WorldWideScience

Sample records for californian mollic haploxeralf

  1. Nearly Four Million Californians Are Food Insecure

    OpenAIRE

    Chaparro, M. Pia; Langellier, Brent; Birnbach, Kerry; Sharp, Kerry; Harrison, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Food insecurity has increased significantly among low-income Californians over the last decade. According to data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey, 3.8 million adults in households with incomes at or below 200% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) could not afford enough food at least once in the previous year. Low-income households with children and Spanish-speaking households suffered from the worst levels of food insecurity. Expanding nutrition assistance programs, such as th...

  2. Californian science students' perceptions of their classroom environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Brok, P.; Fisher, D.; Rickards, T.; Bull, E.

    2006-01-01

    This study utilised the What Is Happening In this Class (WIHIC) questionnaire to examine factors that influence Californian student perceptions of their learning environment. Data were collected from 665 USA middle school science students in 11 Californian schools. Several background variables were

  3. Application of DRIFTS, NMR, and py-MBMS to characterize the effects of soil science oxidation assays on soil organic matter composition in a Mollic Xerofluvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate whether commonly employed chemical treatments remove structurally distinct fractions of soil organic matter (SOM), a Mollic Xerofluvent under agricultural use was subjected to three distinct oxidation treatments: potassium permanganate (KMnO4), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and hydrogen p...

  4. Induction of Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in Ca Ski Human Cervical Cancer Cells Triggered by Mollic Acid Arabinoside Isolated from Leea indica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yau Hsiung Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leea indica is a medicinal plant traditionally used to treat cancer. Through bioassay-guided approach, we isolated mollic acid arabinoside (MAA, for the first time from Leea indica. Here, we present the apoptosis-inducing effect of MAA on Ca Ski cervical cancer cells. Based on DAPI staining, MAA-treated cells manifested nuclear shrinkage, condensation, and fragmentation. We further confirmed the fragmentation of DNA using TUNEL assay. During early apoptosis, MAA caused the perturbation of plasma membrane through externalization of PS, followed by the formation of apoptotic blebs. Prior to these events, MAA triggered rapid dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. In the upstream, MAA increased the expression of Bax, decreased the expression of Bcl-2, and augmented the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. These findings suggested that MAA induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in Ca Ski cells and thus provide the scientific explanation for the traditional application of this herbal medicine in cancer treatment.

  5. 78 FR 2391 - CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc., Michael E. Boyd, Robert M. Sarvey v. Pacific Gas and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc., Michael E. Boyd, Robert M. Sarvey v... and Procedure of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC); CAlifornians for Renewable...

  6. The Genus Lepidochitona Gray, 1821 (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean (Oregonian and Californian Provinces)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eernisse, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The systematics of the northeastern Pacific Lepidochitona from the Californian and Oregonian Provinces (western continental United States) is presented and discussed. Three new species are described: L. caverna spec. nov. and L. berryana spec. nov. from California, and L. fernaldi spec. nov. from Wa

  7. Application of DRIFTS, (13)C NMR, and py-MBMS to Characterize the Effects of Soil Science Oxidation Assays on Soil Organic Matter Composition in a Mollic Xerofluvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margenot, Andrew J; Calderón, Francisco J; Magrini, Kimberly A; Evans, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Chemical oxidations are routinely employed in soil science to study soil organic matter (SOM), and their interpretation could be improved by characterizing oxidation effects on SOM composition with spectroscopy. We investigated the effects of routinely employed oxidants on SOM composition in a Mollic Xerofluvent representative of intensively managed agricultural soils in the California Central Valley. Soil samples were subjected to oxidation by potassium permanganate (KMnO4), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Additionally, non-oxidized and oxidized soils were treated with hydrofluoric acid (HF) to evaluate reduction of the mineral component to improve spectroscopy of oxidation effects. Oxidized non-HF and HF-treated soils were characterized by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS), and for particle size distribution (PSD) using laser diffractometry (LD). Across the range of soil organic carbon (OC) removed by oxidations (14-72%), aliphatic C-H stretch at 3000-2800 cm(-1) (DRIFTS) decreased with OC removal, and this trend was enhanced by HF treatment due to significant demineralization in this soil (70%). Analysis by NMR spectroscopy was feasible only after HF treatment, and did not reveal trends between OC removal and C functional groups. Pyrolysis-MBMS did not detect differences among oxidations, even after HF treatment of soils. Hydrofluoric acid entailed OC loss (13-39%), and for H2O2 oxidized soils increased C:N and substantially decreased mean particle size. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using HF to improve characterizations of SOM composition following oxidations as practiced in soil science, in particular for DRIFTS. Since OC removal by oxidants, mineral removal by HF, and the interaction of oxidants and HF observed for this soil

  8. 77 FR 40878 - Californians for Renewable Energy, Inc., Michael E. Boyd, Robert M. Sarvey, v. California Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Californians for Renewable Energy, Inc., Michael E. Boyd, Robert M. Sarvey, v. California Public Utilities Commission, California Department of Water Resources, Pacific Gas...

  9. 75 FR 76453 - CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc., (CARE), and Barbara Durkin v. National Grid, Cape Wind...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc., (CARE), and Barbara Durkin v. National Grid, Cape Wind, and the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities; Notice of...

  10. Independence at risk: older Californians with disabilities struggle to remain at home as public supports shrink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietzman, Kathryn G; Durazo, Eva M; Torres, Jacqueline M; Choi, Anne Soon; Wallace, Steven P

    2011-12-01

    This policy brief presents findings from a yearlong study that closely followed a small but typical set of older Californians with disabilities who depend on fragile arrangements of paid public programs and unpaid help to live safely and independently at home. Many of these older adults have physical and mental health needs that can rise or fall with little warning; most are struggling with increasing disability as they age. In spite of these challenges, most display resilience and fortitude, and all share a common determination to maintain their independence at almost any cost. Declines in health status and other personal circumstances among aging Californians have been exacerbated by recent reductions in public support, and will be made even worse by significant additional cuts that are pending. Policy recommendations include consolidating long-term care programs and enhancing support for caregivers.

  11. 76 FR 44901 - Californians for Renewable Energy, Inc., Michael E. Boyd, Robert M. Sarvey v. California Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... No: 2011-18909] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL11-52-000] Californians for Renewable Energy, Inc., Michael E. Boyd, Robert M. Sarvey v. California Public Utilities Commission, Pacific Gas and Electric Company Southern California Edison Company, San Diego Gas &...

  12. 78 FR 2393 - CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc., Michael E. Boyd, Robert M. Sarvey v. California Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc., Michael E. Boyd, Robert M. Sarvey v. California Public Utilities Commission, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Contra Costa Generating Station...

  13. Preventing Alcohol Problems among Young People: Californians Support Key Public Policies. Growing Up Well. Focus on Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, James F.

    This report, fourth in a series of eight, highlights the views of Californians about policies local communities and the state can establish to reduce the potential for alcohol problems among young people. In the California Center for Health Improvement (CCHI) "Children and Youth Survey," 51% of the adults surveyed said that they were…

  14. Scale and diversity following manipulation of productivity and disturbance in Californian coastal grasslands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandel, Brody Steven; Corbin, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    known. We ask whether the response of species richness to experimental manipulation of productivity and disturbance varies across small spatial scales (0.016–4 m2). We show that species–area relationships are well suited to summarize cross-scale responses of species richness, and ask whether...... the responses of species–area relationships to experimental manipulations are more consistent than richness at any single scale. Location Northern Californian coastal grasslands. Methods We applied disturbance and productivity reduction treatments over 4 yr at two sites. We assessed changes in species richness......Question Relationships between species richness and environmental drivers such as productivity and disturbance are sensitive to the scale over which they are measured, but the extent to which this scale-dependence is important for experimental studies conducted over small scale ranges is not well...

  15. Application of DRIFTS, 13 C NMR, and py-MBMS to Characterize the Effects of Soil Science Oxidation Assays on Soil Organic Matter Composition in a Mollic Xerofluvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margenot, Andrew J.; Calderón, Francisco J.; Magrini, Kimberly A.; Evans, Robert J.

    2016-12-20

    Chemical oxidations are routinely employed in soil science to study soil organic matter (SOM), and their interpretation could be improved by characterizing oxidation effects on SOM composition with spectroscopy. We investigated the effects of routinely employed oxidants on SOM composition in a Mollic Xerofluvent representative of intensively managed agricultural soils in the California Central Valley. Soil samples were subjected to oxidation by potassium permanganate (KMnO4), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Additionally, non-oxidized and oxidized soils were treated with hydrofluoric acid (HF) to evaluate reduction of the mineral component to improve spectroscopy of oxidation effects. Oxidized non-HF and HF-treated soils were characterized by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS), and for particle size distribution (PSD) using laser diffractometry (LD). Across the range of soil organic carbon (OC) removed by oxidations (14-72%), aliphatic C-H stretch at 3000-2800 cm-1 (DRIFTS) decreased with OC removal, and this trend was enhanced by HF treatment due to significant demineralization in this soil (70%). Analysis by NMR spectroscopy was feasible only after HF treatment, and did not reveal trends between OC removal and C functional groups. Pyrolysis-MBMS did not detect differences among oxidations, even after HF treatment of soils. Hydrofluoric acid entailed OC loss (13-39%), and for H2O2 oxidized soils increased C:N and substantially decreased mean particle size. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using HF to improve characterizations of SOM composition following oxidations as practiced in soil science, in particular for DRIFTS. Since OC removal by oxidants, mineral removal by HF, and the interaction of oxidants and HF observed for this soil may

  16. Cloning and Characterization of Glutamate Receptors in Californian Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santokh Gill

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid produced by marine algae has been shown to cause acute and chronic neurologic sequelae in Californian sea lions following acute or low-dose exposure. Histological findings in affected animals included a degenerative cardiomyopathy that was hypothesized to be caused by over-excitation of the glutamate receptors (GluRs speculated to be present in the sea lion heart. Thus tissues from five sea lions without lesions associated with domoic acid toxicity and one animal with domoic acid-induced chronic neurologic sequelae and degenerative cardiomyopathy were examined for the presence of GluRs. Immunohistochemistry localized mGluR 2/3, mGluR 5, GluR 2/3 and NMDAR 1 in structures of the conducting system and blood vessels. NMDAR 1 and GluR 2/3 were the most widespread as immunoreactivity was observed within sea lion conducting system structures. PCR analysis, cloning and subsequent sequencing of the seal lion GluRs showed only 80% homology to those from rats, but more than 95% homologous to those from dogs. The cellular distribution and expression of subtypes of GluRs in the sea lion hearts suggests that exposure to domoic acid may induce cardiac damage and functional disturbances.

  17. Observations and stochastic modeling of soil moisture control on evapotranspiration in a Californian oak savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyuan; Rubin, Yoram; Ma, Siyan; Baldocchi, Dennis

    2008-08-01

    The study of water exchange between soil, plants, and the atmosphere in response to seasonal or periodic droughts is critical to modeling the hydrologic cycle and biogeochemical processes in water-controlled ecosystems. An essential step in such studies is to characterize changes in evaporation and transpiration under water stress. The objectives of this study are to investigate how soil moisture controls the evapotranspiration in a Californian oak savanna that experiences seasonal droughts, using multiyear field observations at the daily and stand scale, and to model these controls stochastically. The influence of soil moisture on evapotranspiration at the stand scale is studied using correlations between tower-based evapotranspiration measurements and representative soil moisture obtained by aggregating point measurements. The observed pattern of this effect is found in agreement with an existing model that features a linear reduction of the evapotranspiration when soil moisture falls below a critical value. The model parameters are inferred using a Bayesian framework, and they are found to vary from year to year because of climate variability. The comparison between various aggregations of soil moisture at the stand scale from point measurements demonstrates that the spatial variability of the soil moisture and the water uptake capacity limited by the root biomass need be taken into account to produce a model that is most resistant to interannual variability. Finally, the parameterized model is used to predict the actual evapotranspiration with uncertainty estimates determined using the joint distribution of the parameters derived from the Bayesian framework. The satisfactory agreement between the predicted and measured evapotranspiration suggests that the calibrated model can be incorporated into water balance studies in the future.

  18. Population genetics features for persistent, but transient, Botryllus schlosseri (Urochordata) congregations in a central Californian marina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Arzu; Douek, Jacob; Paz, Guy; Rinkevich, Baruch

    2016-08-01

    The colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri is a globally distributed, invasive ascidian that has colonized the Californian coasts of the USA during the mid-late 1940s and has, since the late 1980s, spread north to Washington. This study analyzes the population genetic characteristics of transient populations residing at the Elkhorn Yacht-Club (EYC), in central California (seven sessions, 1996-2008), which suffered periodic catastrophes caused by episodic fresh-water floods and a single sampling session (in the year 2001) of five West-Coast populations using the mtDNA COI gene and five microsatellite markers. EYC microsatellite results were further compared with the closely situated but persistent population of the Santa Cruz Harbor (SCH) to understand the impact on EYC population regeneration processes after the 2005-flood catastrophe. All microsatellites were highly polymorphic, revealing a large number of unique alleles at different sampling dates. Whereas pairwise θ did not reveal significant differences between the EYC time-series samplings, the overall θ was significant, as it was between all the 2001 West Coast populations. The most likely cluster number was 3 for the EYC samples whereas two K values were obtained (2 and 5) for the 2001 samples. Tajima's D and Fu's/Fs tests did not reject the null hypothesis for COI neutral evolution, except for in the EYC-2000, 2007 and two 2001 samplings. The wide geographical range of the analyses has indicated that following the EYC 2005-flood catastrophe, newcomers could have originated from neighboring populations, from deep-water colonies that may have escaped the 2005 low salinity event, or less expectedly, from far away West-Coast populations, while revealing that the SCH population is the most probable source for the EYC population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic and ecotypic differentiation in a Californian plant polyploid complex (Grindelia, Asteraceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail J Moore

    Full Text Available Studies of ecotypic differentiation in the California Floristic Province have contributed greatly to plant evolutionary biology since the pioneering work of Clausen, Keck, and Hiesey. The extent of gene flow and genetic differentiation across interfertile ecotypes that span major habitats in the California Floristic Province is understudied, however, and is important for understanding the prospects for local adaptation to evolve or persist in the face of potential gene flow across populations in different ecological settings. We used microsatellite data to examine local differentiation in one of these lineages, the Pacific Coast polyploid complex of the plant genus Grindelia (Asteraceae. We examined 439 individuals in 10 different populations. The plants grouped broadly into a coastal and an inland set of populations. The coastal group contained plants from salt marshes and coastal bluffs, as well as a population growing in a serpentine grassland close to the coast, while the inland group contained grassland plants. No evidence for hybridization was found at the single location where adjacent populations of the two groups were sampled. In addition to differentiation along ecotypic lines, there was also a strong signal of local differentiation, with the plants grouping strongly by population. The strength of local differentiation is consistent with the extensive morphological variation observed across populations and the history of taxonomic confusion in the group. The Pacific Clade of Grindelia and other young Californian plant groups warrant additional analysis of evolutionary divergence along the steep coast-to-inland climatic gradient, which has been associated with local adaptation and ecotype formation since the classic studies of Clausen, Keck, and Hiesey.

  20. Genetic and ecotypic differentiation in a Californian plant polyploid complex (Grindelia, Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Abigail J; Moore, William L; Baldwin, Bruce G

    2014-01-01

    Studies of ecotypic differentiation in the California Floristic Province have contributed greatly to plant evolutionary biology since the pioneering work of Clausen, Keck, and Hiesey. The extent of gene flow and genetic differentiation across interfertile ecotypes that span major habitats in the California Floristic Province is understudied, however, and is important for understanding the prospects for local adaptation to evolve or persist in the face of potential gene flow across populations in different ecological settings. We used microsatellite data to examine local differentiation in one of these lineages, the Pacific Coast polyploid complex of the plant genus Grindelia (Asteraceae). We examined 439 individuals in 10 different populations. The plants grouped broadly into a coastal and an inland set of populations. The coastal group contained plants from salt marshes and coastal bluffs, as well as a population growing in a serpentine grassland close to the coast, while the inland group contained grassland plants. No evidence for hybridization was found at the single location where adjacent populations of the two groups were sampled. In addition to differentiation along ecotypic lines, there was also a strong signal of local differentiation, with the plants grouping strongly by population. The strength of local differentiation is consistent with the extensive morphological variation observed across populations and the history of taxonomic confusion in the group. The Pacific Clade of Grindelia and other young Californian plant groups warrant additional analysis of evolutionary divergence along the steep coast-to-inland climatic gradient, which has been associated with local adaptation and ecotype formation since the classic studies of Clausen, Keck, and Hiesey.

  1. A diverse population of Cryptococcus gattii molecular type VGIII in southern Californian HIV/AIDS patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond J Byrnes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus gattii infections in southern California have been reported in patients with HIV/AIDS. In this study, we examined the molecular epidemiology, population structure, and virulence attributes of isolates collected from HIV/AIDS patients in Los Angeles County, California. We show that these isolates consist almost exclusively of VGIII molecular type, in contrast to the VGII molecular type isolates causing the North American Pacific Northwest outbreak. The global VGIII population structure can be divided into two molecular groups, VGIIIa and VGIIIb. Isolates from the Californian patients are virulent in murine and macrophage models of infection, with VGIIIa significantly more virulent than VGIIIb. Several VGIII isolates are highly fertile and produce abundant sexual spores that may serve as infectious propagules. The a and α VGIII MAT locus alleles are largely syntenic with limited rearrangements compared to the known VGI (a/α and VGII (α MAT loci, but each has unique characteristics including a distinct deletion flanking the 5' VGIII MATa alleles and the α allele is more heterogeneous than the a allele. Our studies indicate that C. gattii VGIII is endemic in southern California, with other isolates originating from the neighboring regions of Mexico, and in rarer cases from Oregon and Washington state. Given that >1,000,000 cases of cryptococcal infection and >620,000 attributable mortalities occur annually in the context of the global AIDS pandemic, our findings suggest a significant burden of C. gattii may be unrecognized, with potential prognostic and therapeutic implications. These results signify the need to classify pathogenic Cryptococcus cases and highlight possible host differences among the C. gattii molecular types influencing infection of immunocompetent (VGI/VGII vs. immunocompromised (VGIII/VGIV hosts.

  2. The Hidden Poor: Over Three-Quarters of a Million Older Californians Overlooked by Official Poverty Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Frausto, Imelda D; Wallace, Steven P

    2015-08-01

    More than three-quarters of a million (772,000) older Californians are among the "hidden poor"--older adults with incomes above the federal poverty line (FPL) but below a minimally decent standard of living as determined by the Elder Economic Security Standard™ Index (Elder Index) in 2011. This policy brief uses the most recent Elder Index calculations to document the wide discrepancy that exists between the FPL and the Elder Index. This study finds that the FPL significantly underestimates the number of economically insecure older adults who are unable to make ends meet. Yet, because many public assistance programs are aligned with the FPL, potentially hundreds of thousands of economically insecure older Californians are denied aid. The highest rates of the hidden poor among older adults are found among renters, Latinos, women, those who are raising grandchildren, and people in the oldest age groups. Raising the income and asset eligibility requirement thresholds for social support programs such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI), housing, health care, and food assistance would help California's older hidden poor make ends meet.

  3. Evidence for fast seismic lid structure beneath the Californian margin and its implication on regional plate deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, V. H.; Graves, R. W.; Wei, S.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithospheric structure of the Pacific and North American plates play an important role in modulating plate deformation along the California margin. Pure path models indicate that the Pacific plate has a fast thick (80km) lid overlaying a strong low velocity zone (LVZ) extending to beyond 300 km depth. In contrast, the North America structure is characterized by a relatively thin (25-35km) lid and a shallow LVZ. Vertical ray paths have similar travel times across the plate boundary for the two models, making resolution of the transitional structure difficult. Earthquakes such as the 2014 March 10 Mw 6.8 Mendocino and 2014 August 25 Mw 6.0 Napa events recorded at regional distances across California provide an opportunity to study horizontal paths and track the lateral variation in the lower crust-uppermost mantle structure under the Californian margin. Observations from both Napa and Mendocino events show direct SH-wave arrivals at Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) stations are systematically earlier (up to 10 s) for coastal and island stations relative to inland sites. The shift in SH arrival times may be due to features such as varying crustal thickness, varying upper mantle velocity and the presence of a fast seismic lid. To test the different hypotheses, we perform extensive forward modeling using both 1-D frequency-wavenumber and 3-D finite-difference approaches. The model that best fits the SH arrival times has a fast lid (Vs = 4.7 km/s) underlying the whole California margin, with the lid increasing in thickness from east to west to a maximum thickness about 70 km in the western offshore region. The fast, thick seismic lid lends strength and rigidity to the Pacific plate lithosphere in contrast with the weaker North American continental plate, which influences the overall plate deformation along the Californian margin and is in agreement with GPS measurements.

  4. Galápagos and Californian sea lions are separate species: Genetic analysis of the genus Zalophus and its implications for conservation management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Jochen BW

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate formal taxonomic designations are thought to be of critical importance for the conservation of endangered taxa. The Galápagos sea lion (GSL, being appreciated as a key element of the Galápagos marine ecosystem, has lately been listed as 'vulnerable' by the IUCN. To date there is, however, hardly any scientific evidence, whether it constitutes a separate entity from its abundant Californian neighbour (CSL. In this paper, we delineate the taxonomic relationships within the genus Zalophus being comprised of the Galápagos sea lion, the Californian sea lion and the already extinct Japanese sea lion (JSL. Results Using a set of different phylogenetic reconstruction approaches, we find support for monophyly of all three taxa without evidence of reticulation events. Molecular clock estimates place time to common ancestry of the Galápagos sea lion and the Californian sea lion at about 2.3 ± 0.5 mya. Genetic separation is further suggested by diagnostic SNPs in the mitochondrial and nuclear genome. Microsatellite markers confirm this trend, showing numerous private alleles at most of the 25 investigated loci. Microsatellite-based estimates of genetic differentiation between the Galápagos sea lion and the Californian sea lion indicate significant genetic differentiation. Gene diversity is 14% lower in the Galápagos sea lion than in the Californian sea lion, but there is no evidence for recent bottleneck events in the Galápagos sea lion. Conclusion Based on molecular evidence we build a case for classifying the Galápagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki, the Californian sea lion (Zalophus californianus and the Japanese sea lion (Zalophus japonicus as true species. As morphological characters do not necessarily fully reflect the rapid divergence on the molecular level, the study can be considered as a test case for deriving species status from molecular evidence. We further use the results to discuss the role of genetics in

  5. Of the Helmholtz Club, South-Californian seedbed for visual and cognitive neuroscience, and its patron Francis Crick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicardi, Christine

    2014-03-01

    Taking up the view that semi-institutional gatherings such as clubs, societies, research schools, have been instrumental in creating sheltered spaces from which many a 20th-century project-driven interdisciplinary research programme could develop and become established within the institutions of science, the paper explores the history of one such gathering from its inception in the early 1980s into the 2000s, the Helmholtz Club, which brought together scientists from such various research fields as neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, psychophysics, computer science and engineering, who all had an interest in the study of the visual system and of higher cognitive functions relying on visual perception such as visual consciousness. It argues that British molecular biologist turned South Californian neuroscientist Francis Crick had an early and lasting influence over the Helmholtz Club of which he was a founding pillar, and that from its inception, the club served as a constitutive element in his long-term plans for a neuroscience of vision and of cognition. Further, it argues that in this role, the Helmholtz Club served many purposes, the primary of which was to be a social forum for interdisciplinary discussion, where 'discussion' was not mere talk but was imbued with an epistemic value and as such, carefully cultivated. Finally, it questions what counts as 'doing science' and in turn, definitions of success and failure-and provides some material evidence towards re-appraising the successfulness of Crick's contribution to the neurosciences.

  6. One Shared Region and Two Different Change Patterns: Land Use Change in the Binational Californian Mediterranean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Eaton-Gonzalez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Californian Floristic Province, ranging from Northern California, USA, to the northwestern portion of the state of Baja California, Mexico, is a region of great biological richness that has a high risk of loss of species due to the effect of human activities. The main stressor that threatens its biodiversity is the change in land use and vegetation cover, which severely impacts the environmental and socio-economic systems’ functioning, affecting the provision of environmental services including the maintenance of biodiversity. The Tijuana River Watershed (TRW is located within this floristic province. It has experienced rapid population growth during the last 50 years, demanding development of infrastructure in areas where native vegetation existed. As a binational watershed, it is an ideal area to study the processes involved in fragmentation and connectivity of natural environments, since both countries, while sharing the same environment, contrast greatly in their economic and social systems, which impose different pressures to these shared natural resources. Our research addresses change in vegetation cover and land use in the TRW, analyzing the changes and differences between Mexico and the United States. This analysis will be a basis to propose future management strategies for the conservation of ecological processes and biodiversity, according to the policies and actions for land management and conservation in both countries.

  7. Public hospital quality report awareness: evidence from National and Californian Internet searches and social media mentions, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesch, Marco D; Currid-Halkett, Elizabeth; Doctor, Jason N

    2014-03-11

    Publicly available hospital quality reports seek to inform consumers of important healthcare quality and affordability attributes, and may inform consumer decision-making. To understand how much consumers search for such information online on one Internet search engine, whether they mention such information in social media and how positively they view this information. A leading Internet search engine (Google) was the main focus of the study. Google Trends and Google Adwords keyword analyses were performed for national and Californian searches between 1 August 2012 and 31 July 2013 for keywords related to 'top hospital', best hospital', and 'hospital quality', as well as for six specific hospital quality reports. Separately, a proprietary social media monitoring tool was used to investigate blog, forum, social media and traditional media mentions of, and sentiment towards, major public reports of hospital quality in California in 2012. (1) Counts of searches for keywords performed on Google; (2) counts of and (3) sentiment of mentions of public reports on social media. National Google search volume for 75 hospital quality-related terms averaged 610 700 searches per month with strong variation by keyword and by state. A commercial report (Healthgrades) was more commonly searched for nationally on Google than the federal government's Hospital Compare, which otherwise dominated quality-related search terms. Social media references in California to quality reports were generally few, and commercially produced hospital quality reports were more widely mentioned than state (Office of Statewide Healthcare Planning and Development (OSHPD)), or non-profit (CalHospitalCompare) reports. Consumers are somewhat aware of hospital quality based on Internet search activity and social media disclosures. Public stakeholders may be able to broaden their quality dissemination initiatives by advertising on Google or Twitter and using social media interactively with consumers looking

  8. Virulence and pathogenesis of the MSW and MSD strains of Californian myxoma virus in European rabbits with genetic resistance to myxomatosis compared to rabbits with no genetic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvers, L; Inglis, B; Labudovic, A; Janssens, P A; van Leeuwen, B H; Kerr, P J

    2006-04-25

    The pathogenesis of two Californian strains of myxoma virus (MSW and MSD) was examined in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) that were either susceptible to myxomatosis (laboratory rabbits) or had undergone natural selection for genetic resistance to myxomatosis (Australian wild rabbits). MSW was highly lethal for both types of rabbits with average survival times of 7.3 and 9.4 days, respectively, and 100% mortality. Classical clinical signs of myxomatosis were not present except in one rabbit that survived for 13 days following infection. Previously described clinical signs of trembling and shaking were observed in laboratory but not wild rabbits. Despite the high resistance of wild rabbits to myxomatosis caused by South American strains of myxoma virus, the MSW strain was of such high virulence that it was able to overcome resistance. The acute nature of the infection, relatively low viral titers in the tissues and destruction of lymphoid tissues, suggested that death was probably due to an acute and overwhelming immunopathological response to the virus. No virus was found in the brain. The MSD strain was attenuated compared to previously published descriptions and therefore was only characterized in laboratory rabbits. It is concluded that Californian MSW strain of myxoma virus is at the extreme end of a continuum of myxoma virus virulence but that the basic pathophysiology of the disease induced is not broadly different to other strains of myxoma virus.

  9. Alegoria californiana Californian allegory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Ramos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O ensaio parte dos murais de Diego Rivera realizados nos anos 1930 nos Estados Unidos para desentranhar neles uma alegoria das relações Norte e Sul, América do Norte e América Latina. A viagem do muralista mexicano aos Estados Unidos alegoriza essa relação em que se formulam estratégias de combinação entre técnica e natureza, máquina e corpo, nestes murais que representam a linha de produção fordista e a racionalização do tempo do trabalho físico. A viagem de Rivera alegoriza ainda a constituição do "latino-americanismo", como campo universitário em que se inserem as representações culturalizadas da América Latina nos Estados Unidos. A partir dessa matriz o ensaio se detém sobre as políticas da língua hispânica que se inscreve como língua diaspórica nos Estados Unidos, segundo o paradigma da tradução, e encarnando-se em maneiras possíveis de convocação do corpo como corpo da língua nos poemas de Rosário Castellanos e no clássico de Pablo Neruda, "Alturas de Macchu Picchu".El ensayo parte de los murales de Diego Rivera realizados durante los años 30 en Estados Unidos para desentrañar en ellos una alegoría de las relaciones Norte y Sur, América del Norte y América Latina. El viaje del muralista mexicano a Estados Unidos alegoriza esa relación en que se formulan estrategias de combinación entre técnica y naturaleza, máquina y cuerpo, en estos murales que representan la línea de producción fordista y la racionalización del tiempo del trabajo físico. El viaje de Rivera alegoriza también la constitución del "latinoamericanismo", como campo universitario en que se insertan las representaciones culturalizadas de América Latina en Estados Unidos. Partiendo de esa matriz, el ensayo se detiene sobre las políticas de la lengua hispánica que se inscribe como lengua diaspórica en Estados Unidos, según el paradigma de la traducción, y encarnándose en maneras posibles de convocación del cuerpo como cuerpo de la lengua en los poemas de Rosario Castellanos y en el clásico de Pablo Neruda, "Alturas de Macchu Picchu".The essay takes its cue from Diego Rivera's murals accomplished in the thirties in the United States in order to localize in them an allegory of North-South relations, North America and Latin America. The Mexican muralist's trip to the United States allegorizes this relationship in which are formulated strategies for combining technology and nature, the machine and the body, in these murals which represent the Fordist production line and the racionalization of time in physical labor. Rivera's trip also allegorizes the constitution of "Latin Americanism", as an Academic field in which are introduced Cultural representations of Latin America in the United States. Drawing from this model the essay studies the politics of the Spanish language as a diasporic language in the United States, following the translation paradigm, and embodying itself in possible ways of enlisting the body as a body of language in the poems of Rosário Castellanos and Pablo Neruda's classic, "Alturas de Macchu Picchu".

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CALIFORNIAN and other platforms as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration (IDOE) and the Integrated Global Ocean Service (IGOSS) from 1973-07-26 to 1974-08-05 (NODC Accession 7400748)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CALIFORNIAN and other platforms from 26 July 1973 to 05 August 1974. Data were collected by the National...

  11. COMPARATIVE RESEARCHE REGARDING METABOLIC PROFILE OF THE CALIFORNIAN, NEW ZEALAND WHITE, GRAND CHINCHILLA MEAT RABIT BREEDS AND THE F1 NZCH HYBRIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA-MARCELA TOBĂ (GOINA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Precious biological characteristics of rabbits make their breeding a very profitable occupation. The rabbit meat, organoleptically same to the white meat, is rich in proteins, but low in fats. Biological researched done in direction to elucidate the biochemical systems that are the basis for organism physiological processes, have revealed that the level in which this process are develop directly influence the rabbits productivity capacity. 60 rabbit’s heads was used as biological material, distributed in: 15 Californian, 15 New Zeeland White, 15 Grand Chinchilla and 15 F1NZCH hybrids obtained from cross-breeding the New Zeeland White as maternal form and Grand Chinchilla as paternal form. Blood was sampled from the rabbit and was biochemical analyzed. The studied indices were: total protein, albumin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, total bilirubine, cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose. The experimental lot formed from F1 NZCH hybrids registered a concentration of 2.1 mg/dl uric acid, and in the other three lots the concentration was under 2 mg/dl. In all four lots, uric acid value was in normal limits. The determined creatinine registered very low values, under 1 mg/dl, at the low limit of reference values. At hybrids from New Zeeland White as maternal form and Grand Chinchilla as paternal form, in equal environmental conditions, the serum biochemical analysis haven’t registered significant differences compared to pure breeds individuals.

  12. End-of-Life Intensity for Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer: A Californian Population-Based Study That Shows Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Emily E; Alvarez, Elysia; Saynina, Olga; Sanders, Lee; Bhatia, Smita; Chamberlain, Lisa J

    2017-08-22

    Cancer is the leading cause of nonaccidental death among adolescents and young adults (AYAs). High-intensity end-of-life care is expensive and may not be consistent with patient goals. However, the intensity of end-of-life care for AYA decedents with cancer-especially the effect of care received at specialty versus nonspecialty centers-remains understudied. We conducted a retrospective, population-based analysis with the California administrative discharge database that is linked to death certificates. The cohort included Californians age 15 to 39 years who died between 2000 and 2011 with cancer. Intense end-of-life interventions included readmission, admission to an intensive care unit, intubation in the last month of life, and in-hospital death. Specialty centers were defined as Children's Oncology Group centers and National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers. Of the 12,938 AYA cancer decedents, 59% received at least one intense end-of-life care intervention, and 30% received two or more. Patients treated at nonspecialty centers were more likely than those at specialty-care centers to receive two or more intense interventions (odds ratio [OR], 1.46; 95% CI, 1.32 to 1.62). Sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with two or more intense interventions included minority race/ethnicity (Black [OR, 1.35, 95% CI, 1.17 to 1.56]; Hispanic [OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.36]; non-Hispanic white: reference), younger age (15 to 21 years [OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.56; 22 to 29 years [OR,1.26; 95% CI,1.14 to 1.39]; ≥ 30 years: reference), and hematologic malignancies (OR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.41 to 1.66; solid tumors: reference). Thirty percent of AYA cancer decedents received two or more high-intensity end-of-life interventions. In addition to sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, hospitalization in a nonspecialty center was associated with high-intensity end-of-life care. Additional research is needed to determine if these disparities are

  13. Study of the virulence of five strains of amyxomatous myxoma virus in crossbred New Zealand White/Californian conventional rabbits, with evidence of long-term testicular infection in recovered animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlier, D; Mainil, J; Sulon, J; Beckers, J F; Linden, A; Vindevogel, H

    2000-01-01

    The virulence of five amyxomatous myxoma virus (MV) strains, the clinical and pathogenetic effects of which had been studied previously in specific pathogen-free (SPF) rabbits, was determined by inoculation of five groups of 10 crossbred New Zealand White/Californian conventional rabbits. A much more acute myxomatosis syndrome was produced in conventional rabbits than that reproduced previously in SPF animals. However, the main clinical signs were of the respiratory type. The MV strains MYX 254/95 and 801 appeared very virulent, killing all the inoculated animals. The strains MYX 217/95, MYX 555/94 and Saint Benoist were somewhat attenuated, killing only seven, six and six rabbits, respectively. Extensive lung lesions due to supervening bacterial infections were observed in 36 of the 39 rabbits that died. Lethality was found to be a better estimate of virulence than mean survival time. By 98 days after viral inoculation, all the surviving animals had completely recovered. At that time, they were immunosuppressed by treatment with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) for 10 days to determine whether they still harboured the virus. After the ACTH treatment, eight of the 11 surviving rabbits showed clinical signs that resembled amyxomatous myxomatosis. All the virological examinations performed on naso-conjunctival exudate, on mononuclear cells, on eyelids and on ovaries remained negative but infectious virus was isolated from the testes of three of six surviving male rabbits.

  14. Parâmetros genéticos para coelhos da raça Califórnia criados no Brasil Genetic parameters for Californian rabbits raised in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Paula

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Registros de pesos de 3.249 coelhos, nascidos de 1980 a 1996 e, dados de pedigree de 4.857 coelhos da raça Califórnia, criados no Campus da USP de Pirassununga, São Paulo, submetidos à seleção por três gerações, com base em valores genéticos de pesos à desmama (PD e à 10ª semana de idade (P10 e ganho de peso da desmama até 10 semanas de idade (GPD10, foram analisados pelo método de modelos mistos sob modelos animais para obter estimativas de parâmetros genéticos para as características consideradas como parte do critério de seleção. As estimativas do coeficiente de herdabilidade encontradas foram de 0,23 para PD, de 0,44 para P10 e 0,39 para GP10, mostrando ser possível haver ganhos genéticos se aplicados processos seletivos. A correlação genética entre PD e P10 foi de 0,66 e entre PD e GPD10 foi baixa, indicando que as variáveis são praticamente independentes. A proporção da variância fenotípica devida aos efeitos permanentes de ninhada foi importante para todas as características. Os resultados sugerem que a seleção para características ponderais pode ser eficiente.Genetic, phenotypic and environmental parameters of a population of Californian rabbits submitted to selection for three generations were studied. Traits analyzed were individual weaning weight (PD, weight at 10 weeks (P10 and average daily gain from weaning to 10 weeks of age (GPD10 using 3,249 records of weights of rabbits and pedigree information of 4,857 animals, born from 1980 to 1996, and selected based on an index of estimated breeding values for PD, P10 and GPD10. Permanent effects of litters were as important as additive genetic effects. Heritabilities for the three traits were .23 (PD, .44 (P10 and .39 (GPD10. Genetic correlations between PD and P10 and between PD and GPD10 were high (.66 and very low, respectively.

  15. Are Aftershocks of Large Californian Earthquakes Diffusing?

    CERN Document Server

    Helmstetter, A; Sornette, D; Helmstetter, Agnes; Ouillon, Guy; Sornette, Didier

    2003-01-01

    We analyze 21 aftershock sequences of California to test for evidence of space-time diffusion. Aftershock diffusion may result from stress diffusion and is also predicted by any mechanism of stress weakening. Here, we test an alternative mechanism to explain aftershock diffusion, based on multiple cascades of triggering. In order to characterize aftershock diffusion, we develop two methods, one based on a suitable time and space windowing that has been calibrated on the ETAS model of triggered seismicity, the other using a wavelet transform adapted to the removal of background seismicity. Both methods confirm that diffusion of seismic activity is very weak, much weaker than reported in previous studies. A possible mechanism explaining the weakness of observed diffusion is the effect of geometry, including the localization of aftershocks on a fractal fault network and the impact of extended rupture lengths which control the typical distances of interaction between earthquakes.

  16. Comportamiento de lombriz roja californiana y lombriz silvestre en bosta bovina y rumia bovina como sustrato Behavior of californian red earthworm and wild earthworm in bovine dung and bovine rumination as substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Loza Murguía

    californian red earthworm (Eisenia spp. and the wild earthworm (Lumbricus spp. in two substrates with the aim to improve the quality of vermicompost produced by these annelids. The work has been carried out in the module of Environmental Microbiology, in facilities of Unidad Académica Campesina Carmen Pampa (UACCP, Campus Leahy, located in Coroico Nor Yungas of Departamento of La Paz-Bolivia. Their behavior has been studied in two substrates bovine dung (manure and bovine rumination (rumination in 40 experimental units of 0.2 m width*0.25 m length*0.4 m depth, each unit showed a density of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 individuals with two repetitions of each one in 1 000 g of substrate. The cocoons number, number of individuals at 8 weeks, and percentage of degradation of the substrate was determined. The results indicate that substrates manure is better in the population dynamics of Eisenia spp., in comparison with Lumbricus spp. The physical and chemical characteristics of manure and rumination possibly influenced in this type of behavior for Eisenia spp.

  17. Effect of Californian Red Worm (Eisenia foetida on the Nutrient Dynamics of a Mixture of Semicomposted Materials Efecto de la Lombriz Roja Californiana (Eisenia foetida en la Dinámica de Nutrientes de una Mezcla de Materiales Semicompostados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Castillo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of composting processes with and without the addition of Californian red worms (Eisenia foetida was evaluated, using manure of dairy cows to generate organic fertilizer. Several parameters were assessed as physio-chemical indicators of maturity, such as temperature, pH, C/N ratio, phytotoxicity and macro and micronutrients at 25 and 54 ws (mature and stored products, respectively. A linear model was used in the statistical analysis, with four replicates that included as fixed effects, the composting systems and time. At 25 wk, both systems reduced the C/N ratio to values of 15.5 in vermicompost and 17.1 in semi-compost. The content of total N, N-NO3, Ca and some micronutrients also increased. K and Na concentrations were higher in the compost than in the vermicompost. The mean of pH presented differences in the two systems of decomposition. The germination index, using lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa L. var. Grandes Lagos in vitro, of the decomposition products increased in week 25, indicating the degree of maturity reached. The effect of storage was greater stability of the products by reducing the C/N ratio to 8.13 for vermicompost and 7.05 for compost, as well as an increase in available N content in the form of N-NO3 in the case of compost and in the content of Ca, Mg, Na, Zn, Mn and Cu in both systems.Se evaluó la eficiencia de los procesos de compostaje con y sin la adición de lombriz roja californiana (Eisenia foetida usando estiércol de vacas lecheras para la generación de abonos orgánicos. Como indicadores de madurez se evaluaron varios parámetros fisicoquímicos tales como temperatura, pH, relación C/N, fitotoxicidad y macro y micronutrientes durante 25 y 54 semanas (productos maduros y almacenados, respectivamente. En el análisis estadístico se usó un modelo lineal con cuatro repeticiones que incluyó como efectos fijos los sistemas de compostaje y el tiempo. Se realizó análisis de varianza y comparación de

  18. Beyond Amnesty: Programs and Services for the New Californians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Skillman, Thelma; Ali, Saeed M.

    Through State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants (SLIAG), California is projected to receive almost $2 billion to help deal with the impact of the nearly 1.7 million immigrants who received amnesty under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. The California State Education Plan for SLIAG, developed by the California Department of…

  19. A Qualitative Investigation of Californian Youth Interests in the Outdoors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marni Goldenberg

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Prior research has found connections between youth participation in recreational activities and academic achievement, civic involvement, and improved health. To investigate California youth outdoor recreation attitudes, behaviors, and constraints, eight focus groups were conducted with community recreation center youth participants. Youth answered 10 questions about their experiences, attitudes, and perceptions of outdoor recreation. Data were analyzed using grounded theory. Three to seven axial codes were identified for each question. Results showed that youth want to have more access to outdoor recreational activities. However, there are frequently considerable constraints for the youth to overcome including draws of technology, family obligations, and laziness. Safety was a recurring concern among participants. Understanding youth attitudes and perceptions allows managers to meet youth needs, program for youth interests, and provides a strong foundation for marketing and as a rational for funding grants.

  20. Californian Genius: Lewis Terman's Gifted Child in Regional Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Clémentine

    2016-01-01

    This article pays attention to the regional embeddedness of early research on giftedness, looking principally at the works of Lewis Terman and his peers, between the 1910s and 1930s. The rhetoric, ideology, and aesthetics of giftedness in those early works were, I argue, stamped by the context and imaginary of Progressive-Era California and shaped…

  1. Californian labs feel the heat of the energy crisis

    CERN Multimedia

    Dalton, R B

    2001-01-01

    Laboratories operating for the DOE have been told their power may be shut off for up to two hours at a time. Warmer weather has increased the use of air conditioning and the blackouts are expected to become more frequent over the summer (1/2 page).

  2. Californian Genius: Lewis Terman's Gifted Child in Regional Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Clémentine

    2016-01-01

    This article pays attention to the regional embeddedness of early research on giftedness, looking principally at the works of Lewis Terman and his peers, between the 1910s and 1930s. The rhetoric, ideology, and aesthetics of giftedness in those early works were, I argue, stamped by the context and imaginary of Progressive-Era California and shaped…

  3. Assistive technology and employment: experiences of Californians with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Patricia; Kaye, H Stephen; Reed, Myisha; Doe, Tanis M

    2006-01-01

    For people with disabilities, work remains the best route to independence and enacting one's own choices. Assistive technology (AT) is often crucial in removing barriers to employment, and in enabling workers with disabilities to work more productively. A participatory action research project known as Community Research for Assistive Technology surveyed people with disabilities using Independent Living Centers throughout California, in part to identify barriers to employment and study use of job-related AT to overcome such barriers. Across disability groups, disability itself was cited as the primary barrier to employment, with potential loss of benefits and lack of education cited as secondary barriers. A majority of working respondents reported using assistive technology (such as adapted telephones, wheelchairs, magnifiers, and adapted computer equipment) or services to perform job functions. The vast majority of those using job-related AT reported substantial benefits to their productivity and self-esteem. Employees' requests for AT as a workplace accommodation were granted more often than not, but many other employees had to pay for their own workplace AT.

  4. Indian Student Involvement in Tribal Community-Based Research: Underage Drinking Prevention among Rural Native Californians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juliet P; Calac, Daniel; Montag, Annika C; Brodine, Stephanie; Luna, Juan A; Flores, Rosalie Y; Gilder, David A; Moore, Roland S

    2011-01-01

    The critical need for increased numbers of American Indian/Alaska Native scientists and health professionals motivated the development of the California Native American Research Center for Health (CA-NARCH) initiative. One strategy of the initiative has been to encourage opportunities for applied research experiences for American Indian/Alaska Native students. Placement of CA-NARCH students in funded research assistant positions for a research project "Preventing Underage Drinking by Southwest California Indians: Building Capacity" based at the Southern California Tribal Health Clinic, Inc., in a rural part of Southern California, provides a model in which both American Indian//Alaska Native students and research investigators have benefitted. Six students received training in research ethics, data collection methods and data management and analysis. The students' participation in project activities has resulted in positive experiences for themselves, a productive research staff for the project and positive responses from community members to this sensitive research project.

  5. Determinants of the spatial distributions of elemental carbon and particulate matter in eight Southern Californian communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urman, Robert; Gauderman, James; Fruin, Scott; Lurmann, Fred; Liu, Feifei; Hosseini, Reza; Franklin, Meredith; Ayol, Edward; Penfold, Bryan; Gilliland, Frank; Brunekreef, Bert; McConnell, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that near-roadway pollution (NRP) in ambient air has adverse health effects. However, specific components of the NRP mixture responsible for these effects have not been established. A major limitation for health studies is the lack of exposure models that estimate NRP com

  6. Californian forest fire plumes over Southwestern British Columbia: lidar, sunphotometry, and mountaintop chemistry observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. McKendry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest fires in Northern California and Oregon were responsible for two significant regional scale aerosol transport events observed in southern British Columbia during summer 2008. A combination of ground based (CORALNet and satellite (CALIPSO lidar, sunphotometry and high altitude chemistry observations permitted unprecedented characterization of forest fire plume height and mixing as well as description of optical properties and physicochemistry of the aerosol. In southwestern BC, lidar observations show the smoke to be mixed through a layer extending to 5–6 km a.g.l. where the aerosol was confined by an elevated inversion in both cases. Depolarization ratios for a trans-Pacific dust event (providing a basis for comparison and the two smoke events were consistent with observations of dust and smoke events elsewhere and permit discrimination of aerosol events in the region. Based on sunphotometry, the Aerosol Optical Thicknesses (AOT reached maxima of ~0.7 and ~0.4 for the two events respectively. Dubovik-retrieval values of reff, f during both the June/July and August events varied between about 0.13 and 0.15 μm and confirm the dominance of accumulation mode size particles in the forest fire plumes. Both Whistler Peak and Mount Bachelor Observatory data show that smoke events are accompanied by elevated CO and O3 concentrations as well as elevated K+/SO4 ratios. In addition to documenting the meteorology and physic-chemical characteristics of two regional scale biomass burning plumes, this study demonstrates the positive analytical synergies arising from the suite of measurements now in place in the Pacific Northwest, and complemented by satellite borne instruments.

  7. Selection of biosphere reserves for the Californian Biogeographical Province : Final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Completion of the biosphere reserve network within the United States is a major objective of the United States Man and the Biosphere Program (US MAS). Toward this...

  8. Determinants of the spatial distributions of elemental carbon and particulate matter in eight Southern Californian communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urman, Robert; Gauderman, James; Fruin, Scott; Lurmann, Fred; Liu, Feifei; Hosseini, Reza; Franklin, Meredith; Avol, Edward; Penfold, Bryan; Gilliland, Frank; Brunekreef, Bert; McConnell, Rob

    2014-04-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that near-roadway pollution (NRP) in ambient air has adverse health effects. However, specific components of the NRP mixture responsible for these effects have not been established. A major limitation for health studies is the lack of exposure models that estimate NRP components observed in epidemiological studies over fine spatial scale of tens to hundreds of meters. In this study, exposure models were developed for fine-scale variation in biologically relevant elemental carbon (EC). Measurements of particulate matter (PM) and EC less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (EC2.5) and of PM and EC of nanoscale size less than 0.2 μm were made at up to 29 locations in each of eight Southern California Children's Health Study communities. Regression-based prediction models were developed using a guided forward selection process to identify traffic variables and other pollutant sources, community physical characteristics and land use as predictors of PM and EC variation in each community. A combined eight-community model including only CALINE4 near-roadway dispersion-estimated vehicular emissions accounting for distance, distance-weighted traffic volume, and meteorology, explained 51% of the EC0.2 variability. Community-specific models identified additional predictors in some communities; however, in most communities the correlation between predicted concentrations from the eight-community model and observed concentrations stratified by community was similar to those for the community-specific models. EC2.5 could be predicted as well as EC0.2. EC2.5 estimated from CALINE4 and population density explained 53% of the within-community variation. Exposure prediction was further improved after accounting for between-community heterogeneity of CALINE4 effects associated with average distance to Pacific Ocean shoreline (to 61% for EC0.2) and for regional NOx pollution (to 57% for EC2.5). PM fine spatial scale variation was poorly predicted in both size fractions. In conclusion, models of exposure that include traffic measures such as CALINE4 can provide useful estimates for EC0.2 and EC2.5 on a spatial scale appropriate for health studies of NRP in selected Southern California communities.

  9. Health Promotion Interventions for Low-Income Californians Through Medi-Cal Managed Care Plans, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohatsu, Neal D.; Paciotti, Brian M.; Byrne, Jennifer V.; Kizer, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prevention is the most cost-effective approach to promote population health, yet little is known about the delivery of health promotion interventions in the nation’s largest Medicaid program, Medi-Cal. The purpose of this study was to inventory health promotion interventions delivered through Medi-Cal Managed Care Plans; identify attributes of the interventions that plans judged to have the greatest impact on their members; and determine the extent to which the plans refer members to community assistance programs and sponsor health-promoting community activities. Methods The lead health educator from each managed care plan was asked to complete a 190-item online survey in January 2013; 20 of 21 managed care plans responded. Survey data on the health promotion interventions with the greatest impact were grouped according to intervention attributes and measures of effectiveness; quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results Health promotion interventions judged to have the greatest impact on Medi-Cal members were delivered in various ways; educational materials, one-on-one education, and group classes were delivered most frequently. Behavior change, knowledge gain, and improved disease management were cited most often as measures of effectiveness. Across all interventions, median educational hours were limited (2.4 h), and median Medi-Cal member participation was low (265 members per intervention). Most interventions with greatest impact (120 of 137 [88%]) focused on tertiary prevention. There were mixed results in referring members to community assistance programs and investing in community activities. Conclusion Managed care plans have many opportunities to more effectively deliver health promotion interventions. Establishing measurable, evidence-based, consensus standards for such programs could facilitate improved delivery of these services. PMID:26564012

  10. Nurse Practitioner Mental Health Care in the Primary Context: A Californian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theane Theophilos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In America, mental health needs surpass the availability of specialized providers. This vulnerable population also has other obstacles for comprehensive care including gaps in medical coverage, stigma, economic barriers, and a geographical mal‑distribution of qualified mental health professionals. A wide availability of primary care providers, including primary care and family nurse practitioners, are well-positioned to deliver integrated mental and physical health care. A case study from a Southern California Coachella Valley primary care clinic with integrated services is used to demonstrate the much-needed approach of care to address health disparities that face low‑income immigrants, migrant workers, and others without access to specialized care centers and providers. It is argued that mental health care should be part of all holistic treatment provided by primary care and family nurse practitioners. This has implications for curricula and practice development.

  11. Nurse Practitioner Mental Health Care in the Primary Context: A Californian Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Theane Theophilos; Roger Green; Andrew Cashin

    2015-01-01

    In America, mental health needs surpass the availability of specialized providers. This vulnerable population also has other obstacles for comprehensive care including gaps in medical coverage, stigma, economic barriers, and a geographical mal‑distribution of qualified mental health professionals. A wide availability of primary care providers, including primary care and family nurse practitioners, are well-positioned to deliver integrated mental and physical health care. A case study from a S...

  12. Nurse Practitioner Mental Health Care in the Primary Context: A Californian Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theophilos, Theane; Green, Roger; Cashin, Andrew

    2015-03-18

    In America, mental health needs surpass the availability of specialized providers. This vulnerable population also has other obstacles for comprehensive care including gaps in medical coverage, stigma, economic barriers, and a geographical mal‑distribution of qualified mental health professionals. A wide availability of primary care providers, including primary care and family nurse practitioners, are well-positioned to deliver integrated mental and physical health care. A case study from a Southern California Coachella Valley primary care clinic with integrated services is used to demonstrate the much-needed approach of care to address health disparities that face low‑income immigrants, migrant workers, and others without access to specialized care centers and providers. It is argued that mental health care should be part of all holistic treatment provided by primary care and family nurse practitioners. This has implications for curricula and practice development.

  13. The ShakeOut Earthquake Scenario - A Story That Southern Californians Are Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Suzanne; Cox, Dale; Jones, Lucile; Bernknopf, Richard; Goltz, James; Hudnut, Kenneth; Mileti, Dennis; Ponti, Daniel; Porter, Keith; Reichle, Michael; Seligson, Hope; Shoaf, Kimberley; Treiman, Jerry; Wein, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The question is not if but when southern California will be hit by a major earthquake - one so damaging that it will permanently change lives and livelihoods in the region. How severe the changes will be depends on the actions that individuals, schools, businesses, organizations, communities, and governments take to get ready. To help prepare for this event, scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have changed the way that earthquake scenarios are done, uniting a multidisciplinary team that spans an unprecedented number of specialties. The team includes the California Geological Survey, Southern California Earthquake Center, and nearly 200 other partners in government, academia, emergency response, and industry, working to understand the long-term impacts of an enormous earthquake on the complicated social and economic interactions that sustain southern California society. This project, the ShakeOut Scenario, has applied the best current scientific understanding to identify what can be done now to avoid an earthquake catastrophe. More information on the science behind this project will be available in The ShakeOut Scenario (USGS Open-File Report 2008-1150; http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1150/). The 'what if?' earthquake modeled in the ShakeOut Scenario is a magnitude 7.8 on the southern San Andreas Fault. Geologists selected the details of this hypothetical earthquake by considering the amount of stored strain on that part of the fault with the greatest risk of imminent rupture. From this, seismologists and computer scientists modeled the ground shaking that would occur in this earthquake. Engineers and other professionals used the shaking to produce a realistic picture of this earthquake's damage to buildings, roads, pipelines, and other infrastructure. From these damages, social scientists projected casualties, emergency response, and the impact of the scenario earthquake on southern California's economy and society. The earthquake, its damages, and resulting losses are one realistic outcome, deliberately not a worst-case scenario, rather one worth preparing for and mitigating against. Decades of improving the life-safety requirements in building codes have greatly reduced the risk of death in earthquakes, yet southern California's economic and social systems are still vulnerable to large-scale disruptions. Because of this, the ShakeOut Scenario earthquake would dramatically alter the nature of the southern California community. Fortunately, steps can be taken now that can change that outcome and repay any costs many times over. The ShakeOut Scenario is the first public product of the USGS Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project, created to show how hazards science can increase a community's resiliency to natural disasters through improved planning, mitigation, and response.

  14. Climate interacts with soil to produce beta diversity in Californian plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Going, B M; Harrison, S P; Anacker, B L; Safford, H D

    2013-09-01

    Spatially distinct communities can arise through interactions and feedbacks between abiotic and biotic factors. We suggest that, for plants, patches of infertile soils such as serpentine may support more distinct communities from those in the surrounding non-serpentine matrix in regions where the climate is more productive (i.e., warmer and/or wetter). Where both soil fertility and climatic productivity are high, communities may be dominated by plants with fast-growing functional traits, whereas where either soils or climate impose low productivity, species with stress-tolerant functional traits may predominate. As a result, both species and functional composition may show higher dissimilarity between patch and matrix in productive climates. This pattern may be reinforced by positive feedbacks, in which higher plant growth under favorable climate and soil conditions leads to higher soil fertility, further enhancing plant growth. For 96 pairs of sites across a 200-km latitudinal gradient in California, we found that the species and functional dissimilarities between communities on infertile serpentine and fertile non-serpentine soils were higher in more productive (wetter) regions. Woody species had more stress-tolerant functional traits on serpentine than non-serpentine soil, and as rainfall increased, woody species functional composition changed toward fast-growing traits on non-serpentine, but not on serpentine soils. Soil organic matter increased with rainfall, but only on non-serpentine soils, and the difference in organic matter between soils was positively correlated with plant community dissimilarity. These results illustrate a novel mechanism wherein climatic productivity is associated with higher species, functional, and landscape-level dissimilarity (beta diversity).

  15. Californian demonstration and validation of automated agricultural field extraction from multi-temporal Landsat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, L.; Roy, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The spatial distribution of agricultural fields is a fundamental description of rural landscapes and the location and extent of fields is important to establish the area of land utilized for agricultural yield prediction, resource allocation, and for economic planning. To date, field objects have not been extracted from satellite data over large areas because of computational constraints and because consistently processed appropriate resolution data have not been available or affordable. We present a fully automated computational methodology to extract agricultural fields from 30m Web Enabled Landsat data (WELD) time series and results for approximately 250,000 square kilometers (eleven 150 x 150 km WELD tiles) encompassing all the major agricultural areas of California. The extracted fields, including rectangular, circular, and irregularly shaped fields, are evaluated by comparison with manually interpreted Landsat field objects. Validation results are presented in terms of standard confusion matrix accuracy measures and also the degree of field object over-segmentation, under-segmentation, fragmentation and shape distortion. The apparent success of the presented field extraction methodology is due to several factors. First, the use of multi-temporal Landsat data, as opposed to single Landsat acquisitions, that enables crop rotations and inter-annual variability in the state of the vegetation to be accommodated for and provides more opportunities for cloud-free, non-missing and atmospherically uncontaminated surface observations. Second, the adoption of an object based approach, namely the variational region-based geometric active contour method that enables robust segmentation with only a small number of parameters and that requires no training data collection. Third, the use of a watershed algorithm to decompose connected segments belonging to multiple fields into coherent isolated field segments and a geometry based algorithm to detect and associate parts of circular fields together. Fourth, masking of non-agricultural vegetation using a recent WELD 30m percent tree-cover product and a multi-temporal spectral-angle mapping based grass extraction methodology. Implications and recommendations for algorithm refinement and application to decadal conterminous United States WELD data are discussed.

  16. Genetic and Ecotypic Differentiation in a Californian Plant Polyploid Complex (Grindelia, Asteraceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Abigail J Moore; Moore, William L.; Baldwin, Bruce G.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of ecotypic differentiation in the California Floristic Province have contributed greatly to plant evolutionary biology since the pioneering work of Clausen, Keck, and Hiesey. The extent of gene flow and genetic differentiation across interfertile ecotypes that span major habitats in the California Floristic Province is understudied, however, and is important for understanding the prospects for local adaptation to evolve or persist in the face of potential gene flow across populations...

  17. Financing electronic waste recycling Californian households' willingness to pay advanced recycling fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-09-01

    The growth of electronic waste (e-waste) is of increasing concern because of its toxic content and low recycling rates. The e-waste recycling infrastructure needs to be developed, yet little is known about people's willingness to fund its expansion. This paper examines this issue based on a 2004 mail survey of California households. Using an ordered logit model, we find that age, income, beliefs about government and business roles, proximity to existing recycling facilities, community density, education, and environmental attitudes are significant factors for explaining people's willingness to pay an advanced recycling fee (ARF) for electronics. Most respondents are willing to support a 1% ARF. Our results suggest that policymakers should target middle-aged and older adults, improve programs in communities with existing recycling centers or in rural communities, and consider public-private partnerships for e-waste recycling programs.

  18. Scale and diversity following manipulation of productivity and disturbance in Californian coastal grasslands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandel, Brody Steven; Corbin, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    over five grain sizes, encompassing a 256-fold range of plot size. This allowed us to construct a species–area relationship for each experimental plot in each sampling year. We used the slope of the species–area relationship to summarize changes in species richness across multiple spatial scales......Question Relationships between species richness and environmental drivers such as productivity and disturbance are sensitive to the scale over which they are measured, but the extent to which this scale-dependence is important for experimental studies conducted over small scale ranges is not well...... known. We ask whether the response of species richness to experimental manipulation of productivity and disturbance varies across small spatial scales (0.016–4 m2). We show that species–area relationships are well suited to summarize cross-scale responses of species richness, and ask whether...

  19. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mental Illness Stigma and Discrimination Among Californians Experiencing Mental Health Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eunice C; Collins, Rebecca L; Cerully, Jennifer; Seelam, Rachana; Roth, Beth

    2017-01-01

    Reports racial and ethnic differences on the California Well-Being Survey, a surveillance tool that tracks mental illness stigma and discrimination among a sample of California adults experiencing psychological distress.

  20. Methane emissions from a Californian landfill, determined from airborne remote sensing and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautwurst, Sven; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Thompson, David R.; Kolyer, Richard W.; Iraci, Laura T.; Thorpe, Andrew K.; Horstjann, Markus; Eastwood, Michael; Leifer, Ira; Vigil, Samuel A.; Krings, Thomas; Borchardt, Jakob; Buchwitz, Michael; Fladeland, Matthew M.; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2017-09-01

    Fugitive emissions from waste disposal sites are important anthropogenic sources of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4). As a result of the growing world population and the recognition of the need to control greenhouse gas emissions, this anthropogenic source of CH4 has received much recent attention. However, the accurate assessment of the CH4 emissions from landfills by modeling and existing measurement techniques is challenging. This is because of inaccurate knowledge of the model parameters and the extent of and limited accessibility to landfill sites. This results in a large uncertainty in our knowledge of the emissions of CH4 from landfills and waste management. In this study, we present results derived from data collected during the research campaign COMEX (CO2 and MEthane eXperiment) in late summer 2014 in the Los Angeles (LA) Basin. One objective of COMEX, which comprised aircraft observations of methane by the remote sensing Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) instrument and a Picarro greenhouse gas in situ analyzer, was the quantitative investigation of CH4 emissions. Enhanced CH4 concentrations or CH4 plumes were detected downwind of landfills by remote sensing aircraft surveys. Subsequent to each remote sensing survey, the detected plume was sampled within the atmospheric boundary layer by in situ measurements of atmospheric parameters such as wind information and dry gas mixing ratios of CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) from the same aircraft. This was undertaken to facilitate the independent estimation of the surface fluxes for the validation of the remote sensing estimates. During the COMEX campaign, four landfills in the LA Basin were surveyed. One landfill repeatedly showed a clear emission plume. This landfill, the Olinda Alpha Landfill, was investigated on 4 days during the last week of August and first days of September 2014. Emissions were estimated for all days using a mass balance approach. The derived emissions vary between 11.6 and 17.8 kt CH4 yr-1 with related uncertainties in the range of 14 to 45 %. The comparison of the remote sensing and in situ based CH4 emission rate estimates reveals good agreement within the error bars with an average of the absolute differences of around 2.4 kt CH4 yr-1 (±2. 8 kt CH4 yr-1). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported inventory value is 11.5 kt CH4 yr-1 for 2014, on average 2.8 kt CH4 yr-1 (±1. 6 kt CH4 yr-1) lower than our estimates acquired in the afternoon in late summer 2014. This difference may in part be explained by a possible leak located on the southwestern slope of the landfill, which we identified in the observations of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer - Next Generation (AVIRIS-NG) instrument, flown contemporaneously aboard a second aircraft on 1 day.

  1. Polyphenols, fungal enzymes, and the fate of organic nitrogen in a Californian pygmy forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slessarev, E.

