural Historical Complexity of Human Personality Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa E. Wynn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on implicit intelligence has conceptualized students’ beliefs about the nature of intelligence as either fixed or malleable. This research has largely not included African American adolescents, a group for whom beliefs about intelligence have a cultural historical complexity related to both scientific racism and master narratives of race and intelligence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the nature of implicit theories of intelligence for 63 African American adolescents who are seventh and eighth graders in a public charter school. The two-way ANOVA revealed that these adolescents held a malleable view of intelligence, which did not vary by gender or grade. Exploratory correlation analysis showed some consistent relationships with achievement motivation variables found in other studies. These findings may be explained by African American cultural values and the personality characteristic adaptations that they make living within a racialized society.

  13. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: historical origins and current perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenigro, Philip H; Corp, Daniel T; Stein, Thor D; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease that is most often identified in postmortem autopsies of individuals exposed to repetitive head impacts, such as boxers and football players. The neuropathology of CTE is characterized by the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein in a pattern that is unique from that of other neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. The clinical features of CTE are often progressive, leading to dramatic changes in mood, behavior, and cognition, frequently resulting in debilitating dementia. In some cases, motor features, including parkinsonism, can also be present. In this review, the historical origins of CTE are revealed and an overview of the current state of knowledge of CTE is provided, including the neuropathology, clinical features, proposed clinical and pathological diagnostic criteria, potential in vivo biomarkers, known risk factors, and treatment options.

  14. Fermented beverages of pre- and proto-historic China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Patrick E; Zhang, Juzhong; Tang, Jigen; Zhang, Zhiqing; Hall, Gretchen R; Moreau, Robert A; Nuñez, Alberto; Butrym, Eric D; Richards, Michael P; Wang, Chen-Shan; Cheng, Guangsheng; Zhao, Zhijun; Wang, Changsui

    2004-12-21

    Chemical analyses of ancient organics absorbed into pottery jars from the early Neolithic village of Jiahu in Henan province in China have revealed that a mixed fermented beverage of rice, honey, and fruit (hawthorn fruit and/or grape) was being produced as early as the seventh millennium before Christ (B.C.). This prehistoric drink paved the way for unique cereal beverages of the proto-historic second millennium B.C., remarkably preserved as liquids inside sealed bronze vessels of the Shang and Western Zhou Dynasties. These findings provide direct evidence for fermented beverages in ancient Chinese culture, which were of considerable social, religious, and medical significance, and help elucidate their earliest descriptions in the Shang Dynasty oracle inscriptions.

  15. The Serbian and Croatian Historical Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Ramet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Yugoslavia collapsed and descended into war for a number of reasons. The paper is dealing with the role of historical narratives, namely, the failure to develop a common historical narrative, which had the result that the diverse peoples of Yugoslavia had diff erent understandings of some important aspects of their history, both in the remote and the more proximate past. The author discusses the Serbian and Croatian historical narratives, noting especially those areas in which they diff er. Many Serbian politicians looked on the Yugoslav state as a framework within which they could realize the Serbian national idea, which is to say, the idea that all Serbs and Serb-inhabited areas should be united in one state. Many Croats had a rival notion, always resenting the fact that the Serbs constituted the largest national group in the country and dreaming of an independent Croatian state. The author concludes that historical narratives provide frameworks within which a society may fi nd answers to current questions. The problem of legitimacy was fi ltered through the lenses of the historical narrative, so that the system bequeathed by Tito was not just ‘the communist system’, but (for Serbs ‘the anti-Serb federal system, created by the Croat, Tito’ or (for Croats ‘the anti-Croat communist system, dominated by Serbs at the expense of Croats’ or (for Albanians ‘the land of the South Slavs, in which non-Slavs are second class citizens and in which the legitimate rights of the Albanians are quashed’.

  16. Historical emissions critical for mapping decarbonization pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkut, J.; Kopp, R. E.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Oppenheimer, M.

    2016-12-01

    Policymakers have set a goal of limiting temperature increase from human influence on the climate. This motivates the identification of decarbonization pathways to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2. In this context, the future behavior of CO2 sources and sinks define the CO2 emissions necessary to meet warming thresholds with specified probabilities. We adopt a simple model of the atmosphere-land-ocean carbon balance to reflect uncertainty in how natural CO2 sinks will respond to increasing atmospheric CO2 and temperature. Bayesian inversion is used to estimate the probability distributions of selected parameters of the carbon model. Prior probability distributions are chosen to reflect the behavior of CMIP5 models. We then update these prior distributions by running historical simulations of the global carbon cycle and inverting with observationally-based inventories and fluxes of anthropogenic carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. The result is a best-estimate of historical CO2 sources and sinks and a model of how CO2 sources and sinks will vary in the future under various emissions scenarios, with uncertainty. By linking the carbon model to a simple climate model, we calculate emissions pathways and carbon budgets consistent with meeting specific temperature thresholds and identify key factors that contribute to remaining uncertainty. In particular, we show how the assumed history of CO2 emissions from land use change (LUC) critically impacts estimates of the strength of the land CO2 sink via CO2 fertilization. Different estimates of historical LUC emissions taken from the literature lead to significantly different parameterizations of the carbon system. High historical CO2 emissions from LUC lead to a more robust CO2 fertilization effect, significantly lower future atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and an increased amount of CO2 that can be emitted to satisfy temperature stabilization targets. Thus, in our model, historical LUC emissions have a

  17. Methodology to determine the parameters of historical earthquakes in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Lin, Guoliang; Zhang, Zhe

    2017-12-01

    China is one of the countries with the longest cultural tradition. Meanwhile, China has been suffering very heavy earthquake disasters; so, there are abundant earthquake recordings. In this paper, we try to sketch out historical earthquake sources and research achievements in China. We will introduce some basic information about the collections of historical earthquake sources, establishing intensity scale and the editions of historical earthquake catalogues. Spatial-temporal and magnitude distributions of historical earthquake are analyzed briefly. Besides traditional methods, we also illustrate a new approach to amend the parameters of historical earthquakes or even identify candidate zones for large historical or palaeo-earthquakes. In the new method, a relationship between instrumentally recorded small earthquakes and strong historical earthquakes is built up. Abundant historical earthquake sources and the achievements of historical earthquake research in China are of valuable cultural heritage in the world.

  18. Cultural Anthropology Study on Historical Narrative and Jade Mythological Concepts in Records of the Great Historian: Annals of the First Emperor of Qin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN WU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes Records of the Great Historian: Annals of the First Emperor of Qin, an essential historical narrative at the dawning of Chinese civilization, as a case to illustrate the causality of historical incidents and the underlying mythological concepts, reveal the underlying mythological concepts that dominate the ritual behaviors and narrative expressions, and highlight the prototype function of mythological concepts in the man’s behavior and ideology construction. Once the prototype of certain cultural community is revealed, the evolvement track of its historical cultural texts and the operative relations between coding and re-coding will be better understood.

  19. INTERNALISING SIGNS OF OPERATIONS AS BETWEEN HISTORICAL CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY AND HISTORICAL-CRITICAL PEDAGOGY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lígia Márcia Martins

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the theoretical and methodological unity existing between the culturalhistorical psychology and the historical-critical pedagogy, taking the category of mediation as a central element of analysis...

  20. Ecology of Alpine Macrofungi - Combining Historical with Recent Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivano Brunner

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Historical datasets of living communities are important because they can be used to document creeping shifts in species compositions. Such a historical data set exists for alpine fungi. From 1941 to 1953, the Swiss geologist Jules Favre visited yearly the region of the Swiss National Park and recorded the occurring fruiting bodies of fungi >1 mm (so-called “macrofungi” in the alpine zone. Favre can be regarded as one of the pioneers of alpine fungal ecology not least because he noted location, elevation, geology, and associated plants during his numerous excursions. However, some relevant information is only available in his unpublished field-book. Overall, Favre listed 204 fungal species in 26 sampling sites, with 46 species being previously unknown. The analysis of his data revealed that the macrofungi recorded belong to two major ecological groups, either they are symbiotrophs and live in ectomycorrhizal associations with alpine plant hosts, or they are saprotrophs and decompose plant litter and soil organic matter. The most frequent fungi were members of Inocybe and Cortinarius, which form ectomycorrhizas with Dryas octopetala or the dwarf alpine Salix species. The scope of the present study was to combine Favre's historical dataset with more recent data, either with the “SwissFungi” database or with data from major studies of the French and German Alps, and with the data from novel high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques of soils from the Swiss Alps. Results of the latter application revealed, that problems associated with these new techniques are manifold and species determination remains often unclear. At this point, the fungal taxa collected by Favre and deposited as exsiccata at the “Conservatoire et Jardin Botaniques de la Ville de Genève” could be used as a reference sequence dataset for alpine fungal studies. In conclusion, it can be postulated that new improved databases are urgently necessary for the near future

  1. Historical Myths or Mythological History: A Fresh Approach to Understand the History of Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Pranab Jyoti Sarma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper carries out a critical review of the trends of historical writings in Assam. The historiographical study reveals that the beginning of the historical phase was, in fact, late in the North East region. Moreover, in many of these historical writings, the importance of the local histories of the communities of the region was ignored. The author highlights the fact that a pan-Indian history for the region may not be authentic enough to understand the cultural dynamics of the complex society of the Northeast. The author also focuses on corroborating ‘proper’ historical source material for reconstructing the history of the region rather than deriving inferences from mythology and legends. However, the importance of recent trends in historiography such as selective utilisation of oral traditions, folklores and memory studies has been emphasised. An alternative and more precise periodisation of the historical phase has been provided which does not, however, project any clear marker between periods and eras but emphasises on slow and steady transformations. Importance of archaeological sources and material evidence has been kept in mind while deriving periodical divisions. Relooking at the history of the Koches, Kacharis has been emphasised.

  2. A space-for-time (SFT substitution approach to studying historical phenological changes in urban environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Buyantuyev

    Full Text Available Plant phenological records are crucial for predicting plant responses to global warming. However, many historical records are either short or replete with data gaps, which pose limitations and may lead to erroneous conclusions about the direction and magnitude of change. In addition to uninterrupted monitoring, missing observations may be substituted via modeling, experimentation, or gradient analysis. Here we have developed a space-for-time (SFT substitution method that uses spatial phenology and temperature data to fill gaps in historical records. To do this, we combined historical data for several tree species from a single location with spatial data for the same species and used linear regression and Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA to build complementary spring phenology models and assess improvements achieved by the approach. SFT substitution allowed increasing the sample size and developing more robust phenology models for some of the species studied. Testing models with reduced historical data size revealed thresholds at which SFT improved historical trend estimation. We conclude that under certain circumstances both the robustness of models and accuracy of phenological trends can be enhanced although some limitations and assumptions still need to be resolved. There is considerable potential for exploring SFT analyses in phenology studies, especially those conducted in urban environments and those dealing with non-linearities in phenology modeling.

  3. [Historical causality and relative contemporaneity Einsteinian relativity in the historical sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontems, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The construction of historical frame of reference based on the distinction between and articulation of phenomenological and chronological times. As it relativises the notion of simultaneity and inverts its relation to causality, the special theory of relativity can induce analogous modes of reflection on the themes of "contemporaneity" in the history of art (Panofsky) and in epistemology (Bachelard). This "relativist" method, often misunderstood, sheds light on both historical and presentist methods.

  4. Genetic bottlenecks in time and space: reconstructing invasions from contemporary and historical collections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor E Dormontt

    Full Text Available Herbarium accession data offer a useful historical botanical perspective and have been used to track the spread of plant invasions through time and space. Nevertheless, few studies have utilised this resource for genetic analysis to reconstruct a more complete picture of historical invasion dynamics, including the occurrence of separate introduction events. In this study, we combined nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite analyses of contemporary and historical collections of Senecio madagascariensis, a globally invasive weed first introduced to Australia c. 1918 from its native South Africa. Analysis of nuclear microsatellites, together with temporal spread data and simulations of herbarium voucher sampling, revealed distinct introductions to south-eastern Australia and mid-eastern Australia. Genetic diversity of the south-eastern invasive population was lower than in the native range, but higher than in the mid-eastern invasion. In the invasive range, despite its low resolution, our chloroplast microsatellite data revealed the occurrence of new haplotypes over time, probably as the result of subsequent introduction(s to Australia from the native range during the latter half of the 20th century. Our work demonstrates how molecular studies of contemporary and historical field collections can be combined to reconstruct a more complete picture of the invasion history of introduced taxa. Further, our study indicates that a survey of contemporary samples only (as undertaken for the majority of invasive species studies would be insufficient to identify potential source populations and occurrence of multiple introductions.

