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Sample records for californicus reveal historical

  1. Investigations of fine-scale phylogeography in Tigriopus californicus reveal historical patterns of population divergence

    OpenAIRE

    Ladner Jason T; Willett Christopher S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus is a model for studying the process of genetic divergence in allopatry and for probing the nature of genetic changes that lead to reproductive isolation. Although previous studies have revealed a pattern of remarkably high levels of genetic divergence between the populations of this species at several spatial scales, it is not clear what types of historical processes are responsible. Particularly lacking are data that can yield...

  2. Investigations of fine-scale phylogeography in Tigriopus californicus reveal historical patterns of population divergence

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    Ladner Jason T

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus is a model for studying the process of genetic divergence in allopatry and for probing the nature of genetic changes that lead to reproductive isolation. Although previous studies have revealed a pattern of remarkably high levels of genetic divergence between the populations of this species at several spatial scales, it is not clear what types of historical processes are responsible. Particularly lacking are data that can yield insights into population history from the finest scales of geographic resolution. Results Sequence variation in both cytochrome b (CYTB, mtDNA and the rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP, nuclear are examined at a fine scale within four different regions for populations of T. californicus. High levels of genetic divergence are seen for both genes at the broader scale, and genetic subdivision is apparent at nearly all scales in these populations for these two genes. Patterns of polymorphism and divergence in both CYTB and RISP suggest that selection may be leading to non-neutral evolution of these genes in several cases but a pervasive pattern of neither selection nor coadaptation is seen for these markers. Conclusion The use of sequence data at a fine-scale of resolution in this species has provided novel insights into the processes that have resulted in the accumulation of genetic divergence among populations. This divergence is likely to result from an interplay between a limited dispersal ability for this copepod and the temporal instability of copepod habitat. Both shorter-term processes such as the extinction/recolonization dynamics of copepod pools and longer-term processes such as geological uplift of coastline and sea level changes appear to have impacted the patterns of differentiation. Some patterns of sequence variation are consistent with selection acting upon the loci used in this study; however, it appears that most phylogeographic patterns are

  3. Phylogeography of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus reveals substantially reduced population differentiation at northern latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmands, S

    2001-07-01

    Previous studies of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus revealed one of the highest levels of mitochondrial DNA differentiation ever reported among conspecific populations. The present study extends the geographical sampling northward, adding populations from northern California to south-east Alaska. The mitochondrial phylogeny for the entire species range, based on cytochrome oxidase I sequences for a total of 49 individuals from 27 populations, again shows extreme differentiation among populations (up to 23%). However, populations from Oregon northwards appear to be derived and have interpopulation divergences five times lower than those between southern populations. Furthermore, although few individuals were sequenced from each locality, populations from Puget Sound northward had significantly reduced levels of within-population variation. These patterns are hypothesized to result from the contraction and expansion of populations driven by recent ice ages.

  4. Historical wildlife dynamics on Dugway Proving Ground: population and disease trends in jack rabbits over two decades. [Lepus californicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, L.E.; Van Voris, P.

    1986-08-01

    In an effort to determine whether US Army activities on the Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) have had an impact on resident wildlife, intensive studies have been conducted on the biology and ecology of the black-tailed jack rabbit (Lepus californicus) since 1965. in addition, the incidence of endemic diseases in several species of resident wildlife on the DPG have been studied from the late 1950s through the mid-1970s. The objectives of this report are to: (1) compile and summarize the jack rabbit data and some of the disease information that is presently contained only in annual reports; (2) compare the DPG jack rabbit data to data available on other jack rabbit populations; and (3) analyze the data for unusual or unexplained fluctuations in population densities or in incidence of disease.

  5. A supplementary description of Brevipalpus californicus (Acari: Trombidiformes: Tenuipalpidae

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    Mohammad Raissi Ardali

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The false spider mite Brevipalpus californicus from the family Tenuipalpidae was collected from Caucasian alnus, White willow, Persian raspberry and a wild Chrysanthemum bush in Mazandaran province. This species is reported as a new record to the false spider mites-fauna of Iran here. Reviewing literatures revealed that it was briefly described in the original paper without any measures. So, a completed description is presented based on the Iranian specimens and different body segments are drawn for B. californicus. In addition, the above plants are new host records for B. californicus.

  6. Isolation and characterization of cytochrome c from the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus.

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    Rawson, P D; Brazeau, D A; Burton, R S

    2000-05-02

    Mitochondrial energy production requires complex interactions among proteins encoded in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The intergenomic coevolution of interacting gene products has been previously suggested based on interspecific comparisons of cytochrome c (encoded by the nuclear CYC gene) and cytochrome c oxidase (partly encoded in the mitochondrial DNA by the COX1, COX2 and COX3 genes). In the intertidal copepod, Tigriopus californicus, non-synonymous substitutions in the COX1 gene have previously been found in interpopulation comparisons. In order to determine if CYC also shows interpopulation variation, this gene was isolated from a cDNA library using a degenerate primer/polymerase chain reaction approach. Characterization of a cDNA sequence and 25 genomic DNA sequences derived from four T. californicus populations yielded the following results: (1) the T. californicus CYC gene is interrupted by an intron that occurs at the same position as the intron found in vertebrate CYC genes; (2) there is extensive sequence variation within both the coding region and intron of this gene and the vast majority of this variation occurs between sequences drawn from geographically distinct populations; (3) the coding sequence variation includes a minimum of five amino acid replacement substitutions; (4) segregation of length variants among offspring in an interpopulation cross revealed genotypic ratios consistent with the proposed allelic nature of the CYC variants. These results demonstrate that the requisite genetic variation required for intergenomic coevolution exists in the CYC-COX system in T. californicus.

  7. Historical Legacies in World Amphibian Diversity Revealed by the Turnover and Nestedness Components of Beta Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés Baselga; Carola Gómez-Rodríguez; Jorge M. Lobo

    2012-01-01

    Historic processes are expected to influence present diversity patterns in combination with contemporary environmental factors. We hypothesise that the joint use of beta diversity partitioning methods and a threshold-based approach may help reveal the effect of large-scale historic processes on present biodiversity. We partitioned intra-regional beta diversity into its turnover (differences in composition caused by species replacements) and nestedness-resultant (differences in species composi...

  8. Nuclear and mitochondrial gene genealogies and allozyme polymorphism across a major phylogeographic break in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, R S; Lee, B. N.

    1994-01-01

    The genetic structure of natural populations is frequently inferred from geographic distributions of alleles at multiple gene loci. Surveys of allozyme polymorphisms in the tidepool copepod Tigriopus californicus have revealed sharp genetic differentiation of populations, indicating that gene flow among populations is highly restricted. Analysis of population structure in this species has now been extended to include nuclear and mitochondrial gene genealogies. DNA sequences of the mtDNA-encod...

  9. Interpopulation patterns of divergence and selection across the transcriptome of the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

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    Barreto, Felipe S; Moy, Gary W; Burton, Ronald S

    2011-02-01

    The accumulation of genetic incompatibilities between isolated populations is thought to lead to the evolution of intrinsic postzygotic isolation. The molecular basis for these mechanisms, however, remains poorly understood. The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus provides unique opportunities for addressing mechanistic questions regarding the early stages of speciation; hybrids between highly divergent populations are fertile and viable, but exhibit reduced fitness at the F(2) or later generations. Given the current scarcity of genomic information in taxa at incipient stages of reproductive isolation, we utilize high-throughout 454 pyrosequencing to characterize a substantial fraction of protein-coding regions (the transcriptome) of T. californicus. Our sequencing effort was divided equally between two divergent populations in order to estimate levels of divergence and to reveal patterns of selection across the transcriptome. Assembly of sequences generated over 40,000 putatively unique transcripts (unigenes) for each population, 19,622 of which were orthologous between populations. BLAST searches of public databases determined protein identity and functional features for 15,402 and 12,670 unigenes, respectively. Based on rates of nonsynonymous and synonymous substitutions in 5897 interpopulation orthologs (those >150 bp and with at least 2X coverage), we identified 229 potential targets of positive selection. Many of these genes are predicted to be involved in several metabolic processes, and to function in hydrolase, peptidase and binding activities. The library of T. californicus coding regions, annotated with their predicted functions and level of divergence, will serve as an invaluable resource for elucidating molecular mechanisms underlying the early stages of speciation.

  10. Linkage relationships among five enzyme-coding gene loci in the copepod Tigriopus californicus: a genetic confirmation of achiasmiatic meiosis.

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    Burton, R S; Feldman, M W; Swisher, S G

    1981-12-01

    Linkage relationships among five polymorphic enzyme-coding gene loci in the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus have been determined using electrophoretic analysis of progeny from laboratory matings. Phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI; EC 5.3.1.9) was found to be tightly linked to glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT; EC 2.6..1.2), with only one recombinant observed in 364 progeny; glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT; EC 2.6.1.1) is linked to the PGI-GPT pair, with a recombination fraction of approximately 0.20 in male double heterozygotes. Phosphoglucomutase (PGM; EC 2.7.5.1) and an esterase (EST; EC 3.1.1.1) are not linked to the PGI, GPT, GOT grouping, which has been designated linkage group I. Reciprocal crosses have revealed that no recombination occurs in female T. californicus; this observation confirms a previous report that meiosis in female Tigriopus is achiasmatic.

  11. Historical legacies in world amphibian diversity revealed by the turnover and nestedness components of Beta diversity.

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    Andrés Baselga

    Full Text Available Historic processes are expected to influence present diversity patterns in combination with contemporary environmental factors. We hypothesise that the joint use of beta diversity partitioning methods and a threshold-based approach may help reveal the effect of large-scale historic processes on present biodiversity. We partitioned intra-regional beta diversity into its turnover (differences in composition caused by species replacements and nestedness-resultant (differences in species composition caused by species losses components. We used piecewise regressions to show that, for amphibian beta diversity, two different world regions can be distinguished. Below parallel 37, beta diversity is dominated by turnover, while above parallel 37, beta diversity is dominated by nestedness. Notably, these regions are revealed when the piecewise regression method is applied to the relationship between latitude and the difference between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM and the present temperature but not when present energy-water factors are analysed. When this threshold effect of historic climatic change is partialled out, current energy-water variables become more relevant to the nestedness-resultant dissimilarity patterns, while mountainous areas are associated with higher spatial turnover. This result suggests that nested patterns are caused by species losses that are determined by physiological constraints, whereas turnover is associated with speciation and/or Pleistocene refugia. Thus, the new threshold-based view may help reveal the role of historic factors in shaping present amphibian beta diversity patterns.

  12. Historical legacies in world amphibian diversity revealed by the turnover and nestedness components of Beta diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baselga, Andrés; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carola; Lobo, Jorge M

    2012-01-01

    Historic processes are expected to influence present diversity patterns in combination with contemporary environmental factors. We hypothesise that the joint use of beta diversity partitioning methods and a threshold-based approach may help reveal the effect of large-scale historic processes on present biodiversity. We partitioned intra-regional beta diversity into its turnover (differences in composition caused by species replacements) and nestedness-resultant (differences in species composition caused by species losses) components. We used piecewise regressions to show that, for amphibian beta diversity, two different world regions can be distinguished. Below parallel 37, beta diversity is dominated by turnover, while above parallel 37, beta diversity is dominated by nestedness. Notably, these regions are revealed when the piecewise regression method is applied to the relationship between latitude and the difference between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the present temperature but not when present energy-water factors are analysed. When this threshold effect of historic climatic change is partialled out, current energy-water variables become more relevant to the nestedness-resultant dissimilarity patterns, while mountainous areas are associated with higher spatial turnover. This result suggests that nested patterns are caused by species losses that are determined by physiological constraints, whereas turnover is associated with speciation and/or Pleistocene refugia. Thus, the new threshold-based view may help reveal the role of historic factors in shaping present amphibian beta diversity patterns.

  13. Diversifying selection underlies the origin of allozyme polymorphism at the phosphoglucose isomerase locus in Tigriopus californicus.

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    Sean D Schoville

    Full Text Available The marine copepod Tigriopus californicus lives in intertidal rock pools along the Pacific coast, where it exhibits strong, temporally stable population genetic structure. Previous allozyme surveys have found high frequency private alleles among neighboring subpopulations, indicating that there is limited genetic exchange between populations. Here we evaluate the factors responsible for the diversification and maintenance of alleles at the phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi locus by evaluating patterns of nucleotide variation underlying previously identified allozyme polymorphism. Copepods were sampled from eleven sites throughout California and Baja California, revealing deep genetic structure among populations as well as genetic variability within populations. Evidence of recombination is limited to the sample from Pescadero and there is no support for linkage disequilibrium across the Pgi locus. Neutrality tests and codon-based models of substitution suggest the action of natural selection due to elevated non-synonymous substitutions at a small number of sites in Pgi. Two sites are identified as the charge-changing residues underlying allozyme polymorphisms in T. californicus. A reanalysis of allozyme variation at several focal populations, spanning a period of 26 years and over 200 generations, shows that Pgi alleles are maintained without notable frequency changes. Our data suggest that diversifying selection accounted for the origin of Pgi allozymes, while McDonald-Kreitman tests and the temporal stability of private allozyme alleles suggests that balancing selection may be involved in the maintenance of amino acid polymorphisms within populations.

  14. Diversifying selection underlies the origin of allozyme polymorphism at the phosphoglucose isomerase locus in Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoville, Sean D; Flowers, Jonathan M; Burton, Ronald S

    2012-01-01

    The marine copepod Tigriopus californicus lives in intertidal rock pools along the Pacific coast, where it exhibits strong, temporally stable population genetic structure. Previous allozyme surveys have found high frequency private alleles among neighboring subpopulations, indicating that there is limited genetic exchange between populations. Here we evaluate the factors responsible for the diversification and maintenance of alleles at the phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) locus by evaluating patterns of nucleotide variation underlying previously identified allozyme polymorphism. Copepods were sampled from eleven sites throughout California and Baja California, revealing deep genetic structure among populations as well as genetic variability within populations. Evidence of recombination is limited to the sample from Pescadero and there is no support for linkage disequilibrium across the Pgi locus. Neutrality tests and codon-based models of substitution suggest the action of natural selection due to elevated non-synonymous substitutions at a small number of sites in Pgi. Two sites are identified as the charge-changing residues underlying allozyme polymorphisms in T. californicus. A reanalysis of allozyme variation at several focal populations, spanning a period of 26 years and over 200 generations, shows that Pgi alleles are maintained without notable frequency changes. Our data suggest that diversifying selection accounted for the origin of Pgi allozymes, while McDonald-Kreitman tests and the temporal stability of private allozyme alleles suggests that balancing selection may be involved in the maintenance of amino acid polymorphisms within populations.

  15. Heritability of sex tendency in a harpacticoid copepod, Tigriopus californicus.

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    Voordouw, Maarten J; Anholt, Bradley R

    2002-09-01

    Systems with genetic variation for the primary sex ratio are important for testing sex-ratio theory and for understanding how this variation is maintained. Evidence is presented for heritable variation of the primary sex ratio in the harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus californicus. Variation in the primary sex ratio among families cannot be accounted for by Mendelian segregation of sex chromosomes. The covariance in sex phenotype between full-sibling clutches and between mothers and offspring suggests that this variation has a polygenic basis. Averaged over four replicates, the full-sibling heritability of sex tendency is 0.13 +/- 0.040; and the mother-offspring heritability of sex tendency is 0.31 +/- 0.216. Genetic correlations in the sex phenotype across two temperature treatments indicate large genotype-by-temperature interactions. Future experiments need to distinguish between zygotic, parental, or cytoplasmic mechanisms of sex determination in T. californicus.

  16. Viability effects and not meoitic drive cause dramatic departures from Mendelian inheritance for malic enzyme in hybrids of Tigriopus californicus populations.

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    Willett, C S; Berkowitz, J N

    2007-05-01

    The genetic basis of post-zygotic reproductive isolation is beginning to be untangled in closely related species, but less is known about the genetics of reproductive isolation between divergent populations. Here, two genes encoding malic enzyme (ME) are isolated from the copepod Tigriopus californicus and their influence upon lowered viability in F(2) hybrids of genetically divergent populations is determined. Each ME gene has diverged extensively between T. californicus populations and one gene shows evidence for a recent selective sweep. Segregation patterns of genotypes for both ME genes in adult F(2) hybrids reveal dramatic departures from Mendelian inheritance, deviations that are not seen in F(2) nauplii implying that selection is acting during development based upon the genotype at these ME genes. These results imply that selection against deleterious gene combinations and not aberrant segregation (i.e. meiotic drive) is likely to lead to dramatic departures from Mendelian inheritance observed in these crosses.

  17. Historical comparisons reveal altered competitive interactions in a guild of crustose coralline algae.

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    McCoy, S J; Pfister, C A

    2014-04-01

    As the ocean environment changes over time, a paucity of long-term data sets and historical comparisons limits the exploration of community dynamics over time in natural systems. Here, we used a long-term experimental data set to present evidence for a reversal of competitive dominance within a group of crustose coralline algae (CCA) from the 1980s to present time in the northeast Pacific Ocean. CCA are cosmopolitan species distributed globally, and dominant space holders in intertidal and subtidal systems. Competition experiments showed a markedly lower competitive ability of the previous competitively dominant species and a decreased response of competitive dynamics to grazer presence. Competitive networks obtained from survey data showed concordance between the 1980s and 2013, yet also revealed reductions in interaction strengths across the assemblage. We discuss the potential role of environmental change, including ocean acidification, in altered ecological dynamics in this system.

  18. Historical data reveal 30-year persistence of benthic fauna associations in heavily modified waterbody

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    Ruth Callaway

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Baseline surveys form the cornerstone of coastal impact studies where altered conditions, for example through new infrastructure development, are assessed against a temporal reference state. They are snapshots taken before construction. Due to scarcity of relevant data prior to baseline surveys long-term trends can often not be taken into account. Particularly in heavily modified waterbodies this would however be desirable to control for changes in anthropogenic use over time as well as natural ecological variation. Here, the benthic environment of an industrialized embayment was investigated (Swansea Bay, Wales, UK where it is proposed to build a tidal lagoon that would generate marine renewable energy from the tidal range. Since robust long-term baseline data was not available, the value of unpublished historical benthos information from 1984 by a regional water company was assessed with the aim to improve certainty about the persistence of current benthic community patterns. A survey of 101 positions in 2014 identified spatially discrete benthic communities with areas of high and low diversity. Habitat characteristics including sediment properties and the proximity to a sewage outfall explained 17-35% of the variation in the community structure. Comparing the historical information from 1984 with 2014 revealed striking similarity in the benthic communities between those years, not just in their spatial distribution but also to a large extent in the species composition. The 30-year-old information confirmed spatial boundaries of discrete species associations and pinpointed a similar diversity hotspot. A group of five common species was found to be particularly persistent over time (Nucula nitidosa, Spisula elliptica, Spiophanes bombyx, Nephtys hombergii, Diastylis rathkei. According to the Infauna Quality Index (IQI linked to the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD the average ecological status for 2014 was ‘moderate’, but eleven samples

  19. Disruption of mitochondrial function in interpopulation hybrids of Tigriopus californicus.

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    Ellison, Christopher K; Burton, Ronald S

    2006-07-01

    Electron transport system (ETS) function in mitochondria is essential for the aerobic production of energy. Because ETS function requires extensive interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear gene products, coadaptation between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes may evolve within populations. Hybridization between allopatric populations may then expose functional incompatibilities between genomes that have not coevolved. The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus has high levels of nucleotide divergence among populations at mitochondrial loci and suffers F2 hybrid breakdown in interpopulation hybrids. We hypothesize that hybridization results in incompatibilities among subunits in ETS enzyme complexes and that these incompatibilities result in diminished mitochondrial function and fitness. To test this hypothesis, we measured fitness, mitochondrial function, and ETS enzyme activity in inbred recombinant hybrid lines of Tigriopus californicus. We found that (1) both fitness and mitochondrial function are reduced in hybrid lines, (2) only those ETS enzymes with both nuclear and mitochondrial subunits show a loss of activity in hybrid lines, and (3) positive relationships exist between ETS enzyme activity and mitochondrial function and between mitochondrial function and fitness. We also present evidence that hybrid lines harboring mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial RNA polymerase (mtRPOL) from the same parental source population have higher fitness than those with mtDNA and mtRPOL from different populations, suggesting that mitochondrial gene regulation may play a role in disruption of mitochondrial performance and fitness of hybrids. These results suggest that disruption of coadaptation between nuclear and mitochondrial genes contributes to the phenomenon of hybrid breakdown.

  20. Chromosomal basis of viability differences in Tigriopus californicus interpopulation hybrids.

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    Harrison, J S; Edmands, S

    2006-11-01

    Crosses between populations of Tigriopus californicus result in backcross and F2 hybrid breakdown for a variety of fitness related measures. The magnitude of this hybrid breakdown is correlated with evolutionary divergence. We assessed the chromosomal basis of viability differences in nonrecombinant backcross hybrids using markers mapped to individual chromosomes. To assess effects of evolutionary divergence we crossed one population to three different populations: two distantly related (approximately 18% mitochondrial COI sequence divergence) and one closely related (approximately 1% mitochondrial COI sequence divergence). We found that all three interpopulation crosses resulted in significant deviations from expected Mendelian ratios at a majority of the loci studied. In all but one case, deviations were due to a deficit of parental homozygotes. This pattern implies that populations of T. californicus carry a significant genetic load, and that a combination of beneficial dominance and deleterious homozygote-heterozygote interactions significantly affects hybrid viability. Pairwise tests of linkage disequilibrium detected relatively few significant interactions. For the two divergent crosses, effects of individual chromosomes were highly concordant. These two crosses also showed higher heterozygote excess in females than males across the vast majority of chromosomes.

  1. Nuclear and mitochondrial gene genealogies and allozyme polymorphism across a major phylogeographic break in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, R S; Lee, B N

    1994-05-24

    The genetic structure of natural populations is frequently inferred from geographic distributions of alleles at multiple gene loci. Surveys of allozyme polymorphisms in the tidepool copepod Tigriopus californicus have revealed sharp genetic differentiation of populations, indicating that gene flow among populations is highly restricted. Analysis of population structure in this species has now been extended to include nuclear and mitochondrial gene genealogies. DNA sequences of the mtDNA-encoded cytochrome-c oxidase subunit I gene from 21 isofemale lines derived from seven populations reveal a phylogeographic break between populations north and south of Point Conception, California, with sequence divergence across the break exceeding 18%, the highest level of mtDNA divergence yet reported among conspecific populations. Divergence between populations based on 22 sequences of the nuclear histone H1 gene is geographically concordant with the mitochondrial sequences. In contrast with previously studied nuclear genes in other sexually reproducing metazoans, the H1 gene genealogy from T. californicus shows no evidence of recombination. The apparent absence of intragenic recombinants probably results from the persistent lack of gene flow among geographically separated populations, a conclusion strongly supported by allozyme data and the mitochondrial gene genealogy. Despite strong population differentiation at allozyme loci, the phylogeographic break identified by the DNA sequences was not evident in the allozyme data.

  2. Paleoparasitological remains revealed by seven historic contexts from "Place d'Armes", Namur, Belgium

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    Gino Chaves da Rocha

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Human occupation for several centuries was recorded in the archaeological layers of "Place d'Armes", Namur, Belgium. Preventive archaeological excavations were carried out between 1996/1997 and seven historical strata were observed, from Gallo-Roman period up to Modern Times. Soil samples from cesspools, latrines, and structures-like were studied and revealed intestinal parasite eggs in the different archaeological contexts. Ascaris lumbricoides, A. suum, Trichuris trichiura, T. suis. Taenia sp., Fasciola hepatica, Diphyllobothrium sp., Capillaria sp. and Oxyuris equi eggs were found. Paleoparasitology confirmed the use of structures as latrines or cesspit as firstly supposed by the archaeologists. Medieval latrines were not only used for rejection of human excrements. The finding of Ascaris sp. and Trichuris sp. eggs may point to human's or wild swine's feces. Gallo-Roman people used to eat wild boar. Therefore, both A. suum and T. suis, or A. lumbricoides and T. trichuris, may be present, considering a swine carcass recovered into a cesspit. Careful sediment analysis may reveal its origin, although parasites of domestic animals can be found together with those of human's. Taenia sp. eggs identified in latrine samples indicate ingestion of uncooked beef with cysticercoid larvae. F. hepatica eggs suggest the ingestion of raw contaminated vegetables and Diphyllobothrium sp. eggs indicate contaminated fresh-water fish consumption. Ascaris sp. and Trichuris sp. eggs indicate fecal-oral infection by human and/or animal excrements.

  3. Historical comparisons reveal multiple drivers of decadal change of an ecosystem engineer at the range edge.

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    Firth, Louise B; Mieszkowska, Nova; Grant, Lisa M; Bush, Laura E; Davies, Andrew J; Frost, Matthew T; Moschella, Paula S; Burrows, Michael T; Cunningham, Paul N; Dye, Stephen R; Hawkins, Stephen J

    2015-08-01

    Biogenic reefs are important for habitat provision and coastal protection. Long-term datasets on the distribution and abundance of Sabellaria alveolata (L.) are available from Britain. The aim of this study was to combine historical records and contemporary data to (1) describe spatiotemporal variation in winter temperatures, (2) document short-term and long-term changes in the distribution and abundance of S. alveolata and discuss these changes in relation to extreme weather events and recent warming, and (3) assess the potential for artificial coastal defense structures to function as habitat for S. alveolata. A semi-quantitative abundance scale (ACFOR) was used to compare broadscale, long-term and interannual abundance of S. alveolata near its range edge in NW Britain. S. alveolata disappeared from the North Wales and Wirral coastlines where it had been abundant prior to the cold winter of 1962/1963. Population declines were also observed following the recent cold winters of 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. Extensive surveys in 2004 and 2012 revealed that S. alveolata had recolonized locations from which it had previously disappeared. Furthermore, it had increased in abundance at many locations, possibly in response to recent warming. S. alveolata was recorded on the majority of artificial coastal defense structures surveyed, suggesting that the proliferation of artificial coastal defense structures along this stretch of coastline may have enabled S. alveolata to spread across stretches of unsuitable natural habitat. Long-term and broadscale contextual monitoring is essential for monitoring responses of organisms to climate change. Historical data and gray literature can be invaluable sources of information. Our results support the theory that Lusitanian species are responding positively to climate warming but also that short-term extreme weather events can have potentially devastating widespread and lasting effects on organisms. Furthermore, the proliferation of

  4. Sex Conversion Induced by Hydrostatic Pressure in the Marine Copepod Tigriopus californicus.

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    Vacquier, V D; Belser, W L

    1965-12-17

    High hydrostatic pressure applied to the naupliar larval stages of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus converts some individuals that would have become males into females. The copepodid stages are not sensitive to pressureinduced conversion.

  5. Individual variation in paternal responses of virgin male California mice (Peromyscus californicus): behavioral and physiological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.R. de Jong; A. Korosi; B.N. Harris; J.P. Perea-Rodriguez; W. Saltzman

    2012-01-01

    California mice Peromyscus californicus are a rodent species in which fathers provide extensive paternal care; however, behavioral responses of virgin males toward conspecific neonates vary from paternal behavior to tolerance to infanticide. Indirect evidence suggests that paternal responses might b

  6. Sex without sex chromosomes: genetic architecture of multiple loci independently segregating to determine sex ratios in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

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    Alexander, H J; Richardson, J M L; Edmands, S; Anholt, B R

    2015-12-01

    Sex-determining systems are remarkably diverse and may evolve rapidly. Polygenic sex-determination systems are predicted to be transient and evolutionarily unstable, yet examples have been reported across a range of taxa. Here, we provide the first direct evidence of polygenic sex determination in Tigriopus californicus, a harpacticoid copepod with no heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Using genetically distinct inbred lines selected for male- and female-biased clutches, we generated a genetic map with 39 SNPs across 12 chromosomes. Quantitative trait locus mapping of sex ratio phenotype (the proportion of male offspring produced by an F2 female) in four F2 families revealed six independently segregating quantitative trait loci on five separate chromosomes, explaining 19% of the variation in sex ratios. The sex ratio phenotype varied among loci across chromosomes in both direction and magnitude, with the strongest phenotypic effects on chromosome 10 moderated to some degree by loci on four other chromosomes. For a given locus, sex ratio phenotype varied in magnitude for individuals derived from different dam lines. These data, together with the environmental factors known to contribute to sex determination, characterize the underlying complexity and potential lability of sex determination, and confirm the polygenic architecture of sex determination in T. californicus.

  7. Evolutionary genetics of hybrid breakdown in the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus

    OpenAIRE

    Ellison, Christopher K

    2008-01-01

    Populations of the supra-littoral marine copepod Tigriopus californicus are known to be highly divergent and to exhibit a pattern of hybrid breakdown when crossed under laboratory conditions. This dissertation examines the genetic mechanisms involved in hybrid breakdown in T. californicus, particularly those involving integration of the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. In Chapter I, I summarize some of the relevant literature concerning the importance of hybrid breakdown to evolutionary bio...

  8. Maladapted gene complexes within populations of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus?

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    Edmands, Suzanne; Northrup, Sara L; Hwang, Annmarie S

    2009-08-01

    The prevalence of F2 hybrid breakdown in interpopulation crosses of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus can be explained by disruption of coadapted gene complexes. This study further dissects the nature of hybrid gene interactions, revealing that parental populations may also harbor maladapted gene complexes. Diagnostic molecular markers (14) were assayed in reciprocal F2 hybrids to test for gene interactions affecting viability. Results showed some evidence of nuclear-nuclear coadaptation. Although there were no significant examples of pairwise linkage disequilibrium between physically unlinked loci, one of the two reciprocal crosses did show an overall excess of parental double homozygotes and an overall dearth of nonparental double homozygotes. In contrast, the nuclear-cytoplasmic data showed a stronger tendency toward maladaptation within the specific inbred lines used in this study. For three out of four loci with significant frequency differences between reciprocal F2, homozygotes were favored on the wrong cytoplasmic background. A separate study of reciprocal backcross hybrids between the same two populations (but different inbred lines) revealed faster development time when the full haploid nuclear genome did not match the cytoplasm. The occurrence of such suboptimal gene complexes may be attributable to effects of genetic drift in small, isolated populations.

  9. Historical Y. pestis Genomes Reveal the European Black Death as the Source of Ancient and Modern Plague Pandemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, Maria A; Tukhbatova, Rezeda I; Feldman, Michal; Drath, Joanna; Kacki, Sacha; Beltrán de Heredia, Julia; Arnold, Susanne; Sitdikov, Airat G; Castex, Dominique; Wahl, Joachim; Gazimzyanov, Ilgizar R; Nurgaliev, Danis K; Herbig, Alexander; Bos, Kirsten I; Krause, Johannes

    2016-06-08

    Ancient DNA analysis has revealed an involvement of the bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis in several historical pandemics, including the second plague pandemic (Europe, mid-14(th) century Black Death until the mid-18(th) century AD). Here we present reconstructed Y. pestis genomes from plague victims of the Black Death and two subsequent historical outbreaks spanning Europe and its vicinity, namely Barcelona, Spain (1300-1420 cal AD), Bolgar City, Russia (1362-1400 AD), and Ellwangen, Germany (1485-1627 cal AD). Our results provide support for (1) a single entry of Y. pestis in Europe during the Black Death, (2) a wave of plague that traveled toward Asia to later become the source population for contemporary worldwide epidemics, and (3) the presence of an historical European plague focus involved in post-Black Death outbreaks that is now likely extinct.

  10. Fitness and morphological outcomes of many generations of hybridization in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, V L; Knutson, V L; Lee, M; Zieba, J; Edmands, S

    2013-02-01

    Hybridization between genetically divergent populations is an important evolutionary process, with an outcome that is difficult to predict. We used controlled crosses and freely mating hybrid swarms, followed for up to 30 generations, to examine the morphological and fitness consequences of interpopulation hybridization in the copepod Tigriopus californicus. Patterns of fitness in two generations of controlled crosses were partly predictive of long-term trajectories in hybrid swarms. For one pair of populations, controlled crosses revealed neutral or beneficial effects of hybridization after the F1 generation, and hybrid swarm fitness almost always equalled or exceeded that of the midparent. For a second pair, controlled crosses showed F2 hybrid breakdown, but increased fitness in backcrosses, and hybrid swarm fitness deviated both above and below that of the parentals. Nevertheless, individual swarm replicates exhibited different fitness trajectories over time that were not related in a simple manner to their hybrid genetic composition, and fixation of fitter hybrid phenotypes was not observed. Hybridization did not increase overall morphological variation, and underlying genetic changes may have been masked by phenotypic plasticity. Nevertheless, one type of hybrid swarm exhibited a repeatable pattern of transgressively large eggsacs, indicating a positive effect of hybridization on individual fecundity. Additionally, both parental and hybrid swarms exhibited common phenotypic trends over time, indicating common selective pressures in the laboratory environment. Our results suggest that, in a system where much work has focused on F2 hybrid breakdown, the long-term fitness consequences of interpopulation hybridization are surprisingly benign.

  11. Molecular and quantitative trait variation within and among populations of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmands, Suzanne; Harrison, J Scott

    2003-10-01

    While molecular and quantitative trait variation may be theoretically correlated, empirical studies using both approaches frequently reveal discordant patterns, and these discrepancies can contribute to our understanding of evolutionary processes. Here, we assessed genetic variation in six populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus. Molecular variation was estimated using five polymorphic microsatellite loci, and quantitative variation was measured using 22-life history and morphometric characters. Within populations, no correlation was found between the levels of molecular variation (heterozygosity) and quantitative variation (heritability). Between populations, quantitative subdivision (Q(ST)) was correlated with molecular subdivision when measured as F(ST) but not when measured as R(ST). Unlike most taxa studied to date, the overall level of molecular subdivision exceeded the level of quantitative subdivision (F(ST) = 0.80, R(ST) = 0.89, Q(ST) = 0.30). Factors that could contribute to this pattern include stabilizing or fluctuating selection on quantitative traits or accelerated rates of molecular evolution.

  12. Gene expression and variation in social aggression by queens of the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmkampf, Martin; Mikheyev, Alexander S; Kang, Yun; Fewell, Jennifer; Gadau, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    A key requirement for social cooperation is the mitigation and/or social regulation of aggression towards other group members. Populations of the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex californicus show the alternate social phenotypes of queens founding nests alone (haplometrosis) or in groups of unrelated yet cooperative individuals (pleometrosis). Pleometrotic queens display an associated reduction in aggression. To understand the proximate drivers behind this variation, we placed foundresses of the two populations into social environments with queens from the same or the alternate population, and measured their behaviour and head gene expression profiles. A proportion of queens from both populations behaved aggressively, but haplometrotic queens were significantly more likely to perform aggressive acts, and conflict escalated more frequently in pairs of haplometrotic queens. Whole-head RNA sequencing revealed variation in gene expression patterns, with the two populations showing moderate differentiation in overall transcriptional profile, suggesting that genetic differences underlie the two founding strategies. The largest detected difference, however, was associated with aggression, regardless of queen founding type. Several modules of coregulated genes, involved in metabolism, immune system and neuronal function, were found to be upregulated in highly aggressive queens. Conversely, nonaggressive queens exhibited a striking pattern of upregulation in chemosensory genes. Our results highlight that the social phenotypes of cooperative vs. solitary nest founding tap into a set of gene regulatory networks that seem to govern aggression level. We also present a number of highly connected hub genes associated with aggression, providing opportunity to further study the genetic underpinnings of social conflict and tolerance.

  13. A gene-based SNP resource and linkage map for the copepod Tigriopus californicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foley Brad R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As yet, few genomic resources have been developed in crustaceans. This lack is particularly evident in Copepoda, given the extraordinary numerical abundance, and taxonomic and ecological diversity of this group. Tigriopus californicus is ideally suited to serve as a genetic model copepod and has been the subject of extensive work in environmental stress and reproductive isolation. Accordingly, we set out to develop a broadly-useful panel of genetic markers and to construct a linkage map dense enough for quantitative trait locus detection in an interval mapping framework for T. californicus--a first for copepods. Results One hundred and ninety Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs were used to genotype our mapping population of 250 F2 larvae. We were able to construct a linkage map with an average intermarker distance of 1.8 cM, and a maximum intermarker distance of 10.3 cM. All markers were assembled into linkage groups, and the 12 linkage groups corresponded to the 12 known chromosomes of T. californicus. We estimate a total genome size of 401.0 cM, and a total coverage of 73.7%. Seventy five percent of the mapped markers were detected in 9 additional populations of T. californicus. Of available model arthropod genomes, we were able to show more colocalized pairs of homologues between T. californicus and the honeybee Apis mellifera, than expected by chance, suggesting preserved macrosynteny between Hymenoptera and Copepoda. Conclusions Our study provides an abundance of linked markers spanning all chromosomes. Many of these markers are also found in multiple populations of T. californicus, and in two other species in the genus. The genomic resource we have developed will enable mapping throughout the geographical range of this species and in closely related species. This linkage map will facilitate genome sequencing, mapping and assembly in an ecologically and taxonomically interesting group for which genomic resources are

  14. Genetics of mitochondrial glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT-2) in Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, M M; Burton, R S

    1984-04-01

    Glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT; EC 2.6.1.1) occurs as two electrophoretically distinguishable isozymes in the copepod Tigriopus californicus. The slower-migrating form, referred to as GOT2 , is shown to be associated with the mitochondrial cell fraction. GOT2 phenotypes are inherited in typical Mendelian fashion, indicating that they are encoded by a nuclear gene. Allelic frequencies for electrophoretic variants of the two Got loci in 12 California populations of T. californicus show a sharp differentiation of local populations. Linkage studies demonstrated that Got-2 is linked to Got-1; a map of four loci in linkage group I is presented.

  15. Genetic models reveal historical patterns of sea lamprey population fluctuations within Lake Champlain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy C. D’Aloia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The origin of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus in Lake Champlain has been heavily debated over the past decade. Given the lack of historical documentation, two competing hypotheses have emerged in the literature. First, it has been argued that the relatively recent population size increase and concomitant rise in wounding rates on prey populations are indicative of an invasive population that entered the lake through the Champlain Canal. Second, recent genetic evidence suggests a post-glacial colonization at the end of the Pleistocene, approximately 11,000 years ago. One limitation to resolving the origin of sea lamprey in Lake Champlain is a lack of historical and current measures of population size. In this study, the issue of population size was explicitly addressed using nuclear (nDNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA markers to estimate historical demography with genetic models. Haplotype network analysis, mismatch analysis, and summary statistics based on mtDNA noncoding sequences for NCI (479 bp and NCII (173 bp all indicate a recent population expansion. Coalescent models based on mtDNA and nDNA identified two potential demographic events: a population decline followed by a very recent population expansion. The decline in effective population size may correlate with land-use and fishing pressure changes post-European settlement, while the recent expansion may be associated with the implementation of the salmonid stocking program in the 1970s. These results are most consistent with the hypothesis that sea lamprey are native to Lake Champlain; however, the credibility intervals around parameter estimates demonstrate that there is uncertainty regarding the magnitude and timing of past demographic events.

  16. Long-Term Sun Climate Connections, Revealed by the Analyses of Historical and Other Proxy Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, K. D.; Yau, K.

    2004-12-01

    The Sun, once considered constant, actually goes through 11-year, decadal, centennial, and even longer cycles. Our analysis of historical sunspot and aurora records, carbon-14 and beryllium-10 abundances from long-lived trees and deep polar ice cores, respectively, shows that it has gone through nine long cycles in the past 1800 years. Although these changes amounted to China). Total solar irradiances, reconstructed from historical sunspot records, were 0.25% lower then. This correlates nicely with an estimated 0.5-degree drop in Northern Hemisphere summer surface temperatures during the Little Ice Age [Lean, GRL 22, 3195, 1995]. We have also analyzed Chinese historical weather records for comparison. Reports of unseasonable cold are classified by the degree of severity: (1) Late (April-June) or early (July-September) killing frosts; (2) Bitter cold/heavy snowfall; and (3) Heavy sustained snowfall, bitter cold with frozen wells, rivers and icebound seas. The latter cases were often widespread and multi-year. All categories occurred most frequently during the coldest part of the Little Ice Age. The Category 3 episodes were in 1652-54, 1656, 1664, 1670-72, 1676-77, 1683, 1688-91, 1716, and 1718-19. For example the Yangtze River and its lakes froze up to 3-4 times in 1650-1700. The coldest period thus coincides with the Maunder Minimum, and is consistent with general circulation model hindcast winter conditions for China [Shindell, Science, 294, 2149, 2001]. There was only one Category 3 episode between the Maunder and Dalton Minima--in 1761 (due to a large volcanic eruption); and two in the Dalton Minimum (1795-1825)--in 1796 and 1814-17. The Sun has gradually brightened since the Dalton Minimum. But the climate of China remained cold through the 19th century, as in the rest of the world, probably due to increased volcanic aerosol loading of the atmosphere [Sato, JGR 98, 22987, 1993]. The climate of China seems to have been warm during the Late 14th-Century Maximum

  17. Chromosome-Wide Impacts on the Expression of Incompatibilities in Hybrids of Tigriopus californicus

    OpenAIRE

    Willett, Christopher S; Lima, Thiago G.; Inna Kovaleva; Lydia Hatfield

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements such as inversions have been recognized previously as contributing to reproductive isolation by maintaining alleles together that jointly contribute to deleterious genetic interactions and postzygotic reproductive isolation. In this study, an impact of potential incompatibilities merely residing on the same chromosome was found in crosses of populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus. When genetically divergent populations of this copepod are crossed, hybrids ...

  18. Synergistic interaction in simultaneous exposure to Streptomyces californicus and Stachybotrys chartarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huttunen, K.; Pelkonen, J.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog;

    2004-01-01

    chartarum, Bacillus cereus, Mycobacterium terrae, and Pseudomonas fluorescens) alone and together with the actinomycete Streptomyces californicus. The production of nitric oxide, levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and cytotoxicity were...

  19. Three divergent mitochondrial genomes from California populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Ronald S; Byrne, Rosemary J; Rawson, Paul D

    2007-11-15

    Previous work on the harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus californicus has focused on the extensive population differentiation in three mtDNA protein coding genes (COXI, COXII, Cytb). In order to get a more complete understanding of mtDNA evolution in this species, we sequenced three complete mitochondrial genomes (one from each of three California populations) and compared them to two published mtDNA genomes from an Asian congener, Tigriopus japonicus. Several features of the mtDNA genome appear to be conserved within the genus: 1) the unique order of the protein coding genes, rRNA genes and most of the tRNA genes, 2) the genome is compact, varying between 14.3 and 14.6 kb, and 3) all genes are encoded on the same strand of the mtDNA. Within T. californicus, extremely high levels of nucleotide divergence (>20%) are observed across much of the mitochondrial genome. Inferred amino acid sequences of the proteins encoded in the mtDNAs also show high levels of divergence; at the extreme, the three ND3 variants in T. californicus showed >25% amino acid substitutions, compared with californicus mtDNAs. Although not previously noted, this feature is also conserved in T. japonicus mtDNAs; whether this sequence is processed into a functional tRNA has not been determined. The putative control region contains a duplicated segment of different length (from 88 to 155 bp) in each of the T. californicus sequences. In each case, the duplicated segments are not tandem repeats; despite their different lengths, the distance between the start of the first and the start of the second repeat is conserved (520 bp). The functional significance, if any, of this repeat structure remains unknown.

  20. Historical aerial imagery reveals rapid frontal retreat following the 1920's warming in southeast Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, A. A.; Kjaer, K. H.; Korsgaard, N. J.; Khan, S. A.; Kjeldsen, K. K.; Andresen, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet (GIS) is undergoing massive changes in its frontal positions, velocity structure, and overall mass balance. Since 2000, marine and terrestrial terminating glaciers in southeast Greenland have experienced dramatic frontal retreat and dynamic thinning in response to increased sea surface and air temperatures. However, little is known about the long term glacier history prior to the satellite era. Here we show a unique record of the frontal history of 132 glaciers in southeast Greenland based on historical aerial and satellite imagery from 1933 to 2010. Our results demonstrate decadal sensitivity to temperature changes with rapid retreat following the early century warming (1919-1932) and glacial advance during a minor, but profound mid century cooling (1955-1972) succeeded by the present warming again leading to massive retreat. One significant finding lies in the similarity of the retreat following the early century warming and the latest decade, with a majority of the 132 glaciers exhibiting larger retreat rates in the early period. Furthermore, during the mid century cooling glaciers in southeast Greenland showed a surprisingly rapid response to the cooling, indicating that stabilization and subsequent advance can occur with a short cooling period. Marine terminating glaciers originating from the GIS experienced the largest frontal fluctuations often out of sync with local glaciers and ice caps indicating a larger coherence with ocean temperatures, whereas local glaciers and ice caps and GIS terrestrial terminating glaciers shows frontal fluctuations closely related to the air temperature.

  1. Historical nectar assessment reveals the fall and rise of floral resources in Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baude, Mathilde; Kunin, William E.; Boatman, Nigel D.; Conyers, Simon; Davies, Nancy; Gillespie, Mark A. K.; Morton, R. Daniel; Smart, Simon M.; Memmott, Jane

    2016-02-01

    There is considerable concern over declines in insect pollinator communities and potential impacts on the pollination of crops and wildflowers. Among the multiple pressures facing pollinators, decreasing floral resources due to habitat loss and degradation has been suggested as a key contributing factor. However, a lack of quantitative data has hampered testing for historical changes in floral resources. Here we show that overall floral rewards can be estimated at a national scale by combining vegetation surveys and direct nectar measurements. We find evidence for substantial losses in nectar resources in England and Wales between the 1930s and 1970s; however, total nectar provision in Great Britain as a whole had stabilized by 1978, and increased from 1998 to 2007. These findings concur with trends in pollinator diversity, which declined in the mid-twentieth century but stabilized more recently. The diversity of nectar sources declined from 1978 to 1990 and thereafter in some habitats, with four plant species accounting for over 50% of national nectar provision in 2007. Calcareous grassland, broadleaved woodland and neutral grassland are the habitats that produce the greatest amount of nectar per unit area from the most diverse sources, whereas arable land is the poorest with respect to amount of nectar per unit area and diversity of nectar sources. Although agri-environment schemes add resources to arable landscapes, their national contribution is low. Owing to their large area, improved grasslands could add substantially to national nectar provision if they were managed to increase floral resource provision. This national-scale assessment of floral resource provision affords new insights into the links between plant and pollinator declines, and offers considerable opportunities for conservation.

  2. Multigenerational response to artificial selection for biased clutch sex ratios in Tigriopus californicus populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, H J; Richardson, J M L; Anholt, B R

    2014-09-01

    Polygenic sex determination (PSD) is relatively rare and theoretically evolutionary unstable, yet has been reported across a range of taxa. Evidence for multilocus PSD is provided by (i) large between-family variance in sex ratio, (ii) paternal and maternal effects on family sex ratio and (iii) response to selection for family sex ratio. This study tests the polygenic hypothesis of sex determination in the harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus californicus using the criterion of response to selection. We report the first multigenerational quantitative evidence that clutch sex ratio responds to artificial selection in both directions (selection for male- and female-biased families) and in multiple populations of T. californicus. In the five of six lines that showed a response to selection, realized heritability estimated by multigenerational analysis ranged from 0.24 to 0.58. Divergence of clutch sex ratio between selection lines is rapid, with response to selection detectable within the first four generations of selection.

  3. Heritability of Sex Tendency in a Harpacticoid Copepod, Tigriopus californicus

    OpenAIRE

    Voordouw, Maarten J; Anholt, Bradley R.

    2011-01-01

    Systems with genetic variation for the primary sex ratio are important for testing sex-ratio theory and for understanding how this variation is maintained. Evidence is presented for heritable variation of the primary sex ratio in the harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus californicus. Variation in the primary sex ratio among families cannot be accounted for by Mendelian segregation of sex chromosomes. The covariance in sex phenotype between full-sibling clutches and between mothers and offspring sug...

  4. The Genetic Basis of Local Adaptation to Thermal Stress in the Intertidal Copepod Tigriopus Californicus /

    OpenAIRE

    Sefton, Margaret Marie

    2013-01-01

    Populations of the intertidal copepod, Tigriopus californicus, vary in their tolerance to thermal stress. In this study, the genetic basis of these differences was examined by generating interpopulation hybrids between a northern and southern population; hybrids were then exposed them to multiple generations of heat stress. At each generation, changes in allele frequency of six candidate genes were monitored. Although allelic frequencies did not change in response to thermal stress, there was...

  5. Recombination in interpopulation hybrids of the copepod Tigriopus californicus: release of beneficial variation despite hybrid breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmands, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Crosses between divergent populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus typically result in fitness reductions for both F2 and backcross hybrids. Because females in this species lack chiasmatic meiosis, both recombinant and nonrecombinant backcross hybrids can be created. Recombinant hybrids were found to have significantly faster development time for both males and females in 2 pairs of crosses, indicating the creation of favorable gene combinations by disrupting parental linkage groups.

  6. Diversifying Selection Underlies the Origin of Allozyme Polymorphism at the Phosphoglucose Isomerase Locus in Tigriopus californicus

    OpenAIRE

    Schoville, Sean D.; Flowers, Jonathan M.; Ronald S Burton

    2012-01-01

    The marine copepod Tigriopus californicus lives in intertidal rock pools along the Pacific coast, where it exhibits strong, temporally stable population genetic structure. Previous allozyme surveys have found high frequency private alleles among neighboring subpopulations, indicating that there is limited genetic exchange between populations. Here we evaluate the factors responsible for the diversification and maintenance of alleles at the phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) locus by evaluating pa...