    2011-12-01

    Polyphenols are a diverse family of plant secondary compounds which may influence litter decay and soil nutrient turnover. The "short circuit" hypothesis for polyphenol function proposes that polyphenolic compounds provision plants with nitrogen in nutrient-poor soils by facilitating the accumulation of organic nitrogen in soil humus. By binding peptides, polyphenols may sequester nitrogen in a bank of recalcitrant organic matter, granting competitive advantage to plants with the mycorrhizal fungi most capable of recapturing the tightly bound organic nitrogen. Specifically, fungi may retrieve nitrogen from polyphenol-peptide complexes with an extracellular enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO). In order to evaluate the "short circuit" hypothesis, I measured soil PPO activity during four seasons in the Mendocino "ecological staircase," a soil age-gradient consisting of a series of wave-cut terraces along stretches of the northern California coast. Stunted, pygmy-forest plants growing in the nutrient-poor soils of the older marine terraces produce more polyphenols than their con-specifics on nutrient-rich younger terraces, potentially influencing PPO facilitated nitrogen cycling. I found that PPO activity reached its maximum in the younger terrace forest during the spring, achieving levels nearly twice as high as those observed on the younger terrace in other seasons and in the older terrace forest year-round. In both terraces, PPO activity was greatest in the organic humus at the soil surface, decreasing dramatically in the lower mineral horizon. When PPO activity reached its maximum in the younger terrace, I found that soil polyphenol content positively correlated (Rsq=0.63) with enzyme activity, suggesting that polyphenols might induce enzyme production. However, in the tannin-rich soil of the pygmy forest on the older terrace, enzyme activity remained low, and was most strongly correlated with soil moisture. The results do not support the hypothesis that nutrient-poor ecosystems rely in particular on a mycorrhizae facilitated "short circuit" of the nitrogen cycle.

  2. Litter dominates surface fluxes of carbonyl sulfide in a Californian oak woodland

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Wu; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Lett, Céline; Seibt, Ulli

    2016-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a promising tracer for partitioning terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration from net carbon fluxes, based on its daytime co-uptake alongside CO2 through leaf stomata. Because ecosystem COS fluxes are the sum of plant and soil fluxes, using COS as a photosynthesis tracer requires accurate knowledge of soil COS fluxes. At an oak woodland in Southern California, we monitored below-canopy surface (soil + litter) COS and CO2 fluxes for 40 days using chambers and laser ...

  3. Litter dominates surface fluxes of carbonyl sulfide in a Californian oak woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wu; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Lett, Céline; Seibt, Ulli

    2016-02-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a promising tracer for partitioning terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration from net carbon fluxes, based on its daytime co-uptake alongside CO2 through leaf stomata. Because ecosystem COS fluxes are the sum of plant and soil fluxes, using COS as a photosynthesis tracer requires accurate knowledge of soil COS fluxes. At an oak woodland in Southern California, we monitored below-canopy surface (soil + litter) COS and CO2 fluxes for 40 days using chambers and laser spectroscopy. We also measured litter fluxes separately and used a depth-resolved diffusion-reaction model to quantify the role of litter uptake in surface COS fluxes. Soil and litter were primarily COS sinks, and mean surface COS uptake was small (˜1 pmol m-2 s-1). After rainfall, uptake rates were higher (6-8 pmol m-2 s-1), and litter contributed a significant fraction (up to 90%) to surface fluxes. We observed rapid concurrent increases in COS uptake and CO2 efflux following the onset of rain. The patterns were similar to the Birch effect widely documented for soils; however, both COS and CO2 flux increases originated mainly in the litter. The synchronous COS-CO2 litter Birch effect indicates that it results from a rapid increase in litter microbial activity after rainfall. We expect that the drying-rewetting cycles typical for mediterranean and other semiarid ecosystems create a pronounced seasonality in surface COS fluxes. Our results highlight that litter uptake is an important component of surface COS exchange that needs to be taken into account in ecosystem COS budgets and model simulations.

  4. Effectiveness of Prescribed Fire as a Fuel Treatment in Californian Coniferous Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole M. Vaillant; JoAnn Fites-Kaufman; Scott L. Stephens

    2006-01-01

    Effective fire suppression for the past century has altered forest structure and increased fuel loads. Prescribed fire as a fuels treatment can reduce wildfire size and severity. This study investigates how prescribed fire affects fuel loads, forest structure, potential fire behavior, and modeled tree mortality at 80th, 90th, and 97.5th percentile fire weather...

  5. How Californians Feel about Public Education: Results from the PACE/USC Rossier August 2012 Poll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Dominic J.; Plank, David N.; Hall, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    California has long been viewed by the rest of the nation as leader in many areas, including education. The state's K-12 and higher education systems were once the envy of other states. Of late, though, the news from the Golden State has not been so rosy. For the last three decades California has faced increased demands on public services while…

  6. Californians and Public Education: Results from the Fourth PACE/USC Rossier Poll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polikoff, Morgan; Marsh, Julie; Plank, David N.; Hall, Michelle; Hardaway, Tenice; Le, Tien

    2014-01-01

    California is in the middle of a nearly unprecedented period of change in the state's education system. Following voter approval of Proposition 30 in 2012, the Legislature adopted the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) in 2013. The LCFF upended the way California funds schools, redistributing revenues toward schools and school districts facing…

  7. The Histochemical Characterization of the Glycoconjugates in the Epidermal Mucous Cells of the Red Californian Earthworm, Eisenia foetida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Çinar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the nature and regional distribution of the glycoconjugates secreted by epidermal mucous cells in Eisenia foetida (Annelida. Specimens were divided into six regions from anterior to posterior. The histochemistry was carried out by using standard histochemical methods. Histochemical staining properties of glycoconjugates in epidermal mucous cells were determined regionally. The epidermis of all regions contained strong to stronger PAS (+ cells in various degrees. The epidermis of the first, fourth, fifth, and sixth regions had strong to stronger AB pH 2.5 (+ cells. On the contrary, all regions contained weak to moderate AB pH 0.5 and AB pH 1.0 (+ cells. Most of mucous cells in epidermis of the first region contained both PAS (+ and AB (+ mucosubstances. All regions included weaker to weak AF (+ cells. All regions featured KOH/PAS (+ cells, with a slight reduction in reaction intensity in the epidermis of the last three regions. In this context, the different staining patterns observed in epidermal mucous cells hinted at their functional roles with respect to production of mucus with different physical properties. This study provided comprehensive information about the regional distribution patterns of the glycoconjugates and an opportunity to compare their distributional patterns in other annelids.

  8. Methane emissions from a Californian landfill, determined from airborne remote sensing and in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krautwurst

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fugitive emissions from waste disposal sites are important anthropogenic sources of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4. As a result of the growing world population and the recognition of the need to control greenhouse gas emissions, this anthropogenic source of CH4 has received much recent attention. However, the accurate assessment of the CH4 emissions from landfills by modeling and existing measurement techniques is challenging. This is because of inaccurate knowledge of the model parameters and the extent of and limited accessibility to landfill sites. This results in a large uncertainty in our knowledge of the emissions of CH4 from landfills and waste management. In this study, we present results derived from data collected during the research campaign COMEX (CO2 and MEthane eXperiment in late summer 2014 in the Los Angeles (LA Basin. One objective of COMEX, which comprised aircraft observations of methane by the remote sensing Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP instrument and a Picarro greenhouse gas in situ analyzer, was the quantitative investigation of CH4 emissions. Enhanced CH4 concentrations or CH4 plumes were detected downwind of landfills by remote sensing aircraft surveys. Subsequent to each remote sensing survey, the detected plume was sampled within the atmospheric boundary layer by in situ measurements of atmospheric parameters such as wind information and dry gas mixing ratios of CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2 from the same aircraft. This was undertaken to facilitate the independent estimation of the surface fluxes for the validation of the remote sensing estimates. During the COMEX campaign, four landfills in the LA Basin were surveyed. One landfill repeatedly showed a clear emission plume. This landfill, the Olinda Alpha Landfill, was investigated on 4 days during the last week of August and first days of September 2014. Emissions were estimated for all days using a mass balance approach. The derived emissions vary between 11.6 and 17.8 kt CH4 yr−1 with related uncertainties in the range of 14 to 45 %. The comparison of the remote sensing and in situ based CH4 emission rate estimates reveals good agreement within the error bars with an average of the absolute differences of around 2.4 kt CH4 yr−1 (±2. 8 kt CH4 yr−1. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA reported inventory value is 11.5 kt CH4 yr−1 for 2014, on average 2.8 kt CH4 yr−1 (±1. 6 kt CH4 yr−1 lower than our estimates acquired in the afternoon in late summer 2014. This difference may in part be explained by a possible leak located on the southwestern slope of the landfill, which we identified in the observations of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer – Next Generation (AVIRIS-NG instrument, flown contemporaneously aboard a second aircraft on 1 day.

  9. Landscape epidemiology and control of pathogens with cryptic and long-distance dispersal: sudden oak death in northern Californian forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João A N Filipe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exotic pathogens and pests threaten ecosystem service, biodiversity, and crop security globally. If an invasive agent can disperse asymptomatically over long distances, multiple spatial and temporal scales interplay, making identification of effective strategies to regulate, monitor, and control disease extremely difficult. The management of outbreaks is also challenged by limited data on the actual area infested and the dynamics of spatial spread, due to financial, technological, or social constraints. We examine principles of landscape epidemiology important in designing policy to prevent or slow invasion by such organisms, and use Phytophthora ramorum, the cause of sudden oak death, to illustrate how shortfalls in their understanding can render management applications inappropriate. This pathogen has invaded forests in coastal California, USA, and an isolated but fast-growing epidemic focus in northern California (Humboldt County has the potential for extensive spread. The risk of spread is enhanced by the pathogen's generalist nature and survival. Additionally, the extent of cryptic infection is unknown due to limited surveying resources and access to private land. Here, we use an epidemiological model for transmission in heterogeneous landscapes and Bayesian Markov-chain-Monte-Carlo inference to estimate dispersal and life-cycle parameters of P. ramorum and forecast the distribution of infection and speed of the epidemic front in Humboldt County. We assess the viability of management options for containing the pathogen's northern spread and local impacts. Implementing a stand-alone host-free "barrier" had limited efficacy due to long-distance dispersal, but combining curative with preventive treatments ahead of the front reduced local damage and contained spread. While the large size of this focus makes effective control expensive, early synchronous treatment in newly-identified disease foci should be more cost-effective. We show how the successful management of forest ecosystems depends on estimating the spatial scales of invasion and treatment of pathogens and pests with cryptic long-distance dispersal.

  10. Long-term demographic decline and late glacial divergence in a Californian paleoendemic: Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia)

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Richard S.; DeSilva, Rainbow

    2016-01-01

    Mediterranean ecosystems comprise a high proportion of endemic taxa whose response to climate change will depend on their evolutionary origins. In the California flora, relatively little attention has been given to the evolutionary history of paleoendemics from a molecular perspective, yet they number among some of the world's most iconic plant species. Here, we address questions of demographic change in Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia) that is restricted to a narrow belt of groves in...

  11. Long‐term demographic decline and late glacial divergence in a Californian paleoendemic: Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia)

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Richard S.; DeSilva, Rainbow

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mediterranean ecosystems comprise a high proportion of endemic taxa whose response to climate change will depend on their evolutionary origins. In the California flora, relatively little attention has been given to the evolutionary history of paleoendemics from a molecular perspective, yet they number among some of the world's most iconic plant species. Here, we address questions of demographic change in Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia) that is restricted to a narrow belt of ...

  12. Long-term demographic decline and late glacial divergence in a Californian paleoendemic: Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Richard S; DeSilva, Rainbow

    2016-05-01

    Mediterranean ecosystems comprise a high proportion of endemic taxa whose response to climate change will depend on their evolutionary origins. In the California flora, relatively little attention has been given to the evolutionary history of paleoendemics from a molecular perspective, yet they number among some of the world's most iconic plant species. Here, we address questions of demographic change in Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia) that is restricted to a narrow belt of groves in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. We ask whether the current distribution is a result of northward colonization since the last glacial maximum (LGM), restriction of a broader range in the recent past (LGM) or independent colonizations in the deeper past. Genetic diversity at eleven microsatellite loci decreased with increasing latitude, but partial regressions suggested this was a function of smaller population sizes in the north. Disjunct populations north of the Kings River were divergent from those south of the Kings River that formed a single cluster in Bayesian assignment tests. Demographic inferences supported a demographic contraction just prior to the LGM as the most likely scenario for the current disjunct range of the species. This contraction appeared to be superimposed upon a long-term decline in giant sequoia over the last 2 million years, associated with increasing aridity due to the Mediterranean climate. Overall, low genetic diversity, together with competition in an environment to which giant sequoia is likely already poorly adapted, will pose major constraints on its success in the face of increasing aridity.

  13. Linking Californians for Learning: Next Steps for Telecommunications in California Postsecondary Education. Commission Report 81-28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    A follow-up to the 1979 report, Using Instructional Media beyond Campus, this report describes a plan for making statewide use of available media for postsecondary education in California. The first of three sections provides a basic inventory of California's telecommunications resources, focusing on electronic means of transmitting information…

  14. Polybrominated diphenyl ether serum concentrations in a Californian population of children, their parents, and older adults: an exposure assessment study

    Science.gov (United States)

    BackgroundPolybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as flame retardants in many household items. Given concerns over their potential adverse health effects, we identified predictors and evaluated temporal changes of PBDE serum concentrations.MethodsPBDE serum concentrations...

  15. The functional ecology of shoot architecture in sun and shade plants of Heteromeles arbutifolia M. Roem., a Californian chaparral shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Fernando; Pearcy, Robert W

    1998-03-01

    The functional roles of the contrasting morphologies of sun and shade shoots of the evergreen shrub Heteromeles arbutifolia were investigated in chaparral and understory habitats by applying a three-dimensional plant architecture simulation model, YPLANT. The simulations were shown to accurately predict the measured frequency distribution of photosynthetic photon flux density (PFD) on both the leaves and a horizontal surface in the open, and gave reasonably good agreement for the more complex light environment in the shade. The sun shoot architecture was orthotropic and characterized by steeply inclined (mean = 71(o)) leaves in a spiral phyllotaxy with short internodes. This architecture resulted in relatively low light absorption efficiencies (E A) for both diffuse and direct PFD, especially during the summer when solar elevation angles were high. Shade shoots were more plagiotropic with longer internodes and a pseudo-distichous phyllotaxis caused by bending of the petioles that positioned the leaves in a nearly horizontal plane (mean = 5(o)). This shade-shoot architecture resulted in higher E A values for both direct and diffuse PFD as compared to those of the sun shoots. Differences in E A between sun and shade shoots and between summer and winter were related to differences in projection efficiencies as determined by leaf and solar angles, and by differences in self shading resulting from leaf overlap. The leaves exhibited photosynthetic acclimation to the sun and the shade, with the sun leaves having higher photosynthetic capacities per unit area, higher leaf mass per unit area and lower respiration rates per unit area than shade leaves. Despite having 7 times greater available PFD, sun shoots absorbed only 3 times more and had daily carbon gains only double of those of shade shoots. Simulations showed that sun and shade plants performed similarly in the open light environment, but that shade shoots substantially outperformed sun shoots in the shade light environment. The shoot architecture observed in sun plants appears to achieve an efficient compromise between maximizing carbon gain while minimizing the time that the leaf surfaces are exposed to PFDs in excess of those required for light saturation of photosynthesis and therefore potentially photoinhibitory.

  16. Constraining Annual Water Balance Estimates with Basin-Scale Observations from the Airborne Snow Observatory during the Current Californian Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, K.; Painter, T. H.; Marks, D. G.; Hedrick, A. R.; Deems, J. S.; Patterson, V.; McGurk, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the great unknowns in mountain hydrology is how much water is stored within a seasonal snowpack at the basin scale. Quantifying mountain water resources is critical for assisting with water resource management, but has proven elusive due to high spatial and temporal variability of mountain snow cover, complex terrain, accessibility constraints and limited in-situ networks. The Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO, aso.jpl.nasa.gov) uses coupled airborne LiDAR and spectrometer instruments for high resolution snow depth retrievals which are used to derive unprecedented basin-wide estimates of snow water mass (snow water equivalent, SWE). ASO has been operational over key basins in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California since 2013. Each operational year has been very dry, with precipitation in 2013 at 75% of average, 2014 at 50% of average and 2015 - the lowest snow year on record for the region. With vastly improved estimates of the snowpack water content from ASO, we can now for the first time conduct observation-based mass balance accounting of surface water in snow-dominated basins, and reconcile these estimates with observed reservoir inflows. In this study we use ASO SWE data to constrain mass balance accounting of basin annual water storages to quantify the water contained within the snowpack above the Hetch Hetchy water supply reservoir (Tuolumne River basin, California). The analysis compares and contrasts annual snow water volumes from observed reservoir inflows, snow water volume estimates from ASO, a physically based model that simulates the snowpack from meteorological inputs and a semi-distributed hydrological model. The study provides invaluable insight to the overall volume of water contained within a seasonal snowpack during a severe drought and how these quantities are simulated in our modelling systems. We envisage that this research will be of great interest to snowpack modellers, hydrologists, dam operators and water managers worldwide.

  17. Multilocus sequence data reveal dozens of putative cryptic species in a radiation of endemic Californian mygalomorph spiders (Araneae, Mygalomorphae, Nemesiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Dean H; Starrett, James; Westphal, Michael F; Hedin, Marshal

    2015-10-01

    We use mitochondrial and multi-locus nuclear DNA sequence data to infer both species boundaries and species relationships within California nemesiid spiders. Higher-level phylogenetic data show that the California radiation is monophyletic and distantly related to European members of the genus Brachythele. As such, we consider all California nemesiid taxa to belong to the genus Calisoga Chamberlin, 1937. Rather than find support for one or two taxa as previously hypothesized, genetic data reveal Calisoga to be a species-rich radiation of spiders, including perhaps dozens of species. This conclusion is supported by multiple mitochondrial barcoding analyses, and also independent analyses of nuclear data that reveal general genealogical congruence. We discovered three instances of sympatry, and genetic data indicate reproductive isolation when in sympatry. An examination of female reproductive morphology does not reveal species-specific characters, and observed male morphological differences for a subset of putative species are subtle. Our coalescent species tree analysis of putative species lays the groundwork for future research on the taxonomy and biogeographic history of this remarkable endemic radiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. How Californians View Education Standards, Testing and Accountability: Results from the Third PACE/USC Rossier Poll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, David N.; Brewer, Dominic J.; Polikoff, Morgan; Hall, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    California is in the midst of sweeping education changes. The state is rolling out the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and a new system of assessments. Voters approved a temporary statewide tax increase that will provide additional funding to schools after years of spending cuts. The Legislature adopted a new system for funding schools (the…

  19. The Californian crisis: the good use of the electricity market deregulation; La crise californienne: du bon usage de la deregulation du marche de l'electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadas-Lebel, R. [Commission de Regulation de l' Electricite, CRE (France)

    2002-04-01

    Supply shortages and sudden power cuts, significant price increases and bankruptcy of both main State distributors: these events reveal the seriousness of the electric crisis in the richest and most populated state of the United States. California wanted to be a pioneer by opening its electric sector to competition. What has happened? How to explain that one of the most developed regions on the planet has fallen victim to a situation one would expect to find in less developed countries? What lessons can we draw from the experience for France and Europe? (author)

  20. A Scientific Workflow Used as a Computational Tool to Assess the Response of the Californian San Joaquin River to Flow Restoration Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamizar, S. R.; Gil, Y.; Szekely, P.; Ratnakar, V.; Gupta, S.; Muslea, M.; Silva, F.; Harmon, T.

    2011-12-01

    The San Joaquin River (SJR) restoration effort began in October 2009 with the onset of federally mandated continuous flow. A key objective of the effort is to restore and maintain fish populations in the main stem of the San Joaquin River, from below the Friant Dam to the confluence of the Merced River. In addition to the renewed flows, the restoration effort has brought about several upgraded and new water quality monitoring stations equipped with dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature sensors. As the SJR response to the restoration efforts will be dictated by a complex combination of hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes, we propose monitoring whole-stream metabolism as an integrative ecological indicator. Here, we develop and test a near-real time scientific workflow to facilitate the observation of the spatio-temporal distribution of whole-stream metabolism estimates using available monitoring station flow and water quality data. The scientific objective is to identify correlations between whole-stream metabolism estimates and the seasonally variable flow and flow disturbances (e.g., flood-control releases), which are the primary driver of stream ecosystems. To accomplish this requires overcoming technical challenges in terms of both data collection and data analysis because (1) the information required for this multi-site, long-term study, originates from different sources with the implication of different associated properties (data integrity, sampling intervals, units), and (2) the variability of the interim flows requires adaptive model selection within the framework of the metabolism calculations. These challenges are addressed by using a scientific workflow in which semantic metadata is generated as the data is prepared and then subsequently used to select and configure models, effectively customizing them to the current data. Data preparation involves the extraction, cleaning, normalization and integration of the data coming from sensors and third-party data sources. In this process, the metadata captured includes sensor specifications, data types, data properties, and process documentation, and is passed along with the data within the workflow system, automating whole-stream metabolism estimates by the optimal modeling approach. This presentation will describe the architecture of the whole-stream metabolism workflow and present typical results from the scientific study.

  1. Effect of the californian red worm (Eisenia foetida during the composteo and vermicomposteo in properties of the Experimental Station of the Academic Rural Unit Carmen Pampa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paco Gabriel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to evaluate the biotransformación of the organic residuals, of kitchen (Rc remains, pulp of coffee (Pc and cardboard (C by means of compostaje methods and vermicompostaje. The investigation was taken I end up in the Experimental Station, module of lombricultura of the Career of Agronomic Engineering of Carmen Pampa Unit Academic Campesina, located in the community of Carmen Pampa of the Municipality of Coroico Department of La Paz, Bolivia. The used design was totally at random with 3 treatments and 3 repetitions, to compare among obtaining methods in quality it used the test of fixed effects and it stops quantity the test "t" of Student. The quantity of initial sustrato studied in compostaje was of 1m3 and 0,02m3 vermicompostaje ending up culminating the investigation in 120 days. The results in decomposition are obtained in smaller time by means of the method vermicompostaje in Pc in advance of three months of 98.33% continued by C and Rc; while in compostaje it was the treatment with Rc of 3 months with 3 weeks with 90.40% of decomposition, continued by Pc and C. In quantity, starting from 1m3 of initial sustrato bigger bioabono was obtained with Pc 271.62 kg, 465.83 kg, Rc 249.71 kg, 446.00 kg and C 212.48 kg, 404.00 kg, in compost and vermicompost respectively. The chemical composition of the bioabonos of Rc, Pc, C in N and P is tipificados like first floor, high K, Ca in low compost and half vermicompost, half Mg, MO under and lightly alkaline pH to neuter in the two obtaining methods.

  2. Isolation of Bartonella henselae and Two New Bartonella Subspecies, Bartonellakoehlerae Subspecies boulouisii subsp. nov. and Bartonella koehlerae Subspecies bothieri subsp. nov. from Free-Ranging Californian Mountain Lions and Bobcats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Bruno B; Molia, Sophie; Kasten, Rickie W; Borgo, Gina M; Stuckey, Matthew J; Maruyama, Soichi; Chang, Chao-Chin; Haddad, Nadia; Koehler, Jane E

    2016-01-01

    Domestic cats are the natural reservoir of Bartonella henselae, B. clarridgeiae and B. koehlerae. To determine the role of wild felids in the epidemiology of Bartonella infections, blood was collected from 14 free-ranging California mountain lions (Puma concolor) and 19 bobcats (Lynx rufus). Bartonella spp. were isolated from four (29%) mountain lions and seven (37%) bobcats. These isolates were characterized using growth characteristics, biochemical reactions, molecular techniques, including PCR-RFLP of selected genes or interspacer region, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), partial sequencing of several genes, and DNA-DNA hybridization. Two isolates were identical to B. henselae genotype II. All other isolates were distinguished from B. henselae and B. koehlerae by PCR-RFLP of the gltA gene using endonucleases HhaI, TaqI and AciI, with the latter two discriminating between the mountain lion and the bobcat isolates. These two novel isolates displayed specific PFGE profiles distinct from B. henselae, B. koehlerae and B. clarridgeiae. Sequences of amplified gene fragments from the three mountain lion and six bobcat isolates were closely related to, but distinct from, B. henselae and B. koehlerae. Finally, DNA-DNA hybridization studies demonstrated that the mountain lion and bobcat strains are most closely related to B. koehlerae. We propose naming the mountain lion isolates B. koehlerae subsp. boulouisii subsp. nov. (type strain: L-42-94), and the bobcat isolates B. koehlerae subsp. bothieri subsp. nov. (type strain: L-17-96), and to emend B. koehlerae as B. koehlerae subsp. koehlerae. The mode of transmission and the zoonotic potential of these new Bartonella subspecies remain to be determined.

  3. The Californian crisis: putting the de-regulations of the electricity market to the right use; La crise californienne: du bon usage de la deregulation du marche de l'electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadas-Lebel, R. [Commission de Regulation de l' Electricite, CRE, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-02-01

    Power shortages, sudden disruptions, steep price increases and the bankruptcy of two major distributors, all this is evidence of how deep a crisis the richest state with the most population in the United States has experienced following the deregulation of the electricity market. California wanted to be a precursor in opening this market up to competition. How to explain that one of the planet's most developed regions has been trapped in a situation of the sort expected in much less developed lands? What lessons can France and the EU learn from this? (author)

  4. Hypnosis ,Bunco Scheme and Metaphorical Meaning in Mark Twain's "The Californian's Tale"%催眠·骗局·隐喻——《山家奇遇》的未解之谜

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于雷

    2009-01-01

    本文通过对从催眠手法到骗局意识及其隐喻功能的递进模式进行分析,说明在感伤传奇的表象下,实际上凭借其独特的文本形式凸显了19世纪中期美国淘金梦的麻痹性、欺骗性和荒诞性.1906年的吴祷译本,亦影射了晚清赴美"淘金"华工的梦魇,在一定程度上响应了当时国内的民间反美浪潮.

  5. El Nino, from 1870 to 2014, and other Atmospheric Circulation Forcing by Extreme Apparitions of the Eight Annual, Continental Scale, Aerosol Plumes in the Satellite Era which Point to a Possible Cause for the Current Californian Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Eight continental scale aerosol plumes exist each year as the enclosed image shows. Apparitions of seven plumes only exist for a few months in the same season each year whilst the East Asian Plume is visible all year. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) of all the plumes varies enormously interannually with two studies showing the surface radiative forcing of the South East Asian Plume (SEAP) as -150W/m2 and -286W/m2/AOD. I show that the SEAP, created by volcanic aerosols (natural) and biomass burning and gas flares in the oil industry (anthropogenic), is the sole cause of all El Nino events, the greatest interannual perturbation of the atmospheric circulation system. The SEAP creates an El Nino by absorbing solar radiation at the top of the plume which heats the upper atmosphere and cools the surface. This creates a temperature inversion compared to periods without the plume and reduces convection. With reduced convection in SE Asia, the Maritime Continent, the Trade Winds blowing across the Pacific are forced to relax as their exit into the Hadley and Walker Cells is constrained and the reduced Trade Wind speed causes the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) to rise in the central tropical Pacific Ocean as there is a strong negative correlation between wind speed and SST. The warmer SST in the central Pacific creates convection in the region which further reduces the Trade Wind speed and causes the Walker Cell to reverse - a classic El Nino. Having established the ability of such extreme aerosol plumes to create El Nino events I will then show how the South American, West African, Middle East and SEAP plumes create drought in the Amazon, Spain, Darfur and Australia as well as causing the extremely warm autumn and winter in Europe in 2006-07. All these effects are created by the plumes reducing convection in the region of the plume which forces the regional Hadley Cells into anomalous positions thereby creating persistent high pressure cells in the mid latitudes. This perturbs the mid latitude storm tracks and creates persistent high and low pressure regions around the World at those latitudes giving rise to extreme events by causing the regional winds to blow persistently from one direction. Finally I will suggest which plumes may be causing the high pressure ridge in the NE Pacific which is causing the severe drought in California.

  6. P波随时间衰减:以两条加利福尼亚地震破裂带为例%Temporal changes in P-wave attenuation: A tale of two Californian earthquake rupture zones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Kin-Yip; Gary A Henderson

    2005-01-01

    Within the mainshock rupture zones near Loma Prieta (18 September 1989, M7.0) and Morgan Hill (24 April 1984, M6.2), in California, small clusters of nearly identical microearthquakes, called earthquake multiplets, have occurred. A pair of these multiplets, each consisting of 11 repeating events, has produced high-quality waveform data for direct measurements of temporal changes in P-wave path attenuation, or t * , under near-laboratory conditions. Our results reveal the existence, near each cluster, of an anomalous body within which the attenuation exhibited rapid rise and fall in the first ten months following the respective mainshock. The peak attenuation occurred 2 ~ 3 weeks after the Loma Prieta earthquake, where the small cluster of multiplet earthquakes was 10.2 km deep. The peak occurred 5 ~ 6 months after the Morgan Hill earthquake, where the cluster of multiplet earthquakes was centred at 2.6 km depth. In both cases, the peak amplitude of the t * fluctuation exceeded 100% of the absolute t * obtained previously for the same general region in California[1] . The results point to changes in porosity and fluid saturation taking place within parts of the mainshock source volumes, stemming from coseismic crack opening and postseismic relaxation processes such as fluid migration, crack healing and rock compaction. That the attenuation peaked at very different times is a clue that the crack closure and the accompanying fluid migration are overburden sensitive, being more rapid at greater depths and vice versa.%地震预测是地震学研究一个基本目标,而理解地震周期是地震预测的重要环节.遗憾的是,由于地震断层带不但结构复杂,大地震前后短时间内的震源过程更是随时间迅速变化,这些复杂因素使得常规研究方法不再适用.一类特殊的微震成群地发生在主震断层几乎同一地点上,震源系数几乎相同,近年来地震学界通称其为震群(earthquake multiplet).本文论证如何将这类特殊的微震作为一组人工震源来阐述美国西部两次大地震(Loma Prieta和Morgan Hill)的震后弛豫过程.在加利福尼亚Loma Prieta(1989年9月18日,M 7.0)及Morgan Hill(1984年4月24日,M6.2)附近的主震破裂带中就发生了此类震群.其中有两组各包含11个重复地震的震群,分别位于这两个破裂带中,其波形资料质量高,波形及震级变化极小,因而可与实验室条件下的人工震源相比.这些震群地震资料可直接用于计算P波沿波程衰减(即t*)的时间性变化,其方法的简单性及结果的精确性都与实验室水平相当.我们的结果显示,每个震群周围分别存在一个异常体,在其各自主震之后的10个月中,该异常体中的P波衰减迅速上升并降落.衰减峰值发生在Loma Prieta地震后2~3周,其震群深度为10.2km.此峰值在Morgan Hill地震后5~6个月发生,其震群中心深度为2.6km.这两个事例中,t*波动峰值都超过此前获得的加利福尼亚大致同一地区t*绝对值的100%[1].此结果显示了因同震裂隙张开和震后弛豫过程(如流体移动、裂隙复原及岩石压缩),以及孔隙度和流体饱和度在主震源体部分区域发生的变化.衰减达峰值的时间之显著差异则提示我们,裂隙闭合及伴随的流体移动是负载敏感的,深度越大达峰值越快,反之亦然.如将此方法应用于主震前多重地震的资料,将有望更好地理解最终导致主震断层带大破裂的震前微破裂的物理过程.

  7. Reactive versus anticipative adaptive management of Deltas: The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Rhine-Meuse Delta compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieg, T.J.; Zandvoort, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper Californian Adaptive Management (AM) and Dutch Adaptive Delta Management (ADM) are compared. The concepts are introduced in a policy context to deal with prevailing types of uncertainty in water management in the Californian Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Dutch Rhine-Meuse Delta

  8. Proposed Expansion of Acme Landfill Operations, Contra Costa, County, California. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    available. This information is considered proprietary. Data is also not available regarding recycling achievements of volunteer groups. Californians ...modifications, in the areas of architectural and site design review, screening and landscaping, and land use (including open space), have not been determined...Services Department, Trish McConnell, Rehabilitation Counselor, Meeting 3 March 1982. Consultants, Private Industry and Organizations Californians Against

  9. Soil Structure and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houskova, B.; Nagy, V.

    The role of soil structure on saturated hydraulic conductivity changes is studied in plough layers of texturally different soils. Three localities in western part of Slovakia in Zitny ostrov (Corn Island) were under investigation: locality Kalinkovo with light Calcaric Fluvisol (FAO 1970), Macov with medium heavy Calcari-mollic Fluvisol and Jurova with heavy Calcari-mollic Fluvisol. Soil structure was determined in dry as well as wet state and in size of macro and micro aggregates. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was measured by the help of double ring method. During the period of ring filling the soil surface was protected against aggregates damage by falling water drops. Spatial and temporal variability of studied parameters was evaluated. Cultivated crops were ensilage maize at medium heavy and heavy soil and colza at light soil. Textural composition of soil and actual water content at the beginning of measurement are one of major factor affecting aggregate stability and consequently also saturated hydraulic conductivity.

  10. Characterization of phocid herpesvirus-1 and -2 as putative alpha- and gamma-herpesviruses of North American and European pinnipeds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C. Harder (Timm); M. Harder; H. Vos; K. Kulonen; S. Kennedy-Stoskopf; B. Liess; M.J.G. Appel (Max); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractTo study the relationships between herpesvirus recently isolated from different pinniped species, antigenic and genetic analyses were performed. First, herpesviruses isolated from North American harbour seals (Phoca vitulina), a Californian sea lion (Zalophus californianus) and a Europea

  11. Neutrophil surface adhesion molecule and toll like receptor dynamics in crossbred cows suffering from Staphylococcus aureus subclinical and clinical mastitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swain, Dilip; Kushwah, Mohar; Dang, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    ... (SCM; n=12) and clinical mastitis (CM; n=12) after screening 146 cows. The grouping was done based on evaluation of collected milk samples by routine procedures like Californian Mastitis Test (CMT...

  12. Prevalencia de mastitis bovina y su etiología infecciosa en sistemas especializados en producción de leche en el altiplano cundiboyacense (Colombia)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calderón, Alfonso; Rodríguez, Virginia C

    2008-01-01

    Using the Californian Mastitis Test (CMT), 11.416 udder quarts belonging to 2.854 cows from 40 milk production specialized farms of the cundiboyacense plain, selected at random, were evaluated. Of the...

  13. (measured as NDVI) over mine tailings at Mhangura Copper Mine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chari

    within the Miriam Shaft Complex. Though they were ... represent shrub and grassland (0.2 to 0.3), while high values indicate temperate and tropical rainforests .... canopy structure, and photosynthesis in three Californian vegetation types. Ecol.

  14. Characterization of sorption properties of selected soils from Lublin region by using water vapour adsorption method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skic, Kamil; Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-04-01

    *The studies were carried out within the framework of a research project. The project was financed from funds of National Science Center on the base of decision number DEC-2013/11/D/NZ9/02545 Among many methods proposed to study sorption properties of soils an analysis of adsorption/ desorption isotherm is probably the easiest and most convenient one. It characterizes both quantity and quality of mineral and organic components and also their physical and physicochemical properties. The main aim of this study is comparison of sorption properties of selected Polish soils by using water vapour adsorption method. Samples were taken from the depth of 0-20 cm, from the Lublin region, eastern Poland. Soils were selected on the basis of their different physicochemical properties and were classified as: Haplic Fluvisol, Haplic Chernozem, Mollic Gleysol, Rendzic Phaeozem, Stagnic Luvisol, Haplic Cambisol (WG WRB 2006). Data taken from experimental adsorption isotherms were used to determine parameters of monolayer capacity, specific surface area and the total amount of vapour adsorbed at relative pressure of 0.974. Obtained adsorption and desorption isotherms reviled that adsorbate molecules interacted with the soil particles in different extent. Similar monolayer capacity was observed for Haplic Fluvisol, Haplic Chernozem and Stagnic Luvisol, while for Mollic Gleysol was more than 4 times higher. Mollic Gleysol was also characterized by highest values of specific surface area as well as quantity of adsorbed vapour at relative pressure of 0.974. Higher sorption was caused by presence of soil colloids which contains functional groups of a polar nature (mainly hydroxyls, phenolic and carboxyls). These groups similarly to silicates, oxides, hydratable cations as well as electric charge form adsorption centres for water vapour molecules.

  15. THE EFFECT OF BREED ON REPRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE IN COMMODITY RABBIT PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga TOPCZEWSKA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the reproductive rates among different breeds, mostly used in commodity farm conditions. The studies were obtained at fertility level from 6.27 animals in the Californian breed to 8.49 animals in Popielno White. High rate of failures during rearing was observed in the Californian breed. Litter weight was dependent on the number of births and young rearing, lactation and care of female. Kitten weight at 35 day of age ranged from 603.21g (Alaskan to 736.10g (Giant Chinchilla. The results indicate the usefulness of a Popielno White breed for the livestock production.

  16. THE EFFECT OF BREED ON REPRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE IN COMMODITY RABBIT PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Jadwiga TOPCZEWSKA; Anna ROGOWSKA; Leszek GACEK

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reproductive rates among different breeds, mostly used in commodity farm conditions. The studies were obtained at fertility level from 6.27 animals in the Californian breed to 8.49 animals in Popielno White. High rate of failures during rearing was observed in the Californian breed. Litter weight was dependent on the number of births and young rearing, lactation and care of female. Kitten weight at 35 day of age ranged from 603.21g (Alaskan) to 736.10g ...

  17. Shipbuilding and the Wilson Administration: The Development of Policy, 1914-1917

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    dramatic Wilson triumph. Many Californians expected political rewards for the state’s key role in Wilson’s election. As the San Francisco Examiner...graduating third out of a class of forty-six at Annapolis in 1884, he had been sent to Glasgow University, in Scotland, to stLy naval architecture . When he...be a choice between Mr. Page and the man from Michigan, he said: ’Vell, of course I am for the Californian in preference to the man from Hichigan

  18. Winds of change. A comparative study of the politics of wind energy innovation in California and Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Est, R. [Rathenau Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1999-07-01

    This book gives a detailed account of the rise of modern wind energy technology in California and Denmark. In Denmark, groups of neighbors stimulated its decentralized, small-scale use and gradual development, while futuristic looking large-scale wind farms sprouted like mushrooms on the Californian hills. However, the thriving Californian market did not result in a successful American wind turbine industry. In contrast, the Danish industry currently produces more than half the world output of turbines. The author explains the marked differences between the two countries by looking at the way in which policy makers, technicians and entrepreneurs - in interplay - shaped the development of wind power. refs.

  19. Clasificación y evaluación edafológica de tres sitios experimentales del altiplano central de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govaerts, B.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The edaphological evaluation and soil classification of experimental areas sites are important instruments for the correct interpretation of agronomical results and decisionmaking about targeting and ex-ante evaluation of agricultural technology transfer. The objective of this article is to present the results of the edaphological evaluation soil, analysis and classification of three sites located in the altiplano central of Mexico. We wanted to determine the limiting factors for agricultural production before recommending conservation practices, as developed by INIFAP in collaboration with CIMMYT. The soils were classified both under the FAO classification system and USDA Soil Taxonomy in Santa Lucía as a cumulic Phaeozem, or a Cumulic Haplustoll, in El Horno as a mollic Fluvisol or Mollic Ustifluvents and a haplic Fluvisol or Typic Ustifluvents, and in Calpulapan, a petroduric Phaeozem, or Entic Duristoll. The limiting factors for crop production are mainly related to moisture availability, varying structure and texture along the profile, low organic matter content and risk of erosion. Taking into account these limiting factors further development, extension and implementation of conservation agriculture practices is highly recommended.

  20. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Cytotoxic Cycloartane Triterpenoid Glycosides from the Traditionally Used Medicinal Plant Leea indica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yau Hsiung Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leea indica is a medicinal plant used traditionally to cure cancer. In this study, the cytotoxic compounds of L. indica were isolated using bioassay-guided approach. Two cycloartane triterpenoid glycosides, mollic acid arabinoside (MAA and mollic acid xyloside (MAX, were firstly isolated from L. indica. They inhibited the growth of Ca Ski cervical cancer cells with IC50 of 19.21 μM (MAA and 33.33 μM (MAX. MRC5 normal cell line was used to calculate selectivity index. MAA and MAX were about 8 and 4 times more cytotoxic to Ca Ski cells compared to MRC5. The cytotoxicity of MAA was characterized by both cytostatic and cytocidal effects. MAA decreased the expression of proliferative cell nuclear antigen, increased sub-G1 cells, and arrested cells in S and G2/M phases. This study provides the evidence for the ethnomedicinal use of L. indica and paves the way for future mechanism studies on the anticancer effects of MAA.

  1. Analysis of the sorption properties of different soils using water vapour adsorption and potentiometric titration methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skic, Kamil; Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-07-01

    Parameters of specific surface area as well as surface charge were used to determine and compare sorption properties of soils with different physicochemical characteristics. The gravimetric method was used to obtain water vapour isotherms and then specific surface areas, whereas surface charge was estimated from potentiometric titration curves. The specific surface area varied from 12.55 to 132.69 m2 g-1 for Haplic Cambisol and Mollic Gleysol soil, respectively, and generally decreased with pH (R=0.835; α = 0.05) and when bulk density (R=-0.736; α = 0.05) as well as ash content (R=-0.751; α = 0.05) increased. In the case of surface charge, the values ranged from 63.00 to 844.67 μmol g-1 Haplic Fluvisol and Mollic Gleysol, respecively. Organic matter gave significant contributions to the specific surface area and cation exchange capacity due to the large surface area and numerous surface functional groups, containing adsorption sites for water vapour molecules and for ions. The values of cation exchange capacity and specific surface area correlated linearly at the level of R=0.985; α = 0.05.

  2. The Scirtothrips perseae species-group (Thysanoptera), with one new species from avocado, Persea americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mound, Laurence A; Hoddle, Mark S

    2016-02-12

    Following recent molecular studies on avocado thrips, a new species is described from Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Colombia from the young leaves of avocado, Persea americana. Scirtothrips hansoni sp.n. is closely related to the Californian pest, S. perseae, and also to S. astrictus from Costa Rica that remains known from a single female. An illustrated key to these three species is provided.

  3. Dialectal effects in the perception of vowels produced by first and second language speakers : North Carolinian versus Southern Welsh listeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann Bion, R.A.; Escudero, P.; Morrison, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of listeners' dialect on the perception of vowels. Listeners from North Carolina and South Wales categorized natural tokens of the four English vowels /i/, /I/, /E/ and /ae/ which were produced by speakers of Californian-, Dutch-, Spanish-, and Portuguese-accented

  4. Immigrant Voices: Pursuing an American Dream = Voces de inmigrantes: En busca de un sueno americano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira Costa Coll., Oceanside, CA.

    Dedicated to the 1.6 million Californians newly legalized under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, this booklet summarizes interviews with 148 immigrants conducted as part of the Amnesty Education Outreach Project. The interviews included the following topics: why they came, their educational experiences, changes in their lives, their…

  5. The Food and Agriculture Organization, in its Reykjavik Declaration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-06-06

    Jun 6, 2005 ... species to improve the modelling of the ecosystem and therefore its ... Humboldt Current off Peru and Chile (4–40°S), the. Californian Current .... 1994 to 2001 and. (f) tuna longline fisheries (foreign and South African) from 1996 to 2001 ... directed and tuna-directed, were introduced off South. Africa in 1994 ...

  6. Hyperspectral Imaging and Obstacle Detection for Robotics Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    body panels of pick-up 300 pixels 22 Skin from person 1 Sampled from face and hands 300 pixels Several architectural variations on the simple three...following two most abundant object classes: Californian valley-type trees and terrain. (We arbitrarily selected Scene 1 to draw two sets of spectral

  7. Japan Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    architecture contest sponsored by UNESCO. Most of them, whose exhibits are presented in the UNESCO pavilion at Expo «85 at Tsukuba, are from the Third World...forgot to buy any American goods there but only sampled a Californian wine. One positive sign at MITI is that since earlier this week a banner is

  8. Walla Walla District History. Part 3. 1975-80

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    building dams was unques- Dams stopped floods, stored water, produced e 1 ectr i city, and created jobs. Californians built and praised multipurpose... Architecture Category in the Chief of Engineers’ Design and Environ- mental Awards Program in 1979. WEST LEWISTON LEVEE 242 Operation Fish Run

  9. State E-Government Strategies: Identifying Best Practices and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-23

    creating centralized systems and procedures for citizens to obtain information through state web portals and other forms of enterprise architecture ...security and privacy standards; adopting a statewide enterprise architecture ; providing for succession planning; investing in personnel; and implementing...appointments, and settling of traffic citations. Before the DMV offered online appointment-setting, Californians stood in long lines to complete DMV

  10. Customer Satisfaction with Air Force Civil Engineering Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    architecture , excellent materials, and quality workmanship is not a quality facility unless the facility meets the user’s requirement and promotes top...than I expect in private house! 82. Lack of basements ( Californian earthquake requirements) really cramps storage space - should be taken into account

  11. Public Reception of ’Star Wars’: Application of Lessons Learned to Future Space Strategy Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    sIstm w hi -nn r es- ond thin minutes after ai launch has been detected. ’DI will have an nterrated systr.. architecture which will include battle manage...program (7:1). PUBLIC OPINION1 POLLS A poll of Californians conducted in February 1984 indicat,) t <a L 22 Tpercent of those polled favored development of

  12. Petroleum Independence: A Business Case and Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-14

    economy grew 16 percent.112 Further, Californians cut electricity demand by 14 percent in a six month period abruptly ending a state-wide energy crisis...the omni hybrid design is it provides plug and play architecture to utilize alternative fuels and/or engines as they become feasible. Because the

  13. Cyber Terrorism: A Threat to National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Californian hackers can invade military computers then it is no stretch of the imagination to think terrorists can do the same thing. .,Hostile foreign...strategy would assign responsibilities to departments and agencies, direct an architecture for indications and warning of possible attacks, and establish a

  14. The United States in the Middle East: Developing a Policy for the 1990’s

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Weapon: The Experience of Five Industrial Nations, (Berkeley, CA: University of Californian Press, 1988), pgs. 294-305. 51 credibility. 9 The Gulf War...computers, and other passive security measures focused on perimeter security, facility architecture , and the hardening of oil wells. Ibid., pg. 163 3 5 A

  15. The California Energy Crisis: Lesson Plan. Student Handout & Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foundation for Teaching Economics, Davis, CA.

    As Californians put on another sweater, light candles, and open their electricity bills with shaking hands, the rest of the nation wonders who or what caused the problem and whether they will be next. Mixing with accusations about deregulation, there are also insistent voices blaming misguided and heavy-handed government for dimming the lights in…

  16. Breschini and Haversat, eds.: Analysis of South-Central California Shell Artifacts: Studies from Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara Counties

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of South-Central Californian Shell Artifacts: Studies from Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara Counties. Gary S. Breschmi and Trudy Haversat, eds. Salinas: Coyote Press Archives of California Prehistory No. 23, 1988, xiv + 105 pp., 21 figs., 28 tables, $8.70, (paper).

  17. Cognitively Guided Instruction: An Implementation Case Study of a High Performing School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdy, William D. B.

    2011-01-01

    No Child Left Behind legislation developed goals for every student to be proficient in each academic subject by 2014. California's students are far from meeting this goal, especially in mathematics. One Southern Californian school district, renamed Green Valley Unified School District for anonymity, began using Cognitively Guided Instruction…

  18. Higher Education in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Policy Institute of California, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Higher education enhances Californians' lives and contributes to the state's economic growth. But population and education trends suggest that California is facing a large shortfall of college graduates. Addressing this short­fall will require strong gains for groups that have been historically under­represented in higher education. Substantial…

  19. "Tiffany Does Not Have a Solid Language Background, as She Speaks Only English": Emerging Language Ideologies among California Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard-Warwick, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Californians often take for granted a split between ethnic and linguistic identities, expecting immigrants to maintain strong ethnic identities while becoming monolingual in English. However, recent immigration has led to increasing diversity at California universities, with no majority ethnic group and many students bilingual. This study explores…

  20. A new species of the genus Policordia (Bivalvia, Verticordioidea, Lyonsiellidae from off the coast of southern California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila A. Safonova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new species, Policordia hispida, is described and compared with three similar species: P. densicostata (Locard, 1898; P. pilula (Pelseneer, 1911 and a yet un-described species, Policordia sp. (= P. pilula sensu Ivanova, 1977 not Pelseneer, 1911. This is a first record for the genus in the Californian province.

  1. Development of a nested PCR for environmental detection of the pathogenic free-living amoeba Balamuthia mandrillaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Arine F; Andrew, Peter W; Kilvington, Simon

    2011-01-01

    A DNA extraction and nested PCR method for detecting the pathogenic amoeba Balamuthia mandrillaris from the environment was developed. Sixteen of 17 Californian soil samples were positive compared with 0/44 from the United Kingdom. This approach will enable a greater understanding of B. mandrillaris ecology, geographic distribution, and public health risk.

  2. BIOTECHNOLOGY OF ORGANIC WASTE VERMICULTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshchayev A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review contains the information about the role of annelids in maintaining soil fertility. Recommendations based on authors’ experience and scientific literature are given for vermicultivation, biomass use of Californian worms in animal husbandry and vermicompost use in crop production. Furthermore, detailed description of the methods of cultivation of worms is given

  3. The air pollution is stifles the americans; La pollution de l'air etouffe les americains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiret, M.

    2004-06-01

    The increase of the automobile development and the old electric power plants pollutes the atmosphere of many states in the Usa. In California is implementing an energy policy in order to control and decrease this situation. The californian program is briefly presented with a special interest in the hydrogen fuels. (A.L.B.)

  4. A Priority for California's Future: Science for Students. Summary Report. Strengthening Science Education in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for the Future of Teaching and Learning, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents findings of a study that examined Californians' views on science education. The findings are based on telephone interviews with 1,004 adults conducted April 7-22, 2010. Cell phone and Spanish language interviews were included to provide more complete coverage of California's population. In order to enhance understanding of the…

  5. Illness, Injury, and Correlates of Aerobic Exercise and Walking: A Community Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, C. Richard; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A sample of Californians was surveyed to explore differences in aerobic exercise and walking behavior among healthy subjects and subjects with illness/injury serious enough to limit physical activity. Results indicate different patterns of determinants of exercise within various illness/injury groups. This implies interventions to increase…

  6. The effect of age on the carcass composition, portion yield and proximate composition of two rabbit genetic types in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. North

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the carcass component yields and meat proximate composition of 2 rabbit genetic types (Californian and hybrid New Zealand Red×Californian, with 5 rabbits per genetic type being slaughtered every 2 wk throughout the study period (9-17 wk to evaluate the effect of age on these traits. Slaughter weight, reference yield, portion yield (hind leg, foreleg and fore part, as percentage of slaughter weight, meat yield, skin weight and the fat content of the meat (percentage of wet weight increased significantly with age, while the full gastrointestinal tract, liver, head and feet decreased significantly. This is likely a reflection of the early-maturing nature of bone and viscera and later maturing nature of muscle and fat. These results indicate that delaying slaughter to 13 wk tends to improve yields for valuable carcass components. The Californian had a significantly higher total meat yield at 11 and 17 wk and higher portion meat yields at 9 (hind leg, 11 (hind leg and fore part and 13 (foreleg weeks than the hybrid. This was likely due to the later maturation of the hybrid and the influence of the New Zealand Red on carcass quality. It therefore appears that the Californian may be more favourable for meat production, from a carcass and meat quality perspective.

  7. Surfin’ California with Whitman and The Beach Boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Søren Hattesen

    2006-01-01

    are haunted by and pick up on Whitman’s image of the Californian beach results in a kind of Bloomean misprision, in the sense that they (re)inscribe it in a sixties’ context of youth and consumer culture. To Whitman, the shores of the American West coast incarnate the home of perennial homelessness...

  8. Kinetics of methane oxidation in selected mineral soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkiewicz, A.; Bulak, P.; Brzeziñska, M.; Włodarczyk, T.; Polakowski, C.

    2012-10-01

    The kinetic parameters of methane oxidation in three mineral soils were measured under laboratory conditions. Incubationswere preceded by a 24-day preincubationwith 10%vol. of methane. All soils showed potential to the consumption of added methane. None of the soils, however, consumed atmospheric CH4. Methane oxidation followed the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with relatively low values of parameters for Eutric Cambisol, while high values for Haplic Podzol, and especially for Mollic Gleysol which showed the highest methanotrophic activity and much lower affinity to methane. The high values of parameters for methane oxidation are typical for organic soils and mineral soils from landfill cover. The possibility of the involvement of nitrifying microorganisms, which inhabit the ammonia-fertilized agricultural soils should be verified.

  9. Chemical Properties of the Forest Litter in Istria and the Croatian Littoral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špoljar Andrija

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was set up in the forest ecosystem with diverse vegetation zones in the area of Istria and the Croatian Littoral. Research included the following systematic soil units: lithic lepto-sols, rendzic leptosols, rendzic leptosols - eroded, mollic leptosols, chromic cambisol and chromic luvisols. The average quantity of the forest litter in the studied systematic soil units reaches 13.36 t/ha (Tables 1-3. The “wealth” of organic matter in the studied soil units can be presented with the following series: chromic cambisols (CMx > mollic leptosols (LPm, organogenic, rendzic leptosols (LPk > lithic leptosols (LPq > chromic cambisols (CMx - Terra rossa, chromic luvi-sols (LVx > rendzic leptosols (LPk - eroded. As expected, the lowest value of total nitrogen was found in the lithic leptosols in relation to almost all the other soils, except when compared with chromic cambisol and rendzic leptosols (p ⋋ 0.05. The statistically justified higher values of the percentage share of P2O5 in the forest litter were found in chromic luvisols and rendzic leptosols - eroded in relation to the other studied soils. Significantly higher level of copper contamination was inside rendzic leptosols - eroded in relation to the other studied soils. The exception is rendzic leptosols (p ⋋ 0.05. A significantly higher zinc content was detected in the lithic leptosols in relation to the other soil units, except for chromic luvisols, while a justifiably higher total lead and cadmium content in the forest litter was observed in chromic luvisols in relation to the other compared soils (p ⋋ 0.05.

  10. Health care coverage and access in the nation's four largest states. Results from the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Petra W; Collins, Sara R; Doty, Michelle M; Beutel, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Across the country's four largest states, uninsured rates vary for adults ages 19 to 64: 12 percent of New Yorkers, 17 percent of Californians, 21 percent of Floridians, and 30 percent of Texans lacked health coverage in 2014. Differences also extend to the proportion of residents reporting problems getting needed care because of cost, which was significantly lower in New York and California compared with Florida and Texas. Similarly, lower percentages of New Yorkers and Californians reported having a medical bill problem in the past 12 months or having accrued medical debt compared with Floridians and Texans. These differences stem from a variety of factors, including whether states have expanded eligibility for Medicaid, the state's uninsured rate prior to the Affordable Care Act taking effect, differences in the cost protections provided by private health insurance, and demographics.

  11. The taxonomy of the Japanese oak red scale insect, Kuwania quercus (Kuwana) (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Kuwaniidae), with a generic diagnosis, a key to species and description of a new species from California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San'An, Wu; Nan, Nan; Gullan, Penny; Deng, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The oak red scale insect, Kuwania quercus (Kuwana), was described from specimens collected from the bark of oak trees (Quercus species) in Japan. More recently, the species has been identified from California and China, but Californian specimens differ morphologically from Japanese material and are considered here to be a new species based on both morphological and molecular data. In this paper, an illustrated redescription of K. quercus is provided based on type specimens consisting of adult females, first-instar nymphs and intermediate-stage females, and a lectotype is designated for Sasakia quercus Kuwana. The new Californian species, Kuwania raygilli Wu & Gullan, is described and illustrated based on the adult female, first-instar nymph and intermediate-stage female. A new generic diagnosis for Kuwania Cockerell based on adult females and first-instar nymphs, and a key to species based on adult females are included.

  12. Changes in the Concentration of Heavy Metals (Cr, Cd, Ni During the Vermicomposting Process of Sewage Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aušra Zigmontienė

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge treatment and utilization is an important issue for a biodegradable waste management strategy. Heavy metals in sewage sludge complicate its use. Vermicomposting is one of the ways to improve the characteristics of sewage sludge and to reduce the residual concentrations of heavy metals. Study on changes in the concentration of heavy metals (Chromium, Nickel and Cadmium, when vermicomposting sewage sludge, was performed using Californian earthworms (Eisenia fetida. For that purpose, 60 kg of sewage sludge from Vilnius Waste Water Treatment Plant were taken thus inserting 1.5 kg of Californian earthworms into it. Optimal conditions for work (optimum temperature, moisture, pH for earthworms to survive were maintained in the course of the study that lasted 120 days and was conducted in June – August. The samples of sewage sludge and earthworms were taken every 10 days. The concentrations of heavy metals in sewage sludge were measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy.

  13. California customer load reductions during the electricity crisis: Did they help to keep the lights on?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Barbose Galen L.; Eto, Joseph H.

    2002-05-01

    During summer 2001, Californians reduced electricity usage by 6 percent and average monthly peak demand by 8 percent, compared to summer 2000. These load reductions played an important role in avoiding the hundreds of hours of rotating power outages predicted several months prior. Many factors affected electricity use and peak demand in summer 2001, including weather, changes in the State's economy, and deliberate consumer responses to a variety of stimuli associated with the crisis. This paper assesses the roles played by these contributing factors, with a special focus on the extraordinary efforts made by Californians to reduce electricity consumption. We review the role of media coverage and informational campaigns on public awareness and the impact of rate increases and a variety of publicly funded programs in reducing electricity consumption. We also draw lessons for other regions that may be faced with the prospect of electricity shortages.

  14. Up Against the Wall: Primal Therapy and 'the Sixties'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Williams

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available 1. IntroductionPrimal Therapy, a form of psychological treatment based on expelling neurosis through emotional expression, was developed by the Californian psychotherapist Arthur Janov. His work became well known across the Anglophone world with the 1970 publication of The Primal Scream (subtitled Primal Therapy: The Cure for Neurosis. It is claimed this book sold more than one million copies internationally, which – if true – makes it one of the best-selling psychology books ever. In 1968 J...

  15. Efficiency of somatic cell count and california mastitis test in the diagnosis of subclinical mastitis in terrincha ewes

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonça, Álvaro; Machado,M.; A. Tavares; Quintas, Hélder; Valentim, Ramiro; Maurício, Raimundo; Cardoso, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficiency of microbiological test with Californian Mastitis Test and somatic cell count in the diagnosis of Subclinical Mastitis (SM) in Terrincha sheep. Twenty-seven of a flock of about 200 Terrincha ewes (local breed) were studied for a period of 9 weeks (n > 497 samples). Milk samples were aseptically collected from each half udder once a week. At the same time, another sampled was collected from the bulk tank. After being transported to Lab under refrigera...

  16. Mastitis diagnosis in dairy goats through somatic cell counts and California mastitis test. Preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonça, Álvaro; Valentim, Ramiro; Nunes, Manuel; Correia, Teresa Montenegro; Trigo, Margarida; Maurício, Raimundo; Costa, Cristina; Coelho, Alípio

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate somatic cell count (SCC) and Californian mastitis test (CMT) reliability as methods to survey mastitis in Serrana goats. Microbiological diagnosis, SCC and CTM were performed on 2028 samples, collected from individual glands during a lactation period. According to results CMT (predictive negative value = 69.5%) may be used as a cheap and practical method for sub clinical mastitis survey in Serrana goats. Decision on SCC use will depend on additional resear...

  17. Community Sediment Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    are used to determine that model results are consistent across compilers, platforms, and computer architectures , and to ensure that changes in code do...Mississippi State University: Bhate During the early months of this project, the focus was on understanding ROMS-CSTM model, architecture , and...Marchesiello, J.C. McWilliams, & K.D. Stolzenbach, 2007: Sediment transport modeling on Southern Californian shelves: A ROMS case study. Continental

  18. If the Ocean Was Whiskey

    OpenAIRE

    Rigg, Brianna Dawn

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT OF THESISIf the Ocean Was WhiskeyByBrianna Dawn RiggMaster of Fine Arts in Visual ArtsUniversity of California, San Diego, 2012Professor Anya Gallacio, ChairMy work investigates the histories, power relations, and psychological motivations that lead to the production of cultural artifacts. If the Ocean was Whiskey, is an immersive environment composed of artifacts that are reminiscent of the Old West, maritime culture, elementary school classrooms, and Southern Californian architectu...

  19. The California Law Enforcement Community’s Intelligence-Led Policing Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    architecture to provide secure, seamless sharing of information among systems; 23  A national model for intelligence training;  An outreach plan to...by the HMIC in the United Kingdom. In summary, to be more coordinated and cohesive in their efforts to protect and serve Californians , the...the U.S. Department of Justice’s report, “Intelligence-Led Policing: The New Intelligence Architecture ” (2005). David L. Carter also provides a

  20. Sediment Transport on Continental Shelves: Storm Bed Formation and Preservation in Heterogeneous Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    2007) Sediment-transport modeling on Southern Californian shelves: A ROMS case study. Cont. Shelf Res., 27, 832-853. Butman, B., Noble, M. and...Seas. /. Phys. Oceanogr., 19, 1039-1059. Hampson, G. J. (2010) Sediment dispersal and quantitative stratigraphic architecture across an ancient...shelf. Sedimentology, 57, 96-141. Hampson, G.J. (2000) Discontinuity surfaces, clinoforms, and facies architecture in a wave-dominated, shoreface

  1. Principles and Algorithms for Causal Reasoning with Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    65 7.1 Parallel architecture within a statistical prediction server. The round nodes compute of the impact of fluent fi...AC device that keeps the car’s engine block warm, so that the car will start in very cold weatlr. Contrary to what the Californians may think...implementation of this insight both in an abstract machine architecture , and in a program called HITEST that runs on parallel hardware. 7.1 Design of

  2. Nonlinear Real-Time Optical Signal Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    8217 " University of Southern CaliforniaN JU Los Angeles, California 90089-0272 " --;984. ,’ I ’I Research Sponsored by the ., k Air Force Office of...concentrates on experimental results from the sixteen gate clocked master-slave optical flip-flop. A second paper " Architectures for a Sequential Optical Logic...purpose computer could permit the realization of a number of architectural advantages over semiconductor electronics [27]. These advantages include

  3. National Training Center-Fort Irwin, California. Native American Consultation Meeting at Fort Mojave, Nevada, Held on 2-3 October 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    click 19 on an archeological site you might be able to determine 20 what it’s made up of or what the architecture is. 21 MR...non-Indian Americans is really Indian, in their 6 architecture , their language, and maybe some of the 7 spirit, the soul of this country...town he lives in, but he’s a 24 native Californian . 25 And some of the topics he discusses is the 0031 1 Mohave desert

  4. Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Areas Regional Cultural History, Los Angeles County, California,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    dredging and wharf fresh fish for the tables of southern construction began, and in 1915 construction Californians . Located at Berths 79 and 80, the began...deal of is extremely visible, and its architectural style complaint. Wholesalers in !he building today embodies the best features of its time. Further...detailing, and rounded corners. This architectural style was popular in Los Angeles in the late 1920’s to the early 1940’s; however, few examples remain

  5. Impact of Wind Farms on the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volker, Patrick J.H.; Hall, Alex; Capps, Scott B.;

    The presented work is part of a study sponsored by the California Institute of Energy and Environment, in which the impact of the aimed increasing contribution of clean alternative energy sources in the next 30 years will be investigated. Due to the huge wind energy potential along the Californian...... coast, we will focus on the environmental impacts of large offshore wind farms which become feasible, since offshore turbine technology has matured significantly in the last decade....

  6. The Schooling of English Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Russell W. Rumberger; Gándara, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    An increasing number of students entering California’s schools come from non-English speaking backgrounds. Although some of these language minority students enter school already proficient in English, the majority do not. These students are now referred to as English learners. There are several reasons why Californians need to pay careful attention to the schooling of language minority students in their public schools. First, language minority students now constitute more than one-th...

  7. Livable Communities: Creating Safe and Livable Neighborhoods, Towns, and Regions in California

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Community livability is of increasing concern to many Californians as growth-related problems mount. This paper addresses key threats to the livability of the state’s communities and outlines potential policy responses. A "livable" neighborhood can be defined as one that is "pleasant, safe, affordable, and supportive of human community." Key elements of community livability often include an attractive, pedestrian-oriented public realm; low traffic speed, volume, and congestion; decent, af...

  8. Impacts of climate change on plant diseases – opinions and trends

    OpenAIRE

    Pautasso, Marco; Döring, Thomas F.; Garbelotto, M.; Pellis, L; Jeger, MJ

    2012-01-01

    There has been a remarkable scientific output on the topic of how climate change is likely to affect plant diseases in the coming decades. This review addresses the need for review of this burgeoning literature by summarizing opinions of previous reviews and trends in recent studies on the impacts of climate change on plant health. Sudden Oak Death is used as an introductory case study: Californian forests could become even more susceptible to this emerging plant disease, if spring precipitat...