  5. Genetic bottlenecks in time and space: reconstructing invasions from contemporary and historical collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormontt, Eleanor E; Gardner, Michael G; Breed, Martin F; Rodger, James G; Prentis, Peter J; Lowe, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Herbarium accession data offer a useful historical botanical perspective and have been used to track the spread of plant invasions through time and space. Nevertheless, few studies have utilised this resource for genetic analysis to reconstruct a more complete picture of historical invasion dynamics, including the occurrence of separate introduction events. In this study, we combined nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite analyses of contemporary and historical collections of Senecio madagascariensis, a globally invasive weed first introduced to Australia c. 1918 from its native South Africa. Analysis of nuclear microsatellites, together with temporal spread data and simulations of herbarium voucher sampling, revealed distinct introductions to south-eastern Australia and mid-eastern Australia. Genetic diversity of the south-eastern invasive population was lower than in the native range, but higher than in the mid-eastern invasion. In the invasive range, despite its low resolution, our chloroplast microsatellite data revealed the occurrence of new haplotypes over time, probably as the result of subsequent introduction(s) to Australia from the native range during the latter half of the 20th century. Our work demonstrates how molecular studies of contemporary and historical field collections can be combined to reconstruct a more complete picture of the invasion history of introduced taxa. Further, our study indicates that a survey of contemporary samples only (as undertaken for the majority of invasive species studies) would be insufficient to identify potential source populations and occurrence of multiple introductions.

  6. Genetic Bottlenecks in Time and Space: Reconstructing Invasions from Contemporary and Historical Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormontt, Eleanor E.; Gardner, Michael G.; Breed, Martin F.; Rodger, James G.; Prentis, Peter J.; Lowe, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Herbarium accession data offer a useful historical botanical perspective and have been used to track the spread of plant invasions through time and space. Nevertheless, few studies have utilised this resource for genetic analysis to reconstruct a more complete picture of historical invasion dynamics, including the occurrence of separate introduction events. In this study, we combined nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite analyses of contemporary and historical collections of Senecio madagascariensis, a globally invasive weed first introduced to Australia c. 1918 from its native South Africa. Analysis of nuclear microsatellites, together with temporal spread data and simulations of herbarium voucher sampling, revealed distinct introductions to south-eastern Australia and mid-eastern Australia. Genetic diversity of the south-eastern invasive population was lower than in the native range, but higher than in the mid-eastern invasion. In the invasive range, despite its low resolution, our chloroplast microsatellite data revealed the occurrence of new haplotypes over time, probably as the result of subsequent introduction(s) to Australia from the native range during the latter half of the 20th century. Our work demonstrates how molecular studies of contemporary and historical field collections can be combined to reconstruct a more complete picture of the invasion history of introduced taxa. Further, our study indicates that a survey of contemporary samples only (as undertaken for the majority of invasive species studies) would be insufficient to identify potential source populations and occurrence of multiple introductions. PMID:25192006

  7. The artful mind meets art history: toward a psycho-historical framework for the science of art appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullot, Nicolas J; Reber, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws in the psychological approach, we introduce a psycho-historical framework for the science of art appreciation. This framework demonstrates that a science of art appreciation must investigate how appreciators process causal and historical information to classify and explain their psychological responses to art. Expanding on research about the cognition of artifacts, we identify three modes of appreciation: basic exposure to an artwork, the artistic design stance, and artistic understanding. The artistic design stance, a requisite for artistic understanding, is an attitude whereby appreciators develop their sensitivity to art-historical contexts by means of inquiries into the making, authorship, and functions of artworks. We defend and illustrate the psycho-historical framework with an analysis of existing studies on art appreciation in empirical aesthetics. Finally, we argue that the fluency theory of aesthetic pleasure can be amended to meet the requirements of the framework. We conclude that scientists can tackle fundamental questions about the nature and appreciation of art within the psycho-historical framework.

  8. The Historical Construction of the Mediterranean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenech, Dominic; Pace, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    that brought the Mediterranean back into the limelight, as Europe first and then other world players recognized that the region’s concerns were also their own. Looking at the contemporary Mediterranean the authors see in it a scale-model of world affairs, a concentration of intense political situations......Ideas about what the Mediterranean is, was or is imagined to be abound, and the debate over definition continues to intrigue scholars more than ever, especially as the region’s heightened newsworthiness in recent years has forced the protagonists of world affairs to turn their attention to it....... Historically the status of the Mediterranean has changed over and over again, in terms of unity and cohesion, or lack thereof, but also of the region’s shifting place in the global hierarchy of power. The post-Cold War era rekindled or exposed a host of historically-engrained problems and developments...

  9. Historical floods in the Dutch Rhine Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Glaser

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical records provide direct information about the climatic impact on society. Especially great natural disasters such as river floods have been for long attracting the attention of humankind. Time series for flood development on the Rhine branches Waal, Nederrijn/Lek and IJssel in the Dutch Rhine Delta are presented in this paper. In the case of the Waal it is even possible to compare historical flood frequencies based on documentary data with the recent development reconstructed from standardized instrumental measurements. In brief, we will also discuss various parameters concerning the structure of the flood series and the "human dimension" of natural disaster, i.e. the vulnerability of society when facing natural disasters.

  10. Aromatherapy and nursing: historical and theoretical conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Rizzo Gnatta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aromatherapy is a Practical or Complementary Health Therapy that uses volatile concentrates extracted from plants called essential oils, in order to improve physical, mental and emotional well-being. Aromatherapy has been practiced historically and worldwide by nurses and, as in Brazil is supported by the Federal Nursing Council, it is relevant to discuss this practice in the context of Nursing through Theories of Nursing. This study of theoretical reflection, exploratory and descriptive, aims to discuss the pharmacognosy of essential oils, the historical trajectory of Aromatherapy in Nursing and the conceptions to support Aromatherapy in light of eight Nursing Theorists (Florence Nightingale, Myra Levine, Hildegard Peplau, Martha Rogers, Callista Roy, Wanda Horta, Jean Watson and Katharine Kolcaba, contributing to its inclusion as a nursing care practice.

  11. [Aromatherapy and nursing: historical and theoretical conception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnatta, Juliana Rizzo; Kurebayashi, Leonice Fumiko Sato; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes da

    2016-02-01

    Aromatherapy is a Practical or Complementary Health Therapy that uses volatile concentrates extracted from plants called essential oils, in order to improve physical, mental and emotional well-being. Aromatherapy has been practiced historically and worldwide by nurses and, as in Brazil is supported by the Federal Nursing Council, it is relevant to discuss this practice in the context of Nursing through Theories of Nursing. This study of theoretical reflection, exploratory and descriptive, aims to discuss the pharmacognosy of essential oils, the historical trajectory of Aromatherapy in Nursing and the conceptions to support Aromatherapy in light of eight Nursing Theorists (Florence Nightingale, Myra Levine, Hildegard Peplau, Martha Rogers, Callista Roy, Wanda Horta, Jean Watson and Katharine Kolcaba), contributing to its inclusion as a nursing care practice.

  12. Historical aspects of human presence in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsch, V.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: This paper presents the development of human presence in Space from its beginnings. Study hypotheses were based on historical findings on scientific, medical, cultural, and political aspects of manned Space flight due to the different attitudes of Space minded nations and organizations. Impacts of aerospace medicine on the advances of biomedical sciences will be touched upon, as well as the historical development of aviation and Space medical achievements which are described briefly and visions for future developments are given. Methods: An overview was gained by literature-study, archives research and oral history taking. Results: Aviation Medicine evolved parallel to Man's ability to fly. War-triggered advancements in aviation brought mankind to the edge of space-equivalent conditions within a few decades of the first motor-flight, which took place in the USA in 1903 [V. Harsch, Aerospace medicine in Germany: from the very beginnings, Aviation and Space Environment Medicine 71 (2000) 447-450 [1

  13. Earthquake Response of a Historical Castle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Qamaruddin

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The earthquake hazard potential in the Sultanate of Oman is considered real as there are several reports of felt earthquakes in the Sultanate of Oman during the period from years 977 to 1998, although no damage to the existing structures has been reported due to earthquakes. In Oman, seismic zoning map and other basic data are required for the development of a standard code for seismic design of structures. In this paper, seismic response of a historical Nizwa castle in Oman is assessed employing the methodology of Uniform Building Code (UBC, 1994. Also, in the absence of data pertaining to the seismic zone factor and the site coefficient, the seismic response study is carried out by assuming appropriate values of these parameters. The results of such investigation are presented in this paper. The results show that some retrofitting measures have to be undertaken in order that the existing historical building may survive in a possible damaging earthquake.

  14. Preserving the acoustical heritage of historical buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    with the present state building. Next step is to identify what historic conditions that should be reconstructions, especially architectural details, surface materials, obstacles, textiles, performing persons and audience, and typical sounds or music. The computer model is then modified according to these data......The use of virtual reality and auralization techniques has opened new possibilities for the study of acoustical conditions in historic buildings. With reference to some recent and current projects the paper describes the steps in the process and how new technology may be used to overcome some...... of the difficulties involved. If the building exists as a whole or partly the first step is collection of geometrical and architectural data from the site. The level of detail may be huge, e.g. if laser scanning is used for providing the geometrical data, and some degree of simplification may be necessary...

  15. Postmodernism, historical denial, and history education:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert John Parkes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available History educators frequently ignore, or engage only reluctantly and cautiously with postmodernism. This is arguably because postmodernism is frequently accused of assaulting the epistemological foundations of history as an academic discipline, fostering a climate of cultural relativism, encouraging the proliferation of revisionist histories, and providing fertile ground for historical denial. In the Philosophy of History discipline, Frank Ankersmit has become one of those scholars most closely associated with ‘postmodern history’. This paper explores Ankersmit’s ‘postmodern’ philosophy of history, particularly his key notion of ‘narrative substances’; what it might do for our approach to a problem such as historical denial; and what possibilities it presents for history didactics.

  16. Comparative Studies: historical, epistemological and methodological notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Piovani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article some historical, epistemological and methodological issues related to comparative studies in the social sciences are addressed, with specific reference to the field of education. The starting point is a discussion of the meaning of comparison, its logical structure and its presence in science and in everyday life. It follows the presentation and critical appraisal of the perspectives regarding comparison as a scientific method. It is argued that, even rejecting this restrictive meaning of comparison as a method, there is some consensus on the specificity of comparative studies within the social sciences. And in relation to them, the article address in more detail those studies that can be defined as trans-contextual (cross-national and cross-cultural, with emphasis on the main methodological and technical challenges they face. The socio-historical comparative perspective, which has gained importance in recent years in the field of education, is also discussed.

  17. Scanning and georeferencing historical USGS quadrangles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, Kristin A.; Davis, Larry R.; Allord, Gregory J.

    2017-06-23

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program is scanning published USGS 1:250,000-scale and larger topographic maps printed between 1884, the inception of the topographic mapping program, and 2006. The goal of this project, which began publishing the Historical Topographic Map Collection in 2011, is to provide access to a digital repository of USGS topographic maps that is available to the public at no cost. For more than 125 years, USGS topographic maps have accurately portrayed the complex geography of the Nation. The USGS is the Nation’s largest producer of traditional topographic maps, and, prior to 2006, USGS topographic maps were created using traditional cartographic methods and printed using a lithographic process. The next generation of topographic maps, US Topo, is being released by the USGS in digital form, and newer technologies make it possible to also deliver historical maps in the same electronic format that is more publicly accessible.

  18. Historic Sites and National Register of Historic Places - BRIDGES_HISTORIC_IDNR_IN: Historic Bridge Locations in Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology, 1:5,000, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — IDNR documentation states - “This dataset contains point locations of historic bridges in Indiana. It includes buildings, districts, sites, structures and objects...

  19. Solution of Fire Protection in Historic Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iringová Agnes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces optimization of the functional use of renovated spaces in historic buildings in terms of fire risk. It brings assessment of fire protection in the folk house Habánsky Dvor, situated in the village of Veľké Leváre, whose function was changed into the museum. It goes into static analysis of existing load-bearing structures and assessment of their fire resistance according to Eurocodes.