  7. Unusual structure of ribosomal DNA in the copepod Tigriopus californicus: intergenic spacer sequences lack internal subrepeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, R S; Metz, E C; Flowers, J M; Willett, C S

    2005-01-03

    Eukaryotic nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is typically arranged as a series of tandem repeats coding for 18S, 5.8S, and 28S ribosomal RNAs. Transcription of rDNA repeats is initiated in the intergenic spacer (IGS) region upstream of the 18S gene. The IGS region itself typically consists of a set of subrepeats that function as transcriptional enhancers. Two important evolutionary forces have been proposed to act on the IGS region: first, selection may favor changes in the number of subrepeats that adaptively adjust rates of rDNA transcription, and second, coevolution of IGS sequence with RNA polymerase I transcription factors may lead to species specificity of the rDNA transcription machinery. To investigate the potential role of these forces on population differentiation and hybrid breakdown in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus, we have characterized the rDNA of five T. californicus populations from the Pacific Coast of North America and one sample of T. brevicornicus from Scotland. Major findings are as follows: (1) the structural genes for 18S and 28S are highly conserved across T. californicus populations, in contrast to other nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes previously studied in these populations. (2) There is extensive differentiation among populations in the IGS region; in the extreme, no homology is observed across the IGS sequences (>2 kb) from the two Tigriopus species. (3) None of the Tigriopus IGS sequences have the subrepeat structure common to other eukaryotic IGS regions. (4) Segregation of rDNA in laboratory crosses indicates that rDNA is located on at least two separate chromosomes in T. californicus. These data suggest that although IGS length polymorphism does not appear to play the adaptive role hypothesized in some other eukaryotic systems, sequence divergence in the rDNA promoter region within the IGS could lead to population specificity of transcription in hybrids.

  8. A gene-based SNP resource and linkage map for the copepod Tigriopus californicus

    OpenAIRE

    Foley Brad R; Rose Colin G; Rundle Daniel E; Leong Wai; Moy Gary W; Burton Ronald S; Edmands Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background As yet, few genomic resources have been developed in crustaceans. This lack is particularly evident in Copepoda, given the extraordinary numerical abundance, and taxonomic and ecological diversity of this group. Tigriopus californicus is ideally suited to serve as a genetic model copepod and has been the subject of extensive work in environmental stress and reproductive isolation. Accordingly, we set out to develop a broadly-useful panel of genetic markers and to construct...

  9. Closely linked H2B genes in the marine copepod, Tigriopus californicus indicate a recent gene duplication or gene conversion event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D; Cook, A; Wagner, M; Wells, D

    1992-01-01

    Two nonallelic histone gene clusters were characterized in the marine copepod, Tigriopus californicus. The DNA sequence of one of the clusters reveals six genes in the contiguous arrangement of H2B, H1, H3, H4, H2B and H2A. The order of genes within the second cluster is H3, H4, H2B and H2A. There is no evidence for the presence of an H1 gene in this cluster. Comparison of the three copepod H2B genes reveals a high degree of similarity between the 5' upstream regions and between the amino terminal halves of the two H2B genes found within the same cluster. From these data we infer that gene duplication and/or gene conversion events occurred within this cluster in the recent past.

  10. Proline biosynthesis genes and their regulation under salinity stress in the euryhaline copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S; Burton, Ronald S

    2002-08-01

    Diverse organisms regulate concentrations of intracellular organic osmolytes in response to changes in environmental salinity or desiccation. In marine crustaceans, accumulation of high concentrations of proline is a dominant component of response to hyperosmotic stress. In the euryhaline copepod Tigriopus californicus, synthesis of proline from its metabolic precursor glutamate is tightly regulated by changes in environmental salinity. Here, for the first time in a marine invertebrate, the genes responsible for this pathway have been cloned and characterized. The two proteins display the sequence features of homologous enzymes identified from other eukaryotes. One of the cloned genes, delta1-pyrroline-5-carboxylase reductase (P5CR), is demonstrated to have the reductase enzyme activity when expressed in proline-auxotroph bacteria, while the second, delta1-pyrroline-5-carboxylase synthase (P5CS), does not rescue proline-auxotroph bacteria. In contrast to results from higher plants, neither levels of P5CS nor P5CR mRNAs increase in response to salinity stress in T. californicus. Hence, regulation of proline synthesis during osmotic stress in T. californicus is likely mediated by some form of post-transcriptional regulation of either P5CS or P5CR. Understanding the regulation this pathway may elucidate the mechanisms limiting the salinity ranges of marine taxa.

  11. Response of Schoenoplectus acutus and Schoenoplectus californicus at different life-history stages to hydrologic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloey, Taylor M; Howard, Rebecca J.; Hester, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    For wetland restoration success to be maximized, restoration managers need better information regarding how the frequency, depth, and duration of flooding affect soil chemistry and the survival, growth, and morphology of targeted plant species. In a greenhouse study we investigated the impact of four different flooding durations (0 %, 40 %, 60 %, and 100 %) on soil physicochemistry and the responses of seedlings and adults of two species of emergent wetland macrophytes commonly used in restoration efforts (Schoenoplectus acutus and Schoenoplectus californicus). The longest flooding duration, which created more reducing soil conditions, resulted in significantly reduced survival of S. acutus adults (34 ± 21 % survival) and complete mortality of seedlings of both species. Schoenoplectus californicus adults exhibited higher flooding tolerance, showing little impact of flooding on morphology and physiology. A companion field study indicated that S. californicus maintained stem strength regardless of flooding duration or depth, supporting the greenhouse study results. This information serves to improve our understanding of the ecological differences between these species as well as provide restoration managers with better guidelines for targeted elevation and hydrologic regimes for these species in order to enhance the success of restoration plantings and better predict restoration site development.

  12. Conservation biological control in strawberry: effect of different pollen on development, survival, and reproduction of Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugole Ottaviano, María F; Cédola, Claudia V; Sánchez, Norma E; Greco, Nancy M

    2015-12-01

    Wild vegetation surrounding crops may provide temporary habitat and potential food sources for phytoseiids in different seasons. Monthly vegetation samples of wild plants adjacent to strawberry plants and wild plants in a vegetation strip close to the crop were taken. The frequency of Neoseiulus californicus, Tetranychus urticae and other mites and insects was recorded. In addition, in a laboratory assay, the survival, developmental time and fecundity of females fed on pollen of strawberry and pollen of wild plants where N. californicus was recorded during their flowering, were estimated. Pollen from Urtica urens, Lamium amplexicaule, Convolvulus arvensis, Sonchus oleraceous, Galega officinalis, and Fragaria x ananassa (strawberry) allowed development of N. californicus to adult, but not reproduction. Survival was 70-80 % when fed on pollen from S. oleraceus, G. officinalis and C. arvensis, 80-90 % when fed on pollen from U. urens and F. x ananassa, and more than 90 % when fed on T. urticae and on pollen from L. amplexicaule. In autumn and winter, U. urens, L. amplexicaule and S. oleraceous could promote the persistence of N. californicus when prey density in strawberry is low, offering T. urticae, thrips and pollen. In summer, pollen of C. arvensis and G. officinalis would contribute to the persistence of N. californicus when the strawberry crop is ending and offers scarce food resources. Although the pollen of these plants would not enable the predator population to increase, the presence of these plants in the vicinity of strawberry could contribute to the persistence of N. californicus population and help to limit T. urticae growth when this pest begins to colonize the crop.

  13. Chromosome-Wide Impacts on the Expression of Incompatibilities in Hybrids of Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S; Lima, Thiago G; Kovaleva, Inna; Hatfield, Lydia

    2016-06-01

    Chromosome rearrangements such as inversions have been recognized previously as contributing to reproductive isolation by maintaining alleles together that jointly contribute to deleterious genetic interactions and postzygotic reproductive isolation. In this study, an impact of potential incompatibilities merely residing on the same chromosome was found in crosses of populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus When genetically divergent populations of this copepod are crossed, hybrids show reduced fitness, and deviations from expected genotypic ratios can be used to determine regions of the genome involved in deleterious interactions. In this study, a set of markers was genotyped for a cross of two populations of T. californicus, and these markers show widespread deviations from Mendelian expectations, with entire chromosomes showing marked skew. Despite the importance of mtDNA/nuclear interactions in incompatibilities in this system in previous studies, in these crosses the expected patterns stemming from these interactions are not widely apparent. Females lack recombination in this species, and a striking difference is observed between male and female backcrosses. This suggests that the maintenance of multiple loci on individual chromosomes can enable some incompatibilities, perhaps playing a similar role in the initial rounds of hybridization to chromosomal rearrangements in preserving sets of alleles together that contribute to incompatibilities. Finally, it was observed that candidate pairs of incompatibility regions are not consistently interacting across replicates or subsets of these crosses, despite the repeatability of the deviations at many of the single loci themselves, suggesting that more complicated models of Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities may need to be considered.

  14. Interpopulation hybridization results in widespread viability selection across the genome in Tigriopus californicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zieba Jennifer T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic interactions within hybrids influence their overall fitness. Understanding the details of these interactions can improve our understanding of speciation. One experimental approach is to investigate deviations from Mendelian expectations (segregation distortion in the inheritance of mapped genetic markers. In this study, we used the copepod Tigriopus californicus, a species which exhibits high genetic divergence between populations and a general pattern of reduced fitness in F2 interpopulation hybrids. Previous studies have implicated both nuclear-cytoplasmic and nuclear-nuclear interactions in causing this fitness reduction. We identified and mapped population-diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and used these to examine segregation distortion across the genome within F2 hybrids. Results We generated a linkage map which included 45 newly elucidated SNPs and 8 population-diagnostic microsatellites used in previous studies. The map, the first available for the Copepoda, was estimated to cover 75% of the genome and included markers on all 12 T. californicus chromosomes. We observed little segregation distortion in newly hatched F2 hybrid larvae (fewer than 10% of markers at p Conclusion Adult male F2 hybrids between two populations of T. californius exhibit dramatic segregation distortion across the genome. Distorted loci are clustered within specific linkage groups, and the direction of distortion differs between chromosomes. This segregation distortion is due to selection acting between hatching and adulthood.

  15. Acclimation and adaptation to common marine pollutants in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Patrick Y; Foley, Helen B; Handschumacher, Lisa; Suzuki, Amanda; Karamanukyan, Tigran; Edmands, Suzanne

    2014-10-01

    Establishing water quality criteria using bioassays is complicated by variation in chemical tolerance between populations. Two major contributors to this variation are acclimation and adaptation, which are both linked to exposure history, but differ in how long their effects are maintained. Our study examines how tolerance changes over multiple generations of exposure to two common marine pollutants, copper (Cu) and tributyltin oxide (TBTO), in a sexually reproducing marine copepod, Tigriopus californicus. Lines of T. californicus were chronically exposed to sub-lethal levels of Cu and TBTO for 12 generations followed by a recovery period of 3 generations in seawater control conditions. At each generation, the average number of offspring produced and survived to 28 d was determined and used as the metric of tolerance. Lines exposed to Cu and TBTO showed an overall increase in tolerance over time. Increased Cu tolerance arose by generation 3 in the chronically exposed lines and was lost after 3 generations in seawater control conditions. Increased TBTO tolerance was detected at generation 7 and was maintained even after 3 generations in seawater control conditions. It was concluded from this study that tolerance to Cu is consistent with acclimation, a quick gain and loss of tolerance. In contrast, TBTO tolerance is consistent with adaptation, in which onset of tolerance was delayed relative to an acclimation response and maintained in the absence of exposure. These findings illustrate that consideration of exposure history is necessary when using bioassays to measure chemical tolerance.

  16. Hybrid breakdown weakens under thermal stress in population crosses of the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of hybridization can be impacted by environmental conditions, which themselves can contribute to reproductive isolation between taxa. In crosses of genetically divergent populations, hybridization can have both negative and positive impacts on fitness, the balance between which might be tipped by changes in the environment. Genetically divergent populations of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus have been shown to differ in thermal tolerance at high temperatures along a latitudinal gradient. In this study, a series of crosses were made between pairs of genetically divergent populations of T. californicus, and the thermal tolerance of these hybrids was tested. In most cases, the first-generation hybrids had relatively high thermal tolerance and the second-generation hybrids were not generally reduced below the less-tolerant parental population for high temperature tolerance. This pattern contrasts with previous studies from crosses of genetically divergent populations of this copepod, which often shows hybrid breakdown in these second-generation hybrids for other measures of fitness. These results suggest that high temperature stress could either increase the positive impacts of hybridization or decrease the negative impacts of hybridization resulting in lowered hybrid breakdown in these population crosses.

  17. Biology of Neoseiulus californicus feeding on two-spotted spider mite

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    Catiane Dameda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tetranychus urticae (Koch stands out as a polyphagous mite. In a strawberry plant, this mite develops on the underside of leaves, causing a significant injury. This study aimed to know the biological characteristics of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, from cultivated strawberry plants. The study started with thirty eggs isolated in arenas with different stages of T. urticae. The average length of egg-adult was higher for females (5.69±0.08 than for males (5.35±0.11. The sex ratio was 0.66 and the innate capacity for increase (rm was 0.15 female/female/day. The net reproductive rate (Ro was 17.10 times/generation, with an average to each generation (T of 19.35 days. Greater oviposition was observed at the 11th day after its onset, with 2.7 eggs/female/day and the average was 38.14±5.58 eggs/female. The finite increase rate (λ was 1.41 female/day. Neoseiulus californicus showed to reproduce properly when feeding on T. urticae.

  18. Historical aerial imagery reveals rapid frontal retreat following the 1920’s warming in southeast Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Anders Anker; Kjær, Kurt H.; Korsgaard, Niels Jákup;

    sea surface and air temperatures. However, little is known about the long term glacier history prior to the satellite era. Here we show a unique record of the frontal history of 132 glaciers in southeast Greenland based on historical aerial and satellite imagery from 1933 to 2010. Our results...

  19. Chromosome-Wide Impacts on the Expression of Incompatibilities in Hybrids of Tigriopus californicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Willett

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome rearrangements such as inversions have been recognized previously as contributing to reproductive isolation by maintaining alleles together that jointly contribute to deleterious genetic interactions and postzygotic reproductive isolation. In this study, an impact of potential incompatibilities merely residing on the same chromosome was found in crosses of populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus. When genetically divergent populations of this copepod are crossed, hybrids show reduced fitness, and deviations from expected genotypic ratios can be used to determine regions of the genome involved in deleterious interactions. In this study, a set of markers was genotyped for a cross of two populations of T. californicus, and these markers show widespread deviations from Mendelian expectations, with entire chromosomes showing marked skew. Despite the importance of mtDNA/nuclear interactions in incompatibilities in this system in previous studies, in these crosses the expected patterns stemming from these interactions are not widely apparent. Females lack recombination in this species, and a striking difference is observed between male and female backcrosses. This suggests that the maintenance of multiple loci on individual chromosomes can enable some incompatibilities, perhaps playing a similar role in the initial rounds of hybridization to chromosomal rearrangements in preserving sets of alleles together that contribute to incompatibilities. Finally, it was observed that candidate pairs of incompatibility regions are not consistently interacting across replicates or subsets of these crosses, despite the repeatability of the deviations at many of the single loci themselves, suggesting that more complicated models of Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities may need to be considered.

  20. Viability of cytochrome c genotypes depends on cytoplasmic backgrounds in Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, C S; Burton, R S

    2001-08-01

    Because of their extensive functional interaction, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear genes may evolve to form coadapted complexes within reproductively isolated populations. As a consequence of coadaptation, the fitness of particular nuclear alleles may depend on mtDNA genotype. Among populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus, there are high levels of amino acid substitutions in both the mtDNA genes encoding subunits of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and the nuclear gene encoding cytochrome c (CYC), the substrate for COX. Because of the functional interaction between enzyme and substrate proteins, we hypothesized that the fitness of CYC genotypes would depend on mtDNA genotype. To test this hypothesis, segregation ratios for CYC and a second nuclear marker (histone H1) unrelated to mitochondrial function were scored in F2 progeny of several reciprocal interpopulation crosses. Genotypic ratios at the CYC locus (but not the H1 locus) differed between reciprocal crosses and differed from expected Mendelian ratios, suggesting that CYC genotypic fitnesses were strongly influenced by cytoplasmic (including mtDNA) background. However, in most cases the nature of the deviations from Mendelian ratios and differences between reciprocal crosses are not consistent with simple coevolution between CYC and mtDNA background. In a cross in which both newly hatched larvae and adults were sampled, only the adult sample showed deviations from Mendelian ratios, indicating that genotypic viabilities differed. In two of six crosses, large genotypic ratio differences for CYC were observed between the sexes. These results suggest that significant variation in nuclear-mtDNA coadaptation may exist between T. californicus populations and that the relative viability of specific cytonuclear allelic combinations is somehow affected by sex.

  1. Differences in ultrasonic vocalizations between wild and laboratory California mice (Peromyscus californicus.

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    Matina C Kalcounis-Rueppell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs emitted by muroid rodents, including laboratory mice and rats, are used as phenotypic markers in behavioral assays and biomedical research. Interpretation of these USVs depends on understanding the significance of USV production by rodents in the wild. However, there has never been a study of muroid rodent ultrasound function in the wild and comparisons of USVs produced by wild and laboratory rodents are lacking to date. Here, we report the first comparison of wild and captive rodent USVs recorded from the same species, Peromyscus californicus. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used standard ultrasound recording techniques to measure USVs from California mice in the laboratory (Peromyscus Genetic Stock Center, SC, USA and the wild (Hastings Natural History Reserve, CA, USA. To determine which California mouse in the wild was vocalizing, we used a remote sensing method that used a 12-microphone acoustic localization array coupled with automated radio telemetry of all resident Peromyscus californicus in the area of the acoustic localization array. California mice in the laboratory and the wild produced the same types of USV motifs. However, wild California mice produced USVs that were 2-8 kHz higher in median frequency and significantly more variable in frequency than laboratory California mice. SIGNIFICANCE: The similarity in overall form of USVs from wild and laboratory California mice demonstrates that production of USVs by captive Peromyscus is not an artifact of captivity. Our study validates the widespread use of USVs in laboratory rodents as behavioral indicators but highlights that particular characteristics of laboratory USVs may not reflect natural conditions.

  2. Historical DNA reveals the demographic history of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in medieval and early modern Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsdóttir, Guðbjörg Ásta; Westfall, Kristen M; Edvardsson, Ragnar; Pálsson, Snæbjörn

    2014-02-22

    Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) vertebrae from archaeological sites were used to study the history of the Icelandic Atlantic cod population in the time period of 1500-1990. Specifically, we used coalescence modelling to estimate population size and fluctuations from the sequence diversity at the cytochrome b (cytb) and Pantophysin I (PanI) loci. The models are consistent with an expanding population during the warm medieval period, large historical effective population size (NE), a marked bottleneck event at 1400-1500 and a decrease in NE in early modern times. The model results are corroborated by the reduction of haplotype and nucleotide variation over time and pairwise population distance as a significant portion of nucleotide variation partitioned across the 1550 time mark. The mean age of the historical fished stock is high in medieval times with a truncation in age in early modern times. The population size crash coincides with a period of known cooling in the North Atlantic, and we conclude that the collapse may be related to climate or climate-induced ecosystem change.

  3. Co-cultivation of Streptomyces californicus and Stachybotrys chartarum stimulates the production of cytostatic compound(s) with immunotoxic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttinen, Piia; Pelkonen, Jukka; Huttunen, Kati; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2006-12-15

    We have recently shown that the actinobacterium Streptomyces californicus and the fungus Stachybotrys chartarum originating from moisture damaged buildings possess both immunotoxic and immunostimulatory characteristics, which are synergistically potentiated by microbial interaction. In the search for the causative agent(s) behind the immunotoxicity, the cytostatic effects of the co-cultivated spores of S. californicus and S. chartarum were compared to those caused by widely used cytostatic agents produced by streptomycetes. The RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed to four doses of doxorubicin (DOX), actinomycin D (AMD), mitomycin C (MMC) or phleomycin (PHLEO) for 24 h. Kinetics of the spores of the co-cultivated and the separately cultivated microbes (1x10(6) spores/ml) was compared to DOX (0.15 muM). Apoptotic responses were analyzed by measuring DNA content and mitochondria membrane depolarization with flow cytometer, and by the fluorometric caspase-3 assay. The present data indicate that interactions during co-cultivation of S. californicus and S. chartarum stimulate the production of an unidentified cytostatic compound(s) capable of inducing mitochondria mediated apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at S-G(2)/M. The spores of co-cultivated microbes caused a 4-fold collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and an almost 6-fold caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation when compared to control. Similar responses were induced by DNA cleaving compounds, especially DOX and AMD, at the relatively low concentrations, but not the spores of the same microbes when they were grown separately. These data suggest that when growing in the same habitat, interactions between S. californicus and S. chartarum stimulates the production of an unknown cytostatic compound(s) which evoke immunotoxic effects similar to those by chemotherapeutic drugs.

  4. Historical and contemporary geographic data reveal complex spatial and temporal responses of vegetation to climate and land stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Miguel L.; Norman, Laura M.; Webb, Robert H.; Turner, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetation and land-cover changes are not always directional but follow complex trajectories over space and time, driven by changing anthropogenic and abiotic conditions. We present a multi-observational approach to land-change analysis that addresses the complex geographic and temporal variability of vegetation changes related to climate and land use. Using land-ownership data as a proxy for land-use practices, multitemporal land-cover maps, and repeat photography dating to the late 19th century, we examine changing spatial and temporal distributions of two vegetation types with high conservation value in the southwestern United States: grasslands and riparian vegetation. In contrast to many reported vegetation changes, notably shrub encroachment in desert grasslands, we found an overall increase in grassland area and decline of xeroriparian and riparian vegetation. These observed change patterns were neither temporally directional nor spatially uniform over the landscape. Historical data suggest that long-term vegetation changes coincide with broad climate fluctuations while fine-scale patterns are determined by land-management practices. In some cases, restoration and active management appear to weaken the effects of climate on vegetation; therefore, if land managers in this region act in accord with on-going directional changes, the current drought and associated ecological reorganization may provide an opportunity to achieve desired restoration endpoints.

  5. Toxicidade residual de alguns agrotóxicos recomendado na agricultura sobre Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae Residual toxicity of some pesticides recommended for citrus orchards on the predaceous mite Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: phytoseiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Zatti da Silva

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a toxicidade residual de alguns agrotóxicos utilizados em citros sobre Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor em condições de laboratório. O método de bioensaio adotado foi o de contato residual. Folhas de citros da variedade Pêra, acondicionadas em arenas, foram pulverizadas em torre de Potter. A toxicidade residual dos produtos foi avaliada duas horas e 1; 3; 5; 7; 10; 14 e 21 dias após a aplicação. Em cada arena, foram transferidas dez fêmeas adultas de N. californicus, juntamente com uma quantidade suficiente de Tetranychus urticae, como fonte de alimento. As avaliações de mortalidade foram realizadas 72 horas após a transferência dos ácaros para as arenas. Os agrotóxicos acrinathrin, deltamethrin, dinocap, enxofre, fenpropathrin, óxido de fenbutatin e propargite não causaram mortalidades significativas em adultos de N. californicus. Foram registradas mortalidades de 29,8; 24,0 e 34,1% para ácaros N. californicus expostos a resíduos de duas horas de idade de abamectim, azocyclotin e cyhexatin, respectivamente. Dicofol, pyridaben e chlorfenapyr causaram 100% de mortalidade aos ácaros predadores expostos aos resíduos tóxicos dos acaricidas, com duas horas de idade. Abamectin provocou mortalidade significativa por um período inferior a um dia. Resíduos dos acaricidas azocyclotin, cyhexatin, dicofol, pyridaben e chlorfenapyr provocaram mortalidades significativas por períodos de 1; 1; 10; 10 e 21dias, respectivamente. Os resultados obtidos no presente experimento servem de subsídio para a escolha adequada dos agrotóxicos a serem utilizados em pomares de citros nos quais N. californicus esteja presente ou naqueles em que o predador venha a ser liberado. Esses resultados também servem para a escolha do momento mais favorável para a liberação dos ácaros predadores dessa espécie no campo, após a aplicação de agrotóxicos nos pomares. Estudos conduzidos em condições de campo ainda s

  6. Seletividade de agrotóxicos usados na cultura da macieira a Neoseiulus Californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae1 Pesticide selectivity used in apple crops Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine de Andrade Meyer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar os efeitos secundários dos principais agrotóxicos utilizados em macieira sobre adultos e imaturos de Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae. Os testes foram conduzidos em laboratório, utilizando as doses dos produtos recomendadas para a cultura e o método de contato e residual com pulverização em superfície de folha. Foram testados tebufenozida, fosmete, metidationa, clorpirifós, abamectina, fenpiroximato, piridabem, captana, mancozebe (duas dosagens e ditianona. Para o cálculo do efeito total (E% sobre os adultos, avaliaram-se a mortalidade, a oviposição e a viabilidade dos ovos, e para os imaturos, somente a mortalidade. Os resultados do E% foram avaliados 96 horas após a pulverização. Os produtos foram classificados quanto ao efeito total (E% de toxicidade proposta pela IOBC/WPRS. Fosmete, tebufenozida e metidationa foram inócuos; abamectina, fenpiroximato, clorpirifós, captana, mancozebe (nas duas dosagens testadas e ditianona foram levemente nocivos, e piridabem foi moderadamente nocivo aos adultos de N. californicus. O fungicida mancozebe, na maior dosagem (320g,i.a./100L, foi o que mais afetou o ácaro predador. Quanto à seletividade dos agrotóxicos aos imaturos, constatouse que abamectina e piridabem foram moderadamente nocivos, e os demais foram inócuos. Nenhum produto foi classificado como nocivo, evidenciando a tolerância de N. californicus a estes agrotóxicos. Estes resultados permitem uma escolha e manejo mais adequado para os agrotóxicos utilizados nos pomares comerciais de macieira, de forma que a presença deste ácaro predador exerça pressão de controle do ácaro-vermelho.The objective of this study was to evaluate the side effects of the main pesticides used in adult and immature Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae. The tests were carried out in the laboratory by using the contact and residual spraying method on the leaf surface. It was tested

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the world's sheep breeds reveals high levels of historic mixture and strong recent selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijas, James W; Lenstra, Johannes A; Hayes, Ben; Boitard, Simon; Porto Neto, Laercio R; San Cristobal, Magali; Servin, Bertrand; McCulloch, Russell; Whan, Vicki; Gietzen, Kimberly; Paiva, Samuel; Barendse, William; Ciani, Elena; Raadsma, Herman; McEwan, John; Dalrymple, Brian

    2012-02-01

    Through their domestication and subsequent selection, sheep have been adapted to thrive in a diverse range of environments. To characterise the genetic consequence of both domestication and selection, we genotyped 49,034 SNP in 2,819 animals from a diverse collection of 74 sheep breeds. We find the majority of sheep populations contain high SNP diversity and have retained an effective population size much higher than most cattle or dog breeds, suggesting domestication occurred from a broad genetic base. Extensive haplotype sharing and generally low divergence time between breeds reveal frequent genetic exchange has occurred during the development of modern breeds. A scan of the genome for selection signals revealed 31 regions containing genes for coat pigmentation, skeletal morphology, body size, growth, and reproduction. We demonstrate the strongest selection signal has occurred in response to breeding for the absence of horns. The high density map of genetic variability provides an in-depth view of the genetic history for this important livestock species.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of the world's sheep breeds reveals high levels of historic mixture and strong recent selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Kijas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Through their domestication and subsequent selection, sheep have been adapted to thrive in a diverse range of environments. To characterise the genetic consequence of both domestication and selection, we genotyped 49,034 SNP in 2,819 animals from a diverse collection of 74 sheep breeds. We find the majority of sheep populations contain high SNP diversity and have retained an effective population size much higher than most cattle or dog breeds, suggesting domestication occurred from a broad genetic base. Extensive haplotype sharing and generally low divergence time between breeds reveal frequent genetic exchange has occurred during the development of modern breeds. A scan of the genome for selection signals revealed 31 regions containing genes for coat pigmentation, skeletal morphology, body size, growth, and reproduction. We demonstrate the strongest selection signal has occurred in response to breeding for the absence of horns. The high density map of genetic variability provides an in-depth view of the genetic history for this important livestock species.

  9. Mortalidade do ácaro predador Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae em testes de toxicidade residual de inseticidas e acaricidas usuais em pomáceas Mortality of predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae in residual toxicity persistence tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Gustavo Ruiz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Os ácaros fitoseídeos, especialmente Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, são importantes agentes de controle biológico de ácaros tetraniquídeos-praga nas culturas de pomáceas no "Alto Valle del Río Negro y Neuquén", Argentina. Neste trabalho, avaliou-se a mortalidade de N. californicus quando exposto a resíduos dos inseticidas azimphos-methyl, carbaryl e cyfluthrin, e dos acaricidas cyhexatin e propargite. Os produtos foram aplicados às concentrações recomendadas em plantas de pereira. Um, três, seis e dez dias após a aplicação (DAA, folhas tratadas foram retiradas das plantas para a preparação de unidades experimentais. Cinco adultos de N. californicus, provenientes de criação-estoque, foram transferidos para cada unidade, onde pólen de taboa foi fornecido como alimento. As unidades foram mantidas a 25 ± 2 ºC, 60 ± 10% de umidade relativa e fotoperíodo de 14 h. A mortalidade do ácaro foi avaliada 24 h após o confinamento. As médias de mortalidade foram comparadas pelo teste de Dunnett, a 5% de probabilidade. A progressão do declínio do efeito dos produtos testados foi submetida à análise de regressão. Nas duas primeiras datas de avaliação, todos os produtos apresentaram valores de mortalidade significativamente diferentes da testemunha tratada com água. Seis dias após a aplicação, propargite, cyhexatin e cyfluthrin apresentaram mortalidade de aproximadamente 30%, enquanto a mortalidade nos tratamentos azimphos-methyl e carbaryl apresentou níveis estatisticamente similares aos da testemunha. Dez dias após a aplicação, a mortalidade em todos os tratamentos não diferiu significativamente da testemunha. O efeito de todos os produtos apresentou declínio progressivo ao longo do período de observação, sendo significativa a 1% de probabilidade a regressão linear negativa para os valores obtidos. Os maiores efeitos negativos sobre a sobrevivência de N. californicus corresponderam aos acaricidas testados

  10. Genomic sequencing reveals historical, demographic and selective factors associated with the diversification of the fire-associated fungus Neurospora discreta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladieux, Pierre; Wilson, Benjamin A; Perraudeau, Fanny; Montoya, Liliam A; Kowbel, David; Hann-Soden, Christopher; Fischer, Monika; Sylvain, Iman; Jacobson, David J; Taylor, John W

    2015-11-01

    Delineating microbial populations, discovering ecologically relevant phenotypes and identifying migrants, hybrids or admixed individuals have long proved notoriously difficult, thereby limiting our understanding of the evolutionary forces at play during the diversification of microbial species. However, recent advances in sequencing and computational methods have enabled an unbiased approach whereby incipient species and the genetic correlates of speciation can be identified by examining patterns of genomic variation within and between lineages. We present here a population genomic study of a phylogenetic species in the Neurospora discreta species complex, based on the resequencing of full genomes (~37 Mb) for 52 fungal isolates from nine sites in three continents. Population structure analyses revealed two distinct lineages in South-East Asia, and three lineages in North America/Europe with a broad longitudinal and latitudinal range and limited admixture between lineages. Genome scans for selective sweeps and comparisons of the genomic landscapes of diversity and recombination provided no support for a role of selection at linked sites on genomic heterogeneity in levels of divergence between lineages. However, demographic inference indicated that the observed genomic heterogeneity in divergence was generated by varying rates of gene flow between lineages following a period of isolation. Many putative cases of exchange of genetic material between phylogenetically divergent fungal lineages have been discovered, and our work highlights the quantitative importance of genetic exchanges between more closely related taxa to the evolution of fungal genomes. Our study also supports the role of allopatric isolation as a driver of diversification in saprobic microbes.

  11. Effect of chemically contaminated marine sediment on naupliar production of the marine harpacticoid copepod, Tigriopus californicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misitano, D.A.; Schiewe, M.H. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-04-01

    There is a growing body of evidence indicating that chemically contaminated sediments in urban bays and estuaries pose a significant threat to the productivity of these important marine habitats. Particularly at risk are benthic species which live in direct contact with the sediment. However, nondemersal species are also at risk via the food chain and by direct contact with resuspended sediment particulates. There are substantial data on the lethal and sublethal effects of aqueous contaminants on a variety of aquatic species. In contrast, there is very limited information on the toxic effects of the generally water-insoluble sediment-associated contaminants. In the present communication the authors report a series of experiments in which the harpacticoid copepod, Tigriopus californicus, was exposed to sediments from urban and nonurban bays, and reproductive success was evaluated. This species was selected for study as it is widely distributed along the West Coast of North America, and as a group, copepods are an important component of the marine food chain. In addition, the relatively short reproductive life span of this species makes it particularly amenable for studies of reproductive success. Here, the authors report reduced and irregular naupliar production as a consequence of exposure to chemically contaminated sediments from urban waterways.

  12. No evidence for faster male hybrid sterility in population crosses of an intertidal copepod (Tigriopus californicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S

    2008-06-01

    Two different forces are thought to contribute to the rapid accumulation of hybrid male sterility that has been observed in many inter-specific crosses, namely the faster male and the dominance theories. For male heterogametic taxa, both faster male and dominance would work in the same direction to cause the rapid evolution of male sterility; however, for taxa lacking differentiated sex chromosomes only the faster male theory would explain the rapid evolution of male hybrid sterility. It is currently unknown what causes the faster evolution of male sterility, but increased sexual selection on males and the sensitivity of genes involved in male reproduction are two hypotheses that could explain the observation. Here, patterns of hybrid sterility in crosses of genetically divergent copepod populations are examined to test potential mechanisms of faster male evolution. The study species, Tigriopus californicus, lacks differentiated, hemizygous sex chromosomes and appears to have low levels of divergence caused by sexual selection acting upon males. Hybrid sterility does not accumulate more rapidly in males than females in these crosses suggesting that in this taxon male reproductive genes are not inherently more prone to disruption in hybrids.

  13. Potential fitness trade-offs for thermal tolerance in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S

    2010-09-01

    Thermal adaptation to spatially varying environmental conditions occurs in a wide range of species, but what is less clear is the nature of fitness trade-offs associated with this temperature adaptation. Here, populations of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus are examined at both local and latitudinal scales to determine whether these populations have evolved differences in their survival under high temperature stress. A clear pattern of increasing high temperature stress tolerance is seen with decreasing latitude, consistent with temperature adaptation. Additionally, there is also evidence for significant variation in thermal tolerance on a smaller scale. The competitive fitness of pairs of northern and southern copepod populations were also examined under a series of lower, more moderate temperatures. These fitness assays show that the southern populations that have the best survival under extreme high temperatures have lowered competitive fitness at the lower temperatures tested, whereas the fitness of the southern populations exceeded that of the northern populations at the highest temperatures tested. Combined, these results suggest that there may be evolutionary trade-offs between performance at high and stressful temperatures and fitness at moderate temperatures in this species.

  14. Ecological novelty by hybridization: experimental evidence for increased thermal tolerance by transgressive segregation in Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ricardo J; Barreto, Felipe S; Burton, Ronald S

    2014-01-01

    Early generations of hybrids can express both genetic incompatibilities and phenotypic novelty. Insights into whether these conflicting interactions between intrinsic and extrinsic selection persist after a few generations of recombination require experimental studies. To address this question, we use interpopulation crosses and recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of the copepod Tigriopus californicus, and focus on two traits that are relevant for the diversification of this species: survivorship during development and tolerance to thermal stress. Experimental crosses between two population pairs show that most RILs between two heat-tolerant populations show enhanced tolerance to temperatures that are lethal to the respective parentals, whereas RILs between a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive population are intermediate. Although interpopulation crosses are affected by intrinsic selection at early generational hybrids, most of the sampled F9 RILs have recovered fitness to the level of their parentals. Together, these results suggest that a few generations of recombination allows for an independent segregation of the genes underlying thermal tolerance and cytonuclear incompatibilities, permitting certain recombinant lineages to survive in niches previously unused by parental taxa (i.e., warmer thermal environments) without incurring intrinsic selection.

  15. The genomic trajectory of hybrid swarms: outcomes of repeated crosses between populations of Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Victoria L; Edmands, Suzanne

    2013-03-01

    Introgressive hybridization between genetically divergent populations is an important evolutionary process. The degree to which repeated hybridization events between the same parental taxa lead to similar genomic outcomes is unknown. This study addressed this question by following genomic trajectories of replicate hybrid swarms of the copepod Tigriopus californicus over many generations of free mating. Swarm composition was determined both by differential reproductive success of founder individuals and subsequent selection on hybrid genotypes. For one cross, between two populations showing differential fitness in the laboratory and no hybrid breakdown, the genetic trajectory was highly repeatable: replicates rapidly became dominated by alleles from the fitter parent. In a second cross, between two populations showing similar fitness and significant F2 hybrid breakdown, alleles from alternative populations dominated different replicates. Swarms exhibited a general temporal trend of decreasing cytonuclear mismatch. Some patterns of differential introgression across the genome were strikingly congruent amongst swarm replicates, both within and between cross types, and reflected patterns of segregation distortion previously observed within controlled crosses between the same parental populations. Differences in heterozygosity between the sexes, and evidence for a previously suspected sex-distortion locus, suggest that complex interactions between sex and genotype influence hybrid swarm outcome.

  16. Deleterious epistatic interactions between electron transport system protein-coding loci in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S

    2006-07-01

    The nature of epistatic interactions between genes encoding interacting proteins in hybrid organisms can have important implications for the evolution of postzygotic reproductive isolation and speciation. At this point very little is known about the fitness differences caused by specific closely interacting but evolutionarily divergent proteins in hybrids between populations or species. The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus provides an excellent model in which to study such interactions because the species range includes numerous genetically divergent populations that are still capable of being crossed in the laboratory. Here, the effect on fitness due to the interactions of three complex III proteins of the electron transport system in F2 hybrid copepods resulting from crosses of a pair of divergent populations is examined. Significant deviations from Mendelian inheritance are observed for each of the three genes in F2 hybrid adults but not in nauplii (larvae). The two-way interactions between these genes also have a significant impact upon the viability of these hybrid copepods. Dominance appears to play an important role in mediating the interactions between these loci as deviations are caused by heterozygote/homozygote deleterious interactions. These results suggest that the fitness consequences of the interactions of these three complex III-associated genes could influence reproductive isolation in this system.

  17. Significant variation for fitness impacts of ETS loci in hybrids between populations of Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S

    2008-01-01

    The connections between the genes that cause hybrid incompatibilities and the physiological processes disrupted in hybrids by these incompatibilities are not well understood. The interactions between proteins in the electron transport system (ETS) in the copepod, Tigriopus californicus, have emerged as a potential model system to explore such connections. In this study, the effects on hybrid fitness of 3 different nuclear loci encoding proteins of the ETS are examined in hybrid copepods obtained from crosses of genetically divergent populations of this species. The potential interactions between these genes and mitochondrial-encoded proteins of the ETS are also explored; these interactions have been shown to have diverged functionally between these populations in other studies. Large deviations from Mendelian inheritance are found in genotypic ratios at each of the 3 loci in adults but not in nauplii, demonstrating genotype-based selection during development. The length of developmental time of hybrids appears to influence the pattern of deviations in these loci, likely in conjunction with levels of competition in these crosses. The major finding of this study is that in repeated crosses, the nature of deviations at these ETS loci shows dramatic differences suggesting that slight perturbations in initial conditions can dramatically shift the patterns of selection at these ETS loci in interpopulation hybrids.

  18. The foundress's dilemma: group selection for cooperation among queens of the harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Zachary; Sasaki, Takao; Haney, Brian; Janssen, Marco; Pratt, Stephen C; Fewell, Jennifer H

    2016-07-28

    The evolution of cooperation is a fundamental problem in biology, especially for non-relatives, where indirect fitness benefits cannot counter within-group inequalities. Multilevel selection models show how cooperation can evolve if it generates a group-level advantage, even when cooperators are disadvantaged within their group. This allows the possibility of group selection, but few examples have been described in nature. Here we show that group selection can explain the evolution of cooperative nest founding in the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex californicus. Through most of this species' range, colonies are founded by single queens, but in some populations nests are instead founded by cooperative groups of unrelated queens. In mixed groups of cooperative and single-founding queens, we found that aggressive individuals had a survival advantage within their nest, but foundress groups with such non-cooperators died out more often than those with only cooperative members. An agent-based model shows that the between-group advantage of the cooperative phenotype drives it to fixation, despite its within-group disadvantage, but only when population density is high enough to make between-group competition intense. Field data show higher nest density in a population where cooperative founding is common, consistent with greater density driving the evolution of cooperative foundation through group selection.

  19. Identification of the molecular components of a Tigriopus californicus (Crustacea, Copepoda) circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Katherine T; Christie, Andrew E

    2014-12-01

    Copepods of the genus Tigriopus have been proposed as marine models for investigations of environmental perturbation. One rapidly increasing anthropogenic stressor for intertidal organisms is light pollution. Given the sensitivity of circadian rhythms to exogenous light, the genes/proteins of a Tigriopus circadian pacemaker represent a potential system for investigating the influences of artificial light sources on circadian behavior in an intertidal species. Here, the molecular components of a putative Tigriopus californicus circadian clock were identified using publicly accessible transcriptome data; the recently deduced circadian proteins of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus were used as a reference. Transcripts encoding homologs of all commonly recognized ancestral arthropod core clock proteins were identified (i.e. CLOCK, CRYPTOCHROME 2, CYCLE, PERIOD and TIMELESS), as were ones encoding proteins likely to modulate the core clock (i.e. CASEIN KINASE II, CLOCKWORK ORANGE, DOUBLETIME, PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 1, PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A, SHAGGY, SUPERNUMERARY LIMBS and VRILLE) or to act as inputs to it (i.e. CRYPTOCHROME 1). PAR DOMAIN PROTEIN 1 was the only circadian-associated protein not identified in Tigriopus; it appears absent in Calanus too. These data represent just the third full set of molecular components for a crustacean circadian pacemaker (Daphnia pulex and C. finmarchicus previously), and only the second obtained from transcribed sequences (C. finmarchicus previously). Given Tigriopus' proposed status as a model for investigating the influences of anthropogenic stressors in the marine environment, these data provide the first suite of gene/protein targets for understanding how light pollution may influence circadian physiology and behavior in an intertidal organism.

  20. Prediction of the peptidomes of Tigriopus californicus and Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Copepoda, Crustacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E

    2014-05-15

    Transcriptome mining is a powerful method for crustacean peptide discovery, especially when large sequence datasets are available and an appropriate reference is extant. Recently, a 206,041-sequence transcriptome for the copepod Calanus finmarchicus was mined for peptide-encoding transcripts, with ones for 17 families/subfamilies identified. Here, the deduced Calanus pre/preprohormones were used as templates for peptide discovery in the copepods Tigriopus californicus and Lepeophtheirus salmonis; large transcriptome shotgun assembly datasets are publicly accessible for both species. Sixty-five Tigriopus and 17 Lepeophtheirus transcripts, encompassing 22 and 13 distinct peptide families/subfamilies, respectively, were identified, with the structures of 161 and 70 unique mature peptides predicted from the deduced precursors. The identified peptides included members of the allatostatin A, allatostatin C, bursicon α, bursicon β, CAPA/periviscerokinin/pyrokinin, crustacean cardioactive peptide, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone/ion transport peptide, diuretic hormone 31, FLRFamide, leucokinin, myosuppressin, neuroparsin, neuropeptide F, orcokinin, and tachykinin-related peptide families, most of which possess novel structures, though isoforms from other copepods are known. Of particular note was the discovery of novel isoforms of adipokinetic hormone-corazonin-like peptide, allatotropin, corazonin, eclosion hormone and intocin, peptide families previously unidentified in copepods. In addition, Tigriopus precursors for two previously unknown peptide groups were discovered, one encoding GSEFLamides and the other DXXRLamides; precursors for the novel FXGGXamide family were identified from both Tigriopus and Lepeophtheirus. These data not only greatly expand the catalog of known copepod peptides, but also provide strong foundations for future functional studies of peptidergic signaling in members of this ecologically important crustacean subclass.

  1. Habitat use and movement of the endangered Arroyo Toad (Anaxyrus californicus) in coastal southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Elizabeth; Lyren, Lisa M.; Lovich, Robert E.; Mitrovich, Milan J.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    Information on the habitat use and movement patterns of Arroyo Toads (Anaxyrus californicus) is limited. The temporal and spatial characteristics of terrestrial habitat use, especially as it relates to upland use in coastal areas of the species' range, are poorly understood. We present analyses of radiotelemetry data from 40 individual adult toads tracked at a single site in coastal southern California from March through November of 2004. We quantify adult Arroyo Toad habitat use and movements and interpret results in the context of their life history. We show concentrated activity by both male and female toads along stream terraces during and after breeding, and, although our fall sample size is low, the continued presence of adult toads in the floodplain through the late fall. Adult toads used open sandy flats with sparse vegetation. Home-range size and movement frequency varied as a function of body mass. Observed spatial patterns of movement and habitat use both during and outside of the breeding period as well as available climatological data suggest that overwintering of toads in floodplain habitats of near-coastal areas of southern California may be more common than previously considered. If adult toads are not migrating out of the floodplain at the close of the breeding season but instead overwinter on stream terraces in near-coastal areas, then current management practices that assume toad absence from floodplain habitats may be leaving adult toads over-wintering on stream terraces vulnerable to human disturbance during a time of year when Arroyo Toad mortality is potentially highest.

  2. Amino acid composition and functional properties of giant red sea cucumber ( Parastichopus californicus) collagen hydrolysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zunying; Su, Yicheng; Zeng, Mingyong

    2011-03-01

    Giant red sea cucumber ( Parastichopus californicus) is an under-utilized species due to its high tendency to autolysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional properties of collagen hydrolysates from this species. The degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition, SDS-PAGE, emulsion activity index (EAI), emulsion stability index (ESI), foam expansion (FE), and foam stability (FS) of hydrolysates were investigated. The effects of pH on the EAI, ESI FE and FS of hydrolysates were also investigated. The results indicated that the β and α 1 chains of the collagen were effectively hydrolyzed by trypsin at 50°c with an Enzyme/Substrate (E/S) ration of 1:20 (w:w). The DH of collagen was up to 17.3% after 3 h hydrolysis with trypsin. The hydrolysates had a molecular weight distribution of 1.1-17 kDa, and were abundant in glycine (Gly), proline (Pro), glutamic acid (Glu), alanine (Ala) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) residues. The hydrolysates were fractionated into three fractions ( 10 kDa), and the fraction of 3-10 kDa exhibited a higher EAI value than the fraction of > 10 kDa ( P 10 kDa had higher FE and FS values than other fractions ( P4.0. Under pH 7.0 and pH 10.0, the 3-10 kDa fraction showed higher EAI value and the fraction of > 10 kDa showed higher FE value, respectively. They are hoped to be utilized as functional ingredients in food and nutraceutical industries.

  3. Physiological effects of an allozyme polymorphism: glutamate-pyruvate transaminase and response to hyperosmotic stress in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, R S; Feldman, M W

    1983-04-01

    In order to regulate cell volume during hyperosmotic stress, the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus, like other aquatic crustaceans, rapidly accumulates high levels of intracellular alanine, proline, and glycine. Glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT; EC 2.6.1.2), which catalyzes the final step of alanine synthesis, is genetically polymorphic in T. californicus populations at Santa Cruz, California. Spectrophotometric studies of homogenates derived from a homozygous isofemale line of each of the two common GPT alleles indicated that the GPTF allozyme has a significantly higher specific activity than the GPTS allozyme. Under conditions of hyperosmotic stress, individual adult copepods of GPTF and GPTF/S genotypes accumulated alanine, but not glycine or proline, more rapidly than GPTS homozygotes. When young larvae were subjected to the same hyperosmotic conditions, GPTS larvae suffered a significantly higher mortality than GPTF or GPTF/S larvae. These results suggest that the biochemical differences among GPT allozymes result in specific physiological variation among GPT genotypes and that this physiological variation is manifested in differential genotypic survivorships under some naturally occurring environmental conditions.

  4. Molecular evolution at the cytochrome oxidase subunit 2 gene among divergent populations of the intertidal copepod, Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Paul D; Burton, Ronald S

    2006-06-01

    The cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 gene (COII) encodes a highly conserved protein that is directly responsible for the initial transfer of electrons from cytochrome c to cytochrome c oxidase (COX) crucial to the production of ATP during cellular respiration. Despite its integral role in electron transport, we have observed extensive intraspecific nucleotide and amino acid variation among 26 full-length COII sequences sampled from seven populations of the marine copepod, Tigriopus californicus. Although intrapopulation divergence was virtually nonexistent, interpopulation divergence at the COII locus was nearly 20% at the nucleotide level, including 38 nonsynonymous substitutions. Given the high degree of interaction between the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 protein (COX2) and the nuclear-encoded subunits of COX and cytochrome c (CYC), we hypothesized that some codons in the COII gene are likely to be under positive selection in order to compensate for amino acid substitutions in other subunits. Estimates of the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution (omega), obtained using a series of maximum likelihood models of codon substitution, indicated that the majority of codons in T. californicus COII are under strong purifying selection (omega < 1), while approximately 4% of the sites in this gene appear to evolve under relaxed selective constraint (omega = 1). A branch-site maximum likelihood model identified three sites that may have experienced positive selection within the central California sequence clade in our COII phylogeny; these results are consistent with previous studies showing functional and fitness consequences among interpopulation hybrids between central and northern California populations.