  9. Impact of mannanoligo saccharides on performance traits of rainbow trout

    OpenAIRE

    Obradović S.; Živković B.; Đekić V.; Šekler M.; Živkov-Baloš M.; Marković M.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of mannanoligo saccharides (MOS) as a food additive, applied at a concentration of 0.2% (O-I group of fish) and 0.3% (O-II group of fish) on morphometric characteristics and primary production of the Californian trout was investigated. The experiment was conducted on 450 fish divided into three groups with 150 individuals in each group, and lasted 40 days. The analysis of obtained results established the beneficial effect of the applied additives...

  10. Central American and Mexican immigrant characteristics and economic incorporation in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, S P

    1986-01-01

    "Data compiled from the 1980 U.S. Census and other sources are used in this article to demonstrate the distinctiveness of Central American immigration.... Comparisons between Central American and Mexican immigrants in California reveal substantial differences between the two groups in their age structure, sex ratio, and human capital characteristics." The emphasis of the study is on the differences concerning incorporation of these migrant groups into the Californian economy. excerpt

  11. Molecular evidence for bicontinental hybridogenous genomic constitution in Lepidium sensu stricto (Brassicaceae) species from Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummenhoff, Klaus; Linder, Peter; Friesen, Nikolai; Bowman, John L; Lee, Ji-Young; Franzke, Andreas

    2004-02-01

    Lepidium sensu stricto (s.s.) (Brassicaceae) (ca. 150 species) is distributed worldwide with endemic species on every continent. It is represented in Australia and New Zealand by 19 and seven native species, respectively. In the present study we used a nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) phylogeny in comparison with a cpDNA phylogeny to unravel the origin of Australian/New Zealand species. Although phylogenetic relationships within Lepidium s.s. were not fully resolved, the cpDNA data were in agreement with a Californian origin of Lepidium species from Australia/New Zealand. Strongly conflicting signals between the cp- and nuclear DNA phylogenetic analysis clearly indicated hybridogenous genomic constitution of Australian Lepidium s.s. species: All 18 studied Australian/New Zealand Lepidium s.s. species examined shared a Californian cpDNA type. While eleven Australian/New Zealand species appeared to harbor a Californian ITS type, a group of seven species shared a South African ITS type. This pattern is most likely explained by two trans-oceanic dispersals of Lepidium from California and Africa to Australia/New Zealand and subsequent hybridization followed by homogenization of the ribosomal DNA either to the Californian or South African ITS type in the two different lineages. Calibration of our molecular trees indicates a Pliocene/Pleistocene origin of Lepidium in Australia/New Zealand. Low levels of cpDNA and ITS sequence divergence and unresolved topologies within Australian/New Zealand species suggest a rapid and recent radiation of Lepidium after the hybridization event. This coincides with dramatic climatic changes in that geological epoch shaping the composition of the vegetation.

  12. Aldous Huxley: a beginner's guide

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hara, Kieron

    2012-01-01

    Author of Brave New World and The Doors of Perception, and inventor of the term 'psychedelic', Aldous Huxley was a global trend-setter ahead of his time. Charting his transformation from society satirist to Californian guru-mystic, Aldous Huxley: A Beginner's Guide shows how his ideas evolved and why his writing is still vitally relevant today - from detailing the lures of consumerism to exploring individual responsibility in a globalised world. With biographical notes on Huxley's extraordina...

  13. Relaxation Time and the Problem of the Pleistocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Holland

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although changes in habitat area, driven by changes in sea level, have long been considered as a possible cause of marine diversity change in the Phanerozoic, the lack of Pleistocene extinction in the Californian Province has raised doubts, given the large and rapid sea-level changes during the Pleistocene. Neutral models of metacommunities presented here suggest that diversity responds rapidly to changes in habitat area, with relaxation times of a few hundred to a few thousand years. Relaxation time is controlled partly by metacommunity size, implying that different provinces or trophic levels might have measurably different responses to changes in habitable area. Geologically short relaxation times imply that metacommunities should be able to stay nearly in equilibrium with all but the most rapid changes in area. A simulation of the Californian Province during the Pleistocene confirms this, with the longest lags in diversity approaching 20 kyr. The apparent lack of Pleistocene extinction in the Californian Province likely results from the difficulty of sampling rare species, coupled with repopulation from adjacent deep-water or warm-water regions.

  14. The Bio-accessibility of Synthetic Fe-Organo Complexes in Subsurface Soil with Elevated Temperature: a Proxy for the Vulnerability of Mineral Associated Carbon to Warming Rachel C. Porras, Peter S. Nico, and Margaret Torn Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, R. C.; Hicks Pries, C.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, subsurface soils (>30 cm) represent an important reservoir of soil organic carbon (SOC). However, the vulnerability of this deep SOC and, in particular mineral-associated SOC, to warming, and its potential to amplify the effects of climate change is highly uncertain. To gain insight into the bio-accessibility and temperature sensitivity of mineral-associated organic C, we conducted a series of incubations using soils collected from three depths (0-10, 50-60, and 80-90 cm) under coniferous forest. The soils are moderately acidic (mean pH=6.5) sandy, mixed, mesic Ultic Haploxeralfs. To understand how mechanisms controlling SOC bio-accessibilty or temperature sensitivity differ with depth and with the properties of Fe-organo complexes (i.e.,degree of crystallinity, amount of reactive surface area, or surface saturation), we used a 13C labeled glucose substrate to prepare synthetic Fe-organo complexes spanning a range of crystallinity and mineral surface saturation. The synthetic Fe-organo complexes were then added to soil from three depths. The soils containing the 13C labeled Fe-organo adduct were incubated at two temperatures (ambient and +4°C) and respired 13CO2 was measured and used to estimate flux rates. Differences in measured 13CO2 fluxes as a function of depth, surface loading, and mineral properties are discussed in terms of their implications for the temperature sensitivity of mineral protected organic carbon in subsurface soils.

  15. Las altas superficies del interfluvio de los ríos Manzanares-Jarama al NE de Madrid (España. Caracterización geomorfológico y edáfica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zazo, C.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The northern piedmont of the Madrid's basin was formed during the Upper Aragonian and it constitutes a substrate of arkosic nature which currently is going through a dissection process. In the area of Madrid it persist remainings of altipain which is interpreted as morphologic references near the culmination of its sedimentary fill-up. The soils which appear over these surfaces are not comparable which those developed over other peninsular piedmonts. Although these soils are supposed to have a high leve1 of evolution, as a consequence of the antiquity of the surfaces, present a high dependence from the lithologic nature of the geological substrate independently if it is Tertiary or Quaternary. In this manner present a texture generally sandy and their more common characteristic, the occurrence of textura1 contrasts between horizons, is a direct consequence of the original stratigrafical arrangement of the sediment. The repetition in depth of the illuvial horizons is due to the existence of deposition sequences of the geological material. The gain in clay which forms the thick and dense clay skin in these horizons, as well as their mineralogical homogeneity, imply a certain previous soil genesis, to that other developed over the high piedmont surfaces. The order of al1 these soils is Haploxeralf (Soil Taxonomy or Luvisol (FAO. The fact that these soils are not considered «palexeralf» only responds to the rigidity of the normative imposed by the classification, which specify a minimum thickness for the argillic horizon. The truth is that these soils are complex andlor polycyclic worked out over paleosoils intrasedimentary of Neogene age.El piedemonte septentrional de la Cuenca de Madrid se ha construido durante el Aragoniense superior y constituye un sustrato de naturaleza arcósica que se encuentra actualmente en proceso de disección. En la zona madrileña permanecen restos de altiplanicies que se interpretan como referencias morfol

  16. Investigation on the geomorphological characteristics of the Kabutar Ali Chai watershed (NW Iran) and their role in flood production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jananeh, Keristineh

    2016-04-01

    ) mountains (high mountains > 1700 m, >40% dip, Typic Haploxeralfs soils, 27.4%; low to high mountains >1500 m, >25% dip, Typic Haploxeralfs soils, 19.16%; eroded low mountains 15-30% dip, Xerochreptic Calciorthids soils, 21.65%), (2) plateaus and upper terraces (8-25% dip, VI/RW and Calcaric Cambisols soils, 9.92%; 6-12% dip, VI/RW soils, 8.91%; 5-15% dip, Haplic Calccisols soils, 5.94%), and (3) plains (IIST soils, 7.02%). Land-use map prepared for the area shows that most parts of the area are grasslands with various rates of vegetation (79%), and cultivated areas are in the second place (south and west, 11%). To conclude, the most efficient parameters in flood production were identified as the lithology of geologic units, vegetation and the land dip. Flood potential modeling by SCS method also confirmed that areas with poor vegetation and covered by impermeable or low-permeable rocks, such as shales, schists, limestones, marls, siltstones and clays have high potential of flood production, which is intensified by the land dip. Therefore, flood risk is highest in A3 and lowest in A1.

  17. The Old Spanish Days Fiesta in Santa Barbara, California: Cultural Hybridity, Colonial Mythologies and the Romanticization of a Latino Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ann Hardwick

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Old Spanish Days Fiesta is a tradition that was invented in 1924 by civic leaders in Santa Barbara, California to celebrate the periods of the Spanish settlement and the Mexican rule of California and to promote local tourism. This article will trace the historical narrative of the complex cultural and ethnic composition of Santa Barbara before interrogating the colonial and post-colonial histories of the Californian past that are so often romanticized during the events of the Santa Barbara Fiesta. Subsequent to the American appropriation of California, Anglo-American ideas of race and identity were imposed upon Latino Californians. This development led many Spanish-speaking Californians to cultivate a Spanish identity and de-emphasize their Mexican, Native American, or African ancestry as they attempted to maintain their land grants and social prominence under American rule. Official versions of Santa Barbara’s past promoted by Santa Barbara’s civic leaders and Old Spanish Days Fiesta literature tend to privilege romanticized historical interpretations that submerge and absorb California’s hybrid ethnic and cultural histories into an idealized Spanish colonial narrative. This article explores how many individual Santa Barbara Fiesteros choose to engage, negotiate, and/or subvert this simplified official civic narrative of Santa Barbara’s Spanish past through their own personal performances during the Fiesta. An analysis of how local festival participants envision their performance in the context of the festival allows outsiders to have a glimpse into how they create and embody their own personal and nuanced understandings of history during the Fiesta.

  18. Comparative analysis of the complete genome sequence of the California MSW strain of myxoma virus reveals potential host adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Peter J; Rogers, Matthew B; Fitch, Adam; Depasse, Jay V; Cattadori, Isabella M; Hudson, Peter J; Tscharke, David C; Holmes, Edward C; Ghedin, Elodie

    2013-11-01

    Myxomatosis is a rapidly lethal disease of European rabbits that is caused by myxoma virus (MYXV). The introduction of a South American strain of MYXV into the European rabbit population of Australia is the classic case of host-pathogen coevolution following cross-species transmission. The most virulent strains of MYXV for European rabbits are the Californian viruses, found in the Pacific states of the United States and the Baja Peninsula, Mexico. The natural host of Californian MYXV is the brush rabbit, Sylvilagus bachmani. We determined the complete sequence of the MSW strain of Californian MYXV and performed a comparative analysis with other MYXV genomes. The MSW genome is larger than that of the South American Lausanne (type) strain of MYXV due to an expansion of the terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of the genome, with duplication of the M156R, M154L, M153R, M152R, and M151R genes and part of the M150R gene from the right-hand (RH) end of the genome at the left-hand (LH) TIR. Despite the extreme virulence of MSW, no novel genes were identified; five genes were disrupted by multiple indels or mutations to the ATG start codon, including two genes, M008.1L/R and M152R, with major virulence functions in European rabbits, and a sixth gene, M000.5L/R, was absent. The loss of these gene functions suggests that S. bachmani is a relatively recent host for MYXV and that duplication of virulence genes in the TIRs, gene loss, or sequence variation in other genes can compensate for the loss of M008.1L/R and M152R in infections of European rabbits.

  19. Sequence-based analysis of the Vitis vinifera L. cv Cabernet Sauvignon grape must mycobiome in three South African vineyards employing distinct agronomic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MATHABATHA EVODIA SETATI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent microbiomic research of agricultural habitats has highlighted tremendous microbial biodiversity associated with such ecosystems. Data generated in vineyards have furthermore highlighted significant regional differences in vineyard biodiversity, hinting at the possibility that such differences might be responsible for regional differences in wine style and character, a hypothesis referred to as microbial terroir. The current study further contributes to this body of work by comparing the mycobiome associated with South African (SA Cabernet Sauvignon grapes in three neighboring vineyards that employ different agronomic approaches, and comparing the outcome with similar data sets from Californian vineyards. The aim of this study was to fully characterize the mycobiomes associated with the grapes from these vineyards. The data revealed approximately 10 times more fungal diversity than what is typically retrieved from culture-based studies. The Biodynamic vineyard was found to harbor a more diverse fungal community (H = 2.6 than the conventional (H = 2.1 and integrated (H = 1.8 vineyards. The data show that ascomycota are the most abundant phylum in the three vineyards, with Aureobasidium pullulans and its close relative Kabatiella microsticta being the most dominant fungi. This is the first report to reveal a high incidence of K. microsticta in the grape/wine ecosystem. Different common wine yeast species, such as Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Starmerella bacillaris dominated the mycobiome in the three vineyards. The data show that the filamentous fungi are the most abundant community in grape must although they are not regarded as relevant during wine fermentation. Comparison of metagenomic datasets from the three SA vineyards and previously published data from Californian vineyards revealed only 25% of the fungi in the SA dataset was also present in the Californian dataset, with greater variation evident amongst ubiquitous epiphytic fungi.

  20. Sequence-based Analysis of the Vitis vinifera L. cv Cabernet Sauvignon Grape Must Mycobiome in Three South African Vineyards Employing Distinct Agronomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setati, Mathabatha E.; Jacobson, Daniel; Bauer, Florian F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent microbiomic research of agricultural habitats has highlighted tremendous microbial biodiversity associated with such ecosystems. Data generated in vineyards have furthermore highlighted significant regional differences in vineyard biodiversity, hinting at the possibility that such differences might be responsible for regional differences in wine style and character, a hypothesis referred to as “microbial terroir.” The current study further contributes to this body of work by comparing the mycobiome associated with South African (SA) Cabernet Sauvignon grapes in three neighboring vineyards that employ different agronomic approaches, and comparing the outcome with similar data sets from Californian vineyards. The aim of this study was to fully characterize the mycobiomes associated with the grapes from these vineyards. The data revealed approximately 10 times more fungal diversity than what is typically retrieved from culture-based studies. The Biodynamic vineyard was found to harbor a more diverse fungal community (H = 2.6) than the conventional (H = 2.1) and integrated (H = 1.8) vineyards. The data show that ascomycota are the most abundant phylum in the three vineyards, with Aureobasidium pullulans and its close relative Kabatiella microsticta being the most dominant fungi. This is the first report to reveal a high incidence of K. microsticta in the grape/wine ecosystem. Different common wine yeast species, such as Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Starmerella bacillaris dominated the mycobiome in the three vineyards. The data show that the filamentous fungi are the most abundant community in grape must although they are not regarded as relevant during wine fermentation. Comparison of metagenomic datasets from the three SA vineyards and previously published data from Californian vineyards revealed only 25% of the fungi in the SA dataset was also present in the Californian dataset, with greater variation evident amongst ubiquitous epiphytic fungi. PMID

  1. Zinc transformations in neutral soil and zinc efficiency in maize fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jose M; Gonzalez, Demetrio

    2006-12-13

    The effect of six Zn sources (Zn-phenolate, Zn-EDDHA, Zn-EDTA, Zn-lignosulfonate, Zn-polyflavonoid, and Zn-glucoheptonate) was studied by applying different Zn levels to a representative Calcic Haploxeralf neutral soil (the predominant clay is montmorillonite) in incubation and greenhouse experiments. Zinc soil behavior was evaluated by sequential DTPA and Mehlich-3 extraction procedures. In the incubation experiment, the highest percentage recovery values of Zn applied to soil occurred in the water-soluble plus exchangeable fraction (29%) in fertilization with 20 mg of Zn kg(-1) of Zn-EDTA fertilizer. In the greenhouse experiment with maize (Zea mays L.), a comparison of different Zn carriers showed that the application of six fertilizers did not significantly increase the plant dry matter yield among fertilizer treatments. The highest yield occurred when 20 mg of Zn kg(-1) was applied as Zn-EDDHA fertilizer (79.4 g per pot). The relative effectiveness of the Zn sources in increasing Zn concentration in plants was in the following order: Zn-EDTA (20 mg kg(-1)) > Zn-EDDHA (20 mg kg(-1)) approximately Zn-EDTA (10 mg kg(-1)) > Zn-EDDHA (10 mg kg(-1)) approximately Zn-phenolate (both rates) approximately Zn-polyflavonoid (both rates) approximately Zn-lignosulfonate (both rates) approximately Zn-glucoheptonate (both rates) > untreated Zn. The highest amounts of Zn taken up by the plants occurred when Zn was applied as Zn-EDTA fertilizer (20 mg kg(-1), 7.44 mg of Zn per pot; 10 mg kg(-1) Zn rate, 3.93 mg of Zn per pot) and when Zn was applied as Zn-EDDHA fertilizer (20 mg kg(-1) Zn rate, 4.66 mg Zn per pot). After the maize crop was harvested, sufficient quantities of available Zn remained in the soil (DTPA- or Mehlich-3-extractable Zn) for another harvest.

  2. Effects of synthetic Zn chelates on flax response and soil Zn status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, D.; Almendros, P.; Alvarez, J.M.

    2016-11-01

    Throughout the world, flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is often grown in Zn-deficient soils, but appropriate fertilizer management can optimize both crop yield and micronutrient content. A greenhouse experiment was conducted on Typic Haploxeralf (pH 6.1) and Typic Calcixerept (pH 8.1) soils to study the relative efficiency of chelated Zn using two application rates of three different Zn sources [Zn-EDDHSA, ethylenediamine-di-(2-hydroxy-5-sulfophenylacetate of Zn); Zn-HEDTA, N-2-hydroxyethyl-ethylenediaminetriacetate of Zn; and Zn-EDTA, ethylenediaminetetraacetate of Zn]. Dry matter /DM) yield, Zn concentration, chlorophyll content, crude fiber and tensile properties were monitored and the soil-Zn status (available-Zn, Zn-fractions and total-Zn) was assessed. Zinc chelate applications increased the most labile forms of Zn in soils and Zn concentrations in plants. The low rate of Zn generally had a beneficial effect on DM yield and tensile properties. The exception was Zn-EDTA in the weakly acidic soil, where the highest Zn concentrations were observed in leaves and whole shoots; this coincided with the largest concentrations of labile Zn in soil. The most efficient fertilizers were Zn-EDDHSA (in both soils) and Zn-EDTA (in the calcareous soil). The relatively large amounts of labile and available Zn present in both of the soils fertilized with Zn-EDTA points to the applying this chelate at lower rate than 5 mg Zn/kg; this should, in turn, reduce the cost of Zn fertilization and minimize environmental pollution risk. (Author)

  3. Mapping Spatial Moisture Content of Unsaturated Agricultural Soils with Ground-Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, O.; Goldshleger, N.; Basson, U.; Reshef, M.

    2016-06-01

    Soil subsurface moisture content, especially in the root zone, is important for evaluation the influence of soil moisture to agricultural crops. Conservative monitoring by point-measurement methods is time-consuming and expensive. In this paper we represent an active remote-sensing tool for subsurface spatial imaging and analysis of electromagnetic physical properties, mostly water content, by ground-penetrating radar (GPR) reflection. Combined with laboratory methods, this technique enables real-time and highly accurate evaluations of soils' physical qualities in the field. To calculate subsurface moisture content, a model based on the soil texture, porosity, saturation, organic matter and effective electrical conductivity is required. We developed an innovative method that make it possible measures spatial subsurface moisture content up to a depth of 1.5 m in agricultural soils and applied it to two different unsaturated soil types from agricultural fields in Israel: loess soil type (Calcic haploxeralf), common in rural areas of southern Israel with about 30% clay, 30% silt and 40% sand, and hamra soil type (Typic rhodoxeralf), common in rural areas of central Israel with about 10% clay, 5% silt and 85% sand. Combined field and laboratory measurements and model development gave efficient determinations of spatial moisture content in these fields. The environmentally friendly GPR system enabled non-destructive testing. The developed method for measuring moisture content in the laboratory enabled highly accurate interpretation and physical computing. Spatial soil moisture content to 1.5 m depth was determined with 1-5% accuracy, making our method useful for the design of irrigation plans for different interfaces.

  4. MAPPING SPATIAL MOISTURE CONTENT OF UNSATURATED AGRICULTURAL SOILS WITH GROUND-PENETRATING RADAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Shamir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil subsurface moisture content, especially in the root zone, is important for evaluation the influence of soil moisture to agricultural crops. Conservative monitoring by point-measurement methods is time-consuming and expensive. In this paper we represent an active remote-sensing tool for subsurface spatial imaging and analysis of electromagnetic physical properties, mostly water content, by ground-penetrating radar (GPR reflection. Combined with laboratory methods, this technique enables real-time and highly accurate evaluations of soils' physical qualities in the field. To calculate subsurface moisture content, a model based on the soil texture, porosity, saturation, organic matter and effective electrical conductivity is required. We developed an innovative method that make it possible measures spatial subsurface moisture content up to a depth of 1.5 m in agricultural soils and applied it to two different unsaturated soil types from agricultural fields in Israel: loess soil type (Calcic haploxeralf, common in rural areas of southern Israel with about 30% clay, 30% silt and 40% sand, and hamra soil type (Typic rhodoxeralf, common in rural areas of central Israel with about 10% clay, 5% silt and 85% sand. Combined field and laboratory measurements and model development gave efficient determinations of spatial moisture content in these fields. The environmentally friendly GPR system enabled non-destructive testing. The developed method for measuring moisture content in the laboratory enabled highly accurate interpretation and physical computing. Spatial soil moisture content to 1.5 m depth was determined with 1–5% accuracy, making our method useful for the design of irrigation plans for different interfaces.

  5. Effects of synthetic Zn chelates on flax response and soil Zn status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrio Gonzalez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the world, flax (Linum usitatissimum L. is often grown in Zn-deficient soils, but appropriate fertilizer management can optimize both crop yield and micronutrient content. A greenhouse experiment was conducted on Typic Haploxeralf (pH 6.1 and Typic Calcixerept (pH 8.1 soils to study the relative efficiency of chelated Zn using two application rates of three different Zn sources [Zn-EDDHSA, ethylenediamine-di-(2-hydroxy-5-sulfophenylacetate of Zn; Zn-HEDTA, N-2-hydroxyethyl-ethylenediaminetriacetate of Zn; and Zn-EDTA, ethylenediaminetetraacetate of Zn]. Dry matter /DM yield, Zn concentration, chlorophyll content, crude fiber and tensile properties were monitored and the soil-Zn status (available-Zn, Zn-fractions and total-Zn was assessed. Zinc chelate applications increased the most labile forms of Zn in soils and Zn concentrations in plants. The low rate of Zn generally had a beneficial effect on DM yield and tensile properties. The exception was Zn-EDTA in the weakly acidic soil, where the highest Zn concentrations were observed in leaves and whole shoots; this coincided with the largest concentrations of labile Zn in soil. The most efficient fertilizers were Zn-EDDHSA (in both soils and Zn-EDTA (in the calcareous soil. The relatively large amounts of labile and available Zn present in both of the soils fertilized with Zn-EDTA points to the applying this chelate at lower rate than 5 mg Zn/kg; this should, in turn, reduce the cost of Zn fertilization and minimize environmental pollution risk.

  6. Study 5: certification and green electric power market; Etude 5: certification et marche de l'electricite ''Verte''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.E. [Observ' ER, 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-07-01

    The term green electric power, characterizes today the electric power development, from the renewable energies. Whether this development is governed by the market, the government intervention is always necessary. The fiscality is a preferential way where this complementarity between policy and market may hold. The ADEME asks for a study which presents the californian market of the green electric power, the netherlands system of green certificates and the extension to the european scale. This report deals with these three scopes after a recall and the clarification of the concepts. (A.L.B.)

  7. Sand dollar sites orogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Dee

    2013-04-01

    The determinology of the humble sand dollars habitat changing from inception to the drastic evolution of the zone to that of present day. Into the cauldron along the southern Californian 'ring of fire' lithosphere are evidence of geosynclinals areas, metasedimentary rock formations and hydrothermal activity. The explanation begins with 'Theia' and the Moon's formation, battles with cometary impacts, glacial ages, epochs with evolutionary bottlenecks and plate tectonics. Fully illustrated the lecture includes localised diagrams and figures with actual subject photographic examples of plutonic, granitic, jade and peridodite. Finally, the origins of the materials used in the lecture are revealed for prosecution by future students and the enjoyment of interested parties in general.

  8. How to Turn an Industry Green: Taxes versus Subsidies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dröge, Susanne; Schröder, Philipp

    2003-01-01

    Environmental policies frequently target the ratio of dirty to green output within the same industry. To achieve such targets the green sector may be subsidised or the dirty sector be taxed. This paper shows that in a monopolistic competition setting the two policy instruments have different...... welfare effects. For a strong green policy (a severe reduction of the dirty sector) a tax is the dominant instrument. For moderate policy targets, a subsidy will be superior (inferior) if the initial situation features a large (small) share of dirty output. These findings have implications for policies...... such as the Californian Zero Emission Bill or the EU Action Plan for Renewable Energy Sources....

  9. Water Management Policy in California

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oh, Christina; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2015-01-01

    Using Olson’s 1965 logic of collective action and group theory, we argue that the “small group” of the “iron triangle” is able to collectively act to push for command-and-control regulations in Californian water policy. There are individual rent-seeking incentives in the small group because...... the politicians do not want to impose tax, and they would like to have short-term development and economic growth during their term in order to gain a positive reputation from the public or to get re-elected. The developers would like more work and prestige and the water bureaucrats have little incentive to limit...

  10. Revision of the genus Melanagromyza in California, with descriptions of three new species (Diptera: Agromyzidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li; Gaimari, Stephen D

    2015-08-20

    The 27 Californian species of the genus Melanagromyza Hendel (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are reviewed, including descriptions of three new species (Melanagromyza californiana sp. nov., M. chemsaki sp. nov. and M. gonzalesina sp. nov.) and the first record for one species (Melanagromyza martini Spencer) for California and the USA. All species in California are described or redescribed, with illustrations and photographs, and a key to the species is presented. Maps for the species in California, along with host distributions, are provided, with comments on biology and host plants.

  11. Healing gardens: design processes and realizations of beneficial environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Cooper Marcus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Having defined the topic and its related management effects in the healthcare environment, this paper reports considerations of specific design processes, including evidence-based design, Integrated Healthcare Strategies, participatory practices and post occupancy evaluation. Landscape of Italian examples follows before a case study of three Californian healing gardens dedicated to cancer patients, linked to a survey of this category of users’ needs in such spaces. Conclusions report the reflection of practical implications deriving from studying North American examples, underlining the opportunity for audit and certification of therapeutic gardens, as well as the chance to export them outside health infrastructures for social needs.

  12. Normative social influence is underdetected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Jessica M; Schultz, P Wesley; Cialdini, Robert B; Goldstein, Noah J; Griskevicius, Vladas

    2008-07-01

    The present research investigated the persuasive impact and detectability of normative social influence. The first study surveyed 810 Californians about energy conservation and found that descriptive normative beliefs were more predictive of behavior than were other relevant beliefs, even though respondents rated such norms as least important in their conservation decisions. Study 2, a field experiment, showed that normative social influence produced the greatest change in behavior compared to information highlighting other reasons to conserve, even though respondents rated the normative information as least motivating. Results show that normative messages can be a powerful lever of persuasion but that their influence is underdetected.

  13. Changes in Surface Wind Speed over North America from CMIP5 Model Projections and Implications for Wind Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Sujay Kulkarni; Huei-Ping Huang

    2014-01-01

    The centennial trends in the surface wind speed over North America are deduced from global climate model simulations in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project—Phase 5 (CMIP5) archive. Using the 21st century simulations under the RCP 8.5 scenario of greenhouse gas emissions, 5–10 percent increases per century in the 10 m wind speed are found over Central and East-Central United States, the Californian Coast, and the South and East Coasts of the USA in winter. In summer, climate models proje...

  14. USA: California rejects mandatory GMO labelling

    OpenAIRE

    PAULL, JOHN

    2012-01-01

    Buying organic remains the best strategy for US consumers to avoid eating GM food. The voters of California have rejected the proposal to label GMO food. The proposition was narrowly lost, 47% to 53% (4,326,770 ‘Yes’ votes vs. 4,884,961 ‘No’ votes). Proposition 47 was supported by the organic sector but opposed by a coalition of GMO companies and US multinational food companies. Californians were invited to vote into law ‘The California Right to Know Genetically Engineered Food Act’. Section ...

  15. Resistance of Some Vitis Rootstocks to Xiphinema index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A R

    1983-07-01

    Thirty-eight grapevine (Vitis spp.) rootstocks were screened in pots for resistance to the dagger nematode, Xiphinema index, from 1979 to 1981. Resistance ratings were based on visible root symptoms and on changes in the nematode populations over 16 months. Nineteen of the 23 Californian hybrid rootstocks tested were resistant, as were 'Harmony',' 'Freedom,' 'Schwarzmann,' and '3309.' Two hybrids of V. rufotomentosa, '171-52' and '176-9,' were possibly immune to X. index. The rootstocks 'ARG 1,' ' 110 R,' '1202,' and '1616,' which are used commercially for phylloxera resistance were susceptible.

  16. CAD/CAM Zirconia vs. slip-cast glass-infiltrated Alumina/Zirconia all-ceramic crowns: 2-year results of a randomized controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Cavit Çehreli; Ali Murat Kökat; Kivanç Akça

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to compare the early clinical outcome of slip-cast glass-infiltrated Alumina/Zirconia and CAD/CAM Zirconia all-ceramic crowns. A total of 30 InCeram® Zirconia and Cercon® Zirconia crowns were fabricated and cemented with a glass ionomer cement in 20 patients. At baseline, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year recall appointments, Californian Dental Association (CDA) quality evaluation system was used to evaluate the prosthetic replacements, and p...

  17. About a hypothetical terrorist attack on a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-10-01

    After the terrorism attack on the World Trade Center, a record number ( two thirds) of US citizens favour the use of nuclear energy and consider nuclear plants to be safe. At the same time 59% definitely support building more nuclear plants, less than in March during the Californian crisis, but more than earlier., Most american citizens ( 84%) continue to support licence renewal for nuclear plants and 72 % agree with keeping the option open to build new nuclear plants in the future. The strongest supporters are those who have visited a nuclear plant or information centre. (N.C.)

  18. Systems and models of fire blight (Erwinia amylovora prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Kielak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents fire blight prediction models and systems, developed in Europe (system Billing - versions: BOS, BRS, BIS95 and originated from this system: Firescreen, FEUERBRA and ANLAFBRA and in United States (Californian system, model Maryblyt and system Cougarblight. Use of above models and systems in various climatic-geographic conditions and comparison of obtained prognostic data to real fire blight occurrence is reviewed. The newest trends in research on improvement of prognostic analyses parameters with their adjustment to particular conditions and consideration of infection source occurrence are also presented.

  19. Unusual pattern of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in US breast milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She, J.; Holden, A.; Sharp, M.; Tanner, M.; Hooper, K. [California Department of Toxic Substances Control, Berkeley, CA (United States). Hazardous Materials Laboratory; Williams-Derry, C. [Northwest Environment Watch, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Levels of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) among residents of North America are 10-70 times higher than those of individuals in Europe or Japan. Our discovery of high levels of PBDEs in Californians has been confirmed by recent studies showing high levels of PBDEs in US residents in different regions. As a follow-up to these studies, our lab has analyzed 16 breast milk samples collected from residents of the Pacific Northwest, US by Northwest Environment Watch, a Washington state-based NGO, for 12 PBDE congeners including PBDE 209.

  20. The Griffith Observatory exhibit programme: Turning visitors into observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins Petersen, C.; Pine, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    For most Southern Californians and the many visitors who come to Los Angeles, the venerable Griffith Observatory is the shining white building in the Hollywood Hills, once referred to by director E. C. Krupp as "the hood ornament of Los Angeles". It is also familiar to moviegoers in numerous films, most notably the famous James Dean flick, Rebel Without a Cause. Griffith Jenkins Griffith gave funding for construction of the Observatory to the city, as he wanted to create a "people's observatory". Since opening in 1935, the institution has been sharing the skies for free with anyone who wants to see them.

  1. Fattening and slaughter traits of four rabbit genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Silvester Zgur; Ajda Kermauner

    2010-01-01

    Growth rate of 4 genotypes, two lines of Slovene SIKA meat rabbit (maternal line A and sire line C, both 50 rabbits), hybrid AxC (50 rabbits) and crossbred AxCal (A and Californian, 38 rabbits) was recorded from weaning (35 days of age) to slaughter (93 days). Growth performance and slaughter traits of AxC were different from line A (live weight at 91st day: A 2720, C 3158, AxC 3043 g (P£0.05), heterosis effect (H) +3.38%; carcass weight: A 1490, C 1787, AxC 1716 g (P£0.05), H +5....

  2. Algunas reflexiones y precisiones en torno a la temprana historiografía de la pintura rupestre en las Californias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe I. Echenique March

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years both Mexican and foreign researchers have focused their attention on prehistoric painting. As a result of their labors, they have been able to solve several mysteries, as well as dispelling some myths revolving around this form of expression among the ancient Californians.This document, without any intention of invading the field of the archeologist, discusses some clarifications and reflections having to do with pictorial cultural representations, pictographs, and petroglyphs, from a historical standpoint. To do so, it turns to an analysis and critique of written sources, particularly those which refer to the early history of prehistoric painting produced by indigenous groups in the Califomias.

  3. Effect of soil use on their quality, in areas of the farm “Baños de Marrero”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Aguila Alcantara

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two areas (a natural and an agricultural ecosystem, located on brown calcareous soil (correlated to Order Inceptisol, Subgroup Mollic Eutrudept in the Soil Taxonomy system, were chosen with the aim of assessing the effect of agricultural land use on soil quality using the compared scenarios perspective. The physical indicators analyzed were aggregate stabled, permeability coefficient, the factor of structure, lower and upper limits of plasticity, as well as, the index of plasticity. The chemical indicators measured were pH (H2O, pH (KCl, organic matter content, and levels of P2O5 and K2O. Soil microbiology was analyzed by plate counting. For mesofauna extraction was used the funnel methodology of Berlese-Tullgren. Data processing was done using STATGRAPHICS vs 5.0 on Windows 7. The results demonstrated that the physical status of the soil was good in both ecosystems. Significant differences were found for pH, organic matter content, levels of P2O5 and K2O, and in the microbial population. However, no differences were found in mesofauna components; but, the principal components analyses showed that the differentiation between both ecosystems is more defined by the mesofauna and microbiological indicators.

  4. Response of soil catalase activity to chromium contamination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zofia St(e)pniewska; Agnieszka Woli(n)ska; Joanna Ziomek

    2009-01-01

    The impact of chromium (III) and (VI) forms on soil catalase activity is presented.The Orthic Podzol, Haplic Phaeozem and Mollic Gleysol from different depths were used in the experiment.The soil samples were amended with solution of Cr(III) using CrCl3, and with Cr(VI) using K2Cr2O7 in the concentration range from 0 to 20 mg/kg, whereas the samples without the addition of chromium served as control.Catalase activity was assayed by one of the commonly used spectrophotometric methods.As it is demonstrated in the experiment, both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) forms have ability to reduce soil catalase activity.A chromium dose of 20 mg/kg caused the inhibition of catalase activity and the corresponding contamination levels ranged from 75% to 92% for Cr(III) and 68% to 76% for Cr(VI), with relation to the control.Catalase activity reached maximum in the soil material from surface layers (0-25 cm), typically characterized by the highest content of organic matter creating favorable conditions for microorganisms.

  5. Soil Aeration Variability as Affected by Reoxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.WOLI(N)SKA; Z.ST(E)PNIEWSKA

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between soil physical parameters during the recovery from anoxic stresses (reoxidation) is largely unrecognized.This study was conducted to characterise the soil aeration status and derive correlations between variable aeration factors during reoxidation.Surface layers (0-30 cm) of three soil types,Haplic Phaeozem,Mollic Gleysol,and Eutric Cambisol (FAO soil group),were selected for analysis.The moisture content was determined for a range of pF values (0,1.5,2.2,2.7,and 3.2),corresponding to the available water for microorganisms and plant roots.The variability of a number of soil aeration parameters,such as water potential (pF),air-filled porosity (Eg),oxygen diffusion rate (ODR),and redox potential (Eh),were investigated.These parameters were found to be interrelated in most cases.There were significant (P < 0.001) negative correlations of pF,Eg,and ODR with Eh.A decrease in water content as a consequence of soil reoxidation was manifested by an increase in the values of aeration factors in the soil environment.These results contributed to understanding of soil redox processes during recovery from flooding and might be useful for development of agricultural techniques aiming at soil reoxidation and soil fertility optimisation.

  6. CO2 Production by Soils of Lazovskiy Reserve, South-East Primorye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semal, Viktoriia; Purtova, Lyudmila; Kostenkov, Nikolay; Nesterova, Olga; Tregubova, Valentina; Derbentseva, Alla; Tyurina, Elena; Kravchenko, Alla; Glotova, Elena; Sergeeva, Olesya; Korshenko, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    CO2 is practically the only volatile compound in automorphic soils, in the form of which carbon is lost. So the investigation of the carbon dioxide production rate dynamics makes it possible not only to judge the biological processes intensity but also to estimate the organic substance losses due to mineralization. Lazovskiy Reserve holds a unique geographic location: its territory occupies both biologically rich coastal marine area and continental part of Sikhote Alin south-east branches, including both typical mountainous areas and wide intermountain river valleys. Specific conditions of the organic substance formation and transformation, its seasonal dynamics are due not only to the features of the monsoon climate but also to the availability of unique primeval coniferous broadleaved liana forests in the central part of the Reserve and coastal post-fire successions of the secondary oak forests. CO2 emission was observed in the laboratory setting (ex. situ), at 100% maximum water holding capacity (MWHC) and at 60% MWHC. It was found that the CO2 production extensive indicators are typical for Cambisol containing high level of humus. CO2 mean values at 60% MWHC ranged into a following series: Mollic Cambisol - Cambic Fluvisol - Dystric Cambisol.

  7. Assessment of soil properties under degraded forests: Javor mountain in Republic of Srpska - a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapović Marijana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main characteristics of soils under degraded beech forests on Mt. Javor and the possibility of the reintroduction of the spruce and fir that had been cut during previous negative human activity. Research into forest soil characteristics before reforestation is not common practice in the Republic of Srpska, and very often is not successful because it has not been established which soil environment conditions are most appropriate for a particular tree species. Soil degradation has been attributed to improper management and the unplanned deforestation of some parts of the Javor Mountain. Degraded parts were initially colonized by bushes and herbaceous vegetation, but despite this and due to the steep slopes, soil erosion has occurred. The restoration of degraded forests usually requires reforestation in order to reduce soil erosion and convert low to high forests. The aim of this study was the assessment of soil properties for the reintroduction of Picea abies (Karst. and Abies alba (Mill. on degraded parts of Mt. Javor, as one of the ways to protect the forest soil from erosion. According to the World Reference Base we determined the following soil types: Albic Acrisol, Dystric Cambisol and Mollic Leptosol. All analyzed soils can meet the demands of fir and spruce due to their characteristics.

  8. Validation of TOF-SIMS and FE-SEM/EDS Techniques Combined with Sorption and Desorption Experiments to Check Competitive and Individual Pb2+ and Cd2+ Association with Components of B Soil Horizons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Cerqueira

    Full Text Available Sorption and desorption experiments were performed by the batch method on the B horizons of five natural soils: Umbric Cambisol, Endoleptic Luvisol, Mollic Umbrisol, Dystric Umbrisol, and Dystric Fluvisol. Individual and competitive sorption and desorption capacity and hysteresis were determined. The results showed that Pb2+ was sorbed and retained in a greater quantity than Cd2+ and that the hysteresis of the first was greater than that of the second. The most influential characteristics of the sorption and retention of Pb2+ were pH, ECEC, Fe and Mn oxides and clay contents. For Cd2+ they were mainly pH and, to a lesser extent, Mn oxides and clay content. The combined use of TOF-SIMS, FE-SEM/EDS and sorption and desorption analyses was suitable for achieving a better understanding of the interaction between soil components and the two heavy metals. They show the preferential association of Pb2+ with vermiculite, chlorite, Fe and Mn oxides, and of Cd2+ with the same components, although to a much lesser extent and intensity. This was due to the latter's higher mobility as it competed unfavourably with the Pb2+ sorption sites. TOF-SIMS and FE-SEM/EDS techniques confirmed the results of the sorption experiments, and also provided valuable information on whether the soil components (individually or in association retain Cd2+ and/or Pb2+; this could help to propose effective measures for the remediation of contaminated soils.

  9. In depth variation of gypsifeorus forest soil properties after a controlled burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Aznar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes produced by fire on soils depends on several factors (vegetation, soil type, temperature, etc.. Here we study the influence of fire on a gypsiferous forest soil located northwest of the city of Zaragoza. Six blocks of undisturbed soil were collected and burned under laboratory conditions reaching 272.9 ± 21.7 oC at 1cm depth. The fire caused significant differences (p <0.05 in all studied parameters from the O horizon and in the first centimeter of the Ah horizon. No significant differences (p <0.05 for any parameters below this depth were observed. The O horizon, strongly hydrophobic, became hydrophilic after burning. Burning induced a loss of 3.14 Mg organic carbon/ha, less than half of the values ​​reported for other soils with mollic horizon (8.3 Mg/ha. In our soil, the loss is due to a 53.8% in the O horizon by 35.8% in the first centimeter of the Ah, and only 10.4% is lost deeper.

  10. Colonization history and introduction dynamics of capsella bursa-pastoris (Brassicaceae) in north america: isozymes and quantitative traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuffer; Hurka

    1999-10-01

    Multilocus isozyme genotypic composition for aspartate aminotransferase (AAT), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was studied for Capsella in the source continent, Europe (9000 plants from 593 populations), and in the colonized continent, North America (2700 plants from 88 populations). North America was depauperate in the number of genotypes (by approximately 50%), but in terms of frequencies, a few genotypes were common and shared by both continents. Although some, very rare, genotypes were, however, unique for North America, our data provided no evidence to indicate that the introduced gene pools were reconstructed on a multilocus genetic basis after introduction. Instead, they argued for a considerable number of independent introduction events. Geographical distribution patterns of multilocus genotypes in Europe and North America were pronounced and enabled us to trace the colonization history of Californian Capsella back to Spanish ancestral populations and those of temperate North America back to temperate European gene pools. A random-block field experiment with 14 Californian populations from different climatic regions revealed that variation patterns of quantitative traits reflect ecotypic variation, and the ecological amplitude of Capsella in North America is similar to that in Europe, which can be traced back to the introduction of preadapted genotypes. It appears that certain multilocus isozyme genotypes are associated with certain ecotypes. The variable European gene pool of Capsella was essentially introduced into North America without major genetic changes.

  11. Isolation of Bartonella henselae, Bartonella koehlerae subsp. koehlerae, Bartonella koehlerae subsp. bothieri and a new subspecies of B. koehlerae from free-ranging lions (Panthera leo) from South Africa, cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) from Namibia and captive cheetahs from California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molia, S; Kasten, R W; Stuckey, M J; Boulouis, H J; Allen, J; Borgo, G M; Koehler, J E; Chang, C C; Chomel, B B

    2016-11-01

    Bartonellae are blood- and vector-borne Gram-negative bacteria, recognized as emerging pathogens. Whole-blood samples were collected from 58 free-ranging lions (Panthera leo) in South Africa and 17 cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) from Namibia. Blood samples were also collected from 11 cheetahs (more than once for some of them) at the San Diego Wildlife Safari Park. Bacteria were isolated from the blood of three (5%) lions, one (6%) Namibian cheetah and eight (73%) cheetahs from California. The lion Bartonella isolates were identified as B. henselae (two isolates) and B. koehlerae subsp. koehlerae. The Namibian cheetah strain was close but distinct from isolates from North American wild felids and clustered between B. henselae and B. koehlerae. It should be considered as a new subspecies of B. koehlerae. All the Californian semi-captive cheetah isolates were different from B. henselae or B. koehlerae subsp. koehlerae and from the Namibian cheetah isolate. They were also distinct from the strains isolated from Californian mountain lions (Felis concolor) and clustered with strains of B. koehlerae subsp. bothieri isolated from free-ranging bobcats (Lynx rufus) in California. Therefore, it is likely that these captive cheetahs became infected by an indigenous strain for which bobcats are the natural reservoir.

  12. Tests for host-associated fitness trade-offs in the milkweed-oleander aphid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeters, Francis R

    1993-03-01

    The milkweed-oleander aphid, Aphis nerii (Boyer de Fonscolombe) (Homoptera: Aphididae), feeds on different milkweed species in northern California than in Puerto Rico. The hosts vary, primarily between regions, for both identity and quantity of cardenolides that the aphid sequesters for its own defense. In tests for hostassociated fitness trade-offs only one case was found in which host plant and fitness corresponded, but the effect was not significant. However, power to detect fitness trade-offs was limited and the possibility of considerable differences in fitness on a particular host for aphids from different hosts cannot be excluded. On Californian host species, among which migration is common, generalized host use could result from selection for general-purpose genotypes. However, this explanation cannot apply to generalized host use of Californian and Puerto Rican milkweeds because the regions are isolated by distance. A cardenolide sequestration mechanism that is free of substantial energy costs could provide the basis for fitness homeostasis on variable host plants that makes trade-offs unlikely even on hosts from different regions.

  13. Comercialización de semillas (variedades e híbridos importadas de pimentón Capsicum annuum L en Colombia en el periodo enero 1990-agosto 1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lema Nuñez Rosario M.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available

    All the companies that produce varieties of paprika are North American, and due to the strong economic force of 4 or 5, dominate the market. These oligopolies diferenciate the seeds in quality, brand and packaging and in this way restrict other new companies entering the market. Reputable brands of quality (Petoseed, Asgrow and Rogers NK are the sole producers of hybrid seeds. The difference in price of befween the hybrid paprika seed and the Californian wonder type is substantial. The Californian Wonder is a type of seed produced by multinational Petossed priced at $ 2'600.000 (kilo-70:4 times greater in price. The multinational receive a profitable margin 60 times greater and a detailed margin 65 times greater. 77% of the demand for the variety of paprika is found in Californian Wonder (62% and Keyston Resistant Giant (15% planted in Santander del Sur, Antioquia, Cundinamarca, Tolima and Valle del Cauca. The paprika hybrids (Pacific have only been utilised in the Valle region.

     

    Las variedades e híbridos de pimentón sólo representaron e11.5% del volumen total (648. 000 kilos y el 3.25 %  del valor de las importaciones de semillas de hortalizas. Las empresas productoras son norteamericanas y por la alta concentración del mercado en 4 ó 5 empresas, son oligopolios, al igual que los distribuidores exclusivos. Estos oligopolios diferencian las semillas en forma real (calidad y no real (marca, color del empaque y en esta forma impiden la entrada de nuevas empresas. Las marcas de reconocida calidad -Petoseed, Asgrow y Rogers NK, son las únicas que producen semilla híbrida para el mercado Colombiano. La diferencia en precios de la semilla híbrida con relación a la Variedad California Wonder es mayor (70.4 veces, respecto al precio recibido por la multinacional Petoseed ($2'600.000/kilo. El mayorista consigue un margen diferencial 60 veces más alto y el margen del detallista es 65 veces mayor. El 77 % de la demanda por

  14. Estudio de algunos procesos pedogenéticos en el valle de Ojos Negros, Baja California, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Raúl Venegas Cardoso

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El estudio sistemático de suelos en Baja California, México, ha sido pobremente desarrollado. Solamente se han encontrado algunos reportes en la literatura científica, realizados en el Desierto Central. El objetivo de este trabajo es estudiar los procesos pedogenéticos que han permitido el desarrollo de los suelos en el valle de Ojos Negros, Baja California, bajo un ambiente mediterráneo. Para el estudio se utilizó el método jerárquico propuesto por Zinck (1988. Se estableció un ambiente morfogenético de naturaleza deposicional que permitió separar cuatro paisajes; lomeríos piedemonte, planicie de nivel de base y valle fluvial, los que fueron subdivididos por relieve/modelado y por características litológicas y sus correspondientes unidades de suelos a nivel de Gran Grupo de acuerdo con el Soil Survey Staff (1992. Estos suelos se formaron bajo diferentes ambientes, materiales, condiciones climáticas, con periodos glaciares e interglaciares de sequía y humedad. Estos procesos se iniciaron desde el Plioceno y continúan en la actualidad, manifestándose en su pedogénesis. Algunos han desarrollado horizontes Bt rojos sobre esquistos y gneiss, (Rhodoxeralfs, otros desarrollados sobre detritos graníticos, presentan un pobre desarrollo (Xeropsamments; materiales graníticos con procesos coluvio-aluvial han formado suelos poligenéticos, horizontes C, con la presencia de horizontes Bt rojos (4CBt, arcilla heredada y hierro amorfo (Haploxeralfs. Algunos otros manifiestan influencia gley (Cegz1, Gley1 6/5GY, Fluvaquents. Los procesos de erosión, transporte y acumulación de materiales en las tierras bajas continúan a la fecha, asimismo, la presencia de un proceso relativamente reciente: materiales que están siendo redistribuidos por el viento y depositados sobre diques de metarriolita, provocado por las condiciones de sequía en toda la región.

  15. Burn effects on soil properties associated to heat transfer under contrasting moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badía, David; López-García, Sergio; Martí, Clara; Ortíz-Perpiñá, Oriol; Girona-García, Antonio; Casanova-Gascón, José

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the topsoil thickness affected by burning under contrasting soil moisture content (field capacity versus air-dried conditions). A mollic horizon of an Aleppo pine forest was sampled and burned in the laboratory, recording the temperature continuously at the topsoil surface and at soil depths of 1, 2, and 3cm. Changes in soil properties were measured at 0-1, 1-2, 2-3, and 3-4cm. Both the maximum temperature and the charring intensities were significantly lower in wet soils than in air-dried soils up to 3cm in depth. Moreover, soil heating was slower and cooling faster in wet soils as compared to dry soils. Therefore, the heat capacity increase of the soil moistened at field capacity plays a more important role than the thermal conductivity increase on heat transfer on burned soils. Burning did not significantly modify the pH, the carbonate content and the chroma, for either wet or dry soil. Fire caused an immediate and significant decrease in water repellency in the air-dried soil, even at 3cm depth, whereas the wet soil remained hydrophilic throughout its thickness, without being affected by burning. Burning depleted 50% of the soil organic C (OC) content in the air-dried soil and 25% in the wet soil at the upper centimeter, which was blackened. Burning significantly decreased the total N (TN) content only in the dry soil (to one-third of the original value) through the first centimeter of soil depth. Soluble ions, measured by electrical conductivity (EC), increased after burning, although only significantly in the first centimeter of air-dried soils. Below 2cm, burning had no significant effects on the brightness, OC, TN, or EC, for either wet or dry soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Distribution and recovery of nitrogen-15-labeled liquid anhydrous ammonia among various soil fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, R.J.; Kurtz, L.T.; Stevenson, F.J.

    Since liquid anhydrous ammonia (LAA) is a major N fertilizer, information was sought about the proportions of LAA that enter into various combinations in soils. Liquid anhydrous NH/sub 3/, labeled with /sup 15/N was injected into three soils (Drummer, Typic Haplaquoll; Blount, Aeric Ochraqualf; Cisne, Mollic Albaqualf) in the laboratory at a rate equivalent to a field application of 206 kg N ha /sup 1/ in 76.2 cm knife-spacings. At 1, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 112 d after application, fertilizer N present in different soil fractions was determined in five concentric zones with radii of 0 to 1.5, 1.5 to 3.0, 3.0 to 4.5, 4.5 to 6.0, and 6.0 to 7.0 cm around the point of application. Depending on the soil, from 68 to 83% of the applied /sup 15/N was accounted for as (exchangeable NH/sub 4//sup +/ + NO/sub 3//sup -/ + NO/sub 2//sup -/)-N by the 112th day following application, the remainder being accounted for as clay-fixed NH/sub 4//sup +/ (1.9-4.9%), organic matter-fixed NH/sub 3/ (4.0-6.0%), and biologically immobilized organic N (3.9-9.3%). From 50 to 70% of the organic matter-fixed NH/sub 3/-N was released by hydrolysis with dilute KOH solution as compared to 10 to 15% for the immobilized N. Total recovery of /sup 15/N at 112 d ranged from 77% for the Cisne soil to about 97% for the Drummer and Blount soils. Lateral distributions and transformations of NH/sub 4//sup +/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ and pH trends after LAA applications were similar to those reported by previous investigators.

  17. Un suelo referible al periodo calido medieval en Patagonia Austral y Tierra del Fuego (Argentina. Aspectos cronologicos y paleoclimaticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favier Dubois, C. M.

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Geoarchaeological work done in Southernmost Patagonia and in the north of Tierra del Fuego, have revealed the recurrent presence of a paedogenesis interval represented by a soil of an A-AC-C profile, with a mollic epipedon, in the upper section of eolian and colluvial deposits of the late Holocene. This soil is today buried in the sites that have been analyzed, while it remains exposed in other areas of the landscape. Radiocarbon dates obtained on materials placed below it (maximum ages and those obtained by OCR (Oxidizable Carbon Ratio in the AC horizon of this soil (minimum ages, indicate the beginning of its development around the year 1000 BP. Its chronology and environmental implications suggest a relationship with the medieval climatic fluctuations called Medieval Warm Period or Medieval Optimum in Europe. This period has correlates detected in Patagonia by dendroclimatic studies.Estudios geoarqueológicos realizados en 5 localidades de Patagonia austral y norte Tierra del Fuego han revelado la recurrente presencia de un suelo de perfil A-AC-C, de epipedon mólico, en depósitos eólicos y coluviales del Holoceno tardío. Este suelo se observa sepultado en los yacimientos arqueológicos analizados, mientras que permanece expuesto en otras posiciones del paisaje. Numerosas edades máximas y mínimas obtenidas por 14C y por la técnica de OCR (Oxidizable Carbon Ratio indican el comienzo de su desarrollo hacia el 1000 AP. Su cronología e implicancias ambientales permiten vincularlo con fluctuaciones climáticas desarrolladas durante el denominado Período Cálido Medieval u Optimo Medieval Europeo, con correlatos detectados en Patagonia a través de estudios dendroclimáticos.

  18. Episodic soil succession on basaltic lava fields in a cool, dry environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, K.L.; McDaniel, P.A.; Phillips, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Holocene- to late Pleistocene-aged lava flows at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve provide an ideal setting to examine the early stages of soil formation under cool, dry conditions. Transects were used to characterize the amount and nature of soil cover on across basaltic lava flows ranging in age from 2.1 to 18.4 ka. Results indicate that on flows soils (Folists in Soil Taxonomy) are the dominant soil type, providing an areal coverage of up to ∼25%. On flows ≥13.9 ka, deeper mineral soils including Entisols, Aridisols, and Mollisols become dominant and the areal extent increases to ≥95% on flows older than 18.4 ka. These data suggest there are two distinct pedogenic pathways associated with lava flows of the region. The first pathway is illustrated by the younger flows, where Folists dominate. In the absence of a major source of loess, relatively little mineral material accumulates and soils provide only minor coverage of the lava flows. Our results indicate that this pathway of soil development has not changed appreciably over the past ∼10 ka. The second pedogenic pathway is illustrated by the flows older than 13.9 ka. These flows have been subject to deposition of large quantities of loess during and after the last regional glaciation, resulting in almost complete coverage. Subsequent pedogenesis has given rise to Aridisols and Mollisols with calcic and cambic horizons and mollic epipedons. This research highlights the importance of regional climate change on the evolution of Craters of the Moon soilscapes.

  19. Morphophysical pedotransfer functions for groundwater pollution by nitrate leaching in Central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Fuentes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate leaching (NL is a major concern in agriculture due to its impact on human health and ecosystems. Solute movement through soil is governed by various hydraulic and physical properties that determine water flow. To study such relationships, a pedotransfer function of groundwater pollution was developed in two alluvial irrigated soils under long-term pig slurry applications. Two basins of central Chile, San Pedro (Typic Xerochrepts and Pichidegua (Mollic Xerofluvents were selected, where maize (Zea mays L. was grown in spring-summer, while during autumn-winter period a ryegrass-barley-oat mixed crop was established in San Pedro and a fallow management applied in Pichidegua. Soils in cultivated and control sites were characterized in physical and hydraulic terms. Nitrogen and water budgets were determined measuring periodically (biweekly N concentration (N-NO3- and N-NH4+ and monitoring water contents in soil profiles, respectively. Dye tracer tests were performed with brilliant blue (BB dye and the staining patterns analyzed. To contrast the effect of slurry additions over soil physical properties and over NL, t-Student tests were performed. Some accurate pollution groundwater NL pedotransfer functions were obtained calculated through least square fit models and artificial neural networks. Textural porosity, mean diameter variation, slow drainage porosity, air conductivity at 33 kPa water tension and N-NO3- concentrations were directly related to NL. In terms of preferential flow analysis, stained path width > 200 mm was inversely associated to NL. Finally, dye tracer tests provided a better understanding of the characteristics and pattern of water/solute movement through soil to groundwater.

  20. Metagenomic Analysis of Some Potential Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria in Arable Soils at Different Formation Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolińska, Agnieszka; Kuźniar, Agnieszka; Zielenkiewicz, Urszula; Banach, Artur; Izak, Dariusz; Stępniewska, Zofia; Błaszczyk, Mieczysław

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of the study was to determine the diversity of the potential nitrogen-fixing (PNF) bacteria inhabiting agricultural (A) soils versus wastelands serving as controls (C). The soils were classified into three groups based on the formation process: autogenic soils (Albic Luvisols, Brunic Arenosols, Haplic Phaeozem) formed on loess material, hydrogenic soils (Mollic Gleysols, Eutric Fluvisol, Eutric Histosol) formed under the effect of stagnant water and lithogenic soils (Rendzina Leptosols) formed on limestone. In order to determine the preferable conditions for PNF bacteria, the relationships between the soil chemical features and bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were tested. Additionally, the nitrogen content and fertilisation requirement of the lithogenic (LG), autogenic (AG) and hydrogenic (HG) soils were discussed. The composition of the bacterial communities was analysed with the next-generation sequencing (NGS) by the Ion Torrent™ technology. The sequences were clustered into OTU based on a 99 % similarity threshold. The arable soils tested were distinctly dominated by β-Proteobacteria representatives of PNF bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia. Bacteria from the α-Proteobacteria class and Devosia genus were subdominants. A free-living Cyanobacteria population dominated in A rather than in C soils. We have found that both soil agricultural management and soil formation processes are the most conducive factors for PNF bacteria, as a majority of these microorganisms inhabit the AG group of soils, whilst the LG soils with the lowest abundance of PNF bacteria revealed the need for additional mineral fertilisation. Our studies have also indicated that there are close relationships between soil classification with respect to soil formation processes and PNF bacteria preference for occupation of soil niches.

  1. IMPACT OF THE REPEATED TRACTOR PASSES ON SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SILTY LOAM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravko Filipović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to quantify soil compaction induced by tractor traffic on untilled wet silty loam soil (Mollic Fluvisol. Changes in penetration resistance, bulk density and total porosity were measured for detecting the soil compaction. Treatments include ten passes of a four-wheel drive tractor with the engine power of 54.0 kW and weight of 3560 kg (1580 kg on the front axle and 1980 kg on the rear axle, 2.41 m distance between axles. The tyres on the tractor were cross-ply, front 11.2-24 and rear 16.9-30, with the inflation pressure of 160 kPa and 100 kPa, respectively. The speed of tractor during passes over experimental plots was 5.0 km h-1. In comparison to control, each tractor pass induced an increase in soil penetration resistance at all depths, and the average increment ratios, determined as the average of all layers, were 9.8, 18.5 and 26.1% after one, five and ten passes, respectively. The bulk density also increased with number of tractor passes, but with less percentage increasing. The increment ratios comparison to the control were 3.6, 9.5 and 12.9% after one, five and ten passes, respectively. The total porosity decreased with the number of passes, and the decrement ratios were 4.5, 16.5 and 20.8% after one, five and ten passes, respectively.

  2. Substâncias húmicas como suporte à classificação de solos brasileiros Humic substances in support of the Brazilian soil classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Fontana

    2008-10-01

    tipos de horizontes diagnósticos ricos em C orgânico.The humic substances that compose the soil organic matter participate actively in the pedogenetic soil processes, particularly in the Histic (Histic, Mollic (Chernozemic, Umbric (Humic and Spodic (Spodic diagnostic horizons. This study aimed to determine organic C amounts in the soil humic substances and evaluate their applicability for diagnostic horizons recognition. Fifty-six diagnostic soil horizons from different Brazilian regions were used, 52 from surface horizons or epipedons (H histic, A mollic, A proeminent, A humic and A moderate and four subsurface (B spodic. Soil chemical and physical properties and the organic C amounts in the fulvic acid fraction (C-FAF, humic acid fraction (C-HAF and humin (C-HUM were determined by well-established methods. The C-HAF/C-FAF ratio and C-AE/C-HUM ratio (C-AE = C-FAF + C-HAF and the percentage of each fraction in the total organic C (TOC were calculated and all data were submitted to multivariate analysis. In the organic horizon, the amounts of H histic were highest and C-HUM and C-HAF amounts similar. C-HUM was predominant in the major mineral horizons, followed by C-HAF in the A mollic and A humic horizons, and by C-FAF in the A proeminent and A moderate horizons. A greater proportion of either C-FAF or C-HAF were observed in B spodic horizons. Based on canonical analysis, we identified the variables that could be used to separate diagnostic horizon types. The horizons with low influence of organic matter were distinguished from those with greater influence by cluster analysis. With the discriminatory analysis, satisfactory results were obtained for the classification of diagnostic horizons based on humic substance variables, compared to the standard classification. Multivariate analysis indicates that the distribution of C in the humic substances can be used to separate C-rich diagnostic horizon types of tropical soils in Brazil.

  3. Risk factors for subclinical intramammary infection in dairy goats in two longitudinal field studies evaluated by Bayesian logistic regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koop, Gerrit; Collar, Carol A.; Toft, Nils

    2013-01-01

    are imperfect tests, particularly lacking sensitivity, which leads to misclassification and thus to biased estimates of odds ratios in risk factor studies. The objective of this study was to evaluate risk factors for the true (latent) IMI status of major pathogens in dairy goats. We used Bayesian logistic......, caprine arthritis encephalitis-virus infection status, and kidding season), and uncontrollable risk factors (parity, lactation stage, milk yield, pregnancy status, and breed) were measured in the Dutch study, the Californian study or in both studies. Bayesian logistic regression models were constructed...... in which the true (but latent) infection status was linked to the joint test results, as functions of test sensitivity and specificity. The latent IMI status was the dependent variable in the logistic regression model with risk factors as independent variables and with random herd and goat effects...

  4. Changes in Surface Wind Speed over North America from CMIP5 Model Projections and Implications for Wind Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujay Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The centennial trends in the surface wind speed over North America are deduced from global climate model simulations in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project—Phase 5 (CMIP5 archive. Using the 21st century simulations under the RCP 8.5 scenario of greenhouse gas emissions, 5–10 percent increases per century in the 10 m wind speed are found over Central and East-Central United States, the Californian Coast, and the South and East Coasts of the USA in winter. In summer, climate models projected decreases in the wind speed ranging from 5 to 10 percent per century over the same coastal regions. These projected changes in the surface wind speed are moderate and imply that the current estimate of wind power potential for North America based on present-day climatology will not be significantly changed by the greenhouse gas forcing in the coming decades.