  20. Performer rights and responsibilities in historical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irving John

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In April 2014, fortepianist and Mozart specialist John Irving recorded a CD of solo keyboard sonatas by Joseph Haydn, using a modern copy of a Viennese fortepiano of Haydn’s era. This is an account of the project written from the performer’s perspective, examining some relevant issues of historical performance practice, organology, and detailed reflections upon the performer’s preparations (of various musical and technical kinds for the recording.

  1. Irrigation as an Historical Climate Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Shukla, Sonali P.; Puma, Michael J.; Nazarenko, Larissa S.

    2014-01-01

    Irrigation is the single largest anthropogenic water use, a modification of the land surface that significantly affects surface energy budgets, the water cycle, and climate. Irrigation, however, is typically not included in standard historical general circulation model (GCM) simulations along with other anthropogenic and natural forcings. To investigate the importance of irrigation as an anthropogenic climate forcing, we conduct two 5-member ensemble GCM experiments. Both are setup identical to the historical forced (anthropogenic plus natural) scenario used in version 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, but in one experiment we also add water to the land surface using a dataset of historically estimated irrigation rates. Irrigation has a negligible effect on the global average radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere, but causes significant cooling of global average surface air temperatures over land and dampens regional warming trends. This cooling is regionally focused and is especially strong in Western North America, the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and Asia. Irrigation enhances cloud cover and precipitation in these same regions, except for summer in parts of Monsoon Asia, where irrigation causes a reduction in monsoon season precipitation. Irrigation cools the surface, reducing upward fluxes of longwave radiation (increasing net longwave), and increases cloud cover, enhancing shortwave reflection (reducing net shortwave). The relative magnitude of these two processes causes regional increases (northern India) or decreases (Central Asia, China) in energy availability at the surface and top of the atmosphere. Despite these changes in net radiation, however, climate responses are due primarily to larger magnitude shifts in the Bowen ratio from sensible to latent heating. Irrigation impacts on temperature, precipitation, and other climate variables are regionally significant, even while other anthropogenic forcings (anthropogenic aerosols

  2. Historic Landscape Survey, Randolph AFB, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    etc. in landscape architecture or landscape gardening. 3.2 Site and layout In historic landscape studies, the term “ landscape characteristic” has...tarian spaces were located at the edges of the cantonment and featured less decoration in both landscaping and architectural ornamentation. This spatial...level of planning and attention to architectural detailing that characterized the construction of Randolph Field was also extended to the landscape

  3. Historic Landscape Survey, Maxwell AFB, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    trend, event, etc. in landscape architecture or landscape gardening. 3.2 Site and layout In historic landscape studies, the term “ landscape ...TR-13-12 97 The circular layout and modern architecture of Area 1400 was complemented by an extensive landscape plan. Figure 91 is a vegetation...significant alteration) and applies to activities as diverse as community planning, engineering, architecture , and landscape architecture . Design

  4. Masers and lasers an historical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolotti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    This book examines the progress of research and practical use of lasers chronologically, covering the fundamental science in detail alongside fascinating biographical sketches of famous physicists and summaries of seminal papers. It supplies helpful drawings of prototype devices, conceptual diagrams to aid in understanding, and remarkable historical photographs. The Second Edition features new chapters on ultrashort pulse lasers and nonlinear optics, incorporates the latest developments and insights from key scientists, and includes extensive updates on fiber lasers, amplifiers, ultraviolet an

  5. The Historical Basis of Aceh Development

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Özay

    2012-01-01

    Abstract It is vital to see the connection between experiences in history and contemporary developments in almost all corners of the world. Regions which appear as leading powers in economic developments have historically had their own particular dynamics. In the event that the dynamics of the past uncover the true means to go forward, it will trigger the path of progress at an unexpected time, when similar conditions are met. Taking this condition into account with regard to A...

  6. Model of historical education and teacher training

    OpenAIRE

    Gerardo Daniel Mora Hernández; Rosa Ortiz Paz

    2017-01-01

    In Mexico Model Historical Education is an educational proposal that is based on the interaction with primary sources and use of analytical concepts ("second order"). Training model as part of the "representations" of student teachers of history and teaching -tradicionalistas- confronted with experiential activities. Follow the procedural learning teaching model. He concludes with the teaching work in real conditions ("situated learning"), the drafting of a "receptional document" and the prof...

  7. Historical and personal recollections of Guido Altarelli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Giorgio

    2017-12-01

    In this paper I will present a short scientific biography of Guido Altarelli, briefly describing some of his most important seminal works. I will analyze in great details the paper of the q2 evolution of the effective quark distribution: I will put this paper in a historical perspective, describing our theoretical understanding at that time and the reasons why the paper was so successful.

  8. Getting It Right: Historical Fiction or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElmeel, Sharron L.

    2009-01-01

    There seems to be widespread agreement that to qualify as historical, the book's main plot must be set in the past. But how far in the past? Thirty years is sometimes listed as a standard. But does that mean set 30 years at the time the book is written or 30 years from the time it is read? The general consensus is that the book is what it is at…

  9. A Historical Overview of Preeclampsia-Eclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mandy J.

    2010-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive, multi-system disorder of pregnancy whose etiology remains unknown. Although management is evidence-based, preventative measures/screening tools are lacking, treatment remains symptomatic, and delivery remains the only cure. Past hypotheses/scientific contributions have influenced current understanding of preeclampsia pathophysiology and guided management strategies and classification criteria. To provide insight into how past hypotheses/scientific contributions have shaped current practice trends, this paper provides a historical overview of preeclampsia-eclampsia. PMID:20919997

  10. A Historical Perspective on Light Infantry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    for reinforcements, a shelter for recuperating• columns, and a collection point for casualties. Theme strongholds, islands in a sea of Jung ~le, are... Douglas MacArthur, pushed confidently through the mountains of North Korea toward the Yalu River and the Manchurian border, Composed in almost equal...Operations in Korea, 1950-1953, vol. 3, The Chosin Reservoir Campaign (Wi~shington, DC: Historical Branch, G-3, U.S. Marine Corps, 1957; St. Clair

  11. The Fair Trade Network in Historical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Fridell , Gavin

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the fair trade network within the context of the post-war international development regime. In recent years, sales of fair trade goods — both commodities and handicrafts — have grown substantially in Europe and North America, and the fair trade network has been relatively successful at gaining the support of public institutions, international financial institutions, and transnational corporations. This paper argues that this success, when viewed historically, can only be p...

  12. Tactile hallucinations: conceptual and historical aspects.

    OpenAIRE

    Berrios, G E

    1982-01-01

    A brief historical analysis of the general concept of hallucination is presented and the suggestion is made that it emerged as the unwarranted generalisation of a perceptual model that was meant to apply only to vision and the "distance senses". Against this background the evolution of tactile hallucinations is considered and its interaction with 19th century psychological theory explored. It is concluded that tactile hallucinations are sui generis phenomena which do not fit the conventional ...

  13. Historical understanding and teaching in professional psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David B

    2002-08-01

    The teaching of the history of psychology in professional psychology training programs presents to students and teachers any number of opportunities and challenges. The increasing number of professional psychologists teaching the history of psychology coupled with advances in historical scholarship point to an ongoing evolution in the teaching of the history of psychology. In this introduction to the articles that follow, issues of content and context in teaching the history of psychology in professional psychology are discussed and affirmations offered.

  14. Spatial variability of "Did You Feel It?" intensity data: insights into sampling biases in historical earthquake intensity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent parallel development of improved quantitative methods to analyze intensity distributions for historical earthquakes and of web‐based systems for collecting intensity data for modern earthquakes provides an opportunity to reconsider not only important individual historical earthquakes but also the overall characterization of intensity distributions for historical events. The focus of this study is a comparison between intensity distributions of historical earthquakes with those from modern earthquakes for which intensities have been determined by the U.S. Geological Survey “Did You Feel It?” (DYFI) website (see Data and Resources). As an example of a historical earthquake, I focus initially on the 1843 Marked Tree, Arkansas, event. Its magnitude has been previously estimated as 6.0–6.2. I first reevaluate the macroseismic effects of this earthquake, assigning intensities using a traditional approach, and estimate a preferred magnitude of 5.4. Modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) values for the Marked Tree earthquake are higher, on average, than those from the 2011 >Mw 5.8 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake for distances ≤500  km but comparable or lower on average at larger distances, with a smaller overall felt extent. Intensity distributions for other moderate historical earthquakes reveal similar discrepancies; the discrepancy is also even more pronounced using earlier published intensities for the 1843 earthquake. I discuss several hypotheses to explain the discrepancies, including the possibility that intensity values associated with historical earthquakes are commonly inflated due to reporting/sampling biases. A detailed consideration of the DYFI intensity distribution for the Mineral earthquake illustrates how reporting and sampling biases can account for historical earthquake intensity biases as high as two intensity units and for the qualitative difference in intensity distance decays for modern versus historical events. Thus, intensity maps for

  15. Historical Biogeography Using Species Geographical Ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Ignacio; Keil, Petr; Jetz, Walter; Crawford, Forrest W

    2015-11-01

    Spatial variation in biodiversity is the result of complex interactions between evolutionary history and ecological factors. Methods in historical biogeography combine phylogenetic information with current species locations to infer the evolutionary history of a clade through space and time. A major limitation of most methods for historical biogeographic inference is the requirement of single locations for terminal lineages, reducing contemporary species geographical ranges to a point in two-dimensional space. In reality, geographic ranges usually show complex geographic patterns, irregular shapes, or discontinuities. In this article, we describe a method for phylogeographic analysis using polygonal species geographic ranges of arbitrary complexity. By integrating the geographic diversification process across species ranges, we provide a method to infer the geographic location of ancestors in a Bayesian framework. By modeling migration conditioned on a phylogenetic tree, this approach permits reconstructing the geographic location of ancestors through time. We apply this new method to the diversification of two neotropical bird genera, Trumpeters (Psophia) and Cinclodes ovenbirds. We demonstrate the usefulness of our method (called rase) in phylogeographic reconstruction of species ancestral locations and contrast our results with previous methods that compel researchers to reduce the distribution of species to one point in space. We discuss model extensions to enable a more general, spatially explicit framework for historical biogeographic analysis. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Historical Events and People in Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmor, C. Stewart

    This book is a selection of some of the papers given at a historical symposium sponsored by the Interdivisional Commission on History of the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) during ihe International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) General Assembly held in Hamburg in 1983. Most of the papers are from a session on historical events or people, chaired by Schroder, but several are included from a related session on historical scientific records, chaired by J. Feynman (Boston College, Boston, Mass.). The articles cover a number of topics, such as biography. Fine examples here are the article on Balfour W. Currie (1902-1981), the Canadian upper atmosphere physicist (it is a pity that a photograph of h im was not included), or the article on Erich Regener (1881-1955), German pioneer in cosmic ray and upper atmosphere physics. Other articles concern the history of observatories (such as Ben Nevis) or the genesis of concepts (L. Biermann of t h e Max-Planck-Institut, Garching, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), on the solar wind). H. Schmidlin (Denzlingen, FRG) presents excellent “insider” comments on the development of early gravimeters; such comments should be studied by contemporary sociologists of science.

  17. Nationalist Netizens in China: Online Historical Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Bislev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese government is currently performing a delicate act of balance: attempting to foster a "healthy" nationalism among the young generation in China while, at the same time, having to deal with the at times rather loud and uncompromising expression of this nationalism online. By examining examples of online debates on issues of national interest; in this case the Spratly Islands and the animosity between a Chinese and a Japanese child, this article discusses the use of historical imagery in online historical debates and demonstrates a linkage between the version of Chinese history promulgated in the so-called patriotic education campaign and the rhetoric used online. Even though the viewpoints expressed in the two debates vary widely, the central theme of how to deal with China’s past plays a strong role in both debates. I argue that though the Chinese government has been rather successful in promoting this reliance on a certain historical perspective to understand present day China’s place in the world, the online nationalist expressions take on a life of their own partly due to China’s very special internet culture.

  18. Historical restoration recipes: the cleaning of paintings 1600-1900

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stols-Witlox, M.; Bridgland, J.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about historical cleaning methods and materials is important since remnants may still be presentwithin the paint structure and should be taken into account when interpreting instrumental analyses and deciding about future conservation treatments. This paper provides analyses of historical

  19. Fort Bliss Standards for the Treatment of Historic Buildings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stone, Sunny; Smith, Adam; Murphy, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    This report satisfies Section 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) of 1966 as amended and will help the Fort Bliss Cultural Resources Office and Directorate of Public Works in managing their historic building...