  5. Division of labor is associated with age-independent changes in ovarian activity in Pogonomyrmex californicus harvester ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Adam G; Johnson, Joshua; Hölldobler, Bert; Amdam, Gro V

    2013-04-01

    An age-independent division of labor can develop in both the reproductive (queen) and non-reproductive (worker) castes of Pogonomyrmex californicus harvester ants, and individuals develop biases for in-nest activities or external foraging. Additionally, ant ovaries normally atrophy in foragers compared to nest-biased workers (nurses). However, it is not clear whether these ovarian changes are due to changes in behavior or age, since foragers are typically older individuals. Here, we clarify this relationship in P. californicus queens and workers by comparing ovarian activity in same-aged ants that exhibit divergent behavioral biases. We found that foraging individuals had significantly reduced ovarian activity compared to their nest-biased counterparts, thereby linking changes in the ants' reproductive system to social task performance rather than to age. The general finding that ovarian physiology is associated with social insect behaviors is consistent with the hypothesis that reproductive physiology may have played an important role in the evolution of social insect behavior.

  6. Effects of cutting disturbance in Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Mey. Soják on the benthic macroinvertebrates - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v33i1.6383 Effects of cutting disturbance in Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Mey. Soják on the benthic macroinvertebrates - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v33i1.6383

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Luiza Würdig

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Lagoons are considered protected areas because these systems play a key ecological role. However, the extraction of macrophyte Schoenoplectus californicus is held for manufacture of handcrafts, being an alternative income for riverbank communities. This study evaluated the impact of S. californicus experimental cutting on benthic macroinvertebrates trough a field experiment. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 1, 12, 26 and 60 days after the macrophyte cutting in demarked plots (1 m², as well at control plots. The families number was not statistically different (ANOVA, p > 0.05, but the total density of invertebrates, and the density of Ceratopogonidae were significant (ANOVA, p S. californicus, in this area, as the intensity of the cut held, did not affect considerably the aquatic macroinvertebrates. The results suggest that the small-scale extractivism in these regions carries little effect because the fauna of adjacent areas probably can quickly colonize the disturbed areas.Lagoons are considered protected areas because these systems play a key ecological role. However, the extraction of macrophyte Schoenoplectus californicus is held for manufacture of handcrafts, being an alternative income for riverbank communities. This study evaluated the impact of S. californicus experimental cutting on benthic macroinvertebrates trough a field experiment. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 1, 12, 26 and 60 days after the macrophyte cutting in demarked plots (1 m², as well at control plots. The families number was not statistically different (ANOVA, p > 0.05, but the total density of invertebrates, and the density of Ceratopogonidae were significant (ANOVA, p S. californicus, in this area, as the intensity of the cut held, did not affect considerably the aquatic macroinvertebrates. The results suggest that the small-scale extractivism in these regions carries little effect because the fauna of adjacent areas probably can quickly colonize the disturbed

  7. Risk assessment of Cry toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis on the predatory mites Euseius concordis and Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Thiago Rodrigues; Ausique, John Jairo Saldarriaga; Nunes, Daiane Heloisa; Ibanhes, Fernando Henrique; Delalibera Júnior, Italo

    2013-04-01

    Genetically modified plants carrying Cry toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used for pest control. Possible adverse effects as a result of the use of this control technique to non-target organisms is still a concern; however, few studies have addressed the effects of Bt crops on phytoseiid predatory mites. Phytoseiids are important for the natural control of phytophagous mites, but they can also feed on pollen, plant exudates, etc. Thus, phytoseiids may ingest Bt toxins through several pathways. In this paper, we evaluate the direct effect of Bt-toxins by feeding the predators on Bt cell suspensions, on solution of a Bt toxin and the tri-trophic effect by Bt expressed in transgenic plants. We present a method of conducting toxicological tests with Phytoseiidae which can be useful in studies of risk analysis of toxins to be expressed by genetically engineered plants. This method was used to evaluate the potential effect of ingestion of suspensions of Bt (1.25 × 10(8) spores/ml) and of purified protein Cry1Ia12 (0.006 mg/ml and 0.018 mg/ml) on Euseius concordis, a predatory mite that develops and reproduces best on pollen. The effects of genetically modified Bollgard(®) cotton, which carries the Cry1Ac protein, on Neoseiulus californicus, a selective predator that feeds more on spider mites than on pollen or insects, was determined by feeding them with Tetranychus urticae reared in Bollgard(®) cotton and on the non-transgenic isoline. When E. concordis was fed with suspension of Bt isolate derived from product Dipel(®) PM, no significant effects were detected. Similarly, Cry1Ia12 Bt toxin, at a concentration of 0.006 mg/ml, did not affect E. concordis. At a concentration of 0.018 mg/ml, however, the intake of this protein reduced the reproduction of E. concordis. There were no effects of Bollgard(®) cotton on the biological traits and on the predatory capacity of N. californicus. Results indicate that the Cry toxins of B. thuringiensis

  8. Toxicidade diferencial de agrotóxicos utilizados em citros para Neoseiulus californicus, Euseius concordis e Brevipalpus phoenicis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Zatti da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes (Acari: Tenuipalpidae é considerada uma das principais pragas em citros no Brasil, devido à transmissão do vírus da leprose dos citros e à necessidade de frequentes aplicações de acaricidas para seu controle. Assim, objetivou-se comparar a toxicidade dos principais agrotóxicos utilizados em citros no Brasil, sobre populações de B. phoenicis e de ácaros predadores das espécies Neoseiuluscalifornicus (McGregor e Euseius concordis (Chant (Acari: Phytoseiidae. Foram avaliadas duas populações de E. concordis: uma procedente de Jaboticabal (SP e outra de Descalvado (SP. Arenas de folhas (para fitoseídeos ou frutos (para B. phoenicis de Citrus sinensis Osbeck (L. cv. Pera, contendo 25 fêmeas adultas de cada espécie foram pulverizadas em torre de Potter. As avaliações de mortalidade foram realizadas 72 horas após a aplicação. Foram utilizadas 4 a 6 concentrações de cada produto (abamectina, acefato, azociclotina, bifentrina, clorfenapir, dicofol, dinocape, óxido de fembutatina, propargito e piridabem para a obtenção das curvas de concentração-resposta. Abamectina, azociclotina, clorfenapir, dicofol, dinocape, óxido de fembutatin, propargito e piridabem foram altamente tóxicos a B. phoenicis, com valores de CL90 iguais ou inferiores aos das concentrações recomendadas desses produtos. N. californicus foi mais tolerante a bifentrina, propargito, óxido de fembutatina e dinocape que B. phoenicis e E. concordis (ambas as populações. Esses acaricidas tiveram baixa toxicidade aos adultos de N. californicus, para o qual as CL50 foram pelo menos seis vezes maiores que suas concentrações recomendadas. Acefato foi extremamente tóxico a E. concordis, mas inócuo a adultos de N. californicus. A população de E. concordis de Jaboticabal foi mais resistente que a de Descalvado a azociclotina, bifentrina, clorfenapir, dicofol e propargito.

  9. SELETIVIDADE DE INSETICIDAS A Neoseiulus californicus MCGREGOR (ACARI: PHYTOSEIIDAE EM MACIEIRA, NO RIO GRANDE DO SUL AGROCHEMICAL SELECTIVITY TO Neoseiulus californicus MCGREGOR (ACARI: PHYTOSEIIDAE ON APPLE IN RIO GRANDE DO SUL

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    LINO BITTENCOURT MONTEIRO

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Testes para determinar os efeitos de agroquímicos homologados para macieira foram realizados em laboratório sobre Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae. Os indivíduos testados foram coletados de um pomar comercial da Agriflor Ltda, em Vacaria, Rio Grande do Sul, após várias liberações inoculativas. Os inseticidas utilizados foram os tradicionalmente recomendados para o controle de pragas, principalmente mosca-das-frutas Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae. A oviposição e a mortalidade dos ácaros foram avaliadas 12; 24; 48 e 96 horas após a pulverização, cujos produtos foram classificados em quatro classes de toxicidade (IOBC/WPRS. Azinphos ethyl, deltametrina e fenthion provocaram 100% de mortalidade, sendo que dimethoate, fenitrotion, paration, phosmet e triclorfon foram levemente nocivos (classe 2. Malation foi considerado neutro para esta população.The side-effects of agrochemical to Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae were studied in laboratory. The mites were collected in commercial apple orchard of Agropastoril Rincão das Flores, in Vacaria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, after successive inoculative releases. The insecticids used were recommended to control of same pest, as Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae. The reproduction effect and mortality were evalued 12, 24, 48 and 96 hours after pulverization, while the agrochemical were ranked in toxicity classes, according to IOBC/WPRS. Azinphos ethyl, deltametrina e fenthion were harmful with ca. 100% of mortality in 24 hours, dimethoate, fenitrotion, paration, phosmet e triclorfon were slightly harmful (class 2. Malation was harmless.

  10. Correction of locality records for the endangered arroyo toad (Anaxyrus californicus) from the desert region of southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Edward L.; Beaman, Kent R.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    The recovery strategy for an endangered species requires accurate knowledge of its distribution and geographic range. Although the best available information is used when developing a recovery plan, uncertainty often remains in regard to a species actual geographic extent. The arroyo toad (Anaxyrus californicus) occurs almost exclusively in coastal drainages, from Monterey County, California, south into northwestern Baja California, Mexico. Through field reconnaissance and the study of preserved museum specimens we determined that the four reported populations of the arroyo toad from the Sonoran Desert region of Riverside, San Diego, and Imperial counties, California are in error. Two additional sites in the Sonoran Desert are discussed regarding the possibility that the arroyo toad occurs there. We recommend the continued scrutiny of arroyo toad records to maintain a high level of accuracy of its distribution and geographic extent.

  11. Quantifying the elevation of mitochondrial DNA evolutionary substitution rates over nuclear rates in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S

    2012-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes generally evolve rapidly in animals, but considerable variation in the rates of evolution of mtDNA occurs among taxa. Higher levels of mutation will tend to increase the amount of polymorphism, which should also scale with population size, but there are mixed signals from previous studies on the evolutionary outcomes of the interactions of these processes. The copepod Tigriopus californicus provides an interesting model in which to study the evolution of mtDNA because it has high levels of divergence among populations and there is the suggestion that this divergence could be involved in reproductive isolation. This species also appears to have an elevated mtDNA substitution rate, but previous studies did not provide an accurate measurement. This article examines the rate of mtDNA substitution versus nuclear substitution in T. californicus and finds that the mtDNA rate for synonymous sites averages 55-fold higher, a level that exceeds the rates found in most other invertebrates. Levels of polymorphism are also examined in both mtDNA and nuclear genes, and it is shown that the effective population size of mtDNA genes is much lower than that of nuclear genes. In addition, no correlation between polymorphism in mtDNA and nuclear genes is found across populations, which suggest factors other than demography may shape polymorphism in this species. The results from this study suggest that mtDNA is evolving at a very rapid rate in this copepod species, and this could increase the likelihood that mtDNA evolution is involved in the generation of reproductive isolation.

  12. Ribosomal RNA gene silencing in interpopulation hybrids of Tigriopus californicus: nucleolar dominance in the absence of intergenic spacer subrepeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Jonathan M; Burton, Ronald S

    2006-07-01

    A common feature of interspecific animal and plant hybrids is the uniparental silencing of ribosomal RNA gene transcription, or nucleolar dominance. A leading explanation for the genetic basis of nucleolar dominance in animal hybrids is the enhancer-imbalance model. The model proposes that limiting transcription factors are titrated by a greater number of enhancer-bearing subrepeat elements in the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the dominant cluster of genes. The importance of subrepeats for nucleolar dominance has repeatedly been supported in competition assays between Xenopus laevis and X. borealis minigene constructs injected into oocytes. However, a more general test of the importance of IGS subrepeats for nuclear dominance in vivo has not been conducted. In this report, rRNA gene expression was examined in interpopulation hybrids of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus. This species offers a rare opportunity to test the role of IGS subrepeats in nucleolar dominance because the internal subrepeat structure, found in the IGS of virtually all animal and plant species, is absent in T. californicus. Our results clearly establish that nucleolar dominance occurs in F1 and F2 interpopulation hybrids of this species. In the F2 generation, nucleolar dominance appears to break down in some hybrids in a fashion that is inconsistent with a transcription factor titration model. These results are significant because they indicate that nucleolar dominance can be established and maintained without enhancer-bearing repeat elements in the IGS. This challenges the generality of the enhancer-imbalance model for nucleolar dominance and suggests that dominance of rRNA transcription in animals may be determined by epigenetic factors as has been established in plants.

  13. Toxicity of essential oils of Piper marginatum Jacq. against Tetranychus urticae Koch and Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolle Ribeiro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae is an economically important pest of agricultural and ornamental crops worldwide. It has been shown that many of natural plant-based pesticides have fewer side effects compared with synthetic chemicals. The essential oils of plants have been broadly studied for pest-control, including toxic and repellent effects, antifeedant, ovicidal, and other properties. Essential oils from stems, flowers, and leaves of Piper marginatum Jacq. were evaluated in the laboratory regarding their acaricidal potential against the two-spotted spider mite (T. urticae and the results were compared with eugenol as a positive control. The oils were also evaluated with regard to the susceptibility of the natural enemy of T. urticae (Neoseiulus californicus McGregor. Based on LC50 estimates, oils from stems and flowers exhibited the same toxicity and differed significantly from the leaf oil with LC50 0.37, 0.56, and 3.77 μL L-1, respectively. None of the oils tested exhibited toxicity greater than or equal to that of the positive control. The oil mortality rate was significantly lower for N. californicus (50% to 70% than for T. urticae (> 95%. The P. marginatum oils also deterred oviposition. Among the chemical constituents tested, sesquiterpenes were more toxic with an LC50 of 2.89 μL L-1 than phenylpropanoids Z-asarone and E-asarone with LC50 6.64 and 8.51 μL L-1, respectively. The acaricidal properties, oviposition deterrence and selectivity make these oils strong candidates for use as the active ingredient in a plant-based acaricidal agent.

  14. NET ABOVEGROUND PRIMARY PRODUCTION AND BIOMASS DYNAMICS OF SCHOENOPLECTUS CALIFORNICUS (CYPERACEAE MARSHES GROWING UNDER DIFFERENT HYDROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

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    Paula Pratolongo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron diferentes atributos funcionales de 2 pajonales de Schoenoplectus californicus (C. A. Mey Sójak que son muy similares en su estructura y especie dominante, pero aparecen en los extremos opuestos a lo largo de un gradiente de influencia fluvial-mareal en el Bajo Delta del río Paraná. Los resultados mostraron una productividad primaria neta aérea (PPNA significativamente más alta en el pajonal afectado directamente por la marea (1999.41 ± 211.97 g m-2 año-1. En el sitio aguas arriba, menos proclive a la inundación por mareas, S. californicus tuvo una menor PPNA (1299.17 ± 179.48 g m-2 año-1 y el sistema mostró una mayor capacidad para retener la biomasa producida dentro del pajonal, con cantidades significativamente mayores de biomasa muerta en pie (1316.00 ± 336.01 vs. 112.40 ± 55.05 g m-2 y mayores contenidos de materia orgánica en el suelo (16.20 ± 0.12 % vs. 0.70 ± 0.08 %. Los resultados obtenidos en este trabajo sugieren que los flujos superficiales de alta energía pueden cambiar el funcionamiento de estos pajonales, de un sistema estable acumulador de materia orgánica a un pajonal de rápido crecimiento, con altas tasas de acumulación de sedimentos minerales.

  15. Life history of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, 1954) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) fed with castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) pollen in laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafeli, P P; Reis, P R; Silveira, E C da; Souza-Pimentel, G C; de Toledo, M A

    2014-08-01

    The predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, 1954) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is one of the principal natural enemies of tetranychid mites in several countries, promoting efficient control of those mites in several food and ornamental crops. Pest attacks such as that of the spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, 1836 (Acari: Tetranychidae), is one of the problems faced by farmers, especially in the greenhouse, due to the difficulty of its control with the use of chemicals because of the development of fast resistance making it hard to control it. The objective of this work was to study the life history of the predatory mite N. californicus as a contribution to its mass laboratory rearing, having castor bean plant [Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiaceae)] pollen as food, for its subsequent use as a natural enemy of T. urticae on a cultivation of greenhouse rosebushes. The studies were carried out in the laboratory, at 25 ± 2°C of temperature, 70 ± 10% RH and a 14 hour photophase. The biological aspects and the fertility life table were appraised. Longevity of 32.9 days was verified for adult females and 40.4 days for males. The intrinsic rate of increase (rm) was 0.2 and the mean generation time (T) was 17.2 days. The population doubled every 4.1 days. The results obtained were similar to those in which the predatory mite N. californicus fed on T. urticae.

  16. The relevance of the 1198 eruption of Solfatara in the Phlegraean Fields (Campi Flegrei) as revealed by medieval manuscripts and historical sources

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    Scandone, R.; D'Amato, J.; Giacomelli, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Phlegraean Fields (Campi Flegrei) caldera in Italy had one well-documented eruption during the historical period (1538). Another eruption at Solfatara in 1198 is reported by sixteenth and seventeenth-century scholars, and has been commonly regarded as uncertain. In this paper we first discuss the circumstantial evidence and report of this eruption, then discuss the relevance of drawings made in the thirteenth through the fifteenth century illustrating the Solfatara and the primary literary and historical sources describing the site. We infer that the eruption was at most a minor phreatic explosion and we explore the conditions that may have led to the occurrence of this event and the establishment of a small crater pool subsequently used as a thermal bath from the later Middle Ages onward.

  17. Complex deleterious interactions associated with malic enzyme may contribute to reproductive isolation in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

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    Christopher S Willett

    Full Text Available Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities can result from the interactions of more than a single pair of interacting genes and there are several different models of how such complex interactions can be structured. Previous empirical work has identified complex conspecific epistasis as a form of complex interaction that has contributed to postzygotic reproductive isolation between taxa, but other forms of complexity are also possible. Here, I probe the genetic basis of reproductive isolation in crosses of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus by looking at the impact of markers in genes encoding metabolic enzymes in F(2 hybrids. The region of the genome associated with the locus ME2 is shown to have strong, repeatable impacts on the fitness of hybrids in crosses and epistatic interactions with another chromosomal region marked by the GOT2 locus in one set of crosses. In a cross between one of these populations and a third population, these two regions do not appear to interact despite the continuation of a large effect of the ME2 region itself in both crosses. The combined results suggest that the ME2 chromosomal region is involved in incompatibilities with several unique partners. If these deleterious interactions all stem from the same factor in this region, that would suggest a different form of complexity from complex conspecific epistasis, namely, multiple independent deleterious interactions stemming from the same factor. Confirmation of this idea will require more fine-scale mapping of the interactions of the ME2 region of the genome.

  18. The minute brain of the copepod Tigriopus californicus supports a complex ancestral ground pattern of the tetraconate cerebral nervous systems.

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    Andrew, David R; Brown, Sheena M; Strausfeld, Nicholas J

    2012-10-15

    Copepods are a diverse and ecologically crucial group of minute crustaceans that are relatively neglected in terms of studies on nervous system organization. Recently, morphological neural characters have helped clarify evolutionary relationships within Arthropoda, particularly among Tetraconata (i.e., crustaceans and hexapods), and indicate that copepods occupy an important phylogenetic position relating to both Malacostraca and Hexapoda. This taxon therefore provides the opportunity to evaluate those neural characters common to these two clades likely to be results of shared ancestry (homology) versus convergence (homoplasy). Here we present an anatomical characterization of the brain and central nervous system of the well-studied harpacticoid copepod species Tigriopus californicus. We show that this species is endowed with a complex brain possessing a central complex comprising a protocerebral bridge and central body. Deutocerebral glomeruli are supplied by the antennular nerves, and a lateral protocerebral olfactory neuropil corresponds to the malacostracan hemiellipsoid body. Glomeruli contain synaptic specializations comparable to the presynaptic "T-bars" typical of dipterous insects, including Drosophila melanogaster. Serotonin-like immunoreactivity pervades the brain and ventral nervous system, with distinctive deutocerebral distributions. The present observations suggest that a suite of morphological characters typifying the Tigriopus brain reflect a ground pattern organization of an ancestral Tetraconata, which possessed an elaborate and structurally differentiated nervous system.

  19. An H3-H4 histone gene pair in the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus, contains an intergenic dyad symmetry element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D; Brown, D; Wells, D

    1991-01-01

    Histone genes are one of the most widely studied multigene families in eucaryotes. Over 200 histone genes have been sequenced, primarily in vertebrates, echinoderms, fungi and plants. We present here the structure and genomic orientation of an H3-H4 histone gene pair from the marine copepod, Tigriopus californicus. These histone gene sequences are the first to be determined for the class Crustacea and among the first to be determined for protostomes. The H4 and H3 genes in Tigriopus are shown to be adjacent, to have opposite polarity, and to contain a 26 bp region of dyad symmetry centrally located within the spacer region between the two genes. A similarly located dyad element has been found in yeast which contributes to the coordinated cell cycle control of the adjacent histone genes. The Tigriopus H3-H4 histone gene pair is clustered with one H2A and two H2B histone genes on a 15 kb genomic Bam H1 fragment. The H4 gene sequence predicts an H4 protein with an unusual serine to threonine substitution at the amino terminal residue. The H3 gene sequence predicts an H3 protein which is identical to the vertebrate H3.2 histone.

  20. Complex deleterious interactions associated with malic enzyme may contribute to reproductive isolation in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S

    2011-01-01

    Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities can result from the interactions of more than a single pair of interacting genes and there are several different models of how such complex interactions can be structured. Previous empirical work has identified complex conspecific epistasis as a form of complex interaction that has contributed to postzygotic reproductive isolation between taxa, but other forms of complexity are also possible. Here, I probe the genetic basis of reproductive isolation in crosses of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus by looking at the impact of markers in genes encoding metabolic enzymes in F(2) hybrids. The region of the genome associated with the locus ME2 is shown to have strong, repeatable impacts on the fitness of hybrids in crosses and epistatic interactions with another chromosomal region marked by the GOT2 locus in one set of crosses. In a cross between one of these populations and a third population, these two regions do not appear to interact despite the continuation of a large effect of the ME2 region itself in both crosses. The combined results suggest that the ME2 chromosomal region is involved in incompatibilities with several unique partners. If these deleterious interactions all stem from the same factor in this region, that would suggest a different form of complexity from complex conspecific epistasis, namely, multiple independent deleterious interactions stemming from the same factor. Confirmation of this idea will require more fine-scale mapping of the interactions of the ME2 region of the genome.

  1. Postzygotic isolation involves strong mitochondrial and sex-specific effects in Tigriopus californicus, a species lacking heteromorphic sex chromosomes.

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    Foley, B R; Rose, C G; Rundle, D E; Leong, W; Edmands, S

    2013-11-01

    Detailed studies of the genetics of speciation have focused on a few model systems, particularly Drosophila. The copepod Tigriopus californicus offers an alternative that differs from standard animal models in that it lacks heteromorphic chromosomes (instead, sex determination is polygenic) and has reduced opportunities for sexual conflict, because females mate only once. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping was conducted on reciprocal F2 hybrids between two strongly differentiated populations, using a saturated linkage map spanning all 12 autosomes and the mitochondrion. By comparing sexes, a possible sex ratio distorter was found but no sex chromosomes. Although studies of standard models often find an excess of hybrid male sterility factors, we found no QTL for sterility and multiple QTL for hybrid viability (indicated by non-Mendelian adult ratios) and other characters. Viability problems were found to be stronger in males, but the usual explanations for weaker hybrid males (sex chromosomes, sensitivity of spermatogenesis, sexual selection) cannot fully account for these male viability problems. Instead, higher metabolic rates may amplify deleterious effects in males. Although many studies of standard speciation models find the strongest genetic incompatibilities to be nuclear-nuclear (specifically X chromosome-autosome), we found the strongest deleterious interaction in this system was mito-nuclear. Consistent with the snowball theory of incompatibility accumulation, we found that trigenic interactions in this highly divergent cross were substantially more frequent (>6×) than digenic interactions. This alternative system thus allows important comparisons to studies of the genetics of reproductive isolation in more standard model systems.

  2. Apoptosis Activation in Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines by a Novel Synthetic Peptide Derived from Conus californicus Venom

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    Irasema Oroz-Parra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in men and women and a leading cause of death worldwide resulting in more than one million deaths per year. The venom of marine snails Conus contains up to 200 pharmacologically active compounds that target several receptors in the cell membrane. Due to their diversity and specific binding properties, Conus toxins hold great potential as source of new drugs against cancer. We analyzed the cytotoxic effect of a 17-amino acid synthetic peptide (s-cal14.1a that is based on a native toxin (cal14.1a isolated from the sea snail Conus californicus. Cytotoxicity studies in four lung cancer cell lines were complemented with measurement of gene expression of apoptosis-related proteins Bcl-2, BAX and the pro-survival proteins NFκB-1 and COX-2, as well as quantification of caspase activity. Our results showed that H1299 and H1437 cell lines treated with s-call4.1a had decreased cell viability, activated caspases, and reduced expression of the pro-survival protein NFκB-1. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing activation of apoptosis in human lung cancer cell lines by s-cal14.1a and we offer insight into the possible mechanism of action.

  3. Historical mapping reveals causes and temporal patterns of woodland contraction in Austur-Skaftafellssýsla from the 12th century AD to present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurmundsson, Friðþór S.; Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Erlendsson, Egill; Þorbjarnarson, Höskuldur

    2016-04-01

    Land-cover changes in Iceland over the last millennium encompass birch (Betula pubescens) woodland depletion and extensive soil erosion. Yet few studies have focused on spatial change of birch woodland coverage in Iceland over centuries and why and how the woodland depletion took place. The main objectives of this study are: (1) to map the woodland distribution today in Austur-Skaftafellssýsla (3041 km2) in southern Iceland; (2) to map woodland holdings over a period of 900 years from eleventh. AD 1100 to the early 20th century; (3) explain the relative impacts of socio-economic and natural forces on woodland cover over this period. We use a combined approach of historical reconstruction from diverse written archives, GIS techniques and field work. The woodland in Austur-Skaftafellssýsla now covers 73.2 km2 (2.5% of the study area). The woodland holdings, 44 in total, are regularly listed in the church inventories from 1179 to 1570 and are owned by the church. In the first complete register for the district in 1641 the woodland holdings were 73, owned and used by 58 estates, and distributed across Austur-Skaftafellssýsla. All the main patches of woodland remain today, with the exception of four minor woodlands which were exhausted near the end of the 19th century. The woodland was used for firewood and charcoal making as well as grazing during the study period but, crucially, in most cases only one estate had authority over each holding, none were commons. The main driving force behind the development of woodlands was socio-economic, rather than natural, where the form of ownership was fundamental for the fate of the woodland. Harsh climate and volcanism were not directly responsible for woodland depletion. The latter half of the 19th century was the period of greatest woodland loss. This period coincides with considerable expansion in livestock numbers, especially sheep and associated all year around grazing, at a time when the Little Ice Age culminated in

  4. Effects of developmental bisphenol A exposure on reproductive-related behaviors in California mice (Peromyscus californicus: a monogamous animal model.

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    Scott A Williams

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA, a pervasive, endocrine disrupting compound (EDC, acts as a mixed agonist-antagonist with respect to estrogens and other steroid hormones. We hypothesized that sexually selected traits would be particularly sensitive to EDC. Consistent with this concept, developmental exposure of males from the polygynous deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, to BPA resulted in compromised spatial navigational ability and exploratory behaviors, while there was little effect on females. Here, we have examined a related, monogamous species, the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus, where we predicted that males would be less sensitive to BPA in terms of navigational and exploratory behaviors, while displaying other traits related to interactions with females and territorial marking that might be vulnerable to disruption. As in the deer mouse experiments, females were fed either a phytoestrogen-free CTL diet through pregnancy and lactation or the same diet supplemented with BPA (50 mg/kg feed weight or ethinyl estradiol (EE (0.1 part per billion to provide a "pure" estrogen control. After weaning, pups were maintained on CTL diet until they had reached sexual maturity, at which time behaviors were evaluated. In addition, territorial marking was assessed in BPA-exposed males housed alone and when a control male was visible in the testing arena. In contrast to deer mice, BPA and EE exposure had no effect on spatial navigational skills in either male or female California mice. While CTL females exhibited greater exploratory behavior than CTL males, BPA exposure abolished this sex difference. BPA-exposed males, however, engaged in less territorial marking when CTL males were present. These studies demonstrate that developmental BPA exposure can disrupt adult behaviors in a sex- and species-dependent manner and are consistent with the hypothesis that sexually selected traits are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption and should be a

  5. Sex differences in social interaction behavior following social defeat stress in the monogamous California mouse (Peromyscus californicus.

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    Brian C Trainor

    Full Text Available Stressful life experiences are known to be a precipitating factor for many mental disorders. The social defeat model induces behavioral responses in rodents (e.g. reduced social interaction that are similar to behavioral patterns associated with mood disorders. The model has contributed to the discovery of novel mechanisms regulating behavioral responses to stress, but its utility has been largely limited to males. This is disadvantageous because most mood disorders have a higher incidence in women versus men. Male and female California mice (Peromyscus californicus aggressively defend territories, which allowed us to observe the effects of social defeat in both sexes. In two experiments, mice were exposed to three social defeat or control episodes. Mice were then behaviorally phenotyped, and indirect markers of brain activity and corticosterone responses to a novel social stimulus were assessed. Sex differences in behavioral responses to social stress were long lasting (4 wks. Social defeat reduced social interaction responses in females but not males. In females, social defeat induced an increase in the number of phosphorylated CREB positive cells in the nucleus accumbens shell after exposure to a novel social stimulus. This effect of defeat was not observed in males. The effects of defeat in females were limited to social contexts, as there were no differences in exploratory behavior in the open field or light-dark box test. These data suggest that California mice could be a useful model for studying sex differences in behavioral responses to stress, particularly in neurobiological mechanisms that are involved with the regulation of social behavior.

  6. Paternal responsiveness is associated with, but not mediated by reduced neophobia in male California mice (Peromyscus californicus).

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    Chauke, Miyetani; de Jong, Trynke R; Garland, Theodore; Saltzman, Wendy

    2012-08-20

    Hormones associated with pregnancy and parturition have been implicated in facilitating the onset of maternal behavior via reductions in neophobia, anxiety, and stress responsiveness. To determine whether the onset of paternal behavior has similar associations in biparental male California mice (Peromyscus californicus), we compared paternal responsiveness, neophobia (novel-object test), and anxiety-like behavior (elevated plus maze, EPM) in isolated virgins (housed alone), paired virgins (housed with another male), expectant fathers (housed with pregnant pairmate), and new fathers (housed with pairmate and pups). Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and Fos immunoreactivity (IR) were quantified in brain tissues following exposure to a predator-odor stressor or under baseline conditions. New fathers showed lower anxiety-like behavior than expectant fathers and isolated virgins in EPM tests. In all housing conditions, stress elevated Fos-IR in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Social isolation reduced overall (baseline and stress-induced) Fos- and colocalized Fos/CRH-IR, and increased overall CRH-IR, in the PVN. In the central nucleus of the amygdala, social isolation increased stress-induced CRH-IR and decreased stress-induced activation of CRH neurons. Across all housing conditions, paternally behaving males displayed more anxiety-related behavior than nonpaternal males in the EPM, but showed no differences in CRH- or Fos-IR. Finally, the latency to engage in paternal behavior was positively correlated with the latency to approach a novel object. These results suggest that being a new father does not reduce anxiety, neophobia, or neural stress responsiveness. Low levels of neophobia, however, were associated with, but not necessary for paternal responsiveness.

  7. Effects of cutting disturbance in Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Mey. Soják on the benthic macroinvertebrates = Efeito do distúrbio de corte em Schoenoplectus californicus (C.A. Mey. Soják sobre a fauna de macroinvertebrados bentônicos

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    Thiago Cesar Lima Silveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lagoons are considered protected areas because these systems play a key ecological role. However, the extraction of macrophyte Schoenoplectus californicus is held for manufacture of handcrafts, being an alternative income for riverbank communities. This studyevaluated the impact of S. californicus experimental cutting on benthic macroinvertebrates trough a field experiment. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 1, 12, 26 and 60 days after themacrophyte cutting in demarked plots (1 m², as well at control plots. The families number was not statistically different (ANOVA, p > 0.05, but the total density of invertebrates, and the density of Ceratopogonidae were significant (ANOVA, p No Brasil, as margens de lagoas são consideradas áreas protegidas por desempenharem importante papel ecológico. No entanto, a extração da macrófita Schoenoplectus californicus é realizada para a fabricação de artesanato, sendo alternativa de renda para as comunidades ribeirrinhas. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o impacto do corte de S. californicus sobre os macroinvertebrados bentônicos por meio de um experimento de campo. Os macroinvertebrados foram amostrados um dia, 12, 26 e 60 dias após o corte em macrófitas em parcelas demarcadas (1 m², bem como nas parcelas-controle. As famílias de macroinvertebrados mais abundantes não apresentaram diferenças significativas (ANOVA, p < 0,05, mas a densidade total de invertebrados e a densidade de Ceratopogonidae foram significativas (ANOVA, p < 0,05 para a interação entre a data de amostragem e tratamento. A Análise de Componentes Principais identificou que a profundidade no local do experimento foi a variável que influenciou a variabilidade entre as amostras coletadas no experimento. Concluiu-seque o corte de S. californicus, nessa área, como a intensidade do corte realizado, não afeta drasticamente a composição de macroinvertebrados aquáticos. Os resultados sugerem que o extrativismo em pequenas

  8. Reverse genetics in the tide pool: knock-down of target gene expression via RNA interference in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Felipe S; Schoville, Sean D; Burton, Ronald S

    2015-07-01

    Reverse genetic tools are essential for characterizing phenotypes of novel genes and testing functional hypotheses generated from next-generation sequencing studies. RNA interference (RNAi) has been a widely used technique for describing or quantifying physiological, developmental or behavioural roles of target genes by suppressing their expression. The marine intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus has become an emerging model for evolutionary and physiological studies, but this species is not amenable to most genetic manipulation approaches. As crustaceans are susceptible to RNAi-mediated gene knock-down, we developed a simple method for delivery of gene-specific double-stranded RNA that results in significant suppression of target gene transcription levels. The protocol was examined on five genes of interest, and for each, at least 50% knock-down in expression was achieved. While knock-down levels did not reach 100% in any trial, a well-controlled experiment with one heat-shock gene showed unambiguously that such partial gene suppression may cause dramatic changes in phenotype. Copepods with suppressed expression of heat-shock protein beta 1 (hspb1) exhibited dramatically decreased tolerance to high temperatures, validating the importance of this gene during thermal stress, as proposed by a previous study. The application of this RNAi protocol in T. californicus will be invaluable for examining the role of genes putatively involved in reproductive isolation, mitochondrial function and local adaptation.

  9. In Vitro Effect of the Synthetic cal14.1a Conotoxin, Derived from Conus californicus, on the Human Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

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    Marco A. De León-Nava

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxins that are secreted by cone snails are small peptides that are used to treat several diseases. However, their effects on parasites with human and veterinary significance are unknown. Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic parasite that affects approximately 30% of the world’s population and can be lethal in immunologically compromised individuals. The conventional treatment for this parasitic infection has remained the same since the 1950s, and its efficacy is limited to the acute phase of infection. These findings have necessitated the search for new drugs that specifically target T. gondii. We examined the effects of the synthetic toxin cal14.1a (s-cal14.1a from C. californicus on the tachyzoite form of T. gondii. Our results indicate that, at micromolar concentrations, s-cal14.1a lowers viability and inhibits host cell invasion (by 50% and 61%, respectively on exposure to extracellular parasites. Further, intracellular replication decreased significantly while viability of the host cell was unaffected. Our study is the first report on the antiparasitic activity of a synthetic toxin of C. californicus.

  10. HISTORICAL INFORMATION ON AQUATIC VEGETATION REVEALED BY SEDIMENTARY DIATOMS:A CASE STUDY ON LIANGZI LAKE%沉积硅藻揭示的历史时期水生植被信息--以梁子湖为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张清慧; 董旭辉; 姚敏; 陈诗越; 羊向东

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic vegetation is one of the most important ecological characteristics of shallow lake ecosystems. Un-derstanding its evolution is crucial for lake ecological restoration. In this study, Liangzi Lake, a representative lake from the Yangtze floodplain, was chosen because of the high abundance of aquatic vegetation. To reconstruct the historical evolution of aquatic vegetation, a sediment core from its deepest area was analyzed with radiometric dating (210Pb/137Cs) and sedimentary diatoms. The reconstructed aquatic vegetation information by sedimentary diatom records reflected the succession of aquatic vegetation in historical period in comparison with the monitoring aquatic vegetation records since 1950s. We also reconstructed the coverage of aquatic vegetation over the past 200 years for Liangzi Lake. Based on the data from reconstructed historical aquatic vegetation information and the historical environmental data from its catch-ment, this study revealed that flood was one of the main factors affecting aquatic vegetation development in Liangzi Lake. This study demonstrated that diatoms can be used for the reconstruction of the amount of historical aquatic vege-tation in such shallow lakes, which can provide the scientific basis for the aquatic vegetation protection and important guidance of the lake for the ecological restoration.%水生植被是浅水湖泊生态系统最重要的生态特征之一,了解其群落历史演化特征,对生态退化湖泊的修复有着重要指导意义。研究选择长江中下游地区代表性草型湖泊梁子湖,基于梁子湖沉积岩芯210Pb/137Cs测年、沉积硅藻序列和梁子湖长期水生植被监测记录,探讨利用沉积硅藻记录来重建该湖历史时期水生植被演替特征的可行性。研究结果表明:梁子湖沉积硅藻记录对历史时期水生植被的演替有较好的反映;基于此,对梁子湖过去近200年的水生植被覆盖度进行了重建;与湖泊流域

  11. Investigating the molecular basis of local adaptation to thermal stress: population differences in gene expression across the transcriptome of the copepod Tigriopus californicus

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    Schoville Sean D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographic variation in the thermal environment impacts a broad range of biochemical and physiological processes and can be a major selective force leading to local population adaptation. In the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus, populations along the coast of California show differences in thermal tolerance that are consistent with adaptation, i.e., southern populations withstand thermal stresses that are lethal to northern populations. To understand the genetic basis of these physiological differences, we use an RNA-seq approach to compare genome-wide patterns of gene expression in two populations known to differ in thermal tolerance. Results Observed differences in gene expression between the southern (San Diego and the northern (Santa Cruz populations included both the number of affected loci as well as the identity of these loci. However, the most pronounced differences concerned the amplitude of up-regulation of genes producing heat shock proteins (Hsps and genes involved in ubiquitination and proteolysis. Among the hsp genes, orthologous pairs show markedly different thermal responses as the amplitude of hsp response was greatly elevated in the San Diego population, most notably in members of the hsp70 gene family. There was no evidence of accelerated evolution at the sequence level for hsp genes. Among other sets of genes, cuticle genes were up-regulated in SD but down-regulated in SC, and mitochondrial genes were down-regulated in both populations. Conclusions Marked changes in gene expression were observed in response to acute sub-lethal thermal stress in the copepod T. californicus. Although some qualitative differences were observed between populations, the most pronounced differences involved the magnitude of induction of numerous hsp and ubiquitin genes. These differences in gene expression suggest that evolutionary divergence in the regulatory pathway(s involved in acute temperature stress may offer at

  12. Manejo integrado de pragas em macieira no Rio Grande do Sul II: uso de Neoseiulus californicus para o controle de Panonychus ulmi

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    MONTEIRO LINO B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de implementar o controle biológico de ácaro-vermelho Panonychus ulmi em macieira foi proposta uma estratégia de controle baseada na criação de Neoseiulus californicus em estufa, em liberações inundativas e no uso de acaricidas, em um pomar comercial de macieira da Rincão das Flores Agropastoril (Agriflor, em Vacaria, Rio Grande do Sul, entre 1992 e 1996. A amostragem do ácaro-vermelho orientou as liberações e as transferências de ácaros predadores, das estufas de criação e dos ramos provenientes da poda verde, para parcelas de alta incidência de ácaro-vermelho. A eficiência da estratégia de controle do ácaro-vermelho foi avaliada com o levantamento de ovos de inverno. No primeiro ano, a associação de acaricidas com ácaros predadores permitiu um reduzido número de ovos de inverno do ácaro-vermelho, em torno de 1,3 ovo por unidade de amostragem contra 59,8 ovos na testemunha. No segundo ano, 58% das macieiras não foram pulverizadas com acaricidas. Nos dois anos subseqüentes, o controle do ácaro-vermelho foi realizado exclusivamente com ácaros predadores. N. californicus passou o inverno nas ervas daninhas do pomar e migrou espontaneamente para a copa das macieiras nos anos subseqüentes a sua introdução.

  13. Historical Superbolides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Zamora, S.; Ocaña, F.; Tapia, C.; de Burgos, A.; Herráiz, G.; Petrova, M.

    2015-05-01

    The amount of impacts of 50 m -- 1 cm asteroid with the Earth is a typical issue of controversy. Explosions in upper atmosphere and lunar impacts suggest that could have more impacts than is currently accepted. A ``new'' information source data can be fireballs appeared in historical press. Some of these reports indicate the presence of pressure waves or damage that may help estimate the energy of the event. We analysed more than 50 years of the archive of the New York Times and found a number of abnormally clustered events that can not be explained by a Poisson distribution. We have found at least two big concentrations not associated to any major meteor shower. One around the actual 23rd of July and other on the 14th of February. This second major concentration it is really close to the Chelyabinsk event date, so it is probable that there they are related. The preliminary results were published in Sánchez de Miguel, A., Ocaña, F., Zamora, S., et al. 2014, in Garzón Guerrero J. A., López Sánchez A. R., eds, Libro de Actas del XXI Congreso Estatal de Astronomía. Granada, Spain.

  14. Effect of the combined addition of Zn and Pb on partitioning in sediments and their accumulation by the emergent macrophyte Schoenoplectus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreghini, Silvana; de Cabo, Laura; Serafini, Roberto; de Iorio, Alicia Fabrizio

    2017-01-31

    Wetlands usually provide a natural mechanism that diminishes the transport of toxic compounds to other compartments of the ecosystem by immobilization and accumulation in belowground tissues and/or soil. This study was conducted to assess the ability of Schoenoplectus californicus growing in natural marsh sediments, with zinc and lead addition, to tolerate and accumulate these metals, taking account of the metal distribution in the sediment fractions. The Zn and Pb were mainly found in available (exchangeable) and potentially available (bound to organic matter) forms, respectively. The absorption of Zn and Pb by plants increased in sediments with added metals. Both metals were largely retained in roots (translocation factor < 1). Lead rhizome concentrations only increased significantly in treatments with high doses of metal independently of added Zn. The addition of Zn increased its concentration in roots and shoots significantly, while its concentration in rhizomes only increased when both metals were added together. Zinc concentration in shoots did not reach the toxic level for plants. Zinc and Pb concentrations in roots were high, but they were not sufficient to reduce biomass growth.

  15. Efeitos do nim sobre tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae e os predadores Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks e Neoseiulus californicus (Mcgregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cristine Hoffmann Schlesener

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência de controle e os efeitos adversos de dois produtos à base de nim Azamax® (Azadiractina A/B 12g/L e Neemseto® (Azadiractina A/B, Nimbina e Salanina 2,389 g/L sobre o ácaro-rajado Tetranychus urticae e os predadores Phytoseiulus macropilis e Neoseiulus californicus em laboratório. Para o ácaro-rajado, foram consideradas as variáveis mortalidade, fecundidade, efeito ovicida e persistência biológica, enquanto para os fitoseídeos consideraram-se mortalidade e fecundidade. A mortalidade máxima observada para o ácaro-rajado foi de 89,7% e 91,5% para Azamax® e Neemseto®, respectivamente, na concentração de 0,5% após a reaplicação do produto no sétimo dia. Também foram observados efeitos adversos sobre a fecundidade e a viabilidade dos ovos quando tratados com os produtos comerciais (p.c.. A persistência biológica dos produtos foi de aproximadamente três dias após a pulverização. As formulações apresentaram seletividade em relação aos fitoseídeos, porém causaram redução da fecundidade dos mesmos.

  16. National Register Historic Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The National Register Historic District layer is a shape file showing the boundaries of Historic Districts that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

  17. Applied Historical Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, F. Richard

    2014-01-01

    rotation -- as revealed by both timed and untimed eclipse observations -- and (ii) historical supernovae. These subjects will form the main theme of his AAS lecture.

  18. Efeitos do nim sobre tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae e os predadores Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks e Neoseiulus californicus (Mcgregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae Effects of neem on tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae and the predators Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks and Neoseiulus Californicus (Mcgregor (Acari: phytoseiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cristine Hoffmann Schlesener

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência de controle e os efeitos adversos de dois produtos à base de nim Azamax® (Azadiractina A/B 12g/L e Neemseto® (Azadiractina A/B, Nimbina e Salanina 2,389 g/L sobre o ácaro-rajado Tetranychus urticae e os predadores Phytoseiulus macropilis e Neoseiulus californicus em laboratório. Para o ácaro-rajado, foram consideradas as variáveis mortalidade, fecundidade, efeito ovicida e persistência biológica, enquanto para os fitoseídeos consideraram-se mortalidade e fecundidade. A mortalidade máxima observada para o ácaro-rajado foi de 89,7% e 91,5% para Azamax® e Neemseto®, respectivamente, na concentração de 0,5% após a reaplicação do produto no sétimo dia. Também foram observados efeitos adversos sobre a fecundidade e a viabilidade dos ovos quando tratados com os produtos comerciais (p.c.. A persistência biológica dos produtos foi de aproximadamente três dias após a pulverização. As formulações apresentaram seletividade em relação aos fitoseídeos, porém causaram redução da fecundidade dos mesmos.The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of control and adverse effects of two neem based products: Azamax TM (Azadirachtin A/B 12g/L and Neemseto TM (Azadirachtin A/B, Nimbin and Salanin 2,389 g/L over two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae and the predators Phytoseiulus macropilis and Neoseiulus californicus in laboratory. Effects over the mortality, fecundity, eggs and biological persistence of the two-spotted spider mite when treated with neem based products were evaluated. For the phytoseiids the effects on mortality and fecundity were evaluated. The maximum mortality of two-spotted spider mites rates observed were 89.7% and 91.5% for Azamax TM and Neemseto TM respectively, on the 0.5% concentration after reapplying the product on the seventh day. Adverse effects were also observed over the fecundity and viability of the eggs when treated with

  19. VT Historic Preservation Grant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The State-funded Historic Preservation Grant Program helps municipalities and non-profit organizations rehabilitate the historic buildings that are a vital part of...

  20. Building Collections. Historical Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapp, JoAnn Vergona

    2005-01-01

    At least once a year, teachers generally request a historical fiction assignment. Bare facts make dry reading but historical fiction, set in an actual time period with plausible dialogue and credible characters, is more palatable to youngsters. This column discusses the most widely-requested historical periods of study for intermediate and upper…

  1. Democracy and Historical Writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, we try to clarify the relationship between democracy and historical writing. The strategy is first exploring the general relationship between democracy and historical awareness, and then, studying the relationship between democracy and historical writing itself to find out whether dem

  2. Inheriting the past: Exploring historical consciousness across generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Clark

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant research into the meaning and operation of historical consciousness, there is still much to be understood about its hereditary function. For example, what does historical inheritance look like? How does it influence our individual and collective historical consciousnesses? And, just as critically, what happens to historical consciousness when history is deliberately withheld, when that inheritance is suspended or severed? As a way into some of these questions about passing on the past, this paper draws on a qualitative research project into historical consciousness in Australia to explore how so-called ‘ordinary people’ see themselves as part of a historical narrative. It reveals that historical inheritance is critical to our historical consciousness, and it notes the profound impact of forgetting on participants, raising important questions about the role of ‘silence’ and ‘absence’ in the formation of historical consciousness.

