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Sample records for california san diego

  1. Convair Astronautics, San Diego (California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira & Luckmam, Arquitectos

    1960-05-01

    Full Text Available Este brillante y espectacular complejo industrial se ha creado especialmente para la investigación y fabricación de cohetes intercontinentales y vehículos del espacio de las Fuerzas Aéreas de los EE. UU., en las proximidades de San Diego y cerca del campo de pruebas de Sycamore Canyon.

  2. Bismuth ochers from San Diego Co., California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, W.T.

    1911-01-01

    The chief points brought out in this paper may be briefly summarized as follows: (1) The existence of natural Bi2O3 has not been established. (2) Natural bismite or bismuth ocher, when pure, is more probably a bismuth hydroxide. (3) The bismuth ochers from San Diego County, California, are either a bismuth hydroxide or bismuth vanadate, pucherite, or mixtures of these two. (4) Pucherite has been found noncrystallin and determined for the first time in the United States.

  3. 76 FR 75908 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    .... Matthews, Vice Chancellor Resource Management & Planning, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman... the criteria in 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1) should contact Gary C. Matthews, Vice Chancellor...

  4. San Diego, California 1/3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1/3-second San Diego, California Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1/3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  5. San Diego, California Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The San Diego, California Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  6. General Atomic Laboratories. San Diego - California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luckman, Charles

    1962-07-01

    Full Text Available El edificio está emplazado en un espacioso solar de Torrey Pines Mesa, situado en la parte norte de la ciudad de San Diego (California. Los servicios fundamentales comprenden un bloque administrativo; una gran construcción experimental; dos edificios de forma semicilíndrica, en los que se encuentran los laboratorios particulares y las oficinas correspondientes; y otro edificio, de planta circular, en el que está la biblioteca y que, además, sirve para centro de reuniones, conferencias e información técnica. También existe un edificio en el que se encuentra el acelerador lineal de partículas, otros dos que sirven para la investigación de la fisión nuclear y el salón de reuniones. El complejo de los laboratorios, incluyendo los edificios auxiliares y de servicio, ocupa aproximadamente 24.000 m2 y es uno de los mayores y mejor acondicionados para la investigación nuclear privada del mundo.

  7. Solar energy system performance evaluation-seasonal report for Elcam San Diego, San Diego, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system, Elcam San Diego, was designed to supply domestic hot water heating for a single family residence located in Encinitas, California. System description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, maintenance, and conclusions are presented. The system is a 'Sunspot' two tank cascade type, where solar energy is supplied to either a 66 gallon preheat tank (solar storage) or a 40 gallon domestic hot water tank. Water is pumped directly from one of the two tanks, through the 65 square feet collector array and back into the same tank. Freeze protection is provided by automatically circulating hot water from the hot water tank through the collectors and exposed plumbing when freezing conditions exist. Auxiliary energy is supplied by natural gas. Analysis is based on instrumented system data monitored and collected for one full season of operation.

  8. 75 FR 56942 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Diego Air Pollution Control District...

  9. 78 FR 37176 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego Air Pollution Control District

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve a revision to the San Diego Air Pollution Control District (SDAPCD) portion of...

  10. Multibeam bathymetry and selected perspective views offshore San Diego, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Peter; Normark, William R.; Driscoll, Neal W.; Babcock, Jeffrey M.; Gardner, James V.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Iampietro, Pat J.

    2007-01-01

    This set of two posters consists of a map on one sheet and a set of seven perspective views on the other. The ocean floor image was generated from multibeam-bathymetry data acquired by Federal and local agencies as well as academic institutions including: - U.S. Geological Survey mapped from the La Jolla Canyon south to the US-Mexico border using a Kongsberg Simrad multibeam echosounder system (MBES) (March - April 1998). Data and metadata available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2004/1221/. - Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and SCRIPPS Institution of Oceanography mapped the majority of the La Jolla Fan Valley including the sea floor to the north and south of the valley using a Seabeam 2100 MBES. Data available at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/multibeam.html. Survey ID, AT07L09, Chief Scientists, Barrie Walden and Joseph Coburn (April 2002). - California State University, Monterey Bay, mapped Scripps Canyon and the head of La Jolla Canyon using a Reson 8101 MBES (October 2001). Data and metadata available at http://seafloor.csumb.edu/SFMLwebDATA.htm. This work was funded by the California Department of Fish and Game California Coastal Conservancy, San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), California Department of Fish and Game, and Fugro Pelagos mapped the nearshore region out to about 35-40 m. - The sea floor within this image that has not been mapped with MBES is filled in with interpreted bathymetry gridded from single-beam data available at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/hydro.html. Depths are in meters below sea level, which is referenced to Mean Lower Low Water.

  11. California Clean Air Act: A compliance strategy for the City of San Diego`s non-emergency fleet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Historically, parts of California have had the worst air quality in the nation. The California Energy Commission began experimenting with alternate fuels in the 1970`s in an effort to reduce harmful automobile emissions and hence, improve air quality. It is recognized that the costs to California which result from our air quality problems are immense. Ten to twenty billion dollars each year is the estimated damage in terms of health impacts, materials damages, lost agricultural crop output and forest damages. As the California population increases and health care costs escalate, the total monetary damages from air pollution will increase. The California Energy Commission goal to improve air quality became a mandate in 1988 with the passage of the California Clean Air Act (CCAA). The CCAA requires a revised air quality strategy for the San Diego district since we do not meet State air quality standards for smog, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide. Smog remains San Diego`s major air quality problem, even though the annual number of days each year over the Federal standard has been reduced by 55 percent in the past ten years. Ten years ago about two-thirds of San Diego`s smog was transported from Los Angeles. Today more than 60 per cent of the days San Diego exceeds the State standard are from locally generated smog. It is estimated that 57% of the reactive hydrocarbon emissions (which react with nitrogen dioxide in the presence of sunlight to form smog) is from cars, trucks and buses. The Air Pollution Control District (part of the County of San Diego) is the office that the Air Resources Board has put in charge of creating regulations and designing strategy to reduce polluting emissions. The purpose of this project is to determine the full cost of acquiring and operating a municipal fleet which meets the mandates of the California Clean Air Act. With that information, a plan to meet the Clear Air Act (CCAA) requirements can be formulated by local government.

  12. Degradation of tributyltin in San Diego Bay, California, waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, P.F.; Valkirs, A.O.; Lee, R.F.

    1986-12-01

    Several experiments were carried out to determine the degradation rate of tributyltin (TBT) in microcosms containing harbor water. Unlabeled or /sup 14/C-labeled tributyltin was added to water samples collected from two stations in San Diego Bay, CA. Degradation rates were determined by calculating the rate of loss of the added parent TBT compound. Calculated half-lives in water collected from a yacht harbor (ambient concentration was 0.5 ..mu..g of TBT/L) were 6 and 7 days for light and dark treatments, respectively. Half-lives from a clean-water site (< 0.03 ..mu..g of TBT/L) were 9 and 19 days for light and dark treatments, respectively. The principal degradation product in all experiments was dibutyltin with lesser amounts of monobutyltin. Complete mineralization, measured by the formation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, proceeded slowly with a half-life of 50-75 days. Tributyltin at high concentrations (744 ..mu..g/L) was not degraded in sunlight, indicating that photolysis was not taking place and that biological degradation was the primary degradative process for TBT at low ambient concentrations.

  13. Solar energy system economic evaluation for Elcam-Tempe, Tempe, Arizona and Elcam-San Diego, San Diego, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The long term economic performance of the solar energy system at its installation site is analyzed and four additional locations selected to demonstrate the viability of the design over a broad range of environmental and economic conditions. The economic analysis of the solar energy systems that were installed at Tempe, Arizona and San Diego, California, is developed for these and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system cost over a projected twenty year life: life cycle savings; year of positive savings; and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainites in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  14. Glaucoma at the Hamilton Glaucoma Center and the University of California, San Diego

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert N. Weinreb

    2011-01-01

    @@ Known for its unique cross-disciplinary investigative programs and clinical excellence, the scientists and clinicians at the Hamilton Glaucoma Center of the University of California, San Diego seek to enhance the discovery and translation of innovative research to clinical glaucoma care to prevent and cure glaucoma blindness.With state of the art laboratory and clinical facilities located on the La Jolla campus (Figure 1), the Center is a home for a worldrenowned team of scientists and staff.More than 100 post-doctoral fellows in Glaucoma, many of whom hold distinguished academic positions throughout the world, have been trained at the Hamilton Glaucoma Center and the University of California, San Diego.At the core of Hamilton Glaucoma Center activities are the outstanding faculty that are described below.

  15. University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Sky Imager Cloud Position Study Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleissl, J. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Urquhart, B. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Ghonima, M. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Dahlin, E. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Nguyen, A. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Kurtz, B. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Chow, C. W. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Mejia, F. A. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    During the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Sky Imager Cloud Position Study, two University of California, San Diego Sky Imagers (USI) (Figure 1) were deployed the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains SGP) research facility. The UCSD Sky Imagers were placed 1.7 km apart to allow for stereographic determination of the cloud height for clouds over approximately 1.5 km. Images with a 180-degree field of view were captured from both systems during daylight hours every 30 seconds beginning on March 11, 2013 and ending on November 4, 2013. The spatial resolution of the images was 1,748 × 1,748, and the intensity resolution was 16 bits using a high-dynamic-range capture process. The cameras use a fisheye lens, so the images are distorted following an equisolid angle projection.

  16. Species - San Diego Co. [ds121

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is the Biological Observation Database point layer representing baseline observations of sensitive species (as defined by the MSCP) throughout San Diego County....

  17. Assessment of Family Planning Services at Community Pharmacies in San Diego, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Rafie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Levonorgestrel emergency contraception and other contraceptive methods are available over-the-counter (OTC; however youth continue to face a number of barriers in accessing healthcare services, including lack of knowledge of the method, fear of loss of privacy, difficulties in finding a provider, and cost. A descriptive, nonexperimental, cross-sectional study of a sample of 112 community pharmacies in San Diego, California was conducted between December 2009 and January 2010 to assess community pharmacy practices related to the availability and accessibility of family planning health pharmacy services and products, particularly to youth. A majority (n = 79/112, 70.5% of the pharmacies carried a wide selection of male condoms; however, the other OTC nonhormonal contraceptive products were either not available or available with limited selection. A majority of the pharmacies sold emergency contraception (n = 88/111, 78.6%. Most patient counseling areas consisted of either a public or a semi-private area. A majority of the pharmacy sites did not provide materials or services targeting youth. Significant gaps exist in providing family planning products and services in the majority of community pharmacies in San Diego, California. Education and outreach efforts are needed to promote provision of products and services, particularly to the adolescent population.

  18. 78 FR 68995 - Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for the San Diego Captain of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for... advertising by the event sponsor. If the Captain of the Port Sector San Diego or his designated...

  19. Under- and over-nutrition among refugees in San Diego County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondinelli, Amanda J; Morris, Meghan D; Rodwell, Timothy C; Moser, Kathleen S; Paida, Paulino; Popper, Steve T; Brouwer, Kimberly C

    2011-02-01

    Resettled refugees often arrive in their host country with little knowledge of nutrition or available food choices. We explored nutrition-related issues of recent refugee arrivals to San Diego County-the second largest California resettlement site. In-depth interviews (n = 40) were conducted with refugees, health care practitioners, and refugee service organizations. Content analysis identified nutrition-related themes. Unhealthy weight gain after arrival was the most common concern and was attributed to social pressures among adolescents, food choices and a more sedentary lifestyle. Conversely, undernutrition remained a concern due to poor diets. Factors influencing nutritional problems included continuation of past habits, acculturation, unfamiliarity with available foods and socio-economic influences. The nutritional concerns encountered by resettled refugees in San Diego are not unique to this group but are aggravated by their past experiences, and abrupt changes to food choices and behavior. Addressing contextual factors of poor food choices may prevent some of the long term health consequences of poor nutrition.

  20. Mammal Track Counts - San Diego County [ds442

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The San Diego Tracking Team (SDTT) is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the preservation of wildlife habitat in San Diego County through citizen-based...

  1. Mammal Track Counts - San Diego County, 2010 [ds709

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The San Diego Tracking Team (SDTT) is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the preservation of wildlife habitat in San Diego County through citizen-based...

  2. Coastal Cactus Wren, San Diego Co. - 2009 [ds702

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The San Diego Multiple Species Conservation program (MSCP) was developed for the conservation of plants and animals in the southeast portion of San Diego County....

  3. Coastal Cactus Wren, San Diego Co. - 2011 [ds708

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The San Diego Multiple Species Conservation program (MSCP) was developed for the conservation of plants and animals in the southeast portion of San Diego County....

  4. 78 FR 58878 - Safety Zone; San Diego Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay... Diego Shark Fest Swim. This safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of the participants, crew... this rule because the logistical details of the San Diego Shark Fest Swim were not finalized...

  5. Fire risk in San Diego County, California: A weighted Bayesian model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolden, Crystal A.; Weigel, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    Fire risk models are widely utilized to mitigate wildfire hazards, but models are often based on expert opinions of less understood fire-ignition and spread processes. In this study, we used an empirically derived weights-of-evidence model to assess what factors produce fire ignitions east of San Diego, California. We created and validated a dynamic model of fire-ignition risk based on land characteristics and existing fire-ignition history data, and predicted ignition risk for a future urbanization scenario. We then combined our empirical ignition-risk model with a fuzzy fire behavior-risk model developed by wildfire experts to create a hybrid model of overall fire risk. We found that roads influence fire ignitions and that future growth will increase risk in new rural development areas. We conclude that empirically derived risk models and hybrid models offer an alternative method to assess current and future fire risk based on management actions.

  6. Cooling rates and crystallization dynamics of shallow level pegmatite-aplite dikes, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Karen L.; Simmons, William B.; Falster, Alexander U.; Foord, Eugene E.

    1999-01-01

    Pegmatites of the Pala and Mesa Grande Pegmatite Districts, San Diego County, California are typically thin, sheet-like composite pegmatite-aplite dikes. Aplitic portions of many dikes display pronounced mineralogical layering referred to as "line rock," characterized by fine-grained, garnet-rich bands alternating with albite- and quartz-rich bands. Thermal modeling was performed for four dikes in San Diego County including the 1 m thick Himalaya dike, the 2 m thick Mission dike, the 8 m thick George Ashley dike, and the 25 m thick Stewart dike. Calculations were based on conductive cooling equations accounting for latent heat of crystallization, a melt emplacement temperature of 650 °C into 150 °C fractured, gabbroic country rock at a depth of 5 km, and an estimated 3 wt% initial H2O content in the melt. Cooling to -5 cm/s. Crystal size distribution (CSD) studies of garnet from layered aplites suggest growth rates of about 10-6 cm/s. These results indicate that the dikes cooled and crystallized rapidly, with variable nucleation rates but high overall crystal-growth rates. Initial high nucleation rates coincident with emplacement and strong undercooling can account for the millimeter-size aplite grains. Lower nucleation rates coupled with high growth rates can explain the decimeter-size minerals in the hanging walls, cores, and miarolitic cavities of the pegmatites. The presence of tourmaline and/or lepidolite throughout these dikes suggests that although the melts were initially H2O-undersaturated, high melt concentrations of incompatible (or fluxing) components such as B, F, and Li (±H2O), aided in the development of large pegmatitic crystals that grew rapidly in the short times suggested by the conductive cooling models.

  7. Navigation Improvement Design Memorandum Number 1, General Design for San Diego Harbor, San Diego County, California. Appendixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-01

    ice-cooled refrigerator soon after recovery. The frozen samples and dry ice were packed in shipping containers and sent by air to the Environmental...DIEGO HAR POLUTION STUDY FOR PROPOSED CHANNEL DEPEIING AUTDRIZ&TION 1. Results of tests reported herein were requested by DA Form 2544, No. CIV-72-57, 29...was so strongehatolaaais his air hammer to stand up. gh a ola gis Drilling was hard from 0.0’ to about 3.0’ at which depth the C&PAbility of the air

  8. 75 FR 55975 - Safety Zone; San Diego Harbor Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego Harbor Shark Fest Swim; San Diego... Shark Fest Swim, consisting of 600 swimmers swimming a predetermined course. The sponsor will provide 26...; San Diego Harbor Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA. (a) Location. The following area is...

  9. 78 FR 37130 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego Air Pollution Control District

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is taking direct final action to approve a revision to the San Diego Air Pollution Control District (SDAPCD... environment. Section 110(a) of the CAA requires States to submit regulations that control VOC...

  10. 75 FR 56889 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ...: EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the San Diego County Air Pollution Control... high and adverse human health or environmental effects of their programs, policies, and activities on..., disproportionate human health or environmental effects, using practicable and legally permissible methods,...

  11. Persistent organic pollutants in plastic marine debris found on beaches in San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Almira; Rochman, Chelsea M; Flores, Elisa M; Hill, Kish L; Vargas, Erica; Vargas, Serena A; Hoh, Euhna

    2012-01-01

    Plastic debris were collected from eight beaches around San Diego County, California. Debris collected include: pre-production pellets and post-consumer plastics including fragments, polystyrene (PS) foam, and rubber. A total of n = 2453 pieces were collected ranging from plastic pieces were separated by type, location, and appearance and analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its breakdown products, and chlordanes. PAH concentrations ranged from 30 ng g(-1) to 1900 ng g(-1), PCBs from non-detect to 47 ng g(-1), chlordanes from 1.8 ng g(-1) to 60 ng g(-1), and DDTs from non-detect to 76 ng g(-1). Consistently higher PAH concentrations found in PS foam samples (300-1900 ng g(-1)) led us to examine unexposed PS foam packaging materials and PS virgin pellets. Unexposed PS foam contained higher concentrations of PAHs (240-1700 ng g(-1)) than PS virgin pellets (12-15 ng g(-1)), suggesting that PAHs may be produced during manufacturing. Temporal trends of debris were investigated at one site, Ocean Beach, where storm events and beach maintenance were found to be important variables influencing debris present at a given time.