  20. ISLSCP II Historical Croplands Cover, 1700-1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Historical Croplands Cover data set was developed to understand the consequences of historical changes in land use and land cover for ecosystem goods and...

  1. ISLSCP II Historical Croplands Cover, 1700-1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Historical Croplands Cover data set was developed to understand the consequences of historical changes in land use and land cover for ecosystem goods...

  2. Testing a pedagogy for promoting historical contextualization in classrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, Tim; Holthuis, Paul; van Boxtel, Carla; van de Grift, Wim

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the development and testing of a pedagogy aimed at promoting students’ ability to perform historical contextualization. Promoting historical contextualization was conceptualized as three different pedagogical principles: 1) the awareness of the consequences of a present-oriented

  3. International Polar Year Historical Data and Literature, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The International Polar Year Historical Data and Literature collection (formerly known as the Discovery and Access of Historic Literature from the IPYs (DAHLI)...

  4. Matching current windstorms to historical analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Bernd; Maisey, Paul; Scannell, Claire; Vanvyve, Emilie; Mitchell, Lorna; Steptoe, Hamish

    2015-04-01

    European windstorms are capable of producing devastating socioeconomic impacts. They are capable of causing power outages to millions of people, closing transport networks, uprooting trees, causing walls, buildings and other structures to collapse, which in the worst cases has resulted in dozens of fatalities. In Europe windstorms present the greatest natural hazard risk for primary insurers and result in the greatest aggregate loss due to the high volume of claims. In the winter of 2013/2014 alone storms Christian, Xaver, Dirk and Tini cost the insurance industry an estimated EUR 2.5 bn. Here we make use of a high resolution (4 km) historical storm footprint catalogue which contains over 6000 storms. This catalogue was created using the 35 year ERA-Interim model reanalysis dataset, downscaled to 12 km and then to 4.4 km. This approach was taken in order to provide a long term, high resolution data set, consistent with Met Office high resolution deterministic forecast capability for Europe. The footprints are defined as the maximum 3 second gust at each model grid point over a 72 hour period during each storm. Matches between current/forecast storm footprints and footprints from the historical catalogue are found using fingerprint identification techniques, by way of calculating image texture derived from the gray-level-co-occurrence matrix (Haralick, 1973). The best match is found by firstly adding the current or forecast footprints to the stack of the historical storm catalogue. An "identical twin" or "best match" of this footprint is then sought from within this stack. This search is repeated for a set of measures (15 in total) including position of the strongest gusts, storm damage potential and 13 Haralick measures. Each time a candidate is found, the nearest neighbours are noted and a rank proximity measure is calculated. Finally, the Frobenius norm (distance between the two fields at each grid-point averaged) is calculated. This provides an independent

  5. GPR application to historical buildings structural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettinelli, E.; Barone, P. M.; Mattei, E.; Di Matteo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Preservation of historical buildings requires particular care, as any intervention must conducted in a way which does not alter or damage the style, structure or contents of the edifice. In order to properly plan the restoration of a building, non-destructive techniques can be extensively used to detect structural elements and weaknesses. Ground Penetrating Radar is particularly well adapted to this type of work, as the method is non-invasive, rapid, and provides high resolution images of contrasting subsurface materials. In the present work we show three case-histories on three historical buildings - different in age, structure and geometry - in which GPR technique has been successfully used. To obtain 2D time slices of the investigated area, high frequency bistatic GPR (900 MHz and 1GHz antennas) was applied in each site, acquiring data along several parallel profiles. The first case presented here, is the GPR detection of the fractures and the internal lesions in the architrave of the Porticus Octaviae, a Roman building partially restored, located downtown Rome. The second case shows the application of the GPR to detect the internal structure of the floors above the vaulted ceilings that houses a series of 16th century frescos in the important Zuccari Palace, also located in Rome. Finally, the third case illustrates the application of GPR to reconstruct the geometry and the reinforcement structures of the floors and the inside walls of the Provincial Palace of Pescara, dated back to the Fascist age. These three examples show that GPR technique is a valid support which, in exhaustive way, can highlight the state of conservation of historical buildings. In particular, this technique can produce fundamental information for the restorers, in terms of location, dimension, and geometry of the internal lesions in the structure, helping them in developing the best possible protection plan for an historical building. REFERENCES Annan A.P.; 2004: Ground Penetrating Radar

  6. Land of Lincoln: The Teaching of an Historical Icon at the University of Illinois, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Hansen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The celebrations of the 2009 Lincoln Bicentennial revealed the continuing struggle to separate the man from the myth. Lincoln, who has long become an icon of popular culture, as a subject for teaching thus challenges teachers and students alike to divorce the historical figure from his cultural representation(s, which tends to push from view the complexities of his character and his age.

  7. From Homo Sapiens to Homo Cosmicus - Astronautics, Darwinism abd Historical Determinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkowsky, G.

    Since its inception in late-nineteenth century, astronautics has been viewed as a historical outcome of human evolution as well as a future driver thereof. The history of astronautics-related, evolutionary thought reveals a tension between the Darwinian notion of natural selection and that of homocosmic predestination - be it of dialectical materialistic or theological nature. One can detect the influence of this ideological diversity on the American and Soviet space programs.

  8. Memory and historical Jesus studies: Formgeschichte in a new dress?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the quest for the historical Jesus, memory studies are seen as an important breakthrough in the study of the historical Jesus and the way forward in establishing the historicity of the Gospel traditions. This article evaluates the claim made by memory studies by evaluating memory studies' critique on the methodology of the ...

  9. 30 CFR 872.21 - What are historic coal funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION MONEYS AVAILABLE TO ELIGIBLE STATES AND INDIAN TRIBES § 872.21 What are historic coal funds? (a) “Historic coal funds” are moneys provided under section 402(g)(5) of... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are historic coal funds? 872.21 Section...

  10. Historical Research: A Lens for Family and Consumer Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickols, Sharon Y.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes various historical research methods and presents examples of their application in family and consumer sciences (FCS). Historical research preserves the heritage of FCS through greater understanding of the development of the field and practitioners of the profession. Furthermore, historical research can revitalize…

  11. A case for historical and landscape approaches to geography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Historical and Landscape approaches to the study of geography are issues that have loomed large in methodological discussions in geography. This paper evaluates and discusses the arguments about historical and landscape geography. It examines the methodological problems in historical and landscape geography,

  12. DoD Sustainability Application Guide for Historic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    historic materials and craftsmanship are virtually impossible to duplicate today without signifi- cant cost. Therefore, utilizing existing historic...effort is renewable energy, while virtually all machine energy comes from nonrenewable resources. Clean equipment responsibly. Follow federal...However, this may simply move construction activi- ties to installation access points such as historic gatehouses . Since 9/11, guard houses, pass

  13. Walter Schmithals: His contribution to the theological and historical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article describes how Schmithals combines historical criticism with the core tenets of Protestant theology. The following facets were emphasised: Gnosticism, gospel studies and Q, Paul, early Christianity, emperor cult, separation from the synagogue, historical Jesus, apocalypticism, historical Jesus, the relationship ...

  14. HISTORICAL-CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND HISTORICAL-CULTURALPSYCHOLOGY: INFERENCES IN TEACHERSTRAININGAND WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristhyane Ramos Haddad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the historical-critical pedagogy and historical-cultural psychology, also rehearses to make inferences for teacher training in Brazil. Therefore, was sought to theoretical base in authors such as Dermeval Saviani, Newton Duarte, Vygotsky, Leontiev, Ligia Marcia Martins, Marilda Facci, Marta Sforni. The historical-critical pedagogy postulates that the educational actis characterized by intentionality, aiming as objective the appropriation of knowledge systematized by the student. In the same sense, the historical- cultural psychology understands that the learning of knowledge scholarship is critical for the development of higher psychological functions. The good teaching in this perspective is the one that promotes the development of the individual that is always asocial and historical development. These approaches are confronting and overcoming the pedagogies of learning to learn that find their foundation in constructivism and who claim that more important than teaching or learning is to take the student to find ways to learn how to learn. The teacher’s job, according to these pedagogies, is of a learning facilitator, which has led to an undermining of their function and causing serious consequences for the teaching learning process of students in the classroom. Finally, this article points according to the marxist perspective the omnilateral defense of teachers training as an indispensable element for the progress toward the consolidation of a quality public education.

  15. Cultural and historical origins of modern sports (the first message

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl Sutula

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to reveal the cultural and historical origins of modern sports. Material & Methods: research methods consist of the analysis of the specialized literature that highlights various aspects of the development of the field of people's activities related to the use of physical exercises, as well as the application of a systematic and historiographical approach to the analysis of this problem. To solve the tasks set, an analysis was carried out of the print publications available in the Google Books library, which cover the period from the late 16th century to the present and in which the term "sport". Results: materials obtained using the search engine "Google Books Ngram Viewer" indicate that, since the end of the 16th century in English-language prints, and therefore in social practice, for the generalized name of entertainment activities, people have been used, to some extent, as synonyms, the terms "sport" and "disport" (from the old French "disporter". And in the process of historical development of society the frequency of using the term "sport", with respect to the frequency of using the term "disport", has constantly grown. Analysis of materials available in the library "Google Books" also indicates that in the process of socio-cultural evolution, the content of the concept of "sport" in English-speaking practice changed. Conclusion: analysis of the literature showed that the problem of the "beginning" of modern sports is one of the top priorities in the development of the general theory. The results of the study indicate that at the beginning of the 19th century the term "sport" was used in English-speaking practice for a more expressive definition of the subjective sense of people's pleasure from completely different activities, that is, to emphasize that such activity was for them a kind of hobby , entertainment, fun.

  16. Ocean Connections with the Historic Whaling Ship Charles W. Morgan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    This scientific outreach project involved the Charles W. Morgan, Mystic Seaport's historic whaling ship. We educated K-2 students, trained undergraduate and graduate students, and informed the general public about oceanographic data collection, pathways from coastal to ocean waters, and connections in marine ecosystems. I was aboard the Charles W. Morgan for the Provincetown to Stellwagen Bank leg of the historic 38th voyage in summer 2014. While at sea, our voyager team released several GPS-tracked surface drifters to reveal important flow pathways and how the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary is connected to other ocean areas. These drifters were built by graduate and undergraduate students and the drifter artwork was designed by elementary school students. Surface currents dispersed the drifters and carried them much farther offshore than the Charles W. Morgan itself. Many drifters reached Georges Bank, another important biologically productive area. The Charles W. Morgan encountered whales for the first time in decades. Some of the food-chain connections that may explain the abundance of whales at Stellwagen bank that summer are described. This outreach project has been presented in lectures to high school teachers and the general public and also featured in an online interview, a television news story, and a newspaper article. K-2 students at an elementary school math and science day first painted drifters in advance of the voyage, viewed real-time updates in the months following drifter release, and engaged in activities illustrating ocean connectivity and marine habitats at the end of the following academic year. We aimed to convey how sensitive whales are to human activities (on land and water) and to changes in the marine environment. Successes and lessons learned will be discussed. ED003: Creative Ways to Connect Ocean Sciences to the Public

  17. Universality of Man as a Cultural and Historical Human Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Gontcharov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On the grounds of theoretical synthesis, the paper reveals the phenomenon of human being in its creative dimension. The present research is aimed at exploring the prospective opportunities for academic processes. The basics of universal essence of man as a cultural historic being with unlimited potential of self- development are defined; the man being mirrored by the basic philosophic concepts: naturalistic, orthodox-oriented, bio-social or bio-socio-cultural. There are two opposing views on human nature: the anthropological essentialism holding that individuality is predetermined by essence; and the anthropological existentialism claiming the opposite – human existence precedes the essentiality, the latter being constituted by the acts of choice, self-development and self-responsibility for personal choice and projecting. In the first case, the subjective side of human existence is ignored, while in the second – the objective socially conditioned side is left behind. Both theories are antihistorical as it is the history that conditions the essence of man according to the ancestral determination, the latter being modified by way of human activity and communication in a particular historical period. The components of human universal essence are defined as follows: possession of organic body, social heritage, free will, self-activity, creativity, social and rational human nature, absence of antagonistic programs of social behavior. According to the author, for the adequate realization of human universality, it is necessary to move from the profit oriented speculative market economy to the creative one oriented on social effectiveness, quality of life and reproduction of wholesome individuals. The research output can be used for devising the methodology of philosophic and pedagogic anthropology, as well as pedagogic practices of teaching philosophy and pedagogic theory in higher school. 