  3. 温度对加州新小绥螨捕食作用影响及高温耐饥饿能力研究%Effect of Temperature on Predation of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) and Starvation Tolerance at High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃贵勇; 李庆

    2013-01-01

    The functional responses of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) to Panonychus citri AaGregor at different temperatures and the starvation tolerance at high temperature of N.californicus and other four predatory mites were studied.The result showed that the controlling effect of N.californicus to P.citri AaGregor increased with the experimental temperature range of 20 to 30 ℃,the controlling effect was the strongest at 30 ℃,but when the temperatures was higher than 34 ℃,the controlling effect decreased ; the starvation tolerance at high temperature of N.californicus was higher than that of Amblyseius eharai Amitai et Swirski and Euseius nicholsi,and closed to that of A.pseudolongispinosus and A.makuwa Ehara.%本文研究了在不同温度条件下加州新小绥螨Neoseiulus californicus(McGregor)对柑橘全爪螨Panonychus citri AaGregor的功能反应,以及研究了加州新小绥螨等5种捕食螨的高温耐饥饿能力.结果表明:在20~30℃温度下,随着温度的升高,加州新小绥螨对柑橘全爪螨各螨态的控制能力增强,在30℃时,控制能力最强,而超过30 ℃时,加州新小绥螨的控制能力下降;加州新小绥螨的高温耐饥饿能力显著高于江原钝绥螨Amblyseius eharai Amitai et Swirski和尼氏真绥螨Euseius nicholsi(Ehara et Lee),而与拟长毛钝绥螨A.pseudolongispinosus和真桑钝绥螨A.makuwa Ehara接近.

  4. Making Connections with Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Kathy

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the value of historical fiction, using historical fiction to teach history and to teach literature, and activities using historical fiction. Offers a sample approach using the book "Underground to Canada," and notes cautions in using historical fiction. (SR)

  5. Cancer risk assessment foundation unraveling: new historical evidence reveals that the US National Academy of Sciences (US NAS), Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation (BEAR) Committee Genetics Panel falsified the research record to promote acceptance of the LNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2015-04-01

    The NAS Genetics Panel (1956) recommended a switch from a threshold to a linear dose response for radiation risk assessment. To support this recommendation, geneticists on the panel provided individual estimates of the number of children in subsequent generations (one to ten) that would be adversely affected due to transgenerational reproductive cell mutations. It was hoped that there would be close agreement among the individual risk estimates. However, extremely large ranges of variability and uncertainty characterized the wildly divergent expert estimates. The panel members believed that sharing these estimates with the scientific community and general public would strongly undercut their linearity recommendation, as it would have only highlighted their own substantial uncertainties. Essentially, their technical report in the journal Science omitted and misrepresented key adverse reproductive findings in an effort to ensure support for their linearity recommendation. These omissions and misrepresentations not only belie the notion of an impartial and independent appraisal by the NAS Panel, but also amount to falsification and fabrication of the research record at the highest possible level, leading ultimately to the adoption of LNT by governments worldwide. Based on previously unexamined correspondence among panel members and Genetics Panel meeting transcripts, this paper provides the first documentation of these historical developments.

  6. Evaluation and cataloging of Korean historical earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kew Hwa; Han, Young Woo; Lee, Jun Hui; Park, Ji Eok; Na, Kwang Wooing; Shin, Byung Ju [The Reaearch Institute of Basic Sciences, Seoul Nationl Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-15

    In order to systematically collect and analyze the historical earthquake data of the Korean peninsula which are very important in analyzing the seismicity and seismic risk of the peninsula by seismologist and historian, extensive governmental and private historical documents are investigated and relative reliabilities of these documents are examined. This research unearthed about 70 new earthquake records and revealed the change in the cultural, political and social effects of earthquakes with time in Korea. Also, the results of the vibration test of the Korean traditional wooden house are obtained in order to better estimate intensities of the historical earthquakes.

  7. Historically defined autobiographical periods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Norman R.; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Lee, Peter J.;

    2012-01-01

    The chapter reviews a research programme that has demonstrated the existence of historically defined autobiographical periods and identified the conditions that bring them about. Data from four samples of World War II-generation adults show that historically defined autobiographical periods endure...... over time and theoretical implications are discussed, notably by introducing a new approach to autobiographical memory, Transition Theory, which assumes that autobiographical memory is organized by transitional events that can be selfinitiated or externally imposed - historically defined...

  8. Creating Historical Drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassler, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Describes creating for the National Archives Public Education Department a historical drama, "Second in the Realm," based on the story of the Magna Carta. Demonstrates the effectiveness of historical drama as a teaching tool. Explains the difficulties of writing such dramas and provides guidelines for overcoming these problems. (NL)

  9. Historizing epistemology in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Gordana

    2010-12-01

    The conflict between the psychometric methodological framework and the particularities of human experiences reported in psychotherapeutic context led Michael Schwarz to raise the question whether psychology is based on a methodological error. I take this conflict as a heuristic tool for the reconstruction of the early history of psychology, which bears witness to similar epistemological conflicts, though the dominant historiography of psychology has largely forgotten alternative conceptions and their valuable insights into complexities of psychic phenomena. In order to work against the historical amnesia in psychology I suggest to look at cultural-historical contexts which decisively shaped epistemological choices in psychology. Instead of keeping epistemology and history of psychology separate, which nurtures individualism and naturalism in psychology, I argue for historizing epistemology and for historical psychology. From such a historically reflected perspective psychology in contemporary world can be approached more critically.

  10. FCH_ANAXYRUS_CALIFORNICUS_20110209

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas (in general) of critical habitat designated for the arroyo toad. NOTE: THIS DATA SET INCLUDES APPROXIMATELY 900 ACRES OF LAND...

  11. The historical supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, David H

    1977-01-01

    The Historical Supernovae is an interdisciplinary study of the historical records of supernova. This book is composed of 12 chapters that particularly highlight the history of the Far East. The opening chapter briefly describes the features of nova and supernova, stars which spontaneously explode with a spectacular and rapid increase in brightness. The succeeding chapter deals with the search for the historical records of supernova from Medieval European monastic chronicles, Arabic chronicles, astrological works etc., post renaissance European scientific writings, and Far Eastern histories and

  12. Historical foundations of hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2015-04-01

    The present paper provides an historical assessment of the concept of hormesis and its relationship to homeopathy and modern medicine. It is argued that the dose-response concept was profoundly influenced by the conflict between homeopathy and traditional medicine and that decisions on which dose-response model to adopt were not based on "science" but rater on historical antipathies. While the historical dispute between homeopathy and traditional medicine has long since subsided, their impact upon the field has been enduring and generally unappreciated, profoundly adversely affecting current drug development, therapeutic strategies and environmental risk assessment strategies and policies.

  13. History of Historical Archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Schuyler

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available On Sunday April 19, 1998 Jean Carl Harrington (known to the profession as J.C. or "Pinky" Harrington passed away at his home in Richmond, Virginia. At 96 Harrington's life almost spanned the 20th century and did encompass the rise and establishment of professional Historical Archaeology in North America. Many consider Harrington to be the founder or "father" of Americanist Historical Archaeology. In 1936 he took over the newly created NPS-CCC project at Jamestown, Virginia and that event is arguably the inception of Historical Archaeology as an organized, scholarly discipline.

  14. Historical Climatology Series

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Historical Climatology Series (HCS) is a set of climate-related publications published by NOAA's National Climatic Data Center beginning in 1978. HCS is...

  15. Historical Survey Data Archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To preserve NEFSC historical data, images of biological and oceanographic data sheets (1948-1975) were scanned to digital format and can be queried through a portal...

  16. Iowa Historic Cemeteries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This shape file represents Iowa Historic Cemeteries. Originally it was based on an Iowa DNR point file marking cemetery locations as found on 7.5 min. USGS quad...

  17. Econophysics: historical perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel, G.; Sornette, D.

    2008-01-01

    Econophysics embodies the recent upsurge of interest by physicists into financial economics, driven by the availability of large amount of data, job shortage in physics and the possibility of applying many-body techniques developed in statistical and theoretical physics to the understanding of the self-organizing economy. This brief historical survey emphasizes that Econophysics has many historical precursors, and is in fact rooted in a continuous cross-fertilization between economics and phy...

  18. Against the Grain: Teaching Historical Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Many teachers and scholars have written about the importance of inquiry in effective history instruction. At its core, inquiry involves student investigation of a significant historical problem. Experienced teachers, however, often reveal their skill in purposely teaching against the grain. Skilled teachers help students appreciate historical…

  19. The Ellipse A Historical and Mathematical Journey

    CERN Document Server

    Mazer, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Explores the development of the ellipse and presents mathematical concepts within a rich, historical context The Ellipse features a unique, narrative approach when presenting the development of this mathematical fixture, revealing its parallels to mankind's advancement from the Counter-Reformation to the Enlightenment. Incorporating illuminating historical background and examples, the author brings together basic concepts from geometry, algebra, trigonometry, and calculus to uncover the ellipse as the shape of a planet's orbit around the sun. The book begins with a discussion that tells the st

  20. Historical sampling reveals dramatic demographic changes in western gorilla populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guschanski Katerina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today many large mammals live in small, fragmented populations, but it is often unclear whether this subdivision is the result of long-term or recent events. Demographic modeling using genetic data can estimate changes in long-term population sizes while temporal sampling provides a way to compare genetic variation present today with that sampled in the past. In order to better understand the dynamics associated with the divergences of great ape populations, these analytical approaches were applied to western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and in particular to the isolated and Critically Endangered Cross River gorilla subspecies (G. g. diehli. Results We used microsatellite genotypes from museum specimens and contemporary samples of Cross River gorillas to infer both the long-term and recent population history. We find that Cross River gorillas diverged from the ancestral western gorilla population ~17,800 years ago (95% HDI: 760, 63,245 years. However, gene flow ceased only ~420 years ago (95% HDI: 200, 16,256 years, followed by a bottleneck beginning ~320 years ago (95% HDI: 200, 2,825 years that caused a 60-fold decrease in the effective population size of Cross River gorillas. Direct comparison of heterozygosity estimates from museum and contemporary samples suggests a loss of genetic variation over the last 100 years. Conclusions The composite history of western gorillas could plausibly be explained by climatic oscillations inducing environmental changes in western equatorial Africa that would have allowed gorilla populations to expand over time but ultimately isolate the Cross River gorillas, which thereafter exhibited a dramatic population size reduction. The recent decrease in the Cross River population is accordingly most likely attributable to increasing anthropogenic pressure over the last several hundred years. Isolation of diverging populations with prolonged concomitant gene flow, but not secondary admixture, appears to be a typical characteristic of the population histories of African great apes, including gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos.

  1. The Historical Impact of Revealing the Ultra Secret

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    systematic strangulation of his services of supply. It mattered little, for example, whether his tankers sailed from Naples, Taranto, or Piraeus...and predict that the lepidoptera emerging from what they conceive to be a Pandora’s box will yet do mischief. ULTRA, they feel, should have

  2. Historical dictionary of librarianship

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The Historical Dictionary of Librarianship focuses on librarianship as a modern, organized profession, emphasizing the period beginning in the mid-nineteenth century. Author Mary Ellen Quinn relates the history of this profession through a chronology, an introductory essay, appendixes, and an extensive bibliography.

  3. Historicity in development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyra, Maria C. D. P.; Valsiner, Jaan

    2011-01-01

    Human development entails the establishment, widening, and abbreviation of new behavioural and psychological phenomena. This leads to the central role of historicity in developmental science—a look at presently happening events in terms of their constructive borrowing from the past and anticipati...

  4. Why Digitise Historical Television?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, John

    2012-01-01

    abstractDigitisation of historic TV material is driven by the widespread perception that archival material should be made available to diverse users. Yet digitisation alters the material, taking away any lingering sense of presence. Digitisation and online access, however, offer startling new possib

  5. Feasts of Historical Luoyang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FLORA CHANG

    1997-01-01

    FROM famous chefs of long ago to the kitchens of modern China, historical Luoyang has brought culture and taste to dinner tables throughout China. With its long history, Luoyang’s chefs have been cooking up a storm for centuries. Legend has it that Yi Yin, forefather of Chinese chefs during the Tang reign of the Shang Dynasty.

  6. Ambiguity Revealed

    OpenAIRE

    Subir Bose; Matthew Polisson; Ludovic Renou

    2012-01-01

    We derive necessary and suffcient conditions for data sets composed of state-contingent prices and consumption to be consistent with two prominent models of decision making under ambiguity: variational preferences and smooth ambiguity. The revealed preference conditions for the maxmin expected utility and subjective expected utility models are characterized as special cases.

  7. Ambiguity revealed

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Ralph-C; Bose, Subir; Polisson, Matthew; Renou, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for data sets composed of state-contingent prices and consumption to be consistent with two prominent models of decision making under uncertainty: variational preferences and smooth ambiguity. The revealed preference conditions for subjective expected utility, maxmin expected utility, and multiplier preferences are characterised as special cases. We implement our tests on data from a portfolio choice experiment.

  8. APFO Historical Availability of Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The APFO Historical Availability ArcGIS Online web map provides an easy to use reference of what historical imagery is available by county from the Aerial...

  9. Why Digitise Historical Television?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ellis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Digitisation of historic TV material is driven by the widespread perception that archival material should be made available to diverse users. Yet digitisation alters the material, taking away any lingering sense of presence. Digitisation and online access, however, offer startling new possibilities. The article offers three: use of material in language teaching and learning; use in dementia therapy; and applications as data in medical research. All depend on ordinary TV for their effectivity.

  10. Intermediate Genre Study. Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Joan; Lasky, Kathryn

    1996-01-01

    Students can learn to appreciate history as readers and writers of historical fiction. This section presents an introduction to historical fiction, a display idea, a mystery history game, discussion of character-building, charts for students to fill in with information on historical characters, suggestions for customizing writing centers and for…

  11. Historical Dynamics of Implicit and Intuitive Elements of Mathematical Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultanova L. B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with historical dynamics of implicit and intuitive elements of mathematical knowledge. The author describes historical dynamics of implicit and intuitive elements and discloses a historical and evolutionary mechanism of building up mathematical knowledge. Each requirement to increase the level of theoretical rigor in mathematics is historically realized as a three-stage process. The first stage considers some general conditions of valid mathematical knowledge recognized by the mathematical community. The second one reveals the level of theoretical rigor increasing, while the third one is characterized by explication of the hidden lemmas. A detailed discussion of historical substantiation of the basic algebra theorem is conducted according to the proposed technique.

  12. Expiration of Historical Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toman, David

    2001-01-01

    We present a technique for automatic expiration of data in a historical data warehouse that preserves answers to a known and fixed set of first-order queries. In addition, we show that for queries with output size bounded by a function of the active data domain size (the number of values that have...... ever appeared in the warehouse), the size of the portion of the data warehouse history needed to answer the queries is also bounded by a function of the active data do-main size and therefore does not depend on the age of the warehouse (the length of the history)....

  13. Effects of Six Different Pollens on Development and Reproduction of Neoseiulus californicus%6种花粉对加州新小绥螨发育繁殖的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁秀萍; 任俊; 王小军; 赵伊英

    2016-01-01

    为探讨不同花粉对加州新小绥螨Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor)发育和繁殖的影响,在室内采用油菜(Brassica campestris)、槐花(Sophora japonica)、向日葵(Helianthus annuus)、南瓜(Cucurbita moschata)、玉米(Zea mays)和棉花(Gossypium hirstutum)6种植物的花粉分别饲喂加州新小绥螨,观察加州新小绥螨雌成螨繁殖、幼螨发育历期及各螨态存活率.结果表明,经向日葵花粉饲喂后,加州新小绥螨雌成螨存活时间为28.33 d,单雌产卵量最高为32.23粒,幼螨发育为成螨最短需5.84 d,其净增值率(R0)和内禀增长力(rm)分别为29.61和0.18;与其他花粉相比,向日葵花粉的饲喂结果更接近与土耳其斯坦叶螨(Tetranychus turkestani)饲喂的结果.可见向日葵花粉有利于加州新小绥螨繁殖.饲喂不同花粉后,加州新小绥螨的卵期和幼螨期无显著差异,说明花粉主要影响若螨和成螨,对卵和幼螨影响较小.

  14. Revealing Rembrandt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Parker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Our results emphasised the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt’s portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings.

  15. Historical Slovenian Language Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Erjavec

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXTENDED ABSTRACT:The paper presents three language resources enabling better full-text access to digitised printed historical Slovenian texts: a hand-annotated corpus, a hand-annotated lexicon of historical words and a collection of transcribed texts. The aim of the resources is twofold: on one hand they support empirical linguistic research (corpus, collection and represent a reference tool for the research of historical Slovenian (lexicon while on the other hand they may serve as training data for the development of Human Language Technologies enabling better full-text search in digital libraries containing Slovenian written cultural heritage, modernisation of historical texts, and the development of better technological solutions for text recognition and scanning. The hand annotated corpus of historical Slovenian contains the text from 1,000 pages sampled from the years 1750 to 1900, two texts date to the end of the 16th or 17th century. The corpus contains a little more than 250,000 word tokens; each of them being annotated with hand validated linguistic features: modernised form, lemma or base form, and morhpo-syntactic description. Thus the word token »ajfram« is annotated with the normalised form »ajfrom«, by the lemma »ajfer« and morphosyntactic description »Som« or »Samostalnik« (noun, »občni« (common, »moški« (masculine and a modernised form »gorečnost« (fervour. At first the corpus was annotated automatically and then manually verified and corrected. The lexicon was created automatically from the hand-annotated corpus. It contains only attested word-forms and examples of use. The word-forms are ordered under their modern equivalents. All the modern forms of a particular word constitute a dictionary entry, defined by its lemma with conjoint information i.e. the morpho-syntactic description and the closest contemporary synonyms. Thus the entry »ajfrer/Som/gorečnost« is annotated by two modernised words »ajfra

  16. Basavarajeeyam: A historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishteswar, K

    2011-10-01

    Basavarajeeyam is an important handbook for an Ayurvedic physician of Andhra region. It is a bilingual work and the content was presented in Sanskrit and Telugu languages. With regard to the place and date of Basavarajeeyam there is no common opinion among the present day scholars. Pt Govardhana Sharma Changani in his introduction to the Sanskrit version of Basavarajeeyam exposed a historical profile of Basavrajeeyam picturising him as Basava who was a staunch follower of Veerashaivism and a contemporary of king Bijjala (end of 12(th) cent. AD). The same statement is carried out in the works of Ayurvedic Itihasa written by Atredeva Vidyawalkan and Acharya Priyavrata Sharma. It appears that the historical evidence shown by these scholars is one sided and cannot stand any reason. Basavraju stated that he had started writing this work after a thorough study of many works such as Charaka, Nithyanatheeyam (1360 AD), Revenakalpam, Pujyapadiyam, Bahatam, Kashikhandam (1435 AD) etc. Basavraju has faithfully reproduced certain chapter of Vaidyachintamani, which is considered to be a work of 15(th) century. Basavraju not only mentioned Phirangiroga in the index of diseases described by him at the end of the book, but also indicated Phirangichekka (Madhusnuhi) in the management of Meharoga and Granthi. By this evidence Basavarajiyam should be considered as the work of post Bhavaprakasha period. Basavraju indicates in the Gulmaroga Chikitsa that Sankhadravaka should be administered in the dose of 'Ekanni'. The name Ekanni was given for a copper coin which came in to circulation of money during British India produced from Madras mint (1794 AD). Based on these internal evidences, it can be safely concluded that Basavraju belong to 18(th)century.

  17. Historic Preservation Information CFM Website

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA Historic Preservation Office keeps information about VA's programs to comply with Federal preservation requirements, and also interesting information about VA...

  18. FEMA Historical Disaster Declarations - shp

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Historical Disaster Declarations provides geospatial view to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (referred to as the Stafford...

  19. Historical consciousness - Contemporary history and the problem of historical perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Hollander, JC

    2002-01-01

    Historical consciousness is an elusive concept, as long as we try to understand it from the narrow perspective of professional historians. Therefore, a wider perspective is needed. If we accept that historical understanding has become a general trait of modern culture, we may try to explain it in te

  20. Historicity and theology, and the quest for historical Jesus1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Geyser

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of history and historicity is reviewed in this article. The efforts of New Historicism is brought to bear on this question in an effort to find a way out of the impasse created by the modernist demand for objectivity and the postmodern resignation to radical relativism. The possibility of historiography is explored in conjunction with the pragmatic approach and leads to the conclusion that a kind of historical knowledge is attainable which can be described as useful even if not perfect. The author concurs with Crossan and his working definition of history as the past reconstructed interactively by the present through argued evidence in public discourse. The intersubjective nature of any historical enterprise leads the author to the conclusion that the search for the historical Jesus can only be done in the dialectical approach of a both ... and: both the historical Jesus and the kerygmatic Christ

  1. The Return of Historical Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycik, Mary Taylor; Rosler, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Recently, historical fiction has begun to dominate major children's book awards. This article describes the values of using high-quality historical fiction in the classroom and presents different ways to respond to this genre including using modern technology. Two tables, one of picture books and one of novels, with paired nonfiction texts, are…

  2. What is Linked Historical Data?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meroño-Peñuela, A.; Hoekstra, R.

    2014-01-01

    Datasets that represent historical sources are relative newcomers in the Linked Open Data (LOD) cloud. Following the standard LOD practices for publishing historical sources raises several questions: how can we distinguish between RDF graphs of primary and secondary sources? Should we treat archived

  3. What Is Linked Historical Data?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meroño-Peñuela, Albert; Hoekstra, Rinke; Janowicz, Krzysztof; Schlobach, Stefan; Lambrix, Patrick; Hyvönen, Eero

    2014-01-01

    Datasets that represent historical sources are relative new- comers in the Linked Open Data (LOD) cloud. Following the standard LOD practices for publishing historical sources raises several questions: how can we distinguish between RDF graphs of primary and secondary sources? Should we treat archiv

  4. Spiral orbits and oscillations in historical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cheon, Taksu

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the concept of metaasabiya, the second non-material resource, to the asabiya theory of historical dynamics. We find that the resulting three variable dynamical system has peculiar features such as repelling or attracting axes and spiralling orbits in the phase space. Depending on the initial state, the system can go through series of oscillatory rises and falls, mimicking the geopolitical evolution of real-world polities. These distinctive features, absent in conventional Lotka-Volterra type biological systems, reveal the hidden richness inherent in the asabiya theory.

  5. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A team of international researchers supported by the ... when they divide and grow uncontrollably, develop into melanoma. Also, MITF activity is known to be amplified ...

  6. Essays on Historical Optimism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr A. Cherkasov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the debates that unfolded at a round table on Boris Mironov’s three-volume “Russian Empire.” The author notes that the experts approved the generalizing nature of the research and its keen academic polemics and relevance, and highlighted the magnitude of the work, as well as the encyclopedic character of the research through source study and theoretical, factual, and historiographical coverage of the material. According to A.A. Cherkasov, the round table clearly showed that the Marxist approach has lost not only the monopoly and popularity, but also the trust of the majority of researchers. The concept of civilization has aroused considerable skepticism. The theory of modernization received universal recognition from the participants. They unanimously evaluate it as pragmatic and workable, and they consider that its application is a trend in modern national historiography and note the topicality, importance, relevance, and validity of its choice for an explanatory model of Russian history by the domestic historical community. The author notes the existence of a wide consensus among those participating in the discussion. They unanimously agreed that Russia is a normal world power, the vector of its development is European, its achievements and successes in the field of modernization are undeniable, but undervalued and often completely ignored. The discussants acknowledged that Boris Mironov was able to reconstruct the main modernizing trends of the country’s history objectively and convincingly and to discredit the persistent negative myths and to create an objectively positive image of Russia. Thus, the “Russian Empire” contains neither falsifications nor simplistic positive or negative assessment and conclusions. The consensus suggests that a new objective-positive paradigm of the history of imperial Russia has taken shape in Russian historiography.

  7. Historical Vignettes of Epicanthoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Hun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to summarize historical vignettes in regards to epicanthoplasty, systematically.In a PubMed search and a Scopus search, the search terms (epicanthal) AND (fold)and (epicanthoplasty) were used, which resulted in 389 titles found. Among the 480 titles, 74 titles, which were duplicated between PubMed and Scopus were excluded. Excluding 352 titles from the remaining 406 titles, 54 abstracts discussing at least 1 surgical method correcting epicanthal folds were reviewed. By excluding further 6 abstracts, 48 full articles, were reviewed. Finally, 6 mined articles were added, in which 4 studies were excluded resulting in 46 articles being analyzed.Forty-three articles studied eliminating epicanthal folds (93.5%) and 3 discussed reconstructing removed epicanthal folds (6.5%). The methods were categorized into Z-plasty, advancement, skin redraping, excision, and others. Among the 48 methods analyzed, the Z-plasty (21, 43.8%) was written most frequently followed by advancement (14, 29.2%), and excision (7, 14.6%). Redraping was relatively rare (4, 8.3%). The Z-plasty is employed frequently and is increasingly used. Excision has decreased in use and no more articles have been written recently. Advancement has continuously increased but has stabilized from 2010. Redraping has increased recently apparently after Oh's 2007 article was published.Excessive performance of epicanthoplasty causes unwanted results, including overcorrection. Subsequently, reconstruction of the over-corrected cases was needed and restoration methods are now being published. It is expected that new modifications of Z-epicanthoplasty or skin redraping technique will appear. Reconstruction methods will also be developed.

  8. Russian North Caucasus: Historical Memory vs Historical Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiet Yu. Shadzhe

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the content of such terms as «historical memory» and «historical policy»; and carries out their projection on current realities of the Russian Northern Caucasus. We offer possible answers to the question “what to do with the attempts of various actors of historic policy to exploit historical past of the Northern Caucasian peoples, Circassians in the particular. We justify the position that culture is the basis not only for the relationship of memory and identity, but also for mutual understanding among nations. We conclude that the policy, based on dialogue, should be focused on inter-ethnic harmony and preservation of each cultural/ethnic unity in the poliethnic region. In order to strengthen the unity of the nation’s civil and Russian national identity, we raise the problem of combining components to identify all Russian ethnic groups.

  9. Historical and Documentary Data Sets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past climate and environment from historical references and documentary evidence such as church records, harvest dates, and diaries. Parameter keywords...

  10. 2nd Historic Mortars Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, John; Groot, Caspar; Historic Mortars : Characterisation, Assessment and Repair

    2012-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues connected with mortars on historic structures. The book is divided into four sections: Characterisation of Historic Mortars, Repair Mortars and Design Issues, Experimental Research into Properties of Repair Mortars, and Assessment and Testing. The papers present the latest work of researchers in their field. The individual contributions were selected from the contributions to the 2nd Historic Mortars Conference, which took place in Prague, September, 22-24, 2010. All papers were reviewed and improved as necessary before publication. This peer review process by the editors resulted in the 34 individual contributions included in here. One extra paper reviewing and summarising State-of-the-Art knowledge covered by this publication was added as a starting and navigational point for the reader. The editors believe that having these papers in print is important and they hope that it will stimulate further research into historic mortars and related subjects. 

  11. Art’s historical nature

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaraz León, María José

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I examine some of the arguments that have been put forward against Levinson’s historical account of art. These arguments focus upon the conceptual impossibility of defending a historical account of art when we take into consideration issues regarding the identification of art in other cultures or worlds. Levinson has tried to make his position clearer defending himself from these criticisms in a way that seems quite persuasive. However, as I argue at the end of this article, Le...

  12. Why and How I Use Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Tarry

    1995-01-01

    A fifth-grade teacher discusses why she teaches with historical fiction, presenting tips on choosing good historical fiction, reviewing her favorite new historical fiction books, and highlighting how to use historical fiction to teach by discussing Pocahontas to help students differentiate between make-believe and history. (SM)

  13. Historical earthquake investigations in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Makropoulos

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The active tectonics of the area of Greece and its seismic activity have always been present in the country?s history. Many researchers, tempted to work on Greek historical earthquakes, have realized that this is a task not easily fulfilled. The existing catalogues of strong historical earthquakes are useful tools to perform general SHA studies. However, a variety of supporting datasets, non-uniformly distributed in space and time, need to be further investigated. In the present paper, a review of historical earthquake studies in Greece is attempted. The seismic history of the country is divided into four main periods. In each one of them, characteristic examples, studies and approaches are presented.

  14. Analyzing and Interpreting Historical Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kipping, Matthias; Wadhwani, Dan; Bucheli, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    This chapter outlines a methodology for the interpretation of historical sources, helping to realize their full potential for the study of organization, while overcoming their challenges in terms of distortions created by time, changes in context, and selective production or preservation. Drawing....... The chapter contributes to the creation of a language for describing the use of historical sources in management research.......This chapter outlines a methodology for the interpretation of historical sources, helping to realize their full potential for the study of organization, while overcoming their challenges in terms of distortions created by time, changes in context, and selective production or preservation. Drawing...... on social scientific methods as well as the practice and reflections of historians, the chapter describes analytical and interpretive process based on three basic elements, illustrating them with exemplars from management research: source criticism to identify possible biases and judge the extent to which...

  15. Real Analysis A Historical Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Stahl, Saul

    2011-01-01

    A provocative look at the tools and history of real analysis This new edition of Real Analysis: A Historical Approach continues to serve as an interesting read for students of analysis. Combining historical coverage with a superb introductory treatment, this book helps readers easily make the transition from concrete to abstract ideas. The book begins with an exciting sampling of classic and famous problems first posed by some of the greatest mathematicians of all time. Archimedes, Fermat, Newton, and Euler are each summoned in turn, illuminating the utility of infinite, power, and trigonome

  16. Exploring historical trends using taxonomic name metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schenk Ryan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Authority and year information have been attached to taxonomic names since Linnaean times. The systematic structure of taxonomic nomenclature facilitates the ability to develop tools that can be used to explore historical trends that may be associated with taxonomy. Results From the over 10.7 million taxonomic names that are part of the uBio system 4, approximately 3 million names were identified to have taxonomic authority information from the years 1750 to 2004. A pipe-delimited file was then generated, organized according to a Linnaean hierarchy and by years from 1750 to 2004, and imported into an Excel workbook. A series of macros were developed to create an Excel-based tool and a complementary Web site to explore the taxonomic data. A cursory and speculative analysis of the data reveals observable trends that may be attributable to significant events that are of both taxonomic (e.g., publishing of key monographs and societal importance (e.g., world wars. The findings also help quantify the number of taxonomic descriptions that may be made available through digitization initiatives. Conclusion Temporal organization of taxonomic data can be used to identify interesting biological epochs relative to historically significant events and ongoing efforts. We have developed an Excel workbook and complementary Web site that enables one to explore taxonomic trends for Linnaean taxonomic groupings, from Kingdoms to Families.

  17. Design Codes for Historical Irkutsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Meerovich

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a concept of visual environment within the boundaries of the historical settlement of Irkutsk. The concept is aimed at formation of an integrated architectural-artistic appearance and ordered arrangement of outdoor advertising and information facilities.

  18. Developing Historical Thinking through Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viator, Martha Graham

    2012-01-01

    The social studies classroom can and should be a place where students learn critical thinking skills, but too often, especially in the middle grades, students are asked to focus on discrete facts on which they can be tested. The purpose of this article is to suggest that sixth graders can learn the critical thinking skills of "historical thinking"…

  19. Technologies for Prehistoric & Historic Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    Archaeological remains and historic structures and landscapes are important tangible reminders of the United States' rich and diverse cultural heritage. In recent years the stresses on these unique, nonrenewable cultural resources have increased dramatically. This report presents the primary findings of an assessment requested by the House of…

  20. Energy Sources: An Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Constance M.

    1983-01-01

    Putting the present energy situation into an historical perspective provides meaning to today's energy concerns and demonstrates how important energy has always been to our life style. Primary energy sources of the United States from 1850 to the present are examined. (RM)

  1. The Principalship in Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Judith

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a review of the existing historiography of the American school principal. Although a small and incomplete body of research, scholarship on the history of the principalship demonstrates that it has always been a complex and multifaceted role and that principals have historically drawn on shifting sources of authority to assert…

  2. Collaborative Action Research: Historical Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulyan, Lisa

    This paper presents a historical overview of the use of action research in education and describes the basic assumptions and expectations that continue to characterize collaborative research projects today. Action research was initiated in the 1930's by Kurt Lewin and adapted by educators in the 1940's. Interest in action research declined between…

  3. Eukaryotic diversity in historical soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon-van der Staay, Seung Yeo; Tzeneva, Vesela A; van der Staay, Georg W M; de Vos, Willem M; Smidt, Hauke; Hackstein, Johannes H P

    2006-09-01

    The eukaryotic biodiversity in historical air-dried samples of Dutch agricultural soil has been assessed by random sequencing of an 18S rRNA gene library and by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Representatives of nearly all taxa of eukaryotic soil microbes could be identified, demonstrating that it is possible to study eukaryotic microbiota in samples from soil archives that have been stored for more than 30 years at room temperature. In a pilot study, 41 sequences were retrieved that could be assigned to fungi and a variety of aerobic and anaerobic protists such as cercozoans, ciliates, xanthophytes (stramenopiles), heteroloboseans, and amoebozoans. A PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of samples collected between 1950 and 1975 revealed significant changes in the composition of the eukaryotic microbiota.

  4. A Historical Profile of the Higgs Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John; Gaillard, Mary K.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2012-01-31

    The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964, and phenomenological studies of its possible production and decays started in the early 1970s, followed by studies of its possible productionin e{sup +} e{sup -}, {anti p}p and pp collisions, in particular. Until recently, the most sensitive searches for the Higgs boson were at LEP between 1989 and 2000, which have been complemented bysearches at the Fermilab Tevatron. The LHC has recently entered the hunt, excluding a Higgs boson over a large range of masses and revealing a tantalizing hint in the range 119 to125 GeV, and there are good prospects that the existence or otherwise of the Higgs boson will soon be established. One of the most attractive possibilities is that the Higgs bosonis accompanied by supersymmetry, though composite options have yet to be excluded. This article reviews some of the key historical developments in Higgs physics over the past half-century.

  5. Leadership in British nursing: a historical dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzon, M; Bryant, J

    1997-09-01

    A historical overview of nurse leadership in the late 19th and late 20th centuries is presented, supported by relevant material from the literature. The 19th century material revealed the following main themes: emphasis on practical and domestic aspects of management; prominent input of religious ideals and social conscience and, autocratic and feminized style of leadership. The main themes in the contemporary literature examined were: role models in history, dysfunctional leadership styles, importance of knowledge, gender as an influencing factor on nurse leadership and threats to the autonomy of nurse leaders. It was concluded that formal nurse professionalization has progressed steadily during the past hundred years with associated evolution of nurse leaders to fit in with contemporary needs. It is hoped that future policies for nursing will encourage decision-making nearer the 'bed-side', more resource-driven care and value-based leadership.

  6. Statics of Historic Masonry Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments in its architectural heritage. Given the age of much of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant. This book aims to help fill this demand presenting a comprehensive new statics of masonry constructions. The book, result of thirty years of research and professional experience, gives the fundamentals of statics of the masonry solid, then applied to the study of statics of arches, piers and vaults. Further, combining engineering and architecture and through an interdisciplinary approach, the book investigates the statical behaviour of many historic monuments, as the Pantheon, the Colosseum,  the domes of S. Maria del Fiore in Florence and of St. Peter in Rome, the Tower of Pisa, the Gothic Cathedrals and the Masonry Buildings under seismic actions.

  7. Taming power: Generative historical consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, David G

    2016-04-01

    Power is a necessary dimension of all human enterprises. It can inspire and illuminate, but it can also corrupt, oppress, and destroy. Therefore, taming power has been a central moral and political question for most of human history. Writers, theorists, and researchers have suggested many methods and mechanisms for taming power: through affiliation and love, intellect and reason, responsibility, religion and values, democratic political structures, and separation of powers. Historical examples and social science research suggest that each has some success, but also that each is vulnerable to being hijacked by power itself. I therefore introduce generative historical consciousness (GHC) as a concept and measure that might help to secure the benefits of power while protecting against its outrages and excesses. I conclude by discussing the role that GHC may have played in the peaceful resolution of the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962.

  8. Mangghuer Folktales and Historical Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigori Potanin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Grigori Potanin (Xénia de Heering, translator. 2015. Mangghuer Folktales and Historical Narratives IN Gerald Roche and CK Stuart (eds Asian Highlands Perspectives 36: Mapping the Monguor, 178-188, 301-332. Eleven folktales and historical narratives are presented that were collected by Grigori Potanin during his visit to the Sanchuan Region in 1884-1885. The folktales all appear to have been collected from males, mostly monks. One folktale deals with Wencheng Gongzhu, the Chinese bride of the Tibetan emperor, Srong btsan sgam po. One deals with the building of the Potala Palace in Lha sa, another with the founder of Dge lugs Buddhism, Tsong kha pa, and two more with the founding of Dmar gtsang Monastery, in A mdo. Two narratives relate events from the Chinese epic, Journey to the West, and four narrate events related to Li Jinwang, a Tang Dynasty general, and his adopted son, Li Cunxiao.

  9. International Polar Year Historical Data and Literature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Polar Year Historical Data and Literature collection (formerly known as the Discovery and Access of Historic Literature from the IPYs (DAHLI)...

  10. Fort Monroe Historic Image Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    ERDC/CERL SR-10-8 August 2010 Fort Monroe Historic Image Report Adam Smith , Megan Weaver Tooker, Meghan Roller, and Rory Nicholson Construction... Adam Smith was the CERL Project Manager and lead architectural historian, Megan Weaver Tooker was the lead land- scape architect, and Meghan Roller...5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S). Adam Smith , Megan Weaver Tooker, Meghan Roller and Rory Nicholson 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK

  11. On Tangut Historical Documents Recognition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changqing

    As the Tangut studies have made progress, a considerable number of Tangut historical documents' copies have been published. It is of great importance to carry out digitalization and domestication of these copies. The paper firstly makes an initial processing of images by global threshold, then dissect the photocopies by scanning. Finally adopts the recognition approach of principal component analysis. The experiment shows that a better recognition can be achieved by calculation without extra time.

  12. Japan 2006 in historical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Tanaka Nishishima

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Readings of the current Japanese politics with the historic and social insight through analysis of four facts registered in 2006: the visit of the prime minister Koizumi to the Yasukuni shrine; the election of Abe Shinzo as the president of Liberal Democratic Party and the formation of Abe cabinet; the Atomic bomb experimentation by the North Corea; the publication of the book of feminist counteroffensive against the numerous rightist conservative harassment.

  13. Japan 2006 in historical perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Michiko Tanaka Nishishima

    2007-01-01

    Readings of the current Japanese politics with the historic and social insight through analysis of four facts registered in 2006: the visit of the prime minister Koizumi to the Yasukuni shrine; the election of Abe Shinzo as the president of Liberal Democratic Party and the formation of Abe cabinet; the Atomic bomb experimentation by the North Corea; the publication of the book of feminist counteroffensive against the numerous rightist conservative harassment.

  14. Historical Medical Value of Donguibogam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bong-Keun; Won, Jin-Hee; Kim, Sungchul

    2016-03-01

    Oriental medicine, since its origin in China, has had a long history extending over 2000 years. Today, it comprises several types of medicine predominately practiced in East Asia, including traditional Chinese, traditional Korean, and Kampo medicine. The distinctive medical system of traditional Korean medicine was established shortly after the publication of Donguibogam by Dr. Heo Jun in 1613. Donguibogam is highly acclaimed across East Asia; in 2009, in light of its historical medical value, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization registered the book on its cultural heritage list. Here, we review the historical medical value of Donguibogam. The findings confirm that Donguibogam developed a unique and independent form of traditional Korean medicine and innovatively reformed the disease classification system. Moreover, Donguibogam emphasized the importance of disease prevention and medical pragmatism. This book also accelerated the development of folk medicine. Owing to its historical medical value, Donguibogam is now considered the 'bible' of Oriental medicine. Its wide acceptance has contributed to the expansion of Korean medicine utilization among the general public. Donguibogam has also played an important role in the establishment of traditional Korean medicine as a universally valid and original form of medicine, independent of traditional Chinese medicine.

  15. Historical Medical Value of Donguibogam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Keun Song

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Oriental medicine, since its origin in China, has had a long history extending over 2000 years. Today, it comprises several types of medicine predominately practiced in East Asia, including traditional Chinese, traditional Korean, and Kampo medicine. The distinctive medical system of traditional Korean medicine was established shortly after the publication of Donguibogam by Dr. Heo Jun in 1613. Donguibogam is highly acclaimed across East Asia; in 2009, in light of its historical medical value, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization registered the book on its cultural heritage list. Here, we review the historical medical value of Donguibogam. The findings confirm that Donguibogam developed a unique and independent form of traditional Korean medicine and innovatively reformed the disease classification system. Moreover, Donguibogam emphasized the importance of disease prevention and medical pragmatism. This book also accelerated the development of folk medicine. Owing to its historical medical value, Donguibogam is now considered the 'bible' of Oriental medicine. Its wide acceptance has contributed to the expansion of Korean medicine utilization among the general public. Donguibogam has also played an important role in the establishment of traditional Korean medicine as a universally valid and original form of medicine, independent of traditional Chinese medicine.

  16. Mind's historicity: its hidden history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarroso, Noemí

    2013-02-01

    Whereas psychological research can hardly accept the idea of a changing psychological architecture, mind's historicity seems to be commonplace among historians of psychology, at least in recent decades. Attempts to promote a convergence between psychology and history have always existed, though mainly in the margins of both disciplines. Among these attempts, there is a tradition in French psychology that remains quite marginal even to the history of the discipline and is practically unknown out of the French context. Our goal is to introduce this approach, through the work of its main architect, Ignace Meyerson, to an English speaking reader, in the light of current pleas for historicity. Developed within the core of the discipline of psychology, though in dialogue with many others disciplines, Meyerson's historical psychology appears to be more ambitious than other attempts, as it aims at studying psychological activity itself, beyond the history of its conceptualizations. It is concerned not with the analysis of fragmented, isolated, and mechanistic behaviors or cognitive process, but with the study of mind in its functioning through the multiple and changing fields of experience where human beings are involved.

  17. Historical Fiction--New and Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavonetti, Linda M.

    2001-01-01

    Offers brief descriptions of 41 books of historical fiction that may interest intermediate and middle school students, many of them new releases that tackle unusual historical topics. Argues that historical fiction is an ideal medium for taking intermediate and middle school students out of their day-to-day surroundings and into other times and…

  18. Revitalizing History Teaching Through Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Lee C.

    1983-01-01

    Describes the usefulness of including historical fiction on reading lists in high school history courses. Lists criteria for selection and instructional use of historical fiction, and provides a list of historical fiction appropriate for use in studying certain topics in United States history. (KH)

  19. Historical Literacy: Reading History through Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Trenia R.

    2006-01-01

    Using films to teach historical time periods, people, or events is not a new idea. In this article, the author contends that teachers who use film solely to teach historical facts or to test students' ability to stay awake miss an important opportunity to aid in the development of students' real historical understanding. Instead, teachers should…

  20. Historical Films in the Latin Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Jeffrey L.

    Guidelines and lesson plans are presented for teachers of Latin using historical films as instructional and support materials. A discussion of the use of historical films addresses these issues in classroom practice: the legality of using films in the classroom (copyrights); techniques for using historical films as sources of cultural information;…

  1. Historical Novels: Beyond the History Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Constantine D.

    1982-01-01

    Despite the inadequacy of much historical fiction, these novels can awake students' imagination and interest. As records of individual and societal life, historical novels can provide a key to historical understanding and engage students' attention and sympathy. Provides a list of relevant Canadian fiction. (KC)

  2. Historical ecology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Péter

    2015-11-01

    The term 'historical ecology' has been used with various meanings since the first half of the 20th century. Studies labelled as historical ecology have been produced in at least four academic disciplines: history, ecology, geography and anthropology. Although all those involved seem to agree that historical ecology concerns the historical interconnectedness of nature and human culture, this field of study has no unified methodology, specialized institutional background and common publication forums. Knowledge of the development of historical ecology is also limited. As a result, the current multitude of definitions of historical ecology is accompanied by divergent opinions as to where the origins of the field are to be sought. In this review, I follow the development of historical ecology from the 18th century to the present. In the first part, I briefly describe some early examples of historical ecological investigations, followed by a description of the various scientific strands in the 20th century that contributed to the formation of historical ecology. In the second part, I discuss the past five decades of historical ecological investigations in more detail, focusing mostly (but not exclusively) on works that their respective authors identified as historical ecology. I also examine the appearance and interconnectedness of the two main trends (ecological and anthropological) in historical ecological research. In the last part, I attempt to outline the future of historical ecology based on common features in existing research. It appears that at present historical ecology is at a crossroads. With rapidly growing interest in historical ecological research, it may move towards institutionalization or remain an umbrella term.

  3. Political institutions and their historical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Mikael; Lundberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, political scientists define political institutions deductively. This approach may prevent from discovery of existing institutions beyond the definitions. Here, a principal component analysis was used for an inductive extraction of dimensions in Polity IV data on the political institutions of all nations in the world the last two centuries. Three dimensions of institutions were revealed: core institutions of democracy, oligarchy, and despotism. We show that, historically and on a world scale, the dominance of the core institutions of despotism has first been replaced by a dominance of the core institutions of oligarchy, which in turn is now being followed by an increasing dominance by the core institutions of democracy. Nations do not take steps from despotic, to oligarchic and then to democratic institutions, however. Rather, nations hosting the core democracy institutions have succeeded in historically avoiding both the core institutions of despotism and those of oligarchy. On the other hand, some nations have not been influenced by any of these dimensions, while new institutional combinations are increasingly influencing others. We show that the extracted institutional dimensions do not correspond to the Polity scores for autocracy, "anocracy" and democracy, suggesting that changes in regime types occur at one level, while institutional dynamics work on another. Political regime types in that sense seem "canalized", i.e., underlying institutional architectures can and do vary, but to a considerable extent independently of regime types and their transitions. The inductive approach adds to the deductive regime type studies in that it produces results in line with modern studies of cultural evolution and memetic institutionalism in which institutions are the units of observation, not the nations that acts as host for them.

  4. Political institutions and their historical dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Sandberg

    Full Text Available Traditionally, political scientists define political institutions deductively. This approach may prevent from discovery of existing institutions beyond the definitions. Here, a principal component analysis was used for an inductive extraction of dimensions in Polity IV data on the political institutions of all nations in the world the last two centuries. Three dimensions of institutions were revealed: core institutions of democracy, oligarchy, and despotism. We show that, historically and on a world scale, the dominance of the core institutions of despotism has first been replaced by a dominance of the core institutions of oligarchy, which in turn is now being followed by an increasing dominance by the core institutions of democracy. Nations do not take steps from despotic, to oligarchic and then to democratic institutions, however. Rather, nations hosting the core democracy institutions have succeeded in historically avoiding both the core institutions of despotism and those of oligarchy. On the other hand, some nations have not been influenced by any of these dimensions, while new institutional combinations are increasingly influencing others. We show that the extracted institutional dimensions do not correspond to the Polity scores for autocracy, "anocracy" and democracy, suggesting that changes in regime types occur at one level, while institutional dynamics work on another. Political regime types in that sense seem "canalized", i.e., underlying institutional architectures can and do vary, but to a considerable extent independently of regime types and their transitions. The inductive approach adds to the deductive regime type studies in that it produces results in line with modern studies of cultural evolution and memetic institutionalism in which institutions are the units of observation, not the nations that acts as host for them.

  5. Analysis of Traditional Historical Clothing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten; Schmidt, A. L.; Petersen, A. H.

    2013-01-01

    A recurrent problem for scholars who investigate traditional and historical clothing is the measuring of items of clothing and subsequent pattern construction. The challenge is to produce exact data without damaging the item. The main focus of this paper is to present a new procedure...... for establishing a three-dimensional model and the corresponding two-dimensional pattern for items of skin clothing that are not flat. The new method is non-destructive, and also accurate and fast. Furthermore, this paper presents an overview of the more traditional methods of pattern documentation and measurement...

  6. Summary inside IBM's historic turnaround

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This work offers a summary of the book "WHO SAYS ELEPHANTS CAN'T DANCE? Inside IBM's Historic Turnaround" by Louis Gerstner.In nine years as the chairman and CEO of International Business Machine Corporation (IBM), Louis Gerstner brought about a dramatic change in the company's fortunes. When he took charge, IBM was on the verge of extinction as the victim of rapid changes in the computer industry. However, instead of breaking up IBM as most analysts were suggesting, Gerstner and his management team turned the company around and restored it to a position of power and influence within the indu

  7. Wheelchair cushions: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, S L

    1985-07-01

    An important objective of occupational therapy practice is to maximise functional potential in patients who have physical disabilities. Pressure sores are a major complication in the medical course of these individuals. Therefore, prevention, or at least the proper management, of these sores becomes an important focus for occupational therapists who treat the physically disabled patient. Occupational therapists often prescribe wheelchair cushions to relieve pressure and reduce the risk of ulceration. Unfortunately, occupational therapy literature offers few articles dealing with this significant problem. This paper presents a historical review of wheelchair cushions and details some of the physiological and clinical research efforts that are the basis of prescription practice today.

  8. HARMONIZATION, HISTORICAL COST AND INVESTMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Gabriel CRISTEA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Choosing depreciation of assets; revaluation of tangible or keeping their historical cost; registration, whilst the tangible assets are entered in the conservation of amortization expenses or a corresponding adjustment to depreciation expense ascertained; choosing the method of evaluating stocks is accounting policies. IAS 40 is significant because it was the first time the International Accounting Standards Board has introduced a fair value accounting model for non-financial assets. All firms must provide fair value for their real estate assets either directly in the balance sheet in accordance with the fair value model choice, either in the footnotes below cost model selection.

  9. Historical Astrolexicography and Old Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Terry J.

    I describe how the principles of lexicography have been applied in limited ways in astronomy and look at the revision work under way for the third edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, which, when completed, will contain the widest and most detailed coverage of the astronomical lexicon in the English language. Finally, I argue the need for a dedicated historical dictionary of astronomy based rigorously on a corpus of quotations from sources published in English from the beginnings of written English to the present day.