  5. Are grades really oppressive?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张心宇

    2015-01-01

    Are grades really oppressive? The broad question's answer is of course open: it varies in different condition and in prerequisites. Like in Daily Californian,"Why Grades are Oppressive", the title tells us it standing: yes, grades are oppressive. In the article, the authors (this article was written by 16 students of the class) pointed out that the grading system has had a violent and powerfully destructive effect on our lives. Because grading focuses our attention on class requirements that we have no say in determination. And this makes many students equate their self-worth with the grades they get in exams. Besides, grades are intimately connected with a larger system of control in community, which trains students to be submissive and not to question or challenge it. In the end, the authors conclude that they should take responsibility for evaluating their own learning process.

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05346-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lone AH162 microsatellite... 46 0.28 1 ( ES392197 ) MUS10-J24.x1d-t SHGC-MUS Mytilus californianus cD... 40 ...42 4.4 1 ( GE757759 ) MUW10-B16.y1d-s SHGC-MUW Mytilus californianus cD... 42 4.4 1 ( GE755270 ) MUW08-O11.y1d-s SHGC-MUW Mytilus cal...ifornianus cD... 42 4.4 1 ( GE754459 ) MUW07-F12.y1d-s SHGC-MUW Mytilus californian...us cD... 42 4.4 1 ( GE754425 ) MUW04-F02.y1d-s SHGC-MUW Mytilus californianus cD... 42 4.4 1 ( FF564575 ) TT

  7. Effect of integration of Avena sativa L. and Trifolium alexandrinum L. in the ration on milk production performance of rabbit Does

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijani Hedhly,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The ration inclusion of green roughages avena sativa l. and Trifolium alexandrinum l. has been studied at forty "New Zealander x Californian" rabbit does in 3rd and 4th lactation, distributed on five groups, received five diets: four experimental diets (A , A , B and B were based on the distribution at will of green roughages complemented 1 2 1 2 daily with 120 or 180g of concentrate. Control group received only concentrate. The B2 diets compound of 180 g concentrate and Trifolium alexandrinum L. ad libitum. Milk production was not significantly different that given by the control group (P>0.05. Milk production estimated from rabbits (PLL and those estimated from mothers (PLM start with low production levels respectively 83.9 and 134.1 g/day peak production (PLL and (PLM is reached between the 15th and 20th days of lactation.

  8. Effect of culturally relevant pedagogy on Latino students' engagement and content mastery on states of matter unit in physical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jennifer

    This research, in response to the lack of empirical evidence of the impact of culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP) on Latino students in science education, examined the effect CRP on Latino students' engagement and content mastery. Quantitative research was conducted with a treatment group that received an intervention unit on states of matter with CRP approaches and a comparison group that did not receive the intervention. The sample comprised approximately 189 eighth-grade students from a Southern Californian middle school. The research findings reveal that CRP approaches had a statistically significant positive effect on student engagement of all ethnic groups in this study, particularly Latino students, while CRP approaches had a statistically significant negative effect on Latino students' content mastery. Three recommendations result from this study, including professional development of CRP for educators, professional development of CRP for educational leaders, and using CRP to address multiculturalism.

  9. The detection of subclinical mastitis in the bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) by somatic cell count and California mastitis test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurahman, O A

    1996-01-01

    Milk samples (n = 160) from 7 clinically healthy bactrian camels were cultured to detect subclinical udder infection. The samples were assessed by the Californian mastitis test (CMT) and somatic cell count (SCC). Bacteria were recovered from 36 (22.5%) of the milk samples. Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were the main organisms found. Infected quarters had significantly higher mean values for the SCC (p < 0.01) and CMT (p < 0.001) than non-infected quarters. All 7 camels were infected with CNS but only 4 with S. aureus. CMT values for S. aureus-infected camels were significantly higher than for those only infected with CNS. The values for SCC and CMT were significantly influenced by the stage of lactation (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found from the effect of the quarters. Both SCC and CMT were of value in predicting the infection status of the udder.

  10. Atypical Toxoplasma gondii strain from a free-living jaguar (Panthera onca) in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demar, M; Ajzenberg, D; Serrurier, B; Dardé, M L; Carme, B

    2008-02-01

    Like domestic cats, wild felids are involved in the complete infective cycle of Toxoplasma gondii because they can host in their gastrointestinal tract sexually mature parasites and shed infective oocysts in their feces. We report, to our knowledge, the first isolation and molecular characterization of a T. gondii strain from the heart tissue of a free-living jaguar (Panthera onca) in French Guiana. Sequencing at six polymorphic markers indicated that the jaguar isolate had an atypical genotype, including an allele at TgM-A previously found only in isolates from South America, and an allele at GRA6, which was previously reported only in Californian sea otter isolates. These findings are consistent with the recent description of atypical T. gondii strains involved in severe toxoplasmoses in immunocompetent patients in French Guiana that seemed to be linked to a neotropical forest-based cycle involving wild cats and their prey.

  11. Causes of Rabbit Mortality at Mankon Research Station, Cameroon (1983-1987

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nfi, AN.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to determine the causes of mortality in rabbits raised at the Institute of Zootechnical and Veterinary Research Station (IRZV Mankon between 1983-1987. Three breeds of rabbits the Californian, the New Zealand White and their crosses with local rabbits were used in the study. Within the period under review, all dead animals were necropsied and faecal and gastro-intestinal tract samples were examined in the laboratory. It was shown that high mortalities in rabbits were due to snuffles, pneumonia, mucoid enteritis, coccidiosis, mange, enterotoxaemia and Tyzzer's disease. 3060 rabbits died of various diseases comprising 1591 (52 % kittens, 1220 (39.7 % fryers and 280 (9.2 % adults. Kitten mortality compared to fryer and adult was highest ail through the period of study.

  12. Microgrid Selection and Operation for Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Lacommare, Kristina S H; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Coffey, Brian; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-05-01

    The addition of storage technologies such as lead-acid batteries, flow batteries, or heat storage can potentially improve the economic and environmental attractiveness of on-site generation such as PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines (with or without CHP), and can contribute to enhanced demand response. Preliminary analyses for a Californian nursing home indicate that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. While economic results do not make a compelling case for storage, they indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which may lower carbon emissions as well as energy costs depending on the test site, its load profile, and DER technology adoption.

  13. A time journey through solar architecture. 1900 to the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, Robert [Donau Univ. - Krems, Krems (Austria)

    2008-07-01

    This journey from the beginning of the 20th century to the future examines the evolution of buildings making use of the sun. It begins in the USA and then follows paths in Europe and Asia. The way is marked by milestones in the forms of technological breakthroughs and political changes. Two different courses are tracked: the engineering approach using active solar and technical systems and the architectural approach where the building collects, stores and distributes solar heat. Both approaches impact aesthetics and have led to fascinating design variations from the Californian hippy solar houses of the 1970's to today's prefab, industrial design boxes. Along the journey some ways have proven to be dead-ends, some detours and some expressways. It is interesting to learn from the journey in order to make wise choices now as we proceed. (orig.)

  14. [The traits theory in longitudinal life span research. Partial report of a workshop].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munnichs, J M

    1982-12-01

    During the international Workshop on 'Life Span and Change in a Gerontological Perspective' (9-12 July, 1981) at the University of Nijmegen, the Netherlands, research data from the Oakland Growth Study and the Guidance Study have been discussed. The second major contribution came from the longitudinal studies at the Bonn University. These groups of researchers cover different periods in the life span, but both contribute to prediction and understanding of periods not under investigation. Each of these longitudinal studies can contribute to the total understanding of the psychology of the life span. In this contribution we describe the trait-centered approach. The older research is mostly done with this theoretical approach in mind. We summarize the Californian studies and the Manhattan study on mental health. We close with some general critical remarks and we try to define the limitations of the trait-theoretical approach.

  15. Prevalence and pathological study on rabbit hepatic coccidiosis in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J S; Tsai, S F

    1991-10-01

    Five breeds of rabbits, which included the New Zealand, Californian, Spot, Rex and Angora rabbit, were found from a survey of 1,152 rabbits in Taiwan. The prevalence of coccidia in young rabbits (weaning-2 months old) was 95% to 100%. Adult female rabbits usually acted as carriers within the farm and transmitted the parasite to young rabbits, which caused severe infection with clinical signs and even death. Parasitism of hepatic coccidia (Eimeria stiedai) in the rabbit led to severe mortality. Numerous and scattered white nodules about 0.1 to 0.5 cm in diameter were seen on the liver surface and dark greenish mucoid exudate was found in intestinal lumen. Histopathologic lesions included hyperplasia of the bile duct epithelium with different developmental stages of coccidia within. Oocysts could be seen in the lumen, and granuloma tissues encircle the bile duct with infiltration of inflammatory cells. The other organs were not infected.

  16. Design of Road Pavement Using Recycled Aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remišová, Eva; Decký, Martin; Mikolaš, Milan; Hájek, Matej; Kovalčík, Luboš; Mečár, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The presented article gives special attention to codified clauses of the road construction law, the relevant clauses of the standards and technical regulations to design and control the quality of recycled aggregate constructions. The article also presents the authors’ suggestions to design of earth constructions and pavements of roads according to the Slovak technical standards, technical regulations and objectively determined results of research and development of road infrastructure. The article presents a comparison of the mechanical characteristics measurements of the structural layers of road pavements built from the recycled and natural aggregate. It also presents correlation functions of results obtained from in situ and in laboratory CBR (Californian Bearing Ratio) measuring, representing the world's most widely used control method of bearing capacity of mentioned construction layers.

  17. Development of renewable energies in the building industry and in the industry in general; Developpement des energies renouvelable dans le batiment et l'industrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This third issue of the international DERBI conference has permitted to decipher the international actuality of renewable energies, to position the French national projects in this thriving context, and to discover the recent technological innovations. Californian companies were invited to this conference for a comparison of the policies in favor of renewable energy sources on both sides of the Atlantic ocean. This document gathers the transparencies presented at this conference and dealing with technologies, products, projects and realization in the following domains: solar cooling, biomass power plants, photovoltaic power plants and advances in photovoltaic engineering, solar thermal energy, thermodynamic solar power plants, architecture, renewable energies and the Eco-Building European project, biofuels, wood fuels, wind power and small wind power, geothermal energy. Presentations deal also with the financing of renewable energy projects, the competencies, employment and training, the numerical dimension, and the automation in the renewable energies domain. (J.S.)

  18. In vitro susceptibility of sea lion poxvirus to cidofovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollens, Hendrik H; Gulland, Frances M D; Jacobson, Elliott R; Hernandez, Jorge A; Klein, Paul A; Walsh, Michael T; Condit, Richard C

    2008-10-01

    Parapoxviruses of seals and sea lions are commonly encountered pathogens with zoonotic potential. The antiviral activity of the antiviral compounds isatin-beta-thiosemicarbazone, rifampicin, acyclovir, cidofovir and phosphonoacetic acid against a parapoxvirus (SLPV-1) isolated from a Californian sea lions (Zalophus californianus) was evaluated. Cidofovir was able to reduce virus-induced cytopathic effect of SLPV-1 in confluent monolayers when used in concentrations greater than 2microg/ml. A decreasing virus yield was observed in the presence of increasing concentrations of cidofovir, which confirmed the ability of cidofovir to inhibit SLPV-1 replication. The in vitro efficacy of cidofovir against SLPV-1 indicates the therapeutic potential of cidofovir for the treatment of infections of humans and pinnipeds with parapoxviruses of seals and sea lions. This study confirms the previously proposed therapeutic potential of cidofovir for the treatment of parapoxvirus infections.

  19. Mitochondrial recombination in natural populations of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping; Zhang, Ying; Pun, Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    In the majority of sexual eukaryotes, the mitochondrial genomes are inherited uniparentally and have predominantly clonal population structures. In clonally evolving genomes, alleles at different loci will be in significant linkage disequilibrium. In this study, the associations among alleles at nine mitochondrial loci were analyzed for 379 isolates in four natural populations of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus. The results indicated that the mitochondrial genome in the Desert California population was not significantly different from random recombination. In contrast, the three other populations all showed predominantly clonal mitochondrial population structure. While no evidence of recombination was found in the Alberta, Canada A. bisporus population, signatures of recombination were evident in the Coastal Californian and the French populations. We discuss the potential mechanisms that could have contributed to the observed mitochondrial recombination and to the differences in allelic associations among the geographic populations in this economically important mushroom.

  20. [Composition and distribution of the mitochondrial lineages of gray whales (Eschirichtius robustus) in the far eastern seas of Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshcherskiĭ, I G; Kuleshova, M A; Litovka, D I; Burkanov, V N; Endrius, R D; Tsidulko, G A; Rozhnov, V V; Il'iashchenko, V Iu

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of occurrence of the mitotypes (control region, cytochrome b gene, and DN2 gene) has been studied for groups of gray whales feeding and growing along Chukotka Peninsula, Koryak Coast, eastern Kamchatka, and Sakhalin Island. The number of the mitotypes decreased dramatically from the northern waters southwards; however, the dominant mitotypes remained the same. Both mitochondrial lineages known for this species might be found for the whales gathering in the reproductive area along the Californian Coast in accordance with the comparison of the published and original data on the haplotypes of the control region. However, it has also been argued that similar sequences of the control region might be found in different mitochondrial genomes, and the analysis of only this site of mtDNA might lead to incorrect conclusions.

  1. Simulation and similarity using models to understand the world

    CERN Document Server

    Weisberg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In the 1950s, John Reber convinced many Californians that the best way to solve the state's water shortage problem was to dam up the San Francisco Bay. Against massive political pressure, Reber's opponents persuaded lawmakers that doing so would lead to disaster. They did this not by empirical measurement alone, but also through the construction of a model. Simulation and Similarity explains why this was a good strategy while simultaneously providing an account of modeling and idealization in modern scientific practice. Michael Weisberg focuses on concrete, mathematical, and computational models in his consideration of the nature of models, the practice of modeling, and nature of the relationship between models and real-world phenomena. In addition to a careful analysis of physical, computational, and mathematical models, Simulation and Similarity offers a novel account of the model/world relationship. Breaking with the dominant tradition, which favors the analysis of this relation through logical notions suc...

  2. Species area relationships in mediterranean-climate plant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.; Fotheringham, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Aim To determine the best-fit model of species–area relationships for Mediterranean-type plant communities and evaluate how community structure affects these species–area models.Location Data were collected from California shrublands and woodlands and compared with literature reports for other Mediterranean-climate regions.Methods The number of species was recorded from 1, 100 and 1000 m2 nested plots. Best fit to the power model or exponential model was determined by comparing adjusted r2 values from the least squares regression, pattern of residuals, homoscedasticity across scales, and semi-log slopes at 1–100 m2 and 100–1000 m2. Dominance–diversity curves were tested for fit to the lognormal model, MacArthur's broken stick model, and the geometric and harmonic series.Results Early successional Western Australia and California shrublands represented the extremes and provide an interesting contrast as the exponential model was the best fit for the former, and the power model for the latter, despite similar total species richness. We hypothesize that structural differences in these communities account for the different species–area curves and are tied to patterns of dominance, equitability and life form distribution. Dominance–diversity relationships for Western Australian heathlands exhibited a close fit to MacArthur's broken stick model, indicating more equitable distribution of species. In contrast, Californian shrublands, both postfire and mature stands, were best fit by the geometric model indicating strong dominance and many minor subordinate species. These regions differ in life form distribution, with annuals being a major component of diversity in early successional Californian shrublands although they are largely lacking in mature stands. Both young and old Australian heathlands are dominated by perennials, and annuals are largely absent. Inherent in all of these ecosystems is cyclical disequilibrium caused by periodic fires. The

  3. Modeling the impact of post-diagnosis behavior change on HIV prevalence in Southern California men who have sex with men (MSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Aditya S; Goodreau, Steven M; Gorbach, Pamina M; Daar, Eric; Little, Susan J

    2014-08-01

    Our objective here is to demonstrate the population-level effects of individual-level post-diagnosis behavior change (PDBC) in Southern Californian men who have sex with men (MSM), recently diagnosed with HIV. While PDBC has been empirically documented, the population-level effects of such behavior change are largely unknown. To examine these effects, we develop network models derived from the exponential random graph model family. We parameterize our models using behavioral data from the Southern California Acute Infection and Early Disease Research Program, and biological data from a number of published sources. Our models incorporate vital demographic processes, biology, treatment and behavior. We find that without PDBC, HIV prevalence among MSM would be significantly higher at any reasonable frequency of testing. We also demonstrate that higher levels of HIV risk behavior among HIV-positive men relative to HIV-negative men observed in some cross-sectional studies are consistent with individual-level PDBC.

  4. Defining snow drought and why it matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpold, Adrian; Dettinger, Michael; Rajagopal, Seshadri

    2017-01-01

    On 12 February, water resource managers at the Oroville Dam issued an evacuation warning that forced some 180,000 Californians to relocate to higher ground. The story of how conditions got to this point involves several factors, but two clearly stand out: the need to prevent water shortages during a record drought, followed by one of the wettest October–February periods in California history.The situation at Oroville Dam highlights difficulties that many reservoir managers face in managing flood risks while simultaneously storing water to mitigate severe droughts and smaller snowpacks. Central to this difficulty is the idea of “snow drought,” a term that’s gaining traction in both scientific and lay literature.

  5. Immigration and homeownership: the cases of California and Spain,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián LÓPEZ COLÁS

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the evolution of foreign homeownership in Spain between 2001 and 2006, seen as an indicator of integration of migrants in host countries. Other goals, derived from the former, are to determine the influence of nationality in the homeownership and to quantify the likelihood of foreigners to live under this form of tenure. Having modelled the socio-demographic variables between the years 2001 and 2006, the results show a lower propensity of foreign born people to live through ownership than nationals and, what is most important, that the Spanish residential system demands more efforts for foreigners so as to live in property than the Californian system.

  6. Effectiveness of the toll-free line for public insurance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Cynthia M

    2005-03-01

    Toll-free lines for public insurance programs are a major point of entry to inquire about information. More than 1 million Californians are eligible for public insurance programs based on income but not yet enrolled. In 2000 and 2002, a "mystery-shopper" survey was conducted to ascertain overall effectiveness and interlanguage variation for information provided in Armenian, Cantonese, English, Farsi, Hmong, Khmer, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese. Although the 2002 study showed statistically significant improvements from 2000, many constructs remained problematic. In 2002, for example, statistically significant interlanguage variation was identified in discussing and checking eligibility for the program. Specifically, Spanish and Armenian callers were less likely than other language callers to have eligibility checked or deemed eligible. Removing barriers to enrollment in public insurance programs often requires political solutions, but improving customer service for the toll-free line necessitates efficiency and a focus on continuous quality improvement.

  7. Image of the World on polyhedral maps and globes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pędzich Paweł

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of polyhedrons as image surface in cartographic projections has a tradition of more than 200 years. The first maps relying on polyhedrons appeared in the 19th century. One of the first maps which based on an original polyhedral projection using a regular octahedron was constructed by the Californian architect Bernard Cahill in 1909. Other well known polyhedral projections and maps included Buckminster Fuller’s projection and map into icosahedron from 1954 and S. Waterman’s projection into truncated octahedron from 1996, which resulted in the “butterfly” map. Polyhedrons as image surface have the advantage of allowing a continuous image of continents of the Earth with low projection distortion. Such maps can be used for many purposes, such as presentation of tectonic plates or geographic discoveries.

  8. Collaborative and situated learning on the web ? how can teacher education theoretically and practically respond to changing demands and roles of teachers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2006-01-01

    in a modern world. Furthermore, some of the concepts of Lave and Wenger's situated learning theories will be described as well as a case study of Internet based second language learning in a ?virtual community of practice? will be presented. At the end of the paper the relevance of the theoretical concepts......The background for this paper is a growing interest during the past decade in Denmark in the concepts of ?situated learning?, ?social theory of learning? and ?learning in communities of practice? developed by the American social anthropologist Jean Lave and the Californian Research Scientist...... Etienne Wenger. The work by Jean Lave from 1988 (Lave, 1988) based on anthropological field studies in Brazil and Liberia as well as later works by Lave & Wenger (Lave and Wenger, 1991; Chaiklin and Lave, 1993; Wenger, 1998; Wenger, McDermott, R. and W. Snyder, 2002) on situated learning and social...

  9. The opening of electricity markets: the stakes for the nuclear energy; L'ouverture des marches de l'electricite: les enjeux pour le nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maillard, M. [Ministere de l' Economie, des Finances et de l' Industrie, 75 - Paris (France). Direction Generale de L' Energie et des Matieres Premieres

    2002-07-01

    This article is a reprint of the opening talk of M. Maillard, general director of DGEMP (general direction of energy and raw materials, French ministry of economy, finances and industry), given at the 2002 annual meeting of the French society of nuclear energy (SFEN). In his talk, M. Maillard presents, first, the international context of the liberalization of electricity markets (the lessons learnt after the Californian crisis, the situation of the existing nuclear park, the questions relative to the nuclear revival, the conditions of a conservation of the nuclear option beyond the existing facilities). Then he analyzes the French situation and its specificities (pluri-annual planning of investments, mastered liberalization and competitiveness of the nuclear energy, preparation of future date-lines in agreement with the decommissioning of the oldest PWR reactors). (J.S.)

  10. Multi-decadal projections of surface and interior pathways of the Fukushima Cesium-137 radioactive plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Vincent; Van Sebille, Erik; Sen Gupta, Alexander; Garçon, Véronique; England, Matthew H.

    2013-10-01

    Following the March 2011 Fukushima disaster, large amounts of water contaminated with radionuclides, including Cesium-137, were released into the Pacific Ocean. With a half-life of 30.1 years, Cs-137 has the potential to travel large distances within the ocean. Using an ensemble of regional eddy-resolving simulations, this study investigates the long-term ventilation pathways of the leaked Cs-137 in the North Pacific Ocean. The simulations suggest that the contaminated plume would have been rapidly diluted below 10,000 Bq/m3 by the energetic Kuroshio Current and Kurushio Extension by July 2011. Based on our source function of 22 Bq/m3, which sits at the upper range of the published estimates, waters with Cs-137 concentrations >10 Bq/m3 are projected to reach the northwestern American coast and the Hawaiian archipelago by early 2014. Driven by quasi-zonal oceanic jets, shelf waters north of 45°N experience Cs-137 levels of 10-30 Bq/m3 between 2014 and 2020, while the Californian coast is projected to see lower concentrations (10-20 Bq/m3) slightly later (2016-2025). This late but prolonged exposure is related to subsurface pathways of mode waters, where Cs-137 is subducted toward the subtropics before being upwelled from deeper sources along the southern Californian coast. The model suggests that Fukushima-derived Cs-137 will penetrate the interior ocean and spread to other oceanic basins over the next two decades and beyond. The sensitivity of our results to uncertainties in the source function and to inter-annual to multi-decadal variability is discussed.

  11. The Orphan Gene dauerless Regulates Dauer Development and Intraspecific Competition in Nematodes by Copy Number Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melanie G; Rödelsperger, Christian; Witte, Hanh; Riebesell, Metta; Sommer, Ralf J

    2015-06-01

    Many nematodes form dauer larvae when exposed to unfavorable conditions, representing an example of phenotypic plasticity and a major survival and dispersal strategy. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the regulation of dauer induction is a model for pheromone, insulin, and steroid-hormone signaling. Recent studies in Pristionchus pacificus revealed substantial natural variation in various aspects of dauer development, i.e. pheromone production and sensing and dauer longevity and fitness. One intriguing example is a strain from Ohio, having extremely long-lived dauers associated with very high fitness and often forming the most dauers in response to other strains' pheromones, including the reference strain from California. While such examples have been suggested to represent intraspecific competition among strains, the molecular mechanisms underlying these dauer-associated patterns are currently unknown. We generated recombinant-inbred-lines between the Californian and Ohioan strains and used quantitative-trait-loci analysis to investigate the molecular mechanism determining natural variation in dauer development. Surprisingly, we discovered that the orphan gene dauerless controls dauer formation by copy number variation. The Ohioan strain has one dauerless copy causing high dauer formation, whereas the Californian strain has two copies, resulting in strongly reduced dauer formation. Transgenic animals expressing multiple copies do not form dauers. dauerless is exclusively expressed in CAN neurons, and both CAN ablation and dauerless mutations increase dauer formation. Strikingly, dauerless underwent several duplications and acts in parallel or downstream of steroid-hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear-hormone-receptor daf-12. We identified the novel or fast-evolving gene dauerless as inhibitor of dauer development. Our findings reveal the importance of gene duplications and copy number variations for orphan gene function and suggest daf-12 as major target for

  12. The Laminated Marca Shale: High-Frequency Climate Cycles From the Latest Cretaceous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A.; Kemp, A. E.; Weedon, G.; Barron, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    The Latest Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Marca Shale Member, California, displays a well-preserved record of alternating terrigenous and diatomaceous laminae couplets, remarkably similar in lithology to recent laminated sediments from the Gulf of California and Santa Barbara Basin. This similarity, together with the recognition of intra- and inter-annual variability in the diatom flora, implies an annual origin for these couplets. High-resolution backscattered electron imagery has identified two sublaminae types within the varved succession; near monospecific lamina of Chaetoceros-type resting spore and of large Azpeitiopsis morenoensis. The composition and occurrence of these laminae is similar to ENSO forced intra-annual variability of diatom flora along the modern Californian margin. Relative thickness variations in terrigenous and biogenic laminae (proxies for precipitation and productivity respectively) also exhibit similar characteristics to variability in Quaternary varves from the Santa Barbara Basin, shown to be imparted by ENSO forcing. In order to track changes in the levels of bottom water oxygenation within the basin, a bioturbation index was established. Periods when bioturbation was minimal (enhanced benthic anoxia) coincide with times of greatest diatomaceous export flux and also lowest flux of detrital material. Conversely, periods of enhanced bioturbation correspond with reduced diatomaceous export flux and an increased flux of detrital material, comparable with ENSO forced variations in diatomaceous and terrigenous export flux and associated benthic oxygenation levels in Pleistocene varves off the Californian margin. Power spectra obtained from time-series analysis of the bioturbation index and laminae thickness variations exhibit strong signals within the ENSO band. This research implies that high-frequency climate perturbations are inherent components of the climate system and that ENSO-type variability was not confined to the dynamic climate

  13. Morphological adaptations for digging and climate-impacted soil properties define pocket gopher (Thomomys spp. distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel E Marcy

    Full Text Available Species ranges are mediated by physiology, environmental factors, and competition with other organisms. The allopatric distribution of five species of northern Californian pocket gophers (Thomomys spp. is hypothesized to result from competitive exclusion. The five species in this environmentally heterogeneous region separate into two subgenera, Thomomys or Megascapheus, which have divergent digging styles. While all pocket gophers dig with their claws, the tooth-digging adaptations of subgenus Megascapheus allow access to harder soils and climate-protected depths. In a Northern Californian locality, replacement of subgenus Thomomys with subgenus Megascapheus occurred gradually during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. Concurrent climate change over this transition suggests that environmental factors--in addition to soil--define pocket gopher distributional limits. Here we show 1 that all pocket gophers occupy the subset of less energetically costly soils and 2 that subgenera sort by percent soil clay, bulk density, and shrink-swell capacity (a mineralogical attribute. While clay and bulk density (without major perturbations stay constant over decades to millennia, low precipitation and high temperatures can cause shrink-swell clays to crack and harden within days. The strong yet underappreciated interaction between soil and moisture on the distribution of vertebrates is rarely considered when projecting species responses to climatic change. Furthermore, increased precipitation alters the weathering processes that create shrink-swell minerals. Two projected outcomes of ongoing climate change--higher temperatures and precipitation--will dramatically impact hardness of soil with shrink-swell minerals. Current climate models do not include factors controlling soil hardness, despite its impact on all organisms that depend on a stable soil structure.

  14. The Orphan Gene dauerless Regulates Dauer Development and Intraspecific Competition in Nematodes by Copy Number Variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie G Mayer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many nematodes form dauer larvae when exposed to unfavorable conditions, representing an example of phenotypic plasticity and a major survival and dispersal strategy. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the regulation of dauer induction is a model for pheromone, insulin, and steroid-hormone signaling. Recent studies in Pristionchus pacificus revealed substantial natural variation in various aspects of dauer development, i.e. pheromone production and sensing and dauer longevity and fitness. One intriguing example is a strain from Ohio, having extremely long-lived dauers associated with very high fitness and often forming the most dauers in response to other strains' pheromones, including the reference strain from California. While such examples have been suggested to represent intraspecific competition among strains, the molecular mechanisms underlying these dauer-associated patterns are currently unknown. We generated recombinant-inbred-lines between the Californian and Ohioan strains and used quantitative-trait-loci analysis to investigate the molecular mechanism determining natural variation in dauer development. Surprisingly, we discovered that the orphan gene dauerless controls dauer formation by copy number variation. The Ohioan strain has one dauerless copy causing high dauer formation, whereas the Californian strain has two copies, resulting in strongly reduced dauer formation. Transgenic animals expressing multiple copies do not form dauers. dauerless is exclusively expressed in CAN neurons, and both CAN ablation and dauerless mutations increase dauer formation. Strikingly, dauerless underwent several duplications and acts in parallel or downstream of steroid-hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear-hormone-receptor daf-12. We identified the novel or fast-evolving gene dauerless as inhibitor of dauer development. Our findings reveal the importance of gene duplications and copy number variations for orphan gene function and suggest daf-12 as

  15. Modelling soil organic carbon stocks along topographic transects under climate change scenarios using CarboSOIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb Abd-Elmabod, Sameh; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Jordán, Antonio; Anaya-Romero, María; de la Rosa, Diego

    2014-05-01

    CarboSOIL is a land evaluation model for soil organic carbon (SOC) accounting under global change scenarios (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2013a; 2013b) and is a new component of the MicroLEIS Decision Support System. MicroLEIS is a tool for decision-makers dealing with specific agro-ecological problems as, for example, soil contamination risks (Abd-Elmabod et al., 2010; Abd-Elmabod et al., 2012)which has been designed as a knowledge-based approach incorporating a set of interlinked data bases. Global change and land use changes in recent decades have caused relevant impacts in vegetation carbon stocks (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2011) and soil organic carbon stocks, especially in sensible areas as the Mediterranean region (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2012a; 2012b). This study aims to investigate the influence of topography, climate, land use and soil factors on SOC stocks by the application of CarboSOIL in a representative area of the Mediterranean region (Seville, Spain). Two topographic transects (S-N and W-E oriented) were considered, including 63 points separated 4 km each. These points are associated to 41 soil profiles extracted from the SDBm soil data base (De la Rosa et al., 2001) and climatic information (average minimum temperature, average maximum temperature and average rainfall per month) extracted from raster data bases (Andalusian Environmental Information Network, REDIAM). CarboSOIL has been applied along topographic transects at different soil depths and under different climate change scenarios. Climate scenarios have been calculated according to the global climate model (CNRMCM3) by extracting spatial climate data under IPCC A1B scenario for the current period (average data from 1960-2000), 2040, 2070 and 2100. In the current scenario, results show that the highest SOC stock values located on Typic Haploxeralfs under olive groves for soil sections 0-25 cm and for 25-50 cm, but the highest values were determined on fruit-cropped Rendolic Xerothent in the 50-75cm

  16. Rapid Changes in Soil Carbon and Structural Properties Due to Stover Removal from No-Till Corn Plots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

    2006-06-01

    Harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover for producing ethanol may be beneficial to palliate the dependence on fossil fuels and reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, but stover harvesting may deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) and degrade soil structure. We investigated the impacts of variable rates of stover removal from no-till (NT) continuous corn systems on SOC and soil structural properties after 1 year of stover removal in three soils in Ohio: Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. This study also assessed relationships between SOC and soil structural properties as affected by stover management. Six stover treatments that consisted of removing 100, 75, 50, 25, and 0, and adding 100% of corn stover corresponding to 0 (T0), 1.25 (T1.25), 2.50 (T2.5), 3.75 (T3.75), 5.00 (T5), and 10.00 (T10) Mg haj1 of stover, respectively, were studied for their total SOC concentration, bulk density (>b), aggregate stability, and tensile strength (TS) of aggregates. Effects of stover removal on soil properties were rapid and significant in the 0- to 5-cm depth, although the magnitude of changes differed among soils after only 1 year of stover removal. The SOC concentration declined with increase in removal rates in silt loams but not in clay loam soils. It decreased by 39% at Coshocton and 30% at Charleston within 1 year of complete stover removal. At the same sites, macroaggregates contained 10% to 45% more SOC than microaggregates. Stover removal reduced 94.75-mm macroaggregates and increased microaggregates (P G 0.01). Mean weight diameter (MWD) and TS of aggregates in soils without stover (T0) were 1.7 and 3.3 times lower than those in soils with normal stover treatments (T5) across sites. The SOC concentration was negatively correlated with >b and positively with MWD and

  17. Changes in long-term no-till corn growth and yield under different rates of stover mulch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Canqui, Dr. Humberto [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Lal, Dr. Rattan [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Owens, Lloyd [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service

    2006-09-01

    Received for publication January 4, 2006. Removal of corn (Zea mays L.) stover for biofuel production may affect crop yields by altering soil properties. A partial stover removal may be feasible, but information on appropriate rates of removal is unavailable. We assessed the short-term impacts of stover management on long-term no-till (NT) continuous corn grown on a Rayne silt loam (fine loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston in Ohio, and predicted corn yield from soil properties using principal component analysis (PCA). The study was conducted in 2005 on the ongoing experiments started in May 2004 under 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200)% of stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal promoted early emergence and rapid seedling growth (P < 0.01). Early-emerging plants grew taller than late-emerging plants up to about 50 d, and then the heights reversed at Coshocton and were comparable at other two sites. Stover management affected corn yield only at the Coshocton site where average grain and stover yields in the T200, T100, T75, and T50 (10.8 and 10.3 Mg ha-1) were higher than those in the T0 and T25 treatments (8.5 and 6.5 Mg ha-1) (P < 0.01), showing that stover removal at rates as low as 50% (2.5 Mg ha-1) decreased crop yields. Soil properties explained 71% of the variability in grain yield and 33% of the variability in stover yield for the Coshocton site. Seventeen months after the start of the experiment, effects of stover management on corn yield and soil properties were site-specific.

  18. Estabilidad, morfología y rugosidad de agregados de argiudoles típicos sometidos a distintos usos: su rol como indicadores de calidad física en suelos de la provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina Stability, morphology and roughness of aggregates of typical argiudolls under diferent types of land uses: their role as indicators of soils physical quality in Buenos Aires province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fernanda Alvarez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos diez años se observó un importante cambio en el uso de la tierra en la llanura pampeana, lo cual ha llevado a una marcada degradación de los suelos. El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar la estabilidad, la morfología y la rugosidad de distintos tamaños de agregados como indicadores de calidad en Argiudoles Típicos del sudeste bonaerense sometidos a distintos usos de suelo y a distintas intensidades de manejo. Se trabajó con el epipedón mólico de parcelas con distinto uso de suelo: cultivadas, forestadas y naturales. Los resultados mostraron mayor estabilidad en los suelos no laboreados y en los forestados de más de treinta años. En los sitios cultivados y forestados se observaron agregados alargados, cuadrangulares y esféricos, mientras que en los sitios sin laboreo no se presentaron las formas esféricas. La rugosidad de los agregados fue mayor en los suelos sin laboreo, si bien ello varió con el tamaño de los agregados. La estabilidad, morfología y rugosidad de agregados demostraron ser buenos indicadores de calidad de suelos del SE bonaerense.During the last ten years, an important land use change took place in the Pampas region of Argentina. This change led to a significant soil degradation. This work aims to evaluate the stability, morphology and roughness of soil aggregates in soils under different land uses. The values found for each land use could serve as soil quality indicators in southeastern Buenos Aires. Samples were taken from mollic epipedons under cultivated, forest and natural soils. Results showed higher aggregate stability in virgin and forest soils than in cultivated soils. Aggregates were elongated, quadrangular and spherical in cultivated and forest soils. Aggregates from non-cultivated soils did not show the expected spherical forms; they also presented a high roughness although it varied across the different aggregate sizes. Soil aggregate stability, morphology and roughness were suitable

  19. California customer load reductions during the electricity crisis: Did they help to keep the lights on?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Eto, Joseph H.; Barbose, Galen L.

    2002-05-01

    Recurring electricity shortages and rolling blackouts were widely forecasted for summer 2001 in California. Despite these predictions, blackouts were never ordered - in large part, due to the dramatic reductions in electricity use throughout the state. Compared to summer 2000, Californians reduced electricity usage by 6 percent and average monthly peak demand by 8 percent. Our analysis suggests that these reductions were not caused by either the weather or the downturn in the state's economy; rather, they were the result of extraordinary efforts by Californians to reduce electricity consumption. Based on the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO) available operating reserve margin during summer 2001, we estimate that the peak load reductions, which ranged between 3,200 and 5,600 MW in the four summer months, potentially avoided between 50 and 160 hours of rolling blackouts. This extraordinary response by Californians can be attributed to several factors including media coverage and informational campaigns that affected public awareness and understanding, real and/or perceived increases in electricity rates, and various policies and programs deployed by state policymakers and regulators to facilitate customer load reductions. Among these programs, we review the state's 20/20 rebate program, the utilities' energy efficiency programs, programs or initiatives implemented by the California Energy Commission and other state agencies, and load management and demand response programs offered by the state's investor-owned electric utilities and the CAISO. We estimate that energy efficiency and onsite generation projects that were initiated in 2001 will account for about 1,100 MW of customer load reductions, once all projects are installed. These savings represent about 25-30 percent of the observed load reductions and are likely to persist for many years. The persistence of the remaining savings, which were due to changes that customers

  20. Effect of cover crops management in aggregate stability of a vineyard in Central Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Colmenero, Marta; Bienes, Ramon; Marques, Maria-Jose

    2010-05-01

    Our research focuses in cover crop treatments used to avoid soil degradation in hillsides. The soil-plant interaction can influence the soil structure. In this study we pay special attention to the soil aggregates in a hillside vineyard (average slope of 14%), under Mediterranean semiarid climatic conditions (average annual temperature 14°C, annual rainfall around 400 mm), in the South East of Madrid located at an altitude of 800 masl. The soil classification according to USDA (2006) is Calcic Haploxeralf. Its particle size yields 58% sand, 18% silt and 24% clay, so that according to USDA classification it is a sandy clay loam soil. The bulk density of the first 10 cm of topsoil is 1.2 g cm-3 and its real density is 2.4 g cm-3. It has low organic matter content: 1.3 ± 0.1% (Walkley and Black, 1934). Three treatments were tested: i) traditional tillage ii) soil covered by Brachypodium distachyon allowing self-sowing, and iii) soil covered by Secale cereale, mown in early spring. In each treatment the aggregate stability was measured. These cover crops were established in a 2m wide strip at the center of the rows. We have collected samples of soil for each treatment along 2 years and we analyzed the aggregates, trying to find changes in their stability. Aggregates of 4 to 4.75 mm diameter were selected by dry sieving. The stability was measured with Drop-test: CND and TDI (Imeson and Vis, 1984). An improvement in the stability of aggregates was observed after two years of cover crop treatment. There are significant differences among the treatments analyzed with Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, being Brachypodium distachyon the treatment with more stable aggregates, it is necessary a mean higher than 8 drops to disintegrate every aggregate completely. Organic carbon was also measured by Loss on Ignition method (Schulte and Hopkins, 1996). This method can lead to an overestimation of the organic matter in soil samples but is considered suitable for aggregates. Again, those

  1. Planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy and assemblages in the Bering Sea during the Pliocene and Pleistocene: IODP sites U1340 and U1343

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husum, Katrine

    2016-03-01

    IODP Site U1340 and Site U1343 in the Bering Sea have been investigated with regard to planktonic foraminifers and fragmentation. The base of Site U1340 dates back to the Early Pliocene and the base of Site U1343 to the Early Pleistocene. Site U1340 is situated at Bowers Ridge, the southern Bering Sea. Site U1343 is situated near the gateway to the Arctic Ocean in the northern Bering Sea. At both sites there are none or very few planktonic foraminifers during the Pliocene and early Pleistocene. After 1.3-1.4 Ma the planktonic foraminifers are continuously present for most of the samples examined. Three stratigraphic events have been identified in this study. The first occurrence (FO) of Neogloboquadrina inglei is observed at 1.4-1.5 Ma, although this event may be affected by poor preservation of foraminifers in older sediments. The observed age of the change in the coiling ratio of Neogloboquadrina pachyderma from right to left at 1.2 Ma agrees with the dating of the same event at the Californian margin. The age of the last occurrence (LO) of N. inglei also seems to match the same event from the Californian margin at 0.7 Ma. This implies that these events are robust regional events for the entire northern Pacific. Multivariate analyses of the quantitative planktonic foraminifer data show three main faunal assemblages. The oldest assemblage from 1.3-1.4 Ma to 1.2 Ma is dominated by N pachyderma s.l. (dex) together with Globigerina bulloides. Other species in this fauna are N. inglei, N. pachyderma s.l. (sin), Globigerina umbilicata and Turborotalita quinqueloba. After 1.2 Ma the faunal assemblage is dominated by N. pachyderma s.l. (sin), but the remaining species are the same as before. At 0.7 Ma N. inglei disappears, whilst the remaining fauna assemblage stays the same, with N. pachyderma s.l. (sin) still dominating, reflecting subpolar-polar conditions. Prior to 1.4-1.3 Ma there are very few or no planktonic foraminifers. Low shell fragmentation and lower TOC

  2. Molecular Diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi Detected in the Vector Triatoma protracta from California, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Shender

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, is a vector-borne zoonotic protozoan parasite that can cause fatal cardiac disease. While recognized as the most economically important parasitic infection in Latin America, the incidence of Chagas disease in the United States of America (US may be underreported and even increasing. The extensive genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Latin America is well-documented and likely influences disease progression, severity and treatment efficacy; however, little is known regarding T. cruzi strains endemic to the US. It is therefore important to expand our knowledge on US T. cruzi strains, to improve upon the recognition of and response to locally acquired infections.We conducted a study of T. cruzi molecular diversity in California, augmenting sparse genetic data from southern California and for the first time investigating genetic sequences from northern California. The vector Triatoma protracta was collected from southern (Escondido and Los Angeles and northern (Vallecito California regions. Samples were initially screened via sensitive nuclear repetitive DNA and kinetoplast minicircle DNA PCR assays, yielding an overall prevalence of approximately 28% and 55% for southern and northern California regions, respectively. Positive samples were further processed to identify discrete typing units (DTUs, revealing both TcI and TcIV lineages in southern California, but only TcI in northern California. Phylogenetic analyses (targeting COII-ND1, TR and RB19 genes were performed on a subset of positive samples to compare Californian T. cruzi samples to strains from other US regions and Latin America. Results indicated that within the TcI DTU, California sequences were similar to those from the southeastern US, as well as to several isolates from Latin America responsible for causing Chagas disease in humans.Triatoma protracta populations in California are frequently infected with T. cruzi

  3. Active landsliding and landscape denudation in response to transient tectonic uplift, Northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, G. L.; Roering, J. J.; Miller, S. R.; Kirby, E.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Californian Coast ranges present a unique area to study landscape response to transient tectonic uplift. Studies have shown that an increase in uplift may be balanced by the rate of landsliding in settings of steady uplift. However, the landsliding response to transient tectonic uplift remains to be elucidated. The Californian Coast ranges are shaped by the northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ), which geodynamic modeling suggests produces a transient double-humped uplift field. A major research question is whether we can detect a signature of this transient tectonic uplift in landslide activity and document how the channel network communicates this signal to hillslopes. Using air photos and Worldview imagery, we manually mapped more than 2000 earthflows and debris slides in the Eel and surrounding catchments that span the ~400 km-long region. The velocities of active earthflows were estimated by visually tracking features between images spanning 1993 to 2013. We mapped channel steepness from 10m NED DEMs in Topotoolbox 2 and developed a new tool to automatically define knickpoints along the channel network. Earthflows occur almost exclusively in a band of Franciscan mélange oriented along the MTJ transect whilst debris slides are more evenly distributed by lithology. Both earthflows and debris slides are clustered in the Eel catchment around the proposed uplift peaks and are largely absent outside of these zones. Within these areas of high landslide densities, we observe peaks in active earthflows adjacent to peaks in dormant earthflows to the south, suggesting that the signature of earthflow activity remains for a period of time once the uplift peak has passed. Landslide density, mean landslide area, and earthflow velocity all increase rapidly above threshold values of channel steepness and local relief. In the Eel catchment, where the zone of rapid uplift is commencing, landslides, particularly earth flows, are concentrated

  4. Soil Hydraulic Properties Influenced by Corn Stover Removal from No-Till Corn in Ohio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Canqui, H.; Lal, Rattan; Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Shipitalo, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Corn (Zea mays L.) stover removal for biofuel production and other uses may alter soil hydraulic properties, but site-specific information needed to determine the threshold levels of removal for the U.S. Corn Belt region is limited. We quantified impacts of systematic removal of corn stover on soil hydraulic parameters after one year of stover management under no-till (NT) systems in three soils in Ohio including Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Hapludult) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. Interrelationships among soil properties and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) predictions were also studied. Earthworm middens, Ksat, bulk density (ρb), soil-water retention (SWR), pore-size distribution, and air permeability (ka) were determined for six stover treatments including 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200) % of corn stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal reduced the number of middens, Ksat, SWR, and ka at all sites (P<0.01). Complete stover removal reduced earthworm middens by 20-fold across sites, decreased geometric mean Ksat from 6.3 to 0.1 mm h-1 at Coshocton, 3.2 to 0.3 mm h-1 at Hoytville, and 5.8 to 0.6 mm h-1 at Charleston, and increased ρb in the 0- to 10-cm depth by about 15% relative to double stover plots. The SWR for T100 was 1.3 times higher than that for T0 at 0 to -6 kPa. The log ka for T200, T100, and T75 significantly exceeded that under T50, T25, and T0 at Coshocton and Charleston. Measured parameters were strongly correlated, and ka was a potential Ksat predictor. Stover harvesting at rates above 1.25 Mg ha-1 affects soil hydraulic properties and earthworm activity, but further monitoring is needed to ascertain the threshold levels of stover removal.Corn (Zea mays L.) stover removal for

  5. Quantificação e utilização das frações húmicas como característica diferencial em horizontes diagnósticos de solos Brasileiros Humic fractions quantification as a differential characteristic and use in diagnostic horizons in Brazilian soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Fontana

    2010-08-01

    soil horizons and propose the use in the brazilian system of soil classification. A total of 169 diagnostic horizons distributed between Folistic Epipedon (O hístico, Histic Epipedon (H hístico, Mollic Epipedon (A chernozêmico, Umbric Epipedon (A húmico and Spodic Horizon (B espódico were used for this study. These horizons were evaluated for chemical and physical composition. The organic carbon tenors in the fractions: fulvic acids (C-FAF, humic acids (C-HAF and humin (C-HUM were quantified. C-HAF/C-FAF, C-AE/C-HUM and C-AE/COT (C-AE = C-FAF+C-HAF ratio and the percentage of each fraction in the total organic carbon (TOC, %FAF, %HAF, %HUM, %AE (Alkaline Extract were calculated. The Folistic and Histic Epipedon presented predominance of C-HUM, folowed by C-HAF, the Mollic Epipedon presented absolutily dominance of C-HUM, the Umbric Epipedon presented predominance of C-HUM, followed by C-HAF and on Spodic Horizon were observed more expressive of C-HAF or C-FAF. The information of the distribution of humic fractions suggests the use of the following differential characteristics for the families and series levels of SiBCS: stable organic matter (surface mineral horizons: C-AE/C-HUM ( 2.0 and the potential for leaching (system or soil: C-HAF/C-FAF and C AE/C HUM (> 1.0.

  6. Does tobacco industry marketing of 'light' cigarettes give smokers a rationale for postponing quitting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpin, Elizabeth A; Emery, Sherry; White, Martha M; Pierce, John P

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to examine further whether tobacco industry marketing using the labels light and ultra-light is perceived by smokers as a health claim. Smokers might view low tar/nicotine brands of cigarettes as a means to reduce the harm to their health from smoking and postpone quitting. Data were from smokers responding to a large, population-based survey of Californians' smoking behavior, conducted in 1996 (8,582 current smokers). Sixty percent of smokers thought the labels light and ultra-light referred to low tar/nicotine cigarettes, or otherwise implied a health claim. This percentage was higher for smokers of low tar/nicotine brands. Among smokers of regular brands, the more highly addicted, those who were trying unsuccessfully to quit, those who had cut consumption or thought about it, and those with health concerns were more likely to have considered switching. While some of these characteristics also were associated with smokers of low tar/nicotine brands, the associations were not as numerous or as strong. We conclude that some smokers appear to view low tar/nicotine brands as one short-term strategy to reduce the harm to their health from smoking without quitting. By implying reduced tar or nicotine exposure, tobacco industry marketing using the labels light and ultra-light is misleading smokers. The use of such labels should be regulated.

  7. Autopista Tarragona – Valencia - España

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Sánchez, R.

    1974-07-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes the construction of the stretch Puzol-Castellón of the Mediterranean Highway in which for the second time the Californian techniques of rigid pavements have been used in a Spanish highway: bases of gravel-cement and slabs of mass concrete, with oblique, sawn, unsealed joints. This system is especially appropriate for the use of sliding shutterings which means greater savings and faster execution of the roadbed.En el presente artículo se describe la construcción del tramo Puzol-Castellón de la Autopista del Mediterráneo, en el que por segunda vez se han utilizado en una autopista española las técnicas californianas de pavimentos rígidos: bases de grava-cemento y losas de hormigón en masa, con juntas oblicuas serradas y sin sellar. Este sistema está especialmente adecuado para la utilización de equipos de encofrados deslizantes, lo que se traduce en una mayor economía y rapidez en la ejecución del firme.

  8. The contributions of Donald Lee Johnson to understanding the Quaternary geologic and biogeographic history of the California Channel Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Over a span of 50 years, native Californian Donald Lee Johnson made a number of memorable contributions to our understanding of the California Channel Islands. Among these are (1) recognizing that carbonate dunes, often cemented into eolianite and derived from offshore shelf sediments during lowered sea level, are markers of glacial periods on the Channel Islands; (2) identifying beach rock on the Channel Islands as the northernmost occurrence of this feature on the Pacific Coast of North America; (3) recognizing of the role of human activities in historic landscape modification; (4) identifying both the biogenic and pedogenic origins of caliche “ghost forests” and laminar calcrete forms on the Channel Islands; (5) providing the first soil maps of several of the islands, showing diverse pathways of pedogenesis; (6) pointing out the importance of fire in Quaternary landscape history on the Channel Islands, based on detailed stratigraphic studies; and (7), perhaps his greatest contribution, clarifying the origin of Pleistocene pygmy mammoths on the Channel Islands, due not to imagined ancient land bridges, but rather the superb swimming abilities of proboscideans combined with lowered sea level, favorable paleowinds, and an attractive paleovegetation on the Channel Islands. Don was a classic natural historian in the great tradition of Charles Darwin and George Gaylord Simpson, his role models. Don’s work will remain important and useful for many years and is an inspiration to those researching the California Channel Islands today.

  9. Identification of external influences on temperatures in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfils, C; Duffy, P; Santer, B; Wigley, T; Lobell, D; Phillips, T; Doutriaux, C

    2006-06-01

    We use eight different observational datasets to estimate California-average temperature trends over 1950-1999. Observed results are compared to trends from a suite of control simulations of natural internal climate variability. Observed increases in annual-mean surface temperature are distinguishable from climate noise in some but not all observational datasets. The most robust results are large positive trends in mean and maximum daily temperatures in late winter/early spring, as well as increases in minimum daily temperatures from January to September. These trends are inconsistent with model-based estimates of natural internal climate variability, and thus require one or more external forcing agents to be explained. Our results suggest that the warming of Californian winters over the second half of the twentieth century is associated with human-induced changes in large-scale atmospheric circulation. We also hypothesize that the lack of a detectable increase in summertime maximum temperature arises from a cooling associated with large-scale irrigation. This cooling may have, until now, counteracted the warming induced by increasing greenhouse gases and urbanization effects.

  10. A crab swarm at an ecological hotspot: patchiness and population density from AUV observations at a coastal, tropical seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Walter; Starczak, Victoria; Govindarajan, Annette F.; Guzman, Héctor M.; Girdhar, Yogesh; Holleman, Rusty C.; Churchill, James; Singh, Hanumant; Ralston, David K.

    2016-01-01

    A research cruise to Hannibal Bank, a seamount and an ecological hotspot in the coastal eastern tropical Pacific Ocean off Panama, explored the zonation, biodiversity, and the ecological processes that contribute to the seamount’s elevated biomass. Here we describe the spatial structure of a benthic anomuran red crab population, using submarine video and autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) photographs. High density aggregations and a swarm of red crabs were associated with a dense turbid layer 4–10 m above the bottom. The high density aggregations were constrained to 355–385 m water depth over the Northwest flank of the seamount, although the crabs also occurred at lower densities in shallower waters (∼280 m) and in another location of the seamount. The crab aggregations occurred in hypoxic water, with oxygen levels of 0.04 ml/l. Barcoding of Hannibal red crabs, and pelagic red crabs sampled in a mass stranding event in 2015 at a beach in San Diego, California, USA, revealed that the Panamanian and the Californian crabs are likely the same species, Pleuroncodes planipes, and these findings represent an extension of the southern endrange of this species. Measurements along a 1.6 km transect revealed three high density aggregations, with the highest density up to 78 crabs/m2, and that the crabs were patchily distributed. Crab density peaked in the middle of the patch, a density structure similar to that of swarming insects. PMID:27114859

  11. Earthquake potential revealed by tidal influence on earthquake size-frequency statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Satoshi; Yabe, Suguru; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    The possibility that tidal stress can trigger earthquakes is long debated. In particular, a clear causal relationship between small earthquakes and the phase of tidal stress is elusive. However, tectonic tremors deep within subduction zones are highly sensitive to tidal stress levels, with tremor rate increasing at an exponential rate with rising tidal stress. Thus, slow deformation and the possibility of earthquakes at subduction plate boundaries may be enhanced during periods of large tidal stress. Here we calculate the tidal stress history, and specifically the amplitude of tidal stress, on a fault plane in the two weeks before large earthquakes globally, based on data from the global, Japanese, and Californian earthquake catalogues. We find that very large earthquakes, including the 2004 Sumatran, 2010 Maule earthquake in Chile and the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake in Japan, tend to occur near the time of maximum tidal stress amplitude. This tendency is not obvious for small earthquakes. However, we also find that the fraction of large earthquakes increases (the b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter relation decreases) as the amplitude of tidal shear stress increases. The relationship is also reasonable, considering the well-known relationship between stress and the b-value. This suggests that the probability of a tiny rock failure expanding to a gigantic rupture increases with increasing tidal stress levels. We conclude that large earthquakes are more probable during periods of high tidal stress.

  12. Land of a Couple of Dances: Global and Local Influences on Freestyle Play in Dance Dance Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces successful and unsuccessful attempts to shape the meanings of the video game Dance Dance Revolution, specifically with reference to what "dancing" means in this context, as the game moves between various interested parties - game developers, players, Internet forum participants, and other media producers. Drawing on Actor-Network Theory and the network analyses of Manuel Castells, the paper reconstructs the forces shaping players' stylistic decisions through an analysis of dance game machines and software, and of a single forum thread on DDRFreak.com, a major website in the dance game community. The paper asks who decides how DDR players dance and at what times? Are the decisions about play made in the development meeting, the arcade, competitions, online or around the home console? Globally, how do some regions or groups emerge as experts or leaders in play style? Analysis indicates that within the United States, Californian players from major cities dominate discussion, supported by the global flows of people, resources, and capital through the state. The dominant players support their stated norms for play through recourse to mainstream conceptions of masculinity, rap music and associated styles of dance.

  13. Insurance Coverage, Access to Care, and Medical Debt Since the ACA: a Look at California, Florida, New York, and Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunja, Munira Z; Collins, Sara R; Doty, Michelle McEvoy; Beutel, Sophie

    2017-03-01

    ISSUE: The Affordable Care Act has significantly increased health insurance coverage and access to care among U.S. adults nationwide. However, the law gives states flexibility in implementing certain provisions, leading to wide variations between states in consumers’ experiences. GOAL: To examine the differences in insurance coverage, access to care, and medical bill problems in the four largest states—California, Florida, New York, and Texas—all of which have made different choices in implementing the law. METHODS: Analysis of the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, 2016. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: In 2016, uninsured rates among adults ages 19 to 64 across the four states varied from 7 percent in New York and 10 percent in California to 16 percent in Florida and 25 percent in Texas. This variation was also apparent in the proportions of residents reporting problems getting needed care because of the cost—significantly lower in California and New York than in Florida and Texas. Lower percentages of Californians and New Yorkers reported having a medical bill problem in the past 12 months or having accrued medical debt compared to Floridians and Texans. These variations might be explained by several factors: whether the state expanded Medicaid eligibility; whether it ran its own health insurance marketplace; what the uninsured rate was prior to the Affordable Care Act; differences in the cost protections provided by private health plans; and demographic differences.

  14. Survivorship and Inheritance Rights for Same-Gender Couples: Relevance to Social Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Cordero

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Californians voted in November 2008 to ban the right to same-gender marriage in California. This paper summarizes data on changes in societal attitudes relative to homosexuals, same-gender couples, and their civil rights as reflected in Gallup and Princeton Survey Research Associates International poll data over the years through 2011. These findings report deeply entrenched and enduring divisions in American attitudes toward the rights and status of same-gender couples. Although historically a majority of Americans has consistently opposed same-gender marriage, Americans increasingly recognize the need to extend equality to same-gender couples in the form of employment rights, inheritance rights, Social Security, and health insurance benefits. This article explores existing and proposed policies regarding the rights of same-gender couples. In addition, it examines the implications and opportunities for advocacy by social workers who face the challenge of navigating the legal and personal obstacles that arise when their client’s same-gender relationships are not sanctioned by law.

  15. EVALUATION OF VERMICOMPOSTED CATTLE MANURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenko Lončarić

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Vermicompost (lumbripost, biohumus is organic fertilizer or potting medium produced by microbial decomposition of cattle manure using Californian earthworm (Eisenia foetida. Analysing physical, chemical and biological properties confirmed that the vermicompost was stable with significant level of plant nutrients and the concentration of analysed heavy metals below threshold values. The results of vermicompost analyses were 17.85% ash, neutral pH reaction, EC 1.07 dS m-1, 24.6% total C, 2.32% total N and C:N ratio 10.6 indicating vermicompost maturity. Analyses showed significant concentrations (in g kg-1 of total P (11.25, K (6.13, Ca (10 and Mg (8.55 and microelements (in mg kg-1 Fe (9464, Mn (354, Zn (272 and Cu (46. Also, the total concentration of Zn, Cu, Pb (16 mg kg-1 and Cr (42 mg kg-1 was below permitted threshold values indicating that the use of vermicompost as fertilizer or as potting medium would be unrestricted. Biological tests show that (i the vermicompost was stable because measured respiration rate was 1.2 mg CO2-C g-1 compost-C day-1, and (ii the vermicompost did not show any phytotoxic effects because the 14-day growth of lettuce in containers resulted in higher aboveground fresh matter production using vermicompost as a potting medium compared with commercial medium, although the differences were not.

  16. The Effects of Agave fourcroydes Powder as a Dietary Supplement on Growth Performance, Gut Morphology, Concentration of IgG, and Hematology Parameters in Broiler Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, Maidelys; Martínez, Yordan; Jiang, Hongmei; Valdivié Navarro, Manuel; Wu, Xiaosong; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Rosales, Manuel; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of Agave fourcroydes powder as a dietary supplement on the growth performance, gut morphology, serum concentration of IgG, and the hematology parameters of broiler rabbits. A total of 32 rabbits [New Zealand × Californian] were weaned at 35 days. They were randomly selected for two dietary treatments (eight repetitions per treatment), which consisted of a basal diet and a basal diet supplemented with 1.5% dried-stem powder of A. fourcroydes. On day 60 from the initiation of treatment, gut histomorphology (duodenum and cecum), serum concentration of IgG, and hematology parameters were all measured. The results showed that A. fourcroydes powder supplementation improved (P < 0.05) the ADFI, ADG, and final BW. Correspondingly, this treatment increased (P < 0.05) the muscle and mucosa thickness and height and width of villi. However, duodenum crypts depth was lower (P < 0.05) when rabbits were fed with this natural product, compared with the basal diet treatment. Results also indicated that the A. fourcroydes powder increased (P < 0.05) the serum concentration of IgG but did not change the hematology parameters. This data indicates that A. fourcroydes powder, as a supplement, had beneficial effects on increasing the growth performance and serum concentration of IgG, as well as improving the gut morphology without affecting the hematology parameters in broiler rabbits. PMID:27777945

  17. Estimating the early household market for light-duty hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles and other "Mobile Energy" innovations in California: A constraints analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett D.; Kurani, Kenneth S.

    Facing stiff competition from conventional and gasoline-hybrid vehicles, the commercialization prospects for hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles (H 2FCVs) are uncertain. Starting from the premise that new consumer value must drive their adoption, early markets for H 2FCVs are explored in the context of a group of promising opportunities collectively called mobile energy (ME) innovation. An estimate of the initial market potential for ME-enabled vehicles is produced by applying various constraints that eliminate unlikely households from consideration for early adoption of H 2FCVs and other ME technologies (such as plug-in hybrids). Currently 5.2 million of 33.9 million Californians live in households pre-adapted to ME-enabled vehicles, 3.9 million if natural gas is required for home refueling. Several differences in demographic and other characteristics between the target market and the population as a whole are highlighted, and two issues related to the design of H 2FCVs and their supporting infrastructure are discussed: vehicle range and home hydrogen refueling. These findings argue for continued investigation of this and similar target segments-which represent more efficient research populations for subsequent study by product designers and other decision-makers wishing to understand the early market dynamics facing H 2FCVs and related ME innovations.

  18. Queer Bedfellows of Proposition 8: Adopting Social Conservative and Neoliberal Political Rationalities in California’s Same-Sex Marriage Fight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa DeGagne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available On November 4, 2008 California voters passed Proposition 8, and accordingly same-sex marriage was banned under the state constitution. Proposition 8 is now being considered by the Supreme Court. The proposition has sparked national debate about the nature of the relationship between the state and citizens’ sexuality and corresponding rights; calling into question the practice of allocating rights and privileges on the basis of sexuality and family form. Proponents of the proposition, who can be classified as predominantly socially conservative, want to maintain the status and privileges of marriage for heterosexuals; arguing that allowing same-sex marriage threatens the legitimacy, sanctity and strength of traditional heterosexual marriage. This article examines the extent to which three Californian pro-same-sex marriage organizations (Equality California, Join the Impact, and the Courage Campaign have challenged and/or appropriated social conservative and neoliberal discourses in their effort to gain access to the rights and privileges that are currently administered through marriage.

  19. Grouping and comparison of Indian citrus tristeza virus isolates based on coat protein gene sequences and restriction analysis patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A; Ramachandran, P; Brlansky, R H

    2003-04-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is an aphid-transmitted closterovirus, which causes one of the most important citrus diseases worldwide. Isolates of CTV differ widely in their biological properties. CTV-infected samples were collected from four locations in India: Bangalore (CTV-B), Delhi (CTV-D), Nagpur (CTV-N), and Pune (CTV-P), and were maintained by grafting into Kagzi lime ( Citrus aurantifolia (Christm. Swing.). All isolates produced typical vein clearing and flecking symptoms 6-8 weeks after grafting. In addition, CTV-B and CTV-P isolates produced stem-pitting symptoms after 8-10 months. The CTV coat protein gene (CPG) was amplified by RT-PCR using CPG specific primers, yielding an amplicon of 672 bp for all the isolates. Sequence analysis of the CPG amplicon of all the four Indian isolates showed 93-94% nucleotide sequence homology to the Californian CTV severe stem pitting isolate SY568 and 92-93% homology to the Japanese seedling yellows isolate NUagA and Israeli VT p346 isolates. In phylogenetic tree analysis, Indian CTV isolates appeared far different from other isolates as they formed a separate branch. Comparison among the Indian isolates was carried out by restriction analysis and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Specific primers to various genome segments of well-characterized CTV isolates were used to further classify the Indian CTV isolates.