  18. Documenting historic and recent extreme floods in Kashmir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Cánovas, Juan Antonio; Koul Tasaduq, Hussain; Alamgir Shabir, Hussain; Shah Mutayib, Bashir; Stoffel, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Kashmir has been frequently subjected to massive floods along its history. The recent extreme flood events which occurred during September 2014, March 2015 and September 2015 have revealed the high vulnerability of its population. Causes of recent extreme flood events have been attributed to the bowl shaped topography, intense land-use changes and unfavorable climatic change conditions at the onset of the monsoon as well as due to the occurrence of westerly disturbances. This reality implies new challenges to authorities and calls for the development of suitable adaptation strategies focusing on a minimization of the expected negative impacts on inhabitants during future extreme floods. In this context, long-term records can improve our understanding about the flood frequency as well as changes in climate - and land-use - linkages. In this communication, we present an extensive flood records from Kashmir by combining historical descriptions with tree-ring records from headwater catchments as well as with the existing flow gauge records. Historical sources include old records from archives of the Irrigation and Flood Control Department of flood events which have taken place at Jhelum River, but also old pictures and other documents about the river system, going back in time to the British period. At the headwater catchment, we additionally perform tree-ring analyses coupled with classical palaeohydraulic techniques to reconstruct the magnitude and occurrence of recent, yet ungauged extreme events. Both sources of data have been compared and merged with the existing flow records in order to provide a clearer picture about flood phenomena in this region. Historical archives corroborate the assumption that that Srinagar (the main city of Kashmir), as well as the surroundings crops land, have been frequently affected by floods. Although the oldest records are from the 19th century, dense annals including information about water levels are available after the 18th

  19. DIALECTIC HISTORICAL MATERIALISM : CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE CULTURALHISTORICAL THEORY AND THE CRITICAL-HISTORICAL PEDAGOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Junior Bonfim Joia Pereira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This text presents a study of historical-critical pedagogy and cultural-historical psychology and its goal is to show the theoretical approach that exists between them and their contributions to the school education. This interest appeared as soon as we could see that these two concepts are present in academic publications and productions that discuss school and educational work, however some aspects are still not very clear for the educators who follow this line of thought. So, we organized the text in a way that clarifies that dialectical and historical materialism as a philosophical principle, covers these two theories allowing, in the educational field, they can be adopted as a benchmark for the development of educational work.

  20. [Historical research in psychoanalysis. On the method of historical research in psychoanalysis. Reflections of a psychoanalyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merendino, R

    1993-01-01

    Psychoanalysis, aside from being a therapeutic science, is a historical science: it is concerned not only with man himself, but also with his biography, the products of his intellect and of his hands. As historical research, it has adopted research methods proper to history: documents are collected and supplemented with biographical data, connections are woven together and processes are established. But it does not stop at this point: it seeks to understand, through the study of documentary material, the workings of the mind, beyond direct observation. Documents are treated as "signs" and "manifestations" of this world of representations, of fantasies and forces that constitute the ultimate matrix of subjective individual events and historical events. The research method is, at this level, the same that is used to decipher the unconscious world and dream messages: the recounted, experienced, or certified events are considered to be dreams or fragments of dreams, effects of condensation, moving, schisms, and fragmentations carried out by the thought process.

  1. Assessing historical fish community composition using surveys, historical collection data, and species distribution models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Labay

    Full Text Available Accurate establishment of baseline conditions is critical to successful management and habitat restoration. We demonstrate the ability to robustly estimate historical fish community composition and assess the current status of the urbanized Barton Creek watershed in central Texas, U.S.A. Fish species were surveyed in 2008 and the resulting data compared to three sources of fish occurrence information: (i historical records from a museum specimen database and literature searches; (ii a nearly identical survey conducted 15 years earlier; and (iii a modeled historical community constructed with species distribution models (SDMs. This holistic approach, and especially the application of SDMs, allowed us to discover that the fish community in Barton Creek was more diverse than the historical data and survey methods alone indicated. Sixteen native species with high modeled probability of occurrence within the watershed were not found in the 2008 survey, seven of these were not found in either survey or in any of the historical collection records. Our approach allowed us to more rigorously establish the true baseline for the pre-development fish fauna and then to more accurately assess trends and develop hypotheses regarding factors driving current fish community composition to better inform management decisions and future restoration efforts. Smaller, urbanized freshwater systems, like Barton Creek, typically have a relatively poor historical biodiversity inventory coupled with long histories of alteration, and thus there is a propensity for land managers and researchers to apply inaccurate baseline standards. Our methods provide a way around that limitation by using SDMs derived from larger and richer biodiversity databases of a broader geographic scope. Broadly applied, we propose that this technique has potential to overcome limitations of popular bioassessment metrics (e.g., IBI to become a versatile and robust management tool for determining

  2. Historical hydronuclear testing: Characterization and remediation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaulis, L.; Wilson, G.; Jacobson, R.

    1997-09-01

    This report examines the most current literature and information available on characterization and remediation technologies that could be used on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) historical hydronuclear test areas. Historical hydronuclear tests use high explosives and a small amount of plutonium. The explosion scatters plutonium within a contained subsurface environment. There is currently a need to characterize these test areas to determine the spatial extent of plutonium in the subsurface and whether geohydrologic processes are transporting the plutonium away from the event site. Three technologies were identified to assist in the characterization of the sites. These technologies are the Pipe Explorer{trademark}, cone penetrometer, and drilling. If the characterization results indicate that remediation is needed, three remediation technologies were identified that should be appropriate, namely: capping or sealing the surface, in situ grouting, and in situ vitrification. Capping the surface would prevent vertical infiltration of water into the soil column, but would not restrict lateral movement of vadose zone water. Both the in situ grouting and vitrification techniques would attempt to immobilize the radioactive contaminants to restrict or prevent leaching of the radioactive contaminants into the groundwater. In situ grouting uses penetrometers or boreholes to inject the soil below the contaminant zone with low permeability grout. In situ vitrification melts the soil containing contaminants into a solid block. This technique would provide a significantly longer contaminant immobilization, but some research and development would be required to re-engineer existing systems for use at deep soil depths. Currently, equipment can only handle shallow depth vitrification. After existing documentation on the historical hydronuclear tests have been reviewed and the sites have been visited, more specific recommendations will be made.

  3. 19th Century Ankara Through Historical Poems

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    Özge Öztekin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A city is a place whose meaning is found in the poetry created there. In Kevin Lynch’s words, a city presents the imagination with an unlimited potential for “readability”. If we consider this unlimited readability through poetry, it can be said that attempts to find the zeitgeist of a city at a certain time through literary texts must evaluate the poetry, the city and the time. This is because poetry (or literature in general, just like a city, has an important memory which oscillates through ideas of its past and future. In this sense, divan poetry and one particular example of it—historical “manzume” poems—are memories which richly illustrate the ‘continuity’ and ‘change’ within a period. This work, on 19th century Ankara, aims to evaluate the traces reflected in historical manzume poems of the time they were written. Five historical manzume poems in three texts out of seventy 19th century divan collections scanned for this work were found to be about Ankara. Two of these manzumes are by Cazib, one by Ziver Pasha, and one by Mahmud Celaleddin Pasha. The first of these is on Ankara’s dervish lodge; the second on a barracks being built in Ankara; the third on Vecihi Pasha’s governorship of Ankara; the fourth on the the Mayoral Residence. In addition to these, a manzume on the construction of Hamidiye Caddesi by Mahmud Celaleddin Pasha is discovered with in scope of the work. The aim of this work is to provide a contribution to city history through a commentary on elements of 19th century poetry concerning Ankara.

  4. Whole Genome Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of a Historical Collection of Bacillus anthracis Strains from Danish Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derzelle, Sylviane; Girault, Guillaume; Kokotovic, Branko

    2015-01-01

    of such lineage in Europe is demonstrated for the first time, filling an historical gap within the phylogeography of the lineage. Comparative genome analyses of these strains with 41 isolates from other parts of the world revealed that the two Danish A.Br.008/011 strains were related to the heroin...

  5. Empathy as a Tool for Historical Understanding: An Evaluative Approach of the Ancient Greek Primary History Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarakou, Elisabeth D.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examines the ancient Greek history curriculum and the corresponding textbook as they are implemented in the fourth grade of primary school in an aim to determine whether and to what extent empathy is recognized as a fundamental tool for historical understanding. A close examination of the curriculum revealed that empathy is not…

  6. A Historical Materialist Analysis of the Debate in Swedish Print Media on Mobile Phones in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Torbjörn

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile phones for teaching and learning in schools has been a controversial matter. In this paper the debate in two Swedish newspapers on the use of mobile phones in schools is analysed using a historical materialist framework. The results are discussed in relation to contemporary research on mobile learning. The analysis reveals that…

  7. [Inequity in health: its historical development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaverry García, Oswaldo

    2013-01-01

    Health inequity, main issue of contemporary debates on public health, is based on philosophical and historical concepts that date back to the idea of justice from classic Greece. The Aristotelian approach on distributive justice and its higher form, epiekeia or equity, has been reviewed, as well as how this evolves from the Middle Ages and modernity to the heart of the debate of a variety of thinkers such as liberal Rawls and Nobel laureate Amartya Sen. On this conceptual debate lies the World Health Organization version that links equity to health determinants and intends to make it operational through the equitable provision of health services.

  8. People Recognition: A Historical/Anthropological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ardila

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Using current neurological and neuropsychological literature, and the analysis of different cultural and historical conditions, people recognition is analyzed. Different “subsystems” or “modules” could be involved in individuals' recognition: living versus non-living, own species versus other species, familiar versus non-familiar, males versus females, and individual identification versus emotional identification. Not only visual, but also auditory and even olfactory information may be involved in people recognition. Visual information involved in people recognition is proposed to include not only the perception of faces, but also the perception of whole body and gait, clothes, emotional expressions, and individual marks.

  9. Lumbar hernia: a short historical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, Antonino; De Toma, Giorgio; Cavallaro, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare form of abdominal hernia, which has been recognized later along the early development of the modern surgery. it has been, on many occasions, the object of heavy debate regarding its anatomical background and as well its etiology. The authors reports the historical aspects of this rare pathology, focusing on the earliest descriptions of hernia arising in lumbar regions, on the first reports of surgical repair, and on the anatomical description of the lumbar weakness areas, that are currently named Petit's triangle and Grynfeltt and Lesshaft's triangle.

  10. Mathematics education and comparative historical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner RODRIGUES VALENTE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper has as its aims: to characterize the area of research «history of mathematics education» and to defend the idea that mathematics education has constituted a privileged research theme within the field of comparative historical studies. To achieve these aims, the text includes references to a review of the literature concerning comparative studies, the analysis of two fundamental moments focused on attempts to internationalize the mathematics curriculum, both of which occurred during the 20th century, and, to end, a case study emanating from an international cooperation between researchers in Brazil and Portugal.

  11. Renovation of historic, protected buildings in Geneva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.; Haefeli, P.

    2009-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on work done within the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Program's Task 37. The objective of SHC Task 37 is to develop a solid knowledge base on how to renovate housings to a very high energy standard and how to develop strategies that support the market penetration of such renovation methods. The report deals with four listed buildings of historical value in Geneva, Switzerland, and examines various aspects of the renovation. These aspects include a discussion of the techniques applied, including internal and external insulation. Simulation methods used and results obtained are discussed. The improvements made are evaluated.

  12. Model of historical education and teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Daniel Mora Hernández

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Mexico Model Historical Education is an educational proposal that is based on the interaction with primary sources and use of analytical concepts ("second order". Training model as part of the "representations" of student teachers of history and teaching -tradicionalistas- confronted with experiential activities. Follow the procedural learning teaching model. He concludes with the teaching work in real conditions ("situated learning", the drafting of a "receptional document" and the professional examination (reflexive teaching.This training model we have developed in the specialty of History of Bachelor of Secondary Education in Higher Normal School of Mexico since 2006, advising a hundred students.

  13. Historical review of tutorial in education

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    María Gabriela Luna Pérez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, tutorials have always been of an individual character in the history of education. The paper reviews how tutorials in education have evolved from ancient Greece to the present by considering taking into account the following aspects: a its general understanding, b the favorite areas of orientation c the role of learning guiding process d the supporting role of tutorials. We offer a historical account of tutorials development in Mexican Education. The study provides the main trends of tutorial activities in primary education, the evidence confirmed that tutoring has evolved from the learning of philosophical and ethical questions to the multiple learning involving competencies.