  12. (De)constructing literacy: Education inequalities and the production of space in San Diego, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangeman, Andrew Gerrit

    Since its inception, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) and recent additions to the U.S. Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) have elicited a broad swath of responses from the educational community. These responses include critical discussions of how standardized testing requirements proliferate a "teach for the test" mentality that transforms how reading, writing, and mathematics are taught in public schools. This thesis focused specifically on "literacy" in relation to the policies that challenge its status as a subjective form of communication, knowledge sharing, and story-telling. Embedded within the term "literacy" are sets of socially-constructed dualisms such as "good school" vs. "bad school," "literate" vs. "illiterate," and "reader" vs. "test-taker" that are propagated under education reform. Investigating these dualisms involved a mixed methods approach, which included the use of critical theory, geovisualization, and geographic analysis. The resulting data allows for a comprehensive look into the economic, political, social, and cultural forces involved in the production of literate space(s) in San Diego, California.

  13. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, 2004: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 3,900-square-mile (mi2) San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter San Diego) study unit was investigated from May through July 2004 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southwestern California in the counties of San Diego, Riverside, and Orange. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA San Diego study was designed to provide a statistically robust assessment of untreated-groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 58 wells in 2004 and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as the primary aquifers) were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the San Diego study unit. The San Diego study unit consisted of four study areas: Temecula Valley (140 mi2), Warner Valley (34 mi2), Alluvial Basins (166 mi2), and Hard Rock (850 mi2). The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers. For example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination than groundwater in deep water-bearing zones. This study had two components: the status assessment and the understanding assessment. The first component of this study-the status assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource-was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to

  14. Transducer Workshop (17th) Held in San Diego, California on June 22-24, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    EctronJohn Huecke, President Walter Hanford , Vice-President, Marketing 215 Mason Circle 8159 Engineering Rd. Concord, CA 94520 San Diego, CA 92111CocrA...amplifier, the response could be extended below 0.1 Hz if needed for seismic measurement, etc. 6 Response Time and Slew Rate Real amplifiers have other...amplifier sensing element Seismic mass Hermetic sealed Preload ring connector Base Figure 2. Typical triangular shear ICP accelerometer, 206 3.0 SMART

  15. Reconnaissance of geothermal resources near US naval facilities in the San Diego area, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngs, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    A reconnaissance study has found little evidence of potential geothermal resources useful at naval facilities in the greater San Diego metropolitan area. However, there is a zone of modest elevated water well temperatures and slightly elevated thermal gradients that may include the eastern portion of the Imperial Beach Naval Air Station south of San Diego Bay. An increase of 0.3/sup 0/ to 0.4/sup 0/F/100 ft over the regional thermal gradient of 1.56/sup 0/F/100 ft was conservatively calculated for this zone. The thermal gradient can be used to predict 150/sup 0/F temperatures at a depth of approximately 4000 ft. This zone of greatest potential for a viable geothermal resource lies within a negative gravity anomaly thought to be caused by a tensionally developed graben, approximately centered over the San Diego Bay. Water well production in this zone is good to high, with 300 gpm often quoted as common for wells in this area. The concentration of total dissolved solids (TDS) in the deeper wells in this zone is relatively high due to intrusion of sea water. Productive geothermal wells may have to be drilled to depths economically infeasible for development of the resource in the area of discussion.

  16. Community BMI Surveillance Using an Existing Immunization Registry in San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratigan, Amanda R; Lindsay, Suzanne; Lemus, Hector; Chambers, Christina D; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Cronan, Terry A; Browner, Deirdre K; Wooten, Wilma J

    2016-11-11

    This study examines the demographic representativeness of the County of San Diego Body Mass Index (BMI) Surveillance System to determine if the BMI estimates being obtained from this convenience sample of individuals who visited their healthcare provider for outpatient services can be generalized to the general population of San Diego. Height and weight were transmitted from electronic health records systems to the San Diego Immunization Registry (SDIR). Age, gender, and race/ethnicity of this sample are compared to general population estimates by sub-regional area (SRA) (n = 41) to account for regional demographic differences. A < 10% difference (calculated as the ratio of the differences between the frequencies of a sub-group in this sample and general population estimates obtained from the U.S. Census Bureau) was used to determine representativeness. In 2011, the sample consisted of 352,924 residents aged 2-100 years. The younger age groups (2-11, 12-17 years) and the oldest age group (≥65 years) were representative in 90, 75, and 85% of SRAs, respectively. Furthermore, at least one of the five racial/ethnic groups was represented in 71% of SRAs. This BMI Surveillance System was found to demographically represent some SRAs well, suggesting that this registry-based surveillance system may be useful in estimating and monitoring neighborhood-level BMI data.

  17. San Diego's Capital Planning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytton, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article describes San Diego's capital planning process. As part of its capital planning process, the San Diego Unified School District has developed a systematic analysis of functional quality at each of its school sites. The advantage of this approach is that it seeks to develop and apply quantifiable metrics and standards for the more…

  18. Species Observations (poly) - San Diego County [ds648

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Created in 2009, the SanBIOS database serves as a single repository of species observations collected by various departments within the County of San Diego's Land...

  19. Creating an Engaging Library Orientation: First Year Experience Courses at University of California, San Diego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal Goldman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the development of an engaging library orientation module for UC San Diego First Year Experience (FYE courses. The library module included a brief in-class presentation about research concepts and library services, an online interactive library scavenger hunt given as an in-class activity, and a homework assignment where students created public service announcements highlighting their favorite library space or resource. Over 400 FYE students completed the library module, and many indicated a marked increase in comfort using the library by the end of the module. Recommended practices are included for those wishing to create a similar module.

  20. 76 FR 45693 - Safety Zone; San Diego POPS Fireworks, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego POPS Fireworks, San Diego, CA... temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of San Diego Bay in support of the San Diego POPS Fireworks... San Diego POPS Fireworks, which will include a fireworks presentation conducted from a barge in...

  1. 75 FR 38412 - Safety Zone; San Diego POPS Fireworks, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego POPS Fireworks, San Diego, CA... zone on the ] navigable waters of San Diego Bay in support of the San Diego POPS Fireworks. This safety... San Diego POPS Fireworks, which will include fireworks presentations conducted from a barge in...

  2. Proceedings of the Conference on Joint Problem Solving and Microcomputers (San Diego, California, March 31 - April 2, 1983). Technical Report No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael; And Others

    A group of American and Japanese psychologists, anthropologists, linguists, and computer scientists gathered at the University of California, San Diego, to exchange ideas on models of joint problem solving and their special relevance to the design and implementation of computer-based systems of instruction. Much of the discussion focused on…

  3. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Military Testing Association (27th) Held in San Diego, California on 21-25 October 1985. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-25

    and Development Center (NPRDC). The Conference was held at the Bahia Hotel in San Diego, California, 21 through 25 October 1985. A total of 169 paper...different xuthds of ensurrng job performance yield quite different results." Campbell at.o narris 1escro-be the results of attempting to interpret

  4. Reconstructing Equality on New Political Ground: The Politics of Representation in the Charter School Debate at the University of California, San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Lisa; Mehan, Hugh

    2003-01-01

    Attacks on the legitimacy of affirmative action pose new challenges for public universities committed to creating a diverse student population without considering race or ethnicity as factors in admissions. On the basis of a case study of the controversy surrounding the building of a charter school at the University of California, San Diego, in…

  5. Migración y transnacionalismo. Experiencias de inmigrantes en el transporte público de San Diego, California, 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Ciria Valdéz-Gardea

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Con la idea de que las prácticas cotidianas entre los inmigrantes mexicanos permiten construir y redefinir el espacio transnacional, como punto de partida, en este artículo se explorará la noción de la migración desde la perspectiva del transnacionalismo, en el marco de las tendencias contemporáneas del fenómeno migratorio en México. Al examinar las interacciones de los inmigrantes en el transporte público en San Diego, California, se buscará entender cómo se crean y recrean sus acciones. Este acercamiento desde un espacio social, permite analizar las interacciones específicas entre sociedades con historias y procesos de desarrollo diferentes.

  6. Slip rate on the San Diego trough fault zone, inner California Borderland, and the 1986 Oceanside earthquake swarm revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Holly F.; Conrad, James E.; Paull, C.K.; McGann, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The San Diego trough fault zone (SDTFZ) is part of a 90-km-wide zone of faults within the inner California Borderland that accommodates motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Along with most faults offshore southern California, the slip rate and paleoseismic history of the SDTFZ are unknown. We present new seismic reflection data that show that the fault zone steps across a 5-km-wide stepover to continue for an additional 60 km north of its previously mapped extent. The 1986 Oceanside earthquake swarm is located within the 20-km-long restraining stepover. Farther north, at the latitude of Santa Catalina Island, the SDTFZ bends 20° to the west and may be linked via a complex zone of folds with the San Pedro basin fault zone (SPBFZ). In a cooperative program between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), we measure and date the coseismic offset of a submarine channel that intersects the fault zone near the SDTFZ–SPBFZ junction. We estimate a horizontal slip rate of about 1:5 0:3 mm=yr over the past 12,270 yr.

  7. San Diego Littoral Cell CRSMP Receiver Sites 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — A total of 27 possible placement sites (some with multiple placement footprints) are incorporated into this San Diego Coastal Regional Sediment Management Plan to...

  8. Vernal Pool Amphibians, Shrimp, Plants - San Diego [ds188

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — In 2002, the City of San Diego (City) received funding through a U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Section 6 Planning Grant to complete an inventory and...

  9. San Diego Littoral Cell CRSMP Potential Offshore Borrow Areas 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Offshore sediment sources along the entire reach of the San Diego Coastal RSM Plan region were previously identified by SANDAG and used for Regional Beach Sand...

  10. Vegetation Mapping - Tecolote Canyon, San Diego Co. [ds656

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vegetation mapping has been conducted at various City of San Diego Park and Recreation Open Space lands in support of natural resource management objectives and the...

  11. Baseline Surveys - Tecolote Canyon, San Diego Co. [ds655

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Various resource projects have been conducted in the City of San Diego's Open Space Parks as part of the implementation of the City's Multiple Species Conservation...

  12. 76 FR 55796 - Safety Zone; TriRock Triathlon, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; TriRock Triathlon, San Diego Bay, San Diego.... Basis and Purpose Competitor Group is sponsoring the TriRock Triathlon, consisting of 2000 swimmers....T11-431 Safety Zone; TriRock Triathlon, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA. (a) Location. The limits of...

  13. 40 CFR 81.164 - San Diego Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.164 San Diego Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The San Diego Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (California) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Intrastate Air...

  14. Education in a Global Age: An Inter-California Strategy for the Tijuana-San Diego Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Vásquez

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta un bosquejo para una estrategia Inter-California que enlazaría las áreas de San Diego y Tijuana como una sola fuerza regional. Esto intenta conceptualizar dos distintas y frecuentemente contradictorias áreas como una sola, haciendo una aproximación a grosso modo de las desiguales condiciones económicas y educativas en ambos lados de la frontera. Se discute la colaboración binacional en el pasado en educación, y se plantean las posibilidades para el futuro de dicha colaboración, ofreciendo recomendaciones y predicciones de las metas que podrían alcanzarse. Llamando a la región Inter-California, el artículotambién argumenta por una identidad global, y específicamente, por una educación que es relevante para la nueva economía, asi como los avances científicos y tecnológicos que están iluminando cada vez más una nueva sociedad global.

  15. Collaborative Problem-Solving Environments; Proceedings for the Workshop CPSEs for Scientific Research, San Diego, California, June 20 to July 1, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, George

    1999-01-11

    A workshop on collaborative problem-solving environments (CPSEs) was held June 29 through July 1, 1999, in San Diego, California. The workshop was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the High Performance Network Applications Team of the Large Scale Networking Working Group. The workshop brought together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government to identify, define, and discuss future directions in collaboration and problem-solving technologies in support of scientific research.

  16. 77 FR 54811 - Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... zone. Recreational vessels may be allowed to transit through the designated safety zone during the... vessels intending to transit or anchor in the aforementioned portion of the San Diego Bay from September 9... of this safety zone and will announce that fact via Broadcast Notice to Mariners. (c)...

  17. Annual National Small Business Conference (5th) Held in San Diego, California on May 19-21, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-21

    Systems Solutions u Mr. James Lasswell, President & CEO, INDUS Technology u Ms. Patricia Mercado , San Diego Area Manager and Senior Principal, SRA...Department of Labor ; HK MP-5 Sub-Machine Gun Instructor; HK Tactical Rifle Instructor; Diversionary Devise Instructor; Law Enforcement Chemical Agent

  18. 78 FR 21537 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control District...

  19. Can private land conservation reduce wildfire risk to homes? A case study in San Diego County, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsic, Van; Syphard, Alexandra D.; Keeley, Jon E.; Bar-Massada, Avi

    2017-01-01

    The purchase of private land for conservation purposes is a common way to prevent the exploitation of sensitive ecological areas. However, private land conservation can also provide other benefits, one of these being natural hazard reduction. Here, we investigated the impacts of private land conservation on fire risk to homes in San Diego County, California. We coupled an econometric land use change model with a model that estimates the probability of house loss due to fire in order to compare fire risk at the county and municipality scale under alternative private land purchasing schemes and over a 20 year time horizon. We found that conservation purchases could reduce fire risk on this landscape, and the amount of risk reduction was related to the targeting approach used to choose which parcels were conserved. Conservation land purchases that targeted parcels designated as high fire hazard resulted in lower fire risk to homes than purchases that targeted low costs or high likelihood to subdivide. This result was driven by (1) preventing home placement in fire prone areas and (2) taking land off the market, and hence increasing development densities in other areas. These results raise the possibility that resource conservation and fire hazard reduction may benefit from combining efforts. With adequate planning, future conservation purchases could have synergistic effects beyond just protecting ecologically sensitive areas.

  20. Implementation of a food insecurity screening and referral program in student-run free clinics in San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sunny; Malinak, David; Chang, Jinnie; Perez, Maria; Perez, Sandra; Settlecowski, Erica; Rodriggs, Timothy; Hsu, Ming; Abrew, Alexandra; Aedo, Sofia

    2017-03-01

    Food insecurity is associated with many poor health outcomes yet is not routinely addressed in clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to implement a food insecurity screening and referral program in Student-run Free Clinics (SRFC) and to document the prevalence of food insecurity screening in this low-income patient population. All patients seen in three SRFC sites affiliated with one institution in San Diego, California were screened for food insecurity using the 6-item United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Security Survey between January and July 2015 and referred to appropriate resources. The percentage of patients who were food insecure was calculated. The screening rate was 92.5% (430/463 patients), 74.0% (318/430) were food insecure, including 30.7% (132/430) with very low food security. A food insecurity registry and referral tracking system revealed that by January 2016, 201 participants were receiving monthly boxes of food onsite, 66 used an off-site food pantry, and 64 were enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). It is possible to implement a food insecurity screening and referral program into SRFCs. The prevalence of food insecurity in this population was remarkably high yet remained largely unknown until this program was implemented. Other health care settings, particularly those with underserved patient populations, should consider implementing food insecurity screening and referral programs.

  1. Gaining the necessary geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical understanding for additional brackish groundwater development, coastal San Diego, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danskin, Wesley R.

    2012-01-01

    Local water agencies and the United States Geological Survey are using a combination of techniques to better understand the scant freshwater resources and the much more abundant brackish resources in coastal San Diego, California, USA. Techniques include installation of multiple-depth monitoring well sites; geologic and paleontological analysis of drill cuttings; geophysical logging to identify formations and possible seawater intrusion; sampling of pore-water obtained from cores; analysis of chemical constituents including trace elements and isotopes; and use of scoping models including a three-dimensional geologic framework model, rainfall-runoff model, regional groundwater flow model, and coastal density-dependent groundwater flow model. Results show that most fresh groundwater was recharged during the last glacial period and that the coastal aquifer has had recurring intrusions of fresh and saline water. These intrusions disguise the source, flowpaths, and history of ground water near the coast. The flow system includes a freshwater lens resting on brackish water; a 100-meter-thick flowtube of freshwater discharging under brackish estuarine water and above highly saline water; and broad areas of fine-grained coastal sediment filled with fairly uniform brackish water. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen indicate the recharged water flows through many kilometers of fractured crystalline rock before entering the narrow coastal aquifer.

  2. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Witch Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Witch Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  3. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Ammo Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Ammo Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  4. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Harris Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Harris Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  5. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Poomacha Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Poomacha Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  6. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Rice Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Rice Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  7. Mapping the Beat: A History and Geography through Music Curriculum at the University of California San Diego, ArtsBridge America Program - United States History from 1776-1865 for 5th Grade

    OpenAIRE

    Scholl, Jennifer Coordinator; Baker, James; Boyer, William; Eidsheim, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In 2002, the University of California San Diego ArtsBridge America program initiated a project, funded by the National Geographic Society Education Foundation, that was designed to address the lack of standards-based geography content and culture-based arts instruction within San Diego elementary schools. Representatives from host ArtsBridge institutions identified the following factors contributing to this deficiency: • a perceived lack of arts and geography competence amongst elementary ...

  8. National Weather Service, Emergency Medical Services, Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UCSD and California EPA Collaboration on Heat Health Impact and Public Notification for San Diego County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, A. O.; Corcus, I.; Guirguis, K.