  10. Historical changes in the Columbia River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Jay, David A.; Bradford Harvey, R.; Hamilton, Peter; Simenstad, Charles A.

    Historical changes in the hydrology, sedimentology, and physical oceanography of the Columbia River Estuary have been evaluated with a combination of statistical, cartographic, and numerical-modelling techniques. Comparison of data digitized from US Coast and Geodetic Survey bathymetric surveys conducted in the periods 1867-1875, 1926-1937, and 1949-1958 reveals that large changes in the morphology of the estuary have been caused by navigational improvements (jetties, dredged channels, and pile dikes) and by the diking and filling of much of the wetland area. Lesser changes are attributable to natural shoaling and erosion. There has been roughly a 15% decrease in tidal prism and a net accumulation of about 68 × 10 6m 3 of sediment in the estuary. Large volumes of sediment have been eroded from the entrance region and deposited on the continental shelf and in the balance of the estuary, contributing to formation of new land. The bathymetric data indicate that, ignoring erosion at the entrance, 370 to 485 × 10 6m 3 of sediment has been deposited in the estuary since 1868 at an average rate of about 0.5 cm y -1, roughly 5 times the rate at which sea level has fallen locally since the turn of the century. Riverflow data indicate that the seasonal flow cycle of the Columbia River has been significantly altered by regulation and diversion of water for irrigation. The greatest changes have occurred in the last thirty years. Flow variability over periods greater than a month has been significantly damped and the net discharge has been slightly reduced. These changes in riverflow are too recent to be reflected in the available in the available bathymetric data. Results from a laterally averaged, multiple-channel, two-dimensional numerical flow model (described in HAMILTON, 1990) suggest that the changes in morphology and riverflow have reduced mixing, increased stratification, altered the response to fortnightly (neap-spring) changes in tidal forcing, and decreased the

  11. History of Science in the Physics Curriculum: A Directed Content Analysis of Historical Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, Hayati; Guney, Burcu G.

    2012-05-01

    Although history of science is a potential resource for instructional materials, teachers do not have a tendency to use historical materials in their lessons. Studies showed that instructional materials should be adaptable and consistent with curriculum. This study purports to examine the alignment between history of science and the curriculum in the light of the facilitator model on the use of history of science in science teaching, and to expose possible difficulties in preparing historical materials. For this purpose, qualitative content analysis method was employed. Codes and themes were defined beforehand, with respect to levels and their sublevels of the model. The analysis revealed several problems with the alignment of historical sources for the physics curriculum: limited information about scientists' personal lives, the difficulty of linking with content knowledge, the lack of emphasis on scientific process in the physics curriculum, differences between chronology and sequence of topics, the lack of information about scientists' reasoning. Based on the findings of the analysis, it would be difficult to use original historical sources; educators were needed to simplify historical knowledge within a pedagogical perspective. There is a need for historical sources, like Harvard Case Histories in Experimental Science, since appropriate historical information to the curriculum objectives can only be obtained by simplifying complex information at the origin. The curriculum should leave opportunities for educators interested in history of science, even historical sources provides legitimate amount of information for every concepts in the curriculum.

  12. History of Science in Science Education: Development and Validation of a Checklist for Analysing the Historical Content of Science Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Laurinda

    2002-01-01

    Presents a theoretically grounded checklist developed for analyzing the historical content of science textbooks. Results of the analysis indicate that the checklist is able to reveal differences among textbooks. (Contains 65 references.) (DDR)

  13. Historic land use influences contemporary establishment of invasive plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, W Brett; Orrock, John L

    2013-08-01

    The legacy of agricultural land use can have widespread and persistent effects on contemporary landscapes. Although agriculture can lead to persistent changes in soil characteristics and plant communities, it remains unclear whether historic agricultural land use can alter the likelihood of contemporary biological invasions. To understand how agricultural land-use history might interact with well-known drivers of invasion, we conducted factorial manipulations of soil disturbance and resource additions within non-agricultural remnant sites and post-agricultural sites invaded by two non-native Lespedeza species. Our results reveal that variation in invader success can depend on the interplay of historic land use and contemporary processes: for both Lespedeza species, establishment was greater in remnant sites, but soil disturbance enhanced establishment irrespective of land-use history, demonstrating that contemporary processes can help to overcome legacy constraints on invader success. In contrast, additions of resources known to facilitate seedling recruitment (N and water) reduced invader establishment in post-agricultural but not in remnant sites, providing evidence that interactions between historic and contemporary processes can also limit invader success. Our findings thus illustrate that a consideration of historic land use may help to clarify the often contingent responses of invasive plants to known determinants of invasibility. Moreover, in finding significantly greater soil compaction at post-agricultural sites, our study provides a putative mechanism for historic land-use effects on contemporary invasive plant establishment. Our work suggests that an understanding of invasion dynamics requires knowledge of anthropogenic events that often occur decades before the introduction of invasive propagules.

  14. Global imprint of historical connectivity on freshwater fish biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Murilo S; Oberdorff, Thierry; Hugueny, Bernard; Leprieur, Fabien; Jézéquel, Céline; Cornu, Jean-François; Brosse, Sébastien; Grenouillet, Gael; Tedesco, Pablo A

    2014-09-01

    The relative importance of contemporary and historical processes is central for understanding biodiversity patterns. While several studies show that past conditions can partly explain the current biodiversity patterns, the role of history remains elusive. We reconstructed palaeo-drainage basins under lower sea level conditions (Last Glacial Maximum) to test whether the historical connectivity between basins left an imprint on the global patterns of freshwater fish biodiversity. After controlling for contemporary and past environmental conditions, we found that palaeo-connected basins displayed greater species richness but lower levels of endemism and beta diversity than did palaeo-disconnected basins. Palaeo-connected basins exhibited shallower distance decay of compositional similarity, suggesting that palaeo-river connections favoured the exchange of fish species. Finally, we found that a longer period of palaeo-connection resulted in lower levels of beta diversity. These findings reveal the first unambiguous results of the role played by history in explaining the global contemporary patterns of biodiversity.

  15. Democracy is a historical urgency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synek, Miroslav

    2015-03-01

    Survival of humanity, on this planet, may depend, heavily, on coping with advancing technology of nuclear missiles. Let us consider critical alternatives of powerful governments: democracy, as an alternative to dictatorship. Democracy is based on free elections, as a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Democracy is a historical urgency, in the age of inter-continental nuclear missiles, computerized on a push-button, conceivably controllable by a very powerful, miscalculating and/or insane, dictator, capable of producing global nuclear holocaust, on our entire planet. Diplomacy, together with supporting activities, should be utilized, to help, in important steps, at this time, for achieving democracy in critical areas.

  16. Systematic musicology meets historical musicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Chr.

    PVI while stress-timed languages like German have higher nPVI. Recent analyses of historical developments have ascribed linearly increasing nPVI in Austro-German, but not Italian music to waning Italian and increasing German influence on Austro-German music after the Baroque (Daniele & Patel, 2013). This is...... on documented increasing German influence on French music after the Baroque and reported decreasing nPVI in French vocal music composed in 1840-1900 (VanHandel, 2005). This prediction necessitates polynomial modelling. Aims. We aim to replicate, refine and extend previous findings by including French composers......Background. Research has used the normalised Pairwise Variability Index (nPVI) to examine relationships between musical rhythm and durational variability in composers’ native languages (Patel & Daniele, 2003a, 2003b; Huron & Ollen, 2003). Syllable-timed languages like Italian and French have low n...

  17. Critical perspectives on historical collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Karl W; Endfield, Georgina H

    2012-03-06

    Historical collapse of ancient states or civilizations has raised new awareness about its possible relevance to current issues of sustainability, in the context of global change. This Special Feature examines 12 case studies of societies under stress, of which seven suffered severe transformation. Outcomes were complex and unpredictable. Five others overcame breakdown through environmental, political, or socio-cultural resilience, which deserves as much attention as the identification of stressors. Response to environmental crises of the last millennium varied greatly according to place and time but drew from traditional knowledge to evaluate new information or experiment with increasing flexibility, even if modernization or intensification were decentralized and protracted. Longer-term diachronic experience offers insight into how societies have dealt with acute stress, a more instructive perspective for the future than is offered by apocalyptic scenarios.

  18. Piezoelectric Transformers: An Historical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Vazquez Carazo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric transformers (PTs are solid-state devices that transform electrical energy into electrical energy by means of a mechanical vibration. These devices are manufactured using piezoelectric materials that are driven at resonance. With appropriate design and circuitry, it is possible to step up and step down the voltages between the input and output sections of the piezoelectric transformer, without making use of magnetic materials and obtaining excellent conversion efficiencies. The initial concept of a piezoelectric ceramic transformer was proposed by Charles A. Rosen in 1954. Since then, the evolution of piezoelectric transformers through history has been linked to the relevant work of some excellent researchers as well as to the evolution in materials, manufacturing processes, and driving circuit techniques. This paper summarizes the historical evolution of the technology.

  19. Historical Evolution of Spatial Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ardila

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical evolution and cross-cultural differences in spatial abilities are analyzed. Spatial abilities have been found to be significantly associated with the complexity of geographical conditions and survival demands. Although impaired spatial cognition is found in cases of, exclusively or predominantly, right hemisphere pathology, it is proposed that this asymmetry may depend on the degree of training in spatial abilities. It is further proposed that spatial cognition might have evolved in a parallel way with cultural evolution and environmental demands. Contemporary city humans might be using spatial abilities in some new, conceptual tasks that did not exist in prehistoric times: mathematics, reading, writing, mechanics, music, etc. Cross-cultural analysis of spatial abilities in different human groups, normalization of neuropsychological testing instruments, and clinical observations of spatial ability disturbances in people with different cultural backgrounds and various spatial requirements, are required to construct a neuropsychological theory of brain organization of spatial cognition.

  20. Training Analysis: A Historical View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Sarracino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The obligatory nature of training analysis, i.e. of the personal analysis of every candidate analyst, was adopted by all psychoanalytic institutes in Freud’s lifetime. But what had initially been a not particularly burdensome addition to training was subsequently transformed into something quite different. Years of analysis: hundreds of hours at vast expense to the candidate, in the face of a basic unconcern on the part of the schools about undertaking empirical studies or even just examining more closely the theoretical justification (apart from the constantly reasserted need for completeness for such a commitment. The considerable resistance to questioning this practice goes hand in hand with the persistent circulation of a series of legends about its origin. An accurate historical review should offer interesting matter for consideration, showing how the custom of requiring training analysis is underpinned by reasons of an institutional nature rather than by theoretical necessity or empirical findings.

  1. Statics of historic masonry constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2016-01-01

    This successful book, which is now appearing in its second edition, presents a comprehensive new Statics of Masonry Constructions. Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments in its architectural heritage. Given the age of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant. The book you hold in hands contributes to fill this demand. The second edition integrates the original text of the first edition with new developments, widening and revisions, due to recent research studies achievements. The result is a book that gives a complete picture of the behaviour of the Masonry Constructions. First of all, it gives the fundamentals of its Statics, based on the no-tension assumption, and then it develops the Limit Analysis for the Masonry Constructions. In this framework, through an interdisciplinary approach combining Engineering and Architecture, the book also investigates the sta...

  2. Historical Techniques of Lie Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Vicianova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Since time immemorial, lying has been a part of everyday life. For this reason, it has become a subject of interest in several disciplines, including psychology. The purpose of this article is to provide a general overview of the literature and thinking to date about the evolution of lie detection techniques. The first part explores ancient methods recorded circa 1000 B.C. (e.g., God’s judgment in Europe. The second part describes technical methods based on sciences such as phrenology, polygraph and graphology. This is followed by an outline of more modern-day approaches such as FACS (Facial Action Coding System, functional MRI, and Brain Fingerprinting. Finally, after the familiarization with the historical development of techniques for lie detection, we discuss the scope for new initiatives not only in the area of designing new methods, but also for the research into lie detection itself, such as its motives and regulatory issues related to deception.

  3. Location of Historical Buildings (points) at Fort Davis National Historic Site, Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is a point shapefile showing where historic buildings were located at Fort Davis National Historic Site. The remnants or foundations of these buildings where...

  4. 75 FR 15724 - National Register of Historic Places; Weekly Listing of Historic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... National Park Service National Register of Historic Places; Weekly Listing of Historic Properties Pursuant... eligible for listing in, the National Register of Historic Places from January 11 to January 15, 2010. For... Blue Mouse Theatre, 2611 N. Proctor St., Tacoma, 09001235, LISTED, 1/13/10 (Movie Theaters...

  5. Historical Studies of Social Mobility and Stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, Marco H.D. van; Maas, Ineke

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses historical studies of social mobility and stratification. The focus is on changes in social inequality and mobility in past societies and their determinants. It discusses major historical sources, approaches, and results in the fields of social stratification (ranks and classes

  6. SUMMARY OF THE HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT AND LEASING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prudnikova A. E.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the historical analysis of the development and nature of a lease. The article has marked the features of the each stage of the historical development of the institution of leasing and its emergence in the Russian Federation

  7. Historical Fiction: Teaching Tool or Literary Experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Cathy; Nelson-Faulkner, Shari; Pierce, Kathryn Mitchell

    2000-01-01

    Looks at the characteristics of outstanding historical fiction including its literary qualities and criteria associated with authenticity. Discusses how teachers invite readers to approach their experiences with these novels. Looks at the role of historical fiction in today's classrooms. Presents brief annotations of 25 outstanding works of…

  8. The Statement: Foundation of Foucault's Historical Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Carole

    1987-01-01

    Presents an overview of Michel Foucault's approach to the study of historical systems of thought, arguing that Foucault's view of historical criticism and language-in-use have much to offer rhetorical theory and criticism. Discusses the nature of discourse for Foucault and examines the characteristics of the fundamental discursive datum, the…

  9. Introduction : The Metaphor of Historical Distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Hollander, Jaap; Paul, Herman; Peters, Rik

    2011-01-01

    What does "historical distance" mean? Starting with Johan Huizinga, the famous Dutch historian who refused to lecture on contemporary history, this introductory article argues that "historical distance" is a metaphor used in a variety of intellectual contexts. Accordingly, the metaphor has ontologic

  10. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection…

  11. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-03-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection processes.

  12. Negotiating the Process of Historical Empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endacott, Jason L.

    2014-01-01

    Historical empathy scholarship has evolved to the point where further progress necessitates empirical examinations from a variety of perspectives. Prior studies on historical empathy have largely focused on teachers' pedagogical approach and student outcomes. This qualitative study focuses on students as they engage in the process of…

  13. 36 CFR 910.32 - Historic preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE.... Rehabilitation of buildings within the Development Area, which, according to the Plan and the Historic... with the Secretary of the Interior's “Standards for Historic Preservation Projects”: (36 CFR part...

  14. Historical Overview of Nonstandard Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Pamela

    This review of nonstandard treatments as they relate to individuals with mental retardation reveals attempts to increase intelligence and make individuals "normal." Covering the early 1930s through the present, the review addresses: cell therapy, electric shock, behavior modification, vitamin B-6 therapy, Doman-Delacato treatment,…

  15. Historical characterization of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eboli, Paula; Stone, James L; Aydin, Sabri; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2009-06-01

    TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA IS a well known clinical entity characterized by agonizing, paroxysmal, and lancinating facial pain, often triggered by movements of the mouth or eating. Historical reviews of facial pain have attempted to describe this severe pain over the past 2.5 millennia. The ancient Greek physicians Hippocrates, Aretaeus, and Galen, described kephalalgias, but their accounts were vague and did not clearly correspond with what we now term trigeminal neuralgia. The first adequate description of trigeminal neuralgia was given in 1671, followed by a fuller description by physician John Locke in 1677. André described the convulsive-like condition in 1756, and named it tic douloureux; in 1773, Fothergill described it as "a painful affection of the face;" and in 1779, John Hunter more clearly characterized the entity as a form of "nervous disorder" with reference to pain of the teeth, gums, or tongue where the disease "does not reside." One hundred fifty years later, the neurological surgeon Walter Dandy equated neurovascular compression of the trigeminal nerve with trigeminal neuralgia.

  16. Historical Drawbacks of Limited Liability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Boyle

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Limited liability is a human invention which has facilitated enormous economic growth around the world, particularly since the time of its general application in advanced countries during the nineteenth century. The individual legal identity of companies, coupled with the limited liability of their owners, has provided protection for investors from the risks associated with their investments. It has thus contributed to increase the sources of capital available to finance projects which might otherwise have been considered unviable. However, the legal protection offered to investors has negative consequences for other participants in economies. Speculation in stock markets often damages society. It is very important to study the drawbacks of limited liability and to suggest modifications to achieve a more stable, less volatile, economic growth in the world. Although this article goes to some lengths to recognise the work of authors who emphasise the positive historical economic contribution of limited lability, its main objective is to provoke a reflection around texts which point out the drawbacks and propose solutions.

  17. Historical aspects of Mexican psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayardo, Sergio Javier Villaseñor

    2016-04-01

    Mexican psychiatry initiated since pre-Hispanic times. Historically, treatments were a mixture of magic, science and religion. Ancient Nahuas had their own medical concepts with a holistic view of medicine, considering men and cosmos as a whole. The first psychiatric hospital appeared in 1566 and a more modern psychiatric asylum emerged until 1910. International exchanges of theoretical approaches started in the National University with the visit of Pierre Janet. There were other important figures that influenced Mexican psychiatry, such as Erich Fromm, Henri Ey, Jean Garrabé and Yves Thoret. Regarding Mexican psychiatrists, some of the most important contributors to Mexican psychiatry were José Luis Patiño Rojas, Manuel Guevara Oropeza and Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz. This article includes excerpts from "Clinical Psychiatry", a book by Patiño Rojas where he tries to understand and describe the inner world experienced by patients with schizophrenia; also, the thesis conducted by Guevara Oropeza ("Psychoanalisis"), which is a critical comparison between the theories of Janet and Freud. Finally, we include "The study of consciousness: current status" by Ramón de la Fuente, which leads us through the initial investigations concerning consciousness, its evolution, and the contributions made by psychology, philosophy and neurobiology.

  18. Historic physics reprints come home

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    In a surprise happy ending, six boxes of historic reprints have returned home to CERN - more than 30 years after they went missing! The 146 items had been part of the personal library of the Nobel prize-winning physicist, Wolfgang Pauli. After his death in 1958, Pauli's widow bequeathed his scientific legacy to CERN, and part of this valuable archival collection was stored in Salle Pauli, the room dedicated to his memory. In those trustful days the room was always left open so that Pauli's Library could be freely consulted; but then 170 preprints by Born, Bohr, Heisenberg and others - some with dedications to Pauli from the author - disappeared in 1972. Regretfully, the room was then locked. Use of the collection was henceforth ‘by appointment only', but it was assumed that the damage was done and the missing items had gone forever. However, in 2002 the CERN Archivist was surprised by a phone call from a representative of Christie's, New York, who explained that some reprints bearing the stamp of the CERN...

  19. Contemporary and historic factors influence differently genetic differentiation and diversity in a tropical palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Carvalho, C; Ribeiro, M C; Côrtes, M C; Galetti, M; Collevatti, R G

    2015-09-01

    Population genetics theory predicts loss in genetic variability because of drift and inbreeding in isolated plant populations; however, it has been argued that long-distance pollination and seed dispersal may be able to maintain gene flow, even in highly fragmented landscapes. We tested how historical effective population size, historical migration and contemporary landscape structure, such as forest cover, patch isolation and matrix resistance, affect genetic variability and differentiation of seedlings in a tropical palm (Euterpe edulis) in a human-modified rainforest. We sampled 16 sites within five landscapes in the Brazilian Atlantic forest and assessed genetic variability and differentiation using eight microsatellite loci. Using a model selection approach, none of the covariates explained the variation observed in inbreeding coefficients among populations. The variation in genetic diversity among sites was best explained by historical effective population size. Allelic richness was best explained by historical effective population size and matrix resistance, whereas genetic differentiation was explained by matrix resistance. Coalescence analysis revealed high historical migration between sites within landscapes and constant historical population sizes, showing that the genetic differentiation is most likely due to recent changes caused by habitat loss and fragmentation. Overall, recent landscape changes have a greater influence on among-population genetic variation than historical gene flow process. As immediate restoration actions in landscapes with low forest amount, the development of more permeable matrices to allow the movement of pollinators and seed dispersers may be an effective strategy to maintain microevolutionary processes.

  20. Spiral orbits and oscillations in historical evolution of empires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Taksu; Poghosyan, Sergey S.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce the concept of metaasabiya, the second non-material resource, to the asabiya theory of historical dynamics. We find that the resulting three variable dynamical system has peculiar features such as repelling or attracting axes and spiraling orbits in the phase space. Depending on the initial state, the system can go through series of oscillatory rises and falls, mimicking the geopolitical evolution of real-world polities. These distinctive features, absent in conventional Lotka-Volterra type biological systems, reveal the hidden richness inherent in the asabiya theory.

  1. The Blind Spot. Borderline Questions of Historical Semantics between Reinhart Koselleck and Niklas Luhmann

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Merlo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the wide critical reviews that the enterprise of Begriffsgeschichte has triggered, the difficult relationship that conceptual history – in its Koselleckian declination – entertains with systemic theory has remained maybe underexposed until now. Moving from the tension between experience and historicity in Koselleck, the article reflects on the tensions that the historical-conceptual structure reveals as soon as it comes into contact with the problems of historical semantics that accompany the Luhmannian attempt of operating, in the register of second order observation, a temporal dislocation and a de-paradoxification of the paradox activated by Derrida’s différance, as constitutive of historicity. The blind spot at the bottom of Luhmannian gaze cuts out the borders of the “history” continent along the lines of the shipwreck of the classic semantics of modernity.

  2. Pattern-oriented memory interpolation of sparse historical rainfall records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, J. P.; Cohen Liechti, T.; Portela, M. M.; Schleiss, A. J.

    2014-03-01

    The pattern-oriented memory (POM) is a novel historical rainfall interpolation method that explicitly takes into account the time dimension in order to interpolate areal rainfall maps. The method is based on the idea that rainfall patterns exist and can be identified over a certain area by means of non-linear regressions. Having been previously benchmarked with a vast array of interpolation methods using proxy satellite data under different time and space availabilities, in the scope of the present contribution POM is applied to rain gauge data in order to produce areal rainfall maps. Tested over the Zambezi River Basin for the period from 1979 to 1997 (accurate satellite rainfall estimates based on spaceborne instruments are not available for dates prior to 1998), the novel pattern-oriented memory historical interpolation method has revealed itself as a better alternative than Kriging or Inverse Distance Weighing in the light of a Monte Carlo cross-validation procedure. Superior in most metrics to the other tested interpolation methods, in terms of the Pearson correlation coefficient and bias the accuracy of POM's historical interpolation results are even comparable with that of recent satellite rainfall products. The new method holds the possibility of calculating detailed and performing daily areal rainfall estimates, even in the case of sparse rain gauging grids. Besides their performance, the similarity to satellite rainfall estimates inherent to POM interpolations can contribute to substantially extend the length of the rainfall series used in hydrological models and water availability studies in remote areas.

  3. Historical contingency and its biophysical basis in glucocorticoid receptor evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Michael J; Thornton, Joseph W

    2014-08-14

    Understanding how chance historical events shape evolutionary processes is a central goal of evolutionary biology. Direct insights into the extent and causes of evolutionary contingency have been limited to experimental systems, because it is difficult to know what happened in the deep past and to characterize other paths that evolution could have followed. Here we combine ancestral protein reconstruction, directed evolution and biophysical analysis to explore alternative 'might-have-been' trajectories during the ancient evolution of a novel protein function. We previously found that the evolution of cortisol specificity in the ancestral glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was contingent on permissive substitutions, which had no apparent effect on receptor function but were necessary for GR to tolerate the large-effect mutations that caused the shift in specificity. Here we show that alternative mutations that could have permitted the historical function-switching substitutions are extremely rare in the ensemble of genotypes accessible to the ancestral GR. In a library of thousands of variants of the ancestral protein, we recovered historical permissive substitutions but no alternative permissive genotypes. Using biophysical analysis, we found that permissive mutations must satisfy at least three physical requirements--they must stabilize specific local elements of the protein structure, maintain the correct energetic balance between functional conformations, and be compatible with the ancestral and derived structures--thus revealing why permissive mutations are rare. These findings demonstrate that GR evolution depended strongly on improbable, non-deterministic events, and this contingency arose from intrinsic biophysical properties of the protein.

  4. Implementing Solar PV Projects on Historic Buildings and in Historic Districts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Walker, A.; Buddenborg, J; Lindberg, J.

    2011-09-01

    Many municipalities, particularly in older communities of the United States, have a large amount of historic buildings and districts. In addition to preserving these historic assets, many municipalities have goals or legislative requirements to procure a certain amount of energy from renewable sources and to become more efficient in their energy use; often, these requirements do not exempt historic buildings. This paper details findings from a workshop held in Denver, Colorado, in June 2010 that brought together stakeholders from both the solar and historic preservation industries. Based on these findings, this paper identifies challenges and recommends solutions for developing solar photovoltaic (PV) projects on historic buildings and in historic districts in such a way as to not affect the characteristics that make a building eligible for historic status.

  5. Development of a Global Historic Monthly Mean Precipitation Dataset

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨溯; 徐文慧; 许艳; 李庆祥

    2016-01-01

    other datasets. Using the Penalized Maximal t-test method, significant inhomogeneity has been detected in historic precipitation datasets at 340 stations. The ratio method is then employed to effectively remove these remarkable change points. Global precipitation analysis based on CGP v1.0 shows that rainfall has been increasing during 1901–2013 with an increasing rate of 3.52 ± 0.5 mm (10 yr)−1, slightly higher than that in the NCDC data. Analysis also reveals distinguished long-term changing trends at different latitude zones.

  6. Development of a global historic monthly mean precipitation dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su; Xu, Wenhui; Xu, Yan; Li, Qingxiang

    2016-04-01

    other datasets. Using the Penalized Maximal t-test method, significant inhomogeneity has been detected in historic precipitation datasets at 340 stations. The ratio method is then employed to effectively remove these remarkable change points. Global precipitation analysis based on CGP v1.0 shows that rainfall has been increasing during 1901-2013 with an increasing rate of 3.52 ± 0.5 mm (10 yr)-1, slightly higher than that in the NCDC data. Analysis also reveals distinguished long-term changing trends at different latitude zones.

  7. Dead sea asphalts: historical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissenbaum, A.

    1978-05-01

    Asphalts are present in the Dead Sea basin in three forms: (1) huge blocks, up to 100 tons in weight, composed of extremely pure (>99.99%) solid asphalt occasionally found floating on the lake, (2) veins, seepages, and cavity and fissure fillings in Lower Cretaceous to Holocene rocks, and (3) ozocerite veins on the eastern shore of the lake. Dead Sea asphalts probably have been documented over a longer period of time than any other hydrocarbon deposit--from antiquity to the 19th century. Major uses of asphalt from the Dead Sea have been as an ingredient in the embalming process, for medicinal purposes, for fumigation, and for agriculture. The first known war for control of a hydrocarbon deposit was in the Dead Sea area in 312 B.C. between the Seleucid Syrians and the Nabatean Arabs who lived around the lake. Surface manifestations of asphalt are linked closely to tectonic activity. In the lake itself, the asphalt is associated with diapirs During certain historic periods, tectonic and diapiric activity caused frequent liberation to the Dead Sea surface of semiliquid asphalt associated with large amounts of hydrogen sulfide gas. When the tectonic activity was attenuated, as in the 19th and 20th centuries, the rate of asphalt seepage to the bottom sediments of the Dead Sea was much slower and the asphalt solidified on the lake bottom. The release of asphalt to the surface became much more sporadic, and may have resulted in part from earthquakes. Thus, future asphalt prospecting in the Dead Sea area should be conducted along the boundaries of diapirs or their associated faults.

  8. Characterization of historical mortars in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Heras, M.; Arce, I.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the petrographic and mineralogical characterization of mortars from different archaeological sites in Jordan which encompass Nabatean, Late-Antique and Early Islamic (Umayyad) sites, in some cases offering a sequence of different period mortars from the same building. These sites include the Nabataean city of Petra, the Late Antique town of Umm al Jimal and the castle of Qasr Al Hallabat. These mortars were produced with different raw materials and manufacturing technologies, which are reflected on distinctive variations of mineralogy, texture and crystal size and aggregates composition (including volcanic ashes, ceramic fragments, burnt organic material) size and their puzzolanic properties. As a consequence these mortars present different physical properties and reveal nowadays very different states of conservation. There is a dramatic change in mortar properties between those manufactured in pre-Islamic period and those from early Islamic - Ummayad times with a general trend in which these last ones present coarser crystal and aggregate sizes with less puzzolanic aggregates that result in less durable mortars. All of this reflects changes in the different stages of production of the mortar, from the use of either hydraulic, lime putty or slaked lime and the selection of aggregates to the application techniques (polishing). This reflects the evolution of building technology that took place in this area during early Islamic period and how petrological information can shed light on historical interpretation of building technologies. Research funded by AECID (PCI A/032184/10), GEOMATERIALES (S2009/MAT-16) and MCU (Analisis y Documentación de tipología arquitectónica y técnicas constructivas en el periodo de transición Bizantino-Omeya en Jordania)

  9. Historical tradition in Serbian genre literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses two Serbian science-fiction stories with a special emphasis on the motives in their narrative structure; the motive analysis is focused on those motives that represent a transposition of 'historical tradition' elements. The key words connecting images appearing in this context are: fear of losing (national identity and a strategy of resistance towards those, who presumably, want to 'take over' the identity. In this sense, a return to 'the historical tradition', in the analyzed texts, aims to reassess certain past models indicating at the same time those that have successfully served and endured as historical models in this discourse.

  10. Teaching Historical Contextualization : The Construction of an Observational Instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, Tim; van de Grift, Wim; van Boxtel, Carla; Holthuis, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This study chronicles the development an observational instrument to assess teacher competencies in stimulating historical contextualization. Based on previous historical contextualization research, we extracted observable items related to the development of historical contextualization in classroom

  11. Recreating the Past: Historical Fiction in the Social Studies Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Evelyn B.; Levstik, Linda

    1988-01-01

    Explores use of historical fiction in elementary social studies curriculum. Examines the value of historical fiction for children and social studies goals it supports. Offers suggestions for using historical fiction in primary and intermediate grades and recommends specific books. (RWB)

  12. Historical development of origins research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    Following the publication of the Origin of Species in 1859, many naturalists adopted the idea that living organisms were the historical outcome of gradual transformation of lifeless matter. These views soon merged with the developments of biochemistry and cell biology and led to proposals in which the origin of protoplasm was equated with the origin of life. The heterotrophic origin of life proposed by Oparin and Haldane in the 1920s was part of this tradition, which Oparin enriched by transforming the discussion of the emergence of the first cells into a workable multidisciplinary research program. On the other hand, the scientific trend toward understanding biological phenomena at the molecular level led authors like Troland, Muller, and others to propose that single molecules or viruses represented primordial living systems. The contrast between these opposing views on the origin of life represents not only contrasting views of the nature of life itself, but also major ideological discussions that reached a surprising intensity in the years following Stanley Miller's seminal result which showed the ease with which organic compounds of biochemical significance could be synthesized under putative primitive conditions. In fact, during the years following the Miller experiment, attempts to understand the origin of life were strongly influenced by research on DNA replication and protein biosynthesis, and, in socio-political terms, by the atmosphere created by Cold War tensions. The catalytic versatility of RNA molecules clearly merits a critical reappraisal of Muller's viewpoint. However, the discovery of ribozymes does not imply that autocatalytic nucleic acid molecules ready to be used as primordial genes were floating in the primitive oceans, or that the RNA world emerged completely assembled from simple precursors present in the prebiotic soup. The evidence supporting the presence of a wide range of organic molecules on the primitive Earth, including membrane

  13. Historical change and evolutionary theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Roger D

    2007-09-01

    Despite advances in fields like genetics, evolutionary psychology, and human behavior and evolution--which generally focus on individual or small group behavior from a biological perspective--evolutionary biology has made little impact on studies of political change and social history. Theories of natural selection often seem inapplicable to human history because our social behavior is embedded in language (which makes possible the concepts of time and social identity on which what we call "history" depends). Peter Corning's Holistic Darwinism reconceptualizes evolutionary biology, making it possible to go beyond the barriers separating the social and natural sciences. Corning focuses on two primary processes: "synergy" (complex multivariate interactions at multiple levels between a species and its environment) and "cybernetics" (the information systems permitting communication between individuals and groups over time). Combining this frame of reference with inclusive fitness theory, it is possible to answer the most important (and puzzling) question in human history: How did a species that lived for millennia in hunter-gatherer bands form centralized states governing large populations of non-kin (including multi-ethnic empires as well as modern nation-states)? The fragility and contemporary ethnic violence in Kenya and the Congo should suffice as evidence that these issues need to be taken seriously. To explain the rise and fall of states as well as changes in human laws and customs--the core of historical research--it is essential to show how the provision of collective goods can overcome the challenge of self-interest and free-riding in some instances, yet fail to do so in others. To this end, it is now possible to consider how a state providing public goods can--under circumstances that often include effective leadership--contribute to enhanced inclusive fitness of virtually all its members. Because social behavior needs to adapt to ecology, but ecological

  14. Creative Heritage of S. N. Semanov as a Historical Source on the Political History USSR of the 1970th – the 1980th

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Kudrina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In work is considered various works of the prominent Soviet writer and journalist, the convinced Russian national patriot as a historical source. There are revealed the reason of the importance of memoirs and reflections of public figures of the late Soviet era as historical sources. The most significant aspects of a creative heritage of S.N. Semanov for modern historians are defined. The important historical events which found reflections in S. N. Semanov's works are specified.

  15. Historical Aspects in Tolerance Phenomenon Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janat A. Karmanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the historical aspect of the tolerance phenomenon research, particularly the study of tolerance in the age of Antiquity, Middle Ages, New Times, Enlightenment. It is remarkable that the problem of tolerance, emerged in Western civilization on religious grounds, laid the foundation for all other freedoms, attained in many countries. Besides, the article attaches special attention to the researchers of the East, such as Abu Nasr al-Farabi, Khoja Ahmed Yasawi, studies the historical aspect of works by Kazakhstan thinkers A. Kunanbayev, C. Valikhanova, K.B. Zharikbayev, S.K. Kaliyev, A.N. Nysanbayev, A.I. Artemev and others. The analysis of historical research of the tolerance phenomenon brings the author to the conclusion that religious freedom was the starting point for the emergence of new areas of tolerance display. The content of this phenomenon changed according to the historical peculiarities of the societies’ development

  16. Alaska Federal Oil and Gas Historical Leases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the outlines for historic (i.e., relinquished or inactive) federal oil and gas leases in the Alaska OCS Region through sale 193. They...

  17. US Forest Service LANDFIRE Historical Fire Regimes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — Historical fire regimes, intervals, and vegetation conditions are mapped using the Vegetation Dynamics Development Tool (VDDT). These data support fire and landscape...

  18. Digitized Historical Geomagnetic Publications in PDF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A catalog of 732 historical geomagnetic publications that were at risk of loss have been digitized and converted in pdf documents.

  19. Historical Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Historical Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory contains measured and estimated data on ambient air pollution for use in assessing air quality, assisting in...

  20. Special Stamps:Historical Relic Beacons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In May 2002, the State Postal Bureau issued a set of five stamps picturing historical relic beacons. They are the Mao Beacon, the Jiangxinyu Twin Beacon, the Huaniaoshan Beacon, the Laotieshan Beacon, and

  1. Electric Vehicles--A Historical Snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Most people don't realize that the history of electric vehicles (EVs) predates the Civil War. This article provides a historical snapshot of EVs to spark the interest of both teachers and students in this important transportation technology.

  2. Historical Tsunami Event Locations with Runups

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Global Historical Tsunami Database provides information on over 2,400 tsunamis from 2100 BC to the present in the the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans; and...

  3. Historical aspects of heavy ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents historical developments of heavy-ion radiotherapy including discussion of HILAC and HIMAC and discussion of cooperation between Japan and the United States, along with personal reflections.

  4. An Historical Perspective on Collaborative Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillet, Lynee Lewis

    1994-01-01

    Presents a historical study of the contribution of George Jardine to the field of composition. Considers why Jardine has been omitted from histories of writing instruction. Outlines Jardine's plan for using collaborative learning and peer editing in the classroom. (HB)

  5. Historical records of 'plum rains' since 1736

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ To have a better understanding of current global climate change,some researchers turn to historical records to reconstruct climate history over past few centuries.A research team headed by Prof.GE Quansheng with the CAS Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research has made encouraging progress in this aspect by using historical documents of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911).They have been successful in reconstructing a record of the duration and intensity of Meiyu.

  6. The essence and historical genesis of public-private partnership in the tourism sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajkova Anastasija Ivanovna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In article historical stages of emergence and state-private partnership (SPP development as tool of the public relations are investigated, the main lines of process of its formation are revealed, potential subjects of business - "participants of SPP" in economic system "tourism" are considered.

  7. Dialogue--Missing in Action Competence: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Approach in a Botswana School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silo, Nthalivi

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth case study on children's participation in environmental management activities in a primary school in Botswana was undertaken, drawing on cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) and the action competence model. This research revealed that due to a lack of dialogue between teachers and children, teachers tended to view children's…

  8. How science maps reveal knowledge transfer: new measurement for a historical case

    CERN Document Server

    Soós, Sándor

    2014-01-01

    Modelling actors of science via science (overlay) maps has recently become a popular practice in Interdisciplinarity Research (IDR). The benefits of this toolkit have also been recognized for other areas of scientometrics, such as the study of science dynamics. In this paper we propose novel methods of measuring knowledge diffusion/integration based on previous applications of the overlay methodology. New indices called Mean Overlay Distance and Overlay Diversity Ratio, respectively, are being drawn from previous uses of the Stirling index as the main proxy for knowledge diversification. We demonstrate the added value of this proposal via a case study addressing the development of a rather complex discourse in biology, usually referred to as the Species Problem. The selected topic is known for a history connecting various research fields and traditions, being, therefore, both an ideal and challenging case for the study of knowledge diffusion.

  9. Herbarium specimens reveal a historical shift in phylogeographic structure of common ragweed during native range disturbance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Michael David; Zimmer, Elizabeth A.; Olsen, Morten Tange;

    2014-01-01

    expanded rapidly as settlers deforested the landscape on a massive scale, later becoming an aggressive invasive with populations established globally. Towards a direct comparison of genetic structure now and during intense anthropogenic disturbance of the late 19th century, we sampled 45 natural...

  10. Archival search for historical atypical scrapie in sheep reveals evidence for mixed infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Angela; Kennedy, Iain; Goldmann, Wilfred; Green, Andrew; González, Lorenzo; Jeffrey, Martin; Hunter, Nora

    2015-10-01

    Natural scrapie in sheep occurs in classical and atypical forms, which may be distinguished on the basis of the associated neuropathology and properties of the disease-associated prion protein on Western blots. First detected in 1998, atypical scrapie is known to have occurred in UK sheep since the 1980s. However, its aetiology remains unclear and it is often considered as a sporadic, non-contagious disease unlike classical scrapie which is naturally transmissible. Although atypical scrapie tends to occur in sheep of prion protein (PRNP) genotypes that are different from those found predominantly in classical scrapie, there is some overlap so that there are genotypes in which both scrapie forms can occur. In this search for early atypical scrapie cases, we made use of an archive of fixed and frozen sheep samples, from both scrapie-affected and healthy animals (∼1850 individuals), dating back to the 1960s. Using a selection process based primarily on PRNP genotyping, but also on contemporaneous records of unusual clinical signs or pathology, candidate sheep samples were screened by Western blot, immunohistochemistry and strain-typing methods using tg338 mice. We identified, from early time points in the archive, three atypical scrapie cases, including one sheep which died in 1972 and two which showed evidence of mixed infection with classical scrapie. Cases with both forms of scrapie in the same animal as recognizable entities suggest that mixed infections have been around for a long time and may potentially contribute to the variety of scrapie strains.

  11. Genomics reveals historic and contemporary transmission dynamics of a bacterial disease among wildlife and livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Pauline L.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Drees, Kevin P.; Luikart, Gordon; Quance, Christine; Anderson, Neil J.; Clarke, P. Ryan; Cole, Eric K.; Drew, Mark L.; Edwards, William H.; Rhyan, Jack C.; Treanor, John J.; Wallen, Rick L.; White, Patrick J.; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Cross, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing has provided fundamental insights into infectious disease epidemiology, but has rarely been used for examining transmission dynamics of a bacterial pathogen in wildlife. In the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), outbreaks of brucellosis have increased in cattle along with rising seroprevalence in elk. Here we use a genomic approach to examine Brucella abortus evolution, cross-species transmission and spatial spread in the GYE. We find that brucellosis was introduced into wildlife in this region at least five times. The diffusion rate varies among Brucella lineages (B3 to 8 km per year) and over time. We also estimate 12 host transitions from bison to elk, and 5 from elk to bison. Our results support the notion that free-ranging elk are currently a self-sustaining brucellosis reservoir and the source of livestock infections, and that control measures in bison are unlikely to affect the dynamics of unrelated strains circulating in nearby elk populations.

  12. Population genetic structure and historical demography of Oratosquilla oratoria revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D; Ding, Ge; Ge, B; Zhang, H; Tang, B

    2012-12-01

    Genetic diversity, population genetic structure and molecular phylogeographic pattern of mantis shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria in Bohai Sea and South China Sea were analyzed by mitochondrial DNA sequences. Nucleotide and haplotype diversities were 0.00409-0.00669 and 0.894-0.953 respectively. Neighbor-Joining phylogenetic tree clustered two distinct lineages. Both phylogenetic tree and median-joining network showed the consistent genetic structure corresponding to geographical distribution. Mismatch distributions, negative neutral test and "star-like" network supported a sudden population expansion event. And the time was estimated about 44000 and 50000 years ago.

  13. Heat reveals faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinreich, Bernhard [Solarschmiede GmbH, Muenchen (Germany). Engineering Dept.

    2010-07-01

    Gremlins cannot hide from the all-revealing view of a thermographic camera, whereby it makes no difference whether it is a roof-mounted system or a megawatt-sized farm. Just as diverse are the range of faults that, with the growing level of expertise, can now be detected and differentiated with even greater detail. (orig.)

  14. Historic cities as important centres of development of historical-cultural tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr KROOL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The quality and availability of historic-cultural recreational resources in the cities of Volyn region are investigated. The attractiveness of historical cities for the development of regional tourism industry is analyzed.  Meanwhile, the most attention is paid to the number of historical anad cultural resources, its value and the status of preservation, transport communication, access to hotels and catering objects. The archeological monuments, architecture monuments, monuments of city-building and objects of monumental art seem to be the most valuable for the needs of tourism. Instead, the less valuable are historical monuments that are presented by the memorials and tombstones

  15. Historical Meadow Dynamics in Southwest British Columbia: a Multidisciplinary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Lepofsky

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent encroachment of woody species threatening many western North American meadows has been attributed to diverse factors. We used a suite of methods in Chittenden Meadow, southwestern British Columbia, Canada, to identify the human, ecological, and physical factors responsible for its historical dynamics and current encroachment by woody vegetation. We evaluated three hypotheses about the origin and processes maintaining the meadow: the meadow is (1 of recent human origin; (2 of ancient human origin, maintained by aboriginal burning; and (3 of ancient non-human origin, not maintained by aboriginal burning. Our data supported the idea that the meadow had ancient non-human origins and its recent history and current status have resulted from complex interactions among landform, climate, and fire. Soil properties (both horizonation and charcoal content indicate that the meadow is of ancient, non-human origin. Tree ages in the meadow and surrounding forest indicate that encroachment is recent, not related to a variety of recent human activities, and is probably a result of increasing spring temperature and decreasing spring snow depth. Although ethnographic surveys and historical documents revealed indigenous use of the general area over millennia, including the use of fire as a management tool, we found little direct evidence of indigenous use of the meadow. However, there was no proxy record of fire frequency in the meadow that we could have used to determine the role of fire in maintaining the meadow in the past, or the role of humans in igniting those fires. Thus, the historical role of humans in the maintenance of the meadow by prescribed fire remains indeterminate. Based on these conclusions, we combined hypotheses (2 and (3 into an a posteriori hypothesis that reflects changing interactions among people, fire, and climate over time. Without management intervention, we expect that tree encroachment will continue. Several general lessons

  16. Historical Museums in Israel: Semiotics of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Mayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tiny by physical size, the State of Israel retains some of the world’s most important cultural treasures, along with many other great cultural institutions. Archeological treasures have yielded much information as far as biblical history and have been well adapted to a Zionist narrative by both the Jewish press and international news organizations, such as the New York Times whose archives are replete with reports of Jewish history being dug up by the Jewish people. Once the State of Israel gained independence in 1948, the course was set for the development of historical museums whose discourse would reflect the most significant events in Jewish history, most especially the Holocaust and the state of constant warfare that continues to imbue the cultural consciousness of its citizens. In this paper we outline, through categorization, the various historical museums, which are currently operating. Furthermore, this article hopes to shed some light upon the cultural sensibilities conveyed through these institutions. This paper is about Israeli culture, mythology, and collective needs, as formed by and informed through a variety of historical museums. The working assumption is that in a historical museum culture is partially formed and at the same time the culture is influencing the contents and narratives on display inside the museum. It should be clear from the start that the discussion is held about Israeli museums as viewed by a Jewish population and created by and for Jews. Notwithstanding the multifaceted collective of Israeli society, this work is confined to and circumscribed by this demarcation. In the following sections, I intend to provide an explanation for this viewpoint from a historical perspective and also provide a framework of what constitutes a historical museum and justify the methodology of its employ. This will be followed by a discussion of the main categorical types of historical museums present in Israel, and finally a

  17. The Characteristics of Historic Urban Quarters in Ternate, Indonesia Based on Analysis of Urban Space and Architectural Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    マウラナ, イブラヒム; 金澤, 成保

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to reveal the characteristics of Ternate city's historic quarters that has started inhabited since the 17th century both architecturally and its built environment. Ternate city is located in the active volcano island, with an area of 111 Km2 leaving the historical quarter in the city center, which was originally formed as a result of trade and political relations between the Sultanate of Ternate and the Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC). The VOC monopoly that divided the...

  18. Perceived historical drinking norms and current drinking behavior: using the theory of normative social behavior as a framework for assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcioppolo, Nick; Jensen, Jakob D

    2012-01-01

    Social norms are sustained and disseminated, both implicitly and explicitly, through the act of communication. As a result, communication researchers have sought to classify and target normative perceptions to enact social change. In line with this research, the current study investigated whether perceptions of past normative behavior, referred to here as historical norms, were significantly related to current behavior. Using the theory of normative behavior as a guiding framework, two studies were conducted to assess whether college student drinking behavior was related to one of two perceived historical drinking norms measures: historical consumption norms (i.e., the perceived percentage of students who drank over time) and historical tradition norms (i.e., the perception of drinking as a university tradition). Study 1 revealed that although historical consumption norms was not directly related to drinking behavior, it moderated the effect of descriptive norms on drinking behavior (p = .03). A full assessment of the theory of normative social behavior was conducted in study 2 to determine whether perceived historical drinking norms influenced behavior above and beyond both descriptive and injunctive norms. Findings demonstrated that historical tradition norms were significantly related to drinking behavior (p = .001), and marginally moderated the relationship between descriptive norms and drinking behavior (p = .09). These findings offer preliminary evidence in support of measuring perceived historical drinking norms in future campaigns and interventions designed to reduce drinking behavior.

  19. Mobility and accessibility in historic cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana Carla; Paschoalin, Rachel Filgueiras; Castañon, José Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The historic cities of Brazil, despite its colonial structure, don't fail to go through transformations that affect contemporary cities, which is the main source of problems, leading to new approaches to urban issues such as mobility and accessibility. The uncontrolled growth of tourism in the historic cities can be considered as a big problem, because at the same time, they have committed to the conservation of its built heritage and demand control of the activities that occur in their areas without harm. Then, a permanent dialogue between conservatives and planners could be accomplished by joining the various sectoral policies. The study of urban mobility in historical sites was in fact the focus of this work because of their peculiarities, such as its specific characteristics of urban structure, morphology and occupation. In fact, the development of tourism in historic centers generates specific demands, such as adaptation to new uses of the houses, intensive movement of people and vehicles, illegal parking, among others. Beyond threatening the city preservation, does not provide mobility and accessibility to tourists, because these cities were not designed for the tourism conditions and needs of contemporary life. Characteristic features of Brazilian baroque cities, such as topography , the narrow streets, narrow or nonexistent sidewalks, steep turns and ramps strong, are not suitable for heavy vehicles, traffic and pedestrian circulation. Thus, studies concerning conservation urban integrated are aimed at an approach to interaction between historic preservation of the environment with the dynamic socio-economic of the local.