  14. Millimeter wave imaging: a historical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Roger; Robertson, Duncan A.; Wikner, David

    2017-05-01

    The SPIE Passive and Active Millimeter Wave Imaging conference has provided an annual focus and forum for practitioners in the field of millimeter wave imaging for the past two decades. To celebrate the conference's twentieth anniversary we present a historical review of the evolution of millimeter wave imaging over the past twenty years. Advances in device technology play a fundamental role in imaging capability whilst system architectures have also evolved. Imaging phenomenology continues to be a crucial topic underpinning the deployment of millimeter wave imaging in diverse applications such as security, remote sensing, non-destructive testing and synthetic vision.

  15. Harnessing Digital Workflows for Conserving Historic Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Quintero, M.

    2017-05-01

    Recording the physical characteristics of historic structures and landscapes is a cornerstone of preventive maintenance, monitoring and conservation. The information produced by such work assists the decision-making process for property owners, site managers, public officials, and conservators. Rigorous documentation may also serve a broader purpose: over time, it becomes the primary means by which scholars and the public apprehend a site that has since changed radically or disappeared. These records also serve as posterity and monitoring records in the event of catastrophic or gradual loss of the heritage resource.

  16. An interactive program on digitizing historical seismograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yihe; Xu, Tao

    2014-02-01

    Retrieving information from analog seismograms is of great importance since they are considered as the unique sources that provide quantitative information of historical earthquakes. We present an algorithm for automatic digitization of the seismograms as an inversion problem that forms an interactive program using Matlab® GUI. The program integrates automatic digitization with manual digitization and users can easily switch between the two modalities and carry out different combinations for the optimal results. Several examples about applying the interactive program are given to illustrate the merits of the method.

  17. In Situ Preservation of Historic Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, R.; Brooks, R.

    The loss of the Mir space station is shown to symbolize a new consciousness of the value of space artefacts. The reasons why such artefacts as Mir become historic objects worthy of preservation are examined. Preservation of space vehicles in situ is discussed, with particular reference to safety, monitoring and long term costs. An argument is made for a wider definition for World Heritage designations to include material beyond the surface of the Earth, and for international bodies to assess, monitor and oversee these projects. Such heritage sites are seen as an economic driver for the development of space tourism in the 21st century.

  18. Ischia Island: Historical Seismicity and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlino, S.; Cubellis, E.; Iannuzzi, R.; Luongo, G.; Obrizzo, F.

    2003-04-01

    The seismic energy release in volcanic areas is a complex process and the island of Ischia provides a significant scenario of historical seismicity. This is characterized by the occurence of earthquakes with low energy and high intensity. Information on the seismicity of the island spans about eight centuries, starting from 1228. With regard to effects, the most recent earthquake of 1883 is extensively documented both in the literature and unpublished sources. The earthquake caused 2333 deaths and the destruction of the historical and environmental heritage of some areas of the island. The most severe damage occurred in Casamicciola. This event, which was the first great catastrophe after the unification of Italy in the 1860s (Imax = XI degree MCS), represents an important date in the prevention of natural disasters, in that it was after this earthquake that the first Seismic Safety Act in Italy was passed by which lower risk zones were identified for new settlements. Thanks to such detailed analysis, reliable modelling of the seismic source was also obtained. The historical data onwards makes it possible to identify the area of the epicenter of all known earthquakes as the northern slope of Monte Epomeo, while analysis of the effects of earthquakes and the geological structures allows us to evaluate the stress fields that generate the earthquakes. In a volcanic area, interpretation of the mechanisms of release and propagation of seismic energy is made even more complex as the stress field that acts at a regional level is compounded by that generated from migration of magmatic masses towards the surface, as well as the rheologic properties of the rocks dependent on the high geothermic gradient. Such structural and dynamic conditions make the island of Ischia a seismic area of considerable interest. It would appear necessary to evaluate the expected damage caused by a new event linked to the renewal of dynamics of the island, where high population density and the

  19. Historical species losses in bumblebee evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condamine, Fabien L; Hines, Heather M

    2015-03-01

    Investigating how species coped with past environmental changes informs how modern species might face human-induced global changes, notably via the study of historical extinction, a dominant feature that has shaped current biodiversity patterns. The genus Bombus, which comprises 250 mostly cold-adapted species, is an iconic insect group sensitive to current global changes. Through a combination of habitat loss, pathogens and climate change, bumblebees have experienced major population declines, and several species are threatened with extinction. Using a time-calibrated tree of Bombus, we analyse their diversification dynamics and test hypotheses about the role of extinction during major environmental changes in their evolutionary history. These analyses support a history of fluctuating species dynamics with two periods of historical species loss in bumblebees. Dating estimates gauge that one of these events started after the middle Miocene climatic optimum and one during the early Pliocene. Both periods are coincident with global climate change that may have extirpated Bombus species. Interestingly, bumblebees experienced high diversification rates during the Plio-Pleistocene glaciations. We also found evidence for a major species loss in the past one million years that may be continuing today. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Collecting, digitizing, and distributing historical seismological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Alberto; De Simoni, Bruno; Amato, Alessandro; Boschi, Enzo

    The digital preservation of the unique seismological heritage consisting of historical seismograms and earthquake bulletins, and of related documentation (e.g., observatory logbooks, station books, etc.), is critically important in order to avoid deterioration and loss overtime [Kanamori, 1988]. Dissemination of this seismological material in digital form is of equal importance, to allow reanalysis of past earthquakes using modern techniques and the reevaluation of seismic hazard. This is of particular interest for those areas where little or no earthquake activity has occurred since the last significant historical earthquake.In 2001, the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) started an innovative project, Progetto SISMOS (i.e., SISMOgrammi Storici), to scan (i.e., convert into digital form for storage on a computer), at very high resolution,and archive seismological paper records and related material. The Italian Ministry for the Environment originally funded the project to encompass the digitization of seismogram records of the Italian seismic observatories and of associated bulletins

  1. An historic perspective of proteasome inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Mulligan, George

    2012-07-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and associated signaling pathways are regarded today as an exciting area of development for novel therapeutics. However, two decades ago, following the discovery and elucidation of ubiquitin and the 26S proteasome as key mediators of protein turnover, the concept of inhibiting the UPS was not even considered a feasible therapeutic approach due to the assumption that inhibition of this pathway would have widespread deleterious effects. Subsequent clinical developments with the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib have radically overturned that view, with the proteasome now recognized as a validated target and proteasome inhibition demonstrated to be a highly successful treatment for a number of hematologic malignancies. Here we provide a historic perspective on the emergence of proteasome inhibition, sharing some of the lessons learned along the way. We describe the development of bortezomib and the elucidation of the effects of its novel mechanism of action, and place the cutting-edge work described elsewhere in this issue in the context of these historic developments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Unrealized Architectural Projects in Lithuania: Historical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrė Gudelytė

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The “unrealized architectural projects” are the building projects, carried out under the specific design task and intended to be built in a particular place (site, though, for certain reasons and circumstances, have never been constructed. However, up to the present day, the topic of the “unbuilt” has been analyzed just episodically in literature and sources. The article touches upon the historical development of unrealized architectural works, as well as their artistic value and role within various historical periods of Lithuanian architecture. One of the chapters briefly reviews the relevance and development of unrealized projects during the period since Czarist Russian occupation (1795 to the restoration of Lithuanian independence (1990. Furthermore, the deeper analysis of the Soviet period (1940–1990 “dead” architecture is presented. While exploring “the unrealized”, attention has been also paid to what was actu ally built, therefore the prevailing architectural styles, tendencies and examples of the corresponding decade (in Lithuania and worldwide have been studied.Article in Lithuanian

  3. The glue ear 'epidemic': a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, David

    2011-12-01

    This paper explores the historical context of the dramatic rise in surgery for glue ear in the mid-20th century, and questions the published assertion that this represented a manufactured 'epidemic'. In examining historical sources, the reader's theoretical viewpoint greatly influences their conclusions: the sustained rise in treatment for glue ear may be seen as the advance of science in a golden age or the resistance of insular professionals to reason in the light of new scientific study methods. Current views on the practice of medicine, consumerism, science and standardisation, rationing and the nature of 'truth' all affect the way that we see this period. Technological advances clearly allowed better diagnosis and more effective treatment, but these did not appear to drive an 'epidemic', rather they were developed to meet the pre-existing challenges of otological practice. The proposition that an 'epidemic' was created does not appear to have any solid grounding. Society's perception of what constitutes disease and what needs treatment may have evolved, but the prevalence of other important diseases changed dramatically over this time period, and a real change in the epidemiology of glue ear cannot be dismissed. In defining the case for and against surgical treatment, a solely positivist, quantitative worldview cannot give us a complete picture of benefit and risk to individuals, families and society at large.

  4. A New Binarization Algorithm for Historical Documents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Almeida

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Monochromatic documents claim for much less computer bandwidth for network transmission and storage space than their color or even grayscale equivalent. The binarization of historical documents is far more complex than recent ones as paper aging, color, texture, translucidity, stains, back-to-front interference, kind and color of ink used in handwriting, printing process, digitalization process, etc. are some of the factors that affect binarization. This article presents a new binarization algorithm for historical documents. The new global filter proposed is performed in four steps: filtering the image using a bilateral filter, splitting image into the RGB components, decision-making for each RGB channel based on an adaptive binarization method inspired by Otsu’s method with a choice of the threshold level, and classification of the binarized images to decide which of the RGB components best preserved the document information in the foreground. The quantitative and qualitative assessment made with 23 binarization algorithms in three sets of “real world” documents showed very good results.

  5. Mendelian controversies: a botanical and historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, D J; Rytting, B

    2001-05-01

    Gregor Mendel was a 19(th) century priest and botanist who developed the fundamental laws of inheritance. The year 2000 marked a century since the rediscovery of those laws and the beginning of genetics. Although Mendel is now recognized as the founder of genetics, significant controversy ensued about his work throughout the 20(th) century. In this paper, we review five of the most contentious issues by looking at the historical record through the lens of current botanical science: (1) Are Mendel's data too good to be true? (2) Is Mendel's description of his experiments fictitious? (3) Did Mendel articulate the laws of inheritance attributed to him? (4) Did Mendel detect but not mention linkage? (5) Did Mendel support or oppose Darwin?A synthesis of botanical and historical evidence supports our conclusions: Mendel did not fabricate his data, his description of his experiments is literal, he articulated the laws of inheritance attributed to him insofar as was possible given the information he had, he did not detect linkage, and he neither strongly supported nor opposed Darwin.

  6. Music and Astronomy: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The link between music and astronomy has deep historical roots. William Herschel, who is considered to be the father of modern astronomy, began his career as a musician. He was a composer, organist at a church in Bath, UK, and a major contributor to the musical life of that community. Like Herschel, I too am an organist and composer, and much of my creative work focuses on connections between music and astronomy. This presentation will explore briefly aspects of William Herschel's musical career, and will then focus on contemporary music inspired by astronomical phenomena. Emphasis will be placed on the use of music as a creative teaching tool in informal education environments. The University of Arizona's Astronomy Camp, hosted at both Mt. Lemmon and Kitt Peak National Observatory, will be used as an example and case study. Examples from my creative activity as an organ performer and composer will be important features of this presentation. This presentation builds on the session exploring the life and work of the Herschels at the January 2011 AAS Historical Astronomy Division meeting in Seattle, WA.

  7. contemporary architecture; art; Selezione Architettura: historical heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Zanelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available At the end of the Nineties the Emilia-Romagna updates its twenty-year conservation and restoration policy launching the LR 19/98 on urban regeneration; then at the beginning of the Millennium among the first regions it legislate about architectural quality (LR 16/02, which increases the possibility of intervention for urban spaces of historic and artistic interest, but also introduces funding competitions for the design, construction of contemporary architecture, inclusion of works of art in public buildings, studies and research on historical and contemporary architectural heritage, elimination of incongruous works. In addition to several significant interventions, the Law 16/02 develop important research activities: the survey, merged in the volume “Quale e Quanta” (2005, about the quality of architecture of the late twentieth century, which identifies more than one thousand significant buildings in the Region; a survey of works of art pursuant to the “law of 2 percent” (L. 717/49 in public buildings, accompanied by a proposal for a regional law on the same subject; the initiative “Selezione Architettura Emilia-Romagna”, biennial event that chooses the best of architectural production from 2001 onwards.