    2015-12-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued official heat alerts in the form of either a heat advisory or excessive heat warning product to the public and core partners for many years. This information has traditionally been developed through the use of triggers for heat indices which combine humidity and temperature. The criteria typically used numeric thresholds and did not consider impact from a particular heat episode, nor did it factor seasonality or population acclimation. In 2013, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego in collaboration with the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, of the California Environmental Protection Agency and the NWS completed a study of heat health impact in California, while the NWS San Diego office began modifying their criteria towards departure from climatological normal with much less dependence on humidity or heat index. The NWS changes were based on initial findings from the California Department of Public Health, EpiCenter California Injury Data Online system which documents heat health impacts. Results from the UCSD study were finalized and published in 2014; they supported the need for significant modification of the traditional criteria. In order to better understand the impacts of heat on community health, medical outcome data were provided by the County of San Diego Emergency Medical Services Branch, which is charged by the County's Public Health Officer to monitor heat-related illness and injury daily from June through September. The data were combined with UCSD research to inform the modification of local NWS heat criteria and establish trigger points to pilot new procedures for the issuance of heat alerts. Finally, practices and procedures were customized for each of the county health departments in the NWS area of responsibility across extreme southwest California counties in collaboration with their Office of Emergency Services. The end result of the

  9. 78 FR 42027 - Safety Zone; San Diego Bayfair; Mission Bay, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego Bayfair; Mission Bay, San Diego.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... an annual event, permitted by the City of San Diego, it is well advertised, supported by...

  10. Copper toxicity to larval stages of three marine invertebrates and copper complexation capacity in San Diego Bay, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio; Rosen, Gunther; Lapota, David; Chadwick, David B; Kear-Padilla, Lora; Zirino, Alberto

    2005-03-15

    Temporal and spatial measurements of the toxicity (EC50), chemical speciation, and complexation capacity (Cu-CC) of copper in waters from San Diego Bay suggest control of the Cu-CC over copper bioavailability. While spatial distributions of total copper (CuT) indicate an increase in concentration from the mouth toward the head of San Diego Bay, the distribution of aqueous free copper ion (Cu(II)aq) shows the opposite trend. This suggests that the bioavailability of copper to organisms decreases toward the head of the bay, and is corroborated by the increase in the amount of copper needed to reach an EC50, observed for larval stages of three marine invertebrates (Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, sand dollar, Dendraster excentricus, and purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), and by the increase in Cu-CC heading into the head of the bay. The amount of Cu(II)aq required to produce a 50% reduction in normal larval development (referred to here as pCuTox,) of the mussel, the most sensitive of the three marine invertebrates, was generally at or above approximately 1 x 10(-11) mol L(-1) equivalents of Cu (i.e., pCuTox approximately 11 = -(log [Cu(II)aq])). These results suggest that the copper complexation capacity in San Diego Bay controls copper toxicity by keeping the concentration of Cu(II)aq at nontoxic levels.

  11. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Surveillance in Marginalized Populations, Tijuana, Mexico, and West Nile Virus Knowledge among Hispanics, San Diego, California, 2006

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-10

    This podcast describes public health surveillance and communication in hard to reach populations in Tijuana, Mexico, and San Diego County, California. Dr. Marian McDonald, Associate Director of CDC's Health Disparities in the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, discusses the importance of being flexible in determining the most effective media for health communications.  Created: 8/10/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.   Date Released: 8/10/2010.

  12. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Santa Ysabel Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  13. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Warners Ranch Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  14. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Morena Reservoir Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  15. Non-invasive genetic sampling of Southern Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus fuliginatus) reveals limited movement across California State Route 67 in San Diego County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitelberg, Anna; Vandergast, Amy

    2016-01-01

    —The Southern Mule Deer is a mobile but non-migratory large mammal found throughout southern California and is a covered species in the San Diego Multi-Species Conservation Plan. We assessed deer movement and population connectivity across California State Route 67 and two smaller roads in eastern San Diego County using non-invasive genetic sampling. We collected deer scat pellets between April and November 2015, and genotyped pellets at 15 microsatellites and a sex determination marker. We successfully genotyped 71 unique individuals from throughout the study area and detected nine recapture events. Recaptures were generally found close to original capture locations (within 1.5 km). We did not detect recaptures across roads; however, pedigree analysis detected 21 first order relative pairs, of which approximately 20% were found across State Route 67. Exact tests comparing allele frequencies between groups of individuals in pre-defined geographic clusters detected significant genetic differentiation across State Route 67. In contrast, the assignment-based algorithm of STRUCTURE supported a single genetic cluster across the study area. Our data suggest that State Route 67 may reduce, but does not preclude, movement and gene flow of Southern Mule Deer.

  16. 78 FR 38584 - Safety Zone; San Diego Symphony Summer POPS Fireworks 2013 Season, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego Symphony Summer POPS Fireworks... Symphony Summer POPS Fireworks 2013 season. This safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of the... San Diego Symphony Summer POPS, which will include a fireworks presentation from a barge in San...

  17. Arc-rift transition volcanism in the Volcanic Hills, Jacumba and Coyote Mountains, San Diego and Imperial Counties, california

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Gregory Zane

    Neogene volcanism associated with the subduction of the Farallon-Pacific spreading center and the transition from a subduction zone to a rift zone has been studied extensively in Baja, California, Mexico. One of the main goals of these studies was to find a geochemical correlation with slab windows that may have formed during that complicated transition. While workers have been able to find distinct geochemical signatures in samples from Baja California, none have shown statistically significant correlation with samples from southern California that are thought to be related to the same arc-rift transition events. All of the basaltic samples from this study of southern California rocks have prominent Nb depletions typical of island-arc subduction-related volcanism, in contrast to the chemistry of Baja California volcanics that have trace element patterns typical of synrift related volcanism. The work done by previous investigators has been additionally complicated due to each investigator's choice of important ratios or patterns, which bears little, if any, correlation with work done by others working in the same area. For example, Martin-Barajas et al. (1995) use K/Rb ratios in their study of the Puertocitos Volcanic Province, while Castillo (2008) argues that Sr/Y vs. Y is a better indicator of petrogenetic processes. Little petrologic work has been done on Neogene volcanic rocks in the Imperial Valley and eastern San Diego County region of Southern California. This thesis combines new research with that of previous workers and attempts to establish a better understanding of the processes involved with the transition volcanism. Prior work documents significant differences in the geochemistry between some of these areas, especially those in close proximity to each other (e.g. the Volcanic Hills and Coyote Mountains). These differences were thought to be largely the result different magmatic sources. The potential of finding two differing magma types in close

  18. SSC San Diego Strategic Plan. Revision 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE NOV 2001 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SSC San Diego Strategic Plan. Rev 3 5a...Business Improvement Group ( CBIG ), will be composed of the team members listed above, and will be responsible for monitoring the planning and...implementation of these objectives. The CBIG will charter sub-groups as necessary. Improve Corporate IT infrastructure Much of the SSC San Diego IT service

  19. Trouble Brewing in San Diego. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The city of San Diego will face enormous budgetary pressures from the growing deficits in public pensions, both at a state and local level. In this policy brief, the author estimates that San Diego faces total of $45.4 billion, including $7.95 billion for the county pension system, $5.4 billion for the city pension system, and an estimated $30.7…

  20. 78 FR 39610 - Safety Zone; Big Bay Boom, San Diego Bay; San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... Fourth of July Big Bay Boom Fireworks display on the evening of July 4, 2013. These temporary safety... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Big Bay Boom, San Diego Bay; San Diego, CA... representative. ] DATES: This rule is effective from 8:45 p.m. to 10 p.m. on July 4, 2013. ADDRESSES:...

  1. Water- and air-quality and surficial bed-sediment monitoring of the Sweetwater Reservoir watershed, San Diego County, California, 2003-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Gregory O.; Majewski, Michael S.; Foreman, William T.; Morita, Andrew Y.

    2015-01-01

    In 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Sweetwater Authority, began a study to assess the overall health of the Sweetwater watershed in San Diego County, California. This study was designed to provide a data set that could be used to evaluate potential effects from the construction and operation of State Route 125 within the broader context of the water quality and air quality in the watershed. The study included regular sampling of water, air, and surficial bed sediment at Sweetwater Reservoir (SWR) for chemical constituents, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), base-neutral and acid- extractable organic compounds (BNAs) that include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pesticides, and metals. Additionally, water samples were collected for anthropogenic organic indicator compounds in and around SWR. Background water samples were collected at Loveland Reservoir for VOCs, BNAs, pesticides, and metals. Surficial bed-sediment samples were collected for PAHs, organochlorine pesticides, and metals at Sweetwater and Loveland Reservoirs.

  2. Population Effects of Influenza A(H1N1) Pandemic among Health Plan Members, San Diego, California, USA, October-December 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Roger A

    2016-02-01

    Lacking population-specific data, activity of seasonal and pandemic influenza is usually tracked by counting the number of diagnoses and visits to medical facilities above a baseline. This type of data does not address the delivery of services in a specific population. To provide population-specific data, this retrospective study of patients with influenza-like illness, influenza, and pneumonia among members of a Kaiser Permanente health plan in San Diego, California, USA, during October-December 2009 was initiated. Population data included the number of outpatients accessing healthcare; the number of patients diagnosed with pneumonia; antimicrobial therapy administered; number of patients hospitalized with influenza, influenza-like illness, or pneumonia; level of care provided; and number of patients requiring specialized treatments (e.g., oxygen, ventilation, vasopressors). The rate of admissions specific to weeks and predictions of 2 epidemiologic models shows the strengths and weaknesses of those tools. Data collected in this study may improve planning for influenza pandemics.

  3. San Diego Science Alliance Education Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Anne P.

    1996-11-01

    The General Atomics Science Education Outreach Activities as well as those of several other San Diego area institutions led to the formation in 1994 of the San Diego Science Alliance. The Science Alliance is a consortium of science-related industries, institutions of research and higher education, museums, medical health networks, and science competitions in support of K-12 science education. Some Alliance accomplishments include printing over 4000 resource catalogs for teachers, workshops presented by over 20 of their business members at the San Diego Science Education Conference, and hosting of 3 eight-week courses for teachers. The Alliance provides an important forum for interaction between schools and teachers and local industries and institutions. The Science Alliance maintains a World Wide Web Home Page at elvbf http://www.cerf.net/sd_science/. General Atomics' role in the San Diego Science Alliance will be presented.(Presented by Patricia S. Winter for the General Atomics Science Education Groups and San Diego Science Alliance.)

  4. Possible Connections Between the Coronado Bank Fault Zone and the Newport-Inglewood, Rose Canyon, and Palos Verdes Fault Zones Offshore San Diego County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliter, R. W.; Ryan, H. F.

    2003-12-01

    High-resolution multichannel seismic-reflection and deep-tow Huntec data collected by the USGS were interpreted to map the Coronado Bank fault zone (CBFZ) offshore San Diego County, California. The CBFZ is comprised of several major strands (eastern, central, western) that change in both orientation and degree of deformation along strike. Between Coronado Bank and San Diego, the CBFZ trends N25W and occupies a narrow 7 km zone. Immediately north of La Jolla submarine canyon (LJSC), the easternmost strand changes orientation to almost due north and appears to be offset in a right-lateral sense across the canyon axis. The strand merges with a prominent fault that follows the base of the continental slope in about 600 m water depth. The central portion of the CBFZ is mapped as a negative flower structure and deforms seafloor sediment as far north as 15 km north of LJSC. Farther north, this structure is buried by more than 400 m of basin sediment. Along the eastern edge of the Coronado Bank, the western portion of the CBFZ is characterized by high angle normal faults that dip to the east. North of the Coronado Bank, the western segment follows the western edge of a basement high; it cuts through horizontal basin reflectors and in places deforms the seafloor. We mapped an additional splay of the CBFZ that trends N40W; it is only observed north and west of LJSC. Although the predominant trend of the CBFZ is about N40W, along strike deviations from this orientation of some of the strands indicate that these strands connect with other offshore fault zones in the area. Based on the limited data available, the trend of the CBFZ south of Coronado Bank suggests that it might connect with the Rose Canyon fault zone (RCFZ) that has been mapped in San Diego Bay. North of Coronado Bank, the CBFZ is a much broader fault zone (about 25 km wide) composed of diverging fault strands. The westernmost strand may merge with the western strand of the Palos Verdes fault zone (PVFZ) south of

  5. Hispanics of a San Diego Barrio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    Approved for Public Release; ELECTE Distribution unlimited La..1 JUN 2 2 1983 lfl 06 21 02 HISPANICS OF’ A SAN DIEGO BARRIO Louis A. Rojas University of...uiee a. TYPE or REPORT 6 10111110 COV11RED1:0 Hispan icif of a San Diego barrio Interim technical report 41. P91R11ORM111G Ong. REPORT 16U1111111 1...Psychology ARAS &OKUI UBR University of Illinois WR 170-906 603 E. Daniel, Champaign, IL 61820 _____________ 0 1. couTRoLtu4G co7pica N~mE Alto looRiess

  6. 33 CFR 110.210 - San Diego Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Harbor, CA. 110.210... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.210 San Diego Harbor, CA. (a) The anchorage grounds. (1... Commander, Naval Base, San Diego, CA. The administration of these anchorages is exercised by the...

  7. 78 FR 29289 - Safety Zone; Big Bay Boom, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... Big Bay Boom Fireworks display from 8:45 p.m. to 10 p.m. on July 4, 2013. These proposed safety zones... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Big Bay Boom, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA... 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may submit a request...

  8. San Diego Zoo:Success in Breeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Giant pandas have become very popular in U.S.zoos. One in particular, the San Diego Zoo, has been extremely successful at making the pandas feel at home and getting them to breed. In 1999, it became home tothe first surviving panda cub born in the United States.

  9. Energy-water nexus analysis of enhanced water supply scenarios: a regional comparison of Tampa Bay, Florida, and San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Weiwei; Wang, Ranran; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2014-05-20

    Increased water demand and scarce freshwater resources have forced communities to seek nontraditional water sources. These challenges are exacerbated in coastal communities, where population growth rates and densities in the United States are the highest. To understand the current management dilemma between constrained surface and groundwater sources and potential new water sources, Tampa Bay, Florida (TB), and San Diego, California (SD), were studied through 2030 accounting for changes in population, water demand, and electricity grid mix. These locations were chosen on the basis of their similar populations, land areas, economies, and water consumption characters as well as their coastal locations and rising contradictions between water demand and supply. Three scenarios were evaluated for each study area: (1) maximization of traditional supplies; (2) maximization of seawater desalination; and (3) maximization of nonpotable water reclamation. Three types of impacts were assessed: embodied energy, greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, and energy cost. SD was found to have higher embodied energy and energy cost but lower GHG emission than TB in most of its water infrastructure systems because of the differences between the electricity grid mixes and water resources of the two regions. Maximizing water reclamation was found to be better than increasing either traditional supplies or seawater desalination in both regions in terms of the three impact categories. The results further imply the importance of assessing the energy-water nexus when pursuing demand-side control targets or goals as well to ensure that the potentially most economical options are considered.

  10. El Camino de San Diego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Gárate

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Resulta difícil explicar nuestra pasión sudamericana por el fútbol, pero lo es aún más cuando se trata de aquella que siente pueblo argentino por Diego Armando Maradona. No se trata del cariño propio a una gran estrella del balompié, sino del amor incondicional al “10”: el ídolo popular; el mismo que en 1986 lavó en una cancha de fútbol la afrenta de los ingleses, vencedores de la Guerra de las Malvinas. Pero Maradona también representa el éxito del chico pobre, que viene de las villas miser...

  11. Border Security: The San Diego Fence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-23

    sector is located north of Tijuana and Tecate, Mexican cities with a combined population of 2 million people, and features no natural barriers to entry...more marked in the areas where fencing was constructed within San Diego sector. The USBP’s Imperial Beach and Chula Vista stations saw their...effects on (1) the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research and Reserve; (2) state and federally listed threatened and endangered species; (3) lands

  12. SSC San Diego Command History Calendar Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    SSC San Diego from Capt. Tim Flynn on 18 August 2005. Capt. Unetic joined the Center from SPAWAR Headquarters where he was Executive Assistant to...communications. Rear Adm. Tim Flynn Rear Adm. Tim Flynn served as SSC San Diego Commanding Officer beginning 2 May 2002. Before joining SSC San Diego, he was...Steven Short, Arleen Simbulan, Robert Smith, Gleason Snashall, Dow Street, Weden Teng, Deborah Tharp , Tine Thompson, Viet Tran, Thomas Tucker, Rob Turner

  13. Symposium on High-Speed Aerodynamics and Structures (3rd) Held at San Diego, California on March 25-27, 1958. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1958-03-01

    3RD Symposium Cooý " HIGH-SPEED AERODYNAMICS AND STRUCTURES SAN DIEGO., CALIF DTIC Fft EELECTE ti"tSAUG0 419 F 1ThIU~~4 do ume hat be~ aapm p ubi...waves as shown in Fig. 19. 1-0 £ - 45 rnsee -. 5 rnsec t, t ime Fig. 19. The 5-Millisecond Buildup, Finite Rise Time Wave Form 155 The distance at which a

  14. The impact of evolving current rheology on multi-scale heterogeneity in submarine lobe strata: an example from the Upper Cretaceous Point Loma Formation, San Diego, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlown, A.; Mohrig, D. C.; Perillo, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing recognition of transitional flow deposits in submarine fans has shown that the evolution of flow rheology in sediment-gravity currents can have a significant impact on the heterogeneity of deepwater sediment accumulations. Sea-cliff exposure of the Cretaceous Point Loma Formation in San Diego, California, provides a unique opportunity to document the internal variability and spatial distribution of thin, fine-grained event beds. Upper portions of beds which commonly appear as featureless mud in exposures of typical quality are revealed as thin, clast-rich debrites in areas where sea cliffs are polished by waves. The ubiquity of these deposits in distal lobe strata suggests complex rheological evolution for nearly all currents that were able to run out to lobe margins. Here we supplement qualitative outcrop characterization with statistical analysis to quantify relationships between deposit thickness, grain size, and the spatial distribution of sedimentary facies. Intervals dominated by transitional flow deposits are shown to occur vertically near the base of coarsening-upward successions and laterally toward lobe margins, reflecting a combination of dynamic processes during individual events and the spatial distribution of consecutive deposits. We show that the ability to distinguish patterns of bed-scale variability reflecting flow evolution from patterns associated with larger-scale processes, such as distributary channel avulsion and compensational stacking, is critical if one is to accurately model heterogeneity within submarine fan systems. Furthermore, the observation that thin, fine-grained debrites can be nearly impossible to distinguish from featureless mud intervals unless exceptionally well-exposed may cast doubt on existing interpretations where outcrop quality is less than remarkable.