  20. Chandra Associates Pulsar and Historic Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have found new evidence that a pulsar in the constellation of Sagittarius was created when a massive star exploded, witnessed by Chinese astronomers in the year 386 AD. If confirmed, this will be only the second pulsar to be clearly associated with a historic event. These results were presented today by Victoria Kaspi and Mallory Roberts of McGill University at the American Astronomical Society meeting. Also participating in the research were Gautum Vasisht from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Eric Gotthelf from Columbia University, Michael Pivovaroff from Therma-Wave, Inc., and Nobuyuki Kawai from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan. The scientists used Chandra to locate the pulsar exactly at the geometric center of the supernova remnant known as G11.2-0.3. This location provides very strong evidence that the pulsar, a neutron star that is rotating 14 times a second, was formed in the supernova of 386 AD, and therefore has an age of 1615 years. "Determining the true ages of astronomical objects is notoriously difficult, and for this reason, historical records of supernovas are of great importance,"said Kaspi."In roughly the past 2,000 years, fewer than 10 reports of probable supernovae have been archived mostly by Asian astronomers. Of those handful, the remnant of 1054 AD, the Crab Nebula, was until now the only pulsar whose birth could be associated with a historic event - and, hence, the only neutron star that has a firm age." Between mid-April and mid-May in the year 386 AD, a young "guest star", presumably a supernova, was recorded by Chinese observers in the direction of the sky now known as the constellation of Sagittarius. In the 1970s, radio astronomers discovered an expanding nebula of gas and high-energy particles, called G11.2-0.3, that is believed to be the remnant of that explosion. In 1997, a team of X-ray astronomers used Japan’s ASCA satellite to discover a pulsar

  1. Teaching Historical Analysis and Thinking Using the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risinger, C. Frederick

    2008-01-01

    Historical thinking and historical analysis have become significant themes within the ranks of social studies educators. In this article, the author talks about the importance of teaching historical analysis and historical thinking using the Internet. He presents websites that both explain the two concepts and also provide lesson plans,…

  2. Rilem TC 203-RHM: Repair mortars for historic masonry. Requirements for repointing mortars for historic masonry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Groot, C.; Hughes, J.J.; Balen, K. van; Bicer-Simsir, B.; Binda, L.; Elsen, J.; Konow, T. von; Lindqvist, J.E.; Papayanni, I.; Subercaseaux, M.; Tedeschi, C.; Toumbakari, E.E.; Thompson, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives a summary of functional and performance requirements for repointing mortars for historic masonry (design, execution and maintenance). Successful performance of repair and conservation of mortar in historic masonry requires more care with design and execution than with modern masonry

  3. CURRENT STATE OF HISTORIC AND EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magsumov Timur Albertovich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the results of development of national historic and educational research at the turn of the XXth century; pinpoint obvious success and indicate problems and contradictory areas; give grounding to the development model of the XXth century Russian pedagogy; make suggestions on the strategy and tactics of further development of historic and educational science and suggest areas for further research. They are ‘new social history’ of education, professional education and teacher training, personified microhistory and history of local educational environment, genesis of didactic principles, ethno-pedagogy, country school, pedagogical diagnostics, Orthodox religious education, contemporary history of foreign pedagogy, pedagogical futurology. We prove the need in reassessment of certain studies’ viability. We draw the conclusion that historic and educational knowledge determines areas and instruments to understand the problems of educational issues, their roots and realize the existence of ways to solve them.

  4. The historical roots of psychoanalytic orthodoxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, M S

    1997-02-01

    The historical roots of psychoanalytic orthodoxy may now be examined because new hitherto unpublished sources on the history of psychoanalysis have become available. The early defections of Adler and Jung can be seen in a different light from that in Freud's (1914) history of psychoanalysis. The controversial discussions between Anna Freud and Melanie Klein can also yield new insights. In the author's view, the fact that the Kleinians were not expelled gave rise to a new type of creative analyst, that of the modifier. Modifiers complicate the task of psychoanalytic training, but they also keep psychoanalysis alive. Criticisms of psychoanalytic training are cited and the claim is made that psychoanalytic orthodoxy may have been necessary historically speaking, but it extracted a heavy toll. It no longer serves a useful purpose. A new historical approach is recommended. The author believes that understanding the history of psychoanalysis can contribute to tolerance between different psychoanalytic schools.

  5. VARIETIES OF SOCIAL DISCIPLINING, HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás A. Mantecón Movellán

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Historical thought has tended to explain social disciplining according to two main analytical perspectives: on one hand, German tradition about the so-called sozialdisziplinierung and, on the other hand, Foucault perspectives (focussed on disciplines practiced on the bodies-and/or-minds of people by the authorities. From these both viewpoints social disciplining was a dynamic ingredient of change, from traditional societies up to contemporary liberal societies; a machinery to provoke top-down changes (from above. On the bases of historical evidences, this research claims for a third viewpoint that stresses dynamics of social discipline and social disciplining from below; underlines the need of integrating this third perspective in the historical explanation of change in past societies throughout the analysis of social practices of everyday life; the values underneath them and, in the end, taking into account varieties of discipline and perspectives of social disciplining from below.

  6. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; /Marne la Vallee U.; Haddi, Amine; /Marne la Valle U.; Trocellier,; /Saclay; Curti, Enzo; /PSI, Villigen; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  7. Efficient Snapshot Retrieval over Historical Graph Data

    CERN Document Server

    Khurana, Udayan

    2012-01-01

    We address the problem of managing historical data for large evolving information networks like social networks or citation networks, with the goal to enable temporal and evolutionary queries and analysis. We present the design and architecture of a distributed graph database system that stores the entire history of a network and provides support for efficient retrieval of multiple graphs from arbitrary time points in the past, in addition to maintaining the current state for ongoing updates. Our system exposes a general programmatic API to process and analyze the retrieved snapshots. We introduce DeltaGraph, a novel, extensible, highly tunable, and distributed hierarchical index structure that enables compactly recording the historical information, and that supports efficient retrieval of historical graph snapshots for single-site or parallel processing. Along with the original graph data, DeltaGraph can also maintain and index auxiliary information; this functionality can be used to extend the structure to ...

  8. TypeScript revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Maharry, Dan

    2013-01-01

    TypeScript Revealed is a quick 100-page guide to Anders Hejlsberg's new take on JavaScript. With this brief, fast-paced introduction to TypeScript, .NET, Web and Windows 8 application developers who are already familiar with JavaScript will easily get up to speed with TypeScript and decide whether or not to start incorporating it into their own development. TypeScript is 'JavaScript for Application-scale development'; a superset of JavaScript that brings to it an additional object-oriented-like syntax familiar to .NET programmers that compiles down into simple, clean JavaScript that any browse

  9. Spaces of collaboration: The poetics of place and historical consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Lorna R. McLean; Pamela Rogers; Nichole E. Grant; Ashley Law; James Hunter

    2014-01-01

    The process of engaging students in the negotiation of their place in historical landscapes is vitalized through the development of historical consciousness as a pedagogical tool for instruction in social studies. This study uses student reflection collected from a graduate course to examine how historical consciousness is understood and expressed through experiential interaction with historical sites and the role of people, places, and historical events in the creation of social history. Th...

  10. Identification and classification of Serbia's historic floods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prohaska Stevan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available River flooding in Serbia is a natural phenomenon which largely exceeds the scope of water management and hydraulic engineering, and has considerable impact on the development of Serbian society. Today, the importance and value of areas threatened by floods are among the key considerations of sustainable development. As a result, flood protection techniques and procedures need to be continually refined and updated, following innovations in the fields of science and technology. Knowledge of high flows is key for sizing hydraulic structures and for gauging the cost-effectiveness and safety of the component structures of flood protection systems. However, sizing of hydraulic structures based on computed high flows does not ensure absolute safety; there is a residual flood risk and a risk of structural failure, if a flood exceeds computed levels. In hydrological practice, such floods are often referred to as historic/loads. The goal of this paper is to present a calculation procedure for the objective identification of historic floods, using long, multiple-year series of data on high flows of natural watercourses in Serbia. At its current stage of development, the calculation procedure is based on maximum annual discharges recorded at key monitoring stations of the Hydro-Meteorological Service of Serbia (HMS Serbia. When applied, the procedure results in the identification of specific historic maximum stages/floods (if any at all gauge sites included in the analysis. The probabilistic theory is then applied to assess the statistical significance of each identified historic flood and to classify the historic flood, as appropriate. At the end of the paper, the results of the applied methodology are shown in tabular and graphic form for various Serbian rivers. All identified historic floods are ranked based on their probability of occurrence (i.e., return period.

  11. Historical Network Analysis of the Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2013-01-01

    of the online web has for a number of years gained currency within Internet studies. However, the combination of these two phenomena—historical network analysis of material in web archives—can at best be characterized as an emerging new area of study. Most of the methodological challenges within this new area...... at the Danish parliamentary elections in 2011, 2007, and 2001. As the Internet grows older historical studies of networks on the web will probably become more widespread and therefore it may be about time to begin debating the methodological challenges within this emerging field....

  12. Introductory modern algebra a historical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Stahl, Saul

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition ""Stahl offers the solvability of equations from the historical point of view...one of the best books available to support a one-semester introduction to abstract algebra.""-CHOICE Introductory Modern Algebra: A Historical Approach, Second Edition presents the evolution of algebra and provides readers with the opportunity to view modern algebra as a consistent movement from concrete problems to abstract principles. With a few pertinent excerpts from the writings of some of the greatest mathematicians, the Second Edition uniquely facilitates the understanding of pi

  13. THE CONCEPTION CULTURAL-HISTORICAL OF LITERACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meire dos Santos Dangió

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article on screen calls into question the cultural-historical conception of literacy in order to point out the relationship between it and the psychic development process of individuals, arguing - in accordance with the theoretical assumptions of historical-cultural psychology, that literacy takes place within a broader process of cultural development and, consequently, a developmental education from an early age. Thus, we defend the thesis that the teacher literacy needs to know the internal connections between literacy, oral language development and the abstractive leap required for its conversion into written language.

  14. [Clinical cases and historical-medical didactics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Giuseppina Bock

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of remarkable documents dating back to the thirties and coming from the Policlinico Surgical Clinic of Milan, offers the possibility to be read in a historical clue too and to compare the constant discordances with the clinical contemporary practice. The aim is to point out the relationship between yesterday knowledges and critical today interpretations. The analysis can be suggested because certainly instructive and formative, also within the historical-medical didactics students of the courses of degree in Medicine and Nursing since the first match with the Medical Faculty.

  15. Monitoring of distributed systems using historical debuggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorowski, Michał

    2016-09-01

    Historical debuggers are tools that give insight into the history of program execution. This functionality is usually achieved by recording logs (execution traces). There are many tools of this kind but only limited number of them is capable of monitoring of distributed systems. It is a serious problem as the majority of contemporary information systems has distributed nature. This paper shows how to monitor and trace distributed systems using historical debuggers that were designed to work locally. The proposed concept consists of an approach for the correlation of execution traces that were recorded on different nodes of a distributed system that was monitored.

  16. Historical and Conceptual Foundation of Diagrammatical Ontology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Uckelman, Sara L.; Schärfe, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    During the Renaissance there was a growing interest for the use of diagrams within conceptual studies. This paper investigates the historical and philosophical foundation of this renewed use of diagrams in ontology as well as the modern relevance of this foundation. We discuss the historical...... and philosophical background for Jacob Lorhard’s invention of the word ‘ontology’ as well as the scientific status of ontology in the 16th and 17th century. We also consider the use of Ramean style diagrams and diagrammatic ontology in general. A modern implementation of Lorhard’s ontology is discussed...... and this classical ontology is compared to some modern ontologies....

  17. Introduction: Communicating European Integration: A Historical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Müller

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s the so-called 'democratic deficit' of the EU became an increasingly discussed topic in both academic and political circles. In this context, the (apparently insufficient communication of European politics to its citizens has been of especially great importance. Academic research has invested considerable efforts in trying to analyse and explain these problematic relationships. However, because this still growing area of research is still dominated by social scientists, historical approaches seem to be somewhat underrepresented. Against this background, this special issue will present historical studies on actors, means and contents of communicating the process of European integration from its beginnings to the present day.

  18. Intervention on housing of Meridas Historic Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Mansur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals about the importance of rethink and recover the principle of dwelling as an esential principle of Architecture and Urbanism, that allows to comprehend in a deeper meaning, that the sense and importance of Restauration and Intervention of Meridas Historic City Center implies the recover of habits and customs in dayly life of Merida that used to exist previous the economic and social Modernization that generated a transformation in the way of life and interest of citizens, and with that, the transformation of the shape of Merida and the abandon and deterioration of the Historic City Center.

  19. [Vygotsky's Social-Historic Constructivism and nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thofehrn, Maira Buss; Leopardi, Maria Tereza

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to reflect, in the theoretical scope, about the Vygotsky's socio-historical constructivism and the contributions from this Russian researcher to build the nursing knowledge. The Vygotskian approach has as its philosophical, epistemological and methodological purposes, the principles of the historical materialism, it emphasizes the social and cultural context in the working process, also in the use of instruments and in the dialectical interaction between human beings and environment. We understand that the ideas preconized by Vygotsky can represent an alternative method to the practical and theoretical studies, specially, as the subjective dimension of the working process near by the nursing staff.

  20. Big Data and historical social science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bearman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available “Big Data” can revolutionize historical social science if it arises from substantively important contexts and is oriented towards answering substantively important questions. Such data may be especially important for answering previously largely intractable questions about the timing and sequencing of events, and of event boundaries. That said, “Big Data” makes no difference for social scientists and historians whose accounts rest on narrative sentences. Since such accounts are the norm, the effects of Big Data on the practice of historical social science may be more limited than one might wish.

  1. Causality and Time in Historical Institutionalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahoney, James; Mohamedali, Khairunnisa; Nguyen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores the dual concern with causality and time in historical institutionalism using a graphical approach. The analysis focuses on three concepts that are central to this field: critical junctures, gradual change, and path dependence. The analysis makes explicit and formal the logic...... underlying studies that use these “causal-temporal” concepts. The chapter shows visually how causality and temporality are linked to one another in varying ways depending on the particular pattern of change. The chapter provides new tools for describing and understanding change in historical- institutional...

  2. Evaluation and cataloging of Korean historical earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kew Hwa; Han, Young Woo; Lee, Jun Hui; Park, Ji Eok; Na, Kwang Wooing; Shin, Byung Ju [The Reaearch Institute of Basic Sciences, Seoul Nationl Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    Historical earthquake data of the Korean Peninsula which are very important is evaluating seismicity and seismic hazard of the peninsula were collected and analyzed by seismologist and historian. A preliminary catalog of Korean historical earthquake data translated in English was made. Felt places of 528 events felt at more than 2 places were indicated on maps and MMI III isoseismal were drawn for 52 events of MMI{>=}VII. Epicenters and intensities of these MMI{>=}VII events were estimated from these isoseismal maps.

  3. Revealing the programming process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens; Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important goals of an introductory programming course is that the students learn a systematic approach to the development of computer programs. Revealing the programming process is an important part of this; however, textbooks do not address the issue -- probably because the textb......One of the most important goals of an introductory programming course is that the students learn a systematic approach to the development of computer programs. Revealing the programming process is an important part of this; however, textbooks do not address the issue -- probably because...... the textbook medium is static and therefore ill-suited to expose the process of programming. We have found that process recordings in the form of captured narrated programming sessions are a simple, cheap, and efficient way of providing the revelation.We identify seven different elements of the programming...... process for which process recordings are a valuable communication media in order to enhance the learning process. Student feedback indicates both high learning outcome and superior learning potential compared to traditional classroom teaching....

  4. The hidden history of the snowshoe hare, Lepus americanus: extensive mitochondrial DNA introgression inferred from multilocus genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Ferreira, José; Seixas, Fernando A; Cheng, Ellen; Mills, L Scott; Alves, Paulo C

    2014-09-01

    Hybridization drives the evolutionary trajectory of many species or local populations, and assessing the geographic extent and genetic impact of interspecific gene flow may provide invaluable clues to understand population divergence or the adaptive relevance of admixture. In North America, hares (Lepus spp.) are key species for ecosystem dynamics and their evolutionary history may have been affected by hybridization. Here we reconstructed the speciation history of the three most widespread hares in North America - the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), the white-tailed jackrabbit (L. townsendii) and the black-tailed jackrabbit (L. californicus) - by analysing sequence variation at eight nuclear markers and one mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) locus (6240 bp; 94 specimens). A multilocus-multispecies coalescent-based phylogeny suggests that L. americanus diverged ~2.7 Ma and that L. californicus and L. townsendii split more recently (~1.2 Ma). Within L. americanus, a deep history of cryptic divergence (~2.0 Ma) was inferred, which coincides with major speciation events in other North American species. While the isolation-with-migration model suggested that nuclear gene flow was generally rare or absent among species or major genetic groups, coalescent simulations of mtDNA divergence revealed historical mtDNA introgression from L. californicus into the Pacific Northwest populations of L. americanus. This finding marks a history of past reticulation between these species, which may have affected other parts of the genome and influence the adaptive potential of hares during climate change.

  5. Inferring contemporary and historical genetic connectivity from juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feutry, Pierre; Berry, Oliver; Kyne, Peter M; Pillans, Richard D; Hillary, Richard M; Grewe, Peter M; Marthick, James R; Johnson, Grant; Gunasekera, Rasanthi M; Bax, Nicholas J; Bravington, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Measuring population connectivity is a critical task in conservation biology. While genetic markers can provide reliable long-term historical estimates of population connectivity, scientists are still limited in their ability to determine contemporary patterns of gene flow, the most practical time frame for management. Here, we tackled this issue by developing a new approach that only requires juvenile sampling at a single time period. To demonstrate the usefulness of our method, we used the Speartooth shark (Glyphis glyphis), a critically endangered species of river shark found only in tropical northern Australia and southern Papua New Guinea. Contemporary adult and juvenile shark movements, estimated with the spatial distribution of kin pairs across and within three river systems, was contrasted with historical long-term connectivity patterns, estimated from mitogenomes and genome-wide SNP data. We found strong support for river fidelity in juveniles with the within-cohort relationship analysis. Male breeding movements were highlighted with the cross-cohort relationship analysis, and female reproductive philopatry to the river systems was revealed by the mitogenomic analysis. We show that accounting for juvenile river fidelity and female philopatry is important in population structure analysis and that targeted sampling in nurseries and juvenile aggregations should be included in the genomic toolbox of threatened species management.

  6. Vocational Literacy in Mozambique: Historical Development, Current Challenges and Contradictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Popov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The study analyses the historical development of vocational literacy in basic education and Non-Formal Vocational Education (NFVE in Mozambique, as well as current challenges and contradictions. The theoretical lens of Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT is employed in the study. Methodologically the study was executed through an analysis of oral, printed and e-resources produced by the main stakeholders and also the reflective experiences of the authors in their extensive educational work in the country. The findings reveal poorly developed vocational literacy education in schools and non-formal settings in spite of recurrent political declarations about its importance. There is a strong dependence by formal and particularly NFVE sectors on the technical and financial support provided by international organisations. Vocational literacy courses are characterized by a lack of adequate equipment and poor practice. As a consequence, theoretical or elementary forms of vocational knowledge are dominant in the courses, resulting in the dissatisfaction of both learners and educators. Vocational literacy development proved to be a complex field that faces many challenges and ischaracterised by diverse internal contradictions.

  7. Not yet human: implicit knowledge, historical dehumanization, and contemporary consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Phillip Atiba; Eberhardt, Jennifer L; Williams, Melissa J; Jackson, Matthew Christian

    2008-02-01

    Historical representations explicitly depicting Blacks as apelike have largely disappeared in the United States, yet a mental association between Blacks and apes remains. Here, the authors demonstrate that U.S. citizens implicitly associate Blacks and apes. In a series of laboratory studies, the authors reveal how this association influences study participants' basic cognitive processes and significantly alters their judgments in criminal justice contexts. Specifically, this Black-ape association alters visual perception and attention, and it increases endorsement of violence against Black suspects. In an archival study of actual criminal cases, the authors show that news articles written about Blacks who are convicted of capital crimes are more likely to contain ape-relevant language than news articles written about White convicts. Moreover, those who are implicitly portrayed as more apelike in these articles are more likely to be executed by the state than those who are not. The authors argue that examining the subtle persistence of specific historical representations such as these may not only enhance contemporary research on dehumanization, stereotyping, and implicit processes but also highlight common forms of discrimination that previously have gone unrecognized.

  8. Historical tsunami database for France and its overseas territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lambert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A search and analysis of a large number of historical documents has made it possible: (i to discover so-far unknown tsunamis that have hit the French coasts during the last centuries, and (ii conversely, to disprove the tsunami nature of several events referred to in recent catalogues. This information has been structured into a database and also made available as a website (http://www.tsunamis.fr that is accessible in French, English and Spanish. So far 60 genuine ("true" tsunamis have been described (with their dates, causes, oceans/seas, places observed, number of waves, flood and ebb distances, run-up, and intensities and referenced against contemporary sources. Digitized documents are accessible online. In addition, so as to avoid confusion, tsunamis revealed as "false" or "doubtful" have been compiled into a second catalogue.

    Both the database and the website are updated annually corresponding to the state of knowledge, so as to take into account newly discovered historical references and the occurrence of new tsunamis on the coasts of France and many of its overseas territories: Guadeloupe, Martinique, French Guiana, New Caledonia, Réunion, and Mayotte.

  9. Study on relationship between historical volcanic eruptions and historical strong earthquakes in China and its adjacent regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This thesis lists and describes 6 pairs of tectonic events, i.e., historical volcanic eruptions associated with historical strong earthquakes, based on the analysis for the records of historical volcanic eruptions and historical strong earthquakes in China and its adjacent region since the first record. And discusses the relationship between historical eruptions and strong earthquakes by means of analyzing the characteristics of tectonic events themselves, plate movement, regional seismicity, and regional stress environment in China and its adjacent region.

  10. Natural products for chronic cough: Text mining the East Asian historical literature for future therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shergis, Johannah Linda; Wu, Lei; May, Brian H; Zhang, Anthony Lin; Guo, Xinfeng; Lu, Chuanjian; Xue, Charlie Changli

    2015-08-01

    Chronic cough is a significant health burden. Patients experience variable benefits from over the counter and prescribed products, but there is an unmet need to provide more effective treatments. Natural products have been used to treat cough and some plant compounds such as pseudoephedrine from ephedra and codeine from opium poppy have been developed into drugs. Text mining historical literature may offer new insight for future therapeutic development. We identified natural products used in the East Asian historical literature to treat chronic cough. Evaluation of the historical literature revealed 331 natural products used to treat chronic cough. Products included plants, minerals and animal substances. These natural products were found in 75 different books published between AD 363 and 1911. Of the 331 products, the 10 most frequently and continually used products were examined, taking into consideration findings from contemporary experimental studies. The natural products identified are promising and offer new directions in therapeutic development for treating chronic cough.

  11. Seeking historical examples to illustrate key aspects of the nature of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, William F.

    2008-02-01

    Increasingly widespread agreement exists that the nature of science (NOS) must be an integral element of the K-12 science curriculum with emerging consensus on what specific NOS elements should be the focus of such instruction. In this study reported, eight recent trade books written by NOS experts addressing the nature of science for the general public were examined to locate the historical examples included. These historical vignettes were extracted and analyzed to determine the kinds of examples used and the focus of the science discipline from which the example comes. The analysis has revealed that these authors have collectively provided approximately 80 historical vignettes in fields ranging from astronomy to physics, with some cited repeatedly from one book to another. In addition, the entire set of examples was then linked to important NOS notions providing an instructional resource for use by teachers, textbook writers and curriculum developers.

  12. Android Emotions Revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Schärfe, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a method for designing facial interfaces for sociable android robots with respect to the fundamental rules of human affect expression. Extending the work of Paul Ekman towards a robotic direction, we follow the judgment-based approach for evaluating facial expressions to test...... in which case an android robot like the Geminoid|DK –a duplicate of an Original person- reveals emotions convincingly; when following an empirical perspective, or when following a theoretical one. The methodology includes the processes of acquiring the empirical data, and gathering feedback on them. Our...... findings are based on the results derived from a number of judgments, and suggest that before programming the facial expressions of a Geminoid, the Original should pass through the proposed procedure. According to our recommendations, the facial expressions of an android should be tested by judges, even...

  13. Integration of Jeddah Historical BIM and 3D GIS for Documentation and Restoration of Historical Monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, A.; Yaagoubi, R.; Boehm, J.

    2015-08-01

    This work outlines a new approach for the integration of 3D Building Information Modelling and the 3D Geographic Information System (GIS) to provide semantically rich models, and to get the benefits from both systems to help document and analyse cultural heritage sites. Our proposed framework is based on the Jeddah Historical Building Information Modelling process (JHBIM). This JHBIM consists of a Hijazi Architectural Objects Library (HAOL) that supports higher level of details (LoD) while decreasing the time of modelling. The Hijazi Architectural Objects Library has been modelled based on the Islamic historical manuscripts and Hijazi architectural pattern books. Moreover, the HAOL is implemented using BIM software called Autodesk Revit. However, it is known that this BIM environment still has some limitations with the non-standard architectural objects. Hence, we propose to integrate the developed 3D JHBIM with 3D GIS for more advanced analysis. To do so, the JHBIM database is exported and semantically enriched with non-architectural information that is necessary for restoration and preservation of historical monuments. After that, this database is integrated with the 3D Model in the 3D GIS solution. At the end of this paper, we'll illustrate our proposed framework by applying it to a Historical Building called Nasif Historical House in Jeddah. First of all, this building is scanned by the use of a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) and Close Range Photogrammetry. Then, the 3D JHBIM based on the HOAL is designed on Revit Platform. Finally, this model is integrated to a 3D GIS solution through Autodesk InfraWorks. The shown analysis presented in this research highlights the importance of such integration especially for operational decisions and sharing the historical knowledge about Jeddah Historical City. Furthermore, one of the historical buildings in Old Jeddah, Nasif Historical House, was chosen as a test case for the project.

  14. Robotic Autonomous Observatories: A Historical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Javier Castro-Tirado

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a historical introduction to the field of Robotic Astronomy, from the point of view of a scientist working in this field for more than a decade. The author discusses the basic definitions, the differing telescope control operating systems, observatory managers, as well as a few current scientific applications.

  15. Haglund syndrome: historical and systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Sereda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Haglund syndrome is one of the leading causes of pain and functional disorders in the posterior heel. It consists of retrocalcaneal pain caused by retrocalcaneal bursitis and impindgement Achilles tendon tenopathy due to Haglund's deformity. Throughout historical rewiev and systematic rewiev of current conservative and surgical treatments for Haglund syndrome performed in the article.

  16. Haglund syndrome: historical and systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    A. P. Sereda; Kavalerskiy, G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Haglund syndrome is one of the leading causes of pain and functional disorders in the posterior heel. It consists of retrocalcaneal pain caused by retrocalcaneal bursitis and impindgement Achilles tendon tenopathy due to Haglund's deformity. Throughout historical rewiev and systematic rewiev of current conservative and surgical treatments for Haglund syndrome performed in the article.

  17. Historical Photographs: A County-Wide Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Franciska

    This basic outline for the organization of photograph collections is designed for use by individual agencies as well as by people interested in a cooperative collection organization that can encompass a regional network. The working manual provides organizational techniques for the evaluation of historical, monetary, and other values of the…

  18. Important Historical Events in Reading Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    This paper lists and dates important historical happenings related to reading instruction. John Locke (1632-1704) was an early advocate that school should be a pleasant place to learn. He believed in the "tabula rasa" theory whereby a student had a mind like a blank sheet with nothing printed initially. Starting from the conception that…

  19. Historic magmatism on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peate, David W.; Baker, Joel A.; Jakobssen, Sveinn P.

    2009-01-01

    We present new compositional data on a suite of historic lava flows from the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland. They were erupted over a short time period between c. 940 and c. 1340 AD and provide a snap-shot view of melt generation and evolution processes beneath this onshore, 65 km long, ridge segment...

  20. A historical perspective on space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, W. Ray

    1991-01-01

    The historical development of space stations is presented through a series of various spacecraft configurations including: (1) Salut 6; (2) Skylab; (3) the Space Operations Center (SOC); (4) the Manned Science and Applications Space Platform; (5) Space Station Freedom; and (4) the Mir Space Station.

  1. Eukaryotic diversity in historical soil samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moon-van der Staay, S.Y.; Tzeneva, V.A.; Staay, van der G.W.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Smidt, H.; Hackstein, J.H.P.

    2006-01-01

    The eukaryotic biodiversity in historical air-dried samples of Dutch agricultural soil has been assessed by random sequencing of an 18S rRNA gene library and by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Representatives of nearly all taxa of eukaryotic soil microbes could be identified, demonstrating

  2. Teaching Historical Memories in an Intercultural Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibel, Katrine Vinther; Wrochem, Oliver

    How can we approach historical remembrance in history teaching? This question lies at the heart of the three-year, EU-funded project TeacMem,which involves partners from Denmark, Germany and Norway. The participants (teacher trainers, historians, teachers, memorial educators, disseminators...

  3. Democracy in Kazakhstan: Historical Fiction or Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adilzhanov, Nurlykhan B.; Kozhirova, Svetlana B.; Azizian, Rouben

    2016-01-01

    An important issue in the development of transitional societies at the present stage of historical development is the impact of "global democracy" system of government. Trends of such influence in the post-Soviet space, in particular, are becoming more tangible in the context of globalization and especially after the so-called…

  4. Comprehension Strategies for Reading Historical Fiction Picturebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Suzette; Serafini, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As the texts readers encounter in and out of school grow in complexity, the strategies that teachers demonstrate and encourage students to employ need to expand to accommodate the changing nature of these texts. In this article, the authors present a three-part framework for utilizing historical fiction picturebooks as instructional resources.…

  5. Authenticating Historical Fiction: Rationale and Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, Eric; Groce, Robin

    2005-01-01

    In merging social studies education with language arts, classroom teachers are utilizing selections of historical fiction to teach critical literacy skills while also meeting social studies standards. While most of the selections used for teaching history and social studies themes are strong in terms of literary merit, they may be deficient in…

  6. The Time Machine: Writing Historical Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Kathleen

    2000-01-01

    Discusses historical fiction for children and young adults from a writer's point of view and equates it to a time machine into the past. Considers the books that influenced the writer; larger-than-life characters; story ideas; and research to really know and feel the setting. (LRW)

  7. Historic landscapes in Europe: highlights and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Londen, H.; Ruiz del Árbol, M.; Orejas, A.; Orejas, A.; Mattingly, D.; Clavel-Lévêque, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) of the scientific collaboration developed through the COST A27 meetings and common projects concerning the two major themes of our Action: the close relation between historical-archaeological research and its application

  8. [Ludovico Geymonat: The problem of historical epistemology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minazzi, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    The study of the various inspirations of Ludovico Geymonat's epistemology (positivism and neopositivism, neorationalism, historicism and dialectical materialism) illustrates the way in which for the Italian philosopher the problem of objectivity of knowledge remains inseparable from the historicity of the sciences. Geymonat's epistemological approach associates scientific progress to its objectivity.

  9. Active Learning: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Marilyn

    The purposes of the first two parts of this literature review are to clarify the concept of active learning and discuss the use and value of active learning models. In Part I, the perspectives of five historical proponents of active learning, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Dewey, Kilpatrick, and Piaget, are discussed. The views of four contemporary…

  10. Component-compatibility in historical biogeography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandee, M.; Roos, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    -The problems of reconstructing historical relationships for areas of endemism from distributional data for groups of taxa and the cladistic relationships among the members of those groups can be solved by applying the two principles of parsimony and mutual inclusion or exclusion (compatibility) of

  11. Historical Approaches in German Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heering, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Particularly in the second half of the 20th century, historical approaches became relevant in science education. This development can at least in part be explained with the growing awareness of the importance to address Nature of Science aspects in science education. In comparison to the international publications, some particularities can be…

  12. Indians of British Columbia (An Historical Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa (Ontario).

    An historical review is presented of the 6 major groups of Indians of the coastal region of British Columbia: the Coast Salish, Nootka, Kwakiutl, Bella Coola, Tsimshian, and Haida. Characteristics of each tribe are contrasted in the following 7 sections of the review: (1) Introduction--the life style, sociocultural factors, and unique…

  13. Robotic Autonomous Observatories: A Historical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Javier Castro-Tirado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a historical introduction to the field of Robotic Astronomy, from the point of view of a scientist working in this field for more than a decade. The author discusses the basic definitions, the differing telescope control operating systems, observatory managers, as well as a few current scientific applications.

  14. HISTORICAL ASPECTS OF EVALUATION IN ACCOUNTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigidov Y. I.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of objects of accounting is important for obtaining objective information on an economic and financial position of the organization. At the solution of a question of assessment methods in modern conditions, it is necessary to know how these issues were resolved earlier. In this article, we consider historical aspects of an assessment in accounting. The retrospective of the solution of this question is given, beginning from the XIII century in various countries – Italy, France, Great Britain, Germany, Holland, the USA, etc. Various points of view on assessment questions are considered. It is specified, that with the advent of a monetary assessment there was a double record. Types of estimates are considered: at the acquisition price (historical, at the sale (market price, at prime cost, at recovery cost, at the reproduction price, a multiple assessment (for each asset of balance to use the base of an assessment, at fair value. Their positive and negative sides are given. The option of an assessment and revaluation of assets in the conditions of inflation with need to correct the wholesale prices of an inflation index is reflected. The main historical stages of development of an assessment – naturalistic, origin and distribution of a monetary assessment, distribution of market and historical estimates, development of variety of estimates, an assessment regulation, and association of various estimates in the category of “fair value” are formulated

  15. ACCOUNTING PARADIGMS WHICH FAVOR HISTORICAL COST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Gabriel CRISTEA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Henning Kirkegaard shows that the evolution of accounting is to shift from one paradigm to another . Business continuity perspective should guide the company into the future , without confine it exclusively in the past. Accounting in its classical form , however, can not be dissociated from the historical cost evaluation .

  16. Evocations of a Historical Night in Venice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Anna Marie; Hvejsel, Marie Frier

    Venice is a big dream, at once ineffably meaningful and yet still intangible; not merely to the authors of this paper but to many others as well. Why? Not only are we drawn by its mystery and romance; Venice, this otherworldly city, unfolds an architectural nocturne that in many ways makes histor...

  17. Putting Barack Obama's Candidacy in Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Ibram

    2008-01-01

    Senator Barack Obama's historic candidacy for president of the United States has generated an intense and thoughtful national discussion within Black America. His campaign has brought several issues to the fore. Recently, the author spoke with five of the most preeminent Black scholars in the nation to search out some of their thoughts on five key…

  18. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of thes...

  19. Japanese-American Internment. A Historical Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This Historical Reader on "Japanese American Internment" in World War II introduces students to key events and issues during the period through the voices of people with firsthand experienced. Source documents and illustrations are arranged in chronological order and/or thematic units that establish context. Each selection is followed by…

  20. Contemporary Social Psychology in Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Dorwin

    1979-01-01

    The current state of social psychology is assessed in light of its historical and social context. The discipline is viewed as a social system, and it is argued that the properties of this system have influenced the research techniques, substantive content, and theories of contemporary social psychology. (Author/RD)

  1. Social Justice: An Historical and Philosophical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Sharon Kay

    2011-01-01

    Social justice in education concerns three questions: whom do we teach, what do we teach, and how do we teach? In this article the author briefly discusses social justice and its related concepts, its historical underpinnings, the social climate that brought about social change, and its effect on teaching physical activity. She also gives personal…

  2. Non-destructive testing on historical monuments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heruc, S.

    1997-01-01

    Historic monuments are more than just old buildings or architectural importance. They are a symbol of our cultural indentity and in continuity a part of our heritage, and as such it is generally accepted that they should be maintained for so long as possible and without materially altering the fabri

  3. Simple Analysis of Historical Lime Mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Joa~o

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which a simple characterization of a historical lime mortar is made by the determination of its approximate composition by a gravimetric method. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are also used for the qualitative characterization of the lime mortar components. These…

  4. The Weeding of a Historical Society Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Cindy Steinhoff

    1992-01-01

    Describes a major deaccessioning (weeding) project begun in 1985 at the library of the Nebraska State Historical Society, including a brief history of the Society and the events leading to the decision to weed. Public controversy over the handling of the project, benefits of the weeding, and new acquisitions policies are also discussed. (MES)

  5. Intercultural Historical Learning: A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Kenneth; Johansson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines a conceptual framework in order to systematically discuss the meaning of intercultural learning in history education and how it could be advanced. We do so by bringing together theories of historical consciousness, intercultural competence and postcolonial thinking. By combining these theories into one framework, we identify…

  6. Overhills: Entrance Compound. Historic Building Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    community at Overhills to be named Pinewild. The company hired Lewis H. Wise of New York to layout the proposed subdivision. A Fayetteville Observer...the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Roberts, Claudia, and Jim Sumner . 1980. Currituck Shooting Club. Nomination to the National

  7. Play under Siege: A Historical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigler, Edward F.; Bishop-Josef, Sandra J.

    2009-01-01

    In this updated version of their chapter from "Children's Play: The Roots of Reading" (published by ZERO TO THREE in 2004), the authors describe the recent attack on play, in both early childhood and elementary education. They provide a historical overview of the contentious relationship between play and cognitive development. The authors stress…

  8. Historical Empathy and "Canada: A People's History"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Darren; Clark, Penney

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we examine the CBC/Radio-Canada series, "Canada: A People's History," for its use of empathy, specifically with regard to its portrayal of Aboriginal people. We call the empathy promoted in the series, emotive empathy, and compare it to the concept of historical empathy constructed by researchers in history education. The emotive…

  9. Historical perspective: surgery for chronic thromboembolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Stuart W

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a historical perspective for our current understanding of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and surgery for this disease. It chronicles the developments in surgical techniques that have made pulmonary endarterectomy the procedure of choice for obstruction of pulmonary vessels by organized thromboemboli and secondary vessel wall thickening.

  10. Terahertz analysis of an East Asian historical mural painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, K.; Hosako, I.; Kohdzuma, Y.; Koezuka, T.; Kim, M.-J.; Ikari, T.; Du, X.

    2010-05-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and THz and imaging techniques are expected to have great potential for the non-invasive analysis of artworks. We have applied THz imaging to analyse the historic mural painting of a Lamaism temple by using a transportable time-domain THz imaging system; such an attempt is the first in the world. The reflection image revealed that there are two orange colours in the painting, although they appear the same to the naked eye. THz imaging can also estimate the depth of cracks. The colours were examined by X-ray fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy, and the results were found to be in good agreement. This work proved that THz imaging can contribute to the non-invasive analysis of cultural heritage.

  11. A Historical Analysis of the Relationship of Faith and Science and its Significance within Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegge, John G.

    Science curriculum and pedagogy are at the center of a centuries-long debate concerning the appropriate relationship of faith and science. The difficulties that science educators face seem to be based in misinformation about the historical roots of this conflict. To address that conflict, the goals of this research were to separate myth from reality and to provide a necessary context to the current tensions that are disrupting science pedagogy and curriculum content within American public schools. Working within a theoretical framework of historical literacy, this qualitative, historical analysis was a comprehensive examination of the relationship of faith and science from ancient times through the Renascence to the emergence and development of Darwinism. The historical approach methodology was utilized as a means to document the systematic examination of past events, in order to illuminate and interpret the meaning of those events. The historical record revealed that science and religion are not necessarily incompatible and that the early Christian religion provided a fertile environment in which modern science could emerge. Also noted were many instances where the record was inconsistent with what educators have commonly taught as historical fact. Finally, the complex sources of tension between modern fundamentalist Christianity and Darwinism, which has appeared as a flashpoint in public discourse within science education, were examined in depth. Based on this analysis, the study includes recommendations for educators in their approach to addressing these challenges and teaching science. This analysis can produce positive social change for educators and their students, as this information is advanced as a means to enhance historical literacy among educators and their students.

  12. A space-for-time (SFT substitution approach to studying historical phenological changes in urban environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Buyantuyev

    Full Text Available Plant phenological records are crucial for predicting plant responses to global warming. However, many historical records are either short or replete with data gaps, which pose limitations and may lead to erroneous conclusions about the direction and magnitude of change. In addition to uninterrupted monitoring, missing observations may be substituted via modeling, experimentation, or gradient analysis. Here we have developed a space-for-time (SFT substitution method that uses spatial phenology and temperature data to fill gaps in historical records. To do this, we combined historical data for several tree species from a single location with spatial data for the same species and used linear regression and Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA to build complementary spring phenology models and assess improvements achieved by the approach. SFT substitution allowed increasing the sample size and developing more robust phenology models for some of the species studied. Testing models with reduced historical data size revealed thresholds at which SFT improved historical trend estimation. We conclude that under certain circumstances both the robustness of models and accuracy of phenological trends can be enhanced although some limitations and assumptions still need to be resolved. There is considerable potential for exploring SFT analyses in phenology studies, especially those conducted in urban environments and those dealing with non-linearities in phenology modeling.

  13. Historical Myths or Mythological History: A Fresh Approach to Understand the History of Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Pranab Jyoti Sarma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper carries out a critical review of the trends of historical writings in Assam. The historiographical study reveals that the beginning of the historical phase was, in fact, late in the North East region. Moreover, in many of these historical writings, the importance of the local histories of the communities of the region was ignored. The author highlights the fact that a pan-Indian history for the region may not be authentic enough to understand the cultural dynamics of the complex society of the Northeast. The author also focuses on corroborating ‘proper’ historical source material for reconstructing the history of the region rather than deriving inferences from mythology and legends. However, the importance of recent trends in historiography such as selective utilisation of oral traditions, folklores and memory studies has been emphasised. An alternative and more precise periodisation of the historical phase has been provided which does not, however, project any clear marker between periods and eras but emphasises on slow and steady transformations. Importance of archaeological sources and material evidence has been kept in mind while deriving periodical divisions. Relooking at the history of the Koches, Kacharis has been emphasised.

  14. The Historical Necessity for--and Difficulties with--New Historical Analysis in Introductory Literature Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brook

    1987-01-01

    Reflects on the role of New Historicism in teaching literature and remarks on the lack of historical awareness in students today. Offers suggestions for connecting history, as well as other disciplines, to literature to combat currently fragmented college educations. (JC)

  15. 75 FR 17766 - National Register of Historic Places; Weekly Listing of Historic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... (Historic Bridges of Arkansas MPS) Jefferson County Taylor Field, 1201 E. 16th St., Pine Bluff, 09001250..., 09001257, LISTED, 1/21/10 Pulaski County Seed Warehouse No. 5, SW corner of US 165 and AR 161,...

  16. The artful mind meets art history: toward a psycho-historical framework for the science of art appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullot, Nicolas J; Reber, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws in the psychological approach, we introduce a psycho-historical framework for the science of art appreciation. This framework demonstrates that a science of art appreciation must investigate how appreciators process causal and historical information to classify and explain their psychological responses to art. Expanding on research about the cognition of artifacts, we identify three modes of appreciation: basic exposure to an artwork, the artistic design stance, and artistic understanding. The artistic design stance, a requisite for artistic understanding, is an attitude whereby appreciators develop their sensitivity to art-historical contexts by means of inquiries into the making, authorship, and functions of artworks. We defend and illustrate the psycho-historical framework with an analysis of existing studies on art appreciation in empirical aesthetics. Finally, we argue that the fluency theory of aesthetic pleasure can be amended to meet the requirements of the framework. We conclude that scientists can tackle fundamental questions about the nature and appreciation of art within the psycho-historical framework.

  17. [Historical causality and relative contemporaneity Einsteinian relativity in the historical sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontems, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The construction of historical frame of reference based on the distinction between and articulation of phenomenological and chronological times. As it relativises the notion of simultaneity and inverts its relation to causality, the special theory of relativity can induce analogous modes of reflection on the themes of "contemporaneity" in the history of art (Panofsky) and in epistemology (Bachelard). This "relativist" method, often misunderstood, sheds light on both historical and presentist methods.

  18. Assessing historical empathy through simulation – How do Finnish teacher students achieve contextual historical empathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Rantala

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been a great deal of international debate about introducing historical empathy as the focus in teaching history. However, as it is, the contents of the concept have been included in the curricula in many countries. Nevertheless, practising stepping into the shoes of a person from a previous era is still in its infancy in schools in many locations – Finland included. This article discusses Finnish class teacher students' understanding of historical empathy. The article is based on a study where 360 class teacher students played a game simulating the Cuban Missile Crisis. Their task was to assume the roles of the superpower leaders and make decisions on the basis of these roles. The simulation showed that a majority of the student teachers are able to attain a level of contextual historical empathy. They were able to empathize with the historical context in question and make such decisions that would have been possible for the historical actors. Some of the playing groups on the other hand, referred to their current knowledge and attitudes, which, according to Ashby and Lee's empathy classification, shows lower-level empathy. The study corroborates previous research results concerning great discrepancies in the understanding of empathy prevalent within one age group. Moreover, the study raises the question of how historical empathy should be handled in teaching if many future teachers have difficulties in understanding it.

  19. Spatial variability of "Did You Feel It?" intensity data: insights into sampling biases in historical earthquake intensity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent parallel development of improved quantitative methods to analyze intensity distributions for historical earthquakes and of web‐based systems for collecting intensity data for modern earthquakes provides an opportunity to reconsider not only important individual historical earthquakes but also the overall characterization of intensity distributions for historical events. The focus of this study is a comparison between intensity distributions of historical earthquakes with those from modern earthquakes for which intensities have been determined by the U.S. Geological Survey “Did You Feel It?” (DYFI) website (see Data and Resources). As an example of a historical earthquake, I focus initially on the 1843 Marked Tree, Arkansas, event. Its magnitude has been previously estimated as 6.0–6.2. I first reevaluate the macroseismic effects of this earthquake, assigning intensities using a traditional approach, and estimate a preferred magnitude of 5.4. Modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) values for the Marked Tree earthquake are higher, on average, than those from the 2011 >Mw 5.8 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake for distances ≤500  km but comparable or lower on average at larger distances, with a smaller overall felt extent. Intensity distributions for other moderate historical earthquakes reveal similar discrepancies; the discrepancy is also even more pronounced using earlier published intensities for the 1843 earthquake. I discuss several hypotheses to explain the discrepancies, including the possibility that intensity values associated with historical earthquakes are commonly inflated due to reporting/sampling biases. A detailed consideration of the DYFI intensity distribution for the Mineral earthquake illustrates how reporting and sampling biases can account for historical earthquake intensity biases as high as two intensity units and for the qualitative difference in intensity distance decays for modern versus historical events. Thus, intensity maps for

  20. Tectonic and climatic controls on historical landscape modifications: The avulsion of the lower Cecina River (Tuscany, central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, Marco; Bonini, Marco; Moratti, Giovanna; Ricci, Marianna; Tanini, Chiara

    2008-08-01

    Integration of geomorphology, stratigraphy, sedimentology and morphotectonics in the analysis of the lower Cecina River reach, coastal Tuscany, reveals an undocumented historical channel avulsion. Geomorphological evidence and radiocarbon dating support that, from the Last Glacial Maximum until the end of the 16th century, the Cecina River flowed north of the present course and formed a well-developed cuspate delta. Two concurrent factors, active tectonics as a preparing factor and discharge regime as an activation factor, are thus inferred to have favored the avulsion of Cecina River. Fragmentary archaeological and historical records indicate that the late Holocene Cecina River plain was virtually unpopulated until the latest 16th century. This seems the main reason why high-magnitude hydrological events and prominent river channel avulsions were not reported in historical chronicles. From this perspective, geomorphological data may provide important knowledge and understanding of recent dynamics of environmental change when historical record is lacking or missing.

  1. STATISTICAL EVALUATION OF HISTORICAL DIKE FAILURE MECHANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. NAGY

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Statistical evaluation of historical dike failure mechanism The failure mechanism of flood protection dikes includes physical (geotechnical, seepage processes leading to a dike breach. An awareness of the failure mechanism is required directly in dike stability calculations and indirectly for risk calculations. Statistics of historical data indicate among others the distribution and frequency of failure mechanisms associated with dikes. These data may be used in estimations of the expected likelihood of occurrence of non-quantifiable failure mechanisms. In addition to a comparative evaluation of statistics collected in several countries, this publication also presents data for the Carpathian Basin. One of the most important conclusions drawn from statistical information suggests that most dike breaches develop as a consequence of poor safety strategy

  2. [Aromatherapy and nursing: historical and theoretical conception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnatta, Juliana Rizzo; Kurebayashi, Leonice Fumiko Sato; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes da

    2016-02-01

    Aromatherapy is a Practical or Complementary Health Therapy that uses volatile concentrates extracted from plants called essential oils, in order to improve physical, mental and emotional well-being. Aromatherapy has been practiced historically and worldwide by nurses and, as in Brazil is supported by the Federal Nursing Council, it is relevant to discuss this practice in the context of Nursing through Theories of Nursing. This study of theoretical reflection, exploratory and descriptive, aims to discuss the pharmacognosy of essential oils, the historical trajectory of Aromatherapy in Nursing and the conceptions to support Aromatherapy in light of eight Nursing Theorists (Florence Nightingale, Myra Levine, Hildegard Peplau, Martha Rogers, Callista Roy, Wanda Horta, Jean Watson and Katharine Kolcaba), contributing to its inclusion as a nursing care practice.

  3. Liability of Foreignness in Historical Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubinski, Christina

    2014-01-01

    vis-à-vis local firms and raise doubts about the assumption that more distance necessarily translates into higher costs. This article adds to this criticism with a historical analysis of German multinational enterprises in preindependence India. The case proves (1) the relevance of specific......Much of international business literature has dealt with the costs of engaging in business abroad. Recently, several authors have called into question the basic assumptions of the “liability of foreignness” argument. They plead for a more nuanced look at nationality beyond the dichotomy of foreign...... with nationality are, thus making a thorough historical analysis of commercial, political, and cultural links between host and home country indispensable....