  8. Working With Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolff-Michael Roth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the experiences of two researchers, Wolff-Michael ROTH and Luis RADFORD, using cultural-historical activity theory in mathematics education. The aim is to provide insights into the ways these researchers see and engage with activity theory, how they have come to adopt and expand it, and some of the challenges and concerns that they have had using it. These questions are not usually addressed within typical scientific papers. Yet, they are important for understanding both the dynamics of research and the practical use of cultural-historical activity theory. Since the format of research report papers is not necessarily well suited to convey personal experiences and thinking, the present article takes the form of a conversation, which provides an effective vehicle for exploring and articulating these matters. This provides a basis for understanding more deeply the underlying assumptions of this theory; its dynamics and how it is applied in research of mathematics practice, thinking, and learning; and insights into the manner in which experienced researchers grapple with the theoretical dimensions of their research. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1202232

  9. The Historical Evolution of Dental Impression Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadiochos, Ioannis; Papadiochou, Sofia; Emmanouil, Ioannis

    The concept of impression making process in dentistry began in the mid 1800s. Dentists realized that the construction of a prosthetic restoration required both a detailed capture of the oral tissues along with stone cast fabrications. To accomplish these goals, impression materials were essential. Beeswax represents the first impression material, while important bechmarks during the historical evolution of dental impression materials are considered to be the introduction of dental trays in the early 1800s and the invention of the gutta-percha, thermoplastic resins and plaster of Paris. The double (corrective) impression technique, along with the functional impression concept that was established after mid 1800s, are also identified as pivotal innovations. During the 20th century, the advances in material development slowed significantly since the majority of the current impression materials had already been invented. However, the introduction of elastomeric impression materials in the field of prosthodontics that offered the advantages of accuracy and dimensional stability substantially upgraded both the impression accuracy and the quality of the final restoration. Presently, the dental practitioner has access to a variety of impression materials and should be aware of their properties, indications and limitations as well. Futhermore, while continuous attempts are being made to enhance these materials, the ideal impression material has yet to be developed. The purpose of this article was to provide a comprehensive review about the historical development of impression dental materials. Copyright American Academy of the History of Dentistry.

  10. Historical Development of War Stress Reaction Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Nahit Ozmenler

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The battles that have come to this day had spectacular psychologic and psychiatric effects. Battle stres reactions in historical development phase has been mentioned with such different names as nostalgia, shell shock, soldier’s heart, Da Costra Syndrome, old sergeant syndrome, agent orange effect and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD due to the symptoms coming into prominence. On the othere hand they do tend to show similarities (palpilation, stomach complaints, rhomatizmal aches, neurological and psychiatric symptoms, etc. in the context of symptoms and findigs. During the historical phase, the transition of methods have also infliuenced the prominent clinical characteristics of the war stress syndromes. The symptoms that arose during the gulf War have exhibited neither similarities nor explainable characteristics with previous war stress reactions of the past. Therefore, in the context of diagnostics systems, there is no clarity about where it should be incorporated. The inability to find any satisfactory organic pathology in war stress reactions have been the unchanging characteristic of the illness. In collaboration with the increasing mortality and morbidity that arise in wars it is not only an important factor but the resistance of patients, who had been effected, to amelioration is continuing to be an important concern which preoccupies governments, military authorities and doctors. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(1.000: 63-70

  11. Acoustics of Italian Historical Opera Houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodi, Nicola; Pompoli, Roberto; Martellotta, Francesco; Sato, Shin-ichi

    2015-08-01

    Opera houses represent a large group of performance spaces characterized by great complexity and, at the same time, versatility with respect to different usage (from opera to symphonic music and ballet). This kind of building originated in Italy during the 17th century and later spread across the country and then Europe and the rest of the world, slowly evolving into modern theatre shapes. As a consequence of the changes undergone by the interior space, the original acoustic features, which likely influenced many composers, experienced important variations. Thanks to acoustic measurement campaigns inside Italian Historical Opera Houses, promoted by National and Regional Projects, the distinctive features of these spaces were investigated in comparison to modern spaces. In this work, the newly acquired data are merged with data in the literature in order to present and discuss some of the distinctive acoustic features of historical spaces as regards their original function. Moreover, specific issues such as listening in stalls and boxes and the criteria governing the preference judgment of listeners are considered. The concept and the crucial role of the balance between stage and pit sources are also discussed by means of previous literature studies.

  12. PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF THE HISTORICAL CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND THE FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATIONAL OF PSYCHOLOGY HISTORICAL-CULTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Marcia Martins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the theoretical and methodological unity between the historical-critical pedagogy and cultural-historical psychology. It highlights, in addition to the membership of both theories to historical-dialectical materialism, the basic premises that point toward the affirmation of school education as a condition of humanization of individuals, as well as the transmission of historically systematized knowledge as one of the requirements for the achieving this purpose. In this direction, we aim to demonstrate that the historical-critical pedagogy contains, in its innerness, a solid psychological foundation, consistently built by a cultural-historical conception of man, society and educative nature that guides the relationship between them through the human vital activity, that is, through the work. It is in the core of those fundamentals that the alliance between this pedagogical theory and cultural-historical psychology is evident.

  13. Scientific overview and historical context of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquake sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Hough

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The central and eastern United States has experienced only 5 historic earthquakes with Mw 7.0, four during the New Madrid sequence of 1811-1812: three principal mainshocks and the so-called «dawn aftershock» following the first mainshock. Much of the historic earthquake research done in the United States has focused on the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ, because the largest New Madrid earthquakes may represent the archetype for the most damaging earthquakes to be expected in intraplate regions. Published magnitude values ranging from 7.0 to 8.75 have generally been based on macroseismic effects, which provide the most direct constraint on source size for the events. Critical to the interpretation of these accounts is an understanding of their historic context. Early settlments clustered along waterways, where substantial amplification of seismic waves is expected. Analyzing the New Madrid intensity values with a consideration of these effects yields preferred values of Mw 7.2-7.3, 7.0, and 7.4-7.5 for the December, January, and February mainshocks, respectively, and of 7.0 for the «dawn aftershock». These values are consistent with other lines of evidence, including scaling relationships. Finally, I show that accounts from the New Madrid sequence reveal evidence for remotely triggered earthquakes well outside the NMSZ. Remotely triggered earthquakes represent a potentially important new wrinkle in historic earthquake research, as their ground motions can sometimes be confused with mainshock ground motions.

  14. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the A Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  15. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for S tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200 West Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to all the SSTs in the S Tank Farm of the southwest quadrant of the 200 West Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  16. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for SY-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1997-08-12

    The purpose of this historical characterization document is to present the synthesized summaries of the historical records concerning the physical characteristics, radiological, and chemical composition of mixed wastes stored in underground double-shell tanks and the physical condition of these tanks. The double-shell tanks are located on the United States Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, approximately 25 miles northwest or Richland, Washington. The document will be used to assist in characterizing the waste in the tanks in conjunction with the current program of sampling and analyzing the tank wastes. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) developed computer models that used the historical data to attempt to characterize the wastes and to generate estimates of each tank`s inventory. A historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that could be critical to characterization and post characterization activities. This document was developed by reviewing the operating plant process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical data from numerous resources. These resources were generated by numerous contractors from 1945 to the present. Waste characterization, the process of describing the character or quality of a waste, is required by Federal law (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA]) and state law (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303, Dangerous Waste Regulations). Characterizing the waste is necessary to determine methods to safely retrieve, transport, and/or treat the wastes.

  17. A case study of secondary teachers facilitating a historical problem-based learning instructional unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecore, John L.

    addressed a few NOS tenets, emphasizing the full range of possible NOS objectives included in historical PBL is warranted. This study also revealed the importance of creating a collaborative classroom culture and building positive student-teacher relationships when implementing PBL instruction. The four teachers agreed that the historical PBL instructional unit provided a context for learning state standards, and they positively viewed their experiences teaching the lesson. Thus findings from this study suggest that teaching science in a historical context using PBL can be effective.

  18. Y-12 National Security Complex National Historic Preservation Act Historic Preservation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-09-30

    The Historic Preservation Plan (HPP) recognizes that the Y-12 National Security Complex is a vital and long-term component of DOE and NNSA. In addition to NNSA missions, the Office of Science and Energy, the Office of Nuclear Energy, and the Office of Environmental Management have properties located at Y-12 that must be taken into consideration. The HPP also recognizes that the challenge for cultural resource management is incorporating the requirements of NNSA, SC, NE, and EM missions while preserving and protecting its historic resources. The HPP seeks to find an effective way to meet the obligations at Y-12 for historic and archeological protection while at the same time facilitating effective completion of ongoing site mission activities, including removal of obsolete or contaminated facilities, adaptive reuse of existing facilities whenever feasible, and construction of new facilities in order to meet site mission needs. The Y-12 Historic Preservation Plan (HPP) defines the preservation strategy for the Y-12 National Security Complex and will direct efficient compliance with the NHPA and federal archaeological protection legislation at Y-12 as DOE and NNSA continues mission activities of the site.

  19. Advanced geospatial techniques and archaeological methods to investigate historical rice cultivation at Wormsloe Historic Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandro Pasqua

    2016-01-01

    Despite much of the environmental history of Wormsloe State Historic Site on the Isle of Hope, Georgia having previously been documented and described, there are still some aspects that require deeper investigation. For example, whether rice cultivation was ever performed at Wormsloe is a question which does not have a definitive answer.

  20. 75 FR 17766 - National Register of Historic Places; Weekly Listing of Historic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... Twelve Oaks, 7210 AR 7 S, Harrison, 09001237, LISTED, 1/20/10 Carroll County Sanitarium Lake Bridges...) Logan County Liberty Schoolhouse, 12682 Spring Lake Rd., Corley vicinity, 09001252, LISTED, 1/21/10... MPS) CALIFORNIA Los Angeles County Pegfair Estates Historic District, 1525-1645 Pegfair Estates Dr...

  1. The Historical Optimism of Boris Mironov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir G. Khoros

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article attempts to assess the contribution of B.N. Mironov’s monograph “The Russian Empire: From Tradition to Modernity” to historiography. The author has reviewed other books by Mironov. While the reviewer’s assessment is positive overall, a number of points defended by the author call for a rejoinder. The reviewer agrees with the main idea of the book: there was no permanent crisis and impoverishment of the working population in the history of imperial Russia in the 18th to the beginning of 20th centuries. On the contrary, there was some progress and achievements in terms of modernization. The revolutions in the beginning of the 20th century must be explained through other reasons. Credit undoubtedly belongs to Mironov for proof of this thesis. In such an approach, the Russian past appears more complicated and realistic than in many of the preceding investigations by Russian as well as by foreign scholars. An interesting feature of Mironov’s approach is historical optimism, that is, an interpretation of Russian historical evolution as successful. However, sometimes this optimism seems excessive. Key observations are the following. First, overcoming one extreme (the permanent crisis in Russia, Mironov, to some extent, ends up at another extreme – an underestimation of those social and cultural problems in Russian society that stimulated the revolutionary climate. Second, there is an overestimation of the role of the intelligentsia as an agent of revolution, its characteristics are excessively negative, and there is an underestimation of the impulse to protest from below and the popular character of the Russian revolution of 1917. Third, despite a number of interesting ideas concerning the process of modernization in Russia, Mironov identifies this modernization with Westernization (“Europeanization”. But the author himself rightly demonstrates the difference between Russian and European civilizational values. This

  2. Revealing the Differences Between Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Donohoe, Byron; Ciesielski, Peter; Nill, Jennifer; McKinney, Kellene; Mittal, Ashutosh; Katahira, Rui; Himmel, Michael; Biddy, Mary; Beckham, Gregg; Decker, Steve

    2014-09-08

    Enzymatic depolymerization of polysaccharides is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, and discovery of synergistic biomass-degrading enzyme paradigms will enable improved conversion processes. Historically, revealing insights into enzymatic saccharification mechanisms on plant cell walls has been hindered by uncharacterized substrates and low resolution.

  3. The story of a historic morning

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    "To be invited to CERN and also to be involved in a historic moment is a career dream. It’s a place where everyone learns from each other and contributes their speciality to construct something unique that defies understanding." Trivan Pal, Paul Scherrer Institute "CERN is an organization of many challenges, it is difficult to represent its size and quality. Its achievements are stacked like Russian dolls in order to build a true giant." Attila Razc CERN, PH "CERN is more than a place of work. The scope of its projects and the zest of its personnel make it a place to work and to live." Pavel Tashev, Summer Student "The research happening here is such that it needs at least one or two years of a doctorate to grasp its ra...