  15. 78 FR 66844 - Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for the San Diego Captain of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for... advance notification of this enforcement period via the Local Notice to Mariners and local advertising...

  16. Gredos San Diego Cooperative. Cooperate to undertake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos de la Higuera

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the cooperative experience through Gredos San Diego model, its institutional approaches and its history from the point of view of management, focusing on the variables that enable the success of a collective ownership institution. First, the author makes a brief analysis of the principles that guide the cooperative, its origins and its current situation, including the development of GSD Cooperative Group. It continues exploring the evolution of management, dividing it into four distinct stages, and concludes with a summary with the findings of the previous president of the cooperative.Received: 23.07.2012Accepted: 10.09.2012

  17. Pollinator specificity and pollen limitation in the San Diego mesa mint, Pogogyne abramsii, a vernal pool endemic /

    OpenAIRE

    Scioli, Justin Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Vernal pool ecosystems in California support a variety of narrowly distributed annual plants. As a result of the destruction, fragmentation, and degradation of vernal pool habitat, some vernal pool endemic plants are now considered threatened or endangered. The federally endangered San Diego mesa mint Pogogyne abramsii) is a vernal pool endemic now found only in a few locations in coastal San Diego County, California. To learn more about the pollination biology of this species, we conducted a...

  18. The San Diego Panasonic Partnership: A Case Study in Restructuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzman, Michael; Tewel, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    The Panasonic Foundation provides resources for restructuring school districts. The article examines its partnership with the San Diego City School District, highlighting four schools that demonstrate promising practices and guiding principles. It describes recent partnership work on systemic issues, noting the next steps to be taken in San Diego.…

  19. 33 CFR 80.1104 - San Diego Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Harbor, CA. 80.1104 Section 80.1104 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1104 San Diego Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  20. Aquifer geometry, lithology, and water levels in the Anza–Terwilliger area—2013, Riverside and San Diego Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Matthew K.; Morita, Andrew Y.; Nawikas, Joseph M.; Christensen, Allen H.; Faunt, Claudia C.; Langenheim, Victoria E.

    2015-11-24

    The population of the Anza–Terwilliger area relies solely on groundwater pumped from the alluvial deposits and surrounding bedrock formations for water supply. The size, characteristics, and current conditions of the aquifer system in the Anza–Terwilliger area are poorly understood, however. In response to these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the High Country Conservancy and Rancho California Water District, undertook a study to (1) improve mapping of groundwater basin geometry and lithology and (2) to resume groundwater-level monitoring last done during 2004–07 in the Anza–Terwilliger area. 

  1. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Rancho Santa Fe Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  2. Water- and Air-Quality Monitoring of Sweetwater Reservoir Watershed, San Diego County, California - Phase One Results Continued, 2001-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Gregory O.; Foreman, William T.; Morita, Andrew; Majewski, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    In 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Sweetwater Authority, began a study to monitor water, air, and sediment at the Sweetwater and Loveland Reservoirs in San Diego County, California. The study includes regular sampling of water and air at Sweetwater Reservoir for chemical constituents, including volatile organic compounds (VOC), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), pesticides, and major and trace elements. The purpose of this study is to monitor changes in contaminant composition and concentration during the construction and operation of State Route 125. To accomplish this, the study was divided into two phases. Phase One sampling (water years 1998-2004) determined baseline conditions for the detection frequency and the concentrations of target compounds in air and water. Phase Two sampling (starting water year 2005) continues at selected monitoring sites during and after construction of State Route 125 to assess the chemical impact this roadway alignment may have on water quality in the reservoir. Water samples were collected for VOCs and pesticides at Loveland Reservoir during Phase One and will be collected during Phase Two for comparison purposes. Air samples collected to monitor changes in VOCs, PAHs, and pesticides were analyzed by adapting methods used to analyze water samples. Bed-sediment samples have been and will be collected three times during the study; at the beginning of Phase One, at the start of Phase Two, and near the end of the study. In addition to the ongoing data collection, several special studies were initiated to assess the occurrence of specific chemicals of concern, such as trace metals, anthropogenic indicator compounds, and pharmaceuticals. This report describes the study design, and the sampling and analytical methods, and presents data from water and air samples collected during the fourth and fifth years of Phase One of the study (October 2001 to September 2003). Data collected during the first three

  3. 78 FR 45268 - Notice of Availability of the San Diego Gas & Electric Ocotillo Sol Solar Project Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the San Diego Gas & Electric Ocotillo Sol Solar... Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) Ocotillo Sol Solar Project in Imperial County, California, and by this.... ADDRESSES: Copies of the Ocotillo Sol Solar Project Final EIS/Proposed CDCA Plan Amendment have been sent...

  4. Twelve-year proximity relationships in a captive group of western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) at the San Diego Wild Animal Park, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Masayuki; Onishi, Kenji; Silldorf, April; Sexton, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Proximity data were collected in a captive breeding group of gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) at the San Diego Wild Animal Park (currently called the San Diego Zoo Safari Park) twice a year (spring and fall periods) for over 12 years, by using a convenient method in which individuals less than 5 m from each animal in the group were recorded by scan sampling, approximately once per hour. Immature females from infancy to young adulthood maintained relatively frequent proximity to both their mothers and the silverback male and spent little time alone (no animals within 10 m), with relatively large individual differences. On the other hand, immature males decreased the time spent near their mothers and the silverback male and increased the time spent alone with increasing age. Therefore, sex differences in proximity to mothers and the silverback male became apparent after late juvenility. Some adult females maintained increased frequency of proximity to the silverback male than that by other females over the 12-year period, indicating the presence of long-term, stable proximity relationships between the silverback male and the adult females. Such long-term, stable proximity relationships were also observed among adult females. Some association patterns reported in wild gorillas, such as frequent proximity between adult females with dependent offspring and the silverback male and close relationships between related females, were not observed in the present study. The idiosyncratic or individual factors influencing some association patterns were easily reflected in captive situations.

  5. Puente Coronado - San Diego (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1971-12-01

    Full Text Available This 3,5 km long bridge, joining the cities of San Diego and Coronado is one of the longest in the world of this type, and one of the three most important straight line bridges in the United States. Its supporting structure consists of reinforced concrete columns resting on footings or piles, according to whether they are under the sea water or on dry land. The superstructure is partly of metal plates and partly of box girders. The surfacing of the deck consists of asphalt epoxy concrete, of 5 cm depth. Special paint was applied to the bridge, including layers of vinyl, iron oxide and blue vinyl on a zinc base.Este puente, de unos 3 km y medio, que une las ciudades de San Diego y Coronado es uno de los de mayor longitud del mundo, de este tipo, y uno de los tres principales ortótropos de los Estados Unidos de América. Su infraestructura está constituida por pilas de hormigón armado apoyadas sobre pilotes o sobre zapatas, según estén en el mar o en tierra firme. La superestructura está formada, en parte, por chapas metálicas y, en parte, por vigas cajón. El acabado del tablero metálico se realizó a base de hormigón asfáltico de epoxi con un espesor de 5 cm. La pintura es especial y se compone de capas de vinilo, de óxido de hierro y de vinilo azul sobre una capa de cinc.

  6. Marine Ecological Index Survey of San Diego Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Pier (across from Spanish Landing), Sunroad San Diego Marina, Bay View Park (Coronado), San Diego Marriott Hotel and Marina, Tidelands Park (Coronado... Marriott Hotel and Marina S8 Hanging Tidelands Park Coronado S9 Float Amphib Base Fuel Pier S10 Float Chollas Creek S11 Float Paleta Creek S12 Float...S6 32.72687 117.1900 Bayview Park Coronado S7 32.70216 117.17864 San Diego  Marriott   Hotel  and Marina S8 32.70725 117.16557 Tidelands Park Coronado S9

  7. Communication Media and Perceptions of Undocumented Immigrants: The Case of San Diego.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, C. Richard; Loveman, Brian

    A telephone survey of 500 adults in the San Diego, California, area was conducted to examine the role of mass media in shaping views of the respondents toward undocumented immigrants from Mexico. The sample, designed to reflect all adults in the area, was distorted somewhat by a refusal rate of approximately 30%. The results showed that the most…

  8. San Diego Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Sweetwater Marsh and South San Diego Bay Units: Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Impact Statement: Volume I

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on San Diego Bay NWR (Sweetwater Marsh and South San Diego Bay Units) for the next 15...

  9. Estimating Bicycle and Pedestrian Demand in San Diego

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Michael; Buckland, Lauren

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the concepts behind estimating bicycle and pedestrian demand and provides an example of the development of a sketch-plan method for estimating bicycle and pedestrian demand from land use in San Diego County. The paper describes the methodology involved in collecting counts for the currently ongoing Seamless Travel project. The Seamless Travel project intends to develop a model for estimating bicycle and pedestrian demand within San Diego County. The project methodology i...

  10. 75 FR 11194 - San Diego County Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service San Diego County Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation Plan, San Diego and Riverside Counties, CA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... application, and notice of public meetings for the San Diego County Water Authority's (Water...

  11. Annual Report of the Chancellor, San Diego Community College District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Dale

    This document contains a review of the goals of the San Diego Community College District for 1975-76 and the progress that has been made to date in accomplishing those goals. Broad categories reviewed include stabilization and improvement of the environment for teaching and learning, systematization of management efforts, the search for new…

  12. SAN DIEGO FACILITY SETS NEW PATTERN FOR APPRENTICE TRAINING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARNOLD, WALTER M.

    THE APPRENTICE TRADES BUILDING AT SAN DIEGO MESA COLLEGE WAS ERECTED WITH COOPERATIVE FINANCING BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT (UNDER THE VOCATIONAL EDUCATION ACT OF 1963), THE COMMUNITY SCHOOL SYSTEM, LABOR UNIONS, AND INDUSTRY. THE STRUCTURE AND SITE COST OF $339,000 WAS PROVIDED FROM FEDERAL AND SCHOOL DISTRICT FUNDS, WHILE THE EQUIPMENT, WORTH…

  13. 77 FR 34984 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Item In 1929, one clay pipe (or bow pipe), about five inches in total length, was removed from.... The pottery pipe is a bow- type with a beak-shaped holder and has diamond hatching incised about the... Rogers transferred the clay pipe to the San Diego Museum of Man, where he was employed at the...

  14. 75 FR 17329 - Safety Zone; Big Bay Fourth of July Fireworks, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... would be able to pass safely around the safety zone. Vessels will not be allowed to transit through the... operators of vessels intending to transit through, or anchor within the four areas of San Diego Bay or the..., the Captain of the Port will cease enforcement of this safety zone and will announce that fact...

  15. 75 FR 63167 - San Diego Gas and Electric Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary Services Into Markets...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission San Diego Gas and Electric Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary Services Into Markets Operated by the California Independent System Operator Corporation and the...

  16. Environmental Assessment: San Antonio Creek Restoration at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-08

    Potential Masticophis lateralis Chaparral whipsnake Potential Lampropeltis getula California kingsnake Observed Pituophis catenifer San Diego... introduction of exotic predators, were important factors in the decline ofthe California red-legged frog in the early to mid-1900s. Continuing threats...master’s thesis, University of California , Santa Barbara. Grant, C. 1978a. Chumash: Introduction . In California , edited by Robert F. Heizer, pp. 505

  17. Dudleya Variegata Translocation - San Diego [ds654

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — At Mission Trails Regional Park, a translocation project of Dudleya variegata was conducted in efforts to save the population from a private property undergoing...

  18. CoSMoS v3.0 Phase 2 flood-hazard projections: San Diego County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick; Erikson, Li; O'Neill, Andrea; Foxgrover, Amy; Herdman, Liv

    2016-01-01

    CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) v3.0 for Southern California. Phase 2 data for Southern California include flood-hazard information for a variety of storm conditions and sea-level rise scenarios. Several changes from Phase 1 projections are reflected in many areas. Data will be disseminated by county, with San Diego County being the first of Phase 2 data releases.

  19. Rare Plants - City of San Diego [ds455

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Biological Monitoring Plan (BMP; Ogden 1996) for the Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) was developed in 1996 and is a component of the City of San...

  20. 76 FR 1521 - Security Zone: Fleet Industrial Supply Center Pier, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone: Fleet Industrial Supply Center Pier, San... Fleet Industrial Supply Center Pier. The pier is no longer owned by the U.S. Navy and the existing... of the San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA. The existing security zone is around the former Fleet...

  1. Evaluation of Resuspension from Propeller Wash in Pearl Harbor and San Diego Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Technical Report 2036 July 2014 Evaluation of Resuspension from Propeller Wash in Pearl Harbor and San Diego Bay P.F. Wang...2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluation of Resuspension from Propeller Wash in Pearl Harbor and San Diego Bay...calibrated for San Diego Bay, CA; Pearl Harbor , HI; and Sinclair Inlet, WA. Once validated with the field data, CH3D was used to predict footprints

  2. CoSMoS Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) flood hazard projections: Los Angeles, San Diego and Orange counties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick; Erikson, Li; Foxgrover, Amy; O'Neill, Andrea; Herdman, Liv

    2015-01-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. CoSMoS v3.0 for Southern California shows projections for future climate scenarios (sea-level rise and storms) to provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm-hazards information that can be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. Phase I data for Southern California include flood-hazard information for the coast from the Mexican Border to Pt. Conception for a 100-year storm scenario. Data are complete for the information presented but are considered preliminary; changes may be reflected in the full data release (Phase II) in summer 2016.

  3. 78 FR 32121 - When Pigs Fly Fireworks Display; San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 When Pigs Fly Fireworks Display; San Diego, CA AGENCY... on the navigable waters of the San Diego Bay in support of the When Pigs Fly Fireworks Display...

  4. 76 FR 6491 - San Diego County Water Authority Subregional Natural Community Conservation Program/Habitat...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service San Diego County Water Authority Subregional Natural Community Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation Plan, San Diego and Riverside Counties, CA; Final Environmental Impact... November 26, 2003 (68 FR 66478). The Service and Water Authority held a public scoping meeting on...

  5. 76 FR 4833 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... waters within a 100 yard radius around any cruise ship that is located within the San Diego port area... to provide for the safety of the cruise ship, vessels, and users of the waterway. Entry into these... floor, within a 100 yard radius around any cruise ship that is within the San Diego port area inside...

  6. 76 FR 15216 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... any cruise ship that is located within the San Diego port area landward of the sea buoys bounding the... provide for the safety of the cruise ship, vessels, and users of the waterway. Entry into these security... any cruise ship that is within the San Diego port area inside the sea buoys bounding the Port of...

  7. San Diego, California Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  8. Maternal attitudes and behaviors regarding feeding practices in elementary school-aged Latino children: a pilot qualitative study on the impact of the cultural role of mothers in the US-Mexican border region of San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Suzanna M; Rhee, Kyung; Blanco, Estela; Boutelle, Kerri

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to explore the attitudes and behaviors of Latino mothers around feeding their children. Using qualitative methods, we conducted four focus groups in Spanish with 41 Latino mothers of elementary school-age children in San Diego County, CA. Latino mothers' mean age was 41 years; 90% were foreign-born; and 74% had a high school education or less. We explored cultural viewpoints around feeding and cooking and feeding strategies used. Focus groups were analyzed based on a priori and emergent themes. The following themes around feeding emerged: feeding attitudes central to the maternal responsibility of having well-fed children and feeding behaviors that centered on cooking methods, supportive behaviors, and reinforcement strategies for "eating well." These findings increase our understanding of the Latino maternal role to feed children and can help to inform more culturally appropriate research to effectively address nutritional issues and obesity prevention in Latino children.

  9. Proposed South San Diego Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Level III preaquisition survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A Level III Contaminant Preaquisition Survey was conducted during 1992 in the south San Diego Bay area to evaluate potential hazards to trustee resources and/or...

  10. Prioritizing Invasive Plant Populations with WHIPPET: Report to San Diego National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a summary of the WHIPPET analysis as applied to invasive plant data from San Diego National Wildlife Refuge (refuge). The WHIPPET analysis had two...

  11. Deaths associated with choking in San Diego county.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolkas, Laura; Stanley, Christina; Smith, Alan M; Vilke, Gary M

    2007-01-01

    Death from choking is the fourth most common cause of unintentional-injury mortality, but little data are published on causes or locations of these episodes. These deaths typically are peaked at the extremes of age, with young children and the elderly having the greatest rate of fatal choking. Our objective was to characterize the causes of fatal airway obstruction in adults. The San Diego County Medical Examiner's database was searched for deaths attributed to choking in decedents 18 years and older during the 10-year period from 1994 to 2004. Data were abstracted regarding the underlying medical conditions, items choked on, location of the choking, and treatments involved in the individual cases. We found 133 victims who died from choking, with 14% having using alcohol or other sedatives and 55% having a documented neurological deficit or anatomic difficulty with swallowing. The most common specified food objects that victims choked on were meat products, and 45% occurred at home, followed by 26% at supervised facilities, and 14% at restaurants. Of the 19 choking episodes occurring in restaurants, only one employee was documented to attempt a resuscitative effort. Most victims who choked to death had an underlying neurological deficit, and occurred at home or supervised facilities appear to have an appropriate initial-response intervention.

  12. Residencia San Pedro, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neutra, Richard J.

    1961-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta vivienda representa una aproximación más hacia la típica casa grande española, con techos de teca de 7 cm, que los señores Rados han edificado y en la que albergan a su gran familia de hijos, los cuales tienen ya sus propios vástagos. Ambos, el señor y la señora Rados, descienden de familias navieras italianas de Trieste, y el propio señor Rados tiene una compañía constructora de barcos en el puerto de San Pedro, que puede verse desde su propia casa. Los dos son verdaderamente unos abuelos muy sociables, cariñosos y atentos. Por añadidura, la señora Rados se entretiene frecuentemente y le agrada el cuidado de la casa. Por ello ha sido proyectada para facilitar sensiblemente toda esta serie de actividades.

  13. 40 CFR 180.1108 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delta endotoxin of Bacillus... From Tolerances § 180.1108 Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated... of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens...