  20. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE AND YIELD OF PEPPER PLANTS (CAPSICUM ANNUM L. TO ORGANIC FERTILIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata BEROVA

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The experience was brought out to the experimental fi eld of the Agroecological Centre at the Agricultural University of Plovdiv which owns a Certifi cate of ecological farm work. The research was carried out on two pepper cultivars: Gorogled 6 and Buketen 50 – intended for production of red pepper for grinding. For the purpose of the experiment a bio-fertilizer, produced by the Californian earthworm Lumbricus rubellus was used. Two levels of the bio-fertilizer were applied - 50 and 100 ml/per plant. It was determined that the bio-fertilizer speeds up plant growth. It infl uences the growth rate of the roots and stems and affects the formation of the foliage. The bio-fertilizer has a positive effect upon the functional activity of the photosynthetic apparatus /increased content of photosynthetic pigments, improved leaf gas exchange/. The biofertilizer also infl uences the yield (raw material for drying. The highest effect has been achieved at application of 100 ml fertilizer to the Gorogled 6 cultivar.

  1. THE NEED FOR DIVERSIFICATION IN FISH FARMING PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krešimir Pažur

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the characteristics of developed economies in the world is a very rich and diversified offer of goods. There are many products of different assortment, of different quality and price on the market. In keeping with the marketing conception, the production is trying to satisfy all potential consumers. Croatian freshwater fish farming has not yet reached this stage. The assortment is very limited and includes mostly carp (up to 80%, Californian trout (up to 10%, grass carp (around 4%, wels, pike-perch and pike together up to 2.70%, while the rest are commercially insignificant and uninteresting fish species. In the last few years, an increasingly important type of consumers has emerged on the market sporting anglers whose importance is growing and bringing totally new, specific demands that the fish ponds at the moment cannot meet, except maybe in marginal quantities. There is a categorical imperative of a fast adjustment of the production assortment of our fishing farms to the tendencies in the nourishment of the population in developed countries that can also be observed in our country and to the demands and needs of sporting anglers.

  2. Multiscale connectivity and graph theory highlight critical areas for conservation under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilt, Thomas E; Weisberg, Peter J; Leitner, Philip; Matocq, Marjorie D; Inman, Richard D; Nussear, Kenneth E; Esque, Todd C

    2016-06-01

    Conservation planning and biodiversity management require information on landscape connectivity across a range of spatial scales from individual home ranges to large regions. Reduction in landscape connectivity due changes in land use or development is expected to act synergistically with alterations to habitat mosaic configuration arising from climate change. We illustrate a multiscale connectivity framework to aid habitat conservation prioritization in the context of changing land use and climate. Our approach, which builds upon the strengths of multiple landscape connectivity methods, including graph theory, circuit theory, and least-cost path analysis, is here applied to the conservation planning requirements of the Mohave ground squirrel. The distribution of this threatened Californian species, as for numerous other desert species, overlaps with the proposed placement of several utility-scale renewable energy developments in the American southwest. Our approach uses information derived at three spatial scales to forecast potential changes in habitat connectivity under various scenarios of energy development and climate change. By disentangling the potential effects of habitat loss and fragmentation across multiple scales, we identify priority conservation areas for both core habitat and critical corridor or stepping stone habitats. This approach is a first step toward applying graph theory to analyze habitat connectivity for species with continuously distributed habitat and should be applicable across a broad range of taxa.

  3. Discovery of a glowing millipede in California and the gradual evolution of bioluminescence in Diplopoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Paul E; Moore, Wendy

    2015-05-19

    The rediscovery of the Californian millipede Xystocheir bistipita surprisingly reveals that the species is bioluminescent. Using molecular phylogenetics, we show that X. bistipita is the evolutionary sister group of Motyxia, the only genus of New World bioluminescent millipedes. We demonstrate that bioluminescence originated in the group's most recent common ancestor and evolved by gradual, directional change through diversification. Because bioluminescence in Motyxia has been experimentally demonstrated to be aposematic, forewarning of the animal's cyanide-based toxins, these results are contrary to aposematic theory and empirical evidence that a warning pattern cannot evolve gradually in unpalatable prey. However, gradual evolution of a warning pattern is plausible if faint light emission served another function and was co-opted as an aposematic signal later in the diversification of the genus. Luminescence in Motyxia stem-group taxa may have initially evolved to cope with reactive oxygen stress triggered by a hot, dry environment and was repurposed for aposematism by high-elevation crown-group taxa colonizing new habitats with varying levels of predation. The discovery of bioluminescence in X. bistipita and its pivotal phylogenetic location provides insight into the independent and repeated evolution of bioluminescence across the tree of life.

  4. The Rakiura Titi Islands Restoration Project: community action to eradicate Rattus rattus and Rattus exulans for ecological restoration and cultural wellbeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, P.J; Coote,; Trow,; Hutchins,; Nevins, HannahRose M.; Adams, Josh; Newman, J.; Moller, H.; Veitch, C.R.; Clout, Mike N.; Towns, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    In 2003, a non-profit group, Ka Mate Nga Kiore, was set up to oversee the restoration of four Maori-owned islands off the south coast of Stewart Island, New Zealand. The first step in the restoration was to eradicate ship rats (Rattus rattus) from three islands and Pacific rats (R. exulans) from another. The eradication was funded by the Command Oil Spill Trustee Council which managed the mitigation money from an oil spill off the Californian coast in 1998. The funding was coordinated via Oikonos Ecosystem Knowledge, a non-profit USA group primarily involved in seabird research and restoration. The project was primarily to benefit sooty shearwater (Puffinus griseus) and to sustain a culturally important customary harvest of their chicks by Rakiura Maori. However, like all island eradications, a wide range of other species also benefited from the removal of rats. The New Zealand Department of Conservation provided technical advice and assistance for the planning and implementation of the eradication programme. This paper describes how, with appropriate funding, community and technical support, rodent eradications can be achieved on private islands. In this case, a range of institutions and individuals joined to achieve a common goal that highlighted a significant international conservation action. We urge that more international and local-community-led restoration projects be initiated in the future.

  5. Exploring the planets a memoir

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Fred

    2016-01-01

    This book is an informal, semi-autobiographical history, from the particular viewpoint of someone who was involved, of the exploration of the Solar System using spacecraft. The author is a Northumbrian, a Liverpudlian, a Californian, and an Oxford Don with half a century of experience of devising and deploying experiments to study the Earth and the planets, moons, and small bodies of the Solar System. Along with memories and anecdotes about his experiences as a participant in the space programme from its earliest days to the present, he describes in non-technical terms the science goals that drove the projects as well as the politics, pressures, and problems that had to be addressed and overcome on the way. The theme is the scientific intent of these ambitious voyages of discovery, and the joys and hardships of working to see them achieved. The narrative gives a first-hand account of things like how Earth satellites came to revolutionize weather forecasting, starting in the 1960s; how observations from space ...

  6. Concentrations of triiodothyronine (T3), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in milk from healthy and naturally infected quarters of cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slebodziński, A B; Malinowski, E; Lipczak, W

    2002-02-01

    The effect of naturally acquired bacterial infection of the bovine udder on the activity of 5'-thyroxine monodeiodinase (5'-MD), and on the concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in milk, from healthy (control) and inflamed quarters, was determined. The diagnostic procedure included history and clinical examination of the udder, macroscopic evaluation of secretions, the Californian Mastitis Test, determination of somatic cell counts and bacteriological examination of milk. It has been found that the milk triiodothyronine (T3) content and the 5'-MD activity from inflamed quarters were decreased when compared with controls. The decrease in the milk T3 from subclinical mastitic quarters was manifested when somatic cell counts were > 10(6) ml(-1). TNF-alpha was on average 2-fold higher in infected milk, and the concentration of IL-6 was unchanged. These results suggest that the decreased T3 content in mammary secretions during naturally occurring mastitis is associated with the severity of inflammation, increased TNF-alpha concentration and impaired enzymatic activity of 5'-MD.

  7. Ethnic Differences in Risk Factors for Obesity among Adults in California, the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Southerland, Jodi; Wang, Kesheng; Bailey, Beth A; Alamian, Arsham; Stevens, Marc A; Wang, Youfa

    2017-01-01

    Little attention has been given to differences in obesity risk factors by racial/ethnic groups. Using data from the 2011-2012 California Health Interview Survey, we examined differences in risk factors for obesity among Whites, Latinos, Asians, and African Americans among 42,935 adults (24.8% obese). Estimates were weighted to ensure an unbiased representation of the Californian population. Multiple logistic and linear regression analyses were used to examine the differences in risk factors for obesity. Large ethnic disparities were found in obesity prevalence: Whites (22.0%), Latinos (33.6%), African Americans (36.1%), and Asians (9.8%). Differences in risk factors for obesity were also observed: Whites (gender, age, physical activity, smoking, arthritis, and diabetes medicine intake), Latinos (age, arthritis, and diabetes medicine intake), Asians (age, binge drinking, arthritis, and diabetes medicine intake), and African Americans (gender, physical activity, smoking, binge drinking, and diabetes medicine intake). Females were more likely to be obese among African Americans (odds ratio (OR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-1.94), but less likely among Whites (OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.74-0.87). Race/ethnicity should be considered in developing obesity prevention strategies.

  8. Ethnic Differences in Risk Factors for Obesity among Adults in California, the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Little attention has been given to differences in obesity risk factors by racial/ethnic groups. Using data from the 2011-2012 California Health Interview Survey, we examined differences in risk factors for obesity among Whites, Latinos, Asians, and African Americans among 42,935 adults (24.8% obese. Estimates were weighted to ensure an unbiased representation of the Californian population. Multiple logistic and linear regression analyses were used to examine the differences in risk factors for obesity. Large ethnic disparities were found in obesity prevalence: Whites (22.0%, Latinos (33.6%, African Americans (36.1%, and Asians (9.8%. Differences in risk factors for obesity were also observed: Whites (gender, age, physical activity, smoking, arthritis, and diabetes medicine intake, Latinos (age, arthritis, and diabetes medicine intake, Asians (age, binge drinking, arthritis, and diabetes medicine intake, and African Americans (gender, physical activity, smoking, binge drinking, and diabetes medicine intake. Females were more likely to be obese among African Americans (odds ratio (OR = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.05–1.94, but less likely among Whites (OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.74–0.87. Race/ethnicity should be considered in developing obesity prevention strategies.

  9. "Come back when you're dying:" the commodification of AIDS among California's urban poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Johanna; Quirk, Kathleen; van der Straten, Ariane

    2002-10-01

    As with any other long-term illness, the decline in health that accompanies symptomatic HIV infection often has a profound negative impact on employment and personal finances. However, research to date on the financial consequences of AIDS has focused largely on middle-class working individuals, and cannot account for the experiences of those who are already poor and unemployed at the time of their infection. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 33 Californian heterosexual couples in which one partner was infected with HIV and the other was HIV-negative. Most couples interviewed were low-income, marginally housed, and either former or active substance users. Unlike their middle-class counterparts, it became clear through the course of our study that many participating couples were living in a world in which a positive HIV antibody test or an AIDS diagnosis could result in an improved quality of life by allowing for increased access to Supplemental Security Income, subsidized housing, food and services. This situation is in part a consequence of recent policy decisions related to the "War on Drugs" and welfare reform. These policies have contributed to the creation of an economy of poverty in which the sick, needy, and addicted must compete against each other for scarce resources. Within such an economy, an HIV or AIDS diagnosis may actually operate as a commodity.

  10. Variation of airborne quartz in air of Beijing during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Economic Leaders' Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Li, Yingming; Zhang, Hongxing; Li, Honghua; Gao, Guanjun; Zhou, Qian; Gao, Yuan; Li, Wenjuan; Sun, Huizhong; Wang, Xiaoke; Zhang, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Quartz particles are a toxic component of airborne particulate matter (PM). Quartz concentrations were analyzed by X-ray diffraction in eighty-seven airborne PM samples collected from three locations in Beijing before, during, and after the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Leaders' Meeting in 2014. The results showed that the mean concentrations of quartz in PM samples from the two urban sites were considerably higher than those from the rural site. The quartz concentrations in samples collected after the APEC meeting, when the pollution restriction lever was lifted, were higher than those in the samples collected before or during the APEC meeting. The quartz concentrations ranged from 0.97 to 13.2 μg/m(3), which were among the highest values amid those reported from other countries. The highest quartz concentration exceeded the Californian Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment reference exposure level and was close to the occupational threshold limit values for occupational settings. Moreover, a correlation analysis showed that quartz concentrations were positively correlated with concentrations of pollution parameters PM10, PM2.5, SO2 and NOx, but were negatively correlated with O3 concentration. The results suggest that the airborne quartz particles may potentially pose health risks to the general population of Beijing.

  11. Native fungal endophytes suppress an exotic dominant and increase plant diversity over small and large spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami, Michelle E; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2016-05-01

    Understanding community dynamics and processes, such as the factors that generate and maintain biodiversity, drive succession, and affect invasion susceptibility, is a central goal in ecology and evolution. While most studies of how species interactions affect communities have focused on highly visible macroorganisms, we show that mutualistic microfungal endophytes have community-level effects across their host plant's range and provide the first example of fungal endophytes enhancing plant diversity. A three-year field study in which we experimentally manipulated endophyte abundance in a native Californian grass showed that despite their minute biomass, endophytes dramatically increased plant community diversity (~110% greater increase with endophytes) by suppressing a dominant invasive grass, Bromus diandrus. This effect was also detectable, but smaller, across five additional common gardens spanning ecologically diverse habitats, different climates, and > 400 km of the host grass' range as well as at microspatial scales within gardens. Our study illustrates that mutualistic microbes, while often hidden players, can have unexpectedly large ecological impacts across a wide range of habitats and scales and may be important for promoting diverse communities and ecosystems.

  12. Community-level adult daily smoking prevalence moderates the association between adolescents' cigarette smoking and perceived smoking by friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrul, Johannes; Lipperman-Kreda, Sharon; Grube, Joel W; Friend, Karen B

    2014-09-01

    Few studies have investigated the complex interactions among the individual- and community-level social risk factors that underlie adolescents' smoking behaviors. This study investigated whether community-level adult daily smoking prevalence is associated with adolescents' smoking and whether it moderates the associations between perceived friends' smoking approval and smoking behavior and adolescents' own smoking. Self-reported data from 1,190 youths (50.3% female; 13-18 years old) in 50 midsized Californian cities were obtained through telephone interviews. Community characteristics were obtained from 2010 GeoLytics data. Community adult daily smoking prevalence was ascertained from telephone interviews with 8,918 adults conducted in the same 50 cities. Multilevel analyses, controlling for individual and city characteristics, were used to predict adolescents' past 12-month smoking from perceived friends' smoking approval and smoking behavior and from community adult daily smoking prevalence. Results showed that perceived friends' smoking approval and behavior were associated positively with adolescents' smoking, as was the community-level prevalence of adult daily smoking. Furthermore, the association between perceived friends' smoking behavior and adolescents' own smoking was moderated by the prevalence of adult daily smokers in the community. Specifically, the association was stronger in cities with higher prevalence of adult smokers. These results suggest that adult community norms that are more supportive of smoking may enhance the influence of friends' smoking behavior. Therefore, interventions designed to prevent or reduce youths' smoking should also focus on reducing smoking by adults.

  13. [Cosmetic colorants. Toxicology and regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzek, T; Krätke, R; Klein, G; Schulz, C

    2005-01-01

    Some recent publications raised concern over a possible link between hair dye use and the incidence of bladder tumours in a Californian population. The Scientific Committee for Cosmetic Products and Non-Food Products intended for Consumers (SCCNFP) demanded the toxicological testing of all hair dyes used in Europe to exclude any risk. The EU commission initiated corresponding measures. Only safe hair dyes will be included on a positive list while all other hair dyes will be banned. The hair dye lawsone--the dyeing ingredient of henna--was evaluated by the SCCNFP as genotoxic but the BfR came to another conclusion. The regulation of both lawsone and henna remains an open question. Furthermore, some cosmetic colorants were critically discussed. The azo dyes CI 12150, CI 26100, CI 27290 and CI 20170 are allowed for use in cosmetics. On cleavage they form the carcinogenic aromatic amines o-anisidine, 4-aminoazobenzene and 2,4-xylidine, respectively. For three of these dyes the cleavage by human skin bacteria in vitro to the respective arylamine was shown experimentally. Further problems may arise from colorants used for tattoos and permanent makeup. These products up to now are not subject to legislation and there are no regulatory stipulations with respect to health safety and purity for colorants used for these purposes.

  14. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among California Adults With and Without Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Goldstein

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the extent and correlates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use among a population-based sample of California adults that is highly diverse in terms of sociodemographic characteristics and health status. As a follow-up to a state-wide health survey of 55 428 people, 9187 respondents were interviewed by phone regarding their use of 11 different types of CAM providers, special diets, dietary supplements, mind–body interventions, self-prayer and support groups. The sample included all participants in the initial survey who reported a diagnosis of cancer, all the non-white respondents, as well as a random sample of all the white respondents. The relation of CAM use to the respondents' demographic characteristics and health status is assessed. CAM use among Californians is generally high, and the demographic factors associated with high rates of CAM use are the same in California as have been found in other studies. Those reporting a diagnosis of cancer and those who report other chronic health problems indicate a similar level of visits to CAM providers. However, those with cancer are less likely to report using special diets, and more likely to report using support groups and prayer. Health status, gender, ethnicity and education have an independent impact upon CAM use among those who are healthy as well as those who report suffering from chronic health problems, although the precise relation varies by the type of CAM used.

  15. Un altro tipo di ordine. Frank O. Gehry e il progetto di un grande edificio urbano a Berlino / Another Type of Order. Frank O. Gehry and the project of a large urban building in Berlin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Margiotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available L’opera di Frank O. Gehry dà la possibilità di incontrare un ricco universo di tecniche compositive alternative rispetto a quelle di cui si avvalgono la maggior parte degli architetti del ‘900. L’architetto californiano, con la sua dimensione ironica, caricaturale, anti-classica, racconta di un modo alternativo di presentare nella città l’oggetto architettonico e di intendere “l’appropriata collocazione delle cose” e la “scelta dell’effetto dell’opera”, come testimonia il grande edificio urbano costruito a Berlino, in uno dei luoghi più importanti della storia europea. / The work of Frank O. Gehry gives the chance to meet a rich universe of alternative compositional techniques than those of the architects of the ‘900. The Californian architect, with his ironic dimension, caricature, anti-classical, talks about an alternative way of presenting the architectural object in the city and about an alternative way of understanding “the proper placement of things” and the “choice of the effect of the works”, as evidenced by the large urban building built in Berlin, in one of the most important places of European history.

  16. Mitochondrial genome architecture of the giant red sea urchin Mesocentrotus franciscanus (Strongylocentrotidae, Echinoida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Californian giant red sea urchin Mesocentrotus franciscanus has been determined. It has a length of 15,650 bp and contains the same 37 genes found in other metazoans (13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, and two rRNA genes). Only five tRNA genes and the Nad6 gene are coded on the minus strand. There were 14 identified small intergene regions (2 to 24 bp) and a large non-coding region (125 bp) located between the tRNA-T and tRNA-P. The overall base composition of this genome is 29.8% A, 27.6% T, 29.7% C, and 17.5% G, with a slight A + T bias of 59.4%. The most frequent start codon is ATG (11 genes) whereas TAA is the most frequent stop codon (10 genes). Overall, gene arrangement pattern, gene content and genome organization is similar to other echinoids.

  17. A history of solar architecture; Zeitreise durch die Solararchitektur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, R. [AEU GmbH, Wallisellen (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    This journey from the beginning of the 20th century to the present examines the developments in building with the sun with a focus on housing. It begins in the USA and then follows parallel paths in Europe, ending with a prognosis for the future. The way is marked by milestones in the form of technological breakthroughs or changes in politics or economics which dramatically affected the advance in ''solar architecture''. Two different courses are tracked: the engineering approach using active solar and technical systems and the architecture approach where the building is the collector, storage and distributor of solar heat. Both ways influence the aesthetics of a house. How energy concepts have been integrated into architecture has led to fascinating design variations, from the Californian hippy solar houses in the 1970's to modern industrial design housing. Along the journey some ways have proven to be dead-ends, some allowed accelerated progress. It is interesting to learn from the journey in order to make wise choices as we continue our way (orig.)

  18. Discover Science Initiative, outreach and professional development at the University of California, Irvine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestana, Jill; Earthman, James

    Discover Science Initiative (DSI) is an unprecedented success in the Southern Californian community by reaching out to over 5,000 participants through eight hands-on workshops on topics from fungi to the physics of light, and two large events in the past year. The DSI vision is to provide an avenue for University of California, Irvine (UCI) students and faculty from all departments to engage with the local community through workshops and presentations on interdisciplinary, state-of-the-art STEM research unique to UCI. DSI provides professional development opportunities for diverse students at UCI, while providing outreach at one of the most popular educational centers in Southern California, the Discovery Cube, which hosts over 400,000 guests each year. In DSI, students engage in peer-to-peer mentoring with guidance from the UCI School of Education in designing workshops, leading meetings, and managing teams. Also, students practice science communication, coached by certified communications trainers. Students involved in DSI learn important skills to complement their academic degrees, and stay motivated to pursue their career goals. Support for DSI is from Diverse Educational and Doctoral Experience (DECADE) at UCI.

  19. Historical effects of temperature and precipitation on California crop yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobell, D.B. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Cahill, K.N. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Environment and Resources, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Field, C.B. [Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    For the 1980-2003 period, we analyzed the relationship between crop yield and three climatic variables (minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation) for 12 major Californian crops: wine grapes, lettuce, almonds, strawberries, table grapes, hay, oranges, cotton, tomatoes, walnuts, avocados, and pistachios. The months and climatic variables of greatest importance to each crop were used to develop regressions relating yield to climatic conditions. For most crops, fairly simple equations using only 2-3 variables explained more than two-thirds of observed yield variance. The types of variables and months identified suggest that relatively poorly understood processes such as crop infection, pollination, and dormancy may be important mechanisms by which climate influences crop yield. Recent climatic trends have had mixed effects on crop yields, with orange and walnut yields aided, avocado yields hurt, and most crops little affected by recent climatic trends. Yield-climate relationships can provide a foundation for forecasting crop production within a year and for projecting the impact of future climate changes.

  20. Stable isotopic characterisation of francolite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, J. M.; Benmore, R. A.; Coleman, M. L.; Soldi, C.; Yeh, H.-W.; O'Brien, G. W.

    1986-02-01

    Stable isotopic data are presented for 112 samples of francolite from 18 separate phosphate deposits. Values of δ 13C and δ 34S in most offshore deposits suggest formation within oxic or suboxic environments either by carbonate replacement or direct precipitation of francolite from water of normal marine compositions. The exceptions are concretionary francolite from Namibia, which has an isotopic composition in keeping with its formation within organic-rich sediments, and that from offshore Morocco, which has an isotopic signature of the anoxic/suboxic interface. Onshore deposits from Jordan, Mexico, South Africa and, possibly, the Permian Phosphoria Formation in the western U.S.A., are substantially depleted in 18O: they appear to be too altered for deductions to be made about their environments of formation. In other onshore deposits which are unaltered, or minimally altered, the isotopic composition suggests that some formed within sulphate-reducing sediments (Sedhura, Morocco) whilst francolite from the Georgina Basin of Australia formed at the oxic/anoxic boundary, where oxidation of biogenic H 2S decreases the δ 34S of pore water. In general, pelletal samples show non-oxic isotopic signatures, whilst non-pelletal samples show oxic isotopic signatures, but samples from Namibia, Peru (Ica Plateau) and the Californian and Moroccan margins are exceptions to this rule. Morphology may therefore be a misleading indicator of francolite genesis as no definitive relation exists between phosphorite type and isotopic signature.

  1. Disturbance facilitates invasion: the effects are stronger abroad than at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierro, Jos L; Villarreal, Diego; Eren, Ozkan; Graham, Jon M; Callaway, Ragan M

    2006-08-01

    Disturbance is one of the most important factors promoting exotic invasion. However, if disturbance per se is sufficient to explain exotic success, then "invasion" abroad should not differ from "colonization" at home. Comparisons of the effects of disturbance on organisms in their native and introduced ranges are crucial to elucidate whether this is the case; however, such comparisons have not been conducted. We investigated the effects of disturbance on the success of Eurasian native Centaurea solstitialis in two invaded regions, California and Argentina, and one native region, Turkey, by conducting field experiments consisting of simulating different disturbances and adding locally collected C. solstitialis seeds. We also tested differences among C. solstitialis genotypes in these three regions and the effects of local soil microbes on C. solstitialis performance in greenhouse experiments. Disturbance increased C. solstitialis abundance and performance far more in nonnative ranges than in the native range, but C. solstitialis biomass and fecundity were similar among populations from all regions grown under common conditions. Eurasian soil microbes suppressed growth of C. solstitialis plants, while Californian and Argentinean soil biota did not. We suggest that escape from soil pathogens may contribute to the disproportionately powerful effect of disturbance in introduced regions.

  2. Crossbreeding parameters for growth traits in a complete three breeds diallel cross design of rabbits in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Mohamed Abdel-Hamid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to estimate crossbreeding parameters for growth traits of growing rabbits in a complete 3 × 3 diallel crossing experiment involving three breeds namely New Zealand White (NN, Californian (CC and Rex (RR. Highly significant differences (p≤0.001 were observed among different genotypes for almost traits studied with the exception of relative growth rates (RGR at 4-12 weeks of age. Direct genetic effects of NN were found as positive for most of studied traits. Positive total maternal genetic effect was estimated for kits of NN dose for weight at weaning (57 g and 12 weeks of age (92 g. Strong individual heterosis was estimated for NN × CC crossbreds for all body weight (BW and most of body weight gains (BWG. In conclusion, direct additive genetic effects were infavor NN for growth traits and maternal genetic effects were infavor NN for weaning and final weights and higher individual heterosis has been estimated for NN × CC crossbred rabbits for growth traits.

  3. Growth performance, carcass characteristics, meat quality and muscle amino-acid profile of different rabbits breeds and their crosses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Mohammed A F; Abd-Elhamid, Tamer; Hussein, Mohamed A

    2017-12-01

    Meat production efficiency can be enhanced by crossbreeding to capture heterosis. This study aimed to investigate the impact of rabbit genotype on growth performance, carcass traits, meat quality and amino acids profile. A total of 504 weaned rabbits from nine genotypes of full factorial crossing of New Zealand White (NZW), Californian (CA) and Rex (RX) were used. Longissimus thoracis et lumborum muscles were assessed for meat quality and amino acids profile. There were no differences between groups at weaning and 6weeks, but by 10weeks differences were significant (P<0.001) and the numerically heaviest groups were CA×RX and RX×NZW (1970g, P<0.001) with to some extent better amino acids profile. In conclusion, RX growth performance was improved by crossing CA sire with RX dam and RX sire with NZW dam and to have dual purpose breed with better growth performance without hazard on carcass and meat quality. CA×RX and RX×NZW had the heaviest body weight at 10weeks of age and highest body weight gain during the whole finishing period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reproductive biology of Pseudococcus maritimus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterworth, Rebeccah A; Millar, Jocelyn G

    2012-06-01

    This study characterized several parameters associated with reproductive behaviors of a Californian population of the grape mealybug, Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhorn). Experiments with caged adults confirmed that females from this population could not reproduce parthenogenetically. Both sexes were capable of mating multiple times on the same day and on sequential days. Median times between copulations were short (< 10 min) on the first day that males were presented with females, but tended to increase with sequential copulation events. Unmated females lived for up to 19 wk, whereas mating and oviposition resulted in reduced longevity. We hypothesized that constant exposure to pheromone might stimulate males to leave their cocoons sooner and increase their activity levels compared with males that were not exposed to pheromone, resulting in shortened life-spans. However, whereas exposure to pheromone did stimulate males to emerge slightly sooner than control males, pheromone exposure had no effect on the longevity of males. The implications of the results of these experiments for pheromone-based methods of detection and control of mealybugs are discussed.

  5. Potential effects of organic carbon production on ecosystems and drinking water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry R. Brown

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of tidal wetlands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta is an important component of the Ecosystem Restoration Program of the CALFED Bay-Delta Program (CALFED. CALFED is a collaborative effort among state and federal agencies to restore the ecological health and improve water management of the Delta and San Francisco Bay (Bay. Tidal wetland restoration is intended to provide valuable habitat for organisms and to improve ecosystem productivity through export of various forms of organic carbon, including both algae and plant detritus. However, the Delta also provides all or part of the drinking water for over 22 million Californians. In this context, increasing sources of organic carbon may be a problem because of the potential increase in the production of trihalomethanes and other disinfection by-products created during the process of water disinfection. This paper reviews the existing information about the roles of organic carbon in ecosystem function and drinking water quality in the Bay-Delta system, evaluates the potential for interaction, and considers major uncertainties and potential actions to reduce uncertainty. In the last 10 years, substantial progress has been made on the role of various forms of organic carbon in both ecosystem function and drinking water quality; however, interactions between the two have not been directly addressed. Several ongoing studies are beginning to address these interactions, and the results from these studies should reduce uncertainty and provide focus for further research.

  6. The influence of fault geometry on small strike-slip fault mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Elizabeth; Pollard, David D.; Ferris, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Meter-scale subvertical strike-slip fault traces in the central Californian Sierra Nevada exhibit geometric complexities that significantly contribute to their mechanical behavior. Sections of faults that opened at depth channelized fluid flow, as evidenced by hydrothermal mineral infillings and alteration haloes. Thin sections show a variation in the style of ductile deformation of infill along the fault, with greater intensities of deformation along restraining bends. Orthorectified photomosaics of outcrops provide model geometries and parameter constraints used in a two-dimensional displacement discontinuity model incorporating a complementarity algorithm. Model results show that fault shape influences the distribution of opening, and consequently the spatial distribution of fluid conduits. Geometric irregularities are present at many scales, and sections of opening occur along both releasing and restraining bends. Model sensitivity tests focus on boundary conditions along the fault: frictional properties on closed sections and fluid pressure within sections of opening. The influence of the remote stress state varies along a non-planar fault, complicating the relationships between remote stresses, frictional properties, slip, and opening. Discontinuous sections of opening along model faults are similar in spatial distribution and aperture to the epidote infill assemblages observed in the field.

  7. Whole genome duplication in coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) and its implications for explaining the rarity of polyploidy in conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alison Dawn; Stenz, Noah W M; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Baum, David A

    2016-07-01

    Polyploidy is common and an important evolutionary factor in most land plant lineages, but it is rare in gymnosperms. Coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) is one of just two polyploid conifer species and the only hexaploid. Evidence from fossil guard cell size suggests that polyploidy in Sequoia dates to the Eocene. Numerous hypotheses about the mechanism of polyploidy and parental genome donors have been proposed, based primarily on morphological and cytological data, but it remains unclear how Sequoia became polyploid and why this lineage overcame an apparent gymnosperm barrier to whole-genome duplication (WGD). We sequenced transcriptomes and used phylogenetic inference, Bayesian concordance analysis and paralog age distributions to resolve relationships among gene copies in hexaploid coast redwood and close relatives. Our data show that hexaploidy in coast redwood is best explained by autopolyploidy or, if there was allopolyploidy, it happened within the Californian redwood clade. We found that duplicate genes have more similar sequences than expected, given the age of the inferred polyploidization. Conflict between molecular and fossil estimates of WGD can be explained if diploidization occurred very slowly following polyploidization. We extrapolate from this to suggest that the rarity of polyploidy in gymnosperms may be due to slow diploidization in this clade.

  8. Captain Lord's uremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyner, Lawrence Michael

    2013-06-01

    The hundredth anniversary of the worst ever civilian maritime disaster was also the fiftieth anniversary of the death of arguably its most controversial character, Captain Stanley Lord, skipper of the Californian, a "tramp" steamer that became entrapped in ice just off the Grand Banks of Newfoundland on April 14, 1912. Although Lord was faulted in two widely publicized inquiries for failing to respond to Titanic's distress signals, there may have actually been a medical reason for his behavior because he suffered from chronic renal disease and most likely had some secondary cognitive impairment due to this disease. An assessment of Lord's health history shows that he fractured his leg as a young man; suffered from poor eyesight, which led to his premature retirement from the sea by the age of 50; and eventually died from renal failure. Furthermore, his death certificate alludes to previous uremic episodes, perhaps encompassing the time period of the Titanic accident. Lord may have been under some pressure not to reveal his infirmity because doing so could have further jeopardized his career. The literature abounds with evidence that renal insufficiency negatively affects cognition, often years before progression to end-stage renal disease. Captain Lord's failure to act in a crisis situation may serve as a case in point.

  9. The status of Plumularia lagenifera Allman, 1885 (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa) and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchert, Peter

    2013-02-08

    The current status of Plumularia lagenifera Allman, 1885, a common thecate hydroid of the west coast of the USA and Canada, is problematic as it is difficult to distinguish from the near cosmopolitan and very variable Plumularia setacea. Type material of P. lagenifera and newly collected material of P. lagenifera and P. setacea from the region of the type locality of the former was used to compare it to P. setacea from the Atlantic. Measurements of a number of morphological traits were made and analysed using principal components analyses. Type material of the Californian Plumularia palmeri Nutting, 1900 was also included in the comparisons and confirmed the view of earlier workers that it is indistinguishable from P. setacea. Additionally, South African material referred to P. lagenifera by Millard (1975) was compared to the material from the NE Pacific. Plumularia lagenifera remains difficult to separate from P. setacea. The convex outer wall of the hydrotheca offers the only operational character to distinguish P. lagenifera from P. setacea, which always has straight or even concave hydrothecae. For morphological and biogeographic reasons, South African P. lagenifera sensu Millard (1975) should be referred to P. gaimardi (Lamouroux, 1924).

  10. Multiscale connectivity and graph theory highlight critical areas for conservation under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilts, Thomas E; Weisberg, Peter J; Leitner, Philip; Matocq, Marjorie D; Inman, Richard D; Nussear, Kenneth E; Esque, Todd C

    2016-06-01

    Conservation planning and biodiversity management require information on landscape connectivity across a range of spatial scales from individual home ranges to large regions. Reduction in landscape connectivity due changes in land use or development is expected to act synergistically with alterations to habitat mosaic configuration arising from climate change. We illustrate a multiscale connectivity framework to aid habitat conservation prioritization in the context of changing land use and climate. Our approach, which builds upon the strengths of multiple landscape connectivity methods, including graph theory, circuit theory, and least-cost path analysis, is here applied to the conservation planning requirements of the Mohave ground squirrel. The distribution of this threatened Californian species, as for numerous other desert species, overlaps with the proposed placement of several utility-scale renewable energy developments in the American southwest. Our approach uses information derived at three spatial scales to forecast potential changes in habitat connectivity under various scenarios of energy development and climate change. By disentangling the potential effects of habitat loss and fragmentation across multiple scales, we identify priority conservation areas for both core habitat and critical corridor or stepping stone habitats. This approach is a first step toward applying graph theory to analyze habitat connectivity for species with continuously distributed habitat and should be applicable across a broad range of taxa. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. THE EFFECT OF SINGLE NICKEL AND COMBINED NICKEL AND ZINC PERORAL ADMINISTRATION ON HAEMATOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN RABBITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Emrichová

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of single nickel (NiCl2 and nickel in combination with zinc (ZnCl2 on selected haematological parameters of rabbits: white blood cell, red blood cell, haemoglobin, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, platelets, mean platelet volume, red cell distribution width, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, neutrophils, basophils. Twenty rabbits of broiler line Californian were used in this experiment. The animals were divided into the five groups, four animals in each ones (control group K and experimental groups E1, E2, E3 and E4. Animals were fed ad libitum using KKV1 feeding mixture (FM with or without nickel and zinc addition for 90 days follows: group E1 received 17.5 g of NiCl2.100 kg-1 FM; group E2 35 g NiCl2.100 kg-1 FM; group E3 17.5 g NiCl2 + 30 g ZnCl2.100 kg-1 FM and group E4 35 g NiCl2 + 30 g ZnCl2.100 kg-1 FM. The parameters were analysed using Advia – 120. Blood was collected into tubes containing anticoagulant agents K – EDTA. Statistical analyse showed a significant changes (P 0.05. Nickel has negative effect on some haematological parameters, but zinc can eliminates its influence.

  12. Support for solar energy: Examining sense of place and utility-scale development in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juliet E. Carlisle; Stephanie L. Kane; David Solan; Jeffrey C. Joe

    2015-07-01

    As solar costs have declined PV systems have experienced considerable growth since 2003, especially in China, Japan, Germany, and the U.S. Thus, a more nuanced understanding of a particular public's attitudes toward utility-scale solar development, as it arrives in a market and region, is warranted and will likely be instructive for other areas in the world where this type of development will occur in the near future. Using data collected from a 2013 telephone survey (N = 594) from the six Southern Californian counties selected based on existing and proposed solar developments and available suitable land, we examine public attitudes toward solar energy and construction of large-scale solar facilities, testing whether attitudes toward such developments are the result of sense of place and attachment to place. Overall, we have mixed results. Place attachment and sense of place fail to produce significant effects except in terms of perceived positive benefits. That is, respondents interpret the change resulting from large-scale solar development in a positive way insofar as perceived positive economic impacts are positively related to support for nearby large-scale construction.

  13. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA, 444 Ep-ank, and groESL heat shock operon genes in naturally occurring Ehrlichia equi and human granulocytic ehrlichiosis agent isolates from Northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, J S; Foley, J E; Dumler, J S; Madigan, J E

    2000-04-01

    We examined 11 naturally occurring isolates of Ehrlichia equi in horses and two human granulocytic ehrlichiosis agent isolates in California for sequence diversity in three genes. Ehrlichia equi isolates were from Sierra (n = 6), Mendocino (n = 3), Sonoma (n = 1), and Marin (n = 1) counties, and human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) agent isolates were obtained from Humboldt county. PCR with specific primers for 16S rRNA, 444 Ep-ank and groESL heat shock operon genes successfully produced amplicons for all 13 clinical samples. The 444 Ep-ank gene of the HGE agent and E. equi isolates from northern California is different from the eastern U.S. isolates BDS and USG3. The translated amino acid sequence of the groESL heat shock operon gene fragment is identical among E. equi, the HGE agent, and E. phagocytophila, with the exception of the northern Californian equine CASOLJ isolate. Microheterogeneity was observed in the 16S rRNA gene sequences of HGE agent and E. equi isolates from northern California. These results suggest that E. equi and the HGE agent found in California are similar or identical but may differ from the isolates of equine and human origin found in the eastern United States.

  14. Community ecology and disease risk: lizards, squirrels, and the Lyme disease spirochete in California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkeld, Daniel J; Lane, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Vector-borne zoonotic diseases are often maintained in complex transmission cycles involving multiple vertebrate hosts and their arthropod vectors. In the state of California, U.S.A., the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease, is transmitted between vertebrate hosts by the western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus. Several mammalian species serve as reservoir hosts of the spirochete, but levels of tick infestation, reservoir competence, and Borrelia-infection prevalence vary widely among such hosts. Here, we model the host (lizards, Peromyscus mice, Californian meadow voles, dusky-footed wood rats, and western gray squirrels), vector, and pathogen community of oak woodlands in northwestern California to determine the relative importance of different tick hosts. Observed infection prevalence of B. burgdorferi in host-seeking I. pacificus nymphs was 1.8-5.3%, and our host-community model estimated an infection prevalence of 1.6-2.2%. The western gray squirrel (Sciurus griseus) was the only source of infected nymphs. Lizards, which are refractory to Borrelia infection, are important in feeding subadult ticks but reduce disease risk (nymphal infection prevalence). Species identity is therefore critical in understanding and determining the local disease ecology.

  15. PATULIN - INDUCED CHANGES IN HAEMATOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF RABBITS FED BY STRAWBERRY LEAVES AFTER 3 WEEKS EXPOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Emrichova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the present study was to determinate the effect of strawberry leaves inclusion into the feed mixture and single dose of patulin on haematological parameters of rabbits: white blood cell count (WBC, lymphocytes count (LYM, medium size cell count (MID, granulocytes count (GRA, lymphocyte percentage (LYM%, medium size cell percentage (MI%, granulocytes percentage (GRA%, red blood cell count (RBC, haemoglobin (HGB, haematocrit (HCT, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC, red cell distribution width (RDWc, platelet count (PLT, platelet percentage (PCT, mean platelet volume (MPV and platelet distribution width (PDWc. Fifteen rabbits of broiler line Californian were used in this experiment. Animals were divided into four groups, one control group C (n =3 and three experimental groups E1, E2 and E3 (n = 4 in each group. Rabbits were fed with a granular feed mixture (FM with strawberry leaves in various doses and all groups received patulin in injectable form at 10 µg.kg-1 for 21 days 2 times a week. The investigation was performed with haematology analyzer Abacus junior VET (Diatron®, Vienna, Austria. Significant decrease in MI% and MID in experimental group E3 in comparison with the control group was found. The values of other parameters (WBC, LYM, LY%, GRA, GR%, RBC, HGB, HCT, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDWc, PLT, MPV and PDWc in all groups corresponded with normal haematological values in rabbit´s blood.

  16. The Effects of Agave fourcroydes Powder as a Dietary Supplement on Growth Performance, Gut Morphology, Concentration of IgG, and Hematology Parameters in Broiler Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, Maidelys; Martínez, Yordan; Ni, Hengjia; Jiang, Hongmei; Valdivié Navarro, Manuel; Wu, Xiaosong; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Rosales, Manuel; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Fang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of Agave fourcroydes powder as a dietary supplement on the growth performance, gut morphology, serum concentration of IgG, and the hematology parameters of broiler rabbits. A total of 32 rabbits [New Zealand × Californian] were weaned at 35 days. They were randomly selected for two dietary treatments (eight repetitions per treatment), which consisted of a basal diet and a basal diet supplemented with 1.5% dried-stem powder of A. fourcroydes. On day 60 from the initiation of treatment, gut histomorphology (duodenum and cecum), serum concentration of IgG, and hematology parameters were all measured. The results showed that A. fourcroydes powder supplementation improved (P < 0.05) the ADFI, ADG, and final BW. Correspondingly, this treatment increased (P < 0.05) the muscle and mucosa thickness and height and width of villi. However, duodenum crypts depth was lower (P < 0.05) when rabbits were fed with this natural product, compared with the basal diet treatment. Results also indicated that the A. fourcroydes powder increased (P < 0.05) the serum concentration of IgG but did not change the hematology parameters. This data indicates that A. fourcroydes powder, as a supplement, had beneficial effects on increasing the growth performance and serum concentration of IgG, as well as improving the gut morphology without affecting the hematology parameters in broiler rabbits.

  17. The Effects of Agave fourcroydes Powder as a Dietary Supplement on Growth Performance, Gut Morphology, Concentration of IgG, and Hematology Parameters in Broiler Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maidelys Iser

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effects of Agave fourcroydes powder as a dietary supplement on the growth performance, gut morphology, serum concentration of IgG, and the hematology parameters of broiler rabbits. A total of 32 rabbits [New Zealand × Californian] were weaned at 35 days. They were randomly selected for two dietary treatments (eight repetitions per treatment, which consisted of a basal diet and a basal diet supplemented with 1.5% dried-stem powder of A. fourcroydes. On day 60 from the initiation of treatment, gut histomorphology (duodenum and cecum, serum concentration of IgG, and hematology parameters were all measured. The results showed that A. fourcroydes powder supplementation improved (P<0.05 the ADFI, ADG, and final BW. Correspondingly, this treatment increased (P<0.05 the muscle and mucosa thickness and height and width of villi. However, duodenum crypts depth was lower (P<0.05 when rabbits were fed with this natural product, compared with the basal diet treatment. Results also indicated that the A. fourcroydes powder increased (P<0.05 the serum concentration of IgG but did not change the hematology parameters. This data indicates that A. fourcroydes powder, as a supplement, had beneficial effects on increasing the growth performance and serum concentration of IgG, as well as improving the gut morphology without affecting the hematology parameters in broiler rabbits.

  18. The impact of maternal experience of violence and common mental disorders on neonatal outcomes: a survey of adolescent mothers in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Vikram

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both violence and depression during pregnancy have been linked to adverse neonatal outcomes, particularly low birth weight. The aim of this study was to investigate the independent and interactive effects of these maternal exposures upon neonatal outcomes among pregnant adolescents in a disadvantaged population from Sao Paulo, Brazil. Methods 930 consecutive pregnant teenagers, admitted for delivery were recruited. Violence was assessed using the Californian Perinatal Assessment. Mental illness was measured using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. Apgar scores of newborns were estimated and their weight measured. Results 21.9% of mothers reported lifetime violence (2% during pregnancy and 24.3% had a common mental disorder in the past 12 months. The exposures were correlated and each was associated with low education. Lifetime violence was strongly associated with Common Mental Disorders. Violence during pregnancy (PR = 2.59(1.05–6.40 and threat of physical violence (PR = 1.86(1.03–3.35 and any common mental disorders (PR = 2.09 (1.21–3.63 (as well as depression, anxiety and PTSD separately were independently associated with low birth weight. Conclusion Efforts to improve neonatal outcomes in low income countries may be neglecting two important independent, but correlated risk factors: maternal experience of violence and common mental disorder.

  19. A crab swarm at an ecological hotspot: patchiness and population density from AUV observations at a coastal, tropical seamount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Pineda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A research cruise to Hannibal Bank, a seamount and an ecological hotspot in the coastal eastern tropical Pacific Ocean off Panama, explored the zonation, biodiversity, and the ecological processes that contribute to the seamount’s elevated biomass. Here we describe the spatial structure of a benthic anomuran red crab population, using submarine video and autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV photographs. High density aggregations and a swarm of red crabs were associated with a dense turbid layer 4–10 m above the bottom. The high density aggregations were constrained to 355–385 m water depth over the Northwest flank of the seamount, although the crabs also occurred at lower densities in shallower waters (∼280 m and in another location of the seamount. The crab aggregations occurred in hypoxic water, with oxygen levels of 0.04 ml/l. Barcoding of Hannibal red crabs, and pelagic red crabs sampled in a mass stranding event in 2015 at a beach in San Diego, California, USA, revealed that the Panamanian and the Californian crabs are likely the same species, Pleuroncodes planipes, and these findings represent an extension of the southern endrange of this species. Measurements along a 1.6 km transect revealed three high density aggregations, with the highest density up to 78 crabs/m2, and that the crabs were patchily distributed. Crab density peaked in the middle of the patch, a density structure similar to that of swarming insects.

  20. Factors Associated With Increased Cesarean Risk Among African American Women: Evidence From California, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doctor, Jason N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We studied if both observed and unobserved maternal health in African American women in hospitals or communities were associated with cesarean delivery of infants. Methods. We examined the relationship between African American race and cesarean delivery among 493 433 women discharged from 255 Californian hospitals in 2010 using administrative data; we adjusted for patient comorbidities and maternal, fetal, and placental risk factors, as well as clustering of patients within hospitals. Results. Cesarean rates were significantly higher overall for African American women than other women (unadjusted rate 36.8% vs 32.7%), as were both elective and emergency primary cesarean rates. Elevated risks persisted after risk adjustment (odds ratio generally > 1.27), but the prevalence of particular risk factors varied. Although African American women were clustered in some hospitals, the proportion of African Americans among all women delivering in a hospital was not related to its overall cesarean rate. Conclusions. To address the higher likelihood of elective cesarean delivery, attention needs to be given to currently unmeasured patient-level health factors, to the quality of provider–physician interactions, as well as to patient preferences. PMID:25790391

  1. High speed rail trends, technologies and operational patterns: a comparison of established and emerging networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto PALACIN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is set within the framework of the RailNewcastle Summer School program 2014 run by Newcastle University (UK. It presents a short history of high speed rail describing its main design and operational characteristics. The focus of the paper is on assessing the two key distinct models emerging from this trend: the Japanese or Shinkansen model and the French or TGV model. The study then applies these two models to an emerging high speed network such as the planned corridors in California (U.S. to assess the extent of applicability and suitability of applying established high speed models to the Californian network. The results suggest that a suitable possibility would be to apply the French model for the operational aspects given the similarities in terms of geography, population distribution and distance. Implementing the lessons learned from the Japanese model in terms of construction and infrastructure design would be more suitable given the striking similarities in geological characteristics linked to the latent earthquake threat.

  2. The city project electric vehicle as industrial joint venture project; Das Stadtprojekt Elektroauto als industrielles Gemeinschaftsprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legat, W. [Vereinigung Deutscher Elektrizitaetswerke, Berlin (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    Compared to the USA, Japan, France and Switzerland not very much has been done in Germany to achieve a breakthrough for the electric vehicle. The result of the fleet test on Ruegen rather had the opposite non-desired effect. Thus the author, who was responsible for questions concerning the electric vehicle in the Federal Ministry of Traffic until 1994 and who co-ordinated the progress reports, suggests to the German automobile manufacturers and the electricity economy to carry out a demonstration project in Germany similar to the one in La Rochelle. The model project is not only supposed to provide the German answer to the Californian legislation but also the key to a wider introduction of electric vehicles in Germany. (orig.) [German] Im Gegensatz zu USA, Japan, Frankreich und der Schweiz ist hierzulande noch nicht viel geschehen, um dem Elektroauto zum Durchbruch zu verhelfen. Der Flottenversuch auf Ruegen bewirkte im Ergebnis eher das Gegenteil. Der Autor, bis 1994 im Bundesverkehrsministerium fuer Fragen des Elektroautos zustaendig und Koordinator der Fortschreibungsberichte, schlaegt deshalb den deutschen Autoherstellern und der Stromwirtschaft vor, ein Demonstrationsprojekt, aehnlich wie in La Rochelle, auch in Deutschland durchzufuehren. Das Modellvorhaben soll nicht nur die deutsche Antwort auf die Kalifornische Gesetzgebung vorbereiten, sondern auch der Schluessel zur breiteren Einfuehrung von Elektroautos in Deutschland werden. (orig.)

  3. E/I corrected paleolatitudes for the sedimentary rocks of the Baja British Columbia hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijgsman, Wout; Tauxe, Lisa

    2006-02-01

    Paleomagnetic inclinations from sediments of the western terranes of Canada are consistently too shallow for their reconstructed paleogeographic positions. Two contradicting explanations for these discrepancies are: (1) terranes have been displaced northward with respect to the stable American craton by several thousands of kilometres between the Late Cretaceous (˜ 75 Ma) and the Eocene (˜50 Ma) and (2) sedimentary inclination error has caused a shallow bias in the paleomagnetic directions. Here, we apply the elongation/inclination (E/I) method to paleomagnetic data sets from sedimentary rocks of supposedly allochtonous terranes of western North America to correct for inclination flattening. Our results indicate that the paleomagnetic directions from the continental Silverquick sediments (95-92 Ma) of southern British Colombia are not seriously affected by inclination error, because the magnetic signal most likely concerns a chemical remanent magnetisation (CRM). In contrast, the marine sediments of the Nanaimo Group (84-72 Ma) of Vancouver Island region appear seriously affected by inclination flattening ( f = 0.7) and the E/I corrected mean inclinations are about 9° steeper than the original data. We arrive at corrected inclinations/paleolatitudes of I** = 57°/ λ = 38°N for the Silverquick and I** = 55°/ λ = 36°N for the Nanaimo sediments. Our corrected paleolatitudes indicate that the Canadian terranes were indeed located adjacent to the Baja Californian margin during the Late Cretaceous, thus supporting the Baja BC hypothesis.

  4. HIV tests and new diagnoses declined after california budget cuts, but reallocating funds helped reduce impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, Arleen A; Byrnes, Karen; Wynn, Adriane; Farrell, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Historically, California supplemented federal funding of HIV prevention and testing so that Californians with HIV could become aware of their infection and obtain lifesaving treatment. However, budget deficits in 2009 led the state to eliminate its supplemental funding for HIV prevention. We analyzed the impact of California's HIV resource allocation change between state fiscal years 2009 and 2011. We found that the number of HIV tests declined 19 percent, from 66,629 to 53,760, in local health jurisdictions with high HIV burden. In low-burden jurisdictions, the number of HIV tests declined 90 percent, from 20,302 to 2,116. New diagnoses fell from 2,434 in 2009 to 2,235 in 2011 (calendar years) in high-burden jurisdictions and from 346 to 327 in low-burden ones. California's budget crunch prompted state and local programs to redirect remaining HIV funds from risk reduction education to testing activities. Thus, the impact of the budget cuts on HIV tests and new HIV diagnoses was smaller than might have been expected given the size of the cuts. As California's fiscal outlook improves, we recommend that the state restore supplemental funding for HIV prevention and testing.

  5. Long distance kelp rafting impacts seaweed biogeography in the Northeast Pacific: the kelp conveyor hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Gary W

    2014-12-01

    Routine DNA barcoding of the Haida Gwaii seaweed flora revealed "endemic species" attributed initially to this region's past as a glacial refugium. However, subsequent barcode records from central California rapidly eroded this list leaving species characterized by disjunct distributions (DD) between California and Haida Gwaii. This observation prompted a more detailed look at species for California and British Columbia and revealed that 33 of 180 DNA-barcoded genetic groups in common between these regions (~18%) predominantly displayed DD between California and northern British Columbia. A previous discovery that a red abalone shell found in Haida Gwaii (far north of its range) had a float-bearing kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) holdfast attached to it prompted a closer consideration of the COI-5P barcode data in support of a "kelp conveyor hypothesis." The hypothesis posits that there has been a net migration of Californian species to northern British Columbia the vector being species growing on substrata carried along with kelp rafts on the winter Davidson Current.

  6. Plant water use affects competition for nitrogen: why drought favors invasive species in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Katherine; Seabloom, Eric W; Harpole, W Stanley; de Mazancourt, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Classic resource competition theory typically treats resource supply rates as independent; however, nutrient supplies can be affected by plants indirectly, with important consequences for model predictions. We demonstrate this general phenomenon by using a model in which competition for nitrogen is mediated by soil moisture, with competitive outcomes including coexistence and multiple stable states as well as competitive exclusion. In the model, soil moisture regulates nitrogen availability through soil moisture dependence of microbial processes, leaching, and plant uptake. By affecting water availability, plants also indirectly affect nitrogen availability and may therefore alter the competitive outcome. Exotic annual species from the Mediterranean have displaced much of the native perennial grasses in California. Nitrogen and water have been shown to be potentially limiting in this system. We parameterize the model for a Californian grassland and show that soil moisture-mediated competition for nitrogen can explain the annual species' dominance in drier areas, with coexistence expected in wetter regions. These results are concordant with larger biogeographic patterns of grassland invasion in the Pacific states of the United States, in which annual grasses have invaded most of the hot, dry grasslands in California but perennial grasses dominate the moister prairies of northern California, Oregon, and Washington.

  7. Older adults challenged financially when adult children move home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Steven P; Padilla-Frausto, D Imelda

    2014-02-01

    This policy brief looks at the financial burdens imposed on older Californians when adult children return home, often due to a crisis not of their own making, to live with their parents. The findings show that on average in California, the amount of money that older adults need in order to maintain a minimally decent standard of living while supporting one adult child in their home increases their expenses by a minimum of 50 percent. Low-income older adults are usually on fixed incomes, so helping an adult child can provide the child with a critical safety net but at the cost of the parents' own financial well-being. Policy approaches to assisting this vulnerable population of older adults include implementing reforms to increase Supplemental Security Income (SSI), improving the availability of affordable housing, assuring that all eligible nonelderly adults obtain health insurance through health care reform's expansion of Medi-Cal and subsidies, and increasing food assistance through SNAP and senior meal programs.

  8. A crab swarm at an ecological hotspot: patchiness and population density from AUV observations at a coastal, tropical seamount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Jesús; Cho, Walter; Starczak, Victoria; Govindarajan, Annette F; Guzman, Héctor M; Girdhar, Yogesh; Holleman, Rusty C; Churchill, James; Singh, Hanumant; Ralston, David K

    2016-01-01

    A research cruise to Hannibal Bank, a seamount and an ecological hotspot in the coastal eastern tropical Pacific Ocean off Panama, explored the zonation, biodiversity, and the ecological processes that contribute to the seamount's elevated biomass. Here we describe the spatial structure of a benthic anomuran red crab population, using submarine video and autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) photographs. High density aggregations and a swarm of red crabs were associated with a dense turbid layer 4-10 m above the bottom. The high density aggregations were constrained to 355-385 m water depth over the Northwest flank of the seamount, although the crabs also occurred at lower densities in shallower waters (∼280 m) and in another location of the seamount. The crab aggregations occurred in hypoxic water, with oxygen levels of 0.04 ml/l. Barcoding of Hannibal red crabs, and pelagic red crabs sampled in a mass stranding event in 2015 at a beach in San Diego, California, USA, revealed that the Panamanian and the Californian crabs are likely the same species, Pleuroncodes planipes, and these findings represent an extension of the southern endrange of this species. Measurements along a 1.6 km transect revealed three high density aggregations, with the highest density up to 78 crabs/m(2), and that the crabs were patchily distributed. Crab density peaked in the middle of the patch, a density structure similar to that of swarming insects.

  9. [Biomedical research from philanthropy to scarcity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Antonio; De Fiore, Luca; Traversa, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Some huge information technology companies have increased investment in biomedical research: recently Google, Microsoft, and Facebook. The latter presented the ambitious Zuckerberg-Chan Initiative involving three major Californian universities: UC San Francisco, Berkeley and Stanford. These important private investments arouse reflections. First, investing in scientific research improves the corporate image of the most generous companies and it is a great marketing strategy. Second, the availability of private funds is surely useful, especially if these funds are directed to relevant projects, and produce studies conducted and disseminated in a transparent way. Third, private funding should not replace public ones, representing an integration that will not likely affect the determination of the research agenda, which should remain the prerogative of public institutions. Fourth, the researchers involved in public funded projects should benefit from the margin of freedom that private industry promises, both in the decision of research pathways and in their course. Finally, the scarcity of resources is likely to divert energy and attention of the public researchers and this aspect should be considered by decision makers when determining size and recipients of research funding.

  10. Impacts of Photovoltaic Power Plant Sitings and Distributed Solar Panels on Meteorology and Air Quality in Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, L. A.; Jin, L.; Brown, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    California's electric utility companies are required to use renewable energy to produce 20% of their power by 2010 and 33% by 2020. A main source of the power will be solar energy because photovoltaic technologies have advanced so much that large scale installations are being built and will be built in the future with even greater capacity. Rather than being a large emission source, these plants affect the ambient environment through albedo changes and by emission reductions associated with not burning fossil fuels to generate the same amount of electricity. Like conventional power plants, their impact on local meteorology and air quality depends on the specific technology, ambient atmospheric conditions, and the spatial location of the plant. Also, as solar panels on commercial and residential rooftops become even more common, the effect of distributed photovoltaic panels on meteorology and air quality is likely to become significant. In this study, we use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model at high resolution of 4 km x 4 km over several 5-day high-ozone episodes of the summer 2000 to assess the impact of photovoltaic panels on meteorology and air quality in Central California. We investigate the effect of locating a 1.0 Giga watt solar plant in different locations and the effect of distributed rooftop photovoltaic panels in major Californian cities, with a focus on peak and 8-hour average ozone and 24-hour average PM2.5.

  11. Phosphorus cycling and limitation under modified conditions that represent potential future conditions with a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, K.; Paytan, A.; Field, C. B.; Lecher, A.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.; Peek, S.

    2016-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient in terrestrial systems. It has recently been proposed to play an even greater role in ecosystems experiencing some of the many predicted effects of climate change, in particular release from nitrogen limitation. To investigate the potential for P limitation, and P cycling under various controlled conditions we participated in the ongoing Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRGCE). For 18 years the JRGCE has been manipulating four key parameters predicted to change in the future in a Californian grassland system. Elevated Nitrogen deposition, increased precipitation, increased pCO2, and increased temperature are applied and monitored in a split plot system at the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve in the eastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains, California. In this study we utilize the oxygen isotopes of phosphate to investigate P cycling in soils at JRGCE in conjunction with phosphate enzyme activity and other parameters to attempt to elucidate factors influencing P limitation and cycling. A fractional soil extraction process for phosphate enables separation of several operationally defined P pools, and provides auxiliary information regarding the relative concentrations of bio-available P, and relevant minerals in this grassland system under the various conditions.

  12. Investigating feedbacks between natural metal-binding organic ligands and particle dissolution in central California coast seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, S.; Fitzsimmons, J. N.; Ohnemus, D.; Twining, B. S.; Chappell, D.; Sherrell, R. M.; Monticelli, D.; Buck, K. N.

    2016-02-01

    The roles of naturally occurring Fe- and Cu-ligands in particle dissolution were investigated during a 24-hour shipboard incubation experiment amended with various natural particles. The incubation seawater, collected from surface waters of the central Californian coast in July 2014, was amended with the Fe(II)-containing mineral biotite, the Fe(III)-mineral hematite, and resuspended nepheloid layer particles in separate treatments. Nepheloid layer particles were isolated via in situ filtration of bottom boundary layer waters overlying the central California shelf during the same cruise. Replicates of each particle type were incubated in both filtered and unfiltered surface seawater to provide insight on the role of ambient plankton communities on both the speciation of Fe and Cu and on the short-term dissolution of the particles. Samples for Fe- and Cu-binding ligands were analyzed from the 10-minute, 12-hour and 24-hour time points. Copper- and Fe-binding ligand analyses were performed by competitive ligand equilibration - cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-CSV), salicylaldoxime was used as the added competitive ligand for both metals. Dissolved concentrations of Fe and Cu were measured by ICP-MS analysis. Results from this experiment will be presented in the context of recently published studies looking at the influence of model Fe-binding ligands on aerosol dissolution in surface seawater. Altogether, these data emphasize the importance of ligands, and especially Fe-binding ligands, on particle dissolution in seawater.

  13. Introduction of Pinus radiata for afforestation: a review with reference to Aba, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIHui-quan; JackSimpson; LIRong-wei; YANHong; WUZong-xing; CAIShi-min; RobertEldridge

    2003-01-01

    Pinus radiata D. Don, native to a Californian coastal environment, has been introduced to many parts of the world as an exotic species for afforestation. It is now a major plantation species in the Southern Hemisphere. In 1990, it was introduced to the heavily degraded, dry Min river valley area in Aba prefecture of Sichuan Province, P. R. China. Survival and growth of young trees planted at several sites appear to be reasonable. This review is to serve as an introduction to the large body of literature on P.radiata for forest scientists in China. It covers the following aspects: P. radiata in its native environment and in ex situ plantations,provenance and genetic variations, environmental limitations and climate niche, diseases and pests, lessons from unsuccessful introductions, and the use of P. radiata for ecological restoration. The early growth of P. radiata planted in the dry river valley area is briefly described. Potential problems associated with the introduction of P. radiata in Aba and future research needs are also identified.

  14. Performance of growing rabbits fed increasing levels of discarded Salvia hispanica L. (chia) seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Abello, Diana; Ramírez-Avilés, Luis; Navarro-Alberto, Jorge; Zamora-Bustillos, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    This experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of including five levels of discarded chia seed (DCS) on growth, energy, and economic efficiency in rabbits. Fifty crossbred (New Zealand × Californian) weaning rabbits, weighing 798 ± 170 g, were randomly assigned to the following treatments: 0 % (control), 10 % (Ch10), 20 % (Ch20), 30 % (Ch30), and 40 % (Ch40) of DCS. Ten unsexed rabbits were allocated to each treatment and housed individually in cages; the experimental period was 6 weeks. There were no statistically significant differences between treatments in final body weight (2050 g), body weight gain (30 g/rabbit/day), and carcass weight (1010 g); however, feed intake (91 g/rabbit/day in Ch20 vs. 80 g/rabbit/day in Ch40), feed conversion ratio (2.77 in control and Ch40 vs. 2.95 in Ch10, Ch20, and Ch30), energy conversion ratio (32 MJ/kg in Ch20 vs. 29 MJ/kg on average in control, Ch10, Ch20, Ch30, and Ch40), and economic efficiency (358 % in control vs. 433 % in Ch40) showed differences (P < 0.05) between treatments. Discarded chia seed can be included up to 40 % in growing rabbit diets without any adverse effects on growth and carcass weight, and increased economic efficiency.