  4. Aromatherapy and nursing: historical and theoretical conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Rizzo Gnatta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aromatherapy is a Practical or Complementary Health Therapy that uses volatile concentrates extracted from plants called essential oils, in order to improve physical, mental and emotional well-being. Aromatherapy has been practiced historically and worldwide by nurses and, as in Brazil is supported by the Federal Nursing Council, it is relevant to discuss this practice in the context of Nursing through Theories of Nursing. This study of theoretical reflection, exploratory and descriptive, aims to discuss the pharmacognosy of essential oils, the historical trajectory of Aromatherapy in Nursing and the conceptions to support Aromatherapy in light of eight Nursing Theorists (Florence Nightingale, Myra Levine, Hildegard Peplau, Martha Rogers, Callista Roy, Wanda Horta, Jean Watson and Katharine Kolcaba, contributing to its inclusion as a nursing care practice.

  5. Historical floods in the Dutch Rhine Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Glaser

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical records provide direct information about the climatic impact on society. Especially great natural disasters such as river floods have been for long attracting the attention of humankind. Time series for flood development on the Rhine branches Waal, Nederrijn/Lek and IJssel in the Dutch Rhine Delta are presented in this paper. In the case of the Waal it is even possible to compare historical flood frequencies based on documentary data with the recent development reconstructed from standardized instrumental measurements. In brief, we will also discuss various parameters concerning the structure of the flood series and the "human dimension" of natural disaster, i.e. the vulnerability of society when facing natural disasters.

  6. Energetic Refurbishment of Historic Brick Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zagorskas, Jurgis; Mykolas Paliulis, Grazvydas; Burinskiene, Marija

    2013-01-01

    is creating a demand for suitable materials, retrofitting techniques and research. The differences between refurbishment of new-build projects and historical or valuable buildings are insufficiently recognized – mostly the buildings without further cultural preservation requirements are studied. This article...... covers the theme of refurbishment measures in historical buildings – the specific measures like inside insulation which are allowed due to the valuable façade or other heritage preservation requirements. An overview of other innovative methods for energy saving in existing buildings and their potential......Building standards for energy effectiveness are increasing constantly and the market follows these changes by constructing new buildings in accordance with standards and refurbishment of the existing housing stock. Comprehensive trends in European construction market show tremendous increase...

  7. Economics of Historic Preservation: Dollars and Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April D. ALLEN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The built environment expresses diversity, identity, individuality, and differentiation. In economics, it is the differentiated product that commands a monetary premium. Historic preservation protects our diverse building stock while creating more construction jobs, returning under-utilized buildings to the tax rolls, attracting heritage tourists, and maximizing the use of existing infrastructure. It has been said that the greenest building is the one that is already built. Four out of five existing buildings will be renovated over the next generation while two new buildings are added. With an overwhelming vastness of existing building stock, this becomes the elephant in the room. We cannot build our way to sustainability but must conserve our way to it. Economically, this makes good sense. Historic preservation, sustainability and conservation go hand in hand to protect our built environment while providing healthy, aesthetically pleasing buildings in which to live, work, and play, thus growing the local economy.

  8. Historical restoration recipes: the cleaning of paintings 1600-1900

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stols-Witlox, M.; Bridgland, J.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about historical cleaning methods and materials is important since remnants may still be presentwithin the paint structure and should be taken into account when interpreting instrumental analyses and deciding about future conservation treatments. This paper provides analyses of historical

  9. Narrative Politics in Historical Fictions for Children

    OpenAIRE

    Streamas, John

    2008-01-01

    In "Narrative Politics in Historical Fictions for Children," John Streamas points out that narrative theory and ethnic studies need to ask each other basic questions before a reading of race in children's literature can be useful. Is the literature merely a reflection of the experience of adult writers and parents? That is, must we read the literature as nostalgic, reflecting a developmental bias? Or does it engage children on their own contemporary terms? Are children themselves capable of r...

  10. Getting It Right: Historical Fiction or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElmeel, Sharron L.

    2009-01-01

    There seems to be widespread agreement that to qualify as historical, the book's main plot must be set in the past. But how far in the past? Thirty years is sometimes listed as a standard. But does that mean set 30 years at the time the book is written or 30 years from the time it is read? The general consensus is that the book is what it is at…

  11. Irrigation as an Historical Climate Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Shukla, Sonali P.; Puma, Michael J.; Nazarenko, Larissa S.

    2014-01-01

    Irrigation is the single largest anthropogenic water use, a modification of the land surface that significantly affects surface energy budgets, the water cycle, and climate. Irrigation, however, is typically not included in standard historical general circulation model (GCM) simulations along with other anthropogenic and natural forcings. To investigate the importance of irrigation as an anthropogenic climate forcing, we conduct two 5-member ensemble GCM experiments. Both are setup identical to the historical forced (anthropogenic plus natural) scenario used in version 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, but in one experiment we also add water to the land surface using a dataset of historically estimated irrigation rates. Irrigation has a negligible effect on the global average radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere, but causes significant cooling of global average surface air temperatures over land and dampens regional warming trends. This cooling is regionally focused and is especially strong in Western North America, the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and Asia. Irrigation enhances cloud cover and precipitation in these same regions, except for summer in parts of Monsoon Asia, where irrigation causes a reduction in monsoon season precipitation. Irrigation cools the surface, reducing upward fluxes of longwave radiation (increasing net longwave), and increases cloud cover, enhancing shortwave reflection (reducing net shortwave). The relative magnitude of these two processes causes regional increases (northern India) or decreases (Central Asia, China) in energy availability at the surface and top of the atmosphere. Despite these changes in net radiation, however, climate responses are due primarily to larger magnitude shifts in the Bowen ratio from sensible to latent heating. Irrigation impacts on temperature, precipitation, and other climate variables are regionally significant, even while other anthropogenic forcings (anthropogenic aerosols

  12. The Historic Panorama of Acne Vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Humyra Tabasum; Tanzeel Ahmad; Farzana Anjum; Hina Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Although acne is described in very ancient writings dating back to Eber’s Papyrus, its clear description is found after Fuch’s coined the term ‘Acne Vulgaris’ and Erasmus Wilson separated it from acne rosacea. The early treatment of acne was based upon the witchcraft. Later new therapies got evolved with the discoveries in the field of anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. The following review focuses the historical overview of acne vulgaris, highlighting persons and discoveries in medival an...

  13. Archaeological and historical glasses: A bibliometric study

    OpenAIRE

    Palomar Sanz, Teresa; García Heras, Manuel; Villegas Broncano, María Ángeles

    2009-01-01

    Glass is one of the materials more widely developed throughout History. In the last decades, it has been stated a growing demand in the application of chemical-physical techniques to obtain more detailed information on technology and production of glasses in past societies. This research field lies within the domain of archaeometry. Results of a bibliometric study undertaken on 201 scientific articles published on ancient and historical glasses between 1987 and 2008 are presented ...

  14. Solution of Fire Protection in Historic Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iringová, Agnes; Idunk, Róbert

    2016-12-01

    The paper introduces optimization of the functional use of renovated spaces in historic buildings in terms of fire risk. It brings assessment of fire protection in the folk house Habánsky Dvor, situated in the village of Veľké Leváre, whose function was changed into the museum. It goes into static analysis of existing load-bearing structures and assessment of their fire resistance according to Eurocodes.

  15. Irrigation as an historical climate forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Shukla, Sonali P.; Puma, Michael J.; Nazarenko, Larissa S.

    2015-03-01

    Irrigation is the single largest anthropogenic water use, a modification of the land surface that significantly affects surface energy budgets, the water cycle, and climate. Irrigation, however, is typically not included in standard historical general circulation model (GCM) simulations along with other anthropogenic and natural forcings. To investigate the importance of irrigation as an anthropogenic climate forcing, we conduct two 5-member ensemble GCM experiments. Both are setup identical to the historical forced (anthropogenic plus natural) scenario used in version 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, but in one experiment we also add water to the land surface using a dataset of historically estimated irrigation rates. Irrigation has a negligible effect on the global average radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere, but causes significant cooling of global average surface air temperatures over land and dampens regional warming trends. This cooling is regionally focused and is especially strong in Western North America, the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and Asia. Irrigation enhances cloud cover and precipitation in these same regions, except for summer in parts of Monsoon Asia, where irrigation causes a reduction in monsoon season precipitation. Irrigation cools the surface, reducing upward fluxes of longwave radiation (increasing net longwave), and increases cloud cover, enhancing shortwave reflection (reducing net shortwave). The relative magnitude of these two processes causes regional increases (northern India) or decreases (Central Asia, China) in energy availability at the surface and top of the atmosphere. Despite these changes in net radiation, however, climate responses are due primarily to larger magnitude shifts in the Bowen ratio from sensible to latent heating. Irrigation impacts on temperature, precipitation, and other climate variables are regionally significant, even while other anthropogenic forcings (anthropogenic aerosols

  16. Performer rights and responsibilities in historical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irving John

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In April 2014, fortepianist and Mozart specialist John Irving recorded a CD of solo keyboard sonatas by Joseph Haydn, using a modern copy of a Viennese fortepiano of Haydn’s era. This is an account of the project written from the performer’s perspective, examining some relevant issues of historical performance practice, organology, and detailed reflections upon the performer’s preparations (of various musical and technical kinds for the recording.

  17. Risk and Risk society in Historical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Since the mid-1980s “risk” has constituted a sort of banner to which the social sciences have rallied. It has given rise to a whole range of research in the political science, sociology and economics spheres. This paper is a general introduction to a History and Technology special issue which attempt to construct analytical frameworks and research proposals that may contribute to a historization and a denaturalization of risk. This paper considers the role of history i...

  18. Heisenberg: Paralleling Scientific and Historical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofield, Calla

    2007-04-01

    Werner Heisenberg is an important historical subject within the physics community partly because his actions as a human being are discussed nearly as often as his work as a physicist. But does the scientific community establish it's historical ideas with the same methods and standards as it's scientific conclusions? I interviewed Heisenberg's son, Jochen Heisenberg, a professor of physics at UNH. Despite a great amount of literature on Werner Heisenberg, only one historian has interviewed Jochen about his father and few have interviewed Werner's wife. Nature is mysterious and unpredictable, but it doesn't lie or distort like humans, and we believe it can give ``honest'' results. But are we keeping the same standards with history that we do with science? Are we holding historians to these standards and if not, is it up to scientists to not only be keepers of scientific understanding, but historical understanding as well? Shouldn't we record history by using the scientific method, by weighing the best sources of data differently than the less reliable, and are we right to be as stubborn about changing our views on history as we are about changing our views on nature?

  19. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P; Owen, M J; Ophoff, R A; O'Donovan, M C; Corvin, A; Cichon, S; Sullivan, P F

    2015-05-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of these genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published on these genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why historical candidate gene studies did not achieve their primary aims is inadequate statistical power. However, the considerable efforts embodied in these early studies unquestionably set the stage for current successes in genomic approaches to schizophrenia.

  20. HISTORICAL VIEW OF CARDINAL VOWELS IN TURKISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih ÖZEK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Turkish is a rich language in terms of presence of vowels. There are eight vowels that originated from the relationship between palatalité, aperture and labialité in terms of their characteristics in general Turkish. These are /a/, /e/, /ı/, /i/, /o, /ö/, /u/ and /ü/. In general, /a/, /i/ and /u/ are considered as cardinal vowels in Turkish. According to this viewpoint, Turkish has a triple vowel system consisting of /a/, /i/ and /u/ in the periods when Turkish could not be pursued in writing. /e/, /ı/, /o, /ö/ and /ü/ vowels have also originated from these three cardinal vowels. Thus, our study is limited to a/, /i/ and /u/ vowels. Periodical restriction of the study is Historical Turkish Dialects Köktürk, Uighur, Karakhanid, Khorezmian, Kipchak, Chagatai and Old Oghuz Turkic languagesIn this study we are aiming to determine the following;1. Sources of /a/, /i/ and /u/ vowels in the historical Turkish dialects,2. Presence of /a/, /i/ and /u/ vowels in the first syllables and other than first syllables,3. Sound events taking place in the /a/, /i/ and /u/ vowels and their reasons,4. relations of /a/, /i/ and /u/ vowels among themselves and with the consonants,5. whether or not /a/, /i/ and /u/ vowels and sound events taking place in these vowels are determinative within a historical dialect.

  1. Terrestrial impact of the galactic historical SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyudin, A. F.

    2002-03-01

    Galactic supernovae (SNe) of the last millennium have left their signatures in many energy domains, with the optical being the best known due to the absence of astronomical instruments before the 17th century being more sophisticated than the human eye. Alongside with these records found in the scriptes of the ancient eastern and western astronomers, quite recently other signatures were recognised as valuable tracers of historical SNe, for example, different ionic and/or molecular depositions in the polar ice, radioactive isotopes depositions, and the /γ-ray emission from the radioactive 44Ti produced in the SN explosion. While the ice depositions are expected to be the result of the supernova flash in the UV and soft X-rays, the 60Fe radioactive isotope deposition into the deep-ocean ferromanganese crust is the result of direct isotope transfer by cosmic rays dust grains originating in the SN blast wave. These and other impacts of the galactic SNe are important from the point of view of their possible influence on the terrestrial environment. In this paper we consider known tracers of historical SNe and compare them to the proposed new tracer based on the atmospheric response to the galactic supernova emission in the UV and X-rays. In addition to using the 44Ti radioactive decay line photons for uncovering hidden galactic supernova remnants by imaging /γ-ray telescopes, all such tracers form an important complement to the historical SNe record.

  2. From Homo Sapiens to Homo Cosmicus - Astronautics, Darwinism abd Historical Determinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkowsky, G.

    Since its inception in late-nineteenth century, astronautics has been viewed as a historical outcome of human evolution as well as a future driver thereof. The history of astronautics-related, evolutionary thought reveals a tension between the Darwinian notion of natural selection and that of homocosmic predestination - be it of dialectical materialistic or theological nature. One can detect the influence of this ideological diversity on the American and Soviet space programs.

  3. Historical Business Cycles and Market Integration: Evidence from Comovement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uebele, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This thesis addresses historical business cycles and market integration in Europe and America in the 19th and 20th centuries. For the analysis of historical business cycles, the widely used methodology of historical national accounting is complemented with a dynamic factor model that allows for usin

  4. 30 CFR 872.21 - What are historic coal funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are historic coal funds? 872.21 Section... What are historic coal funds? (a) “Historic coal funds” are moneys provided under section 402(g)(5) of SMCRA based on the amount of coal produced before August 3, 1977, in your State or on Indian lands...

  5. Variables and Values in Historical Fiction for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mingshui

    1992-01-01

    Notes that historical fiction can be more entertaining than history and more informative than fiction. Delimits the boundaries of historical fiction by defining its conventions and expectations. Discusses the four variables of historical fiction (time, truth, tone, and perspective) and the relations among them. (RS)

  6. Geohistorical Archaeology: A Perspective for Considering the Historic Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, John R.

    2002-01-01

    The term geohistorical archaeology was adopted to describe the combination of the techniques and concepts of historical geography, historical archaeology, and history. It is suggested that the field offers the potential of enhanced research and instruction as it pertains to the early historical settlement of an area. Particular emphasis is placed…

  7. Saving Energy in Historic Buildings: Balancing Efficiency and Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluver, John H.; Randall, Brad

    2012-01-01

    By now the slogan of the National Trust for Historic Preservation that "the greenest building is the one already built" is widely known. In an era of increased environmental awareness and rising fuel prices, however, the question is how can historic building stock be made more energy efficient in a manner respectful of its historic integrity and…

  8. Puerto Rico Revealed Preference data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Revealed preference models provide insights into recreational angler behavior and the economic value of recreational fishing trips. Revealed preference data is...

  9. Revealing the Beast Within

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Deeply Embedded Massive Stellar Clusters Discovered in Milky Way Powerhouse Summary Peering into a giant molecular cloud in the Milky Way galaxy - known as W49 - astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have discovered a whole new population of very massive newborn stars . This research is being presented today at the International Astronomical Union's 25th General Assembly held in Sydney, Australia, by ESO-scientist João Alves. With the help of infrared images obtained during a period of excellent observing conditions with the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla Observatory (Chile), the astronomers looked deep into this molecular cloud and discovered four massive stellar clusters, with hot and energetic stars as massive as 120 solar masses. The exceedingly strong radiation from the stars in the largest of these clusters is "powering" a 20 light-year diameter region of mostly ionized hydrogen gas (a "giant HII region"). W49 is one of the most energetic regions of star formation in the Milky Way. With the present discovery, the true sources of the enormous energy have now been revealed for the first time, finally bringing to an end some decades of astronomical speculations and hypotheses. PR Photo 21a/03 : Colour Composite of W49A (NTT+SOFI). PR Photo 21b/03 : Radio and Near-Infrared Composite of W49A Giant molecular clouds Stars form predominantly inside Giant Molecular Clouds which populate our Galaxy, the Milky Way. One of the most prominent of these is W49 , which has a mass of a million solar masses. It is located some 37,000 light-years away and is the most luminous star-forming region known in our home galaxy: its luminosity is several million times the luminosity of our Sun. A smaller region within this cloud is denoted W49A - this is one of the strongest radio-emitting areas known in the Galaxy . Massive stars are excessive in all ways. Compared to their smaller and ligther brethren, they form at an Olympic speed and

  10. HISTORICAL-CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND HISTORICAL-CULTURALPSYCHOLOGY: INFERENCES IN TEACHERSTRAININGAND WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristhyane Ramos Haddad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the historical-critical pedagogy and historical-cultural psychology, also rehearses to make inferences for teacher training in Brazil. Therefore, was sought to theoretical base in authors such as Dermeval Saviani, Newton Duarte, Vygotsky, Leontiev, Ligia Marcia Martins, Marilda Facci, Marta Sforni. The historical-critical pedagogy postulates that the educational actis characterized by intentionality, aiming as objective the appropriation of knowledge systematized by the student. In the same sense, the historical- cultural psychology understands that the learning of knowledge scholarship is critical for the development of higher psychological functions. The good teaching in this perspective is the one that promotes the development of the individual that is always asocial and historical development. These approaches are confronting and overcoming the pedagogies of learning to learn that find their foundation in constructivism and who claim that more important than teaching or learning is to take the student to find ways to learn how to learn. The teacher’s job, according to these pedagogies, is of a learning facilitator, which has led to an undermining of their function and causing serious consequences for the teaching learning process of students in the classroom. Finally, this article points according to the marxist perspective the omnilateral defense of teachers training as an indispensable element for the progress toward the consolidation of a quality public education.

  11. Configuring Historical Facts through Historical Fiction: Agency, Art-in-Fact, and Imagination as Stepping Stones between Then and Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Heyer, Kent; Fidyk, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    The historical fiction novel straddles the factual and the fictive recreation of past motivations that animate historical events. Through reading a work of historical fiction, Ursula Hegi's novel "Stones from the River," Kent den Heyer and Alexandra Fidyk offer a theoretical consideration of the following questions and their classroom…

  12. Whole Genome Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of a Historical Collection of Bacillus anthracis Strains from Danish Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derzelle, Sylviane; Girault, Guillaume; Kokotovic, Branko

    2015-01-01

    of such lineage in Europe is demonstrated for the first time, filling an historical gap within the phylogeography of the lineage. Comparative genome analyses of these strains with 41 isolates from other parts of the world revealed that the two Danish A.Br.008/011 strains were related to the heroin...

  13. A Historical Materialist Analysis of the Debate in Swedish Print Media on Mobile Phones in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Torbjörn

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile phones for teaching and learning in schools has been a controversial matter. In this paper the debate in two Swedish newspapers on the use of mobile phones in schools is analysed using a historical materialist framework. The results are discussed in relation to contemporary research on mobile learning. The analysis reveals that…

  14. Psychotherapy in residential treatment: historical development and critical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, D Patrick

    2004-04-01

    In a time of concern with policies of managed care, more limited financial resources, and reduced lengths of residential treatment for troubled children and adolescents in the United States, we seem to be confronted ironically with an ever larger number of children who are growing up in circumstances of social dis-organization and personal despair. Faced with this dilemma, considerations of issues related to the provision of therapeutic services within residential treatment were provided by an examination of the historical development of the concepts of the milieu and residential care in the United States. The historical review revealed how the emergence of differing theories of psychotherapy has influenced the creation of various models of residential care. Several tensions have persisted over the years in the effort to provide therapy services within the broader residential setting. Behavioral and cognitive-behavioral methodologies currently have come to the forefront in many aspects of milieu treatment in group care for children and adolescents in the United States. This article concluded with a critique of some potential impacts associated with those perspectives on individual and group treatment and on our views of the individual and culture in general. This discussion did not attempt to provide answers to all the stresses that can emerge in a residential setting that strives to provide a range of mental health services, nor was it intended to present an exclusively rejecting, strident criticism of the medical model or behaviorally oriented therapies. The intent was to point out some of the limitations of relying exclusively on those perspectives and to show that an amalgamation of treatment models can have real consequences for children in group care. A continued awareness of those potential consequences is essential to mitigate their potentially antitherapeutic effects.

  15. Universality of Man as a Cultural and Historical Human Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Gontcharov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On the grounds of theoretical synthesis, the paper reveals the phenomenon of human being in its creative dimension. The present research is aimed at exploring the prospective opportunities for academic processes. The basics of universal essence of man as a cultural historic being with unlimited potential of self- development are defined; the man being mirrored by the basic philosophic concepts: naturalistic, orthodox-oriented, bio-social or bio-socio-cultural. There are two opposing views on human nature: the anthropological essentialism holding that individuality is predetermined by essence; and the anthropological existentialism claiming the opposite – human existence precedes the essentiality, the latter being constituted by the acts of choice, self-development and self-responsibility for personal choice and projecting. In the first case, the subjective side of human existence is ignored, while in the second – the objective socially conditioned side is left behind. Both theories are antihistorical as it is the history that conditions the essence of man according to the ancestral determination, the latter being modified by way of human activity and communication in a particular historical period. The components of human universal essence are defined as follows: possession of organic body, social heritage, free will, self-activity, creativity, social and rational human nature, absence of antagonistic programs of social behavior. According to the author, for the adequate realization of human universality, it is necessary to move from the profit oriented speculative market economy to the creative one oriented on social effectiveness, quality of life and reproduction of wholesome individuals. The research output can be used for devising the methodology of philosophic and pedagogic anthropology, as well as pedagogic practices of teaching philosophy and pedagogic theory in higher school. 

  16. Sample size considerations for historical control studies with survival outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Song; Ahn, Chul

    2015-01-01

    Historical control trials (HCTs) are frequently conducted to compare an experimental treatment with a control treatment from a previous study, when they are applicable and favored over a randomized clinical trial (RCT) due to feasibility, ethics and cost concerns. Makuch and Simon developed a sample size formula for historical control (HC) studies with binary outcomes, assuming that the observed response rate in the HC group is the true response rate. This method was extended by Dixon and Simon to specify sample size for HC studies comparing survival outcomes. For HC studies with binary and continuous outcomes, many researchers have shown that the popular Makuch and Simon method does not preserve the nominal power and type I error, and suggested alternative approaches. For HC studies with survival outcomes, we reveal through simulation that the conditional power and type I error over all the random realizations of the HC data have highly skewed distributions. Therefore, the sampling variability of the HC data needs to be appropriately accounted for in determining sample size. A flexible sample size formula that controls arbitrary percentiles, instead of means, of the conditional power and type I error, is derived. Although an explicit sample size formula with survival outcomes is not available, the computation is straightforward. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed method preserves the operational characteristics in a more realistic scenario where the true hazard rate of the HC group is unknown. A real data application of an advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinical trial is presented to illustrate sample size considerations for HC studies in comparison of survival outcomes. PMID:26098200

  17. Documenting historic and recent extreme floods in Kashmir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Cánovas, Juan Antonio; Koul Tasaduq, Hussain; Alamgir Shabir, Hussain; Shah Mutayib, Bashir; Stoffel, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Kashmir has been frequently subjected to massive floods along its history. The recent extreme flood events which occurred during September 2014, March 2015 and September 2015 have revealed the high vulnerability of its population. Causes of recent extreme flood events have been attributed to the bowl shaped topography, intense land-use changes and unfavorable climatic change conditions at the onset of the monsoon as well as due to the occurrence of westerly disturbances. This reality implies new challenges to authorities and calls for the development of suitable adaptation strategies focusing on a minimization of the expected negative impacts on inhabitants during future extreme floods. In this context, long-term records can improve our understanding about the flood frequency as well as changes in climate - and land-use - linkages. In this communication, we present an extensive flood records from Kashmir by combining historical descriptions with tree-ring records from headwater catchments as well as with the existing flow gauge records. Historical sources include old records from archives of the Irrigation and Flood Control Department of flood events which have taken place at Jhelum River, but also old pictures and other documents about the river system, going back in time to the British period. At the headwater catchment, we additionally perform tree-ring analyses coupled with classical palaeohydraulic techniques to reconstruct the magnitude and occurrence of recent, yet ungauged extreme events. Both sources of data have been compared and merged with the existing flow records in order to provide a clearer picture about flood phenomena in this region. Historical archives corroborate the assumption that that Srinagar (the main city of Kashmir), as well as the surroundings crops land, have been frequently affected by floods. Although the oldest records are from the 19th century, dense annals including information about water levels are available after the 18th

  18. Forming Historical Consciousness – Towards a Humanistic History Didactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn Rüsen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper present  some reflexions between History Didactics and a new concept of  Humanism. It shows among other questions the challenges of nowadays historical culture, which come from the growth of the interculturality and communication in all  dimensions of pratical human life. To develop the argumentation it has been necessary to clarify some categories like History Didactics, Historical consciousness, Historical culture, Historical  learning and Humanism. Moreover, to answer the challenges, one has developed the idea of a new humanism and its implications for historical learning. The paper also discutes how to learn Universal History means the understanding that the unity of historical time within the diversity of historical experience and how it could be a contribution for people to learn to be human.

  19. Inference and Assumption in Historical Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musson, R. M. W.

    The principal aim in studies of historical earthquakes is usually to be able to derive parameters for past earthquakes from macroseismic or other data and thus extend back in time parametric earthquake catalogues, often with improved seismic hazard studies as the ultimate goal. In cases of relatively recent historical earthquakes, for example, those of the 18th and 19th centuries, it is often the case that there is such an abundance of available macroseismic data that estimating earthquake parameters is relatively straightforward. For earlier historical periods, especially medieval and earlier, and also for areas where settlement or documentation are sparse, the situation is much harder. The seismologist often finds that he has only a few data points (or even one) for an earthquake that nevertheless appears to be regionally significant.In such cases, it is natural that the investigator will attempt to make the most of the available data, expanding it by making working assumptions, and from these deriving conclusions by inference (i.e. the process of proceeding logically from some premise). This can be seen in a number of existing studies; in some cases extremely slight data are so magnified by the use of inference that one must regard the results as tentative in the extreme. Two main types of inference can be distinguished. The first type is inference from documentation. This is where assumptions are made such as: the absence of a report of the earthquake from this monastic chronicle indicates that at this locality the earthquake was not felt. The second type is inference from seismicity. Here one deals with arguments such as all recent earthquakes felt at town X are events occurring in seismic zone Y, therefore this ancient earthquake which is only reported at town X probably also occurred in this zone.

  20. 19th Century Ankara Through Historical Poems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özge Öztekin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A city is a place whose meaning is found in the poetry created there. In Kevin Lynch’s words, a city presents the imagination with an unlimited potential for “readability”. If we consider this unlimited readability through poetry, it can be said that attempts to find the zeitgeist of a city at a certain time through literary texts must evaluate the poetry, the city and the time. This is because poetry (or literature in general, just like a city, has an important memory which oscillates through ideas of its past and future. In this sense, divan poetry and one particular example of it—historical “manzume” poems—are memories which richly illustrate the ‘continuity’ and ‘change’ within a period. This work, on 19th century Ankara, aims to evaluate the traces reflected in historical manzume poems of the time they were written. Five historical manzume poems in three texts out of seventy 19th century divan collections scanned for this work were found to be about Ankara. Two of these manzumes are by Cazib, one by Ziver Pasha, and one by Mahmud Celaleddin Pasha. The first of these is on Ankara’s dervish lodge; the second on a barracks being built in Ankara; the third on Vecihi Pasha’s governorship of Ankara; the fourth on the the Mayoral Residence. In addition to these, a manzume on the construction of Hamidiye Caddesi by Mahmud Celaleddin Pasha is discovered with in scope of the work. The aim of this work is to provide a contribution to city history through a commentary on elements of 19th century poetry concerning Ankara.

  1. Electrochemical desalination of historic Portuguese tiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble salts cause severe decay of historic Portuguese tiles. Treatment options for removal of the salts to stop the decay are few. The present paper deals with development of a method for electrochemical desalination, where an electric DC field is applied to the tiles. Laboratory experiments were...... the electrochemical treatment. The removal rate was similar for the two anions so the chloride concentration reached the lowest concentration level first. At this point the electric resistance increased, but the removal of nitrate continued unaffected till similar low concentration. The sulfate concentration...... was successful. Based on the obtained results an important step is taken towards development of an electrochemical technique for desalination of tile panels....

  2. [Inequity in health: its historical development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaverry García, Oswaldo

    2013-01-01

    Health inequity, main issue of contemporary debates on public health, is based on philosophical and historical concepts that date back to the idea of justice from classic Greece. The Aristotelian approach on distributive justice and its higher form, epiekeia or equity, has been reviewed, as well as how this evolves from the Middle Ages and modernity to the heart of the debate of a variety of thinkers such as liberal Rawls and Nobel laureate Amartya Sen. On this conceptual debate lies the World Health Organization version that links equity to health determinants and intends to make it operational through the equitable provision of health services.

  3. The modern hospital in historical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Leder, Ron

    2009-01-01

    The evolution and development of hospitals in their historical context is quickly reviewed, starting first as simple shelters for the sick and indigent, waiting essentially for death, up to the relatively recent concept of true health centers where patients face a high probability of actual recovery and rehabilitation. Anesthesia, microbiology, asepsia, antibiotics, virology, radiology, transfusion and different biomedical engineering technologies, along with other basic sciences knowledge, led to the intensive care and emergency units introduced in the 1960's, leading to the specialty of critical care medicine and underlining the patient as the center of care.

  4. Lumbar hernia: a short historical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, Antonino; De Toma, Giorgio; Cavallaro, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare form of abdominal hernia, which has been recognized later along the early development of the modern surgery. it has been, on many occasions, the object of heavy debate regarding its anatomical background and as well its etiology. The authors reports the historical aspects of this rare pathology, focusing on the earliest descriptions of hernia arising in lumbar regions, on the first reports of surgical repair, and on the anatomical description of the lumbar weakness areas, that are currently named Petit's triangle and Grynfeltt and Lesshaft's triangle.

  5. Preserving the acoustical heritage of historical buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    of the difficulties involved. If the building exists as a whole or partly the first step is collection of geometrical and architectural data from the site. The level of detail may be huge, e.g. if laser scanning is used for providing the geometrical data, and some degree of simplification may be necessary...... with the present state building. Next step is to identify what historic conditions that should be reconstructions, especially architectural details, surface materials, obstacles, textiles, performing persons and audience, and typical sounds or music. The computer model is then modified according to these data...

  6. Funding Melbourne's hospitals: some historical moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C

    1998-01-01

    In 1993 the Victorian Government introduced casemix funding as part of its restructure of the public hospital system. Casemix funding provides a new basis for government funding according to outcomes. At the same time, restructure of hospitals allows for a reconsideration of who is eligible to use them. Historical research into the growth of the public hospital system in Melbourne shows that attempts to reform the hospital system are as old as the system itself. This paper argues that the views of hospitals in funding crises and the solutions that are recommended have more to do with the politics of the day than the economics of running hospitals.

  7. The Historic Panorama of Acne Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humyra Tabasum

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Although acne is described in very ancient writings dating back to Eber’s Papyrus, its clear description is found after Fuch’s coined the term ‘Acne Vulgaris’ and Erasmus Wilson separated it from acne rosacea. The early treatment of acne was based upon the witchcraft. Later new therapies got evolved with the discoveries in the field of anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. The following review focuses the historical overview of acne vulgaris, highlighting persons and discoveries in medival and modern period.

  8. The Intelligence Revolution: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    Castro Hidalgo, Orlando. Spy for Fidel. Miami, FL: E. A. Seemann Pub., 1971. (JL 1009.5 .16 C3) Chomsky , Noam . The Washington connection and Third World...and Joseph 0. Baylen. Colonel Philip R. Faymonville and the Red Army, 1934-43. Slavic Review 35(3):483-505, 1975. Mersky, Peter. My dad made models . U.S...Neilson, Keith. "Joy rides?": British intelligence and propaganda in Russia, 1914-1917. Historical Journal 24(4):885-906, 1981. Watching the "steamroller

  9. Renovation of historic, protected buildings in Geneva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.; Haefeli, P.

    2009-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on work done within the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Program's Task 37. The objective of SHC Task 37 is to develop a solid knowledge base on how to renovate housings to a very high energy standard and how to develop strategies that support the market penetration of such renovation methods. The report deals with four listed buildings of historical value in Geneva, Switzerland, and examines various aspects of the renovation. These aspects include a discussion of the techniques applied, including internal and external insulation. Simulation methods used and results obtained are discussed. The improvements made are evaluated.

  10. In Situ Preservation of Historic Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, R.; Brooks, R.

    The loss of the Mir space station is shown to symbolize a new consciousness of the value of space artefacts. The reasons why such artefacts as Mir become historic objects worthy of preservation are examined. Preservation of space vehicles in situ is discussed, with particular reference to safety, monitoring and long term costs. An argument is made for a wider definition for World Heritage designations to include material beyond the surface of the Earth, and for international bodies to assess, monitor and oversee these projects. Such heritage sites are seen as an economic driver for the development of space tourism in the 21st century.

  11. People Recognition: A Historical/Anthropological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ardila

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Using current neurological and neuropsychological literature, and the analysis of different cultural and historical conditions, people recognition is analyzed. Different “subsystems” or “modules” could be involved in individuals' recognition: living versus non-living, own species versus other species, familiar versus non-familiar, males versus females, and individual identification versus emotional identification. Not only visual, but also auditory and even olfactory information may be involved in people recognition. Visual information involved in people recognition is proposed to include not only the perception of faces, but also the perception of whole body and gait, clothes, emotional expressions, and individual marks.

  12. Natural Colorants: Historical, Processing and Sustainable Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Mohd; Shabbir, Mohd; Mohammad, Faqeer

    2017-02-01

    With the public's mature demand in recent times pressurized the textile industry for use of natural colorants, without any harmful effects on environment and aquatic ecosystem, and with more developed functionalities simultaneously. Advanced developments for the natural bio-resources and their sustainable use for multifunctional clothing are gaining pace now. Present review highlights historical overview of natural colorants, classification and predominantly processing of colorants from sources, application on textiles surfaces with the functionalities provided by them. Chemistry of natural colorants on textiles also discussed with relevance to adsorption isotherms and kinetic models for dyeing of textiles.

  13. Historical review of tutorial in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Luna Pérez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, tutorials have always been of an individual character in the history of education. The paper reviews how tutorials in education have evolved from ancient Greece to the present by considering taking into account the following aspects: a its general understanding, b the favorite areas of orientation c the role of learning guiding process d the supporting role of tutorials. We offer a historical account of tutorials development in Mexican Education. The study provides the main trends of tutorial activities in primary education, the evidence confirmed that tutoring has evolved from the learning of philosophical and ethical questions to the multiple learning involving competencies.

  14. Mathematics education and comparative historical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner RODRIGUES VALENTE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper has as its aims: to characterize the area of research «history of mathematics education» and to defend the idea that mathematics education has constituted a privileged research theme within the field of comparative historical studies. To achieve these aims, the text includes references to a review of the literature concerning comparative studies, the analysis of two fundamental moments focused on attempts to internationalize the mathematics curriculum, both of which occurred during the 20th century, and, to end, a case study emanating from an international cooperation between researchers in Brazil and Portugal.

  15. Desiccation Resistance in Tigriopus californicus(Copepoda, Harpacticoida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powlik, James J.; Lewis, Alan G.

    1996-10-01

    In field populations and controlled laboratory microcosms, the supralittoral copepod Tigriopus californicusdemonstrated the ability to recover populations from evaporated splashpools. The response to either seawater or rainwater introduction occurred mainly within 24 h, regardless of copepod abundance or substrate material (mixed sediment or dried samples of the alga Enteromorpha compressa). As a proportion of available individuals, the response was quite consistent over all life-history stages. However, egg-carrying females andadult males showed the greatest net increase in individual numbers due to their abundance in source (dried) materials. Enteromorpha compressatreatments hydrated with seawater yielded significantly greater re-animation ( P<0·05), suggesting a response to food resources rather than moisture or salinity alone. Overall, 10·7±8·5% (mean±SD) of individuals were re-animated following hydration. While a slight percentage, the tremendous density of individuals trapped in dried splashpools probably still yields sufficient numbers of effective intra-pool recolonization. Such a response may be more practical for population endurance in ephemeral supralittoral habitats than reliance on environmental influences (waves, precipitation or transport on coincident invertebrates) or the deposition of encysted eggs.

  16. DAMAGE AGAINST THE HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL HERITAGE AND THEIR NORMATIVE INSTRUMENTS OF PROTECTION: case study from a public civil action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luiz Oliveira dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a study on the environmental damage and the crimes against the urban heritage and cultural history in the city of Belém. This is a case study about a Class Action (Ação Civil Pública concerning the historic and commercial building known as “O Portuga”, which has been the target of damages to the urban environment in the historical and cultural heritage district of Batista Campos. This district houses a set of enduring historical buildings, whose architectural, artistic and decorative characteristics reveal the memory from a period of prominent historical importance of this city. The study focuses on the effective and possible damages to this historical landmark building, as well as the need to provide remedy for the environmental damage, as well as the duty to provide reparation for the collective damages. It also presents a prompt analysis of the Parquet’s role as the legitimate party to propose this Class Action in order to safeguard the collective right to the cultural environment. The main benchmark used here are environmental protection statutes and other legislations (Constitutional, Civil, Environmental, Criminal that aim to safeguard the transindividual, collective and homogeneous interests, in which the historic and cultural environment is embedded in.

  17. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for SY-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1997-08-12

    The purpose of this historical characterization document is to present the synthesized summaries of the historical records concerning the physical characteristics, radiological, and chemical composition of mixed wastes stored in underground double-shell tanks and the physical condition of these tanks. The double-shell tanks are located on the United States Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, approximately 25 miles northwest or Richland, Washington. The document will be used to assist in characterizing the waste in the tanks in conjunction with the current program of sampling and analyzing the tank wastes. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) developed computer models that used the historical data to attempt to characterize the wastes and to generate estimates of each tank`s inventory. A historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that could be critical to characterization and post characterization activities. This document was developed by reviewing the operating plant process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical data from numerous resources. These resources were generated by numerous contractors from 1945 to the present. Waste characterization, the process of describing the character or quality of a waste, is required by Federal law (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA]) and state law (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303, Dangerous Waste Regulations). Characterizing the waste is necessary to determine methods to safely retrieve, transport, and/or treat the wastes.

  18. Scientific overview and historical context of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquake sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Hough

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The central and eastern United States has experienced only 5 historic earthquakes with Mw 7.0, four during the New Madrid sequence of 1811-1812: three principal mainshocks and the so-called «dawn aftershock» following the first mainshock. Much of the historic earthquake research done in the United States has focused on the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ, because the largest New Madrid earthquakes may represent the archetype for the most damaging earthquakes to be expected in intraplate regions. Published magnitude values ranging from 7.0 to 8.75 have generally been based on macroseismic effects, which provide the most direct constraint on source size for the events. Critical to the interpretation of these accounts is an understanding of their historic context. Early settlments clustered along waterways, where substantial amplification of seismic waves is expected. Analyzing the New Madrid intensity values with a consideration of these effects yields preferred values of Mw 7.2-7.3, 7.0, and 7.4-7.5 for the December, January, and February mainshocks, respectively, and of 7.0 for the «dawn aftershock». These values are consistent with other lines of evidence, including scaling relationships. Finally, I show that accounts from the New Madrid sequence reveal evidence for remotely triggered earthquakes well outside the NMSZ. Remotely triggered earthquakes represent a potentially important new wrinkle in historic earthquake research, as their ground motions can sometimes be confused with mainshock ground motions.

  19. RETURN TO SOURCES: RENAISSANCE OF THE PRE-REVOLUTIONARY HISTORICAL PERIODICAL PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur Albertovich Magsumov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The review of the modern scientific historical periodical press on materials of the recreated pre-revolutionary magazines for identification of a present state and prospects of development of historical science and scientific journalism became the purpose of work.Methodology. To work with periodical press materials we were guided by ten "rules of a general meaning" formulated by Zh. Kayser.Results. Different ways of an increment, streamlining and a regulation of historical knowledge in a perspective of last centuries are shown. Periodical press problems as historiographic base of research of national history are analysed. Features of development of modern scientific journalism are considered. The general review of the most important editions of the pre-revolutionary and modern press giving on the pages an important place to questions of the past of our country is submitted. Through a prism of periodicals problem zones in historical science and their reflection in consciousness of representatives of the intellectuals are revealed.Practical implications. Results facilitate a problem of search of necessary information on the Russian history and its subsequent use in the course of research.

  20. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for S tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200 West Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to all the SSTs in the S Tank Farm of the southwest quadrant of the 200 West Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  1. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for B Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Johnson, E.D.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the B Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  2. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the A Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  3. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BY Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the BY Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices contain data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  4. PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF THE HISTORICAL CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND THE FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATIONAL OF PSYCHOLOGY HISTORICAL-CULTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Marcia Martins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the theoretical and methodological unity between the historical-critical pedagogy and cultural-historical psychology. It highlights, in addition to the membership of both theories to historical-dialectical materialism, the basic premises that point toward the affirmation of school education as a condition of humanization of individuals, as well as the transmission of historically systematized knowledge as one of the requirements for the achieving this purpose. In this direction, we aim to demonstrate that the historical-critical pedagogy contains, in its innerness, a solid psychological foundation, consistently built by a cultural-historical conception of man, society and educative nature that guides the relationship between them through the human vital activity, that is, through the work. It is in the core of those fundamentals that the alliance between this pedagogical theory and cultural-historical psychology is evident.

  5. Universals versus historical contingencies in lexical evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, V; Solovyev, V; Wichmann, S

    2014-12-06

    The frequency with which we use different words changes all the time, and every so often, a new lexical item is invented or another one ceases to be used. Beyond a small sample of lexical items whose properties are well studied, little is known about the dynamics of lexical evolution. How do the lexical inventories of languages, viewed as entire systems, evolve? Is the rate of evolution of the lexicon contingent upon historical factors or is it driven by regularities, perhaps to do with universals of cognition and social interaction? We address these questions using the Google Books N-Gram Corpus as a source of data and relative entropy as a measure of changes in the frequency distributions of words. It turns out that there are both universals and historical contingencies at work. Across several languages, we observe similar rates of change, but only at timescales of at least around five decades. At shorter timescales, the rate of change is highly variable and differs between languages. Major societal transformations as well as catastrophic events such as wars lead to increased change in frequency distributions, whereas stability in society has a dampening effect on lexical evolution.

  6. Geomagnetic storms: historical perspective to modern view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2016-12-01

    The history of geomagnetism is more than 400 years old. Geomagnetic storms as we know them were discovered about 210 years ago. There has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs, and concomitant magnetic storms in recent times. Magnetic storms are the most important component of space weather effects on Earth. We give an overview of the historical aspects of geomagnetic storms and the progress made during the past two centuries. Super magnetic storms can cause life-threatening power outages and satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. The data for such super magnetic storms that occurred in the last 50 years during the space era is sparce. Research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a database for intense and super magnetic storms. New knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of magnetic storms gained from spaceage observations will be used to review the super magnetic storm of September 1-2, 1859. We discuss the occurrence probability of such super magnetic storms, and the maximum possible intensity for the effects of a perfect ICME: extreme super magnetic storm, extreme magnetospheric compression, and extreme magnetospheric electric fields.

  7. Detecting Spammers via Aggregated Historical Data Set

    CERN Document Server

    Menahem, Eitan

    2012-01-01

    The battle between email service providers and senders of mass unsolicited emails (Spam) continues to gain traction. Vast numbers of Spam emails are sent mainly from automatic botnets distributed over the world. One method for mitigating Spam in a computationally efficient manner is fast and accurate blacklisting of the senders. In this work we propose a new sender reputation mechanism that is based on an aggregated historical data-set which encodes the behavior of mail transfer agents over time. A historical data-set is created from labeled logs of received emails. We use machine learning algorithms to build a model that predicts the \\emph{spammingness} of mail transfer agents in the near future. The proposed mechanism is targeted mainly at large enterprises and email service providers and can be used for updating both the black and the white lists. We evaluate the proposed mechanism using 9.5M anonymized log entries obtained from the biggest Internet service provider in Europe. Experiments show that propose...

  8. Estimation of peak discharges of historical floods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Herget

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt, that the hazard assessment of future floods especially under consideration of the recent environmental change can be significantly improved by the consideration of historic flood events. While flood frequency inventories on local, regional and even European scale are already developed and published, the estimation of their magnitudes indicated by discharges is still challenging. Such data are required due to significant human impact on river channels and floodplains though historic flood levels cannot be related to recent ones or recent discharges. Based on own experiences from single local key studies the general outline of an approach to estimate the discharge of the previous flood based on handed down flood level and topographic data is presented. The model for one-dimensional steady flow is based on the empirical Manning equation for the mean flow velocity. Background and potential sources of information, acceptable simplifications and data transformation for each element of the model-equation are explained and discussed. Preliminary experiences on the accuracy of ±10% are documented and potential approaches for the validation of individual estimations given. A brief discussion on benefits and limitations including a generalized statement on alternative approaches closes the review presentation of the approach.

  9. The Historical-Conceptual Language of Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Mié

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In an essay devoted to the method of philosophy, Ernst Tugendhat (1989 warned about the scarcity of general methodological clarifications that this discipline offers for its own labor. Beyond the many ways there currently exist to make philosophy, and along its vast history, such lack of clarifications about the procedures can signal a lasting fault in the concept and scope of philosophy. Although Tugendhat is certainly right in his diagnosis, his proposal is quite incomplete and its formulation in the classical terms of the analytic tradition −according to which doing philosophy is a form of clarification in the use of linguistic expressions− must be completed with the historical feature which is peculiar to the discipline. However, in this paper I will not discuss this author’s thesis, but I will examine the methodological problem mapped out by him. The strategy is to start from what I consider a necessary previous step: to clarify the conceptual and historical dimensions of the philosophical vocabulary whereby this discipline handles its own topics. As a result, I will be able to derive some consequences vis-à-vis the method and goals of philosophy.

  10. Acoustics of Italian Historical Opera Houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodi, Nicola; Pompoli, Roberto; Martellotta, Francesco; Sato, Shin-ichi

    2015-08-01

    Opera houses represent a large group of performance spaces characterized by great complexity and, at the same time, versatility with respect to different usage (from opera to symphonic music and ballet). This kind of building originated in Italy during the 17th century and later spread across the country and then Europe and the rest of the world, slowly evolving into modern theatre shapes. As a consequence of the changes undergone by the interior space, the original acoustic features, which likely influenced many composers, experienced important variations. Thanks to acoustic measurement campaigns inside Italian Historical Opera Houses, promoted by National and Regional Projects, the distinctive features of these spaces were investigated in comparison to modern spaces. In this work, the newly acquired data are merged with data in the literature in order to present and discuss some of the distinctive acoustic features of historical spaces as regards their original function. Moreover, specific issues such as listening in stalls and boxes and the criteria governing the preference judgment of listeners are considered. The concept and the crucial role of the balance between stage and pit sources are also discussed by means of previous literature studies.