  14. K-12 Students Flock To ToxTown In San Diego: Results of an SOT K-12 Education Outreach Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just prior to the start of the 2015 Annual Meeting in San Diego, hundreds of K-12 students, teachers, and science enthusiasts visited the ToxTown booth at the annual San Diego Festival of Science and Engineering grand finale event, EXPO Day. Over 20,000 attendees participated in ...

  15. Vegetation - San Felipe Valley [ds172

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This Vegetation Map of the San Felipe Valley Wildlife Area in San Diego County, California is based on vegetation samples collected in the field in 2002 and 2005 and...

  16. Brucellosis in San Diego: epidemiology and species-related differences in acute clinical presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, Stephanie B; Rickman, Leland S; Davis, Charles E

    2005-05-01

    Although aggressive public health measures have greatly reduced the number of brucellosis cases in the United States, there is a resurgence of interest in this worldwide zoonosis because of its potential as a bioweapon and its 8-fold higher incidence in California, Texas, and the other borderlands between the United States and Mexico compared with the national rate. Accordingly, we reviewed the clinical records of 28 patients diagnosed at a university hospital in San Diego, CA, between 1979 and 2002 to look for new epidemiologic trends and to test the hypothesis that there are species-specific differences in clinical presentations. In contrast to the latest California-wide study completed in 1992, Brucella abortus infections were more common (73%) than Brucella melitensis after 1992, and women were more commonly infected (77% compared with 39%) than men. Major risk factors remained Hispanic ethnicity, travel to Mexico, and ingestion of nonpasteurized dairy products. Analysis of diagnostic procedures suggested that the traditional practice of prolonged incubation of blood cultures increased their sensitivity for Brucella, even in automated radiometric systems. Direct comparison of the clinical manifestations of infections with B. abortus and B. melitensis strongly supported differences in acute presentations. B. melitensis presented more acutely as fevers of unknown origin with statistically significant higher rates of abdominal tenderness, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, and hepatic dysfunction. These results suggest that the epidemiology of brucellosis in California may be evolving, and they show, to our knowledge for the first time in a single series, that species-specific differences in presentations may account for some of the protean manifestations of brucellosis. Familiarity with manifestations of brucellosis and the optimal laboratory techniques for its diagnosis could help physicians protect the public against this reemerging

  17. 33 CFR 165.1101 - Security Zone: San Diego Bay, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone: San Diego Bay, CA. 165.1101 Section 165.1101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited...

  18. Pharmacy Automation in Navy Medicine: A Study of Naval Medical Center San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    medication, dispensing errors, Navy Medicine, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery , BUMED, Naval Medical Center San Diego, NMCSD 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 105...to pharmacist verification. ...............................................................7  Figure 3.  Robotic Delivery System Installed at Naval...processes tend to happen when there is a complication . Only the eight processes outline in Chapter III are specifically relevant to this study

  19. Proceedings of the Great Literacy Crisis Symposium, San Diego State University, October 2, 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Diego State Univ., CA.

    The "Great Literacy Crisis" Symposium was convened at San Diego State University to ascertain what scholarship reveals about literacy and whether that scholarship influences the public's perception of the issue. Topics discussed included the following: the effect of the literacy crisis on the professions; the reality or illusory nature of the…

  20. Creating an Engaging Library Orientation: First Year Experience Courses at UC San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Crystal; Turnbow, Dominique; Roth, Amanda; Friedman, Lia; Heskett, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the development of an engaging library orientation module for UC San Diego First Year Experience (FYE) courses. The library module included a brief in-class presentation about research concepts and library services, an online interactive library scavenger hunt given as an in-class activity, and a homework assignment where…

  1. 33 CFR 165.1121 - Security Zone: Fleet Supply Center Industrial Pier, San Diego, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone: Fleet Supply... Guard District § 165.1121 Security Zone: Fleet Supply Center Industrial Pier, San Diego, CA. (a... feet from the north, west, and south sides of the Fleet Industrial Supply Center enclosed by...

  2. 33 CFR 165.1104 - Security Zone: San Diego Bay, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone: San Diego Bay, CA. 165.1104 Section 165.1104 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Bay, CA. (a) Location. The following area is a security zone: on the waters along the...

  3. 75 FR 82243 - Security Zones; Moored Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... a 100 yard radius around any cruise ship that is moored at any berth within the San Diego port area... for the safety of the cruise ship, vessels, and users of the waterway. Entry into these security zones... Broadway cruise ship terminal and the anticipated arrival of cruise ships immediately thereafter,...

  4. Contours--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. The vector data file...

  5. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  6. Habitat--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  7. Bathymetry--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of San Francisco, California (raster data file is included in...

  8. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  9. San Diego Coast Kelp Persistence (1967-1999)

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Giant kelp forests, with their extensive vertical structure, represent the most diverse of the marine habitats and support commercial fisheries, education, and...

  10. The impact of transit-oriented development on housing prices in San Diego, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This research measures the influence of transit-oriented development (TOD) on the San Diego, CA, condominium market. Many view TOD as a key element in creating a less auto dependent and more sustainable transport system. Price premiums indicate a potential for a market-driven expansion of TOD inventory. A hedonic price model is estimated to isolate statistically the effect of TOD. This includes interaction terms between station distance and various measures of pedestrian orientation. The resulting model shows that station proximity has a significantly stronger impact when coupled with a pedestrian-oriented environment. Conversely, station area condominiums in more auto-oriented environments may sell at a discount. This indicates that TOD has a synergistic value greater than the sum of its parts. It also implies a healthy demand for more TOD housing in San Diego.

  11. San Diego Littoral Cell CRSMP Upland Sand Source Sites 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Sediment sources of interest to this Coastal RSM Plan exist seaward of the coastal watershed drainage divide. These sources generally are more plentiful downstream...

  12. San Diego Littoral Cell CRSMP Sensitive Habitat 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Specific concerns relate to the threatened snowy plover’s critical habitat, including nesting and wintering locations, as well as the endangered least tern’s nesting...

  13. San Diego Littoral Cell CRSMP Sensitive Habitat 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Specific concerns relate to the threatened snowy plover’s critical habitat, including nesting and wintering locations, as well as the endangered least tern’s...

  14. San Diego Region Nearshore Coastal Zone Seafloor Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The layer is meant to display those locations offshore where bedrock is present, as these locations may support sensitive habitats that could be adversely affected...

  15. Initial source and site characterization studies for the U. C. San Diego campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, S.; Erick, F.; Heuze, F.E.; Mellors, R.; Minster, B.; Park, S.; Wagoner, J.

    1999-07-01

    The basic approach of the Campus Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) project is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the University of California (UC) system in geology, seismology, geotechnical engineering, and structural engineering to evaluate the effects of large earthquakes on UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, dynamic soil testing, and structural dynamics. The UC campuses currently chosen for applications of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The basic procedure is first to identify possible earthquake source regions and local campus site conditions that may affect estimates of strong ground motion. Combined geological , geophysical, and geotechnical studies are conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. The project will then drill and log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access to deeper materials, below the soil layers, that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analysis of conjugate downhole and uphole records provides a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are then used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings.

  16. Littoral Zone Sediments, San Diego, Region, October 1983-June 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    corresponding foreshore samples within the five littoral segments at Lake Tahoe which show the most persistent grain-size fining trends. The value for the...terrains exposed at higher elevations as the dominant ultimate source rocks for the obtained sample set. 3.03 The Geologic Map of the Corona, Elsinore ...Austin, Texas, Hemphill’s Bookstore, 182 p. Gaynor, J. M., 1984, Sources and transport of sand in the littoral zone of Lake Tahoe, California and Nevada

  17. Navigation Improvement Design Memorandum Number 1, General Design for San Diego Harbor, San Diego County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-28

    Silver Strand Beach is predominantly northward from its natural sand source at the Tijuana River to Zuniga Shoal. The natural source of sediment is...now lost, since most of the Tijuana River drainage basin has been severed from the coast. Subsequently, the Silver Strand Beach area has been nourished...Strand Beach Park to the mouth of the Tijuana River. (3) Placing dredged material on the Silver Strand Beach would act as an immediate source of

  18. Bathymetry--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps (see sheet 1 and 2, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California....

  19. Habitat--Offshore of San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor (see sheet 7, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. The vector data...

  20. Sebastián de Benavente y la capilla de San Diego de Alcalá

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz Yábar, Juan María

    2008-01-01

    The correct interpretation of the documents concerning the chapel of San Diego in the convent of Santa María de Jesús in Alcalá de Henares demonstrates that the master-architect Sebastián de Benavente played a fundamental role in its invention and realization, including the main altarpiece. For both documental and stylistic reasons, the author attributes to Benavente the drawing from a Florentine private collection until now attributed to Alonso Cano.

    La ...

  1. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2015, San Diego.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-01-01

    The 64th Annual Scientific Sessions and Exposition of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at the San Diego Convention Center from March 14-16, 2015. The ACC Scientific Sessions are 1 of 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the United States, with nearly 20,000 attendees, including 15,000 cardiovascular professionals. There were over 2,100 oral and poster abstracts, and more than 15 late-breaking clinical trials (LBCTs) abstructs. This report presents the highlights and several key presentations, especially the LBCTs, from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2015. I hope this review will help cardiologists update to the latest information.

  2. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of San Gregorio, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Watt, Janet T.; Golden, Nadine E.; Endris, Charles A.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Bretz, Carrie K.; Manson, Michael W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Ross, Stephanie L.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Chin, John L.; Cochran, Susan A.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California's State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of San Gregorio map area is located in northern California, on the Pacific coast of the San Francisco Peninsula about 50 kilometers south of the Golden Gate. The map area lies offshore of the Santa Cruz Mountains, part of the northwest-trending Coast Ranges that run roughly parallel to the San Andreas Fault Zone. The Santa Cruz Mountains lie between the San Andreas Fault Zone and the San Gregorio Fault system. The nearest significant onshore cultural centers in the map area are San Gregorio and Pescadero, both unincorporated communities with populations well under 1,000. Both communities are situated inland of state beaches that share their names. No harbor facilities are within the Offshore of San Gregorio map area. The hilly coastal area is virtually undeveloped grazing land for sheep and cattle. The coastal geomorphology is controlled by late Pleistocene and Holocene slip in the San Gregorio Fault system. A westward bend in the San Andreas Fault Zone, southeast of the map area, coupled with right-lateral movement along the San Gregorio Fault system have caused regional folding and uplift. The coastal area consists of high coastal bluffs and vertical sea cliffs. Coastal promontories in

  3. Predictors of Dropouts From a San Diego Diabetes Program: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Benoit

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The objective of this study was to determine the demographic, treatment, clinical, and behavioral factors associated with dropping out of a nurse-based, low-income, multiethnic San Diego diabetes program. Methods Data were collected during a 17-month period in 2000 and 2002 on patients with type 2 diabetes from Project Dulce, a disease management program in San Diego County designed to care for an underserved diabetic population. The study sample included 69 cases and 504 controls representing a racial/ethnic mix of 53% Hispanic, 7% black, 16% Asian, 22% white, and 2% other. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with patient dropout. Results Patients who had high initial clinical indicators including blood pressure and hemoglobin A1c and those who smoked currently or smoked in the past were more likely to drop out of the diabetes program. Conclusion This study provides markers of patient dropout in a low-income, multiethnic, type 2 diabetic population. Reasons for dropout in this program can be investigated to prevent further cohort loss.

  4. Local responses to globalization: new opportunities for San Diego-Tijuana region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris Clement

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se examinan las condiciones políticas, sociales, administrativas y económicas de las ciudades de San Diego y Tijuana, haciendo énfasis en este último aspecto y en la interrelación entre ambas ciudades, mismas que actualmente se encuentran en paulatina decadencia económica. Se realiza además una revisión conceptual que permita abordar el estudio de la problemática de la región, así como un análisis comparativo tanto de modelos norteamericanos como europeos, que puedan proveer información útil para implementar estrategias de desarrollo regional. Se toca también el tema de la "desmilitarización" de San Diego, y sus efectos en la economía local. Por último, se proponen planes alternativos de desarrollo para la zona, tomando en cuenta los problemas relacionados con la frontera internacional, y se plantean hipótesis del posible resultado de cada uno de estos planes

  5. Sebastián de Benavente y la capilla de San Diego de Alcalá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz Yábar, Juan María

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The correct interpretation of the documents concerning the chapel of San Diego in the convent of Santa María de Jesús in Alcalá de Henares demonstrates that the master-architect Sebastián de Benavente played a fundamental role in its invention and realization, including the main altarpiece. For both documental and stylistic reasons, the author attributes to Benavente the drawing from a Florentine private collection until now attributed to Alonso Cano.

    La correcta interpretación de los documentos relativos a la capilla de San Diego en el convento de Santa María de Jesús de Alcalá de Henares demuestra que el maestro arquitecto Sebastián de Benavente tuvo un papel fundamental en su invención y realización, incluido el retablo mayor. Consideramos suyo el dibujo de colección particular florentina hasta ahora atribuido a Alonso Cano, lo que defendemos por razones documentales y estilísticas.

  6. Economic integration and cross-border economic organizations: The case of San Diego-Tijuana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Mendoza Cota

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The economic integration between the United States and Mexico has affected the economic, political and social relations in the border region. The paper seeks to relate the increasing economic integration and business cycles of the economies of San Diego and Tijuana to the development of both national and binational economic organizations in the border region. The methodology of analysis uses both statistical estimations of the economic integration of San Diego and Tijuana and semi-structured interviews of economic organizations to analyze the increasing economic integration and the role and achievements of the cross-border economic organizations. The results showed that cross-border cooperation is predominately controlled by federal and state governments on both sides of the border. However, the main achievements of cross-border economic cooperation have been accomplished by local private organizations. The perspective of further local economic development greatly depends on both the possibility of increased involvement of federal governments and the growing encouragement of regional organizations.

  7. Adjacent Band Interference from San Diego Area Transmitters to Goldstone Deep Space Network Receivers Near 2300 Megahertz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C.; Bathker, D.; Sue, M.; Peng, T.

    2001-10-01

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has recently granted a commercial company a license to potentially deploy its wireless Internet system in the San Diego area in the 2300- to 2305-MHz frequency range. Each of several base station emitters would transmit a relatively strong effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) (about 50 W). The frequency band is immediately above the band (2290 to 2300 MHz) used by NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) receiving stations at Goldstone, California. A potential interference problem to DSN receivers thus exists through some anomalous propagation modes, such as tropospheric ducting and rain scattering, and interference must be kept under a very small percentage of time (0.001 percent), as required by NASA deep-space missions. In this article, we have estimated the effects of interference from the wireless Internet system to Goldstone receivers. The calculation results show that at 2300 MHz the interference received by the DSN could exceed the DSN protection level up to 0.1 percent of the time for ducting propagation. For rain scattering, this could occur up to 2.3 percent of the time. At 2290 MHz, due to the transmitter spectrum, interference through either mode is below the DSN protection level. Interference through terrain diffraction will suffer very large attenuations at both frequencies. After considering that in the middle of the path there is a tall mountain peak that largely blocks the surface ducting and direct illumination of rain clouds, the interference generated by the wireless system emitters and propagated

  8. San Antonio Creek Restoration, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-27

    constrictor Racer Potential Masticophis lateralis Chaparral whipsnake Potential Lampropeltis getula California kingsnake Observed Pituophis catenifer...Unpublished master’s thesis, University of California , Santa Barbara. Grant, C. 1978a. Chumash: Introduction . In California , edited by Robert F. Heizer, pp...Final Draft Environmental Assessment San Antonio Creek Restoration Vandenberg Air Force Base California

  9. Tijuana River Flood Control Project, San Diego County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-20

    heavier-rainfall watershed have reduced runoff, and the occurrence of a series of dryer -than-normal years which has not yet ended; and (c) the absence...bus Tumbling pigweed Ameranthus graucizans Red orache A triplex rosea Field mustard* Brassica campestris Black mustard Brassica nigra White goosefoot

  10. Reclassification of SIDS cases--a need for adjustment of the San Diego classification?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisbeth Lund; Rohde, Marianne Cathrine; Banner, Jytte;

    2012-01-01

    A study was undertaken reclassifying cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) taken from two geographically separate locations utilizing the San Diego definition with subclassifications. One hundred twenty-eight infant cases were examined from files at Forensic Science South Australia...... period from 1992 to 2007. Eighty-two (38%) were originally diagnosed as SIDS, 128 (59%) with identifiable causes of death, and 8 (4%) as unexplained. After review, 77 (35%) cases were reclassified as SIDS, a decrease of 6%. Twenty (26%) infants were classified as category IB SIDS and 57 (74%) as II SIDS...... in Adelaide, SA, Australia over a 7.5-year period from July 1999 to January 2007. Thirty-one cases (24%) had initially been diagnosed as SIDS and 30 (23%) as undetermined while 67 (52%) had an explainable cause of death. After reclassification, the number of SIDS cases had increased to 49 of the 128 cases...

  11. Copper bioavailability and toxicity to Mytilus galloprovincialis in Shelter Island Yacht Basin, San Diego, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Casey; Rosen, Gunther; Colvin, Marienne; Earley, Patrick; Santore, Robert; Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio

    2014-08-15

    The bioavailability and toxicity of copper (Cu) in Shelter Island Yacht Basin (SIYB), San Diego, CA, USA, was assessed with simultaneous toxicological, chemical, and modeling approaches. Toxicological measurements included laboratory toxicity testing with Mytilus galloprovincialis (Mediterranean mussel) embryos added to both site water (ambient) and site water spiked with multiple Cu concentrations. Chemical assessment of ambient samples included total and dissolved Cu concentrations, and Cu complexation capacity measurements. Modeling was based on chemical speciation and predictions of bioavailability and toxicity using a marine Biotic Ligand Model (BLM). Cumulatively, these methods assessed the natural buffering capacity of Cu in SIYB during singular wet and dry season sampling events. Overall, the three approaches suggested negligible bioavailability, and isolated observed or predicted toxicity, despite an observed gradient of increasing Cu concentration, both horizontally and vertically within the water body, exceeding current water quality criteria for saltwater.