  15. Preparing for a "Big One": The great southern California shakeout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L.M.; Benthien, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Great Southern California ShakeOut was a week of special events featuring the largest earthquake drill in United States history. On November 13, 2008, over 5 million Southern Californians pretended that the magnitude-7.8 ShakeOut scenario earthquake was occurring and practiced actions derived from results of the ShakeOut Scenario, to reduce the impact of a real, San Andreas Fault event. The communications campaign was based on four principles: 1) consistent messaging from multiple sources; 2) visual reinforcement: 3) encouragement of "milling"; and 4) focus on concrete actions. The goals of the Shake-Out established in Spring 2008 were: 1) to register 5 million people to participate in the drill; 2) to change the culture of earthquake preparedness in Southern California; and 3) to reduce earthquake losses in Southern California. Over 90% of the registrants surveyed the next year reported improvement in earthquake preparedness at their organization as a result of the ShakeOut. ?? 2011, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  16. Delta smelt: Life history and decline of a once abundant species in the San Francisco Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Peter B.; Brown, Larry R.; Durand, John R; Hobbs, James A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews what has been learned about Delta Smelt and its status since the publication of The State of Bay-Delta Science, 2008 (Healey et al. 2008). The Delta Smelt is endemic to the upper San Francisco Estuary. Much of its historic habitat is no longer available and remaining habitat is increasingly unable to sustain the population. As a listed species living in the central node of California’s water supply system, Delta Smelt has been the focus of a large research effort to understand causes of decline and identify ways to recover the species. Since 2008, a remarkable record of innovative research on Delta Smelt has been achieved, which is summarized here. Unfortunately, research has not prevented the smelt’s continued decline, which is the result of multiple, interacting factors. A major driver of decline is change to the Delta ecosystem from water exports, resulting in reduced outflows and high levels of entrainment in the large pumps of the South Delta. Invasions of alien species, encouraged by environmental change, have also played a contributing role in the decline. Severe drought effects have pushed Delta Smelt to record low levels in 2014–2015. The rapid decline of the species and failure of recovery efforts demonstrate an inability to manage the Delta for the “co-equal goals” of maintaining a healthy ecosystem and providing a reliable water supply for Californians. Diverse and substantial management actions are needed to preserve Delta Smelt.

  17. Genetic variation in eastern North American and putatively introduced populations of Ceratocystis fimbriata f. platani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, C J B; Harrington, T C; Steimel, J; Capretti, P

    2004-10-01

    The plant pathogenic fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata f. platani attacks Platanus species (London plane, oriental plane and American sycamore) and has killed tens of thousands of plantation trees and street trees in the eastern United States, southern Europe and Modesto, California. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA fingerprints and alleles of eight polymorphic microsatellite markers of isolates of C. fimbriata from these regions delineated major differences in gene diversities. The 33 isolates from the eastern United States had a moderate degree of gene diversity, and unique genotypes were found at each of seven collection sites. Fingerprints of 27 isolates from 21 collection sites in southern Europe were identical with each other; microsatellite markers were monomorphic within the European population, except that three isolates differed at one locus each, due perhaps to recent mutations. The genetic variability of C. fimbriata f. platani in the eastern United States suggests that the fungus is indigenous to this region. The genetic homogeneity of the fungus in Europe suggests that this population has gone through a recent genetic bottleneck, perhaps from the introduction of a single genotype. This supports the hypothesis that the pathogen was introduced to Europe through Naples, Italy during World War II on infected crating material from the eastern United States. The Californian population may also have resulted from introduction of one or a few related genotypes because it, too, had a single nuclear and mitochondrial genotype and limited variation in microsatellite alleles.

  18. Population receptivity to tobacco advertising/promotions and exposure to anti-tobacco media: effect of Master Settlement Agreement in California: 1992-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpin, Elizabeth A; Distefan, Janet M; Pierce, John P

    2004-07-01

    Tobacco marketing contributes to adolescent smoking initiation, and the Master Settlement Agreement (MSA), therefore, included relevant restrictions. We analyzed data from large population surveys of Californians, conducted in 1992 (11,905 adults, ages 18 years and older), 1993 (5,531 adolescents, ages 12 to 17 years), and 1996 (6,252 adolescents, 18,616 adults) before the MSA, and in 1999 (6,090 adolescents, 14,729 adults) and 2002 (5,857 adolescents, 20,525 adults) following its implementation. Camel lost favorite-advertisement popularity after 1996, and between 1999 and 2002, there were large increases in the percentages declining to name a favorite advertisement. Ownership of tobacco promotional items declined from its peak in 1996. Furthermore, in 2002, close to 90% of adolescents and young adults reported seeing anti-tobacco messages on television in the past month, significantly higher than 1996. These trends indicate less receptivity to tobacco advertising and promotions following the MSA but leave room for additional restrictions to further reduce receptivity.

  19. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Alison; McMahon, James; Masanet, Eric; Lutz, Jim

    2008-08-13

    Residential water heating is a large source of energy use in California homes. This project took a life cycle approach to comparing tank and tankless water heaters in Northern and Southern California. Information about the life cycle phases was calculated using the European Union's Methodology study for EcoDesign of Energy-using Products (MEEUP) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Life Cycle Inventory (NREL LCI) database. In a unit-to-unit comparison, it was found that tankless water heaters would lessen impacts of water heating by reducing annual energy use by 2800 MJ/year (16% compared to tank), and reducing global warming emissions by 175 kg CO2 eqv./year (18% reduction). Overall, the production and combustion of natural gas in the use phase had the largest impact. Total waste, VOCs, PAHs, particulate matter, and heavy-metals-to-air categories were also affected relatively strongly by manufacturing processes. It was estimated that tankless water heater users would have to use 10 more gallons of hot water a day (an increased usage of approximately 20%) to have the same impact as tank water heaters. The project results suggest that if a higher percentage of Californians used tankless water heaters, environmental impacts caused by water heating would be smaller.

  20. Experimental infection of specific pathogen-free New Zealand White rabbits with five strains of amyxomatous myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlier, D; Cassart, D; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Coignoul, F; Vindevogel, H

    1999-11-01

    Myxomatosis is a specific disease of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) due to a virus belonging to the genus Leporipoxvirus. Forty-seven years after its deliberate introduction into Europe, the clinical aspects and the epizootiology of myxomatosis have changed. Two forms (nodular and amyxomatous) of the disease have been identified to date. A comparative study was made of the clinical signs, pathogenesis and gross lesions observed in male specific pathogen-free New Zealand White rabbits inoculated with five strains of amyxomatous myxoma virus. All five strains induced the characteristic amyxomatous myxomatosis clinical syndrome with clinical signs that differed only in intensity. The varying clinical intensity, together with the results of virological examination question the virulence of at least three of the five strains. Genomic analysis confirmed that the five strains came from the Lausanne strain introduced in 1952 in France and not from an unnoticed introduction of a Californian strain of myxoma virus. No link was found between the amyxomatous myxoma virus strains and the SG33 vaccine strain. 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  1. CO2-induced ocean acidification increases anxiety in rockfish via alteration of GABAA receptor functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trevor James; Holcombe, Adam; Tresguerres, Martin

    2014-01-22

    The average surface pH of the ocean is dropping at a rapid rate due to the dissolution of anthropogenic CO2, raising concerns for marine life. Additionally, some coastal areas periodically experience upwelling of CO2-enriched water with reduced pH. Previous research has demonstrated ocean acidification (OA)-induced changes in behavioural and sensory systems including olfaction, which is due to altered function of neural gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. Here, we used a camera-based tracking software system to examine whether OA-dependent changes in GABAA receptors affect anxiety in juvenile Californian rockfish (Sebastes diploproa). Anxiety was estimated using behavioural tests that measure light/dark preference (scototaxis) and proximity to an object. After one week in OA conditions projected for the next century in the California shore (1125 ± 100 µatm, pH 7.75), anxiety was significantly increased relative to controls (483 ± 40 µatm CO2, pH 8.1). The GABAA-receptor agonist muscimol, but not the antagonist gabazine, caused a significant increase in anxiety consistent with altered Cl(-) flux in OA-exposed fish. OA-exposed fish remained more anxious even after 7 days back in control seawater; however, they resumed their normal behaviour by day 12. These results show that OA could severely alter rockfish behaviour; however, this effect is reversible.

  2. Impacts of chronic N input on the carbon and nitrogen storage of a postfire Mediterranean-type shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourlitis, George L.; Hentz, Cloe S.

    2016-02-01

    Mediterranean-type shrublands are subject to periodic fire and high levels of nitrogen (N) deposition, but little is known how chronic N deposition affects carbon (C) and N storage during succession. We conducted a long-term experiment in Californian chaparral to test the hypothesis that chronic N enrichment would increase postfire C and N accumulation. The experimental layout consisted of a randomized design where four 10 × 10 m plots received 5 g N m-2 annually since 2003 and four 10 × 10 m plots served as controls. Aboveground and belowground C and N pools and fluxes were measured seasonally (every 3 months) for a period of 10 years. Added N rapidly increased soil extractable N pools and decreased soil pH; however, total soil C and N storage were not affected. Added N plots initially had significantly lower C and N storage than control plots, presumably because of nutrient losses from leaching and/or higher belowground C allocation. However, rates of aboveground N and C storage became significantly higher in added N plots after 4-5 years of exposure, thus increasing fuel buildup, which has implications for future fire intensity. This recovering chaparral stand is not yet "N saturated" after 10 years of chronic N input. However, N leaching continues to be higher in added N plots, indicating that postfire chaparral stands in high-N deposition areas can be important sources of N to groundwater/aquatic systems even if productivity is stimulated by N input.

  3. Bright patches on chernozems - from space to surface and soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanova, Anna; Burian, Libor; Holec, Juraj; Minár, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    located in areas with slope gradient between 3 and 6°, which is consider as the higher slope in this part of the hilly land. In 1949 the distribution of bright patches was more strongly related to higher slope gradient, the convex forms of profile curvature, and upslope position than in 2004. In the studied catchment, 34 soil profiles were described in the bright patches (identified in 2004), and 73% of them were situated on the convex forms of profile curvature. The most of the profiles were eroded (88%), the mean soil loss was 0.36 m (in the comparison with the reference soil profile), and in 55% of described soil profiles the entire mollic horizon was removed. The typical surface horizon contained 2.3% of humus and 21% of carbonates. The soil profiles were further compared with these situated in the areas neighbouring with the bright patches, and soil profiles on two valley cross-sections, in order to understand the soil redistribution in the catchment, and describe the differences between the bright and black patches in the chernozem landscape. This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the contract ESF-EC-0006-07 and APVV-0625-11; Anna Smetanová has received the support of the AgreenSkills fellowship (under grant agreement n°267196).

  4. Semeadura direta de forrageiras de estação fria em campo natural submetido à aplicação de herbicidas: II. Composição botânica No-till seeding of cold season forage on native pasture under herbicides application: II. Botanical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Pérez Gomar

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A semeadura direta de espécies forrageiras de estação fria permite reduzir a marcada estacionalidade da sua produção em campos naturais. Durante quatro anos, conduziu-se um experimento de aplicação de herbicidas sobre campo nativo, em um solo Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo, de textura arenosa do norte do Uruguai visando introduzir forrageiras de estação fria e estudar o impacto dos herbicidas na composição botânica de espécies estivais. Foram testadas doses de herbicidas (glifosate 1L ha-1, glifosate 4L ha-1, paraquat 3L ha-1 e testemunha, como tratamento principal, aplicadas no ano 1994, em um delineamento blocos ao acaso. A repetição ou não das mesmas doses no ano 1995 constituiu a subparcela e a aplicação ou não das mesmas doses no ano de 1996 constituiu a sub-subparcela. No levantamento de espécies da vegetação existentes no outono de 1998, observou-se que o maior distúrbio sobre a composição botânica do campo nativo foi provocado com a aplicação continuada da dose de 4L ha-1 de glifosate, onde foram identificadas seis espécies. No levantamento de espécies existentes no tratamento testemunha, no outono, foram identificadas onze espécies, sendo que as espécies Andropogon lateralis, Paspalum notatum, Conyza bonariensis, Eryngium horridum, Desmodium incanum, Cyperus sp. e Digitaria sp. constituiram 90% da composição botânica. Com a aplicação de herbicida, ocorreu uma substituição de espécies perenes por anuais.No-till seeding of winter species may reduce seasonal fluctuations of forage production of natural grasslands. An experiment of herbicide application on native grasses was conducted for four years, on a fine-loamy, mixed Mollic Hapludalf in northern of Uruguay to introduce winter forage and study the impact of herbicide on botanical composition of grass field. The experimental design was split-splitplot with three randomized blocks, with types and dosis of herbicides (gliphosate 1L ha-1, gliphosate 4L

  5. Dynamic C and N stocks - key factors controlling the C gas exchange of maize in heterogenous peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, M.; Hoffmann, M.; Hagemann, U.; Giebels, M.; Albiac Borraz, E.; Sommer, M.; Augustin, J.

    2015-05-01

    The drainage and cultivation of fen peatlands create complex small-scale mosaics of soils with extremely variable soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and groundwater levels (GWLs). To date, the significance of such sites as sources or sinks for greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4 is still unclear, especially if the sites are used for cropland. As individual control factors such as GWL fail to account for this complexity, holistic approaches combining gas fluxes with the underlying processes are required to understand the carbon (C) gas exchange of drained fens. It can be assumed that the stocks of SOC and N located above the variable GWL - defined as dynamic C and N stocks - play a key role in the regulation of the plant- and microbially mediated CO2 fluxes in these soils and, inversely, for CH4. To test this assumption, the present study analysed the C gas exchange (gross primary production - GPP; ecosystem respiration - Reco; net ecosystem exchange - NEE; CH4) of maize using manual chambers for 4 years. The study sites were located near Paulinenaue, Germany, where we selected three soil types representing the full gradient of GWL and SOC stocks (0-1 m) of the landscape: (a) Haplic Arenosol (AR; 8 kg C m-2); (b) Mollic Gleysol (GL; 38 kg C m-2); and (c) Hemic Histosol (HS; 87 kg C m-2). Daily GWL data were used to calculate dynamic SOC (SOCdyn) and N (Ndyn) stocks. Average annual NEE differed considerably among sites, ranging from 47 ± 30 g C m-2 yr-1 in AR to -305 ± 123 g C m-2 yr-1 in GL and -127 ± 212 g C m-2 yr-1 in HS. While static SOC and N stocks showed no significant effect on C fluxes, SOCdyn and Ndyn and their interaction with GWL strongly influenced the C gas exchange, particularly NEE and the GPP : Reco ratio. Moreover, based on nonlinear regression analysis, 86% of NEE variability was explained by GWL and SOCdyn. The observed high relevance of dynamic SOC and N stocks in the aerobic zone for plant and soil gas exchange likely originates from the

  6. Dynamic C and N stocks - key factors controlling the C gas exchange of maize in a heterogenous peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, M.; Hoffmann, M.; Hagemann, U.; Giebels, M.; Albiac Borraz, E.; Sommer, M.; Augustin, J.

    2014-11-01

    Drainage and cultivation of fen peatlands creates complex small-scale mosaics of soils with extremely variable soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and groundwater-level (GWL). To date, it remains unclear if such sites are sources or sinks for greenhouse gases like CO2 and CH4, especially if used for cropland. As individual control factors like GWL fail to account for this complexity, holistic approaches combining gas fluxes with the underlying processes are required to understand the carbon (C) gas exchange of drained fens. It can be assumed that the stocks of SOC and N located above the variable GWL - defined as dynamic C and N stocks - play a key role in the regulation of plant- and microbially mediated C gas fluxes of these soils. To test this assumption, the present study analysed the C gas exchange (gross primary production - GPP, ecosystem respiration - Reco, net ecosystem exchange - NEE, CH4) of maize using manual chambers for four years. The study sites were located near Paulinenaue, Germany. Here we selected three soils, which represent the full gradient in pedogenesis, GWL and SOC stocks (0-1 m) of the fen peatland: (a) Haplic Arenosol (AR; 8 kg C m-2); (b) Mollic Gleysol (GL; 38 kg C m-2); and (c) Hemic Histosol (HS; 87 kg C m-2). Daily GWL data was used to calculate dynamic SOC (SOCdyn) and N (Ndyn) stocks. Average annual NEE differed considerably among sites, ranging from 47 ± 30 g C m-2 a-1 at AR to -305 ± 123 g C m-2 a-1 at GL and -127 ± 212 g C m-2 a-1 at HS. While static SOC and N stocks showed no significant effect on C fluxes, SOCdyn and Ndyn and their interaction with GWL strongly influenced the C gas exchange, particularly NEE and the GPP:Reco ratio. Moreover, based on nonlinear regression analysis, 86% of NEE variability was explained by GWL and SOCdyn. The observed high relevance of dynamic SOC and N stocks in the aerobic zone for plant and soil gas exchange likely originates from the effects of GWL-dependent N availability on C formation and

  7. Long-term CO2 flux dynamics and soil C stock changes of a drained fen mire under different grassland management practices in Northeast Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Juergen; Giebels, Michael; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Hoffmann, Mathias; Sommer, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Fen mires, widely distributed in Germany and Northern Europe, contain extreme high amounts of carbon (up to 5000 t C per hectare). For this reason, they play an important role in the global cycle of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Currently more than 95% of all fen mires in central Europe are drained. Therefore, they are assumed to represent extremely strong sources for CO2,accompanied by a fast reduction of the peat carbon stocks. For a number of reasons it is not possible to overcome this problem by restoration measures like flooding at the most drained fen sites. Moreover, there are till now just few and contradictory information about the contribution of alternative land use forms like grassland extensification on the reduction of the CO2 source function of these organic soils. As a contribution to clearing this deficit, we have ongoingly measured the CO2 and CH4 exchange as well as the changes in C stock on a deeply drained fen mire near the village of Paulinenaue from 2007 till 2012. The measurement sites is located within the so-called Rhin-Havelluch, an 80000 ha shallow paludification mire complex in the northwest of Berlin. The investigation included extensively and intensively used meadows (one cut vs. three cuts) on two soil types with different C stocks (Hemic Rheic Histosol vs. Mollic Gleysol). We used transparent chambers for measuring the CO2 flux net ecosystem exchange (difference between gross primary production and ecosystem respiration) and non-transparent chambers for measuring the CO2 flux ecosystem respiration and the CH4 exchange. Determined soil stock changes based on a C budget approach, including cumulated annual net ecosystem exchange, cumulated CH4 exchange, C export by harvest, and C import by fertilization. All current C fluxes were influenced in a complex way by ground-water level, plant development, land use intensity (cut frequency) and current weather conditions. Averaged over the whole investigation

  8. The greenhouse gas balance of a drained fen peatland is mainly controlled by land-use rather than soil organic carbon content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Eickenscheidt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Drained organic soils are considered as hotspots for greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. Particularly arable lands and intensively used grasslands have been regarded as the main producers of carbon dioxide (CO2 and nitrous oxide (N2O. However, GHG balances of former peatlands and associated organic soils not considered as peatland according to the definition of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC have not been investigated so far. Therefore, our study addressed the question to what extent the soil organic carbon (SOC content affects the GHG release of drained organic soils under two different land-use types (arable land and intensively used grassland. Both land-use types were established on a mollic Gleysol (named Cmedium as well as on a sapric Histosol (named Chigh. The two soil types significantly differed in their SOC contents in the topsoil (Cmedium: 9.4–10.9% SOC; Chigh: 16.1–17.2% SOC. We determined GHG fluxes (CO2, N2O and methane (CH4 over a period of 2 years. The daily and annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE of CO2 was determined with the closed dynamic chamber technique and by modeling the ecosystem respiration (RECO and the gross primary production (GPP. N2O and CH4 were determined by the close chamber technique. Estimated NEE of CO2 significantly differed between the two land-use types with lower NEE values (−6 to 1707 g CO2–C m−2 yr−1 at the arable sites and higher values (1354 to 1823 g CO2–C m−2 yr−1 at the grassland sites. No effect on NEE was found regarding the SOC content. Significantly higher annual N2O exchange rates were observed at the arable sites (0.23–0.86 g N m−2 yr−1 compared to the grassland sites (0.12–0.31 g N m−2 yr−1. Furthermore, N2O fluxes from the Chigh sites significantly exceeded those of the Cmedium sites. CH4 fluxes were found to be close to zero at all plots. Estimated global warming potential, calculated for a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100 revealed a very high

  9. Semeadura direta de forrageiras de estação fria em campo natural com aplicação de herbicidas: I. Produção de forragem e contribuição relativa das espécies No-till seeding of cool season forages on native pasture with herbicides application: I. Forage yield and relative contribution of plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Pérez Gomar

    2004-06-01

    conducted during four years on a fine-loamy, mixed, active Mollic Hapludalf, sandy A horizon, in northern Uruguay. The experimental design was split-splitplot on randomized blocks, with types and dosis of herbicides (gliphosate 1L ha-1, gliphosate 4L ha-1, paraquat 3L ha-1, and a check without herbicides as main treatments, applied in 1994. The application or not of the same treatments in 1995 constituted the splitplots, and their reapplication or not in 1996 constituted the split-splitplots.The results showed that the greatest disturbance on the botanical composition of the native grassland was caused with the application of the higher systemic herbicide dose every year. When herbicides were not applied, there were eleven species present, but with 4L ha-1 of glifosate every year there were only six species, as well as a substitution of perennial species by annual ones. The use of paraquat and the lower gliphosate dose showed intermediate effects between the native grassland without applied herbicides, and the treatment with the higher gliphosate dose. On the other hand, dry matter yield of the introduced winter forage species was 63% greater in the higher gliphosate dose than in the treatment without herbicide application, due to greater control of the competition by the native grasses.

  10. Historia del descubrimiento de la coccidioidomicosis History of the discovery of the coccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Negroni

    2011-09-01

    those days. They did a very nice description of the clinical manifestations of the chronic disseminated form of coccidioidomycosis, the histopathology of skin and lymph nodes lesions, the microscopic aspects of the etiologic agent in tissues and they were able to reproduce the disease in several animal species. Posadas and Wernicke considered that this infectious disease was due to protozoa of the gender Psorosperma and they could not obtain cultures "in vitro". The first Californian patient suffering this mycosis was reported by Rixford and Gilchrist in San Francisco, in 1894. The patient was a rural worker who had come from San Joaquin Valley. They also thought that the etiologic agent was protozoa and they named this microorganism Coccidiodes immitis. In 1900, Ophüls and Moffit were able to reproduce this disease in guinea pigs by the inoculation with a white mould which had been isolated from patient's lesions. In this way they proved the fungal nature of the etiologic agent of coccidioidomycosis. After Ophüls studies the Californian researchers proved the existence of benign and self limited forms of infection, the diagnostic importance of coccidioidin skin and serologic tests, the infection portal of entry, the efficacy of different treatments and, more recently the genetic characteristics of the etiologic agents.

  11. Evaluation of the Decree on Emission Regulations for Medium-sized Combustion Installations; Evaluatie Besluit emissie-eisen middelgrote stookinstallaties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroon, P.; Plomp, A.J. [ECN Beleidsstudies, Petten (Netherlands); Van Berkel, L.; Burgers, W.; Hermans, L.; Groot, M.; Simonse, W. [Kenniscentrum InfoMil, Rijkswaterstaat Water, Verkeer en Leefomgeving, Den Haag (Netherlands); Kruithof, P.; Taal, M.; Van Bergen, J.; Walthaus, H. [Ministerie van Infrastructuur en Milieu IenM, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    In April 2010 the Dutch decree on emission limit values (ELVs) on medium-sized combustion installations entered into force. Bems sets ELVs for NOx, SO2, PM and CxHy. In 2013 the Bems legislation was transferred to the Activities Decree (In Dutch: Ab - Activiteitenbesluit). At the same time the Industrial Emissions Directive (IED) was implemented in the Ab. At the time Bems entered into force, it was decided to evaluate this legislation in 2014. Due to incorporation of Bems and the implementation of the IED in the Ab, it was decided to perform this evaluation a year earlier, thereby enabling the consideration of several stakeholders' comments on these implementations. This report presents the main conclusions of this evaluation. In Bems, combustion installations smaller than 50 MWth have to comply with ELVs based on Best Available Technology (BAT). Five possible ELVs have been discussed but not implemented in Bems, due to a lack of knowledge. These ELVs have been included in this evaluation. For gas engines < 2.5 MWth the NOx ELV could be more stringent, namely 140 mg/Nm{sup 3} instead of 340 mg/Nm{sup 3}; all ELVs are set at dry conditions in the flue gas and 3% O2. For biogas engines, introduction of the same ELV might be postponed until a comparable ELV enters into force in 2016 in a Californian region. Both the Californian ELV and this ELV need a gas cleaning technology. For (bio)diesel engines the dust ELV could be more stringent, namely 15 mg PM/Nm{sup 3} instead of 50 mg PM/Nm{sup 3}, while for NOx the ELV can be tightened from 450 mg/Nm{sup 3} to 250 mg/Nm{sup 3}. Both ELVs may be postponed until Tier 4 limits in the USA enter into force in the period 2014-2017. The Netherlands is one of the very few countries with CxHy ELVs for gas engines. The current CxHy ELV of 1500 mg C/Nm{sup 3} may be tightened to 1200 mg C/Nm{sup 3}. Other issues and changes, directly related to the Dutch legislation, have been discussed as well. These include exemption rules

  12. Controlling for race/ethnicity: a comparison of California commercial health plans CAHPS scores to NCBD benchmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Rebeca A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because California has higher managed care penetration and the race/ethnicity of Californians differs from the rest of the United States, we tested the hypothesis that California's lower health plan Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS® survey results are attributable to the state's racial/ethnic composition. Methods California CAHPS survey responses for commercial health plans were compared to national responses for five selected measures: three global ratings of doctor, health plan and health care, and two composite scores regarding doctor communication and staff courtesy, respect, and helpfulness. We used the 2005 National CAHPS 3.0 Benchmarking Database to assess patient experiences of care. Multiple stepwise logistic regression was used to see if patient experience ratings based on CAHPS responses in California commercial health plans differed from all other states combined. Results CAHPS patient experience responses in California were not significantly different than the rest of the nation after adjusting for age, general health rating, individual health plan, education, time in health plan, race/ethnicity, and gender. Both California and national patient experience scores varied by race/ethnicity. In both California and the rest of the nation Blacks tended to be more satisfied, while Asians were less satisfied. Conclusions California commercial health plan enrollees rate their experiences of care similarly to enrollees in the rest of the nation when seven different variables including race/ethnicity are considered. These findings support accounting for more than just age, gender and general health rating before comparing health plans from one state to another. Reporting on race/ethnicity disparities in member experiences of care could raise awareness and increase accountability for reducing these racial and ethnic disparities.

  13. Long term marijuana users seeking medical cannabis in California (2001–2007: demographics, social characteristics, patterns of cannabis and other drug use of 4117 applicants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bou-Matar Ché B

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cannabis (marijuana had been used for medicinal purposes for millennia. Cannabinoid agonists are now attracting growing interest and there is also evidence that botanical cannabis is being used as self-medication for stress and anxiety as well as adjunctive therapy by the seriously ill and by patients with terminal illnesses. California became the first state to authorize medicinal use of cannabis in 1996, and it was recently estimated that between 250,000 and 350,000 Californians may now possess the physician's recommendation required to use it medically. More limited medical use has also been approved in 12 additional states and new initiatives are being considered in others. Despite that evidence of increasing public acceptance of "medical" use, a definitional problem remains and all use for any purpose is still prohibited by federal law. Results California's 1996 initiative allowed cannabis to be recommended, not only for serious illnesses, but also "for any other illness for which marijuana provides relief," thus maximally broadening the range of allowable indications. In effect, the range of conditions now being treated with federally illegal cannabis, the modes in which it is being used, and the demographics of the population using it became potentially discoverable through the required screening of applicants. This report examines the demographic profiles and other selected characteristics of 4117 California marijuana users (62% from the Greater Bay Area who applied for medical recommendations between late 2001 and mid 2007. Conclusion This study yielded a somewhat unexpected profile of a hitherto hidden population of users of America's most popular illegal drug. It also raises questions about some of the basic assumptions held by both proponents and opponents of current policy.

  14. Long term marijuana users seeking medical cannabis in California (2001-2007): demographics, social characteristics, patterns of cannabis and other drug use of 4117 applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Thomas J; Bou-Matar, Ché B

    2007-11-03

    Cannabis (marijuana) had been used for medicinal purposes for millennia. Cannabinoid agonists are now attracting growing interest and there is also evidence that botanical cannabis is being used as self-medication for stress and anxiety as well as adjunctive therapy by the seriously ill and by patients with terminal illnesses. California became the first state to authorize medicinal use of cannabis in 1996, and it was recently estimated that between 250,000 and 350,000 Californians may now possess the physician's recommendation required to use it medically. More limited medical use has also been approved in 12 additional states and new initiatives are being considered in others. Despite that evidence of increasing public acceptance of "medical" use, a definitional problem remains and all use for any purpose is still prohibited by federal law. California's 1996 initiative allowed cannabis to be recommended, not only for serious illnesses, but also "for any other illness for which marijuana provides relief," thus maximally broadening the range of allowable indications. In effect, the range of conditions now being treated with federally illegal cannabis, the modes in which it is being used, and the demographics of the population using it became potentially discoverable through the required screening of applicants. This report examines the demographic profiles and other selected characteristics of 4117 California marijuana users (62% from the Greater Bay Area) who applied for medical recommendations between late 2001 and mid 2007. This study yielded a somewhat unexpected profile of a hitherto hidden population of users of America's most popular illegal drug. It also raises questions about some of the basic assumptions held by both proponents and opponents of current policy.

  15. Assessing local planning to control groundwater depletion: California as a microcosm of global issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater pumping has caused excessive groundwater depletion around the world, yet regulating pumping remains a profound challenge. California uses more groundwater than any other U.S. state, and serves as a microcosm of the adverse effects of pumping felt worldwide—land subsidence, impaired water quality, and damaged ecosystems, all against the looming threat of climate change. The state largely entrusts the control of depletion to the local level. This study uses internationally accepted water resources planning theories systematically to investigate three key aspects of controlling groundwater depletion in California, with an emphasis on local-level action: (a) making decisions and engaging stakeholders; (b) monitoring groundwater; and (c) using mandatory, fee-based and voluntary approaches to control groundwater depletion (e.g., pumping restrictions, pumping fees, and education about water conservation, respectively). The methodology used is the social science-derived technique of content analysis, which involves using a coding scheme to record these three elements in local rules and plans, and State legislation, then analyzing patterns and trends. The study finds that Californian local groundwater managers rarely use, or plan to use, mandatory and fee-based measures to control groundwater depletion. Most use only voluntary approaches or infrastructure to attempt to reduce depletion, regardless of whether they have more severe groundwater problems, or problems which are more likely to have irreversible adverse effects. The study suggests legal reforms to the local groundwater planning system, drawing upon its empirical findings. Considering the content of these recommendations may also benefit other jurisdictions that use a local groundwater management planning paradigm.

  16. Genetic variation of St. Louis encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Fiona J; Li, Li; Zhang, Shuliu; Guzman, Hilda; Beasley, David W C; Tesh, Robert B; Higgs, Stephen; Raj, Pushker; Bueno, Rudy; Randle, Yvonne; Chandler, Laura; Barrett, Alan D T

    2008-08-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) has been regularly isolated throughout the Americas since 1933. Previous phylogenetic studies involving 62 isolates have defined seven major lineages (I-VII), further divided into 14 clades. In this study, 28 strains isolated in Texas in 1991 and 2001-2003, and three older, previously unsequenced strains from Jamaica and California were sequenced over the envelope protein gene. The inclusion of these new sequences, and others published since 2001, has allowed better delineation of the previously published SLEV lineages, in particular the clades of lineage II. Phylogenetic analysis of 106 isolates identified 13 clades. All 1991 and 2001-2003 isolates from Nueces, Jefferson and Harris Counties (Texas Gulf Coast) group in clade IIB with other isolates from these counties isolated during the 1980s and 1990s. This lack of evidence for introduction of novel strains into the Texas Gulf Coast over a long period of time is consistent with overwintering of SLEV in this region. Two El Paso isolates, both from 2002, group in clade VA with recent Californian isolates from 1998-2001 and some South American strains with a broad temporal range. Overall, these data are consistent with multiple introductions of SLEV from South America into North America, and provide support for the hypothesis that in most situations, SLEV circulates within a locality, with occasional incursions from other areas. Finally, SLEV has much lower nucleotide (10.1 %) and amino acid variation (2.8 %) than other members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex (maximum variation 24.6 % nucleotide and 11.8 % amino acid).

  17. Topographic Controls on Southern California Ecosystem Function and Post-fire Recovery: a Satellite and Near-surface Remote Sensing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzari, George

    Southern Californian wildfires can influence climate in a variety of ways, including changes in surface albedo, emission of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the production of tropospheric ozone. Ecosystem post-fire recovery plays a key role in determining the strength, duration, and relative importance of these climate forcing agents. Southern California's ecosystems vary markedly with topography, creating sharp transitions with elevation, aspect, and slope. Little is known about the ways topography influences ecosystem properties and function, particularly in the context of post-fire recovery. We combined images from the USGS satellite Landsat 5 with flux tower measurements to analyze pre- and post-fire albedo and carbon exchanged by Southern California's ecosystems in the Santa Ana Mountains. We reduced the sources of external variability in Landsat images using several correction methods for topographic and bidirectional effects. We used time series of corrected images to infer the Net Ecosystem Exchange and surface albedo, and calculated the radiative forcing due to CO2 emissions and albedo changes. We analyzed the patterns of recovery and radiative forcing on north- and south-facing slopes, stratified by vegetation classes including grassland, coastal sage scrub, chaparral, and evergreen oak forest. We found that topography strongly influenced post-fire recovery and radiative forcing. Field observations are often limited by the difficulty of collecting ground validation data. Current instrumentation networks do not provide adequate spatial resolution for landscape-level analysis. The deployment of consumer-market technology could reduce the cost of near-surface measurements, allowing the installation of finer-scale instrument networks. We tested the performance of the Microsoft Kinect sensor for measuring vegetation structure. We used Kinect to acquire 3D vegetation point clouds in the field, and used these data to compute plant height, crown diameter, and

  18. High temperatures and inverted metamorphism in the schist of Sierra de Salinas, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, Steven; Ducea, Mihai N.

    2006-01-01

    New field and thermobarometric work in the Californian Salinian block clarifies current and pre-Tertiary relationships between the schist of Sierra de Salinas and Cretaceous arc-related granitic rocks. The contact is variably preserved as a brittle fault and high-temperature mylonite zone, the Salinas shear zone, which represents the contact between North America and sediments accreted above the Farallon slab between ˜ 76 Ma and ˜ 70 Ma. Near granulite facies, prograde replacement of hornblende with clinopyroxene is associated with deformation of plutonic rocks at the base of the upper plate. In the lower plate, the schist of Sierra de Salinas, garnet-biotite thermometry indicates decreasing temperatures down-section from at least 714 °C to ˜ 575 °C over an exposed thickness of ˜ 2.5 km, consistent with petrologic evidence of an inverted metamorphic gradient. The measured temperatures are significantly higher than observed at shallow levels above subducting slabs or predicted by 2D computational models assuming low shear stresses. Previous workers have called upon shear heating to explain similar observations in the correlative Pelona schist, an unlikely scenario given the results of recent rock deformation experiments which predict that feldspar-quartz-mica aggregates are far too weak to withstand stresses of ˜ 70 MPa required by the shear heating hypothesis. As an alternative, we propose that high temperatures resulted from conductive heating while the leading edge of the schist traveled ˜ 150 km beneath the recently active Salinian continental arc during the initiation of shallow subduction. Weakening of the schist due to high temperatures helped facilitate the collapse of the Salinian arc as the schist was emplaced. Schist emplacement coincided with loss of lower, mafic portions of the arc, and therefore evolution of the Southern California crust towards a more felsic composition.

  19. DJ Goa Gil: Kalifornian Exile, Dark Yogi and Dreaded Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham St John

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Connecting three generations of music enthusiasts, Goa Gil is an imposing figure in the world of psychedelic trance. If the title of his 2007 compilation registers intent, he is a Worldbridger. Bristling with motifs of world sacred sites and appropriated "tribal" icons, with Gil seated cross-legged upon the apex of a Mayan temple, the album's cover artwork confabulates the physical, spiritual and cultural worlds he professes to bridge. Leading world-wide "trance dance rituals" Goa Gil operates under the guise of a "techno-shaman", a "cyber-baba" and a selector/mixer of traditions whose rituals are reputedly timeless and universal. But this intent is performed amid a highly mobile lifestyle spread across diverse psychedelic music cultures, scenes and sensibilities in discrete times and places. From the 1960s Haight-Ashbury psychedelic rock scene, to the psychedelic jam band scene on Anjuna beach, Goa, India, in the 1970s, to the adoption of electronic music in a DJ-led scene in the 1980s, to the birth of "Goa trance" in the 1990s, to his selection, production and performance of dark psychedelic trance in the 1990s/2000s onwards, DJ Goa Gil's life spans a breathtaking panorama of this-worldly psychedelic scenes. Gil is a freak bricoleur, an anomalous figure who evades modest circumscription. A Californian exile and sanctioned Shaivite practitioner with a professional hankering for darkpsy (as a DJ-producer, a hippie broker of the "Cosmic Spirit" and a post-apocalyptic punk, he is a spiritual authority and cultural outlaw touring the planet with an improbable mix of semiotic and sonic baggage. What's more, celebrated as a champion of the "Goa vibe" or derogated as an accomplice to its demise, Gil is a controversial figure who is the embodiment of considerable ambivalence. This article explores this holiest of anomalies in the world of DJing.

  20. Professor Michael Levitt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma-Louise Davies

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Professor Michael Levitt (Stanford University, USA won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems—computational tools which can calculate the course of chemical reactions. Professor Levitt was born in Pretoria, South Africa; he came to the UK on a summer vacation aged 16, where he decided to stay and study for his A‑levels. His interest in the physics of living systems drove him to study biophysics at King’s College London, before securing a PhD position at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge. In the interim year between his degree and beginning his PhD, Professor Levitt worked at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, where he met his future wife. They married later that year and moved to Cambridge, where their three children were born. After completing his PhD, he spent time working in Israel, Cambridge, the Salk Institute and Stanford (both California. Since 1986, he has split his time between Israel and California. Outside of science, he is a keen hiker and he is well-known to have attended the eclectic ‘Burning Man’ Festival in California.[1]Professor Levitt visited the University of Warwick to speak at the Computational Molecular Science Annual Conference in March 2015. In this interview, Dr Gemma-Louise Davies, an Institute of Advanced Study Global Research Fellow, spoke to Professor Levitt about the importance of Interdisciplinarity in his field, role models in Academia, and his plans for the future.Image: Professor Michael Levitt (left with Dr Scott Habershon (right, organiser of the 2015 Computational Molecular Science Annual Conference during his visit to the University of Warwick in March 2015.[1] ‘Burning Man’ is a unique annual festival dedicated to community, art, music, self-expression and self-reliance. Tens of thousands of people flock to this temporary metropolis built in the Californian desert.

  1. New perspectives in human stem cell therapeutic research

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    Trounson Alan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human stem cells are in evaluation in clinical stem cell trials, primarily as autologous bone marrow studies, autologous and allogenic mesenchymal stem cell trials, and some allogenic neural stem cell transplantation projects. Safety and efficacy are being addressed for a number of disease state applications. There is considerable data supporting safety of bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cell transplants but the efficacy data are variable and of mixed benefit. Mechanisms of action of many of these cells are unknown and this raises the concern of unpredictable results in the future. Nevertheless there is considerable optimism that immune suppression and anti-inflammatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells will be of benefit for many conditions such as graft versus host disease, solid organ transplants and pulmonary fibrosis. Where bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells are being studied for heart disease, stroke and other neurodegenerative disorders, again progress is mixed and mostly without significant benefit. However, correction of multiple sclerosis, at least in the short term is encouraging. Clinical trials on the use of embryonic stem cell derivatives for spinal injury and macular degeneration are beginning and a raft of other clinical trials can be expected soon, for example, the use of neural stem cells for killing inoperable glioma and embryonic stem cells for regenerating β islet cells for diabetes. The change in attitude to embryonic stem cell research with the incoming Obama administration heralds a new co-operative environment for study and evaluation of stem cell therapies. The Californian stem cell initiative (California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has engendered global collaboration for this new medicine that will now also be supported by the US Federal Government. The active participation of governments, academia, biotechnology, pharmaceutical companies, and private investment is a powerful consortium for

  2. Scientific Visualizations of Multidimensional Data Collected from Various Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samilo, D.; Nayak, A.; Kilb, D.; Im, T.; Vernon, F. L.; Astiz, L.; Eakins, J.; Moschetti, M.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2006-12-01

    With the advances in the collection of greater quantities of higher caliber data, the field geophysics demands a new device to appropriately synthesize and compare the continuously-incoming slew of heterogeneous datasets from various branches of earth science. These data include earthquakes, sediment thickness, focal mechanisms, topography, tomography, Moho depth, aquifers, mines, geology, magnetics, faults, gravity, and photo-imagery. Due to the terminology, domain knowledge, and file formats associated with each data type and respective sub-discipline, the coherent translation of the data made accessible for all involved parties of researchers becomes a difficult task. Herein, interactive 3D visualizations succor in advancing comprehension of interdependencies between datasets, even manifesting never-before-seen relations previously masked by directly interpreting raw data. One such example would be the examination of Californian fault systems. To assay the discrete intricacies of fault systems, we use 3D visualizations to posit representations of first motion mechanisms as sets of dual nodal planes (strike & dip) into a geographically-bound environment; once this is accomplished, a mere visual inspection yields the identification of certain regions as of high fault complexity (e.g., Coalinga, the San Jacinto fault) and of relative fault simplicity (e.g., Parkfield). These visualizations can be appended with imagery from earthquake locations (lat, lon, depth), surface fault traces, and seismic instrument locations. Other projects include interpreting and using data recorded by the USArray Transportable Array network to generate temporal snapshots of how surface wave tomography derived from ambient seismic noise has evolved with the expansion of the sensor network. Likewise, these "snapshots" can be visualized to produce stunning presentations. Visualizations such as the aforementioned are available to the public through download at the Scripps Visualization

  3. Incorporating Problem-Based Learning Into A Petrology Course Through A Research Project In The Local Northern Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    A research project into the local petrology was integrated into the Spring 2016 Petrology and Optical Mineralogy course at California State University, Chico. This is a required majors course, typically taken during spring of the junior year, with an enrollment of 10-20 students. Since the labs for this course have a strong focus on petrography, a research project was introduced to give students experience in using a multi-faceted approach to investigate a problem. In many cases, this is their first taste of research. During the first week of the Spring 2016 class, students were introduced to the research question: In the broader context of Californian tectonic history, are the Bucks Lake and Grizzly plutons of the northern Sierra Nevada petrogenetically related? With faculty guidance over the course of the semester, students carried out fieldwork and sampling, lithologic description, selection of the best samples for further analysis, thin section production, petrographic description, and analysis and interpretation of published geochemical data. Research activities were strategically scheduled within the course framework such that students were academically prepared to carry out each task. Each student was responsible for generating all the data for one sample, and data were then collated as a class, so students wrote their individual final reports using all the data collected by the class. Careful scaffolding of writing assignments throughout the semester guided students through the preparation of an academic-style scientific report, while allowing for repeated feedback on their writing style and content. In mid-May, the class presented a group poster at the College of Natural Sciences annual poster symposium, and were awarded `Best Student Class Project' by the judges. Anecdotal student feedback indicated they highly valued the research experience and some were inspired to pursue individual undergraduate research projects under faculty supervision.

  4. Campylobacter pinnipediorum sp. nov., isolated from pinnipeds, comprising Campylobacter pinnipediorum subsp. pinnipediorum subsp. nov. and Campylobacter pinnipediorum subsp. caledonicus subsp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Maarten J; Miller, William G; Leger, Judy St; Chapman, Mary H; Timmerman, Arjen J; Duim, Birgitta; Foster, Geoffrey; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2017-06-01

    During independent diagnostic screenings of otariid seals in California (USA) and phocid seals in Scotland (UK), Campylobacter-like isolates, which differed from the established taxa of the genus Campylobacter, were cultured from abscesses and internal organs of different seal species. A polyphasic study was undertaken to determine the taxonomic position of these six isolates. The isolates were characterized by 16S rRNA gene and AtpA sequence analysis and by conventional phenotypic testing. The whole-genome sequences were determined for all isolates, and the average nucleotide identity (ANI) was determined. The isolates formed a separate phylogenetic clade, divergent from all other taxa of the genus Campylobacter and most closely related to Campylobactermucosalis. Although all isolates showed 100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence homology, AtpA and ANI analyses indicated divergence between the otariid isolates from California and the phocid isolates from Scotland, which warrants subspecies status for each clade. The two subspecies could also be distinguished phenotypically on the basis of catalase activity. This study shows clearly that the isolates obtained from pinnipeds represent a novel species within the genus Campylobacter, for which the name Campylobacter pinnipediorum sp. nov. is proposed. Within this novel species, the Californian isolates represent a separate subspecies, for which the name C. pinnipediorum subsp. pinnipediorum subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain for both this novel species and subspecies is RM17260T (=LMG 29472T=CCUG 69570T). The Scottish isolates represent another subspecies, for which the name C. pinnipediorum subsp. caledonicus subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of this subspecies is M302/10/6T (=LMG 29473T=CCUG 68650T).

  5. Constraining Anthropogenic and Biogenic Emissions Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kathleen M.

    Numerous gas-phase anthropogenic and biogenic compounds are emitted into the atmosphere. These gases undergo oxidation to form other gas-phase species and particulate matter. Whether directly or indirectly, primary pollutants, secondary gas-phase products, and particulate matter all pose health and environmental risks. In this work, ambient measurements conducted using chemical ionization mass spectrometry are used as a tool for investigating regional air quality. Ambient measurements of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) were conducted in Mexico City. A method of inferring the rate of ozone production, PO3, is developed based on observations of HO2NO 2, NO, and NO2. Comparison of this observationally based PO3 to a highly constrained photochemical box model indicates that regulations aimed at reducing ozone levels in Mexico City by reducing NOx concentrations may be effective at higher NO x levels than predicted using accepted photochemistry. Measurements of SO2 and particulate sulfate were conducted over the Los Angeles basin in 2008 and are compared to measurements made in 2002. A large decrease in SO2 concentration and a change in spatial distribution are observed. Nevertheless, only a modest reduction in sulfate concentration is observed at ground sites within the basin. Possible explanations for these trends are investigated. Two techniques, single and triple quadrupole chemical ionization mass spectrometry, were used to quantify ambient concentrations of biogenic oxidation products, hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde. The use of these techniques demonstrates the advantage of triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for separation of mass analogues, provided the collision-induced daughter ions are sufficiently distinct. Enhancement ratios of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde in Californian biomass burning plumes are presented as are concentrations of these compounds at a rural ground site downwind of Sacramento.

  6. Direct and indirect costs of dinitrogen fixation in Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501 and possible implications for the nitrogen cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eGroßkopf

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent detection of heterotrophic nitrogen (N2 fixation in deep waters of the southern Californian and Peruvian OMZ questions our current understanding of marine N2 fixation as a process confined to oligotrophic surface waters of the oceans. In experiments with Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501, a marine unicellular diazotrophic (N2-fixing cyanobacterium, we demonstrated that the presence of high nitrate concentrations (up to 800 µM had no inhibitory effect on growth and N2 fixation over a period of two weeks. In contrast, the environmental oxygen concentration significantly influenced rates of N2 fixation and respiration, as well as carbon and nitrogen cellular content of C. watsonii over a 24 hour period. Cells grown under lowered oxygen atmosphere (5% had a higher nitrogenase activity and respired less carbon during the dark cycle than under normal oxygen atmosphere (20%. Respiratory oxygen drawdown during the dark period could be fully explained (104% by energetic needs due to basal metabolism and N2 fixation at low oxygen, while at normal oxygen these two processes could only account for 40% of the measured respiration rate. Our results revealed that under normal oxygen concentration most of the energetic costs during N2 fixation (~60% are not derived from the process of N2 fixation per se but rather from the indirect costs incurred for the removal of intracellular oxygen or by the reversal of oxidative damage (e.g. nitrogenase de novo synthesis. Theoretical calculations suggest a slight energetic advantage of N2 fixation relative to assimilatory nitrate uptake for heterotrophic and phototrophic growth, when oxygen supply is in balance with the oxygen requirement for cellular respiration (i.e. energy generation for basal metabolism and N2 fixation. Taken together our results imply the existence of a niche for diazotrophic organisms inside oxygen minimum zones, which are predicted to further expand in the future ocean.

  7. A frameshift mutation in the melanophilin gene causes the dilute coat colour in rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanesi, L; Scotti, E; Allain, D; Dall'olio, S

    2014-04-01

    In rabbit, the dilute locus is determined by a recessive mutated allele (d) that causes the dilution of both eumelanic and pheomelanic pigmentations. In mice, similar phenotypes are determined by mutations in the myosin VA, Rab27a and melanophilin (MLPH) genes. In this study, we investigated the rabbit MLPH gene and showed that a mutation in this gene appears responsible for the dilute coat colour in this species. Checkered Giant F1 families segregating for black and grey (diluted or blue) coat colour were first genotyped for a complex indel in intron 1 of the MLPH gene that was completely associated with the coat colour phenotype (θ = 0.00; LOD = 4.82). Then, we sequenced 6357 bp of the MLPH gene in 18 rabbits of different coat colours, including blue animals. A total of 165 polymorphisms were identified: 137 were in non-coding regions and 28 were in coding exons. One of them was a frameshift deletion in exon 5. Genotyping the half-sib families confirmed the complete cosegregation of this mutation with the blue coat colour. The mutation was analysed in 198 rabbits of 23 breeds. All Blue Vienna and all other blue/grey/ash rabbits in other breeds (Californian, Castor Rex, Checkered Giant, English Spot, Fairy Marburg and Fairy Pearly) were homozygous for this deletion. The identification of MLPH as the responsible gene for the dilute locus in rabbit provides a natural animal model for human Griscelli syndrome type 3 and a new mutant to study the role of this gene on pigmentation. © 2013 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  8. Carcass traits and some blood stress parameters of summer stressed growing male rabbits of different breeds in response to boldenone undecylenate

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    Tamer Mohamed Abdel-Hamid

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of boldenone undecylenate (BUL on carcass traits and blood stress parameters in growing male rabbits. A total of 170 male rabbits comprising of three breeds namely New Zealand White (NZW; n=55, Californian (CAL; n=50, and Rex (RX; n=65 were taken for this study. The rabbits of each breed were divided into three groups viz., D0 (control, D1 provided with normal dose of BUL (at 4.4 mg/kg body weight, and D2 provided with BUL (at 8.8 mg/kg bwt. The rabbits were kept under temperature ranged from 28-32 and deg;C during the experimental period. Carcass traits of the rabbits were studied, and the blood parameters were measured by radioimmunoassay. Most of carcass traits, globulin and cholesterol levels in the serum were significantly improved for the injection of BUL at normal dose. Plasma corticosterone levels in normal dose injected rabbits were lowered by 27.21 and 15.25% as compared to controls and double dose, respectively. The effect of interaction between dose and breed was non-significant (P>0.05 on almost all carcass traits and blood parameters. In conclusion, BUL improves all carcass traits in male growing rabbits when injected with normal dose of BUL, with the exception of dressing-out%, and has a significant lowering effect on stress hormone (i.e., corticosterone, and increasing effect on serum total protein, globulin and cholesterol. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2015; 2(3.000: 263-270

  9. The effect of agency budgets on minimizing greenhouse gas emissions from road rehabilitation policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Darren; Madanat, Samer; Horvath, Arpad

    2015-11-01

    Transportation agencies are being urged to reduce their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. One possible solution within their scope is to alter their pavement management system to include environmental impacts. Managing pavement assets is important because poor road conditions lead to increased fuel consumption of vehicles. Rehabilitation activities improve pavement condition, but require materials and construction equipment, which produce GHG emissions as well. The agency’s role is to decide when to rehabilitate the road segments in the network. In previous work, we sought to minimize total societal costs (user and agency costs combined) subject to an emissions constraint for a road network, and demonstrated that there exists a range of potentially optimal solutions (a Pareto frontier) with tradeoffs between costs and GHG emissions. However, we did not account for the case where the available financial budget to the agency is binding. This letter considers an agency whose main goal is to reduce its carbon footprint while operating under a constrained financial budget. A Lagrangian dual solution methodology is applied, which selects the optimal timing and optimal action from a set of alternatives for each segment. This formulation quantifies GHG emission savings per additional dollar of agency budget spent, which can be used in a cap-and-trade system or to make budget decisions. We discuss the importance of communication between agencies and their legislature that sets the financial budgets to implement sustainable policies. We show that for a case study of Californian roads, it is optimal to apply frequent, thin overlays as opposed to the less frequent, thick overlays recommended in the literature if the objective is to minimize GHG emissions. A promising new technology, warm-mix asphalt, will have a negligible effect on reducing GHG emissions for road resurfacing under constrained budgets.

  10. Using a dynamical advection to reconstruct a part of the SSH evolution in the context of SWOT, application to the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogé, Marine; Morrow, Rosemary; Ubelmann, Clément; Dibarboure, Gérald

    2017-08-01

    The main oceanographic objective of the future SWOT mission is to better characterize the ocean mesoscale and sub-mesoscale circulation, by observing a finer range of ocean topography dynamics down to 20 km wavelength. Despite the very high spatial resolution of the future satellite, it will not capture the time evolution of the shorter mesoscale signals, such as the formation and evolution of small eddies. SWOT will have an exact repeat cycle of 21 days, with near repeats around 5-10 days, depending on the latitude. Here, we investigate a technique to reconstruct the missing 2D SSH signal in the time between two satellite revisits. We use the dynamical interpolation (DI) technique developed by Ubelmann et al. (2015). Based on potential vorticity (hereafter PV) conservation using a one and a half layer quasi-geostrophic model, it features an active advection of the SSH field. This model has been tested in energetic open ocean regions such as the Gulf Stream and the Californian Current, and has given promising results. Here, we test this model in the Western Mediterranean Sea, a lower energy region with complex small scale physics, and compare the SSH reconstruction with the high-resolution Symphonie model. We investigate an extension of the simple dynamical model including a separated mean circulation. We find that the DI gives a 16-18% improvement in the reconstruction of the surface height and eddy kinetic energy fields, compared with a simple linear interpolation, and a 37% improvement in the Northern Current subregion. Reconstruction errors are higher during winter and autumn but statistically, the improvement from the DI is also better for these seasons.

  11. CAD/CAM Zirconia vs. slip-cast glass-infiltrated Alumina/Zirconia all-ceramic crowns: 2-year results of a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Cavit Çehreli

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to compare the early clinical outcome of slip-cast glass-infiltrated Alumina/Zirconia and CAD/CAM Zirconia all-ceramic crowns. A total of 30 InCeram® Zirconia and Cercon® Zirconia crowns were fabricated and cemented with a glass ionomer cement in 20 patients. At baseline, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year recall appointments, Californian Dental Association (CDA quality evaluation system was used to evaluate the prosthetic replacements, and plaque and gingival index scores were used to explore the periodontal outcome of the treatments. No clinical sign of marginal discoloration, persistent pain and secondary caries was detected in any of the restorations. All InCeram® Zirconia crowns survived during the 2-year period, although one nonvital tooth experienced root fracture coupled with the fracture of the veneering porcelain of the restoration. One Cercon® Zirconia restoration fractured and was replaced. According to the CDA criteria, marginal integrity was rated excellent for InCeram® Zirconia (73% and Cercon® Zirconia (80% restorations, respectively. Slight color mismatch rate was higher for InCeram® Zirconia restorations (66% than Cercon® Zirconia (26% restorations. Plaque and gingival index scores were mostly zero and almost constant over time. Time-dependent changes in plaque and gingival index scores within and between groups were statistically similar (p>0.05. This clinical study demonstrates that single-tooth InCeram® Zirconia and Cercon® Zirconia crowns have comparable early clinical outcome, both seem as acceptable treatment modalities, and most importantly, all-ceramic alumina crowns strengthened by 25% zirconia can sufficiently withstand functional load in the posterior zone.

  12. Feasibility of Mating Disruption for Agricultural Pest Eradication in an Urban Environment: Light Brown Apple Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in Perth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soopaya, Rajendra; Woods, Bill; Lacey, Ian; Virdi, Amandip; Mafra-Neto, Agenor; Suckling, David Maxwell

    2015-08-01

    Eradication technologies are needed for urban and suburban situations, but may require different technologies from pest management in agriculture. We investigated mating disruption of a model moth species recently targeted for eradication in Californian cities, by applying dollops of SPLAT releasing a two-component sex pheromone of the light brown apple moth in 2-ha plots in low-density residential Perth, Australia. The pheromone technology was applied manually at ∼1.5 m height to street and garden trees, scrubs, and walls at 500 dollops per hectare of 0.8 g containing ∼80 mg active two-component pheromone. Catches of male moths were similar among all plots before treatment, but in treated areas (six replicates) pheromone trap catches were substantially reduced for up to 29 wk posttreatment, compared with untreated control plot catches (three replicates). The treatment with pheromone reduced catch to virgin females by 86% (P < 0.001) and reduced the occurrence of mating by 93%, compared with three equivalent untreated control plot catches (P < 0.001). Eradication programs are following an upward trend with globalization and the spread of invasive arthropods, which are often first detected in urban areas. Eradication requires a major increase in the communication distance between individuals, but this can be achieved using sex pheromone-based mating disruption technology, which is very benign and suitable for sensitive environments. The need for new socially acceptable tools for eradication in urban environments is likely to increase because of increasing need for eradications.

  13. Immigration and homeownership: the cases of California and Spain, Inmigración y propiedad de la vivienda: los casos de California y España, 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda YÉPEZ MARTÍNEZ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the evolution of foreign homeownership in Spain between 2001 and 2006, seen as an indicator of integration of migrants in host countries. Other goals, derived from the former, are to determine the influence of nationality in the homeownership and to quantify the likelihood of foreigners to live under this form of tenure. Having modelled the socio-demographic variables between the years 2001 and 2006, the results show a lower propensity of foreign born people to live through ownership than nationals and, what is most important, that the Spanish residential system demands more efforts for foreigners so as to live in property than the Californian system.En los últimos años California y España, dos contextos donde predomina la tenencia de la vivienda en propiedad, han recibido un gran volumen de inmigrantes y han experimentado una burbuja inmobiliaria que ha acabado por desinflarse. El objetivo de este artículo es analizar la propiedad de la vivienda de los extranjeros en ambos contextos entre 2001 y 2006, considerándola como un indicador de integración de los inmigrantes en las sociedades de acogida. Otros objetivos, derivados del anterior, son determinar la influencia de la nacionalidad en la propiedad de la vivienda y analizar cómo influyen los factores sociodemográficos para que nacionales y extranjeros vivan en propiedad. La modelización de las variables sociodemográficas muestra que entre 2001 y 2006 la propensión a vivir en propiedad de los extranjeros es inferior a la de los nacionales y, lo que es más importante, que el sistema residencial español les exige más esfuerzo que el californiano para vivir en propiedad.

  14. A 50,000 year insect record from Rancho La Brea, Southern California: Insights into past climate and fossil deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Anna R.; Southon, John R.; Will, Kipling; Kirby, Matthew E.; Aalbu, Rolf L.; Markey, Molly J.

    2017-07-01

    Rigorously studied and dated Late Quaternary paleoenvironmental reconstructions from Ranch La Brea (RLB) and the Los Angeles Basin are scarce. Here, we use data from AMS radiocarbon dated insect fragments to infer local climates over the past 50,000 years. Our results indicate: 1) Quaternary insect remains can be located with great accuracy in radiocarbon time, and 2) well-dated and documented climate indicator beetle species are sensitive proxies for environmental change in the Los Angeles Basin. A total of 182 extant RLB ground and darkling beetle species (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Tenebrionidae) were radiocarbon dated. The resulting radiocarbon dates form a semi-continuous range from ∼50 to 28, 16-7.5, and 4 kcal yrs BP to the present. Associated insect climate ranges indicate past conditions consistent with, or very similar to, the current Los Angeles Basin Mediterranean climate. Importantly, these insect data suggest higher temperatures and aridity than inferred previously from other RLB proxies. Furthermore, wider-than-assumed dating spreads for some deposits emphasize the lack of biostratigraphy for RLB, and challenge inferences based on limited sets of radiocarbon dates and assumptions about stratigraphic integrity. Our results demonstrate the necessity to independently radiocarbon date each taxon. The insect paleoclimate interpretations were compared to regional pollen data, primarily from various southern Californian sites including Lake Elsinore and Santa Barbara Basin. These comparisons reveal an important difference in climate interpretations for the last Glacial: the RLB insect data suggest climate similar to the current one, while the regional pollen data have been interpreted as indicating a climate wetter than present.

  15. Energy and air emission effects of water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Jennifer R; Horvath, Arpad

    2009-04-15

    Life-cycle air emission effects of supplying water are explored using a hybrid life-cycle assessment For the typically sized U.S. utility analyzed, recycled water is preferable to desalination and comparable to importation. Seawater desalination has an energy and air emission footprint that is 1.5-2.4 times larger than that of imported water. However, some desalination modes fare better; brackish groundwater is 53-66% as environmentally intensive as seawater desalination. The annual water needs (326 m3) of a typical Californian that is met with imported water requires 5.8 GJ of energy and creates 360 kg of CO2 equivalent emissions. With seawater desalination, energy use would increase to 14 GJ and 800 kg of CO2 equivalent emissions. Meeting the water demand of California with desalination would consume 52% of the state's electricity. Supply options were reassessed using alternative electricity mixes, including the average mix of the United States and several renewable sources. Desalination using solar thermal energy has lower greenhouse gas emissions than that of imported and recycled water (using California's electricity mix), but using the U.S. mix increases the environmental footprint by 1.5 times. A comparison with a more energy-intensive international scenario shows that CO2 equivalent emissions for desalination in Dubai are 1.6 times larger than in California. The methods, decision support tool (WEST), and results of this study should persuade decision makers to make informed water policy choices by including energy consumption and material use effects in the decision-making process.

  16. Molecular systematics of new world gopher, bull, and pinesnakes (Pituophis: Colubridae), a transcontinental species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Robles, J A; De Jesús-Escobar, J M

    2000-01-01

    Pituophis melanoleucus (gopher, bull, and pinesnakes) is among the most widely distributed polytypic species complexes in North America, with most authors recognizing from a single transcontinental species (the melanoleucus complex, composed of 15 subspecies) to four (monotypic and polytypic) species. We used mitochondrial gene sequences from the two middle American species, P. deppei and P. lineaticollis, and from 13 subspecies from most of the range of the melanoleucus complex to test various phylogenetic hypotheses for Pituophis. Maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods identified the same major clades within Pituophis and indicated that two segments of the melanoleucus complex, the lodingi-melanoleucus-mugitus eastern pinesnake clade and the affinis-annectens-bimaris-catenifer-deserticola- sayi-ruthveni-vertebr alis clade from central and western United States and northern Mexico, represent divergent, allopatric lineages with no known intergradation zone. We recognize each of these two groupings as a different species. Our data also indicate that some ruthveni are more closely related to sayi than to other ruthveni. Nonetheless, ruthveni is an allopatric taxon diagnosable from its closest relatives by a combination of morphometric characters, and because it is likely that at least some of these traits are independent and genetically inherited, we interpret this as evidence that ruthveni has attained the status of independent evolutionary lineage, despite the fact that it retains strong genetic affinities with sayi. The endemic Baja Californian gopher snakes (bimaris and vertebralis) are considered by some taxonomists as a different species, P. vertebralis, but we discovered that these serpents belong to two different clades and hence we do not agree with the recognition of P. vertebralis as presently defined. In summary, we believe that three distinct species are included in the melanoleucus complex, Pituophis melanoleucus (sensu stricto), P. catenifer

  17. Body mass index and prostate cancer severity: do obese men harbor more aggressive disease on prostate biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamie, Karim; Oberfoell, Stephanie; Kwan, Lorna; Labo, Jessica; Wei, John T; Litwin, Mark S

    2013-05-01

    To examine the association of obesity with the prebiopsy prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, clinical stage, and D'Amico tumor risk in 2 independent cohorts of men with prostate cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of men with biopsy-proven prostate cancer from California's Improving Access, Counseling and Treatment for Californians with Prostate Cancer program and from a random sample of men treated at the University of Michigan. We performed multivariate analyses to examine the relationship of body mass index (BMI) with the prebiopsy PSA level, Gleason score, clinical stage, and D'Amico tumor risk, while controlling for demographics. The mean age was 61.5 years, and the median prebiopsy PSA level was 6.7 ng/mL. Greater than 70% of men were at least overweight. On univariate analysis, the BMI was not associated with prebiopsy PSA levels, Gleason score, or D'Amico tumor risk. On multivariate analysis, we found no association between BMI and log-transformed PSA, Gleason score, clinical T stage, or D'Amico risk. Advancing age was associated with a greater risk of a higher prebiopsy PSA level, Gleason score, and D'Amico tumor risk. Obese men with prostate cancer were no more likely to have a higher prebiopsy PSA level, Gleason score, clinical T stage, or D'Amico risk than those of normal weight. Although we do not know whether the BMI affected the prebiopsy PSA values in those without a diagnosis of prostate cancer, our findings suggest that the BMI does not affect the interpretation of the prebiopsy PSA levels in those with cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of diet supplementation with live yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae on performance of rabbit does and their progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Belhassen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the effect of live yeast supplementation in the diet of rabbit does on their mortality and reproductive performance and the performance of their progeny. A total of 52 cross-bred rabbit does (New Zealand×Californian were divided into 2 groups differing in diet offered during 2 reproductive cycles and containing (group S; n=26 or not (group C; n=26 1 g of yeast (Actisaf Sc 47, S.I. LESAFFRE, France/kg of feed. Natural mating was performed 11 d after kindling and kits were weaned at 28 d of age. Body weight of litters was measured at birth, 21 d and at 28 d of age (weaning. Mortality of kits and rabbit does was monitored daily, and fertility of rabbit does and viability rate of kits at birth were also determined. Weight and litter size at birth and at weaning, litter weight gain during lactation and length of gestation were similar between the 2 groups during the 2 cycles. The mortality of does during the experiment was higher in group C than in group S (27 vs. 4%; P<0.05. Fertility rate of rabbits does and viability rate of kits at birth were higher (P<0.05 in rabbits fed with the supplemented diet than those with the control diet during the second lactation. In the first cycle, kit mortality was lower in S group (15.5% than the C group (24.7% during the first 21 d (P<0.05. However, no difference was observed during the second lactation. In conclusion, our results suggest that the inclusion of yeast in the diet of rabbit does could trigger positive effects on the fertility and mortality of rabbit does, as well as on the viability rate of kits at birth.