  4. [Cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Historical considerations and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Arturo; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Basurto, Lourdes; De la Chesnaye, Elsa; Saldívar, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormones and an essential component of the cell membrane, however, altered regulation of the synthesis, absorption and excretion of cholesterol predispose to cardiovascular diseases of atherosclerotic origin. Despite, the recognition of historical events for 200 years, starting with Michel Chevreul naming «cholesterol»; later on, Lobstein coining the term atherosclerosis and Marchand introducing it, Anichkov identifying cholesterol in atheromatous plaque, and Brown and Goldstein discovering LDL receptor; as well as the emerging of different drugs, such as fibrates, statins and cetrapibs this decade, promising to increase HDL and the most recent ezetimibe and anti-PCSK9 to inhibit the degradation of LDL receptor, however morbidity has not been reduced in cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  5. Who's bigger? where historical figures really rank

    CERN Document Server

    Skiena, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Is Hitler bigger than Napoleon? Washington bigger than Lincoln? Picasso bigger than Einstein? Quantitative analysts are rapidly finding homes in social and cultural domains, from finance to politics. What about history? In this fascinating book, Steve Skiena and Charles Ward bring quantitative analysis to bear on ranking and comparing historical reputations. They evaluate each person by aggregating the traces of millions of opinions, just as Google ranks webpages. The book includes a technical discussion for readers interested in the details of the methods, but no mathematical or computational background is necessary to understand the rankings or conclusions. Along the way, the authors present the rankings of more than one thousand of history's most significant people in science, politics, entertainment, and all areas of human endeavor. Anyone interested in history or biography can see where their favorite figures place in the grand scheme of things.

  6. Latin America; Recent History; Democracy; Historical Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo MIRA DELLI-ZOTTI

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies the restoration of the democracy and its persistence as one of the most remarkable facts of the recent history of Latin America. Nevertheless, in the experience of the subcontinent, democracy does not appear like synonymous of democratization. Starting off with the transitions, this article is led toward a periodic analysis of the so-called democratic crossing of Latin America. At the same time, it studies the unequal incidence that the impact of the «historical memory» has had in the public sphere of countries like Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, El Salvador and Guatemala, contrasting with the case of Brazil.

  7. Controversies in nursing ethics: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, D P

    1992-09-01

    The author critiques the dialectic between justice-based ethics and an ethic of caring from a historical perspective (by analogy with the dialectic between agape and friendship). Justice-based ethics have been problematic for nursing because of the decontextualized approach. The ethic of caring is problematic because caring, being contextual, is particularistic and therefore can be based on morally irrelevant factors, such as liking. There is a tradition of writing which seeks to reconcile the particularistic obligations of friendship with the moral duty to all others equally. Ideas from the following authors are reviewed for relevance to nursing: Aristotle, Aelred of Rievaulx, Augustine, John Cassian, Cicero, George Berkeley, Immanuel Kant, Michel de Montaigne, Jeremy Taylor and Max Weber. The authors concludes by noting that both sides of the dialectic are synthesized in the lived experience of individuals. A synthesis in thought is called for on this basis.

  8. Reading the Historical Phenomenon of Australian Bushrangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohanes Hartadi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Outlaws in their various images have been important parts of history. In Australia, the longest lasting image of outlaws is the bushranger. Despite its popularity, there is a range of depictions of bushrangers and these are not necessarily similar. Interpretation of the bushrangers in colonial time differs from contemporary imagining. This papers aims at unfolding the various interpretations of the bushrangers in different periods in many types of artifact. Information was collected and interpreted by library research. The artifact analysis will be seen through a postmodernism theory by Michel Foucault and Roland Barthes. Since the phenomenon of bushranger stemmed from the colonial period, this study will commence from the period up to contemporary period. It can be concluded that a study of the different periods finds out that knowledge of the bushrangers does not make up a linear history, but rather a discontinuity in the historical narratives. 

  9. Climatological data summary 1993 with historical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoitink, D.J.; Burk, K.W.

    1994-06-01

    This document presents the climatological data summary for calendar year 1993. It presents updated historical climatologies for temperature, wind, precipitation, and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters from the Hanford Meteorology Station (HMS) and Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network. It also presents climatological normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation for the HMS. Previous documents have included climatological data collected at the old Hanford Townsite, located approximately 10 miles east-northeast of the present HMS. The records for these two different sites have been frequently interchanged as if representing the same location. With the exception of Section 2.0, the remainder of this document uses data only from the HMS, with a period of record beginning December 7, 1944.

  10. Leadership Gathering Marks Historic Transition at AGU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Ann

    2010-06-01

    The 2008-2010 AGU Council adopted a strategic plan and voted to create a task force to facilitate AGU leadership in Earth and space sciences at its meeting on 7 June 2010. The meeting, at AGU headquarters in Washington, D. C., was the first part of a 4-day historic leadership conference that included 66 volunteer leaders and key staff as AGU prepares to transition to a new governance structure. The new Union officers (president, president-elect, general secretary, and international secretary), the newly established Board of Directors, and the new Council—which will consist of section presidents and presidents-elect, focus group chairs and vice chairs, committee chairs, and four appointed student/early-career scientists—take office on 1 July 2010.

  11. Historical approach to teaching foreign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel MARTÍN SÁNCHEZ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The publication of this work is to make a historical-pedagogical approach to teaching foreign languages, part of the Humanism and concluding with the current theories and methods. Since the 18th century with the emergence of traditional method, also known as the method of grammar and translation, to the methodological principles of communicative approaches, it have been going a number of methods with the intent to resolve and improve teaching techniques for teaching and learning a second language. However, it is worth to note that this is a scientific developments, as most of the methods take as a starting point for his reflections ideas, suggestions, beliefs, techniques and procedures of former methods that preceded them, therefore we cannot speak of revolutionary methods, but rather evolutionary.

  12. The historical context of the Accra Confession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Averell Rust

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article places the Accra Confession, accepted at the 24th General Assembly of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches (WARC (2004, within the historical context of the WARC’s struggle for economic justice in the face of globalisation. It moves beyond addressing such issues merely as ethical issues to rather viewing them as confessional issues of faith. It highlights the difficulties of the WARC to reach consensus on issues concerning economic justice. It also shows how the WARC has taken the lead in the ecumenical movement by engaging a broad spectrum of people – professionals and non-professionals, from the North and the South, rich and poor – to ensure that such a confession is a true reflection of the experiences of people at grass-roots level and that it speaks from the heart. The Accra Confession challenges Christians to take a faith stance on economic injustice.

  13. Reincarnation in America: A Brief Historical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Irwin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available American theories of reincarnation have a long and complex history, dating from 1680s to the present. It is the purpose of this paper to highlight the main currents of reincarnation theory in the American context, giving a brief historical survey. Sources surveyed begin with Native American traditions, and then move to immigrant traditions based in Western Esotericism, Christianity, Judaism, missionary Hinduism and Buddhism, Spiritualism, Theosophy, Rosicrucianism, and concludes with more current theoretical influences, based in paranormal science research. The paper demonstrates that current theories of reincarnation are increasingly less dependent upon religious support and increasingly based in direct personal experience, paranormal research, and new therapeutic models. The paper concludes with some reflections on the complexity of reincarnation theory and raises questions concerning the future development of such theory.

  14. Astronomy in India a historical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    India has a strong and ancient tradition of astronomy, which seamlessly merges with the current activities in Astronomy and Astrophysics in the country. While the younger generation of astronomers and students are reasonably familiar with the current facilities and the astronomical research, they might not have an equally good knowledge of the rich history of Indian astronomy. This particular volume, brought out as a part of the Platinum Jubilee Celebrations of Indian National Science Academy, concentrates on selected aspects of historical development of Indian astronomy in the form of six invited chapters. Two of the chapters – by Balachandra Rao and M.S. Sriram – cover ancient astronomy and the development of calculus in the ancient Kerela text Yuktibhasa. The other four chapters by B.V. Sreekantan, Siraj Hasan, Govind Swarup and Jayant Narlikar deal with the contemporary history of Indian astronomy covering space astronomy, optical astronomy, radio astronomy and developments in relativistic astrophysic...

  15. An historical ophthalmic study of Jane Austen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Graham A

    2012-11-01

    Today, no other classic novelist has the popularity or power of Jane Austen, and in 2013 the world will celebrate 200 years of her comic masterpiece Pride and Prejudice. Her millions of fans have an abiding fascination with all aspects of her life, including her health and the cause of her death. This historical ophthalmic study of Jane Austen, based on very incomplete medical bibliographic data, finds that she had a mild ocular surface disorder from age 23. This disorder did not significantly impact on her visual performance for writing. There are many references to eyes in her novels, but Jane's eyes and those of her characters cannot contribute further to the debate around the cause of her death at age 41.

  16. Breast implants under siege: an historical commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J C; Brody, G S

    1992-01-01

    Despite 3 decades of rapidly expanding application of polydimethylsiloxane as a relatively safe implantable biomaterial, the American public is being told by a vocal minority that its use in the breast implant may be dangerous. Most of the furor has been generated by consumer advocates with support of a handful of scientists who have expressed opinions, not well supported by facts, about the risks of these devices. These anxieties have been fueled in the public's mind by a media more interested in sensationalism than disciplined reporting. The controversy has complicated the regulatory process and has become politicized in the halls of State Legislatures and Congress. Remarkably, this controversy has not involved the many other biomedical applications of silicone. How has this controversy gathered momentum? What role has the government played and how have the professional, scientific, corporate, and patient communities responded to public concern? This discussion places the breast implant battle into an historical perspective.

  17. Anamnesis of the radioimmunoassay: A historical reminiscence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallee, E.

    1984-01-27

    Anamnesis of the Radioimmunoassay - A Historical Reminiscence: Several requirements have to be met before the first radioimmunoassay of a proteohormone (i.e., insulin) could be developed. One of these requirements was that iodination ought not substantially impair the immunologic properties of the insulin molecule. Since the reversibility of antigen adsorption to antibodies is the most important basis of all immunoassays, the adsorptive behavior of proteins first had to be studied at extremely low protein concentrations. Only after these requirements had been investigated was direct electrophoretic detection of a nonprecipitating anti-hormone antibody possible by desorption of insulin on filter paper. Later, the inaccuracy of the species specificity of insulin-binding antibodies proved to be particularly useful for the determination of insulin in human sera.

  18. Divining and knowing: Karl Sudhoff's historical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the historical method of Karl Sudhoff (1853- 1938), Germany's first professor of medical history. It argues that in order to understand his ideas more fully, we need to step outside the historiography of medical history and assess his methodology in relation to the norms and ideals of German academic history writing in general. The article demonstrates that the philology-based "critical method" of Leopold von Ranke (1795-1886) was central to Sudhoff's methodological thinking. It investigates the underlying philosophical and epistemological assumptions of Ranke's method, which tend to be less appreciated than his overt empiricism and explores how Sudhoff applied these to the new professionalizing subdiscipline of the history of medicine. The article argues that Sudhoff's concerns with the methodology of history, which involved a particular conception of the relationship between the human sciences and the medical sciences, offers compelling addresses to our times.

  19. Women and drug addiction: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandall, Stephen R

    2010-04-01

    The history of women and addiction in America extends back more than 150 years. Although the true epidemiology of women and addiction has always been difficult to determine, the spectrum of female addicts extends well beyond those women who make sensationalistic headlines by "abandoning" or "battering" their children. Historically, female addiction has been largely the result of inappropriate overmedication practices by physicians and pharmacists, media manipulation, or individuals own attempts to cope with social or occupational barriers preventing equality and self-fulfillment. From the mid-nineteenth century, uneasy tolerance, social ostracism, vilification, persecution, and legal prosecution have grudgingly, but not completely, given way to more humane treatment opportunities in the setting of more enlightened comprehensive care.

  20. Some historical conditions of narrative work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beels, C Christian

    2009-09-01

    Written to honor the immense contribution of Michael White as a leader in the development of narrative therapy, this historical essay contrasts the origins of psychoanalysis, family therapy and narrative therapy. Changes in the understanding of therapeutic strategies, methods of training and supervision, styles of leadership, the involvement of audiences in the therapeutic and training processes, and conceptions of the nature of the mind are described. A style of direct demonstration of methods, especially of the formulation of questions, is important in narrative work. The central master-role of the therapist in analysis and family therapy is replaced in narrative work by eliciting local knowledge, and the recruitment of audiences to the work. This is consistent with narrative therapy's "de-centered" image of the therapist.