  11. Collecting, digitizing, and distributing historical seismological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Alberto; De Simoni, Bruno; Amato, Alessandro; Boschi, Enzo

    The digital preservation of the unique seismological heritage consisting of historical seismograms and earthquake bulletins, and of related documentation (e.g., observatory logbooks, station books, etc.), is critically important in order to avoid deterioration and loss overtime [Kanamori, 1988]. Dissemination of this seismological material in digital form is of equal importance, to allow reanalysis of past earthquakes using modern techniques and the reevaluation of seismic hazard. This is of particular interest for those areas where little or no earthquake activity has occurred since the last significant historical earthquake.In 2001, the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) started an innovative project, Progetto SISMOS (i.e., SISMOgrammi Storici), to scan (i.e., convert into digital form for storage on a computer), at very high resolution,and archive seismological paper records and related material. The Italian Ministry for the Environment originally funded the project to encompass the digitization of seismogram records of the Italian seismic observatories and of associated bulletins

  12. Working With Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolff-Michael Roth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the experiences of two researchers, Wolff-Michael ROTH and Luis RADFORD, using cultural-historical activity theory in mathematics education. The aim is to provide insights into the ways these researchers see and engage with activity theory, how they have come to adopt and expand it, and some of the challenges and concerns that they have had using it. These questions are not usually addressed within typical scientific papers. Yet, they are important for understanding both the dynamics of research and the practical use of cultural-historical activity theory. Since the format of research report papers is not necessarily well suited to convey personal experiences and thinking, the present article takes the form of a conversation, which provides an effective vehicle for exploring and articulating these matters. This provides a basis for understanding more deeply the underlying assumptions of this theory; its dynamics and how it is applied in research of mathematics practice, thinking, and learning; and insights into the manner in which experienced researchers grapple with the theoretical dimensions of their research. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1202232

  13. Unrealized Architectural Projects in Lithuania: Historical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrė Gudelytė

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The “unrealized architectural projects” are the building projects, carried out under the specific design task and intended to be built in a particular place (site, though, for certain reasons and circumstances, have never been constructed. However, up to the present day, the topic of the “unbuilt” has been analyzed just episodically in literature and sources. The article touches upon the historical development of unrealized architectural works, as well as their artistic value and role within various historical periods of Lithuanian architecture. One of the chapters briefly reviews the relevance and development of unrealized projects during the period since Czarist Russian occupation (1795 to the restoration of Lithuanian independence (1990. Furthermore, the deeper analysis of the Soviet period (1940–1990 “dead” architecture is presented. While exploring “the unrealized”, attention has been also paid to what was actu ally built, therefore the prevailing architectural styles, tendencies and examples of the corresponding decade (in Lithuania and worldwide have been studied.Article in Lithuanian

  14. contemporary architecture; art; Selezione Architettura: historical heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Zanelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available At the end of the Nineties the Emilia-Romagna updates its twenty-year conservation and restoration policy launching the LR 19/98 on urban regeneration; then at the beginning of the Millennium among the first regions it legislate about architectural quality (LR 16/02, which increases the possibility of intervention for urban spaces of historic and artistic interest, but also introduces funding competitions for the design, construction of contemporary architecture, inclusion of works of art in public buildings, studies and research on historical and contemporary architectural heritage, elimination of incongruous works. In addition to several significant interventions, the Law 16/02 develop important research activities: the survey, merged in the volume “Quale e Quanta” (2005, about the quality of architecture of the late twentieth century, which identifies more than one thousand significant buildings in the Region; a survey of works of art pursuant to the “law of 2 percent” (L. 717/49 in public buildings, accompanied by a proposal for a regional law on the same subject; the initiative “Selezione Architettura Emilia-Romagna”, biennial event that chooses the best of architectural production from 2001 onwards.

  15. Modeling Concept Evolution: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolo, Flavio; Velegrakis, Yannis; Mylopoulos, John; Bykau, Siarhei

    The world is changing, and so must the data that describes its history. Not surprisingly, considerable research effort has been spent in Databases along this direction, covering topics such as temporal models and schema evolution. A topic that has not received much attention, however, is that of concept evolution. For example, Germany (instance-level concept) has evolved several times in the last century as it went through different governance structures, then split into two national entities that eventually joined again. Likewise, a caterpillar is transformed into a butterfly, while a mother becomes two (maternally-related) entities. As well, the concept of Whale (a class-level concept) changed over the past two centuries thanks to scientific discoveries that led to a better understanding of what the concept entails. In this work, we present a formal framework for modeling, querying and managing such evolution. In particular, we describe how to model the evolution of a concept, and how this modeling can be used to answer historical queries of the form "How has concept X evolved over period Y". Our proposal extends an RDF-like model with temporal features and evolution operators. Then we provide a query language that exploits these extensions and supports historical queries.

  16. Mendelian controversies: a botanical and historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, D J; Rytting, B

    2001-05-01

    Gregor Mendel was a 19(th) century priest and botanist who developed the fundamental laws of inheritance. The year 2000 marked a century since the rediscovery of those laws and the beginning of genetics. Although Mendel is now recognized as the founder of genetics, significant controversy ensued about his work throughout the 20(th) century. In this paper, we review five of the most contentious issues by looking at the historical record through the lens of current botanical science: (1) Are Mendel's data too good to be true? (2) Is Mendel's description of his experiments fictitious? (3) Did Mendel articulate the laws of inheritance attributed to him? (4) Did Mendel detect but not mention linkage? (5) Did Mendel support or oppose Darwin?A synthesis of botanical and historical evidence supports our conclusions: Mendel did not fabricate his data, his description of his experiments is literal, he articulated the laws of inheritance attributed to him insofar as was possible given the information he had, he did not detect linkage, and he neither strongly supported nor opposed Darwin.

  17. Revealing the Differences Between Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Donohoe, Byron; Ciesielski, Peter; Nill, Jennifer; McKinney, Kellene; Mittal, Ashutosh; Katahira, Rui; Himmel, Michael; Biddy, Mary; Beckham, Gregg; Decker, Steve

    2014-09-08

    Enzymatic depolymerization of polysaccharides is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, and discovery of synergistic biomass-degrading enzyme paradigms will enable improved conversion processes. Historically, revealing insights into enzymatic saccharification mechanisms on plant cell walls has been hindered by uncharacterized substrates and low resolution.

  18. Jane Eyre, a Historic Mirror%Jane Eyre,a Historic Mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王姝; 庄严

    2007-01-01

    Jane Eyre,a historic Mirror is from 3 aspects to illustrate the author's point of view in details, and the emphasis is according to the background of Victorian Age to express the society,the religion and the people's spiritual and physical life of that time.

  19. Dutch strategies for the historic urban core, the historic inner city, faded glory or core business

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Toorn Vrijthoff, W.

    2011-01-01

    This article is about the strategies of Dutch cities for the historic urban core, based on empirical research done on the policy reports of twenty Dutch cities. In addition to the policy reports plans for spatial and functional interventions, initiated by the local government, were analyzed. The ana

  20. Y-12 National Security Complex National Historic Preservation Act Historic Preservation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-09-30

    The Historic Preservation Plan (HPP) recognizes that the Y-12 National Security Complex is a vital and long-term component of DOE and NNSA. In addition to NNSA missions, the Office of Science and Energy, the Office of Nuclear Energy, and the Office of Environmental Management have properties located at Y-12 that must be taken into consideration. The HPP also recognizes that the challenge for cultural resource management is incorporating the requirements of NNSA, SC, NE, and EM missions while preserving and protecting its historic resources. The HPP seeks to find an effective way to meet the obligations at Y-12 for historic and archeological protection while at the same time facilitating effective completion of ongoing site mission activities, including removal of obsolete or contaminated facilities, adaptive reuse of existing facilities whenever feasible, and construction of new facilities in order to meet site mission needs. The Y-12 Historic Preservation Plan (HPP) defines the preservation strategy for the Y-12 National Security Complex and will direct efficient compliance with the NHPA and federal archaeological protection legislation at Y-12 as DOE and NNSA continues mission activities of the site.

  1. Shaping a Stories of Resilience Model from urban American Indian elders' narratives of historical trauma and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinschmidt, Kerstin M; Attakai, Agnes; Kahn, Carmella B; Whitewater, Shannon; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette

    2016-01-01

    American Indians (AIs) have experienced traumatizing events but practice remarkable resilience to large-scale and long-term adversities. Qualitative, community-based participatory research served to collect urban AI elders' life narratives on historical trauma and resilience strategies. A consensus group of 15 elders helped finalize open-ended questions that guided 13 elders in telling their stories. Elders shared multifaceted personal stories that revealed the interconnectedness between historical trauma and resilience, and between traditional perceptions connecting past and present, and individuals, families, and communities. Based on the elders' narratives, and supported by the literature, an explanatory Stories of Resilience Model was developed.

  2. The Historical Optimism of Boris Mironov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir G. Khoros

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article attempts to assess the contribution of B.N. Mironov’s monograph “The Russian Empire: From Tradition to Modernity” to historiography. The author has reviewed other books by Mironov. While the reviewer’s assessment is positive overall, a number of points defended by the author call for a rejoinder. The reviewer agrees with the main idea of the book: there was no permanent crisis and impoverishment of the working population in the history of imperial Russia in the 18th to the beginning of 20th centuries. On the contrary, there was some progress and achievements in terms of modernization. The revolutions in the beginning of the 20th century must be explained through other reasons. Credit undoubtedly belongs to Mironov for proof of this thesis. In such an approach, the Russian past appears more complicated and realistic than in many of the preceding investigations by Russian as well as by foreign scholars. An interesting feature of Mironov’s approach is historical optimism, that is, an interpretation of Russian historical evolution as successful. However, sometimes this optimism seems excessive. Key observations are the following. First, overcoming one extreme (the permanent crisis in Russia, Mironov, to some extent, ends up at another extreme – an underestimation of those social and cultural problems in Russian society that stimulated the revolutionary climate. Second, there is an overestimation of the role of the intelligentsia as an agent of revolution, its characteristics are excessively negative, and there is an underestimation of the impulse to protest from below and the popular character of the Russian revolution of 1917. Third, despite a number of interesting ideas concerning the process of modernization in Russia, Mironov identifies this modernization with Westernization (“Europeanization”. But the author himself rightly demonstrates the difference between Russian and European civilizational values. This

  3. Memory and historical Jesus studies: Formgeschichte in a new dress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest van Eck

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the quest for the historical Jesus, memory studies are seen as an important breakthrough in the study of the historical Jesus and the way forward in establishing the historicity of the Gospel traditions. This article evaluates the claim made by memory studies by evaluating memory studies’ critique on the methodology of the criteria approach. In this evaluation attention is given to the methodological points of departure of memory studies, including an assessment of the few examples memory studies thus far have produced in their investigation of the historicity of the Gospels and the historical Jesus. The conclusion reached is that memory studies are guilty of what they accuse the criteria approach, and thus far have not yet offered a viable methodological alternative to the current criteria approach used in historical Jesus research.

  4. Earthquake recovery of historic buildings: exploring cost and time needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nammari, Fatima M; Lindell, Michael K

    2009-07-01

    Disaster recovery of historic buildings has rarely been investigated even though the available literature indicates that they face special challenges. This study examines buildings' recovery time and cost to determine whether their functions (that is, their use) and their status (historic or non-historic) affect these outcomes. The study uses data from the city of San Francisco after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake to examine the recovery of historic buildings owned by public agencies and non-governmental organisations. The results show that recovery cost is affected by damage level, construction type and historic status, whereas recovery time is affected by the same variables and also by building function. The study points to the importance of pre-incident recovery planning, especially for building functions that have shown delayed recovery. Also, the study calls attention to the importance of further investigations into the challenges facing historic building recovery.

  5. The use of historical materials in elementary science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafai, Yasmin B.; Gilliland-Swetland, Anne J.

    2001-07-01

    Science educators have stressed in recent years the importance of providing students with an historical understanding of the development of scientific knowledge. Although many approaches have been suggested for building historical understanding of science, historical source materials have often been deemed too difficult to use with elementary school students. This article reports on a case study that used archival and contemporary source materials in project activities, such as photographs and field notes, to engage students in the processes of data generation, selection, annotation, and evaluation. The curricular science activities of one elementary classroom with 29 fourth and fifth grade students are decribed and analyzed as they build and use archives of historical and contemporary naturalist materials. The article concludes with a discussion of the feasibility and benefits of using historical source materials within elementary science education, as well as the implications for selecting and preparing historical source materials in digital format for use in elementary education.

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement Potential in Historical Brick Building

    OpenAIRE

    Žogla, Gatis; Blumberga, Andra; Zvaigznītis, Kristaps; Dzikēvičs, Miķelis; Blumberga, Dagnija; Burinskiene, Marija

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficiency in historical heritage buildings is viewed as a taboo because these buildings usually are law-protected and no energy efficiency measures that would change the appearance of building are allowed. In this paper we look at a potential of increasing energy efficiency level in historical buildings. Measurements to determine energy efficiency of a historical brick building have been done, which also give the possibility to determine the potential of energy efficiency measures in ...

  7. Moving History: The Cinematic Regime of Historicity in Weimar Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Allred, Mason Kamana

    2015-01-01

    This study shows how historical film confronted popular memory and the dominant sense of history, to deconstruct and supplant these modes, resulting in a media revolution for historical transmission and experience. With its inherent potential and oft-lamented drawbacks, I argue that film came to shape a primary regime of historicity, one that made history internationally shared, primarily imagistic rather than narrative, explicitly constructed and a sensory experience specifically for embodie...

  8. Path dependence: a foundational concept for historical social science

    OpenAIRE

    Paul A. David

    2007-01-01

    This introduction to the concept of path dependence, its pertinence for the development of historical social science, and its application in economic analysis and economic history, proceeds from intuitive general ideas about history and historicity in narratives. It provides precise definitions of what is meant by describing a dynamical process as being “historical.” Deterministic and stochastic formalizations of such dynamical systems are distinguished. The characterization of stochastic pat...

  9. Methods in Historical linguistics: Evidences from Tamil epigraphic texts

    OpenAIRE

    Murugaiyan, Appasamy

    2013-01-01

    Historical linguistics, among other things, aims at understanding the principles and factors that cause changes in languages. The Dravidian comparative linguistics in the last few decades has arrived at excellent results at different levels of language change: phonology, morphology and etymology. However, the field of historical syntax remains to be explored in detail. The linguistic analysis of Tamil inscriptions and classical and ancient literary texts will shed light on the historical ling...

  10. Continuity in Mexico's security police and historical institutionalism

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper intends to analyze the historical evolution of military involvement in internal security affairs of Mexico since the late 1940s. Recently, many critics have written extensively about Mexico’s heavily militarized policy towards drug trafficking and the organized crime (f.ex: Moloeznik 2010; Manaut 2009; Artz 2003). But without recognizing the historical continuities underlying such policy model, we cannot fully comprehend its origins and effectiveness. Historical-institutionalism is...

  11. The Carnot cycle and the teaching of thermodynamics: a historical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeiras, Cássio C.; Portela, Sebastião I. C.

    2016-09-01

    The Carnot cycle is a topic that is traditionally present in introductory physics courses dedicated to the teaching of thermodynamics, playing an essential role in introducing the concept of Entropy and the consequent formulation of the second Law. Its effective understanding and contribution to the development of thermodynamics is often hindered, however. Among other things, this is the result of a pragmatic approach, which usually limits itself to presenting the isotherms and adiabatic curves in a P-V diagram and is totally disconnected from the historical fundamentals of Heat Theory. The purpose of this paper is to reveal the potential of an approach to the subject that recovers the historical and social dimensions of scientific knowledge, and to promote reflections about the nature of science (NOS).

  12. The Use of Fair Value and Historical Cost Accounting for Investment Properties in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Taplin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the use of fair value accounting for investment properties by 96 randomly selected Chinese listed companies’ year-ending 2008 annual reports. Half the sampled companies use fair value while half use historical cost, both methods being allowable under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS and Chinese Accounting Standards (CAS. This represents the lowest possible level of comparability (or harmony when there are only two choices of method. A combination of T indices to summarise the level of comparability and logistic regression reveals that companies with an international influence (listed on international stock exchanges and/or with international operations are more likely to use fair value. Furthermore, there is evidence that companies with above average volatility in earnings are more likely to use fair value than historical cost. The consequences for domestic and international harmony for regulators and investors is discussed in the context of the opening of Chinese markets to international investment.

  13. The role of BIM (Building Information Modeling for representation and managing of built and historic artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Bianchini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It’s established that in the design and construc- tion of new buildings, BIM is a fundamental refe- rence especially when the standardization is the typical character of the project. As Architecture, with the management of the entire building pro- cess, requires standardization for greater eco- nomy, thanks to BIM tools the building process seems to have actually moved to a 2.0 phase; on the contrary, when BIM is applied to historical bu- ildings it still reveals not so adequate. In this framework, this paper will not discuss the differences between CAD and BIM or the un- doubted potential of BIM software from a tech- nical or operational standpoint; we would focus instead on the implication of BIM referring to the Representation disciplines and to the issues con- nected with its application to the existing built stock and especially to historic buildings. 

  14. Who's bigger? where historical figures really rank

    CERN Document Server

    Skiena, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Is Hitler bigger than Napoleon? Washington bigger than Lincoln? Picasso bigger than Einstein? Quantitative analysts are rapidly finding homes in social and cultural domains, from finance to politics. What about history? In this fascinating book, Steve Skiena and Charles Ward bring quantitative analysis to bear on ranking and comparing historical reputations. They evaluate each person by aggregating the traces of millions of opinions, just as Google ranks webpages. The book includes a technical discussion for readers interested in the details of the methods, but no mathematical or computational background is necessary to understand the rankings or conclusions. Along the way, the authors present the rankings of more than one thousand of history's most significant people in science, politics, entertainment, and all areas of human endeavor. Anyone interested in history or biography can see where their favorite figures place in the grand scheme of things.

  15. The story of a historic morning

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    "To be invited to CERN and also to be involved in a historic moment is a career dream. It’s a place where everyone learns from each other and contributes their speciality to construct something unique that defies understanding." Trivan Pal, Paul Scherrer Institute "CERN is an organization of many challenges, it is difficult to represent its size and quality. Its achievements are stacked like Russian dolls in order to build a true giant." Attila Razc CERN, PH "CERN is more than a place of work. The scope of its projects and the zest of its personnel make it a place to work and to live." Pavel Tashev, Summer Student "The research happening here is such that it needs at least one or two years of a doctorate to grasp its ra...

  16. Extraction of Historical Events from Wikipedia

    CERN Document Server

    Hienert, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The DBpedia project extracts structured information from Wikipedia and makes it available on the web. Information is gathered mainly with the help of infoboxes that contain structured information of the Wikipedia article. A lot of information is only contained in the article body and is not yet included in DBpedia. In this paper we focus on the extraction of historical events from Wikipedia articles that are available for about 2,500 years for different languages. We have extracted about 121,000 events with more than 325,000 links to DBpedia entities and provide access to this data via a Web API, SPARQL endpoint, Linked Data Interface and in a timeline application.

  17. Light-echo spectroscopy of historic Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Oliver

    Young Galactic supernova remnants are unique laboratories for supernova physics. Due to their proximity they provide us with the most detailed view of the outcome of a supernova. However, the exact spectroscopic types of their original explosions have been undetermined so far -hindering to link the wealth of multi-wavelength knowledge about their remnants with the diverse population of supernovae. Light echoes, reflektions of the brilliant supernova burst of light by interstellar dust, provide a unique opportunity to reobserve today -with powerful scientific instruments of the 21st century -historic supernova exlosions even after hundreds of years and to conclude on their nature. We report on optical light-echo spectroscopy of two famous Galactic supernovae: Tycho Brahe's SN 1572 and the supernova that created the Cassiopeia A remnant around the year 1680. These observations finally recovered the missing spectroscopic classifications and provide new constraints on explosion models for future studies.

  18. Electrochemical desalination of historic Portuguese tiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble salts cause severe decay of historic Portuguese tiles. Treatment options for removal of the salts to stop the decay are few. The present paper deals with development of a method for electrochemical desalination, where an electric DC field is applied to the tiles. Laboratory experiments were...... and glaze, where salt crystals were clearly identified by SEM-EDX before desalination. The concentrations of chloride and especially nitrate were very high in the tiles (around 280 mmol Cl−/kg and 450 mmol NO3−/kg respectively). Both anions were successfully removed to below 6 mmol/kg during...... was initially very low, but nevertheless, sulfate removal started at the point where chloride and nitrate concentrations were very low in the tiles. Investigating the interface between biscuit and glaze after the treatment showed no signs of crystallized salts, so also in this important point, the desalination...

  19. The population health approach in historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szreter, Simon

    2003-03-01

    The origin of the population health approach is an historic debate over the relationship between economic growth and human health. In Britain and France, the Industrial Revolution disrupted population health and stimulated pioneering epidemiological studies, informing the early preventive public health movement. A century-long process of political adjustment between the forces of liberal democracy and propertied interests ensued. The 20th-century welfare states resulted as complex political mechanisms for converting economic growth into enhanced population health. However, the rise of a "neoliberal" agenda, denigrating the role of government, has once again brought to the fore the importance of prevention and a population health approach to map and publicize the health impacts of this new phase of "global" economic growth.

  20. Astronomy in India a historical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    India has a strong and ancient tradition of astronomy, which seamlessly merges with the current activities in Astronomy and Astrophysics in the country. While the younger generation of astronomers and students are reasonably familiar with the current facilities and the astronomical research, they might not have an equally good knowledge of the rich history of Indian astronomy. This particular volume, brought out as a part of the Platinum Jubilee Celebrations of Indian National Science Academy, concentrates on selected aspects of historical development of Indian astronomy in the form of six invited chapters. Two of the chapters – by Balachandra Rao and M.S. Sriram – cover ancient astronomy and the development of calculus in the ancient Kerela text Yuktibhasa. The other four chapters by B.V. Sreekantan, Siraj Hasan, Govind Swarup and Jayant Narlikar deal with the contemporary history of Indian astronomy covering space astronomy, optical astronomy, radio astronomy and developments in relativistic astrophysic...

  1. Divining and knowing: Karl Sudhoff's historical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the historical method of Karl Sudhoff (1853- 1938), Germany's first professor of medical history. It argues that in order to understand his ideas more fully, we need to step outside the historiography of medical history and assess his methodology in relation to the norms and ideals of German academic history writing in general. The article demonstrates that the philology-based "critical method" of Leopold von Ranke (1795-1886) was central to Sudhoff's methodological thinking. It investigates the underlying philosophical and epistemological assumptions of Ranke's method, which tend to be less appreciated than his overt empiricism and explores how Sudhoff applied these to the new professionalizing subdiscipline of the history of medicine. The article argues that Sudhoff's concerns with the methodology of history, which involved a particular conception of the relationship between the human sciences and the medical sciences, offers compelling addresses to our times.

  2. INDIAN CASTE SYSTEM: HISTORICAL AND PSYCHOANALYTIC VIEWS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhaneni, Madhusudana Rao

    2015-12-01

    This paper elucidates the historical origins and transformations of India's caste system. Surveying the complex developments over many centuries, it points out that three positions have been taken in this regard. One suggests that the caste one is born into can be transcended within one's lifetime by performing good deeds. The other declares caste to be immutable forever. And, the third says that one can be reborn into a higher caste if one lives a virtuous life. Moving on to the sociopolitical realm, the paper notes how these positions have been used and exploited. The paper then attempts to anchor the existence and purpose of the Hindu caste system in Freud's ideas about group psychology and Klein's proposals of splitting and projective identification. The paper also deploys the large group psychology concepts of Volkan and the culturally nuanced psychoanalytic anthropology of Roland and Kakar. It concludes with delineating some ameliorative strategies for this tragic problem in the otherwise robust democratic society of India.

  3. READING THE HISTORICAL PHENOMENON OF AUSTRALIAN BUSHRANGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohanes Hartadi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Outlaws in their various images have been important parts of history. In Australia, the longestlasting image of outlaws is the bushranger. Despite its popularity, there is a range of depictions ofbushrangers and these are not necessarily similar. Interpretation of the bushrangers in colonial timediffers from contemporary imagining. This papers aims at unfolding the various interpretations of thebushrangers in different periods in many types of artifact. Information was collected and interpretedby library research. The artifact analysis will be seen through a postmodernism theory by MichelFoucault and Roland Barthes. Since the phenomenon of bushranger stemmed from the colonialperiod, this study will commence from the period up to contemporary period. It can be concluded thata study of the different periods finds out that knowledge of the bushrangers does not make up a linearhistory, but rather a discontinuity in the historical narratives.

  4. Anamnesis of the radioimmunoassay: A historical reminiscence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallee, E.

    1984-01-27

    Anamnesis of the Radioimmunoassay - A Historical Reminiscence: Several requirements have to be met before the first radioimmunoassay of a proteohormone (i.e., insulin) could be developed. One of these requirements was that iodination ought not substantially impair the immunologic properties of the insulin molecule. Since the reversibility of antigen adsorption to antibodies is the most important basis of all immunoassays, the adsorptive behavior of proteins first had to be studied at extremely low protein concentrations. Only after these requirements had been investigated was direct electrophoretic detection of a nonprecipitating anti-hormone antibody possible by desorption of insulin on filter paper. Later, the inaccuracy of the species specificity of insulin-binding antibodies proved to be particularly useful for the determination of insulin in human sera.

  5. An historical ophthalmic study of Jane Austen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Graham A

    2012-11-01

    Today, no other classic novelist has the popularity or power of Jane Austen, and in 2013 the world will celebrate 200 years of her comic masterpiece Pride and Prejudice. Her millions of fans have an abiding fascination with all aspects of her life, including her health and the cause of her death. This historical ophthalmic study of Jane Austen, based on very incomplete medical bibliographic data, finds that she had a mild ocular surface disorder from age 23. This disorder did not significantly impact on her visual performance for writing. There are many references to eyes in her novels, but Jane's eyes and those of her characters cannot contribute further to the debate around the cause of her death at age 41.

  6. [Historical overview of antimalarials used in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerpa de Artiles, N

    1993-06-01

    A historical review of antimalarials used in Venezuela is presented from the time when the bark of quina was used until the massive distribution of quinine and metoquine by the Dirección de Malariología y Saneamiento Ambiental. The utility of chloroquine and primaquine against sensible parasite isolates and of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and quinine, currently used against P. falciparum resistant strains, is thoroughly discussed. The author suggests use of artemisimine and its derivatives as a very promising antimalarial drug. She also stresses the possibility of the application of new antimalaria vaccine against P. falciparum blood states, presently assayed in the country as an additional tool in malaria control programs.

  7. The vector algebra war: A historical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Chappell, James M; Hartnett, John G; Abbott, Derek

    2015-01-01

    There are a wide variety of different vector formalisms currently utilized in science. For example, Gibbs three-vectors, spacetime four-vectors, complex spinors for quantum mechanics, quaternions used for rigid body rotations and Clifford multivectors. With such a range of vector formalisms in use, it thus appears that there is as yet no general agreement on a vector formalism suitable for the whole of science. This surprising situation exists today, despite the fact that one of the main goals of nineteenth century science was to correctly describe vectors and the algebra of three-dimensional space. This situation has also had the unfortunate consequence of fragmenting knowledge across many disciplines and requiring a very significant amount of time and effort in learning the different formalisms. We thus review historically the development of our various vector systems and conclude that the Clifford algebra multivector fulfills the goal of correctly describing vectorial quantities in three dimensions.

  8. [Cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Historical considerations and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Arturo; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Basurto, Lourdes; De la Chesnaye, Elsa; Saldívar, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormones and an essential component of the cell membrane, however, altered regulation of the synthesis, absorption and excretion of cholesterol predispose to cardiovascular diseases of atherosclerotic origin. Despite, the recognition of historical events for 200 years, starting with Michel Chevreul naming «cholesterol»; later on, Lobstein coining the term atherosclerosis and Marchand introducing it, Anichkov identifying cholesterol in atheromatous plaque, and Brown and Goldstein discovering LDL receptor; as well as the emerging of different drugs, such as fibrates, statins and cetrapibs this decade, promising to increase HDL and the most recent ezetimibe and anti-PCSK9 to inhibit the degradation of LDL receptor, however morbidity has not been reduced in cardiovascular disease.

  9. Democratic Learning Processes: Conceptual and Historical Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ann-Dorte; Rasmussen, Palle

    2009-01-01

    of the article outlines the authors' understanding of the core concepts involved. In the second part these conceptual discussions are related to two themes: the question of public adaptation of historical experiences in connection with the German reunification and the learning perspectives related to women......In this article democratic learning is conceptualised with inspiration from two academic traditions, one being the conceptions of citizenship, political identities and deliberative democracy in political sociology; the other theories and research on social and lifelong learning. The first part......'s empowerment and inclusion in the Danish democratic model. On the background of these two analyses the authors finally discuss some current democratic problems with integrating the diversity represented by ethnic minority groups. The discussion emphasizes the learning theory perspective on the initiative...

  10. Historical approach to teaching foreign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel MARTÍN SÁNCHEZ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The publication of this work is to make a historical-pedagogical approach to teaching foreign languages, part of the Humanism and concluding with the current theories and methods. Since the 18th century with the emergence of traditional method, also known as the method of grammar and translation, to the methodological principles of communicative approaches, it have been going a number of methods with the intent to resolve and improve teaching techniques for teaching and learning a second language. However, it is worth to note that this is a scientific developments, as most of the methods take as a starting point for his reflections ideas, suggestions, beliefs, techniques and procedures of former methods that preceded them, therefore we cannot speak of revolutionary methods, but rather evolutionary.

  11. Historical Changes In The Balance Of Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Tămaș

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Humanity crosses a period of historical discontinuity on the socio-politic and economic plan. The major changing vector is represented by the emerging economies, whose development high rates made them become the main contributor to the global growth. One of the principal consequences of this transition is the remodeling of the world’s order, the change in the global balance of powers, through the transition from the uni-polar world dominated by the United States of America to the multi-polar world in which emerging powers’ position is, more and more, taken into account. The progress registered by those emerging economies requires the reviewing of some theories, concepts and principles that orientate the economic and political contemporary practice.

  12. Historical and social aspects of halitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Marina Sá; Ferriani, Maria das Graças Carvalho

    2006-01-01

    Buccal odors have always been a factor of concern for society. This study aims to investigate the historical and social base of halitosis, through systematized research in the database BVS (biblioteca virtual em saúde - virtual library in health) and also in books. Lack of knowledge on how to prevent halitosis allows for its occurrence, limiting quality of life. As social relationships are one of the pillars of the quality of life concept, halitosis needs to be considered a factor of negative interference. Education in health should be accomplished with a view to a dynamic balance, involving human beings' physical and psychological aspects, as well as their social interactions, so that individuals do not become jigsaw puzzles of sick parts.

  13. READING THE HISTORICAL PHENOMENON OF AUSTRALIAN BUSHRANGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohanes Hartadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Outlaws in their various images have been important parts of history. In Australia, the longest lasting image of outlaws is the bushranger. Despite its popularity, there is a range of depictions of bushrangers and these are not necessarily similar. Interpretation of the bushrangers in colonial time differs from contemporary imagining. This papers aims at unfolding the various interpretations of the bushrangers in different periods in many types of artifact. Information was collected and interpreted by library research. The artifact analysis will be seen through a postmodernism theory by Michel Foucault and Roland Barthes. Since the phenomenon of bushranger stemmed from the colonial period, this study will commence from the period up to contemporary period. It can be concluded that a study of the different periods finds out that knowledge of the bushrangers does not make up a linear history, but rather a discontinuity in the historical narratives.

  14. UKRAINIAN EVENTS AS HISTORICAL, INTERNATIONAL CATASTROPHE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kasyanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the scientific article fully examines current events in Ukraine in 2014-2015. The author believes that the causal and comparative historical analysis of the current Ukrainian crisis allows characterizing it as a major historical and ethnic catastrophe on a global scale after the collapse of the USSR in 1991. Obvious microand macroeffects inevitably impact on the history of relations between Ukrainian and Russian brotherly nations, lead (and has led to freeze their contacts, projects and links. It causes a feeling of well-founded anxiety for the fate of not only bilateral relations between Ukraine and Russia and the state of Post-Soviet space, but also for the development of all Slavic ethnic groups in the world. According to the author, it is necessary to review quickly realized Ukrainian direction of Russian state policy. It is necessary, as quickly as possible to get away from officiously promotional activities, technologies and techniques of information war and bring aid all the diversity of cultural cooperation. It is only a means of soft power, understood by us in the manner of the approach of its founder, American political scientist Joseph Nye, are able to restore the broken trust and interaction structures. Only the culture, and more specifically it such areas as language, traditions, generation feats, faith, can gradually normalize, and then to improve the bilateral relations, the each other perception, to restore a sense of respect, friendship and mutual assistance between Ukraine and Russia. It is obvious that bilateral cultural project able to change the existing negative situation.

  15. Vertical transmission of arboviruses in mosquitoes: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequime, Sebastian; Lambrechts, Louis

    2014-12-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are mainly transmitted horizontally among vertebrate hosts by blood-feeding invertebrate vectors, but can also be transmitted vertically in the vector from an infected female to its offspring. Vertical transmission (VT) is considered a possible mechanism for the persistence of arboviruses during periods unfavorable for horizontal transmission, but the extent and epidemiological significance of this phenomenon have remained controversial. To help resolve this question, we reviewed over a century of published literature on VT to analyze historical trends of scientific investigations on experimental and natural occurrence of VT in mosquitoes. Our synthesis highlights the influence of major events of public health significance in arbovirology on the number of VT publications. Epidemiological landmarks such as emergence events have significantly stimulated VT research. Our analysis also reveals the association between the evolution of virological assays and the probability of VT detection. Increased sensitivity and higher-throughput of modern laboratory assays resulted in enhanced VT detection. In general, VT contribution to arbovirus persistence is likely modest because vertically infected mosquitoes are rarely observed in nature. Taken together, however, our results call for caution when interpreting VT studies because their conclusions are context- and method-dependent.

  16. Radical Transparency in Journalism: Digital Evolutions from Historical Precedents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Justin Heemsbergen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that transparency projects retain a political hue from the social-technological context from which they are created. Thus, radical transparency is considered as an opportunity to evolve both journalistic and democratic practices. Transparency in practice reveals diverse expectations of how journalists reporting should be used, and these expectations in turn, seem dependent on specific worldviews. This paper presents a comparative analysis of the effects of the current exemplar of radical journalism, WikiLeaks. It compares Wikileaks to its historical equivalents, including Hansard in the 18th century, and the reporting of open diplomacy in the early 20th century. This analysis shows how journalism evolves along with radical transparency projects, and how the current context of networked radical transparency can, and will, be made into news with specific political effects. In conclusion, this paper argues that practitioners should be aware of the political hues that new transparency mechanisms afford. Being cognizant of context and design choices can increase the degree to which new initiatives can have a deep systemic impact—as well as acknowledge the qualities and repercussions of that impact.

  17. HISTORICAL ANALYSIS AND INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF FIGHT WITH SKYJACKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyokhin V. P.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There was considered the historical analysis and international experience of fight with skyjacking in the article. The article is relevant, as the hijacking of aircraft is a crime with the highest public risk, both in Russia and worldwide, this international crime. Discusses statistical data theft aircraft in Russia from 1998 to 2014. The article reveals the object, the objective side, the subject and the subjective side of the hijacking of aircraft. Given the criminal law comparative analysis of auto theft and hijacking of aircraft. Considered criminal legislation of the CIS member States about the hijacking of aircraft. The article provides examples of judicial practice on the hijacking of aircraft. Discusses and international legislation, in particular the Convention for the suppression of acts of unlawful interference involving aircraft. Given the chronological table analysis grabs passenger aircraft in the USSR in the period from 1973 to 1989. In conclusion, the article draws conclusions and makes suggestions for improvement of the criminal legislation about the hijacking of aircraft. In particular they say about the need to improve legislation on transport and the development of a complete and correct concepts.

  18. Freedom 7 the historic flight of Alan B. Shepard, Jr.

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Inevitably, there are times in a nation’s history when its hopes, fears and confidence in its own destiny appear to hinge on the fate of a single person. One of these pivotal moments occurred on the early morning of May 5, 1961, when a 37-year-old test pilot squeezed himself into the confines of the tiny Mercury spacecraft that he had named Freedom 7. On that historic day, U.S. Navy Commander Alan Shepard carried with him the hopes, prayers, and anxieties of a nation as his Redstone rocket blasted free of the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, hurling him upwards on a 15-minute suborbital flight that also propelled the United States into the bold new frontier of human space exploration. This book tells the enthralling story of that pioeering flight as recalled by many of the participants in the Freedom 7 story, including Shepard himself, with anecdotal details and tales never before revealed in print. Although beaten into space just three weeks earlier by the Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, Alan Shepard’s h...

  19. On the historical consciousness of Hong Kong students

    OpenAIRE

    Kan, Flora

    2008-01-01

    This study focused on evaluating students' historical consciousness as defined by Jorn Rüsen. Two historical events are used. Students were asked the importance of these historical events to himself/herself and/or to others. The aim is to investigate whether the typology of historical consciousness devised by Rüsen could be applied to Hong Kong, and/or whether there were other possible typologies other than the four types specified by Rüsen. Rüsen's 'traditional' category does not distinctive...

  20. 48 CFR 552.270-2 - Historic Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...)). (2) Historic district means a geographically definable area, urban or rural, possessing a significant..., architecture, archeology, engineering and culture that the Secretary of the Interior is authorized to...

  1. The Historical and Lived Sources of Collective Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Muller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to study the role that lived and historical memories havein the conformation of collective memory through the participant’s appraisals in the recent past of Argentina. These memories operate as sources that nurture collective memory. Lived memories are related to live experiences, while historical memories are related to indirect sources that inform about the past. 60 participants, divided in two groups (above and below 46 years of age appraised the present and recent past, based on lived and historical memories. Results show that lived or autobiographical and historical memories contribute differently to collective memory.

  2. Molecular identification of human tuberculosis in recent and historic bone tissue samples: The role of molecular techniques for the study of historic tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Albert R; Grabner, Waltraud; Nerlich, Andreas G

    2005-01-01

    We describe the molecular identification of the M. tuberculosis complex DNA in bone tissue samples from recent and historic populations. In a first set, archival paraffin material from vertebral bodies of 12 recent cases with clinically/microbiologically proven tuberculosis was compared to 12 further cases without tuberculosis. While eight TB cases revealed a specific mycobacterial amplification product, none of the controls was positive. Interestingly, one case with tuberculous sepsis (Landouzy sepsis), five cases with tuberculous spread beyond the primarily affected organ (i.e., lymph node or miliar involvement), and also two of six cases with restricted pulmonary tuberculosis reacted positively in the vertebral specimens. This indicates that a molecular analysis can detect mycobacteria even in unremarkable bone tissue, proving that organ tuberculosis is present. In addition, the extent of spread is of high significance for the frequency of positive reactions. In addition, we investigated a series of vertebral samples coming from an Egyptian population of the necropolis of Thebes-West dating to approximately 1450-500 BC. In this group of 36 cases, three of five cases with typical macromorphological signs for tuberculous spondylitis, 2 of 12 cases with nonspecific alterations, and 2 of 19 cases without macroscopic pathology revealed a specific amplicon of the M. tuberculosis complex. This suggests a significant frequency of infected people in that ancient population. Finally, a fourth group of 51 long bone samples with pathological alterations coming form a southern German ossuary (between AD 1400-1800) was investigated, and 10 cases were positive for the M. tuberculosis complex. These studies of historic material clearly support the notion that tuberculous infections can be unequivocally identified by molecular techniques. The relatively high frequency of ancient bacterial DNA amplifications in unremarkable bone is well-explained by our analysis of the recent

  3. Traumatic pasts and the historical imagination: Symptoms of loss, postcolonial suffering, and counter-memories among African migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneduce, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    This work aims to rethink the relationship between anthropology and cultural psychiatry from a historical perspective, through reflections on the dynamics of forgetting and remembering in the context of migration. While migrants' symptoms often bear cultural hallmarks of suffering, they also reveal images of a traumatic history, which resurface in moments of danger, uncertainty, and crisis. I claim these symptoms are allegories of a dispossessed past, and can be interpreted as counter-memories, as "palimpsests" of an eclipsed script. Trauma symptoms keep returning to a collective past, and thus can be considered a particular form of historical consciousness. Psychiatric diagnoses may obscure these counter-memories. In particular, the diagnostic category of posttraumatic stress disorder that is commonly attached to traumatic experiences in current clinical practice recognizes the truth of individual traumatic events, but at the same time contributes to concealing the political, racial, and historical roots of suffering.

  4. RUSSIAN LEGENDS IN THE HISTORICAL TALES BY M. MAKAROV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Fedoseeva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the  works by  M. Makarov, one  of  the  littleknown Russian authors of  the fi rst third of  the  19th century. There is  an  interest to  the author’s works due to  the controversy of  the  genre specifi city of Russian prose of the 1830-s and the topicality of the Orthodoxoriented governmental way of  thinking, which is  expressed in  his  works. The  collection “Stories from the  Russian folk tales” targets folklore as  the form of expression of the national spirit and ethics. The historical, toponymical and ethnogenetic legends of Vladimir, Novgorod, Ryazan and Moscow lands form the plot of the stories of the collection. At the poetic and stylistic levels the article reveals the correspondence of the analyzed stories to Karamzin’s model of  a  sentimental pre-Romantic tale of  the  1800-s. Its typological specifi city consists in  a  broken plot line; in  special attention to  a  person’s destiny; in the “Gothic anthropologism”, which asserts the unity of human morals of the past and of the present. The fictionalized plots of the legends in Makarov’s tales serve to accentuate the Orthodox-based spiritual guidelines and moral values of the nation. As a result, the undertaken study substantiates the special type of  folklorism of  Russian historical prose in  the fi rst third of  the  19th  century. The combination of  the  features of  oral poetical and literary genres comprises its peculiarity

  5. Historical seismometry database project: A comprehensive relational database for historical seismic records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The recovery and preservation of the patrimony made of the instrumental registrations regarding the historical earthquakes is with no doubt a subject of great interest. This attention, besides being purely historical, must necessarily be also scientific. In fact, the availability of a great amount of parametric information on the seismic activity in a given area is a doubtless help to the seismologic researcher's activities. In this article the project of the Sismos group of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology of Rome new database is presented. In the structure of the new scheme the matured experience of five years of activity is summarized. We consider it useful for those who are approaching to "recovery and reprocess" computer based facilities. In the past years several attempts on Italian seismicity have followed each other. It has almost never been real databases. Some of them have had positive success because they were well considered and organized. In others it was limited in supplying lists of events with their relative hypocentral standards. What makes this project more interesting compared to the previous work is the completeness and the generality of the managed information. For example, it will be possible to view the hypocentral information regarding a given historical earthquake; it will be possible to research the seismograms in raster, digital or digitalized format, the information on times of arrival of the phases in the various stations, the instrumental standards and so on. The relational modern logic on which the archive is based, allows the carrying out of all these operations with little effort. The database described below will completely substitute Sismos' current data bank. Some of the organizational principles of this work are similar to those that inspire the database for the real-time monitoring of the seismicity in use in the principal offices of international research. A modern planning logic in a distinctly historical

  6. Historical tsunami in the Azores archipelago (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, C.; Borges, P.; Freitas, M. C.

    2006-08-01

    Because of its exposed northern mid-Atlantic location, morphology and plate-tectonics setting, the Azores Archipelago is highly vulnerable to tsunami hazards associated with landslides and seismic or volcanic triggers, local or distal. Critical examination of available data - written accounts and geologic evidence - indicates that, since the settlement of the archipelago in the 15th century, at least 23 tsunami have struck Azorean coastal zones. Most of the recorded tsunami are generated by earthquakes. The highest known run-up (11-15 m) was recorded on 1 November 1755 at Terceira Island, corresponding to an event of intensity VII-VIII (damaging-heavily damaging) on the Papadopolous-Imamura scale. To date, eruptive activity, while relatively frequent in the Azores, does not appear to have generated destructive tsunami. However, this apparent paucity of volcanogenic tsunami in the historical record may be misleading because of limited instrumental and documentary data, and small source-volumes released during historical eruptions. The latter are in contrast with the geological record of massive pyroclastic flows and caldera explosions with potential to generate high-magnitude tsunami, predating settlement. In addition, limited evidence suggests that submarine landslides from unstable volcano flanks may have also triggered some damaging tsunamigenic floods that perhaps were erroneously attributed to intense storms. The lack of destructive tsunami since the mid-18th century has led to governmental complacency and public disinterest in the Azores, as demonstrated by the fact that existing emergency regulations concerning seismic events in the Azores Autonomous Region make no mention of tsunami and their attendant hazards. We suspect that the coastal fringe of the Azores may well preserve a sedimentary record of some past tsunamigenic flooding events. Geological field studies must be accelerated to expand the existing database to include prehistoric events

  7. Structuring Historic Site-Based History Laboratories for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Providing training for pre-service teachers at historic sites necessitates a reorientation for historic site-based teacher education programs away from strict content learning towards programs that emphasize the modeling of disciplinary problem solving and transfer learning. Outlined here is a History Lab model for teacher education that uses the…

  8. A Novel Approach: Historical Fiction in the Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Bárbara C.

    2013-01-01

    Barbara Cruz describes how what began as a challenge (i.e., finding or justifying the time to spend on history instruction in an environment of high-stakes testing) turned into a rich learning experience for students using historical fiction. By designing experiences that were literacy centered but based in historical content, this group of…

  9. Authentication Projects for Historical Fiction: Do You Believe It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTigue, Erin; Thornton, Elaine; Wiese, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Authentication projects, particularly for historical fiction, provide a means for students to explore literature and history while practicing critical literacy skills. The authors 1) present benefits and cautions for historical fiction use in elementary classrooms, 2) introduce authentication projects as a means to mitigate risks and enhance…

  10. Understanding History through the Visual Images in Historical Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Suzette

    2012-01-01

    In the last ten years, historical fiction picturebooks have won numerous children's literature awards and have assumed a prominent role in the literacy landscape of elementary and middle school classrooms. Whether read in read-alouds, study groups, as a focus of genre study, or as a supplement to the social studies curriculum, historical fiction…

  11. Textbook vs. Historical Fiction: Impact on Social Studies Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of adding historical fiction novels as a supplement to the textbook in an eighth grade social studies course. This qualitative study focused on student interest and feedback as their social studies class was altered through the addition of historical fiction novels. The research questions were…

  12. Using the Historical Environment: Practical Ideas and Activities for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996

    This handbook provides eight detailed interdisciplinary lesson plans, with art, archaeological, and architectural heritage of historical British sites as the introductory focus. Historical background is combined with a variety of possible content area approaches, documentary sources, and photocopiable activity sheets for classroom and on-site…

  13. Protection of historic buildings against environmental pollution of vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalska-Koczwara Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Historic buildings in Poland are largely neglected objects that small percentage is preserved in its original form. Unrelenting in the case of historic buildings is a time that brings with it the natural processes of aging of buildings, but also the history of the object which is often marked by military conflicts, fires or even incompetently carried out reconstruction. Nowadays historic buildings are also destroyed by the rapid development of infrastructure and residential construction. This development could lead to changes of water in the soil, make changes in the geologic al structure or cause exposure of the historic building to the new influences (eg. traffic vibrations, to which building has not been subjected so far. Vibrations are often omitted in environmental issues, although the protection against noise and vibration has its place in the Law on Environmental Protection. This article presents the methodology for the measurement and interpretation of vibration influence on historic buildings and the assessment methods of technical condition of historic building on the example of dynamic measurements made on St. Nicholas Church in Krakow. The importance of well-done crack-by-crack documentation and characterization of damages based on damage index is shown. Difficulties that can be encountered when determining the causes of technical condition of historic buildings are also shown. Based on the example of the Church in the article are also given the possible protection solutions of historic structures from vibrations.

  14. Governmentality as a Genealogical Toolbox in Historical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Janicke

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to show how governmentality may be used to analyze historical events and discourses, and how this historical analysis can be used as a perspective to problematize contemporary discourses. The example used in this article is from my research on life-extension handbooks published in Sweden 1700-1930, and by this I stress…

  15. Historical consciousness and Culture of Students in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haue, Harry

    2007-01-01

    In this article the use of historical consciousnes is beeing discussed in relation to the teaching of history in the primary school. The point is that the capacity of the children to do abstract thinking is a necessary condition for being able to understand the use of historical consciousness...

  16. 36 CFR 65.4 - National Historic Landmark criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Historic Landmark criteria. 65.4 Section 65.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... anthropologists familiar with the broad range of the nation's resources and historical themes. The...

  17. Concerns for the Historical Profession: A Liberal Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarausch, Konrad H.

    This paper contends that the debate over multiculturalism in the university is best understood from a broadened historical perspective. The experiences of educational reformers in Germany and the impact of fascism and communism are explored. Based on a historical approach to the multiculturalism debate, three areas of particular concern are…

  18. Perspectives: Using Historical Documents To Think about NIF Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Service (GSA), Washington, DC.

    The purpose of using historical documents in the classroom is to generate and enhance discussion by providing a historical perspective for issues. Five documents are included in this packet and are to be used as a supplemental material for the National Issues Forum (NIF) topics. Issues raised include (1) an analysis of the documents and (2)…

  19. Libraries, Policy, and Politics in a Democracy: Four Historical Epochs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Paul T.; Gorham, Ursula; Sarin, Lindsay C.; Bertot, John Carlo

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the historical relationships between libraries, policy, and politics in the United States. Far too often, policy and political discussions related to libraries have little historical context. While libraries have long viewed themselves as a pillar of democracy by supporting informed, educated, and engaged citizenry, political…

  20. Spaces of collaboration: The poetics of place and historical consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorna R. McLean

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of engaging students in the negotiation of their place in historical landscapes is vitalized through the development of historical consciousness as a pedagogical tool for instruction in social studies. This study uses student reflection collected from a graduate course to examine how historical consciousness is understood and expressed through experiential interaction with historical sites and the role of people, places, and historical events in the creation of social history. The participants in the study reflected on how public memory is constructed and individualized within grand and personal narratives of their chosen area of commemoration. The study’s participants showed an eagerness to incorporate interactive technology to express their understanding of historical events, further highlighting technology’s role in democratizing information through digital historical narratives. The student-participants also internalized and articulated their experiences with history through artistic means, which permitted a free expression across multiple media. As prospective educators, the participants negotiated the role of historical consciousness in the development and extension of curricular practices, including the critical examination of official narratives in favour of a socialized history.