  19. Utilizing Electric Vehicles to Assist Integration of Large Penetrations of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Gowri, Krishnan

    2012-11-30

    Executive Summary Introduction and Motivation This analysis provides the first insights into the leveraging potential of distributed photovoltaic (PV) technologies on rooftop and electric vehicle (EV) charging. Either of the two technologies by themselves - at some high penetrations – may cause some voltage control challenges or overloading problems, respectively. But when combined, there – at least intuitively – could be synergistic effects, whereby one technology mitigates the negative impacts of the other. High penetration of EV charging may overload existing distribution system components, most prominently the secondary transformer. If PV technology is installed at residential premises or anywhere downstream of the secondary transformer, it will provide another electricity source thus, relieving the loading on the transformers. Another synergetic or mitigating effect could be envisioned when high PV penetration reverts the power flow upward in the distribution system (from the homes upstream into the distribution system). Protection schemes may then no longer work and voltage violation (exceeding the voltage upper limited of the ANSI voltage range) may occur. In this particular situation, EV charging could absorb the electricity from the PV, such that the reversal of power flow can be reduced or alleviated. Given these potential mutual synergistic behaviors of PV and EV technologies, this project attempted to quantify the benefits of combining the two technologies. Furthermore, of interest was how advanced EV control strategies may influence the outcome of the synergy between EV charging and distributed PV installations. Particularly, Californian utility companies with high penetration of the distributed PV technology, who have experienced voltage control problems, are interested how intelligent EV charging could support or affect the voltage control

  20. Using stress shadows to invert for changes in local stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, C. D.; Tiampo, K. F.; Rundle, J.

    2009-12-01

    When a large earthquake occurs, stresses in the crust are redistributed creating regions that experience an increase in stress while others experience a stress decrease which are called stress shadows. In many studies, these stress shadows are said to contain less seismic activity than the average background rate, and so correlations are made between lack of seismicity or a decrease in seismicity rate and the stress shadow locations and magnitudes (the amount of decrease of stress). In this study the opposite procedure is applied: We use seismicity rate changes to determine information about the stress changes due to a large magnitude earthquake, as well as its effect on the stress field itself. We use the Pattern Informatics method to examine the changes in seismicity rate, as it is an objective measure of the rate changes with respect to the regional background rate. The results from this analysis are then used to invert for, with a genetic algorithm, parameters that define the stress field such as the principal stress orientations, the coefficient of friction, and the calculation depth. The modelled stress data is calculated using Coulomb stress change theory and the Coulomb 3 program, and it is trying to produce the same size and location of stress shadows as seen in the seismicity rate change data. Four different Californian earthquakes were chosen in order to determine their effect on the local stress field: (1) 1987 Superstition Hills (2) 1989 Loma Prieta (3) 1992 Landers and (4) 1994 Northridge. In order to find out the effect that each of the parameters have on the modelled results, we performed a Monte Carlo simulation to find the errors associated with each, and a sensitivity analysis to determine the magnitude of change that each one produces. We hope with this new information of the changes incurred due to a large magnitude earthquake occurrence, that modelling of earthquakes can be advanced, and our understanding of their mechanics enhanced.

  1. Increased Extreme Hydrological Events and Decreased Water Supply Availability for the Southwestern United States Projected by Mid-Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagan, B. R.; Ashfaq, M.; Rastogi, D.; Naz, B. S.; Kao, S. C.; Mei, R.; Kendall, D. R.; Pal, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Semi-arid Southern California relies primarily on imported water originating mostly from snowpack in basins outside of the region including the San-Joaquin River, Tulare Lake, Sacramento River, Owens Valley, Mono Lake, and Colorado River basins. This study provides an integrated ensemble approach to assessing climate change impacts on the hydrologic cycle and hydrologic extremes for all water supplies to Southern California. Output from 10 global climate models is used to force a regional climate model and hydrological model resulting in high-resolution 4.17-km output for the region. Greenhouse gas concentrations are prescribed according to historical values for the present-day (1965-2005) and the IPCC Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 for the near to mid term future (2010-2050). On the annual timescale, temperature, precipitation and evaporation increase throughout the majority of the study area. With increased temperatures, precipitation is less likely to fall as snow, decreasing snowpack and natural storage and shifting peak flows to earlier in the year. Daily annual maximum runoff and precipitation events are projected to significantly increase in intensity and frequency by mid-century. The 50-year event, for example, becomes approximately five times more likely in the Colorado River basin and twice as likely in the other basins. In densely populated coastal Southern Californian cities, extreme flood events become three to five times as likely substantially increasing the risk of overburdening flood control systems and potential widespread flooding. The escalating likelihood of the combined effects of runoff occurring earlier in the year and in significantly higher amounts poses a substantial flood control risk requiring adaptation measures such as water release from reservoirs. Significant snowpack reductions and increased flood risk will likely necessitate additional multiyear storage solutions for urban and agricultural regions in the Southwestern US.

  2. Regional CalVal of Altimeter Range at Non-Dedicated Sites in Preparation f Sentinel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancet, M.; Watson, C.; Haines, B.; Bonnefond, P.; Lyard, F.; Femenias, P.; Guinle, T.

    2015-12-01

    In situ calibration ensures regular and long-term control of the altimeter sea surface height (SSH) time series through comparisons with independent records. Usually, in situ calibration and validation of altimeter SSH is undertaken at specific CALVAL sites through the direct comparison of the altimeter data with in situ data [1]. However, NOVELTIS has developed a regional CALVAL technique, which aims at increasing the number and the repeatability of the altimeter bias assessments by determining the altimeter bias both on overflying passes and on satellite passes located far away from the calibration site. In principle this extends the single site approach to a wider regional scale, thus reinforcing the link between the local and the global CALVAL analyses. It also provides a means to maintain a calibration time series through periods of data-outage at a specific dedicated calibration site. The regional method was initially developed at the Corsican calibration sites of Senetosa and Ajaccio. The method was used to compute the biases of Jason-1, Jason-2 and Envisat (before and after the orbit change in 2010) at both sites, and proved its stability and generality through this cross-calibration exercise [2]. These last years, the regional method was successfully implemented at the Californian site of Harvest and at the Australian site of Bass Strait, in close collaboration with JPL and the University of Tasmania, respectively. These recent studies gave the first Envisat absolute bias estimates at non-dedicated sites using the same method, and showed high consistency with the analyses of the global CALVAL teams and the work of the in situ CALVAL teams. These results highlight the numerous advantages of this technique for monitoring missions on any orbits such as the future Sentinel-3 and Jason-CS/Sentinel-6 missions.

  3. Establishment failure in biological invasions: a case history of Littorina littorea in California, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The early stages of biological invasions are rarely observed, but can provide significant insight into the invasion process as well as the influence vectors have on invasion success or failure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized three newly discovered populations of an introduced gastropod, Littorina littorea (Linné, 1758, in California, USA, comparing them to potential source populations in native Europe and the North American East Coast, where the snail is also introduced. Demographic surveys were used to assess spatial distribution and sizes of the snail in San Francisco and Anaheim Bays, California. Mitochondrial DNA was sequenced and compared among these nascent populations, and various populations from the North American East Coast and Europe, to characterize the California populations and ascertain their likely source. Demographic and genetic data were considered together to deduce likely vectors for the California populations. We found that the three large California L. littorea populations contained only adult snails and had unexpectedly high genetic diversity rather than showing an extreme bottleneck as typically expected in recent introductions. Haplotype diversity in Californian populations was significantly reduced compared to European populations, but not compared to East Coast populations. Genetic analyses clearly suggested the East Coast as the source region for the California introductions. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The California L. littorea populations were at an early, non-established phase of invasion with no evidence of recruitment. The live seafood trade is the most likely invasion vector for these populations, as it preferentially transports large numbers of adult L. littorea, matching the demographic structure of the introduced California L. littorea populations. Our results highlight continued operation of live seafood trade vectors and the influence of vectors on the demographic and

  4. The Processing of Turning Colour Olives of Oblica Cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea Kulišić

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research the observation of the preservation process of turning colour olives of Oblica cultivar (an autochthonous Croatian cultivar processed according to the Californian type of processing has been carried out. Although the oblica cultivar is the most frequent cultivar in Croatian orchards, it is absolutely unexplored concerning the concentration of polyphenolic compounds (oleuropein and its derivatives as well as concerning the composition of natural microflora in the fruit. It has been very important to determine to what extent the choice of preserving technology is optimal for the cultivar’s particularities. The changes of fundamental physical and chemical features of brine (total acidity, pH value, the concentration of sodium chloride, the concentration of sugar, and brine temperature have been screened during the process of preservation. The appearance of the lactobacilli population has also been observed. The Lactobacillus plantarum species has been isolated and identified in this population on the seventh day after the fruit has been put in brine. The Lactobacillus plantarum species has been isolated and identified by means of the API 50 CHL (“bioMérieux”, France biochemical test and the APILAB PLUS (“bioMérieux”, France software. During further phases of the process, no appearance of the lactobacilli has been identified. On the basis of our physical and chemical examinations, we have concluded that the type of processing of turning colour olives of Oblica cultivar (which was applied without a complete knowledge of the Oblica’s particularities did not give optimal and expected values (low brine temperature, exceptionally high acidity of the medium. We have also concluded that it is necessary for further research to include the examinations of the portion of polyphenolic compounds in the fruit, as well as the examinations of the composition of naturally present microflora. Both examinations represent the

  5. Clinical performance of enamel-dentine bonded all-ceramic restorations: retrospective evaluation in a postgraduate clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Printzell, Lisa; Haseid, Carl Fredrik; Ekfeldt, Anders; Hjortsjö, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical survival and success of five dif- ferent types of adhesive bonded all-ceramic restorations, in a postgraduate clinic. All ceramic enamel-dentin adhesive bonded restorations, either partial (n=94) or full coverage (n=145), were assessed by clinical examination using a modified Californian Dental Association (CDA) system for quality evaluation of dental care and a questionnaire assessing patient satis- faction (VAS) of 29 subjects with 239 restorations. The same 3-step adhesive bonding system in combination with dual-cured resin composite cement was used for all restorations Rubber dam was used for moisture control.The ceramics were evaluated with respect to patient satisfaction, esthetics, technical and biological complications. The reasons for treatment were mineralisation disorders (n=82), trauma (n=40), esthetic (n=57) and pathological tooth wear (n=60). Observation period for the restorations was up to 71 month (mean 33). All restorations were in place at the examinations (l00% survival rate). Number offractures and infractions were 28 and 20 respectively giving a 69% success rate. No significant difference was observed between full coverage and partial coverage restorations. Most of the fractures were small chippings of the veneering porcelain. From a biological point of view subgingival location of the restoration margin showed a significant correlation with bleeding on probing.The esthetic outcome seemed to depend on the ability of the selected veneering material to mask a severe tooth discoloration.The patients reported a high degree of satisfaction with both the esthetics and the function of their restorations. In conclusion all-ceramic enamel-dentin-bonded restorations demonstrated good short-term survival rate.The success rate was found to be lower. Both technical and biological complica- tions were present but mainly without any need of correction.The patients were in general very satisfied

  6. PhotoSpec - Ground-based Remote Sensing of Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, K.; Magney, T. S.; Frankenberg, C.; Seibt, U.; Pivovaroff, A. L.; Hurlock, S. C.; Stutz, J.

    2016-12-01

    Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF) emitted from vegetation can be used as a proxy for photosynthetic activity and is observable on a global scale from space. However, many issues on a leaf-to-canopy scale remain poorly understood, such as influences on the SIF signal from environmental conditions, water stress, or radiation. We have developed a novel ground-based spectrometer system for measuring SIF from natural ecosystems. The instrumental set-up, requirements, and measurement technique are based on decades of experience using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), an established method to measure atmospheric trace gases. The instrument consists of three thermally stabilized commercial spectrometers that are linked to a 2D scanning telescope unit via optical fiber bundles, and also includes a commercial photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) sensor. The spectrometers cover a SIF retrieval wavelength range at high spectral resolution (670 - 780 nm, 0.1 nm FWHM), and also provide moderate resolution spectra (400 - 800 nm, 1.5 nm FWHM) to retrieve vegetation indices and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI). We report on results of the first continuous field measurements of this novel system at Stunt Ranch Santa Monica Mountains UC Reserve, where the PhotoSpec instrument was monitoring SIF of four native Californian shrubland species with different adaptations to seasonal summer drought. We report on the correlation with CO2 fluxes over both the growing season and the hot summer period in 2016. We also show detailed measurements of the diurnal cycle of the SIF signal of single broad leaves, as well as dark-light transitions, under controlled experimental conditions. In addition to demonstrating the instrumental set-up, retrieval algorithm, and instrument performance, our results illustrate that SIF measurements at the leaf to ecosystem scale are needed to understand and interpret the SIF signals retrieved at larger scales.

  7. Combining stated and revealed choice research to simulate the neighbor effect: The case of hybrid-electric vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axsen, Jonn [Institute of Transportation Studies, Univ. of California at Davis, 2028 Academic Surge, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Mountain, Dean C. [DeGroote School of Business, McMaster Univ., 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M4 (Canada); Jaccard, Mark [School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser Univ., 8888 Univ. Drive, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    According to intuition and theories of diffusion, consumer preferences develop along with technological change. However, most economic models designed for policy simulation unrealistically assume static preferences. To improve the behavioral realism of an energy-economy policy model, this study investigates the ''neighbor effect'', where a new technology becomes more desirable as its adoption becomes more widespread in the market. We measure this effect as a change in aggregated willingness to pay under different levels of technology penetration. Focusing on hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), an online survey experiment collected stated preference (SP) data from 535 Canadian and 408 Californian vehicle owners under different hypothetical market conditions. Revealed preference (RP) data was collected from the same respondents by eliciting the year, make and model of recent vehicle purchases from regions with different degrees of HEV popularity: Canada with 0.17% new market share, and California with 3.0% new market share. We compare choice models estimated from RP data only with three joint SP-RP estimation techniques, each assigning a different weight to the influence of SP and RP data in coefficient estimates. Statistically, models allowing more RP influence outperform SP influenced models. However, results suggest that because the RP data in this study is afflicted by multicollinearity, techniques that allow more SP influence in the beta estimates while maintaining RP data for calibrating vehicle class constraints produce more realistic estimates of willingness to pay. Furthermore, SP influenced coefficient estimates also translate to more realistic behavioral parameters for CIMS, allowing more sensitivity to policy simulations. (author)

  8. High Resolution Analysis of Dyke Tips and Segments, Using Drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dering, G.; Micklethwaite, S.; Cruden, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    We analyse outstanding exposures of dykes from both coastal (Western Australia) and high altitude glacier-polished (Sierra Nevada, California) outcrops, representing intrusion at shallow upper-crustal and mid-crustal conditions respectively. We covered 10,000 m^2 of outcrop area sampling the ground at a scale of 3-5 mm per pixel. Using Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry from ground-based and UAV photographs lacking GPS camera positions (>500 images per study), we generated and calibrated a 3D geometry of dense point clouds by selectively using 25-30 ground control points measured by high precision GPS (40-90 mm error). Ground control points used in the photogrammetric model building process typically yielded a root mean square error (RMSE) of 5 cm. Half the ground control points were withheld from the model building process and when they were compared against the model they yielded RMSE values only 6-10% higher than the points used for georeferencing, suggesting good internal consistency of the dataset and accuracy relative to the reference frame, at least for the purposes of this study. The structural orientations of the dykes and associated fractures were then extracted digitally using the iterative Random Sample Consensus method (RANSAC) and least-squares plane fitting. Furthermore, fracture intensity relative to dykes was measured along a series of scanlines and the running average and variance calculated. All results were compared against field measurements. Results show fracture intensity increases toward the dykes in the shallow crustal examples (West Australia) but no such fractures exist around the mid-crustal (Californian) dykes. Despite this there is a remarkable uniformity of geometry, and by implication process, between the two dyke sets. In order to extract full value from the big visual data now available to us, the near-future requires dedicated research into software solutions for expert-driven, semi-automatic mapping of geology and structure.

  9. Evaluation of wildfire patterns at the wildland-urban fringe across the continental U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, A. M.; Hogue, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfires threaten ecosystems and urban development across the United States, posing significant implications for land management and natural processes such as watershed hydrology. This study investigates the spatial association between large wildfires and urbanization. Several geospatial dataset are combined to map wildfires (Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity for 1984 to 2012) and housing density (SILVIS Lab Spatial Analysis for Conservation and Sustainability decadal housing density for 1940 to 2030) relative to natural wildlands across the contiguous U.S. Several buffers (i.e. 25 km) are developed around wildlands (Protected Areas Database of the United States) to quantify the change and relationship in spatial fire and housing density patterns. Since 1984, wildfire behavior is cyclical and follows general climatology, where warmer years have more and larger fires. Ignition locations also follow transportation corridors and development which provide easy accessibility to wildlands. In California, both fire frequency and total acres burned exhibit increasing trends (statistically significant at 95%). The 1980s average wildfire frequency and total acres burned was 3100 fires and approximately 1200 km2, respectively. These numbers have increased to 2200 fires and over 1500 km2 in the 2010 to 2012 period alone. Initial observations also show that decennial population and area burned for four major Californian counties (Los Angeles, San Bernardino, San Diego, and Shasta) show strong correlation between the last decade of burned area, urban-fringe proximity, and urbanization trends. Improving our understanding of human induced wildfire regimes provides key information on urban fringe communities most vulnerable to the wildfire risks and can help inform regional development planning.

  10. Prevalence and Correlates of Suicidal Ideation Among Transgender Youth in California: Findings From a Representative, Population-Based Sample of High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Brumer, Amaya; Day, Jack K; Russell, Stephen T; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L

    2017-09-01

    No representative population-based studies of youth in the United States exist on gender identity-related disparities in suicidal ideation or on factors that underlie this disparity. To address this, this study examined gender identity-related disparities in the prevalence of suicidal ideation; evaluated whether established psychosocial factors explained these disparities; and identified correlates of suicidal ideation among all youth and stratified by gender identity. Data were derived from the 2013 to 2015 California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS; N = 621,189) and a weighted subsample representative of the Californian student population (Biennial Statewide California Student Survey [CSS], N = 28,856). Prevalence of past 12-month self-reported suicidal ideation was nearly twice as high for transgender compared with non-transgender youth (33.73% versus 18.85%; χ(2) = 35.48, p youth had 2.99 higher odds (95% CI 2.25-3.98) of reporting past-year suicidal ideation compared with non-transgender youth. Among transgender youth, only depressive symptoms (adjusted odds ratio 5.44, 95% CI 1.81-16.38) and victimization (adjusted odds ratio 2.66, 95% CI 1.26-5.65) remained significantly associated with higher odds of suicidal ideation in fully adjusted models. In multiple mediation analyses, depression attenuated the association between gender identity and suicidal ideation by 17.95% and victimization by 14.71%. This study uses the first representative population-based sample of youth in the United States that includes a measurement of gender identity to report on gender identity-related disparities in suicidal ideation and to identify potential mechanisms underlying this disparity in a representative sample. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quercetin-induced changes in femoral bone microstructure of adult male rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Babosová

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are a group of plant metabolites with antioxidant effects. One of the most abundant flavonoids in the human diet is quercetin. It is found widely in fruits, vegetables and has a lot of beneficial effects on human health. Quercetin has a positive pharmacological effect on bone metabolism and it prevents the organism against bone loss. However, its impact on the size of basic structural units of the compact bone is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of present study was to investigate the impact of the quercetin on femoral bone microstructure in 5-month-old male rabbits. Five rabbits of Californian broiler line were randomly divided into two groups. In the experimental group (E group; n=3, animals were intramuscularly injected with quercetin at dose 1000 μg.kg-1 body weight (bw for 90 days, 3 times per week. Two rabbits without quercetin administration served as a control group (C group. According to our results, intramuscular application of quercetin had an insignificant effect on cortical bone thickness in male rabbits. In these rabbits, changes in qualitative histological characteristics were present in the middle part of the compacta, where primary vascular longitudinal bone tissue was present and expanded there from the periosteum. Also, a lower number of secondary osteons was found in these animals. From the histomorphometrical point of view, significantly decreased sizes of primary osteons' vascular canals and secondary osteons (p <0.05 were found in rabbits administered by quercetin. Our findings indicate that subchronic administration of quercetin at the dose used in our study had considerable impact on both qualitative and quantitative histological characteristics of the compact bone in adult male rabbits.

  12. Short communication: Identification of coagulase-negative staphylococcus species from goat milk with the API Staph identification test and with transfer RNA-intergenic spacer PCR combined with capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, G; De Visscher, A; Collar, C A; Bacon, D A C; Maga, E A; Murray, J D; Supré, K; De Vliegher, S; Haesebrouck, F; Rowe, J D; Nielen, M; van Werven, T

    2012-12-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the most commonly isolated bacteria from goat milk, but they have often been identified with phenotypic methods, which may have resulted in misclassification. The aims of this paper were to assess the amount of misclassification of a phenotypic test for identifying CNS species from goat milk compared with transfer RNA intergenic spacer PCR (tDNA-PCR) followed by capillary electrophoresis, and to apply the tDNA-PCR technique on different capillary electrophoresis equipment. Milk samples were collected from 416 does in 5 Californian dairy goat herds on 3 occasions during lactation. In total, 219 CNS isolates were identified at the species level with tDNA-PCR and subjected to the API 20 Staph identification test kit (API Staph; bioMérieux, Durham, NC). If the same species was isolated multiple times from the same udder gland, only the first isolate was used for further analyses, resulting in 115 unique CNS isolates. According to the tDNA-PCR test, the most prevalent CNS species were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus caprae, and Staphylococcus simulans. Typeability with API staph was low (72%). Although the API Staph test was capable of identifying the majority of Staph. epidermidis and Staph. caprae isolates, sensitivity for identification of Staph. simulans was low. The true positive fraction was high for the 3 most prevalent species. It was concluded that the overall performance of API Staph in differentiating CNS species from goat milk was moderate to low, mainly because of the low typeability, and that genotypic methods such as tDNA-PCR are preferred.

  13. Degradation State, Sources, and Reactivity of Dissolved Organic Matter from an Amino Acid Time Series in an Agricultural Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiasek, S. J.; Pellerin, B. A.; Spencer, R. G.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Hernes, P.

    2015-12-01

    A detailed time series of dissolved amino acids was obtained in an agricultural watershed in the northern Central Valley, California, USA to investigate the roles of hydrologic and seasonal changes on the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Total hydrolysable amino acid (THAA) concentrations ranged from 0.55 to 9.96 μM (mean 3.76 ± 1.80 μM) and not only peaked with discharge during winter storms, but also remained elevated throughout the irrigation season when discharge was low. Summer irrigation was a critical hydrologic regime for DOM cycling, since it mobilized DOM similar in concentration and reactivity to DOM released during winter storms for an extended period of time, with the largest amino acid contributions to the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pools (3.4 ‒ 3.7 % DOC-AA, 17.4 ‒ 22.5 % DON-AA), the largest proportion of basic amino acids (B/(B+A) = 0.19 ‒ 0.22), and the largest degradation index values (mean 1.37 ± 0.96). The mole percent of non-protein amino acids, commonly considered as an indicator of microbial degradation, decreased with DOM processing and was highest during summer (mean 4.1 ± 1.1%). A lack of correlation between THAA concentrations and UV-Vis absorbance and fluorescence proxies (including "protein-like" fluorophores B and T) indicated that optical properties may be limited in representing amino acid dynamics in this system. A new parameter for DOM processing derived from trends in individual amino acids demonstrated strong potential for inferring the extent of DOM degradation in freshwater systems. The biogeochemical relevance of irrigation practices is heightened by timing, since the additional export of reactive DOM coincides with enhanced downstream DOM processing in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, a critical habitat for endangered species serving as water source for 25 million Californians.

  14. The Social Dimensions of Sustainability and Change in Diversified Farming Systems

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    Christopher M. Bacon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural systems are embedded in wider social-ecological processes that must be considered in any complete discussion of sustainable agriculture. Just as climatic profiles will influence the future viability of crops, institutions, i.e., governance agreements, rural household and community norms, local associations, markets, and agricultural ministries, to name but a few, create the conditions that foster sustainable food systems. Because discussions of agricultural sustainability often overlook the full range of social dimensions, we propose a dual focus on a broad set of criteria, i.e., human health, labor, democratic participation, resiliency, biological and cultural diversity, equity, and ethics, to assess social outcomes, and on institutions that could support diversified farming systems (DFS. A comparative analysis of case studies from California's Central Valley, Mesoamerican coffee agroforestry systems, and European Union agricultural parks finds that DFS practices are unevenly adopted within and among these systems and interdependent with institutional environments that specifically promote diversified farming practices. Influential institutions in these cases include state policies, farmers' cooperatives/associations, and organized civic efforts to influence agroenvironmental policy, share knowledge, and shape markets for more 'sustainable' products. The Californian and Mesoamerican cases considers organic and fair trade certifications, finding that although they promote several DFS practices and generate social benefits, they are inadequate as a single strategy to promote agricultural sustainability. The complex governance and multifunctional management of Europe's peri-urban agricultural parks show unexpected potential for promoting DFS. Unless DFS are anchored in supportive institutions and evaluated against an inclusive set of social and environmental criteria, short-term investments to advance diversified agriculture could

  15. Monte Carlo Bayesian Inference on a Statistical Model of Sub-gridcolumn Moisture Variability Using High-resolution Cloud Observations . Part II; Sensitivity Tests and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Part I presented a Monte Carlo Bayesian method for constraining a complex statistical model of GCM sub-gridcolumn moisture variability using high-resolution MODIS cloud data, thereby permitting large-scale model parameter estimation and cloud data assimilation. This part performs some basic testing of this new approach, verifying that it does indeed significantly reduce mean and standard deviation biases with respect to the assimilated MODIS cloud optical depth, brightness temperature and cloud top pressure, and that it also improves the simulated rotational-Ramman scattering cloud optical centroid pressure (OCP) against independent (non-assimilated) retrievals from the OMI instrument. Of particular interest, the Monte Carlo method does show skill in the especially difficult case where the background state is clear but cloudy observations exist. In traditional linearized data assimilation methods, a subsaturated background cannot produce clouds via any infinitesimal equilibrium perturbation, but the Monte Carlo approach allows finite jumps into regions of non-zero cloud probability. In the example provided, the method is able to restore marine stratocumulus near the Californian coast where the background state has a clear swath. This paper also examines a number of algorithmic and physical sensitivities of the new method and provides guidance for its cost-effective implementation. One obvious difficulty for the method, and other cloud data assimilation methods as well, is the lack of information content in the cloud observables on cloud vertical structure, beyond cloud top pressure and optical thickness, thus necessitating strong dependence on the background vertical moisture structure. It is found that a simple flow-dependent correlation modification due to Riishojgaard (1998) provides some help in this respect, by better honoring inversion structures in the background state.

  16. Genetic Variability of Myxoma Virus Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Christoph; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Schultz, Anne-Kathrin; Bulla, Ingo; Schirrmeier, Horst; Mayer, Dietmar; Neubert, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Myxomatosis is a recurrent problem on rabbit farms throughout Europe despite the success of vaccines. To identify gene variations of field and vaccine strains that may be responsible for changes in virulence, immunomodulation, and immunoprotection, the genomes of 6 myxoma virus (MYXV) strains were sequenced: German field isolates Munich-1, FLI-H, 2604, and 3207; vaccine strain MAV; and challenge strain ZA. The analyzed genomes ranged from 147.6 kb (strain MAV) to 161.8 kb (strain 3207). All sequences were affected by several mutations, covering 24 to 93 open reading frames (ORFs) and resulted in amino acid substitutions, insertions, or deletions. Only strains Munich-1 and MAV revealed the deletion of 10 ORFs (M007L to M015L) and 11 ORFs (M007L to M008.1L and M149R to M008.1R), respectively. Major differences were observed in the 27 immunomodulatory proteins encoded by MYXV. Compared to the reference strain Lausanne, strains FLI-H, 2604, 3207, and ZA showed the highest amino acid identity (>98.4%). In strains Munich-1 and MAV, deletion of 5 and 10 ORFs, respectively, was observed, encoding immunomodulatory proteins with ankyrin repeats or members of the family of serine protease inhibitors. Furthermore, putative immunodominant surface proteins with homology to vaccinia virus (VACV) were investigated in the sequenced strains. Only strain MAV revealed above-average frequencies of amino acid substitutions and frameshift mutations. Finally, we performed recombination analysis and found signs of recombination in vaccine strain MAV. Phylogenetic analysis showed a close relationship of strain MAV and the MSW strain of Californian MYXV. However, in a challenge model, strain MAV provided full protection against lethal challenges with strain ZA. IMPORTANCE Myxoma virus (MYXV) is pathogenic for European rabbits and two North American species. Due to sophisticated strategies in immune evasion and oncolysis, MYXV is an important model virus for immunological and

  17. A coupled stable isotope-size spectrum approach to understanding pelagic food-web dynamics: A case study from the southwest sub-tropical Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, B. P. V.; Allain, V.; Menkes, C.; Lorrain, A.; Graham, B.; Rodier, M.; Pagano, M.; Carlotti, F.

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the food web structure of the oligotrophic picophytoplankton-dominated pelagic ecosystem in the vicinity of New Caledonia, within the Archipelagic Deep Basin (ARCH) province of the southwest sub-tropical Pacific. Nitrogen stable isotope (δ15N) data were collected for mesozooplankton (0.2-2 mm), macrozooplankton (2-20 mm), micronekton (20-200 mm) and nekton (>200 mm) during 2002-2004 and 2011. Using a coupled δ15N size-spectrum approach, we estimated (1) organism trophic level (TL); (2) food chain length (FCL); (3) predator prey mass ratio (PPMR); and (4) transfer efficiency (TE). The role of phytoplankton size structure in determining these parameters was investigated. Applying a trophic enrichment factor (TEF) of 3.4, maximum TL was calculated at ~5. The number of TLs spanned by each length class was 1.97 for mesozooplankton, 2.07 for macrozooplankton, 2.75 for micronekton, and 2.21 for nekton. Estimated PPMR was 10,099:1 for mesozooplankton, 3683:1 for macrozooplankton/micronekton, and 2.44×105:1 for nekton, corresponding to TEs of 6.3%, 8.5% and 2.4%, respectively. PPMR and TE were strongly influenced by the TEF used, and TEF 3.4 likely over and underestimated PPMR and TE, respectively, for mesozooplankton and macrozooplankton/micronekton. Comparatively low PPMR for mesozooplankton and macrozooplankton/micronekton indicated longer food chains and higher connectivity within these groups than for the nekton. Conversely, the high PPMR yet high trophic niche width for the nekton indicated that they prey primarily on macrozooplankton/micronekton, with a relatively high degree of dietary specialisation. Our results are discussed in the context of other marine food webs. The ARCH food chain was found to be 1-1.5 trophic levels longer than the eutrophic micro-/nanophytoplankton-dominated Californian upwelling system, providing empirical support for the role of phytoplankton size in determining FCL. Group specific PPMR estimates demonstrated

  18. Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: "Mobile electricity" technologies, early California household markets, and innovation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett David

    Starting from the premise that new consumer value must drive hydrogen-fuel-cell-vehicle (H2FCV) commercialization, a group of opportunities collectively called "Mobile Electricity" (Me-) is characterized. Me- redefines H2 FCVs as innovative products able to provide home recharging and mobile power, for example for tools, mobile activities, emergencies, and electric-grid-support services. To characterize such opportunities, this study first integrates and extends previous analyses of H2FCVs, plug-in hybrids, and vehicle-to-grid (V2G) power. It uses a new model to estimate zero-emission-power vs. zero-emission-driving tradeoffs, costs, and grid-support revenues for various electric-drive vehicle types and levels of infrastructure service. Next, the initial market potential for Me- enabled vehicles, such as H2FCVs and plug-in hybrids, is estimated by eliminating unlikely households from consideration for early adoption. 5.2 million of 33.9 million Californians in the 2000 Census live in households pre-adapted to Me-, 3.9 million if natural gas is required for home refueling. The possible sales base represented by this population is discussed. Several differences in demographic and other characteristics between the target market and the population as a whole are highlighted, and two issues related to the design of H2FCVs and their supporting infrastructure are discussed: vehicle range and home hydrogen refueling. These findings argue for continued investigation of this and similar target segments-which represent more efficient research populations for subsequent study by product designers and other decision-makers wishing to understand the early market dynamics facing Me- innovations. Next, Me-H2FCV commercialization issues are raised from the perspectives of innovation, product development, and strategic marketing. Starting with today's internalcombustion hybrids, this discussion suggests a way to move beyond the battery vs. fuel-cell zero-sum game and towards the

  19. Ecological release and niche partitioning under stress: Lessons from dorvilleid polychaetes in sulfidic sediments at methane seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Ziebis, Wiebke; Mendoza, Guillermo F.; Bertics, Victoria J.; Washington, Tracy; Gonzalez, Jennifer; Thurber, Andrew R.; Ebbe, Brigitte; Lee, Raymond W.

    2013-08-01

    Organisms inhabiting methane seep sediments are exposed to stress in the form of high levels of hydrogen sulfide, which result mainly from sulfate reduction coupled to anaerobic methane oxidation. Dorvilleidae (Polychaeta) have successfully invaded this ecosystem, and multiple species in divergent genetic clades co-occur at high densities. At methane seeps in the NE Pacific off California and Oregon, the genera Ophryotrocha, Parougia and Exallopus are especially well represented. To test the hypothesis that dorvilleid coexistence is facilitated by niche partitioning through sulfide tolerance and trophic patterns, we examined dorvilleid species-specific patterns of occurrence and nutrition at methane seeps off Eel R. [ER] on the Californian continental slope and at Hydrate Ridge [HR] on the Oregon continental slope, and in two habitats (clam bed and microbial mat) characterized by lower and higher hydrogen sulfide levels, respectively. Microelectrode measurements of hydrogen sulfide enabled characterization of environmental sulfide levels for species sampled in background sediment cores and in colonization trays. Dorvilleids tolerated H2S levels from 10 μM to over 2.6 mM, with the majority of species inhabiting sediments with similar environmental H2S concentrations (median 85-100 μM). Dorvilleid species richness was greater at HR than ER, but did not differ between clam bed and microbial mat habitats. Species distribution patterns reflected preferences for ER clam bed (lower sulfide levels), ER mat and HR clam bed (moderate sulfide levels), or HR mat (very high sulfide levels). Nutritional patterns, including trophic diversity and functional similarity, were examined using community stable isotope metrics based on δ15N and δ13C. Within each region, dorvilleid species exhibited multiple trophic strategies. Co-existing congeners typically exhibited distinct isotope signatures, suggesting trophic partitioning. Trophic diversity and δ15N range for whole

  20. Data Fusion of Imaging Spectroscopy, Lidar, and In-Situ Laboratory Data for Detecting Aerosols from Biomass Burning Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, I. B.; Arnott, W. P.; Schläpfer, D.; McGill, M.

    2007-12-01

    of laboratory measurements of smoke emission of several important fuel types. These fuel types included dominant species of the Southern Californian Chaparral vegetation community. During the 2007 phase of FLAME a portable field spectroradiometer collected radiance data from 380 - 2400 nm for comparison with AVIRIS. Other in-situ measurements of aerosol optical and chemical properties collected during FLAME will also be compared to the October 27, 2003 remote sensing measurements of wildfire aerosols. This study will quantify the presence of aerosols from biomass burning using remote sensing.

  1. Carbonyl Alkyl Nitrates as Trace Constituents in Urban Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woidich, S.; Gruenert, A.; Ballschmiter, K.

    2003-04-01

    : Measurements in Californian and South Atlantic Air and Global Comparison Using C2Cl4 and CHBr3 as Marker Molecules2 Environ. Sci. Technol. (1998) 32: 3055-3062. (2) G. Werner, J. Kastler, R. Looser, K. Ballschmiter: 2Organic nitrates of isoprene as atmospheric trace compounds2 Angewandte Chemie International Edition (1999) 38: 1634- 1637. (3) RG Fischer; J. Kastler, K. Ballschmiter, "Levels and pattern of alkyl nitrates, multifunctional alkyl nitrates, and halocarbons in the air over the Atlantic Ocean" J. Geophys. Res. - Atmosphere (2000) 105: 14 473-14 494.

  2. Humanitarismo, redención y ciencia médica en Nueva España: El expediente de salud pública para frenar la extinción de indios en la Baja California (1797-1805 Humanitarianism, Redemption and Medical Science in New Spain: The Public Health Plan to Halt the Extinction of Indians in Baja California (1797-1805

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Altable

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A partir de la descripción de los diversos momentos de la puesta en marcha de un programa médico diseñado para revertir el largo proceso de decadencia poblacional de los indios de la península de California, se pone a la vista lo que podría denominarse el humanitarismo político de la corona española, proyectado en el debate habido entre las perspectivas religiosa y científica en torno a la extinción de los indios. El artículo explica las causas de lo que se denomina aquí la utopía de la sanación de los californios y ofrece una interpretación que varía de las concepciones relativas a la consabida incapacidad génica de los indios para sobrevivir a los contagios, a los errores e imposiciones del proceso de aculturación y a otros factores adversos a la existencia indígena. Se concluye que el fracaso del programa médico en cuestión contribuyó a la frustración de las expectativas colonizadoras, humanitarias, religiosas y modernizadoras del régimen borbónico.On the basis of a description of various moments in the implementation of a medical program to reverse the long population decline of Indians in the California península, what could be called the political humanitarianism of the Spanish Crown emerged, projected onto the debate between the religious and scientific perspectives regarding the extinction of the Indians. The árdele explains the causes of what is called the Utopia of the Californians' healing, offering an interpretation that ranges from relative conceptions to the Indians' well-known genetic capacity to survive the infections, errors and impositions of the acculturation process and other factors that adversely affect indigenous existence. It concludes that the failure of the medical program in question contributed to the frustration of the colonizing, humanitarian, religious and modernizing expectations of the Bourbon regime.

  3. Cultural politics: Linguistic identity and its role as gatekeeper in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton-Brown, Bryan Anthony

    This dissertation investigated how participation in the cultural practices of science classrooms creates intrapersonal conflict for ethnic minority students. Grounded in research perspectives of cultural anthropology, sociocultural studies of science education, and critical pedagogy, this study examined the cultural tensions encountered by minority students as they assimilate into the culture of the science classroom. Classroom interaction was viewed from the perspective of instructional congruence---the active incorporation of students' culture into science pedagogy. Ogbu's notion of "oppositional identity", Fordham's "fictive kinship", Bahktin's "antidialogics", and Freire's "critical consciousness" were brought together to examine how members of marginalized cultures develop non-normative behaviors as a means of cultural resistance. Choice of genre for public discourse was seen as a political act, representing students' own cultural affiliations. Conducted in a diverse Southern Californian high school with an annual population of over 3,900 students, this study merged ethnographic research, action research, and sociolinguistic discourse analysis. Post hoc analysis of videotaped classroom activities, focus group interviews, and samples of student work revealed students' discursive behavior to shift as a product of the context of their discursive exchanges. In whole class discussions students explained their understanding of complex phenomena to classmates, while in small group discussions they favored brief exchanges of group data. Four domains of discursive identities were identified: Opposition Status, Maintenance Status, Incorporation Status, and Proficiency Status. Students demonstrating Opposition Status avoided use of science discourse. Those students who demonstrated Maintenance Status were committed to maintaining their own discursive behavior. Incorporation Status students were characterized by an active attempt to incorporate science discourse into

  4. Transport of the urban pollution plume in a mountain regime during the RoMBAS-BEACHON field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Brioude, J.; de Foy, B.; Hodzic, A.

    2012-12-01

    The formation and origin of organic aerosols measured at forest/urban interfaces is not well understood. Naturally emitted volatile organic compounds from trees can be oxidized into highly functionalized and condensable products that form secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Recent studies indicate that the rate of this formation can be enhanced in presence of oxidant-rich urban or industrial pollution plume. The Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol field Study (RoMBAS) took place in July-August 2011 at the Manitou Forest Observatory (MFO) in the Colorado Front Range as part of the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen (BEACHON) program. Extensive aerosol measurements and modeling were performed to study the formation of organic aerosols, and identify the periods of high anthropogenic influence. In particular, the modern carbon filters suggest that up to 50% of the organic material measured at the site is from anthropogenic origin. To analyze the origin of air masses, we simulate transport events using particle trajectories in backward mode with FLEXPART that is integrated with the high temporal and spatial resolutions mesoscale meteorology from Weather Research Forecasting modeling with Chemistry (WRF/Chem). We use the Residence Time Analysis (RTA) method to analyze the transport. The results suggest that the urban plumes from Denver and Colorado Springs are frequently transported to the forest site during the day and could influence the local chemistry, whereas at night the flow is dominated by the westerly winds. The influence of the North American Monsoon circulation and the transport of the Californian pollution are also discussed. As the treatment of atmospheric turbulence in the complex topography is an important source of uncertainty for the back-trajectory simulations, we evaluate the results for two PBL schemes in WRF/Chem i.e. the Yonsei University (YSU) and the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ), as well as the

  5. Isópodos litorales y de aguas someras de la bahía de Todos los Santos, Baja California, México Littoral and shallow water isopods from Todos los Santos Bay, Baja California, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Campos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una lista de los isópodos de vida libre de la bahía de Todos los Santos con base en recolecciones alocrónicas realizadas entre 1988 y 2005 en el intermareal rocoso, arenoso y limo-arcilloso así como en el sublitoral arenoso hasta una profundidad de 256 m. Se recolectaron 26 especies de las 48 registradas para la Provincia Californiana: 2 Asellota; 7 Cymothoida; 1 Oniscoidea; 7 Sphaeromatidea; 9 Valvifera Las especies más abundantes fueron Excirolana linguifrons (Richardson, 1899, (mesolitoral arenoso, Idotea fewkesi Richardson, 1905 junto con Idotea resecata Stimpson, 1857, (mesolitoral rocoso, Haliophasma geminatum Menzies et Barnard, 1959 (mesolitoral e infralitoral arcilloso asociada al pasto marino Zostera marina Linnaeus y Caecognathia crenulatifrons (Monod, 1926, (sublitoral. Las especies recolectadas se ha registrado en biotopos marinos similares de California, Estados Unidos de América. De las 26 especies encontradas 7 son primeros registros para México: Erichsonella crenulata Menzies, 1950, Exosphaeroma amplicauda (Stimpson 1857, E. octonum (Richardson, 1899, Idarcturus allelomorphus Menzies et Barnard, 1959, Idotea fewkesi, Janiralata davisi Menzies, 1951 y Paracerceis gilliana (Richardson, 1899, extendiendo su distribución sureña hasta la bahía de Todos los Santos.A checklist of the free-living isopods of Todos los Santos Bay, Baja California, is presented on the basis of allochronic collections made between 1988 and 2005 along the rocky, sandy, and muddy intertidal and sandy subtidal to 256 meters deep. We collected 26 of the 48 species known from the Californian province: 2 Asellota; 7 Cymothoida; 1 Oniscoidea; 7 Sphaeromatidea; 9 Valvifera. The most abundant species were Excirolana linguifrons (Richardson, 1899, (sandy mesolitoral, Idotea fewkesi Richardson, 1905 and I. resecata Stimpson 1857, (rocky intertidal, Haliophasma geminatum Menzies and Barnard, 1959, (muddy intertidal and subtidal associated with the

  6. Estimation of Future Earthquake Losses in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowshandel, B.; Wills, C. J.; Cao, T.; Reichle, M.; Branum, D.

    2003-12-01

    Recent developments in earthquake hazards and damage modeling, computing, and data management and processing, have made it possible to develop estimates of the levels of damage from earthquakes that may be expected in the future in California. These developments have been mostly published in the open literature, and provide an opportunity to estimate the levels of earthquake damage Californians can expect to suffer during the next several decades. Within the past 30 years, earthquake losses have increased dramatically, mostly because our exposure to earthquake hazards has increased. All but four of the recent damaging earthquakes have occurred distant from California's major population centers. Two, the Loma Prieta earthquake and the San Fernando earthquake, occurred on the edges of major populated areas. Loma Prieta caused significant damage in the nearby Santa Cruz and in the more distant, heavily populated, San Francisco Bay area. The 1971 San Fernando earthquake had an epicenter in the lightly populated San Gabriel Mountains, but caused slightly over 2 billion dollars in damage in the Los Angeles area. As urban areas continue to expand, the population and infrastructure at risk increases. When earthquakes occur closer to populated areas, damage is more significant. The relatively minor Whittier Narrows earthquake of 1987 caused over 500 million dollars in damage because it occurred in the Los Angeles metropolitan area, not at its fringes. The Northridge earthquake had fault rupture directly beneath the San Fernando Valley, and caused about 46 billion dollars in damage. This vast increase in damage from the San Fernando earthquake reflected both the location of the earthquake directly beneath the populated area and the 23 years of continued development and resulting greater exposure to potential damage. We have calculated losses from potential future earthquake, both as scenarios of potential earthquakes and as annualized losses considering all the potential

  7. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA used to compare two different methods of ripe table olive processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo, Carlo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to analyze the most common method used for processing ripe table olives: the “California style”. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA was applied to detect the “hot spots” of the system under examination. The LCA results also allowed us to compare the traditional “California style”, here called “method A”, with another “California style”, here called “method B”. We were interested in this latter method, because the European Union is considering introducing it into the product specification of the Protected Denomination of Origin (PDO “La Bella della Daunia”. It was also possible to compare the environmental impacts of the two “California style” methods with those of the “Spanish style” method. From the comparison it is clear that “method B” has a greater environmental impact than “method A” because greater amounts of water and electricity are required, whereas “Spanish style” processing has a lower environmental impact than the ”California style” methods.

    El objetivo de este estudio es analizar el método más común utilizado para el procesamiento de la aceituna negra de mesa “estilo California” (Californian Style. La metodología LCA se aplicó para detectar los puntos calientes del sistema estudiado. Los resultados LCA también nos permitieron comparar el estilo californiano tradicional, aquí llamado “método A”, con otro estilo californiano, llamado “método B”. Nosotros estábamos interesados en el segundo método, porque la Unión Europea está considerando introducirlo en la Denominación de Origen Protegida (DOP “La Bella della Daunia”. También fue posible comparar los impactos medioambientales de los dos mètodos californianos con los impactos del método español. Observando la comparación, está claro que el “método B” tiene un mejor impacto ambiental que el “método A” porque este último requiere más cantidad de agua y

  8. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with protection against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Perry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori, a lifelong and typically asymptomatic infection of the stomach, profoundly alters gastric immune responses, and may benefit the host in protection against other pathogens. We explored the hypothesis that H. pylori contributes to the control of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first examined M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-gamma and H. pylori antibody responses in 339 healthy Northern Californians undergoing routine tuberculin skin testing. Of 97 subjects (29% meeting criteria for latent tuberculosis (TB infection (LTBI, 45 (46% were H. pylori seropositive. Subjects with LTBI who were H. pylori-seropositive had 1.5-fold higher TB antigen-induced IFN-gamma responses (p = 0.04, ANOVA, and a more Th-1 like cytokine profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared to those who were H. pylori seronegative. To explore an association between H. pylori infection and clinical outcome of TB exposure, we evaluated H. pylori seroprevalence in baseline samples from two high risk TB case-contact cohorts, and from cynomolgus macaques experimentally challenged with M. tuberculosis. Compared to 513 household contacts who did not progress to active disease during a median 24 months follow-up, 120 prevalent TB cases were significantly less likely to be H. pylori infected (AOR: 0.55, 95% CI 0.0.36-0.83, p = 0.005, though seroprevalence was not significantly different from non-progressors in 37 incident TB cases (AOR: 1.35 [95% CI 0.63-2.9] p = 0.44. Cynomolgus macaques with natural H. pylori infection were significantly less likely to progress to TB 6 to 8 months after M. tuberculosis challenge (RR: 0.31 [95% CI 0.12-0.80], p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H. pylori infection may induce bystander effects that modify the risk of active TB in humans and non-human primates. That immunity to TB may be enhanced by exposure to other microbial agents may have important implications for

  9. Quantitative Mapping of Precursory Seismic Quiescence Before Large Aftershocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukomm, S.; Wiemer, S.; Giardini, D.

    2002-12-01

    A relative decrease of aftershock activity before the occurrence of large aftershocks to M6+ mainshocks is one of only few earthquake precursors accepted for the IASPEI preliminary list of significant earthquake precursors. If one considers earthquake rate to be dependent on stressing rate, aftershocks sequences offer in fact an ideal environment to detect precursory quiescence before large earthquakes: The numerous aftershocks allow a much higher spatial and temporal resolution of transients in seismicity than possible with the average background rate of micro-earthquakes. Past studies of precursory quiescence before larger aftershocks, however, have largely been based on bulk value. The aim of this study is to map the temporal and spatial variability of activity rate within several rich aftershock sequences, and, possibly, exploit the results for improving real time probabilistic aftershock hazard assessment. We introduce a new algorithm based on fitting the modified Omori law to the aftershock sequences. At arbitrarily chosen grid points, the Omori parameters of the sub-samples containing all aftershock within 5 or 10 km of the node are estimated at time t. We calculate the number of aftershocks N +/- dN in the time interval t + dt using the relevant four Omori parameters (p, c and k) parameters and their corresponding standard deviations estimated using a bootstrap analysis. The difference between the forecasted and the observed number of aftershocks, normalized by the standard deviation of the forecast, is our estimator of rate change. The algorithm is tested on synthetic aftershock sequences containing artificial quiescences in order to calibrate the free parameters for optimal detection of precursory quiescence. We then perform our spatial and temporal mapping for several prominent Californian and Japanese aftershock sequences (Landers, Hector Mine, Northridge, Loma Prieta, Kobe, Western Tottori and Hokkaido). Preliminary results suggest that we cannot

  10. Ballot initiatives and the national debate on immigration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Menéndez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Proposition 187 voted by Californians in 1994 was the first in a long series of ballot initiatives proposed by other states limiting access to welfare programs and education to illegal immigrants. Local initiatives and referendums on sensitive political issues, such as illegal immigration, their economic consequences in states and on the disengagement of the federal government have influenced the shaping of future federal legislation and policy formulation. As of 1996 new laws related to immigration and access to welfare benefits followed the main guidelines of Proposition 187; since the 9-11 attacks national security has become the main axis of immigration laws. Recent ballot initiatives have reinforced the perception of the immigrant as a national and cultural danger as Arizona’s Proposition 103 and the English Only Movement did in 2006.En 1994, l’État de la Californie approuve la proposition 187 qui restreint l’accès des immigrés illégaux aux services sociaux et aux écoles. Les démarches locales entreprises via les referendums touchent de plus en plus l’immigration illégale et les conséquences économiques sur les politiques des États concernés mais aussi débouchent sur le désengagement de l’État fédéral. Avec les nouvelles législations de 1996, la politique migratoire et celle des droits sociaux ont été fortement modifiées par le Congrès américain qui semble suivre et appliquer une politique de plus en plus restrictive dans la lignée de la proposition 187. La période après les attentats du 11 septembre ne fait que renforcer le besoin de sécurité nationale ainsi que la perception de l’immigré comme un danger. D’où une augmentation de propositions dans certains États, comme l’Arizona en 2006, qui visent à contrôler et à restreindre davantage les droits des immigrés.

  11. Observations of volatile organic compounds during ARCTAS – Part 1: Biomass burning emissions and plume enhancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hills

    2011-05-01

    may lead to significant under-prediction of emissions in fire emissions inventories. Notably, though variable between plumes, observed EMRs of individual light alkanes are highly correlated within BB emissions. Using the NCAR master mechanism chemical box model initialized with concentrations based on two observed scenarios, i.e., fresh Canadian BB and fresh Californian BB, both plumes are expected to experience primarily decreases in oxygenated VOCs during the first 2.5 days, such that any production in the plumes of these compounds is less than the chemical loss. Comparisons of the modeled EMRs to the observed EMRs from BB plumes estimated to be three days in age or less indicate overall good agreement and, for most compounds, no significant difference between BB plumes in these two regions.

  12. Molybdenum geochemistry in a seasonally dysoxic Mo-limited lacustrine ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Jennifer B.; Chappaz, Anthony; Eustis, Brooke; Heyvaert, Alan C.; Waetjen, David P.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.; Anbar, Ariel D.

    2013-08-01

    Lakes are important for storage of the essential micronutrient molybdenum (Mo) during its transfer from the continents to the oceans, but little is known about the major sources and sinks for Mo in lacustrine ecosystems. We studied Mo cycling in Castle Lake, a small subalpine lake in the Klamath-Siskiyou Mountains of Northern California underlain primarily by mafic and ultramafic rocks where primary productivity is limited by Mo bioavailability. The deeper water of the lake becomes dysoxic (9-90 μM dissolved oxygen) during the summer. This study was undertaken to identify the sources of Mo to Castle Lake and establish a Mo budget. We measured Mo concentrations in a suite of bulk solids (lake sediments, soils and bedrock) and aqueous samples (sediment porewaters, soil runoff, spring waters, snow and ice) from Castle Lake and its watershed. Lake sediments have elevated Mo (7-36 ppm) compared to soils and bedrock (0.2-2 ppm) and Mo/Al values were nearly two orders of magnitude higher than the crustal abundance. Sediment porewaters had higher Mo (4-15 nM) than lake water (2-4 nM), soil runoff (0.1-6.2 nM), snowmelt (⩽0.1 nM), lake ice (0.3-2.2 nM) and local spring waters (0.03-2.72 nM). Bulk lake sediments had negative δ98/95Mo values, ranging from -0.5 to -1.0‰ (±0.1). We used the numerical model PROFILE to estimate the net reaction rate of Mo in the porewater. Model calculations ruled out diagenesis as a source of Mo to lake sediments; diagenetic Mo always represented ⩽5% of the total Mo content in sediment. We also ruled out dissolved Mo inputs from groundwater and watershed inflow as important sources of Mo. Two whole-lake experimental Mo additions in the 1960's could have contributed a sizeable amount of Mo to the lake sediments, but only over a short period. Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic Mo from extensive copper smelting that occurred south of Castle Lake from 1896 to 1919 and from major Californian urban centers today were negligible Mo

  13. Why Don't People Evacuate When Nature Threatens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, K. J.; Broad, K.; Meyer, R.; Orlove, B. S.

    2011-12-01

    Why do so many Southern Californians fail to evacuate when warned that winter storms have critically raised the risk of a debris flow in their neighborhoods? Have they perhaps not seen or heeded news coverage of past debris flow events? Are they unaware that recent fires made the hillsides above them more prone to gravity-driven processes? Do they think they can wait to start their cars until they can actually see the flow coming? Or have they merely experienced too many "false alarms" in past years, and no longer put much stock in the judgment of public officials or the ability of scientists to judge debris flow risk? In preparation for a simulation study that will place decision makers in a virtual house in the California foothills during a winter storm event, we explore the reasons that people do and do not evacuate in the face of potential debris flows. Working in collaboration with the USGS Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project for Southern California, we are surveying hundreds of local residents, from debris-flow prone areas and from elsewhere in the state, to establish their baseline knowledge (and misconceptions) about, attitudes toward, information use regarding, and experience with debris flows. Initial interviews with residents of recently hit neighborhoods give qualitative data suggesting that false-alarm effects and underestimation of risk are driving factors; these surveys will provide quantitative evidence to extend those findings. We will discuss the results of this survey in the context of a comprehensive body of psychology research that seeks to explain why people frequently appear to ignore or discount hazard warnings: neglecting to insure their homes and crops (Kunreuther, 1984), failing to evacuate in the face of storms and fires (Baker, 1991; Packham, 1995), and (barring a recent, vivid event) showing little support for measures that would manage or mitigate future hazards (Kunreuther, 2006a, 2006b; Weber, 2006). We will also consider the

  14. Mitochondrial genome sequences illuminate maternal lineages of conservation concern in a rare carnivore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilgrim Kristine

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Science-based wildlife management relies on genetic information to infer population connectivity and identify conservation units. The most commonly used genetic marker for characterizing animal biodiversity and identifying maternal lineages is the mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial genotyping figures prominently in conservation and management plans, with much of the attention focused on the non-coding displacement ("D" loop. We used massively parallel multiplexed sequencing to sequence complete mitochondrial genomes from 40 fishers, a threatened carnivore that possesses low mitogenomic diversity. This allowed us to test a key assumption of conservation genetics, specifically, that the D-loop accurately reflects genealogical relationships and variation of the larger mitochondrial genome. Results Overall mitogenomic divergence in fishers is exceedingly low, with 66 segregating sites and an average pairwise distance between genomes of 0.00088 across their aligned length (16,290 bp. Estimates of variation and genealogical relationships from the displacement (D loop region (299 bp are contradicted by the complete mitochondrial genome, as well as the protein coding fraction of the mitochondrial genome. The sources of this contradiction trace primarily to the near-absence of mutations marking the D-loop region of one of the most divergent lineages, and secondarily to independent (recurrent mutations at two nucleotide position in the D-loop amplicon. Conclusions Our study has two important implications. First, inferred genealogical reconstructions based on the fisher D-loop region contradict inferences based on the entire mitogenome to the point that the populations of greatest conservation concern cannot be accurately resolved. Whole-genome analysis identifies Californian haplotypes from the northern-most populations as highly distinctive, with a significant excess of amino acid changes that may be indicative of molecular

  15. Benefits of Earthquake Early Warning to Large Municipalities (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, J.

    2013-12-01

    early testing of an EQEW system will help shape the EQEW policy which will determine the seismic safety of millions of Californians in the years to come.

  16. Spatial Distributions of Foreshocks and Aftershocks: Static or Dynamic Triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, M. J.; Rubin, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, the spatial distributions of foreshocks and aftershocks have been scrutinized for evidence supporting either triggering by static stress changes induced by the permanent deformation from prior earthquakes or triggering by the dynamic stresses from seismic waves. Felzer & Brodsky (2006) identified small (mbeyond the zone traditionally thought to be affected by static stress changes. On this basis, they argued that dynamic stresses are responsible for triggering earthquakes. Richards-Dinger et al. (2010) and other studies, however, have presented several lines of evidence that suggest otherwise. One crucial question is whether the stacked distances of pairs of earthquakes, representing either mainshock-aftershock or foreshock-mainshock pairs, are in fact correctly identified and not misattributed, unrelated earthquakes. This question is especially important in the critical distance range of several to tens of earthquake radii, over which static stresses are thought to be too small to affect seismicity. If earthquake pairs in this range are not causally related, then the histogram of foreshock-mainshock and mainshock-aftershock pairs should be identical, and the difference between the two histograms can be used to identify remote triggering. Results based on southern Californian seismicity suggest that (1) the existence of a single power-law with a particular exponent may not be a robust observation, (2) geothermal regions seem to play an important role over the relevant distances, (3) remote triggering seems to exist beyond the classical static stress influence zone (perhaps out to 15 km after mainshocks with magnitudes between 3 and 4), (4) simple ETAS model simulations cannot reproduce all observations, and (5) at most one-third of the remote aftershocks had received significant static Coulomb stress change from much earlier but nearby large (m>5) quakes, suggesting that a misattribution of aftershocks statically triggered by large quakes as

  17. California DREAMing: The design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peffer, Therese Evelyn

    Electrical utilities worldwide are exploring "demand response" programs to reduce electricity consumption during peak periods. Californian electrical utilities would like to pass the higher cost of peak demand to customers to offset costs, increase reliability, and reduce peak consumption. Variable pricing strategies require technology to communicate a dynamic price to customers and respond to that price. However, evidence from thermostat and energy display studies as well as research regarding energy-saving behaviors suggests that devices cannot effect residential demand response without the sanction and participation of people. This study developed several technologies to promote or enable residential demand response. First, along with a team of students and professors, I designed and tested the Demand Response Electrical Appliance Manager (DREAM). This wireless network of sensors, actuators, and controller with a user interface provides information to intelligently control a residential heating and cooling system and to inform people of their energy usage. We tested the system with computer simulation and in the laboratory and field. Secondly, as part of my contribution to the team, I evaluated machine-learning to predict a person's seasonal temperature preferences by analyzing existing data from office workers. The third part of the research involved developing an algorithm that generated temperature setpoints based on outdoor temperature. My study compared the simulated energy use using these setpoints to that using the setpoints of a programmable thermostat. Finally, I developed and tested a user interface for a thermostat and in-home energy display. This research tested the effects of both energy versus price information and the context of sponsorship on the behavior of subjects. I also surveyed subjects on the usefulness of various displays. The wireless network succeeded in providing detailed data to enable an intelligent controller and provide feedback to

  18. THE GREAT SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SHAKEOUT: Earthquake Science for 22 Million People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L.; Cox, D.; Perry, S.; Hudnut, K.; Benthien, M.; Bwarie, J.; Vinci, M.; Buchanan, M.; Long, K.; Sinha, S.; Collins, L.

    2008-12-01

    Earthquake science is being communicated to and used by the 22 million residents of southern California to improve resiliency to future earthquakes through the Great Southern California ShakeOut. The ShakeOut began when the USGS partnered with the California Geological Survey, Southern California Earthquake Center and many other organizations to bring 300 scientists and engineers together to formulate a comprehensive description of a plausible major earthquake, released in May 2008, as the ShakeOut Scenario, a description of the impacts and consequences of a M7.8 earthquake on the Southern San Andreas Fault (USGS OFR2008-1150). The Great Southern California ShakeOut was a week of special events featuring the largest earthquake drill in United States history. The ShakeOut drill occurred in houses, businesses, and public spaces throughout southern California at 10AM on November 13, 2008, when southern Californians were asked to pretend that the M7.8 scenario earthquake had occurred and to practice actions that could reduce the impact on their lives. Residents, organizations, schools and businesses registered to participate in the drill through www.shakeout.org where they could get accessible information about the scenario earthquake and share ideas for better reparation. As of September 8, 2008, over 2.7 million confirmed participants had been registered. The primary message of the ShakeOut is that what we do now, before a big earthquake, will determine what our lives will be like after. The goal of the ShakeOut has been to change the culture of earthquake preparedness in southern California, making earthquakes a reality that are regularly discussed. This implements the sociological finding that 'milling,' discussing a problem with loved ones, is a prerequisite to taking action. ShakeOut milling is taking place at all levels from individuals and families, to corporations and governments. Actions taken as a result of the ShakeOut include the adoption of earthquake

  19. EL PROGRAMA CASE STUDY HOUSE: INDUSTRIA, PROPAGANDA Y VIVIENDA / Case Study House Program: industry, propaganda and housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Díez Martínez

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN En enero de 1945, John Entenza, editor de la revista californiana Arts & Architecture, puso en marcha el programa Case Study House, un ambicioso proyecto cuyo firme objetivo era investigar las posibilidades y soluciones del problema de la vivienda al que se enfrentaba los Estados Unidos de la posguerra. Para ello, Entenza diseñó una novedosa estrategia de colaboración entre algunos de los mejores arquitectos californianos del momento y la maquinaria industrial estadounidense, abierta a un proceso de reconversión de producción bélica a objetos para la población civil que tendría lugar en un tiempo récord. Así, el artículo propone el análisis de esa relación entre empresa y domesticidad, entre viabilidad económica y calidad arquitectónica, entre procesos de prefabricación y espíritu individual. Todos ellos conceptos aparentemente opuestos pero que, de la mano del programa Case Study House, lograron un entendimiento que a día de hoy sigue resultando extraordinario. SUMMARY In January 1945, John Entenza, editor of the California Arts & Architecture magazine, launched the 'Case Study House Program', an ambitious project whose firm objective was to investigate the possibilities and solutions for the housing problem facing the United States after the war. To do this, Entenza designed a novel strategy for collaboration between some of the best Californian architects of the time and the U.S. industrial machine, open to a process of conversion from military production to objects for the civilian population that would take place in record time. Thus, the article proposes the analysis of the relationship between business and domesticity, between economic viability and architectural quality, between prefabrication processes and individual spirit. All of these seemingly opposing concepts reached, at the hands of the 'Case Study House Program', an understanding that still seems extraordinary today.