  12. Time Evolution of Man-Made Harbor Modifications in San Diego: Effects on Tsunamis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggeliki Barberopoulou

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available San Diego, one of the largest ports on the U.S. West Coast and home to the largest U.S. Navy base, is exposed to various local and distant tsunami sources. During the first half of the twentieth century, extensive modifications to the port included but were not limited to dredging, expansion of land near the airport and previous tidal flats, as well as creation of jetties. Using historical nautical charts and available Digital Elevation Models, this study gives an overview of changes to San Diego harbor in the last 150+ years due to human intervention and examines the effects of these changes on tsunamis. Two distant and two local scenarios were selected to demonstrate the impact of modified nearshore topography and bathymetry to incoming tsunamis. Inundation pattern, flow depths, and flooded localities vary greatly from year to year in the four scenarios. Specifically, flooded areas shift from the inner harbor to outer locations. Currents induced by the distant tsunamis intensify with modifications and shift from locations primarily outside the harbor to locations inside. A new characteristic in tsunami dynamics associated with port modifications is the introduction of high current spots. Numerical results also show that the introduction of high currents could threaten navigation, vessels, and facilities at narrow openings and also along the harbor “throat”—therefore, at an increased number of locations. Modifications in the port show that changes could have a negative but also a positive impact through constraint of flooding outside of the harbor and shifting of high currents to locations of minimal impact. The results of this study may be used as a first step toward future harbor design plans to reduce tsunami damages.

  13. Wind resource assessment: San Nicolas Island, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Olsen, T.L. [Timothy L. Olsen Consulting, (United States)

    1996-01-01

    San Nicolas Island (SNI) is the site of the Navy Range Instrumentation Test Site which relies on an isolated diesel-powered grid for its energy needs. The island is located in the Pacific Ocean 85 miles southwest of Los Angeles, California and 65 miles south of the Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS), Point Mugu, California. SNI is situated on the continental shelf at latitude N33{degree}14` and longitude W119{degree}27`. It is approximately 9 miles long and 3.6 miles wide and encompasses an area of 13,370 acres of land owned by the Navy in fee title. Winds on San Nicolas are prevailingly northwest and are strong most of the year. The average wind speed is 7.2 m/s (14 knots) and seasonal variation is small. The windiest months, March through July, have wind speeds averaging 8.2 m/s (16 knots). The least windy months, August through February, have wind speeds averaging 6.2 m/s (12 knots).

  14. Improving Pediatric Cancer Care Disparities Across the United States-Mexico Border: Lessons Learned from a Transcultural Partnership between San Diego and Tijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizabal, Paula; Fuller, Spencer; Rivera, Rebeca; Beyda, David; Ribeiro, Raul C; Roberts, William

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the 5-year survival rate for children with acute leukemia in Baja California, Mexico was estimated at 10% (vs. 88% in the United States). In response, stakeholders at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, and the Hospital General de Tijuana (HGT) implemented a transcultural partnership to establish a pediatric oncology program. The aim was to improve clinical outcomes and overall survival for children in Baja California. An initial needs assessment evaluation was performed and a culturally sensitive, comprehensive, 5-year plan was designed and implemented. After six years, healthcare system accomplishments include the establishment of a fully functional pediatric oncology unit with 60 new healthcare providers (vs. five in 2007). Patient outcome improvements include a rise in 5-year survival for leukemia from 10 to 43%, a rise in new cases diagnosed per year from 21 to 70, a reduction in the treatment abandonment rate from 10% to 2%, and a 45% decrease in the infection rate. More than 600 patients have benefited from this program. Knowledge sharing has taken place between teams at the HGT and Rady Children's Hospital San Diego. Further, one of the most significant outcomes is that the HGT has transitioned into a regional referral center and now mentors other hospitals in Mexico. Our results show that collaborative initiatives that implement long-term partnerships along the United States-Mexico border can effectively build local capacity and reduce the survival gap between children with cancer in the two nations. Long-term collaborative partnerships should be encouraged across other disciplines in medicine to further reduce health disparities across the United States-Mexico border.

  15. Resilient development and environmental justice in divided territory: political ecology in the San Diego-Tijuana bioregion.

    OpenAIRE

    Haines, K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores issues in the expansion of environmental justice rhetoric to the developing world, and propose insights from resilience theory, political ecology, and bioregionalism as supplements. I do this from the frame of the San Diego-Tijuana region, where regional inequalities are stark and global processes have a heavy local footprint. Sharing a broadly-defined natural region, the growing evidence of ecological crisis increasingly calls for collaboration between two communities whi...

  16. Navigating High School Academics: A Qualitative Study of Education and Transnationalism in the San Diego-Tijuana Border Region

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of Mexican students commute from Mexico to the United States each day to attend school. South San Diego's transfronterizo, or cross-border, students (most U.S. citizens) offer a colorful microcosm of the greater diversity evident in American schools. But little is known about this phenomenon of transfronterizos. The topic demands penetrating research to understand how we can effectively help these students navigate the U.S. education system and routes into higher education. The shif...

  17. Effects of dissolved and complexed copper on heterotrophic bacterial production in San Diego bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Thomas J; Wolgast, David M; Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio; Holm-Hansen, Osmund; Hewes, Christopher D; Zirino, Alberto; Chadwick, D Bart

    2005-04-01

    Bacterial abundance and production, free (uncomplexed) copper ion concentration, total dissolved copper concentration, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total suspended solids (TSS), and chlorophyll a were measured over the course of 1 year in a series of 27 sample "Boxes" established within San Diego Bay. Water was collected through a trace metal-clean system so that each Box's sample was a composite of all the surface water in that Box. Bacterial production, chlorophyll a, TSS, DOC, and dissolved copper all generally increased from Box 1 at the mouth of the Bay to Box 27 in the South or back Bay. Free copper ion concentration generally decreased from Box 1 to Box 27 presumably due to increasing complexation capacity within natural waters. Based on correlations between TSS, chlorophyll a, bacterial production or DOC and the ratio of dissolved to free Cu ion, both DOC and particulate (bacteria and algae) fractions were potentially responsible for copper complexation, each at different times of the year. CuCl2 was added to bacterial production assays from 0 to 10 microg L(-1) to assess acute copper toxicity to the natural microbial assemblage. Interestingly, copper toxicity appeared to increase with decreases in free copper from the mouth of the Bay to the back Bay. This contrasts the free-ion activity model in which higher complexation capacity should afford greater copper protection. When cell-specific growth rates were calculated, faster growing bacteria (i.e. toward the back Bay) appeared to be more susceptible to free copper toxicity. The protecting effect of natural dissolved organic material (DOM) concentrated by tangential flow ultrafiltration (>1 kDa), illite and kaolinite minerals, and glutathione (a metal chelator excreted by algae under copper stress) was assessed in bacterial production assays. Only DOM concentrate offered any significant protection to bacterial production under increased copper concentrations. Although the potential copper protecting

  18. 77 FR 32986 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, U.S. Marine Corps, San Diego...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... the Pechanga Reservation, California; Rincon Band of Luiseno Mission Indians of the Rincon Reservation... Juaneno Band of Mission Indians and the San Luis Rey Band of Mission Indians. History and Description...

  19. Arte, literatura y acción colectiva en Tijuana-San Diego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelio Meza Valdez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aquí se describe y analiza el impacto de las acciones colectivas en los campos artístico- literarios de Tijuana y San Diego. Se expone que estos campos se conforman generalmente por acciones colectivas, algunas con impacto local y a corto plazo (desde abajo, y otras con el apoyo de aparatos institucionales (desde arriba. Se distingue entre colectivos formativos y consolida - dos, con funciones diversas. Los casos estudiados (Colectivo Intransigente, Agitprop Art Space y Cog∙nate Collective, dado su carácter independiente, surgieron con funciones formativas, y sus acciones eran desde abajo. Sin embargo, su participación en proyectos colectivos ha contribuido a su consolidación, individual o grupalmente, en los campos restringidos. Después, se esboza el marco teórico para describir las acciones colectivas y los tipos de colectivos que existen de acuer - do con su función. Se analizan algunos ejemplos de acción colectiva en los grupos escogidos, su finalidad y estrategia a seguir, así como sus repercusiones en los campos artístico y literario. Por último, se hace un pequeño recuento de las actitudes de sociólogos y filósofos en torno al arte contemporáneo, y cómo los casos estudiados modifican o refuerzan estas reflexiones.

  20. Chemistry and toxicity of sediments from San Diego Bay, including a biomarker (P450 RGS) response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.W. [Columbia Analytical Services, Carlsbad, CA (United States); Newton, F.C.; Hardin, J. [MEC Analytical Systems, Carlsbad, CA (United States); Tukey, R.H. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology; Richter, K.E. [NRaD, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Thirty sediment samples were collected from the vicinity of the Naval Docking Facility in San Diego Bay and used to conduct bioassays with amphipods, oyster larvae, Microtox, and a new rapid screening test called the cytochrome P450 Reporter Gene System (RGS). This RGS cell line, from a human liver cancer cell, has been engineered to produce luciferase, when the CYP1A1 gene on the chromosome is induced by toxic and carcinogenic organics (dioxin, coplanar PCBs, PAHs). Elutriates were tested with both Microtox and oyster larvae, and organic extracts of sediments were tested with Microtox and the P450 RGS assay. Chemical analyses included total organic carbon (TOC), and acid volatile sulfides (AVS) along with a wide range of metals and organic chemicals. The simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) to AVS ratio was compared to the toxic response of oyster larvae and amphipods. Along each of the piers sampled, contaminant concentrations decreased with distance from shore. A correlation matrix analysis of all biological and chemical data was conducted. The strongest correlation between a chemical measurement and a biological response was that of total PAH versus the P450 RGS response. The use of P450 RGS as a screening tool to assess the relative risk of contaminants on sediments is biologically meaningful, and is a rapid and inexpensive means of determining which samples require complete chemical characterization.

  1. The BirthPlace collaborative practice model: results from the San Diego Birth Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz; Jackson; Lang; Ecker; Ganiats; Dickinson; Nguyen

    1998-07-01

    Objective: The search for quality, cost-effective health care programs in the United States is now a major focus in the era of health care reform. New programs need to be evaluated as alternatives are developed in the health care system. The BirthPlace program provides comprehensive perinatal services with certified nurse-midwives and obstetricians working together in an integrated collaborative practice serving a primarily low-income population. Low-risk women are delivered by nurse-midwives in a freestanding birth center (The BirthPlace), which is one component of a larger integrated health network. All others are delivered by team obstetricians at the affiliated tertiary hospital. Wellness, preventive measures, early intervention, and family involvement are emphasized. The San Diego Birth Center Study is a 4-year research project funded by the U.S. Federal Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (#R01-HS07161) to evaluate this program. The National Birth Center Study (NEJM, 1989; 321(26): 1801-11) described the advantages and safety of freestanding birth centers. However, a prospective cohort study with a concurrent comparison group of comparable risk had not been conducted on a collaborative practice-freestanding birth center model to address questions of safety, cost, and patient satisfaction.Methods: The specific aims of this study are to compare this collaborative practice model to the traditional model of perinatal health care (physician providers and hospital delivery). A prospective cohort study comparing these two health care models was conducted with a final expected sample size of approximately 2,000 birth center and 1,350 traditional care subjects. Women were recruited from both the birth center and traditional care programs (private physicians offices and hospital based clinics) at the beginning of prenatal care and followed through the end of the perinatal period. Prenatal, intrapartum, postpartum and infant morbidity and mortality are being

  2. Faults--Offshore of San Francisco Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore San Francisco map area, California. The vector data file is...

  3. Seafloor character--Offshore of San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the seafloor-character map (see sheet 5, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. The raster data...

  4. Backscatter C [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  5. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  6. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  7. Backscatter D [7125]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  8. San Francisco Bay, California 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1-second San Francisco Bay, California Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This...

  9. Faults--Offshore of San Gregorio Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California....

  10. Folds--Offshore of San Gregorio Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California....

  11. Faults--Offshore of San Francisco Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore San Francisco map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  12. Folds--Offshore of San Francisco Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. The vector data file is...

  13. Using Local Climate Science to Educate "Key Influentials" and their Communities in the San Diego Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudrias, M. A.; Estrada, M.; Anders, S.; Silva-Send, N. J.; Yin, Z.; Schultz, P.; Young, E.

    2012-12-01

    The San Diego Regional Climate Education Partnership has formed an innovative and collaborative team whose mission is to implement a research-based climate science education and communications program to increase knowledge about climate science among highly-influential leaders and their communities and foster informed decision making based on climate science and impacts. The team includes climate scientists, behavioral psychologists, formal and informal educators and communication specialists. The Partnership's strategic plan has three major goals: (1) raise public understanding of the causes and consequences of climate change; (2) identify the most effective educational methods to educate non-traditional audiences (Key Influentials) about the causes and consequences of climate change; and (3) develop and implement a replicable model for regional climate change education. To implement this strategic plan, we have anchored our project on three major pillars: (1) Local climate science (causes, impacts and long-term consequences); (2) theoretical, research-based evaluation framework (TIMSI); and (3) Key! Influentials (KI) as primary audience for messages (working w! ith and through them). During CCEP-I, the Partnership formed and convened an advisory board of Key Influentials, completed interviews with a sample of Key Influentials, conducted a public opinion survey, developed a website (www.sandiego.edu/climate) , compiled inventories on literature of climate science education resources and climate change community groups and local activities, hosted stakeholder forums, and completed the first phase of on an experiment to test the effects of different messengers delivering the same local climate change message via video. Results of 38 KI Interviews provided evidence of local climate knowledge, strong concern about climate change, and deeply held values related to climate change education and regional leadership. The most intriguing result was that while 90% of Key

  14. Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Areas Cultural Resource Survey, Los Angeles County, California,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    10, 1968. (fig. B)Stickel, E. G. Status Differentiation at the Rincon Site. UCLAArchaeological Survey Annual Report, Vo. Map 1. Helzer, R. F. (ed...Reconnaissance of a Pre-Ceramic Site at Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo, California. San Diego Science Foundation Occasional Paper No. 1, San Diego. 1962. Moday

  15. Paleohydrogeology of the San Joaquin basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A.M.; Garven, G.; Boles, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Mass transport can have a significant effect on chemical diagenetic processes in sedimentary basins. This paper presents results from the first part of a study that was designed to explore the role of an evolving hydrodynamic system in driving mass transport and chemical diagenesis, using the San Joaquin basin of California as a field area. We use coupled hydrogeologic models to establish the paleohydrogeology, thermal history, and behavior of nonreactive solutes in the basin. These models rely on extensive geological information and account for variable-density fluid flow, heat transport, solute transport, tectonic uplift, sediment compaction, and clay dehydration. In our numerical simulations, tectonic uplift and ocean regression led to large-scale changes in fluid flow and composition by strengthening topography-driven fluid flow and allowing deep influx of fresh ground water in the San Joaquin basin. Sediment compaction due to rapid deposition created moderate overpressures, leading to upward flow from depth. The unusual distribution of salinity in the basin reflects influx of fresh ground water to depths of as much as 2 km and dilution of saline fluids by dehydration reactions at depths greater than ???2.5 km. Simulations projecting the future salinity of the basin show marine salinities persisting for more than 10 m.y. after ocean regression. Results also show a change from topography-to compaction-driven flow in the Stevens Sandstone at ca. 5 Ma that coincides with an observed change in the diagenetic sequence. Results of this investigation provide a framework for future hydrologic research exploring the link between fluid flow and diagenesis.

  16. El ferrocarril San Diego-Arizona y el ferrocarril Tijuana-Tecate: Un corredor de herencia cultural binacional

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    En este artículo se discuten algunos lineamientos teóricos para identificar el antiguo ferrocarril estadounidense San Diego-Arizona del cual forma parte el ferrocarril mexicano Tijuana-Tecate como un corredor de herencia binacional. Asimismo se analiza una aproximación metodológica dentro del campo de la geografía cultural y de la preservación histórica para su valorización e integración al desarrollo regional fronterizo.

  17. El ferrocarril San Diego-Arizona y el ferrocarril Tijuana-Tecate: Un corredor de herencia cultural binacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Castillo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se discuten algunos lineamientos teóricos para identificar el antiguo ferrocarril estadounidense San Diego-Arizona –del cual forma parte el ferrocarril mexicano Tijuana-Tecate– como un corredor de herencia binacional. Asimismo se analiza una aproximación metodológica dentro del campo de la geografía cultural y de la preservación histórica para su valorización e integración al desarrollo regional fronterizo.

  18. Injury-Reduction Effectiveness of Prescribing Running Shoes Based on Plantar Shape in Marine Corps Basic Training, San Diego, CA, and Parris Island, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    San Diego, CA: Carol Macera, Mitchell Rauh, and Richard Shaffer. Additional thanks are due to James Reading from MCRD, San Diego, CA. REPORT...Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 30:21-28. 40. Brody D.M. 1980. Running injuries. CIBA Clinical Symposia, 32:1-36. 41. James S.L...kappa-B in aveolar macrophages stimulated with TLR2 and TLR4 angonists. Journal of Immunology, 179:6097-6106. 131. McCrea K.A., Ensor J.E., Nall K

  19. Strong earthquake motion estimates for three sites on the U.C. San Diego campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, S; Doroudian, M; Elgamal, A; Gonzales, S; Heuze, F; Lai, T; Minster, B; Oglesby, D; Riemer, M; Vernon, F; Vucetic, M; Wagoner, J; Yang, Z

    2002-05-07

    The approach of the Campus Earthquake Program (CEP) is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the UC system in geology, seismology, and geotechnical engineering, to estimate the earthquake strong motion exposure of UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, and dynamic soil testing. The UC campuses currently chosen for application of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The procedure starts with the identification of possible earthquake sources in the region and the determination of the most critical fault(s) related to earthquake exposure of the campus. Combined geological, geophysical, and geotechnical studies are then conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. We drill, sample, and geophysically log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties, and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access below the soil layers, to deeper materials that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analyses of conjugate downhole and uphole records provide a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and with nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are shared with the UC consultants, so that they can be used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings. Thus, for each campus targeted by the CEP project, the strong motion studies consist of two phases, Phase 1--initial source and site characterization, drilling

  20. Resilient development and environmental justice in divided territory: political ecology in the San Diego-Tijuana bioregion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Haines

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores issues in the expansion of environmental justice rhetoric to the developing world, and propose insights from resilience theory, political ecology, and bioregionalism as supplements. I do this from the frame of the San Diego-Tijuana region, where regional inequalities are stark and global processes have a heavy local footprint. Sharing a broadly-defined natural region, the growing evidence of ecological crisis increasingly calls for collaboration between two communities which often perceive themselves as relatively disconnected. Understanding challenges to social-ecological resilience and environmental justice in the San Diego-Tijuana region, however, also requires understanding it as an inflection point for global economic, military, and human migration flows occurring at many scales. It is in the context of building effective regional collaboration that environmental justice must engage the analyses of scale and political economy contained in political ecology as a challenge. I suggest, however, that any environmental justice discourse informed by political ecology cannot remain abstract from the local context. A “bioregional” community forged around shared ecological systems may serve as an important resource for creating social-ecological resilience in politically divided territory.

  1. Recent deep-seated coastal landsliding at San Onofre State Beach, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    Airborne LiDAR collected during the period 1998-2010 and differential GPS surveys conducted over 2008-2013 show recent reactivation and movement of a large deep-seated coastal landslide at San Onofre State Beach, San Diego County, California. The overall slide complex extends about 700 m alongshore, 150 m inland, and an unknown distance offshore. Differencing digital elevation models and tracking field monuments (benchmarks) provide time series of quantitative topographic landslide changes and new insight in to the slide motion sequences and mechanics. The slide contains several distinct primary and secondary regions moving and deforming at different rates. Primary slide motion includes slow seaward translational motion, rotational slipping, and upward offshore movement. Secondary processes of basal wave erosion and new inland cliffline failures contribute to primary landslide destabilization. The landslide exhibits lithologic and structural controls, is driven by a combination of marine and subaerial processes, influences local beach morphology, and deviates from typical southern California coastal cliff processes which mostly involve shallow landslides and topples. Large-scale, cross-shore slide rotation has recently created new nearshore reefs. Eroded cliff sediments provide a local beach sand source and probably influence local nearshore ecosystems. All known time periods of major historical landslide activity were preceded by elevated seasonal rainfall and analysis suggests elevated rainfall generated primary slide motion as opposed to wave action. As of spring 2013, landslide activity has slowed, but continued positive feedbacks including toe removal by wave activity suggest that future landsliding will probably threaten coastal infrastructure.

  2. Minisparker seismic-reflection data of field activity S-5-09-SC: San Pedro Basin, offshore southern California from 2009-07-06 to 2009-07-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliter, Ray W.; Conrad, James E.; Ryan, Holly F; Triezenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This dataset includes raw and processed, high-resolution seismic-reflection data collected in 2009 to explore a possible connection between the San Diego Trough Fault and the San Pedro Basin Fault. The survey is in the San Pedro Basin between Santa Catalina Island and San Pedro, California. The data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Parke Snavely. The seismic-reflection data were acquired using a SIG 2mille minisparker. Subbottom acoustic penetration spanned tens to several hundreds of meters, variable by location.

  3. Chirp seismic-reflection data of field activity S-5-09-SC: San Pedro Basin, offshore southern California from 2009-07-06 to 2009-07-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliter, Ray W.; Conrad, James E.; Ryan, Holly F.; Triezenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This dataset includes raw and processed, high-resolution seismic-reflection data collected in 2009 to explore a possible connection between the San Diego Trough Fault and the San Pedro Basin Fault. The survey is in the San Pedro Basin between Catalina Island and San Pedro, California. The data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Parke Snavely. The seismic-reflection data were acquired using an Edgetech 512 Chirp subbottom profiling system. Subbottom acoustic penetration spanned tens to hundreds of meters, variable by location.

  4. Interpretation of geology, geophysics and hydrochemistry for selection of geothermal drilling sites, Canon de San Diego Grant, Sandoval county, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, J.B.; McIntyre, J.R.; Klein, C.W.; Beyer, J.H.

    1978-11-01

    This project began in mid-1977 as an evaluation of the geology and hydrogeology of the Canon de San Diego Grant for Sunoco Energy Development Co. (Sunedco) and evolved late in 1977, at Sunedco's direction, into a more comprehensive study of geophysical, geologic and hydrogeochemical data. This has been used to select sites for the possible drilling of deep geothermal wells.

  5. Seafloor character--Offshore of San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the seafloor-character map (see sheet 5, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. The raster data file...

  6. Geological literature on the San Joaquin Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, J.C.; Trollman, W.M.; Denman, J.M.

    1973-01-01

    The following list of references includes most of the geological literature on the San Joaquin Valley and vicinity in central California (see figure 1) published prior to January 1, 1973. The San Joaquin Valley comprises all or parts of 11 counties -- Alameda, Calaveras, Contra Costa, Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Tulare (figure 2). As a matter of convenient geographical classification the boundaries of the report area have been drawn along county lines, and to include San Benito and Santa Clara Counties on the west and Mariposa and Tuolumne Counties on the east. Therefore, this list of geological literature includes some publications on the Diablo and Temblor Ranges on the west, the Tehachapi Mountains and Mojave Desert on the south, and the Sierra Nevada Foothills and Mountains on the east.

  7. Apropiación de la figura de san Diego de Alcalá por una comunidad maya de Campeche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David de Ángel García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se ilustran algunos mecanismos implementados por los mayas peninsulares de la comunidad de Nunkiní, Campeche, para apropiarse de la figura de san Diego de Alcalá, el santo patrono del pueblo. Basándome en datos etnográficos y en testimonios orales, me ocuparé de tres ámbitos en los que se ponen de manifiesto las profundas transformaciones y reelaboraciones que ha sufrido este personaje sagrado desde su llegada a Nunkiní. Pretendo mostrar cómo una entidad tan extraña al universo cultural indígena pudo pasar a convertirse en una deidad con características propias de las potencias mesoamericanas y una identidad marcadamente local.

  8. Vertical tectonic deformation associated with the San Andreas fault zone offshore of San Francisco, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, H. F.; Parsons, T.; Sliter, R. W.

    2008-10-01

    A new fault map of the shelf offshore of San Francisco, California shows that faulting occurs as a distributed shear zone that involves many fault strands with the principal displacement taken up by the San Andreas fault and the eastern strand of the San Gregorio fault zone. Structures associated with the offshore faulting show compressive deformation near where the San Andreas fault goes offshore, but deformation becomes extensional several km to the north off of the Golden Gate. Our new fault map serves as the basis for a 3-D finite element model that shows that the block between the San Andreas and San Gregorio fault zone is subsiding at a long-term rate of about 0.2-0.3 mm/yr, with the maximum subsidence occurring northwest of the Golden Gate in the area of a mapped transtensional basin. Although the long-term rates of vertical displacement primarily show subsidence, the model of coseismic deformation associated with the 1906 San Francisco earthquake indicates that uplift on the order of 10-15 cm occurred in the block northeast of the San Andreas fault. Since 1906, 5-6 cm of regional subsidence has occurred in that block. One implication of our model is that the transfer of slip from the San Andreas fault to a fault 5 km to the east, the Golden Gate fault, is not required for the area offshore of San Francisco to be in extension. This has implications for both the deposition of thick Pliocene-Pleistocene sediments (the Merced Formation) observed east of the San Andreas fault, and the age of the Peninsula segment of the San Andreas fault.

  9. Contours--Offshore of San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps (see sheets 1, 2, 3, 7, 10, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map...

  10. San Jose, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Jose, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  11. Polyplacophora (Mollusca) from the San Diego Formation: A remarkable assemblage of fossil chitons from the Pliocene of southern Califoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrasco, Michael J.; Eernisse, Douglas J.; Powell, Charles L.; Fernandez, Christine Z.

    2012-01-01

    A rich chiton assemblage consisting of more than 15,000 valves (shell plates) was collected by George P. Kanakoff (1897–1973) from Pliocene exposures of the San Diego Formation just north of the U.S./Mexican border. The assemblage includes 16 extant species, three extinct species (Callistochiton sphaerae n. sp., Lepidozona kanakoffi n. sp., and Amicula solivaga n. sp.), and three indeterminate species. The collection is dominated by the genus Callistochiton and also includes the genera Leptochiton, Oldroydia, Lepidozona, Stenoplax, Amicula, Mopalia, Placiphorella, Tonicella, Dendrochiton, and Nuttallina. This assemblage expands the known stratigraphic and paleogeographic ranges of many chiton genera and species and provides information about an apparent late Cenozoic diversification of chitons along the Pacific Coast of North America. Chitons appear to have diversified in the northeastern Pacific from the middle Miocene to Pleistocene, driven in part by regional increases in productivity and environmental heterogeneity during that time. The chitons are interpreted to have been deposited at inner-neritic depths (,25 m) in the mouth of a bay or in a continental shelf environment, and the annual temperature range and seasonality are inferred to have been similar to those that occur off the nearby San Diego coast today. However, the fossil assemblages also include a mixture of taxa that today range only to the north or to the south. The large sample sizes of chiton valves allow rigorous analysis of the ratio of valve types, revealing a divergence from the expected pattern. This divergence is even greater on average than what occurs in assemblages of chiton valves in Holocene sediments, revealing that

  12. College Success and the Black Male. San Jose City College, San Jose, California. Research Report #128.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Percy; And Others

    In 1992, a study was conducted at San Jose City College (SJCC) and Evergreen Valley College (EVC), California, to examine the fourth semester persistence rates of black male students and to investigate the effect of SJCC athletic and athlete academic support programs on persistence. Study findings included the following: (1) new full-time (NFT)…

  13. AFSC/NMML/CCEP: Survival Rate of California sea lions at San Miguel Island, California from 1987-2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains initial capture and marking data for California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) pups at San Miguel Island, California and subsequent...

  14. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of San Francisco, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Endris, Charles A.; Manson, Michael W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Watt, Janet Tilden; Ross, Stephanie L.; Bruns, Terry R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology.

  15. 76 FR 12719 - City of Escondido, California, and Vista Irrigation District; Notice of Application Accepted for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... Rincon Indian Reservation. Lake Wohlford stores the water obtained from the San Luis Rey River and... Powerhouse Project. f. Location: On the San Luis Rey River in San Diego County, near Escondido, California... reservation lands owned by the La Jolla, San Pasqual, and Rincon Indian Tribes. g. Filed Pursuant to:...

  16. Structure and mechanics of the San Andreas-San Gregorio fault junction, San Francisco, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Tom; Bruns, Terry R.; Sliter, Ray

    2005-01-01

    The right-lateral San Gregorio and San Andreas faults meet west of the Golden Gate near San Francisco. Coincident seismic reflection and refraction profiling across the San Gregorio and San Andreas faults south of their junction shows the crust between them to have formed shallow extensional basins that are dissected by parallel strike-slip faults. We employ a regional finite element model to investigate the long-term consequences of the fault geometry. Over the course of 2-3 m.y. of slip on the San Andreas-San Gregorio fault system, elongated extensional basins are predicted to form between the two faults. An additional consequence of the fault geometry is that the San Andreas fault is expected to have migrated eastward relative to the San Gregorio fault. We thus propose a model of eastward stepping right-lateral fault formation to explain the observed multiple fault strands and depositional basins. The current manifestation of this process might be the observed transfer of slip from the San Andreas fault east to the Golden Gate fault.

  17. Downscaling climate change models to local site conditions: San Diego National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Executive Summary Southern California tidal marshes have been affected by coastal development and urbanization.Over the past 150 years, dredging and filling...

  18. Diego de San Pedro's Cárcel de Amor: Political and Social Consequences of the Mismatch of Laureola and the King

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Márquez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a political and social analysis of Diego de San Pedro’s Cárcel de Amor. Our starting point will be the Laureola's rejection, which will contrast with the king's refusal to request of his vassals. From there, we will examine both the social ideology of courtly love for the social class of the nobility as well as the political implications of this situation for the government of the kingdom.

  19. Cierre de fronteras, libre comercio y migrantes: el área binacional de San Diego – Tijuana como resultado inesperado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio García Marín

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available La presente investigación analiza la aparición de áreas y ciudades binacionales a lo largo de la frontera entre Estados Unidos y México. Es decir, si son fruto de la interacción o bien de la integración. En este sentido, pareciera que este fenómeno ha vivido un incremento constante y progresivo en los últimos tiempos, a pesar de la combinación de medidas represivas ante la migración y su asociación a la inseguridad y el terrorismo. Se sostiene que las áreas binacionales serían un resultado no esperado de la creciente represión a la migración latinoamericana y, por otra, efecto de la difuminación de fronteras para mercancías y capitales entre los miembros del Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte. En este sentido, el estudio de caso de la frontera San Diego – Tijuana no pareciera dibujar un área de convergencia económica, cultural y social a la luz de los datos, aunque sí de creciente interacción económica.

  20. BILIRUBIN CONCENTRATIONS IN CLINICALLY HEALTHY AND DISEASED CAPTIVE WATERBUCK (KOBUS ELLIPSIPRYMNUS) AT THE SAN DIEGO ZOO SAFARI PARK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Ryan A; Lamberski, Nadine; Christopher, Mary M

    2016-06-01

    Captive waterbuck ( Kobus ellipsiprymnus ) that appear clinically healthy have been noted to have high serum bilirubin concentrations compared with other ruminants; however, questions remain about the physiologic factors affecting bilirubin concentration and its potential association with underlying disease and icteric serum or mucous membranes. Serum bilirubin concentrations of healthy and diseased waterbuck housed at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park from 1989 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed to determine any link between icteric serum, total bilirubin concentration (tBili), and disease entities in this species. Total bilirubin and direct (dBili) bilirubin concentrations and the prevalence of icteric serum were compared by subspecies, age group, and health status; associations with complete blood count and biochemical results and clinical diagnosis were assessed. No significant differences were found in tBili or dBili between Ellipsen (n = 32) and Defassa (n = 29) subspecies or in juveniles (n = 22) versus adults (n = 39). Clinically healthy waterbuck (n = 40) had significantly higher tBili (mean ± 2SD, 7.9 ± 1.2 mg/dl; P bilirubin (2.2-6.2 mg/dl). These results suggest healthy waterbuck have relatively high tBili and dBili compared with related species. Icteric serum may be seen in up to 15% of healthy animals in the absence of icteric tissues.

  1. Risk profile and HIV testing outcomes of women undergoing community-based testing in San Diego 2008–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Susannah K.; Little, Susan J.; Hoenigl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Women comprised 19% of new HIV diagnoses in the United States in 2014, with significant racial and ethnic disparities in infection rates. This cross-sectional analysis of women enrolled in a cohort study compares demographics, risk behaviour, and sexually transmitted infections (STI) in those undergoing HIV testing in San Diego County. Data from the most recent screening visit of women undergoing voluntary HIV screening April 2008 –July 2014 was used. HIV diagnosis, risk behaviour and self-reported STIs were compared among women aged ≤24, 25–49, and ≥50, as well as between HIV-infected and uninfected women and between Hispanic and non-Hispanic women. Among the 2535 women included, Hispanic women were less likely than other women to report unprotected vaginal intercourse (p = 0.026) or stimulant drug use (p = 0.026), and more likely to report one or fewer partners (p awareness of partner risk and appropriate testing. PMID:28165056

  2. Lack of association of the serotonin transporter polymorphism with the sudden infant death syndrome in the San Diego Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, David S; Rivera, Keith D; Broadbelt, Kevin G; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Belliveau, Richard A; Holm, Ingrid A; Haas, Elisabeth A; Stanley, Christina; Krous, Henry F; Kinney, Hannah C; Markianos, Kyriacos

    2010-11-01

    Dysfunction of medullary serotonin (5-HT)-mediated respiratory and autonomic function is postulated to underlie the pathogenesis of the majority of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases. Several studies have reported an increased frequency of the LL genotype and L allele of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) gene promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR), which is associated with increased transcriptional activity and 5-HT transport in vitro, in SIDS cases compared with controls. These findings raise the possibility that this polymorphism contributes to or exacerbates existing medullary 5-HT dysfunction in SIDS. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the frequency of LL genotype and L allele are higher in 179 SIDS cases compared with 139 controls of multiple ethnicities in the San Diego SIDS Dataset. We observed no significant association of genotype or allele with SIDS cases either in the total cohort or on stratification for ethnicity. These observations do not support previous findings that the L allele and/or LL genotype of the 5-HTTLPR are associated with SIDS.

  3. Población commuter de la frontera norte: el caso de Mexicali-Calexico y Tijuana-San Diego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Vega Briones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo central de este trabajo es analizar el perfil sociodemográfico de los trabajadores transfronterizos o commuters de las ciudades de Tijuana-San Diego y Mexicali- Calexico de acuerdo con el sexo y el lugar donde se encuentra el trabajo. Los trabajadores transfronterizos o commuters son los individuos que residen en alguna ciudad de la frontera norte de México, pero cotidianamente cruzan la línea fronteriza para trabajar en la ciudad estadounidense contigua. La información que se utiliza para realizar este estudio es la obtenida por el Censo de Población y Vivienda mexicano del año 2010; sin embargo, el análisis sobre el perfil de los commuters se complementa con información de carácter etnográfico producto de diversas entrevistas realizadas a los trabajadores transfronterizos, principalmente en las ciudades de Tijuana y Mexicali. Consideramos que esta población tiene una imagen individual y cotidiana más completa de la compleja relación que se da en la frontera México-Estados Unidos, dada su característica principal de interacción continua entre ambos lados de la frontera. Ello al mismo tiempo nos permite contar con una visión más profunda de una realidad fronteriza que se basa en la dependencia creada y recreada en las sociedades tanto mexicana como estadounidense.