  20. Strategic alliances for the development of fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruo, Kanehira [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Section of Science and Technology Studies

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore and describe the current stage of fuel cell vehicle development in the world. One can write three possible future scenarios - an optimistic, a realistic, and a pessimistic scenario: - The optimistic scenario -- The Daimler/Ballard/Ford alliance continues to develop fuel cell stacks and fuel cell vehicle systems as eagerly as they have been doing in recent years. Daimler(/Chrysler)-Benz continues to present its Necar 4, Necar 5, and so on, as planned, and thus keeps Toyota and Honda under severe pressure. Toyota`s and Honda`s real motivation seems to be not to allow Daimler-Benz to be the first to market. Their investment in fuel cell technology will be very large. At the same time, governments and other stake-holders will quickly and in a timely fashion build up infrastructures. We will then see many fuel cell vehicles by 2004. A paradigm shift in automotive technology will have taken place. - The realistic scenario -- Fuel cell vehicles will reach the same level of development by 2004/2005 as pure electric vehicles were at in 1997/1998. This means that fuel cell vehicles will be produced at the rate of several hundred vehicles per year per manufacturer and cost about $40,000 or more, which is still considerably more expensive than ordinary gasoline cars. These fuel cell vehicles will have a performance similar to today`s advanced electric vehicles, e.g., Toyota`s RAV4/EV and Honda`s EV Plus. To go further from this stage to the mass-production stage strong government incentives will be needed. - The pessimistic scenario -- It turns out that fuel cells are not as pure or efficient as in theory and in laboratory experiments. Prices of gasoline and diesel gas continue to be very low. The Californian 10% ZEV Requirement that has been meant to be valid at least ten years from 2003 through 2012 will be suspended or greatly modified. Daimler-Benz, Toyota, and Honda slow down their fuel cell vehicle development activities. No one is

  1. Restoration of a Freshwater Wetland on Subsided Peat Soils: Potential Effects on Release of Dissolved Organic Carbon and Disinfection Byproduct Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.; Fujii, R.; Bossio, D.

    2002-12-01

    In 1997, a wetland restoration demonstration project began on Twitchell Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta), California, to examine the effects of a permanently flooded, freshwater wetland on peat soil subsidence. Conversion from agriculture to wetland has changed many of the biogeochemical processes controlling dissolved organic carbon (DOC) production, release, and transport from the peat soils, relative to the previous agricultural land uses. This study explores the effects of agricultural and wetland management on peat soil biogeochemistry of DOC and disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursor release. DBPs [e.g. trihalomethanes (THMs)] form when chlorine reacts with the natural organic matter present in source drinking water. Many DBPs are carcinogenic and mutagenic and pose a potential threat to more than 22 million Californians whose drinking water is diverted from the Delta. Results indicate that previous drainage practices substantially affected the quantity of water-soluble DOC currently extractable from Delta peat soils and ranged from 0.40 mg C (carbon)/g soil for well-drained soils to 0.76 mg C/g soil for poorly drained soils. Present management also affects the propensity of this DOC to form DBPs. The following values for DBP formation were measured for a variety of soil types and depths (all values are medians in mmole THMs produced/mole C): well-drained agricultural field (7.7 plow layer, 7.9 below plow layer), poorly drained agricultural field (7.0 plow layer, 8.7 below plow layer), open-water wetland (12.8 sediment, 10.1 underlying soil), and vegetated wetland (11.3 sediment, 7.7 underlying soil). Sources of organic matter inputs and decomposition pathways seem to be important factors in DBP precursor formation and release when DOC loadings are of similar magnitude. These results indicate that soil conditions have a greater effect on DOC and DBP loadings than any differences caused by conversion from agriculture to wetland, which is of

  2. Expression profiles of myostatin, myogenin, and Myosin heavy chain in skeletal muscles of two rabbit breeds differing in growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Liangde; Xie, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Lei, Min; Li, Congyan; Ren, Yongjun; Zheng, Jie; Guo, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Cuixia; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Yucai

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare mRNA levels of myostatin (MSTN), myogenin (MyoG), and fiber type compositions in terms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) in skeletal muscles of two rabbit breeds with different body sizes and growth rates. Longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles of 16 Californian rabbits (CW) and 16 Germany great line of ZIKA rabbits (GZ) were collected at the ages of 35d and 84d (slaughter age). The results showed that the live weights of GZ rabbits of 35d and 84d old were approximately 36% and 26% greater than those of CW rabbits, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that at the age of 84d GZ rabbits contained significantly lower MSTN mRNA level and higher MyoG mRNA level in both longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles than CW rabbits, and mRNA levels of MSTN and MyoG exhibited opposite changes from the age of 35d to 84d, suggesting that GZ rabbits were subjected to less growth inhibition from MSTN at slaughter age, which occurred most possibly in skeletal muscles. Four types of fiber were identified by real-time PCR in rabbit muscles, with MyHC-1 and MyHC-2D, MyHC-2B were the major types in biceps femoris and longissimus dorsi muscles, respectively. At the age of 84d, GZ rabbits contained greater proportion of MyHC-1 and decreased proportion of MyHC-2D and decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity in biceps femoris than CW rabbits, and the results were exactly opposite in longissimus dorsi, suggesting that GZ rabbits show higher oxidative capacity in biceps femoris muscle than CW rabbits. In conclusion, the trends of mRNA levels of MSTN and fiber types in GZ rabbits' skeletal muscles might be consistent with the putative fast growth characteristic of GZ rabbits compared to CW rabbits.

  3. Sediment budgets, transport, and depositional trends in a large tidal delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Tara; Wright, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is the largest delta on the west coast of the United States. It is formed where the confluence of California’s two largest rivers (the Sacramento and San Joaquin) meet the ocean tides and has a significant physical gradient from fluvial to tidal. It is a semidiurnal system (two high and two low tides per day). Today, the Delta is one of the most manipulated in the United States. Once composed of many shallow, meandering and braided dendritic channels and dead-end sloughs and wetlands, it is now a network of leveed canals moving clear water around subsided islands. It historically has supported a biologically diverse tidal wetland complex, of which only 3% remains today (Whipple et al., 2012). It has also witnessed a collapse in the native fish populations. The Delta provides critical habitat for native species, however the hydrology and water quality are complicated by manipulations and diversions to satisfy multiple statewide objectives. Today water managers face co-equal goals of water supply to Californians and maintenance of ecosystem health and function. The Delta is a hub for both a multi-hundred-million dollar agricultural industry and a massive north-to-south water delivery system, supplying the primary source of freshwater to Central Valley farmers and drinking water for two-thirds of California’s population. Large pump facilities support the water demand and draw water from the Delta, further altering circulation patterns and redirecting the net flow toward the export facilities (Monsen et al., 2007). Fluvial sedimentation, along with organic accumulation, creates and sustains the Delta landscape. Hydraulic mining for gold in the watershed during the late 1800s delivered an especially large sediment pulse to the Delta. More recently, from 1955 to the present, a significant sediment decline has been observed that is thought to have been caused mostly by the construction of water storage reservoirs that trap the upstream

  4. California GAMA Program: Sources and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in the Llagas Basin of Santa Clara County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; McNab, W; Esser, B; Hudson, G; Carle, S; Beller, H; Kane, S; Tompson, A B; Letain, T; Moore, K; Eaton, G; Leif, R; Moody-Bartel, C; Singleton, M

    2005-06-29

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate is the most pervasive and intractable contaminant in California groundwater and is the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the cities of Morgan Hill and Gilroy, CA, in the Llagas Subbasin of Santa Clara County, where high nitrate levels affect several hundred private domestic wells. The main objectives of the study are: (1) to identify the main source(s) of nitrate that issue a flux to the shallow regional aquifer (2) to determine whether denitrification plays a role in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin and (3) to assess the impact that a nitrate management plan implemented by the local water agency has had on the flux of nitrate to the regional aquifer. Analyses of 56 well water samples for major anions and cations, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, dissolved excess nitrogen, tritium and groundwater age, and trace organic compounds, show that synthetic fertilizer is the most likely source of nitrate in highly contaminated wells, and that denitrification is not a significant process in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin except in the area of recycled water application. In addition to identifying contaminant sources, these methods offer a deeper understanding of how the severity and extent of contamination are affected by hydrogeology and groundwater management practices. In the Llagas subbasin, the nitrate problem is amplified in the shallow aquifer because it is highly vulnerable with high vertical recharge rates and rapid lateral transport, but the deeper aquifers are relatively more protected by laterally extensive aquitards. Artificial recharge delivers low-nitrate water and provides a means of

  5. Relationship between Rock Varnish and Adjacent Mineral Dust Compositions Using Microanalytical Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macholdt, D.; Jochum, K. P.; Otter, L.; Stoll, B.; Weis, U.; Pöhlker, C.; Müller, M.; Kappl, M.; Weber, B.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Weigand, M.; Al-Amri, A. M.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    Rock varnishes are up to 250 μm thick, Mn- and Fe-rich, dark black to brownish-orange lustrous rock coatings. Water and aeolian dust (60-70%), in combination with biological oxidation or inorganic precipitation processes, or even a combination of both, induce varnish growth rates of a few μm per 1000 a, indicating that element enrichment and aging processes are of major importance for the varnish formation. A combination of 200 nm-fs laser- and 213 nm-ns laser ablation- inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), focused ion beam (FIB) slicing, and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy-near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) was chosen for high-spatial-resolution analyses. The aim was to identify provenance, chemistry, and dynamics of the varnishes, and their formation over the millennia. To this end, mineral dust and adjacent varnishes were sampled in six arid to semi-arid deserts, in Israel, South Africa, California, and Saudi Arabia. Dust minerals incorporated in the varnishes were examined by STXM-NEXAFS spectroscopic and element mapping at the nm scale. Varnishes from different locations can be distinguished by element ratio plots of Pb/Ni vs. Mn/Ba. A comparison of dust element ratios of particles <50 μm to ratios of adjacent varnishes reveals much lower values for dust. However, the factors between the element ratios of dust and of varnish are similar for four of six regions (Mn/Ba: 6 ± 2; Pb/Ni: 4 ± 3). Two of the six regions diverge, which are South African (Mn/Ba: 20, Pb/Ni: 0.5) and Californian (Anza Borrego Desert: Mn/Ba: 4.5; Pb/Ni: 16.5) varnishes.The results indicate that the enrichment and degradation processes might be similar for most locations, and that Mn and Pb are preferably incorporated and immobilized in most varnishes compared to Ba and Ni. The Pb/Ni ratios of the South African varnishes are indicators for either a preferred incorporation of Ni compared to Pb from available dust, and

  6. Efeito da granulometria do bagaço de cana sobre as características digestivas e a contribuição nutritiva dos cecotrofos Effect particle size of sugar cane bagasse on the digestive traits and the cecotrophes nutritive contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia da Silva Vieira

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Foram realizados dois experimentos com coelhos mestiços Nova Zelândia Branco x Califórnia, com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito da granulometria da fonte de fibra sobre as características digestivas de coelhos em crescimento e sobre a produção, composição química e a contribuição nutritiva dos cecotrofos, em termos de matéria seca (MS e proteína bruta (PB. Quatro dietas foram elaboradas com diferentes granulometrias do bagaço de cana com diâmetro geométrico médio (DGM de 0,231, 0,506, 0,616 e 0,833 mm. O desempenho e os pesos do sistema digestivo cheio, sistema digestivo vazio, conteúdo do sistema digestivo, ceco cheio, ceco vazio e conteúdo cecal não foram afetados significativamente, entretanto o nitrogênio amoniacal do conteúdo cecal aumentou significativamente com o aumento da granulometria do bagaço de cana. Na avaliação da cecotrofia, foi observado efeito linear significativo da granulometria sobre a produção de cecotrofos e o teor de MS e PB ingerido por cecotrofia, porém sua composição química não foi afetada.Two experiments using New Zealand White x Californian rabbits were carried out with the objective of evaluating the effect of fiber source particle size on digestive traits of growing rabbit and the production, chemical composition and cecotrophes nutritive contribuition on dry matter (DM and crude protein (CP base. Four diets were prepared with different particle size of sugar cane bagasse with average geometric diameters of .231, .506, .616 and .833 mm. The productive performance and weight of the full and empty digestive tract, digestive tract content, full and empty cecum and cecum content were not affected, however the ammonia nitrogen percentage in the caecum content was significantly increased by increasing particle size of sugar cane bagasse. In cecotrophy evaluation, effects of particle size on cecotrophes production, DM and CP content ingested were observed, but the cecotrophes chemical

  7. Genetic Variability of Myxoma Virus Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Christoph; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Schultz, Anne-Kathrin; Bulla, Ingo; Schirrmeier, Horst; Mayer, Dietmar; Neubert, Andreas; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2017-02-15

    Myxomatosis is a recurrent problem on rabbit farms throughout Europe despite the success of vaccines. To identify gene variations of field and vaccine strains that may be responsible for changes in virulence, immunomodulation, and immunoprotection, the genomes of 6 myxoma virus (MYXV) strains were sequenced: German field isolates Munich-1, FLI-H, 2604, and 3207; vaccine strain MAV; and challenge strain ZA. The analyzed genomes ranged from 147.6 kb (strain MAV) to 161.8 kb (strain 3207). All sequences were affected by several mutations, covering 24 to 93 open reading frames (ORFs) and resulted in amino acid substitutions, insertions, or deletions. Only strains Munich-1 and MAV revealed the deletion of 10 ORFs (M007L to M015L) and 11 ORFs (M007L to M008.1L and M149R to M008.1R), respectively. Major differences were observed in the 27 immunomodulatory proteins encoded by MYXV. Compared to the reference strain Lausanne, strains FLI-H, 2604, 3207, and ZA showed the highest amino acid identity (>98.4%). In strains Munich-1 and MAV, deletion of 5 and 10 ORFs, respectively, was observed, encoding immunomodulatory proteins with ankyrin repeats or members of the family of serine protease inhibitors. Furthermore, putative immunodominant surface proteins with homology to vaccinia virus (VACV) were investigated in the sequenced strains. Only strain MAV revealed above-average frequencies of amino acid substitutions and frameshift mutations. Finally, we performed recombination analysis and found signs of recombination in vaccine strain MAV. Phylogenetic analysis showed a close relationship of strain MAV and the MSW strain of Californian MYXV. However, in a challenge model, strain MAV provided full protection against lethal challenges with strain ZA. Myxoma virus (MYXV) is pathogenic for European rabbits and two North American species. Due to sophisticated strategies in immune evasion and oncolysis, MYXV is an important model virus for immunological and pathological research. In

  8. Amputation Risk in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus and Peripheral Artery Disease Using Statewide Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Misty D; Brunson, Ann; Hedayati, Nasim; Romano, Patrick; Melnkow, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Conflicting data exist regarding changes in amputation rates in patients with ulcers because of diabetes mellitus (DM) and peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study focuses on how population-based amputation rates are changing in the current treatment era. Using the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Patient Discharge database, all patients who underwent major nontraumatic lower extremity (LE) amputation in 2005 through 2011 were identified. Age-adjusted population-based amputation risk was determined by year. Gender and age trends in amputation risk were estimated separately for diabetes-related amputations and PAD-related amputations, treating all California residents as the population at risk. From 2005 to 2011, 32,025 qualifying amputations were performed in California. Of these, 11,896 were DM-associated (n = 1,095), PAD-associated (n = 4,335), or associated with both conditions (n = 6,466). PAD-associated amputation rates and combined PAD/DM-associated amputation rates have changed little since 2009 after decreasing substantially over the prior 5 years, but DM-associated amputation rates have continuously increased since 2005. California residents older than the age of 80 years had the most dramatic decrease in PAD-associated amputation rates from 2005 to 2011 (i.e., from 317 to 175 per million Californians). Men with PAD/DM had amputation rate 1.5 times higher than those of patients with PAD alone and 5 times higher than rates of DM patients. In women the difference between patient with PAD and PAD/DM was not seen; however, these rates were 2.5 times higher than patients with DM alone. Preventable amputations associated with high-risk diseases are no longer decreasing despite continuing advances in care and education. Octogenarians with PAD represent the highest risk group for amputation, but DM-associated amputations have increased since 2005. Further research to understand treatment pathways for patient with LE wounds may shed

  9. Synthesis of Biomass and Utilization of Plant Wastes in a Physical Model of a Biological Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, A. A.; Ushakova, S. A.; Manukovsky, N. S.; Lisovsky, G. M.; Kudenko, Yu A.; Kovalev, V. S.; Gribovksaya, I. V.; Tirranen, L. S.; Zolotukkhin, I. G.; Gros, J. B.; Lasseur, Ch.

    Biological life support systems (LSS) with highly closed intrasystem mass ex change mass ex change hold much promise for long-term human life support at planetary stations (Moon, Mars, etc.). The paper considers problems of biosynthesis of higher plants' biomass and "biological incineration" of plant wastes in a working physical model of biological LSS. The plant wastes are "biologically incinerated" in a special heterotroph block involving Californian worms, mushrooms and straw. The block processes plant wastes (straw, haulms) to produce soil-like substrate (SLS) on which plants (wheat, radish) are grown. Gas ex change in such a system consists of respiratory gas ex change of SLS and photosynthesis and respiration of plants. Specifics of gas ex change dynamics of high plants -SLS complex has been considered. Relationship between such a gas ex change and photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) and age of plants has been established. SLS fertility has been shown to depend on its thickness and phase of maturity. The biogenic elements (potassium, phosphorus, nitrogen) in Liebig minimum have been found to include nitrogen which is the first to impair plants' growth in disruption of the process conditions. The SLS microflora has been found to have different kinds of ammonifying and denitrifying bacteria which is indicative of intensive transformation of nitrogen-containing compounds. The number of physiological groups of microorganisms in SLS was, on the whole, steady. As a result, organic substances -products of ex change of plants and microorganisms were not accumulated in the medium, but mineralized and assimilated by the biocenosis. Experiments showed that the developed model of a man-made ecosystem realized complete utilization of plant wastes and involved them into the intrasystem turnover. In multiple recycle of the mat ter (more than 5 cycles) under the irradiance intensity of 150 W/m2 PAR and the SLS mass (dry weight) of 17.7 -19.9 kg/m2 average total harvest of

  10. Influence of soil organic C content on the greenhouse gas emission potential after application of biogas residues or cattle slurry - Results from a pot experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Gawan

    2017-04-01

    varying SOC contents (Cambisol, termed Clow; Mollic Gleysol, termed Cmedium and Sapric Histosol, termed Chigh). The application rate was equivalent to 150 kg NH4+-N ha-1. GHG exchange (CO2, CH4 and N2O) was measured on five replicates over a period of 22 days using the closed chamber technique to simulate the high-risk situation of enhanced GHG emissions following organic fertilizer application in energy maize cultivation. Generally, it was found that the application of cattle slurry resulted in significantly higher CO2 and N2O fluxes compared to the application of biogas digestate. The total cumulative CO2 exchange rates after 22 days ranged from 137 ± 4.6 kg C ha-1 22d-1 (Clow, control) to 885 ± 32.5 kg C ha-1 22 d-1 (Chigh, CS). However, the total cumulative N2O exchange rates ranged from 7.7 ± 6.1 g N ha-1 22 d-1 (Clow, control) up to 2000 ± 226 g N ha-1 22 d-1 (Cmedium, CS). No differences were found regarding the CH4 exchange, which was close to zero for all treatments. Total cumulative CH4 exchange rates ranged between -31 ± 32 g C ha-1 22d-1 (Cmedium, control) and -167 ± 34 g C ha-1 22d-1 (Chigh, CS). Calculated cumulative emissions revealed that 4% to 15% of the C derived from the organic fertilizer was emitted as CO2, and 0.06% to 0.67% of the applied N as N2O. Significantly higher CO2 emissions were observed at the Chigh treatments compared to the other two soil types investigated, whereas the significantly highest N2O emissions were found at the Cmedium treatments. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of soil type-adapted fertilization with respect to changing soil physical and environmental conditions. Considering the distinctly higher global warming potential (GWP) of N2O compared to CO2 (298:1; IPCC 2014), the present results revealed that soil type-specific 22-day cumulative N2O emissions contributed to 8% of the total GWP balance at Clow, 25% at Cmedium and 4% at Chigh, respectively. Overall, it seems that soils rich in SOM have a higher

  11. Hacia una síntesis biogeográfica de México Toward a synthesis of Mexican biogeography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Morrone

    2005-12-01

    ón biótica del componente Neotropical se relacionan con el desarrollo de los istmos de Tehuantepec y Panamá y la inundación de las tierras bajas de Nicaragua y de la Península de Yucatán.Recognition of biotic components constitutes the first step toward a synthetic biogeographic theory. In Mexico we can characterize three main biotic components, each one having a particular combination of different biotic elements. The Nearctic component (Nearctic region includes the arid subtropical areas in the north of the country, in the Californian, Baja Californian, Sonoran, Mexican Plateau and Tamaulipan biogeographic provinces. This component is dominated by the original element (Old Northern or Paleoamerican, together with one of more recent dispersal (Nearctic and a third of ancient Neotropical origin. Vicariant events associated with the biotic evolution of the Nearctic component are related to the uplift of the Sierra Madre Occidental, which separated the Chihuahuan desert from the Sonoran and Mojave deserts; and the expansion of the Sea of Cortes, separating the Peninsula of Baja California from the continental mainland. The Transitional component (Mexican Transition Zone includes basically montane areas in central Mexico, which are assigned to the Sierra Madre Oriental, Sierra Madre Occidental, Transmexican Volcanic Belt, Balsas basin and Sierra Madre del Sur biogeographic provinces. In this component, the Paleoamerican, Nearctic, Tropical Mesoamerican and Montane Mesoamerican elements coexist. Vicariant events associated with the biotic evolution of the Transitional component are the development of the Sierras Madre and the volcanism of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt. The Neotropical component (Neotropical region includes humid and subhumid tropical areas of southern Mexico, assigned to the Mexican Pacific Coast, Mexican Gulf, Chiapas and Yucatan Peninsula biogeographic provinces. In it the Tropical Mesoamerican element predominates, but Nearctic and Antillean

  12. Long-term water repellency in organic olive orchards in the Cànyoles River watershed. The impact of land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; González Pelayo, Óscar; García Orenes, Fuensanta; Jordán, Antonio; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Neris, Jonay

    2015-04-01

    ., & Martí-Dalmau, C. 2014. Changes in water repellency, aggregation and organic matter of a mollic horizon burned in laboratory: soil depth affected by fire. Geoderma, 213, 400-407. Badía-Villas, D., González-Pérez, J. A., Aznar, J. M., Arjona-Gracia, B., & Martí-Dalmau, C. 2014. Changes in water repellency, aggregation and organic matter of a mollic horizon burned in laboratory: soil depth affected by fire. Geoderma, 213, 400-407. Bodí, M.B. Doerr, S.H., Cerdà, A., Mataix-Solera, J. 2012. Hydrological effects of a layer of vegetation ash on underlying wettable and water repellent soils. Geoderma, 191, 14-23. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geoderma.2012.01.006 Bodí, M.B., Muñoz-Santa, I., Armero, C., Doerr, S.H., Mataix-Solera, J., Cerdà, A. 2013. Spatial and temporal variations of water repellency and probability of its occurrence in calcareous Mediterranean rangeland soils affected by fires. Catena, 108, 14-24. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.catena.2012.04.002 Dlapa, P., Bodí, M.B., Mataix-Solera, J., Cerdà, A., Doerr, S.H. 2013. FT-IR spectroscopy reveals that ash water repellency is highly dependent on ash chemical composition. Catena, 108, 35-43. Doi:10.1016/j.catena.2012.02.011 García-Moreno, J., Gordillo-Rivero, Á. J., Zavala, L. M., Jordán, A., & Pereira, P. 2013. Mulch application in fruit orchards increases the persistence of soil water repellency during a 15-years period. Soil and Tillage Research, 130, 62-68. García-Orenes, F., Roldán, A., Mataix-Solera, J., Cerdà, A., Campoy, M., Arcenegui, V., Caravaca, F. 2012 Soil structural stability and erosion rates influenced by agricultural management practices in a semi-arid Mediterranean agro-ecosystem. Soil Use and Management 28(4): 571-579. DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-2743.2012.00451.x Goebel, M. O., Bachmann, J., Reichstein, M., Janssens, I. A., Guggenberger, G. 2011. Soil water repellency and its implications for organic matter decomposition-is there a link to extreme climatic events?. Global Change Biology

  13. Respuesta productiva de conejos alimentados con forraje verde hidropónico de avena, como reemplazo parcial de concentrado comercial Productive response of rabbits fed with green hydroponic oats forage as partial replacement of commercial concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Fabián Fuentes Carmona

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available La respuesta productiva de conejos raza californiana alimentados con forraje verde hidropónico (FVH de avena como reemplazo parcial de concentrado comercial (CC, fue evaluada en condiciones de desierto en el norte de Chile. Se establecieron cinco tratamientos de alimentación, equivalentes a 0, 25, 50, 75 y 100% de reemplazo de la dieta diaria con FVH, el cual fue cosechado y utilizado directamente diez días después de la siembra. Cuarenta y cinco conejos destetados a los 31 días fueron evaluados en un diseño completamente al azar hasta alcanzar un peso de sacrificio de 2 kg de peso vivo. La calidad del FVH de avena fue considerada como buena, presentando similar valor nutritivo que el CC. Las variables evaluadas y sus respectivos rangos fueron: consumo de materia seca promedio (59.17 - 104.73 g/día, ganancia de peso vivo promedio (16.35 - 29.10 g/animal por día, conversión alimenticia promedio (3.31 - 3.93 kg MS/kg PV, tiempo de peso vivo a sacrificio (53 - 91 días, peso vivo final (1430 - 2044 g/animal, peso de la canal (1235 - 1385 g/animal y rendimiento de la canal (59.19 - 62.25%. El reemplazo de hasta 50% de la dieta base con FVH de avena no afectó significativamente (P The productive response of Californian rabbits fed with hydroponic green oats forage (HGOF as a partial replacement of commercial concentrate (CC was evaluated under desert conditions in northern Chile. Five treatments were established as follow: 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% replacement of daily diet with HGOF, which was harvested and used directly at 10 days after sowing. Forty-five rabbits weaned at 31 days were evaluated in a completely randomized design until slaughter weight of 2.0 kg. HGOF quality was considered as good, presenting similar nutritional value to CC. The variables assessed and range values were: average dry matter intake (59.17-104.73 g/d, average weight gain (16.35-29.10 g/ rabbit for day, feed conversion average (3.31-3.93 kg DM/ kg LW, time of

  14. Profile of the chemicals industry in California: Californiaindustries of the future program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-06-01

    -specific energy-efficiency. An important element of the SIOF-program is the preparation of R&D roadmaps for each of the selected industries. The roadmap will help to identify priority needs for the participating industries to meet their energy challenges. The roadmap effort builds on the roadmaps developed by DOE, and on the conditions specific for the industry in California. Key to the successful preparation of a roadmap in the selected industries is the development of a profile of the industries. The profile provides a basis for the participants in the roadmap-effort, especially as the structure of the industries in California can be different than in the nation. The sector profiles describe the current economic and energy situation of these industries in California, the processes and energy uses, and the potential future developments in each industry. The profiles are an integral part of the roadmap, to help working group partners to evaluate the industry's R&D needs for their industry in California. In this report, we focus on the chemicals industry. The industry is an important economic factor in the state, providing over 82,300 jobs directly, and more in indirect employment. Value of shipments in 2001 was just under $25.7 Billion, or 6% of all manufacturing in California. There are over 1,500 chemical plants in California, of which 52% are pharmaceutical companies. Many companies operate chemical plants in California. The industry consumes 8% of the electricity and 5% of the natural gas in California. In this report, we start with a description of the chemical industry in the United States and California. This is followed by a discussion of the energy consumption and energy intensity of the Californian chemical industry. Chapter 3 focuses on the main sub-sectors. For each of the sub-sectors a general process description is provided in Chapter 4. Based on this analysis, in Chapter 5, we discuss potential technology developments that can contribute to further improving

  15. Lista sistemática de la ictiofauna en la Reserva de la Biosfera La Encrucijada, Chiapas, México A checklist of the ichthyofauna from La Encrucijada Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adán E. Gómez-González

    2012-09-01

    last 2 species are reported for the first time in the Mexican pacific; the presence of the exotic cichlid Oreochromis niloticus is also reported. The best represented families in species richness were Carangidae (14, Sciaenidae (11, Gobiidae (10 and Ariidae (9. Based on its ecogeographical derivation, 4 species (2.6% are freshwater primary; 13 (8.5% freshwater secondary, and 134 (88.9% peripheral; the last group is ecologically composed by 3 catadromous species (2%, 11 estuarine residents (7.2%, 56 marine euryhalines (36.6% and 66 marine stenohalines (43.1%. Biogeographically, 91.2% of the species are distributed in Eastern Pacific, 47.7% are from the Californian province, 65.4% from Cortés province, 80.4% from Panamian province, and 41.2% from Peruvian province. Comparatively, the REBIEN contains the highest fish richness in all the estuarine-lagoon systems along the Mexican Pacific.

  16. Influence of breed on postweaning litter growth and litter feed efficiency of meat rabbits%品种对肉兔断奶后窝生长性状的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张翔宇; 李丛艳; 邝良德; 郑洁; 张翠霞

    2013-01-01

    本研究旨在明确影响肉兔断奶后窝生长性状和料肉比的重要因素.利用一般线性模型分析了来自5个不同肉兔品种(新西兰白兔,加利福尼亚兔,比利时兔,青紫蓝兔和福建黄兔)的909只173窝肉兔断奶后窝生长和料肉比性状.结果表明,品种和断奶数对断奶窝重(5周龄窝重),窝增重,窝上市体重(10周龄窝重),个体平均上市体重,窝采食量和料肉比的影响极显著(P<0.01).出生月份对窝采食量影响极显著(P<0.01),对断奶窝重和窝上市体重的影响显著(P<0.05).比利时兔的断奶窝重、窝增重、窝上市体重、窝采食量和平均上市体重显著高于其他品种,而福建黄兔的上述5项指标显著低于其他品种(P<0.05).断奶数与断奶窝重、窝采食量、窝增重、窝上市体重和料肉比的回归系数为正且显著.品种、断奶数和出生月份是影响肉兔断奶后窝性状和料肉比的重要因素.本研究的结果为将比利时兔作为杂交的终端父本提供重要依据.%The major factors influencing post-weaning litter growth and litter feed efficiency were analyzed with the General Linear Model (GLM) using 909 meat rabbits, from 173 litters representing 5 breeds (New Zealand White, Californian, Flemish Giant, Chinchilla, and Fujian Yellow). Breed and number weaned per litter had a significant effect on litter weaning weight at 5 weeks, litter weight gain, litter market weight at 10 weeks, average market weight, litter feed intake, and litter feed efficiency (P<0. 01). Month of birth had a significant (P<0. 01) difference on litter feed intake and on litter weaning weight and litter market weight (P<0. 05). Litter weaning weight, litter weight gain, litter market weight and average market weight were heavier and litter feed intake was higher in Flemish Giant litters than in other breed litters (P<0. 05). However, the five traits mentioned above were lower in Fujian Yellow litters than in other breed

  17. Profile of the chemicals industry in California: Californiaindustries of the future program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-06-01

    -specific energy-efficiency. An important element of the SIOF-program is the preparation of R&D roadmaps for each of the selected industries. The roadmap will help to identify priority needs for the participating industries to meet their energy challenges. The roadmap effort builds on the roadmaps developed by DOE, and on the conditions specific for the industry in California. Key to the successful preparation of a roadmap in the selected industries is the development of a profile of the industries. The profile provides a basis for the participants in the roadmap-effort, especially as the structure of the industries in California can be different than in the nation. The sector profiles describe the current economic and energy situation of these industries in California, the processes and energy uses, and the potential future developments in each industry. The profiles are an integral part of the roadmap, to help working group partners to evaluate the industry's R&D needs for their industry in California. In this report, we focus on the chemicals industry. The industry is an important economic factor in the state, providing over 82,300 jobs directly, and more in indirect employment. Value of shipments in 2001 was just under $25.7 Billion, or 6% of all manufacturing in California. There are over 1,500 chemical plants in California, of which 52% are pharmaceutical companies. Many companies operate chemical plants in California. The industry consumes 8% of the electricity and 5% of the natural gas in California. In this report, we start with a description of the chemical industry in the United States and California. This is followed by a discussion of the energy consumption and energy intensity of the Californian chemical industry. Chapter 3 focuses on the main sub-sectors. For each of the sub-sectors a general process description is provided in Chapter 4. Based on this analysis, in Chapter 5, we discuss potential technology developments that can contribute to further improving

  18. The new 2.0 l TDI {sup registered} to fulfill American emission standards in Volkswagens new Passat; Der neue 2,0l TDI {sup registered} zur Erfuellung der amerikanischen Emissionsgesetze in Volkswagens neuem Passat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahrstedt, Joern; Dorenkamp, Richard; Kuiken, Sander; Greiner, Michael; Kuehne, Ingo; Nigro, Giampaolo; Duesterdiek, Thorsten; Veldeten, Burkhard; Thoem, Norbert [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    coating of the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) / diesel particulate filter (DPF) module was modified to ensure an optimal NO{sub 2}-NO{sub X} ratio over lifetime. Improved thermal response and an increase in the stationary temperature in the SCR catalytic converter at low loads were achieved by thermal insulation of the exhaust system. In order to obtain highly uniform NH{sub 3} distribution, a mixer has been integrated into the SCR system. Optimization of the coating minimized aging and de-activation of the SCR catalytic converter. The SCR system concept was adopted from the Passat 'BlueTDI' complying with Euro 6, as introduced in Europe in 2009 [2]. The tank is matched to the vehicle geometrically and located in the rear section of the vehicle. The tank and the feed lines to the injector can be heated to ensure the supply of AdBlue even at very low ambient temperatures. The requirements to be satisfied by the OBD system are determined by the tough current Californian standards for the 2013 model year, especially the more stringent exhaust gascorrelating threshold diagnoses. New functions were developed as a means of satisfying these diagnostic requirements. With the new second-generation 2.0l TDI {sup registered} BIN5/ULEV engine for the new Passat, which has been matched completely to the needs of the American market, combined with the low level of emissions, Volkswagen sets new standards for road performance and fuel consumption in a midsize automobile. (orig.)

  19. Mediterranean-type ecosystems: the influence of biodiversity on their functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, George W.; Richardson, David M.; Keeley, Jon E.; Hobbs, Richard J.; Mooney, H.A.; Cushman, J.H.; Medina, E.; Sala, O.E.; Schulze, E.-D.

    1996-01-01

    Ecosystems in the Mediterranean-climate regions of the world have served as a unit for comparative ecological studies for over two decades. The cohesiveness of research in this set of widely distributed regions rests on the similarity of the climates where they occur, and the identifiable convergence in elements of their vegetation structure (Di Castri and Mooney 1973). In this chapter we review functional aspects of what have come to be known as Mediterranean-type ecosystems (METs) in the context of a concerned global interest in the sustainability of the human environment and its dependence on biological diversity. The approach we adopt here is to look for evidence that this biodiversity, for which some MTEs are renowned (Cowling, 1992; Hobbs, 1992), has an influence on processes which are important both for the maintenance of natural systems, and for providing "ecosystem services" with human utility. Almost a century ago, Schimper (1903) recognized the biological similarities between five widely separated regions characterized by Mediterranean-type climates, and much comparative work has been done on that basis since. These regions comprise the Mediterranean basin itself, a major portion of California, central Chile, the southwestern and southern extremities of South Africa, and parts of southwestern and southern Australia (Figure 7.1). The first attention paid to MTEs in terms of quantitative ecological research arose out of the International Biological Programme (IBP) of the 1960s and 1970s. Those efforts focused on comparisons between the Chilean and Californian systems (Mooney 1977), and dealt with parallel models of ecosystem processes, especially water flux (Fuentes et al 1995). Because of the already perceived similarities between vegetation in these and the other three regions, the project was soon extended to include all five regions. The first broad comparative overview was published as an anthology which considered the origins and the convergent

  20. Tratamento homeopático da hepatotoxicose aguda induzida por tetracloreto de carbono em coelhos Homeopatic treatment of acute carbon tetrachloride induced hepatotoxicity in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Ribeiro Moncorvo

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Quinze (15 coelhos (Oryctolagus cuniculus foram submetidos à intoxicação pelo tetracloreto de carbono na dosagem de 0,5 ml/kg de peso corporal, dose única, administrado por sonda gástrica. Foram realizadas as dosagens de alanina amino transferase (ALT, aspartato amino transferase (AST, fosfatase alcalina (FA e gama glutamil transferase (GGT antes e durante o experimento. Vinte e quatro (24 horas após a intoxicação, os coelhos foram divididos aleatoriamente em três grupos de 5 animais. Cada grupo recebeu um tratamento diferente durante 13 dias. O grupo I foi tratado com tetracloreto de carbono diluído na 30ª centesimal hahnemanniana (30 CH, uma vez ao dia. O grupo II recebeu Phosphorus 30 CH, também uma vez ao dia. O grupo III desempenhou o papel de controle, recebendo diariamente uma dose de placebo, pelo mesmo período de tempo que os grupos anteriores. Os resultados das concentrações séricas de ALT, AST, GGT e FA foram submetidos à análise estatística. A variação da concentração de todas as enzimas foi significativa entre os dias, mas nem todas variaram significativamente entre os grupos considerados. O tetracloreto de carbono 30 CH foi capaz de acelerar a recuperação do quadro de hepatite tóxica aguda determinada pela redução dos níveis de ALT. O tratamento com Phosphorus 30 CH mostrou-se incapaz seja de reverter o quadro de hepatite tóxica, seja de acelerar a regeneração hepática.Fithteen (15 New Zeland and Californian rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus were submitted to intoxication with carbon tethracloride in a dose 0/0.5 ml/kg, once a day, administred by orogastric sonde. Enzimatic parameters: alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltransferase of those rabbits were tested before and during the experiment. After the intoxication, the rabbits were divided in three groups of five animals. Each group received differents treatments during 13 days. The

  1. Iconos de la ley, literaturas del desastre. La figura de Moisés en la obra de Schönberg y Thomas Mann

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    Bayón, Fernando

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay is an attempt of interpretation of the figure of Moses as elaborated in Thomas Mann’s short story “The Law”, and Arnold Schönberg’s opera “Moses und Aron”. In the case Schönberg’s, the dramatical recuperation of the jewish legislator –and his brother– results in an attempt of responding to the crisis of the Republic of Weimar from his “exile” in Berlin (1924-1933. Thomas Mann, for his part, came back to the fictional figure of Moses once living in his californian exile (1943, and used this mythos as a means of responding to Hitler’s dictatorship. The text arises why in historical situations of a very serious gravity, such a great artists like Mann or Schönberg decide to revert to narrate the mosaic mythos. We are specially concerned by a problem of major ethical and political implications: What are the forces needed to achieve a common ethos? And what are the violences avoided by this search for a moral link protagonized by an oppressed people?Este texto pretende acercarse a la figura de Moisés tal como se elabora en el relato “La ley” de Thomas Mann (1943, y la ópera “Moisés y Aarón” de Arnold Schönberg (1932. En el caso de Schönberg, la recuperación del legislador judío resulta en un esfuerzo por responder a la crisis de la república de Weimar desde su exilio berlinés. Thomas Mann, por su parte, vuelve tras el mito de Moisés desde su exilio estadounidense, como respuesta a la dictadura nacionalsocialista. El ensayo se plantea por qué en situaciones históricas de una gravedad tan crítica el arte decide volver a narrar el mito mosaico. Especialmente nos interesa estudiar la actualidad que le conceden tanto Mann como Schönberg al problema y el método de la imposición del monoteísmo a través de la fuerza moralizadora de la Ley, en competición con el pluralismo de dioses, imágenes y normas del pueblo. Intentaremos mostrar cómo ambos artistas intentan responder a un problema de gran

  2. Paso superior en una ladera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bender, O.

    1965-07-01

    Full Text Available The Redwood highway, through the Californian forest, runs on a viaduct, as it crosses a mountain slope of about 45° inclination. The firm ground is fairly deep, and as an additional constructional difficulty, it was necessary to respect the natural beauty of the countryside. A structure of portal frames were built, forming a number of short spans. These spans were bridged with metal girders, on which a 19 m wide deck was placed. The columns are hollow and have a transversal cross beam, to join each pair. There was difficulty in excavating the foundations for the columns, as it was necessary to dig through the soft top soil, and also prevent this soil from hurting the trunks of the forest trees. Another significant difficulty in the construction of this viaduct was the access to the working site, since there were no suitable platforms from which to operate the appropriate machinery. This made it necessary to do a lot of the work by manual operation. As one of the edges of the deck is very close to the mountain side, a supporting beam was erected on this side. It was made of concrete, on metal piles. The formwork for the deck structure was placed on the concrete stems of the supporting piles.La autopista denominada Redwood (California salva, con un paso superior, la ladera de un bosque cuya pendiente es del 1/1. El terreno firme se halla a bastante profundidad, añadiéndose, a los naturales problemas de la construcción, el imperativo de respetar la belleza agreste del paraje. La solución adoptada consiste en una estructura porticada, con varios tramos de pequeñas luces, salvados con vigas metálicas, sobre los que se coloca la losa del tablero, de 19 m de anchura total. Los soportes están constituidos por pórticos de dos montantes huecos (con bases de hormigón en masa por debajo del suelo, hasta el firme coronados por un cabezal. La perforación de pozos para el hormigonado de los montantes presentaba la dificultad de atravesar el terreno

  3. Interception of Phytophthora syringae on Citrus fruits imported from California, USA%进境美国加州脐橙中丁香疫霉Phytophthora syringae截获

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗加凤; 刘跃庭; 廖芳; 胡晓红; 刘鹏; 黄国明

    2012-01-01

    Several brown rot fruits have been found from Californian fresh orange sample. Three isolates similar to Phytophthora syringae were obtained from these rot fruits. The colonies grew slowly on PDA and V8 juice agar (V8A). They were stellate, tiled and thin on V8A, but on PDA, the margin was chrysanthemum petaloid; mycelia dense, milk-white-colored. Sporangia and catenulate hyphal swellings formed in sterilizing water and soil extract water in 48h. The isolates were homothallic. Oospores were produced abundantly on PDA and V8A mixed with fresh Citrus fruit tissue or leaf of rhododendron. The isolates were wounded-inoculated on fresh Citrus fruits. Typical brown rot symptoms are apparent on inoculated fruits in 7d. DNA of hyphae was amplified with ITS1/ITS4 primers. In comparision with P. Syringae from NCBIGenBank databases, the sequences had 99% identity. All the results of tests showed that the isolates were Phytophthorasyringae.%从产自美国加利福尼亚州的新鲜脐橙样品中发现多个腐烂病果,通过分离培养得到3个疑似丁香疫霉Phytophthora syringae菌株,对3个菌株进行形态学研究、致病性测定和分子序列比对分析.结果表明病菌在V8A培养基上菌落稀疏、平铺,呈星状,菌丝紧贴培养基生长或埋于基质内生长;在PDA培养基上菌落呈菊花花瓣状,菌丝致密,乳白色;游动孢子囊和菌丝膨大体在无菌水和土壤浸出液中黑暗条件下48h后产生;菌株为同宗配合,卵孢子在带有新鲜脐橙果实组织或杜鹃叶片的V8A培养基中大量产生;创伤接种脐橙果实,7d后接种脐橙出现典型的褐腐症状;通用引物ITS 1/ITS4扩增测序,Blastn分析表明序列与GenBank中P.syringae序列相似性为99%.依据上述研究结果,将分离获得的3株菌鉴定为丁香疫霉Phytophthora syringae,系国内首次截获的一种植物检疫性真菌病害.

  4. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2001-06-01

    The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fish flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in

  5. A study of the earth radiation budget using a 3D Monte-Carlo radiative transer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okata, M.; Nakajima, T.; Sato, Y.; Inoue, T.; Donovan, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the earth's radiation budget when data are available from satellite-borne active sensors, i.e. cloud profiling radar (CPR) and lidar, and a multi-spectral imager (MSI) in the project of the Earth Explorer/EarthCARE mission. For this purpose, we first developed forward and backward 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes that can treat a broadband solar flux calculation including thermal infrared emission calculation by k-distribution parameters of Sekiguchi and Nakajima (2008). In order to construct the 3D cloud field, we tried the following three methods: 1) stochastic cloud generated by randomized optical thickness each layer distribution and regularly-distributed tilted clouds, 2) numerical simulations by a non-hydrostatic model with bin cloud microphysics model and 3) Minimum cloud Information Deviation Profiling Method (MIDPM) as explained later. As for the method-2 (numerical modeling method), we employed numerical simulation results of Californian summer stratus clouds simulated by a non-hydrostatic atmospheric model with a bin-type cloud microphysics model based on the JMA NHM model (Iguchi et al., 2008; Sato et al., 2009, 2012) with horizontal (vertical) grid spacing of 100m (20m) and 300m (20m) in a domain of 30km (x), 30km (y), 1.5km (z) and with a horizontally periodic lateral boundary condition. Two different cell systems were simulated depending on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration. In the case of horizontal resolution of 100m, regionally averaged cloud optical thickness, , and standard deviation of COT, were 3.0 and 4.3 for pristine case and 8.5 and 7.4 for polluted case, respectively. In the MIDPM method, we first construct a library of pair of observed vertical profiles from active sensors and collocated imager products at the nadir footprint, i.e. spectral imager radiances, cloud optical thickness (COT), effective particle radius (RE) and cloud top temperature (Tc). We then select a best

  6. California Tribal Nations Technical Water Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben, C; Coty, J

    2005-08-15

    , it was necessary to confine the analysis to a smaller geographic area, yet still represent the diversity of tribes and context within which tribal water issues arise. The state of California provides this opportunity. California has 106 federally recognized tribes. California is diverse in its geography, environment, demographics, and economic bases; California tribes demonstrate similar diversity. Additionally, no central repository of national or state tribal water issues exists and information must be aggregated, in general, tribe by tribe. This presents research challenges and, for this report, these were overcome by developing a method to essentially ''sub-sample'' the 106 federally recognized tribes in the state, while making every effort to maintain a sub-sample that broadly represents all of the 106 tribes. n an effort to develop an equitable and appropriate method with which to identify this set of representative tribes, multiple entities were contacted for guidance. Consultation with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Indian Health Services (IHS), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) and Tribal Environmental Directors, provided key information and recommendations to guide the research process. It is hoped that an appropriate representation of the diversity of tribes across the state has been achieved; this includes an adequate representation of similarities and differences between Californian tribes on key water research issues (and the same between regions). This research occurred over a limited time period (i.e., three months) and given a general concern that this may not be sufficient, any information and conclusions in this report should be viewed with this in mind. Finally, it is hoped that this research allows for an (enhanced) informed capacity to better propose further dialog between tribes and LLNL to continue to exchange water research perspectives and define

  7. Isotopic and enzymatic analyses of planktonic nitrogen utilisation in the vicinity of Cape Sines (Portugal) during weak upwelling activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawyk, Gerd; Coste, Bernard; Collos, Yves; Rodier, Martine

    1997-01-01

    ) absolute and Chl a-specific nitrate uptake rates (10.4 nM h -1, 7.5 nmol μ -1 h -1) compared to the mean rates during weak upwelling (1.7 nM h -1, 1.5 nmol μ -1 h -1). From a comparison with the neighbouring Moroccan upwelling, it is assumed that new production in the Portuguese upwelling averages 50 nM h -1. Thus, this upwelling would rank with the northwest African upwelling system off Cape Blanc or with the Californian upwelling at Point Conception for the capacity of new production, but seems to be much less efficient (seven-fold) than the highly permanent Peru upwelling.

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Einstein's Jury: The Race to Test Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Jürgen

    2007-10-01

    the Vulcan hypothesis, Evershed's Earth effect, and D C Miller's ether drift experiments. In particular, the sections on the history of the Californian observatories, their leading personalities, the differing attitudes of American and European scientists, and the influence of World War 1 on science, add interesting and informative aspects to the narrative. Those sections which report logistic and instrumental details of, for example, eclipse expeditions, were (to me) somewhat tiring. A weakness seems to be that the scientific importance of relativity problems is not stated clearly. On p43, the reader learns that Curtis quoted de Sitter's theoretical result of 7.15'' per century for Mercury's anomalous perihelion shift, but it is not mentioned that this value was due only to the special-relativistic variation of mass with velocity and already known to be much smaller than the observed value given on p88 and explained by general relativity, which includes, in particular, space curvature. In connection with light bending, the 'factor 2' is mentioned in several places without the explanation that this doubling is due to space curvature, the principal new effect whose observation created such a stir in 1919. Moreover, technical terms, for example absolute space, inertial frame, state of rest and (anomalous) dispersion, are used without explanation. Besides, readers interested as much in science as in its history would probably have appreciated a brief account of the present state of knowledge concerning the issues treated in this book and related ones. There are a few deplorable errors, for example the spectrum of the Andromeda nebula is shifted not towards the red, but towards the blue (p12); Eddington's limb deflection is given (p144) as 0.61'', while the correct value is 1.61''; misprints like that on p147 (coefficient of dr²), mistaking the astronomer Soldner (not Solden) for a physicist (p164). On p34 one reads 'Minkowski did not really grasp the physical

  9. 不同品种肉兔断奶后生长性状的比较%Comparison of Postweaning Growth of Different Meat Rabbit Breeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张翔宇; 谢晓红; 黄邓萍; 雷岷; 李金良; 杨锐; 肖嵩扬

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The objective of the present study was to compare different purebred rabbits based on individual body growth traits and evaluate the germplasm. [Method] Postweaning data of 909 rabbits from 173 litters representing five breeds, Flemish Giant, New Zealand White, Californian, Chinchilla, Fujian Yellow, were compared for individual growth traits such as body weights at 5 (5WT), 6 (6WT), 7 (WT), 8 (WT), 9 (WT), and 10 (10WT) weeks of age, and post-weaning average daily gain between 5 and 10 weeks of age (ADG), and approximate age at market weight (AGE). The model included main effects of breed type, month of birth of the litter, parity of dam, sex, random effect of litter, litter size at weaning and age at weighting as linear covariate, and the random error. [Result] The overall means for 5WT, 6WT, 7WT, 8WT, 9WT, 10WT, ADG, AGE were 619.46 g, 791.57 g, 941.51 g, 1 107.51 g, 1 309.51 g, 1 445.52 g, 23.64 g·d-1 and 103.14 d. Significant sources of variation for individual growth traits were breed and number weaned per litter. The Flemish Giant had heavier body weights in all weeks than the other four breeds (P<0.05). However, the Fujian Yellow had lower body weights in all weeks than the other four breeds (P<0.05). Common litter variance explained a significantly large proportion of total phenotypic variance, with the proportions ranging between 0.48 and 0.74. [ Conclusion ] This result would lead us to use Flemish Giant as a terminal sire breed because of its better growth rates. A multi-trait selection index with the inclusion of both number weaned per litter and growth traits was used as the criterion of selecting the lines of meat rabbits.%[目的]比较不同肉兔品种断奶后的生长性能,并进行种质评估.[方法]分别分析了弗朗德巨兔、新西兰白兔、加利福尼亚兔、青紫蓝兔和福建黄兔的5、6、7、8、9和10周龄体重,平均日增重和上市日龄.断奶后生长数据来自上述5个品种的173

  10. Free and total GMP (glycomacropeptide contents of milk during bovine lactation Variação dos teores de GMP (glicomacropeptídeo livre e total no leite bovino durante a lactação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Maria Furlanetti

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Individual milk samples taken every two weeks from parturition to the end of lactation from 34 animals of three different herds and breeds were analyzed for free-GMP. A milk pool of each herd was analyzed for free and total GMP (released from k-casein by the action of rennin and the data were correlated with sanitary conditions of animal and udder, phase of lactation and milk production. Most udder problems were concentrated near parturition, with few and spaced occurrences of clinical mastitis. The Californian Mastitis Test (CMT results showed oscillations compatible with the phases of lactation period and environmental conditions. The widest variations in free-GMP occurred as a function of lactation period and as a consequence of clinical or subclinical mastitis. Higher levels were observed at the beginning of lactation (5.87mg L-1 of sialic acid, becoming normal with mean values of about 3.30mg L-1 at the end of the second month, and increasing again during the final third of lactation. On average, the same trends were observed for total GMP released by commercial rennet, beginning with slightly high values (35.59mg L-1, becoming normal by the sixth month with values close to 27.15mg L-1, and rising gradually up to the end of lactation, with 58.35mg L-1 of sialic acid. These results prove to be useful for the correct interpretation of tests applied to milk selection with respect to proteolytic status or even to restrain frauds by the addition of whey to milk.Amostras quinzenais, desde o parto até o final do período de lactação, obtidas de 34 vacas de três diferentes raças e propriedades, foram analisadas quanto à presença de GMP livre. Um "pool" das amostras quinzenais de cada rebanho foi analisada tanto para o conteúdo de GMP livre quanto para o GMP total (liberado da k-caseína pela ação da renina, correlacionando-os com as condições sanitárias do animal e do úbere, à fase da lactação e à produção de leite. A maioria

  11. Fitogeografía de la costa del Pacífico de Norteamérica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgadillo Rodríguez, José

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to explore floristic variation along the Pacific coast from Cook Inlet, Alaska (61º30’N, to the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico, at 23º02’N. Data corresponding to 965 phytosociological relevés (including 686 vascular plants obtained by sampling 279 coastal sites were examined. Using an objective classification system (Average Linkage Clustering and Sørensen’s index, floristic data acquired in fieldwork were related to the biogeographical regions of the study area. According to the worldwide distribution pattern of genera and species, the registered taxa were grouped into phytogeographical elements. These elements, along with the climatic classification of the sites and comparisons among the main coastal vegetation types, gave rise to a phytogeographical classification of the study area in which four regions (North American Boreal, Rocky Mountain, Californian and Xerophytic-Mexican and eight floristic provin - ces were distinguished. Each province is characterized by its climate, changes in phytogeographic elements, the presence of endemic genera or species, and by its characteristic vegetation types. Floristic differences among provinces are related to palaeoclimatic and palaeogeographical events. The boreal and temperate provinces show high percentages of broadly distributed elements, whose origins can be found in the Boreotropical or Arctotertiary geoflora that dominated the Northern Hemisphere during the Tertiary. The floristically richest provinces are the three that occupy the Mediterranean zone, since these provinces harbour elements of the Arctotertiary and Madrotertiary geofloras. The flora of tropical Baja California is characterised by a high number of taxa related to Neotropical flora, especially to those showing links with South America.

    Este estudio fue diseñado para analizar la variación florística a lo largo de la costa del Pacífico entre Cook Inlet, Alaska (61º30’N hasta el

  12. Development of water facilities in the Santa Ana River Basin, California, 1810-1968: a compilation of historical notes derived from many sources describing ditch and canal companies, diversions, and water rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M.B.

    1977-01-01

    This report traces by text, maps, and photographs, the development of the water supply in the Santa Ana River basin from its beginning in 1810 or 1811 to 1968. The value of the report lies in the fact that interpretation of the hydrologic systems in the basin requires knowledge of the concurrent state of development of the water supply, because that development has progressively altered the local regimen of both surface water and ground water. Most of the information for the earlier years was extracted and condensed from an investigation made by W. H. Hall, California State Engineer during the years 1878-87. Hall's study described irrigation development in southern California from its beginning through 1888. Information for the years following 1888 was obtained from the archives of the numerous water companies and water agencies in the Santa Ana River basin and from the various depositories of courthouse, county, and municipal records. The history of water-resources development in the Santa Ana River basin begins with the introduction of irrigation in the area by the Spanish, who settled in southern California in the latter part, of the 18th century. The first irrigation diversion from the Santa Ana River was made in 1810 or 1811 by Jose Antonio Yorba and Juan Pablo Peralta. Irrigation remained a localized practice during the Mexican-Californian, or rancho, period following the separation of Mexico from Spain in 1821. Rancho grantees principally raised cattle, horses, and sheep and irrigated only small· plots of feed grain for their livestock and fruit crops for household use. The breakup of the ranchos through sales to Americans, who were migrating to California in ever-increasing numbers following the acquisition of California by the United States in 1848, marked the beginning of a rapid increase in water use and the beginning of widespread irrigation. Many water companies and water agencies were organized to divert the surface flow of the Santa Ana River and

  13. SOHO sees right through the Sun, and finds sunspots on the far side

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    , helioseismologists detect many different modes of vibration appearing at the Sun's surface, all with tales to tell about how the interior is structured and how the gas moves about. The SOHO spacecraft is an ideal platform for helioseismology because its station 1.5 million kilometres out in space allows it to watch the Sun for 24 hours a day. Its own motions are very gentle -- an important consideration when scientists are looking for subtle motions on the Sun's surface. Developed and operated by a Californian team, the MDI instrument is the most elaborate of three helioseismic instruments on SOHO. It measures rhythmic motions at a million points across the Sun's visible surface. Computers can interpret the motions in terms of sound waves travelling through the Sun. The waves are affected by the various layers and movements of gas that they encounter. MDI has already revealed many unknown features of the interior, including layers where the speed of the gas changes abruptly and hidden jet streams circling the Sun's poles. The team is also discovering what goes on underneath sunspots on the near side of the Sun. Philip Scherrer of Stanford University, California, leads the MDI team. He is gratified but not surprised that his instrument has chalked up another success, with the detection of sunspots on the far side. "Up till now we've explored the Sun's interior quite thoroughly from the near surface down to the core," Scherrer commented. "Charlie Lindsey and Doug Braun told me many years ago how they hoped to use MDI on SOHO to see all the way to the far side. I was always sure they could do it." The technique of helioseismic holography used by Lindsey and Braun examines a wide ring of sound waves that emanate from a small region on the far side, and reach the near side by rebounding internally from the solar surface. A sunspot group reveals itself because the Sun's surface is depressed and very strong magnetic fields speed up the sound waves. As a result the sound waves arrive at the

  14. Rainfall simulation experiments and Water Drop Penetration Time measurements shed light on the impact of water repellency on soils under organic farming management in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; González, Óscar; León, Javier; Jordán, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    the most water repellent soils generate a fast surface runoff that use to be infiltrate in macropores (cracks and fauna) and that runoff at plot scales was negligible in water repellent soils. Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7-ENV-2013- supported this research. References Atanassova, I., Doerr, S. H. 2011. Changes in soil organic compound composition associated with heat-induced increases in soil water repellency. European Journal of Soil Science, 62(4), 516-532. Badía-Villas, D., González-Pérez, J. A., Aznar, J. M., Arjona-Gracia, B., & Martí-Dalmau, C. 2014. Changes in water repellency, aggregation and organic matter of a mollic horizon burned in laboratory: soil depth affected by fire. Geoderma, 213, 400-407. Bodí, M. B., Doerr, S. H., Cerdà, A., Mataix-Solera, J. 2012. Hydrological effects of a layer of vegetation ash on underlying wettable and water repellent soil. Geoderma, 191, 14-23. Bodí, M.B. Doerr, S.H., Cerdà, A., Mataix-Solera, J. 2012. Hydrological effects of a layer of vegetation ash on underlying wettable and water repellent soils. Geoderma, 191, 14-23. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geoderma.2012.01.006 Bodí, M.B., Muñoz-Santa, I., Armero, C., Doerr, S.H., Mataix-Solera, J., Cerdà, A. 2013. Spatial and temporal variations of water repellency and probability of its occurrence in calcareous Mediterranean rangeland soils affected by fires. Catena, 108, 14-24. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.catena.2012.04.002 Butzen, V., Seeger, M., Wirtz, S., Huemann, M., Mueller, C., Casper, M., Ries, J. B. 2014. Quantification of Hortonian overland flow generation and soil erosion in a Central European low mountain range using rainfall experiments. Catena, 113, 202-212. Cerdà, A. 1998a. Effect of climate on surface flow along a climatological gradient in Israel. A field rainfall simulation approach. Journal of Arid Environments, 38, 145

  15. THE HANDBOOK OF BLENDED LEARNING:Global Perspectives, Local Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Alev ATES

    2009-10-01

    into HE administration structure and require rethinking of the ways for teaching, they provide the best way to improve student learning outcomes. Examples from New Zealand (the Massey University and the Open Polytechnic, Wales (TheUniversity of Glamorgan, USA (California-National University in teacher education, In Part Four: For-profit and online university perspectives, the University of Phoenix, Capella University and Jones International University provide different histories and programs of BL practices in local designs besides its impact on students with various demographics. Several practices and cases are able to stimulate higher educators to review the aspects and discuss issues in applying BL models in their own institutions.In Part Five: Cases of blended learning in higher education from around the world,specific case situations from twelve different countries which are Japan, Korea, China, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia, Canada, the United States, Mexico, Israel, the United Kingdom and South Africa are highlighted. These cases can provide readers a great understanding for implementation of BL according to diverse learning needs and cultures. However, I have also expected to see cases from Anadolu University in Turkey, since it is the fourth largest university in the world by enrollment and the national provider of open education since 1982 with over 1.500.000 enrollments (AU,2009. This valuable contribution could have helped to complete the global picture of distance and blended learning practices in higher education.In Part Six: Multinational blended learning perspectives, the integration of learning technologies into Europe‘s education besides BL in Africa and the Middle East and in the context of international development are highlighted. In Part Seven: Workplace, on demand, and authentic learning, emerging trends in workplace, work flow and ondemand learning are provided. The opportunities for mentoring and apprenticeship in learning in the workplace

  16. Obituary: Brian Marsden (1937-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gareth; Marsden, Cynthia

    2011-12-01

    had brought to the MPC in 2000. Dr. Marsden served as an associate director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (the combination of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Harvard College Observatory) for 15.75 years from the beginning of 1987 (the longest tenure for any of the Center's associate directors). He was chair of the Division of Dynamical Astronomy of the American Astronomical Society during 1976-1978 and president of the IAU commissions that oversaw the operation of the minor Planet Center (1976-1979) and the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (2000-2003). He continued to serve subsequently on the two solar-system nomenclature committees of the IAU, being the perennial secretary of the one that decides on names for asteroids. He also continued to publish a "Catalogue of Cometary Orbits," the first of these having appeared in 1972 and its successors roughly at intervals of two years. Among the various awards he received from the U.S., the U.K. and a handful of other European countries, the ones he particularly appreciated were the 1995 Dirk Brouwer Award (named for his mentor at Yale) of the AAS Division on Dynamical Astronomy and the 1989 Van Biesbroeck Award (named for an old friend and observer of comets and double stars), then presented by the University of Arizona, now by the AAS, for service to astronomy. Dr. Marsden married Nancy Lou Zissell, of Trumbull, Connecticut, on 1964 December 26, and fathered Cynthia (who is married to Gareth Williams, still MPC associate director), of Arlington, Massachusetts; and Jonathan, of San Mateo, California. There are three Californian grandchildren, Nikhilas, Nathaniel and Neena. A sister, Sylvia Custerson, continues to reside in Cambridge, England. From material written by Brian Marsden, edited by Gareth Williams, Cynthia Marsden, and HAD. First posted by the Minor Planet Center on 18 November 2010 as Minor Planet Electronic Circular 2010-W10.