  4. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-01-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries.

  5. PV Validation and Bankability Workshop: San Jose, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, J.; Howard, J.

    2011-12-01

    This report is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). The report provides feedback from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Program PV Validation and Bankability Workshop in San Jose, California on August 31, 2011. It focuses on the current state of PV in the United States, private funding to fund U.S. PV industry growth, roles and functions of the regional test center program, and ways to improve the current validation and bankability practices.

  6. 75 FR 2079 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... facilities. Also, please see our response to CPF comment 3. B. San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control...) San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District. (1) Rule 4570, ``Confined Animal Facilities... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley...

  7. Antibody engineering & therapeutics, the annual meeting of the antibody society December 7–10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M.; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Carter, Paul J.; Melis, Joost P.M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6–10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on “Antibodies to watch” in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  8. Hybrid energy system cost analysis: San Nicolas Island, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, T.L.; McKenna, E.

    1996-07-01

    This report analyzes the local wind resource and evaluates the costs and benefits of supplementing the current diesel-powered energy system on San Nicolas Island, California (SNI), with wind turbines. In Section 2.0 the SNI site, naval operations, and current energy system are described, as are the data collection and analysis procedures. Section 3.0 summarizes the wind resource data and analyses that were presented in NREL/TP 442-20231. Sections 4.0 and 5.0 present the conceptual design and cost analysis of a hybrid wind and diesel energy system on SNI, with conclusions following in Section 6. Appendix A presents summary pages of the hybrid system spreadsheet model, and Appendix B contains input and output files for the HYBRID2 program.

  9. The Cenozoic evolution of the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartow, J. Alan

    1991-01-01

    The San Joaquin Valley, which is the southern part of the 700-km-long Great Valley of California, is an asymmetric structural trough that is filled with a prism of upper Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments up to 9 km thick; these sediments rest on crystalline basement rocks of the southwestward-tilted Sierran block. The San Joaquin sedimentary basin is separated from the Sacramento basin to the north by the buried Stockton arch and associated Stockton fault. The buried Bakersfield arch near the south end of the valley separates the small Maricopa-Tejon subbasin at the south end of the San Joaquin basin from the remainder of the basin. Cenozoic strata in the San Joaquin basin thicken southeastward from about 800 m in the north to over 9,000 m in the south. The San Joaquin Valley can be subdivided into five regions on the basis of differing structural style. They are the northern Sierran block, the southern Sierran block, the northern Diablo homocline, the westside fold belt, and the combined Maricopa-Tejon subbasin and southmargin deformed belt. Considerable facies variation existed within the sedimentary basin, particularly in the Neogene when a thick section of marine sediment accumulated in the southern part of the basin, while a relatively thin and entirely nonmarine section was deposited in the northern part. The northern Sierran block, the stable east limb of the valley syncline between the Stockton fault and the San Joaquin River, is the least deformed region of the valley. Deformation consists mostly of a southwest tilt and only minor late Cenozoic normal faulting. The southern Sierran block, the stable east limb of the valley syncline between the San Joaquin River and the Bakersfield arch, is similar in style to the northern part of the block, but it has a higher degree of deformation. Miocene or older normal faults trend mostly north to northwest and have a net down-to-the-west displacement with individual offsets of as much as 600 m. The northern Diablo

  10. Summary of California Clapper Rail winter populations in the San Francisco National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The California Clapper rail (Rallus lonqirostris obsoletus) is a seldom seen resident in some of the remaining tidal salt marshes in San Francisco Bay. The...

  11. Topographic measurements of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, 2015, using backpack GPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Topographic data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2015 for Little Holland Tract in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California. The data...

  12. Digital elevation model of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This product is a digital elevation model (DEM) for the Little Holland Tract in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California based on U.S. Geological Survey...

  13. Bathymetric measurements of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Bathymetric data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2015 for the Little Holland Tract in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California. The...

  14. Topographic measurements of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Topographic data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2015 for the Little Holland Tract in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California. The...

  15. Digital Elevation Model of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This product is a digital elevation model (DEM) for the Little Holland Tract in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California based on U.S. Geological Survey...

  16. Factors affecting reproductive success of the California clapper rail (Rallus longirostris obsoletus) in San Francisco Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We assessed the reproductive success of the California clapper rail (Rallus longirostris obsoletus), an endangered species restricted to San Francisco Bay, and the...

  17. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of San Gregorio Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. The vector...

  18. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of San Francisco Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. The polygon shapefile is included in...

  19. The Economically Active Population in Tijuana and that of Mexican Origin in San Diego from 1970 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Pineda Chávez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available tijuana y s an Diego forman una frontera de intensa dinámica demográf ica y socioeconó - mica, con población de origen mexicano creciente en s an Diego generada por oportunidades de empleo en esta ciudad. l as economías en interrelación modif ican la población y las ra - mas de trabajo. s e analiza el contexto económico de 1970 a 2010, incluyendo el Programa de industria lización Fronteriza, la ley s impson- rodino, el t ratado de l ibre c omercio de a mérica del n orte y la crisis de 2008. e n t ijuana predomina la industria de transformación, mientras que en s an Diego los servicios y el comercio requieren trabajadores de origen mexicano, que ahora incrementan su participación en servicios profesionales.

  20. 75 FR 3996 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... Planning, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District; letter dated and received August 17, 2009... Sadredin, Executive Director/Air Pollution Control Officer of San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control... emission control requirements of Rule 4684 are consistent with the California Air Resources Board's...

  1. 76 FR 68103 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... Unified Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Rulemaking For the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

  2. 33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. 334.950 Section 334.950 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.950 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. (a) The... degrees true, 5.35 nautical miles; thence 040.4 degrees true to the beach. (3) The waters of the...

  3. H09112: NOS Hydrographic Survey , San Diego, California, 1970-03-25

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  4. H09113: NOS Hydrographic Survey , San Diego, California, 1970-04-07

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  5. State Education & Environment Roundtable (SEER) Seminar (9th, San Diego, California, May 21-25, 2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Gerald A.; Hoody, Linda L.

    This document reports on the 9th seminar of the State Education and Environment Roundtable (SEER). It consists of brief overviews of the daily discussions and presentations that were made at the seminar. Topics discussed include connecting service learning and the Environment as an Integrated Context for learning (EIC), and reports from states on…

  6. 2013 NOAA Ortho-rectified Color Mosaic of California: Port of San Diego

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  7. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R; Reed, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones.

  8. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Reed, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones.

  9. Biblioteca de la Universidad Central de San Diego - California (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L. Pereira y Asociados, Arquitectos

    1972-09-01

    Full Text Available This building, which is an original and daring design, consists of five floors and is sphere shaped. It is in the central square of the campus with magnificent views in all directions. It is anticipated that there will be room for 700,000 volumes and about 1,250 students. And in the near future, with easy extensions, these figures will be tripled. The central nucleus and the concrete columns constitute the vertical structure, from which the beams which support the floors extend. The majority of these elements have been left exposed.El edificio, de original y atrevido diseño, consta de cinco plantas y presenta forma esférica, estando emplazado en la plaza central del «campus», con magníficas vistas hacia todas las direcciones. La capacidad prevista es de 700.000 volúmenes, que pueden ser consultados por unos 1.250 estudiantes. En un futuro previsible, y con auxilio de fáciles ampliaciones, pueden llegarse a triplicar las cifras citadas. El núcleo central y los pilares de hormigón constituyen la estructura vertical, desde la que se extienden las vigas que soportan las plantas. La mayor parte de estos elementos se han dejado vistos.

  10. Geologic map of the Morena Reservoir 7.5-minute quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Victoria R.

    2016-06-01

    IntroductionMapping in the Morena Reservoir 7.5-minute quadrangle began in 1980, when the Hauser Wilderness Area, which straddles the Morena Reservoir and Barrett Lake quadrangles, was mapped for the U.S. Forest Service. Mapping was completed in 1993–1994. The Morena Reservoir quadrangle contains part of a regional-scale Late Jurassic(?) to Early Cretaceous tectonic suture that coincides with the western limit of Jurassic metagranites in this part of the Peninsular Ranges batholith (PRB). This suture, and a nearly coincident map unit consisting of metamorphosed Cretaceous and Jurassic back-arc basinal volcanic and sedimentary rocks (unit KJvs), mark the boundary between western, predominantly metavolcanic rocks, and eastern, mainly metasedimentary, rocks. The suture is intruded and truncated by the western margin of middle to Late Cretaceous Granite Mountain and La Posta plutons of the eastern zone of the batholith.

  11. F00473C: NOS Hydrographic Survey , San Diego Bay, California, 2001-04-13

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  12. F00590: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Enterance to San Diego Bay, California, 2010-10-25

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  13. A Marriage of Minds: James R. Jacobs & Shinjoung Yeo Univ. of California-San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Their personalities and backgrounds are very different, but James R. Jacobs and Shinjoung Yeo are passionate about the same causes: librarianship, open government, and empowerment through information. They balance each other. Yeo is focused, realistic, critical, and an excellent researcher. Her superhero alter ego is Wet Blanket Woman, able to…

  14. AERA Vocational Education Special Interest Group Proceedings (San Diego, California, April 13-17, 1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Diane H., Ed.

    This document contains six research papers: "Articulation Practices among Secondary and Postsecondary Vocational-Technical Education Programs" (Bob R. Stewart, Sandra Eckert-Stewart); "What Message Are We Sending to Counselors about Their Role in Tech Prep?" (Paula Puckett); "From School-to-Work: Secretaries' and Machinists' Representations of…

  15. Munitions Executive Summit 2010 Held in San Diego, California on February 8-10, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    echnology • raining / areer g t Tooele Army Depot •Supply Depot Operations •Ammunition Peculiar Equip ele r y e t • upply epot perations • unition... mobility , force protection, and close battle systems for the Army’s Current, Stryker and Future Forces. • PM Demil • Industrial Base/EDCA • SMCA...ccsweb.pica.army.mil PM CCS Mission:  Provide the Warfighter world‐class close combat, force protection & assured  mobility  capabilities across full

  16. Proceedings of Damping 󈨟, Held in San Diego, California on 13 - 15 February 1991. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    and Fluids The Vibration Damping Effect of an Electrorheological Fluid GAB Stephen A. Austin Modelling of Nonlinear Dilatation Response of Fluids...Control of a Flexible Planar Truss Using A Reaction Mass GBC Actuator Capt. Steven G. Webb and LL David R. Lee SESSION GC - Damping Indentification A

  17. Proceedings of Damping 󈨟, Held in San Diego, California on 13 - 15 February 1991. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Rheological Fluids and Fluids The Vibration Damping Effect of an Electrorheological Fluid GAB Stephen A. Austin Mod,!!ing of Nonlinear Dilatation Response of...W. Vos Passive Control of a Flexible Planar Truss Using A Reaction Mass GBC Actuator Capt. Steven G. Webb and Lt. David R. Lee SESSION GC - Damping...Procedure to the PACOSS Multi- Actuator Control Experiment To show the applicability of the procedure to the solution of realistic dynamics and control

  18. Connectionist Models: Proceedings of the Summer School Held in San Diego, California on 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    for a netter For A and A’, one. Figure 8 is the equivalent of figure 7 for this Ap[t] = P(r[t + 11 - p[t]), p[0] = r[1J, case, showing the best...Oscillation and Chaos in Physiological Control Systems. Science, 197:287. J. Moody & C. Darken. (1988) Learning with Localized Receptive Fields. In D. Touretzky...N Cooper, and F. F. Ebner (1987) A which differ only in the initial conditions of Physiological Basis for a Theory of Synapse Modifica- the networks

  19. Proceedings of Damping 󈨟, Held in San Diego, California on 13 - 15 February 1991. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    further damp vertical bending of the solar array masts, while tuned mass dampers suppress solar array blanket modes. SIDA . hos~d bya Sn-3 orksatin...County, July 21, 1952 (iv) Llolleo, Chile , March 3, 1985 (v) La Union, Michoacan, September 19, 1985 (vi) Zacatula, Michoacan, September 19, 1985

  20. Smart Parking Pilot on the Coaster Commuter Rail Line in San Diego, California

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Tagan; Rodier, Caroline J.; Shaheen, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, public transit authorities are harnessing advances in sensor, payment, and enforcement technologies to operate parking facilities more efficiently. In the short term, these innovations promise to enhance customer parking experiences, increase the effective supply of existing parking with minimal investment, and increase ridership and overall revenue. Over the longer term, these systems could further expand ridership by generating revenue to add parking capacity and improve acces...

  1. Organochlorine contaminants in eggs of tern species and the western snowy plover nesting in San Diego Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Previous studies have raised concerns about the organochlorine pesticide concentrations in the eggs of tern species in Southern California including the California...

  2. CUERPO, TRATO INTERIOR Y ARTES DE LA MEMORIA: AUTOCONOCIMIENTO E INDIVIDUO MODERNO EN EL TEXTO DE ÚRSULA SAN DIEGO CONVENTO ESPIRITUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Araya

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available La obra Convento Espiritual, de la religiosa Úrsula de San Diego, posiblemente escrita en el siglo XVI en Granada, España, forma parte de una tradición de escritura de mujeres como ejercicio ascético-místico en la vida religiosa y devota a ambos lados del Atlántico. En este trabajo se presenta un modo de leerlo en tanto género textual derivado de prácticas de organización del conocimiento provenientes de las artes de la memoria y, como tal, una forma de construcción del sujeto. Estas características son notables en este texto, y si bien no son exclusivas de él, es importante por formar parte de la historia de los primeros impresos en Chile luego de la independencia indicando con ello el reconocimiento pedagógico de este tipo de escritura femenina en las sociedades del Antiguo Régimen.The book Convento Espiritual (Spiritual Convent ofthe Spanish nun Ursula de San Diego, possibly written during the sixteenth century in Granada, Spain, is part of a tradition of womens' writing as an exercise in mystical-ascetic and devout religious life on both sides of the Atlantic. This essay proposes a reading this text within the frame of a textual genre originated in those practices of knowledge organization derived from the arts of memory; as a textual genre, it can also be understood as aform of subject construction. These are remarkable features to be foundin this text, and though they are not exclusive to it, they are important because the Convento espiritual belongs to the history of the early books printed in Chile after the Independence; this points out to the recognition of the educational value  of this type of writing women in those societies belonging to the Old Regime.

  3. The San Bernardino, California, Terror Attack: Two Emergency Departments’ Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Lee, MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On December 2, 2015, a terror attack in the city of San Bernardino, California killed 14 Americans and injured 22 in the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001. Although emergency personnel and law enforcement officials frequently deal with multi-casualty incidents (MCIs, what occurred that day required an unprecedented response. Most of the severely injured victims were transported to either Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC or Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC. These two hospitals operate two designated trauma centers in the region and played crucial roles during the massive response that followed this attack. In an effort to shed a light on our response to others, we provide an account of how these two teaching hospitals prepared for and coordinated the medical care of these victims. In general, both centers were able to quickly mobilize large number of staff and resources. Prior disaster drills proved to be invaluable. Both centers witnessed excellent teamwork and coordination involving first responders, law enforcement, administration, and medical personnel from multiple specialty services. Those of us working that day felt safe and protected. Although we did identify areas we could have improved upon, including patchy communication and crowd-control, they were minor in nature and did not affect patient care. MCIs pose major challenges to emergency departments and trauma centers across the country. Responding to such incidents requires an ever-evolving approach as no two incidents will present exactly alike. It is our hope that this article will foster discussion and lead to improvements in management of future MCIs.

  4. The San Bernardino, California, Terror Attack: Two Emergency Departments' Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Carol; Walters, Elizabeth; Borger, Rodney; Clem, Kathleen; Fenati, Gregory; Kiemeney, Michael; Seng, Sakona; Yuen, Ho-Wang; Neeki, Michael; Smith, Dustin

    2016-01-01

    On December 2, 2015, a terror attack in the city of San Bernardino, California killed 14 Americans and injured 22 in the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001. Although emergency personnel and law enforcement officials frequently deal with multi-casualty incidents (MCIs), what occurred that day required an unprecedented response. Most of the severely injured victims were transported to either Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) or Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC). These two hospitals operate two designated trauma centers in the region and played crucial roles during the massive response that followed this attack. In an effort to shed a light on our response to others, we provide an account of how these two teaching hospitals prepared for and coordinated the medical care of these victims. In general, both centers were able to quickly mobilize large number of staff and resources. Prior disaster drills proved to be invaluable. Both centers witnessed excellent teamwork and coordination involving first responders, law enforcement, administration, and medical personnel from multiple specialty services. Those of us working that day felt safe and protected. Although we did identify areas we could have improved upon, including patchy communication and crowd-control, they were minor in nature and did not affect patient care. MCIs pose major challenges to emergency departments and trauma centers across the country. Responding to such incidents requires an ever-evolving approach as no two incidents will present exactly alike. It is our hope that this article will foster discussion and lead to improvements in management of future MCIs.

  5. The Eastern California Shear Zone as the northward extension of the southern San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Wayne R.; Savage, James C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Cluster analysis offers an agnostic way to organize and explore features of the current GPS velocity field without reference to geologic information or physical models using information only contained in the velocity field itself. We have used cluster analysis of the Southern California Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity field to determine the partitioning of Pacific-North America relative motion onto major regional faults. Our results indicate the large-scale kinematics of the region is best described with two boundaries of high velocity gradient, one centered on the Coachella section of the San Andreas Fault and the Eastern California Shear Zone and the other defined by the San Jacinto Fault south of Cajon Pass and the San Andreas Fault farther north. The ~120 km long strand of the San Andreas between Cajon Pass and Coachella Valley (often termed the San Bernardino and San Gorgonio sections) is thus currently of secondary importance and carries lesser amounts of slip over most or all of its length. We show these first order results are present in maps of the smoothed GPS velocity field itself. They are also generally consistent with currently available, loosely bounded geologic and geodetic fault slip rate estimates that alone do not provide useful constraints on the large-scale partitioning we show here. Our analysis does not preclude the existence of smaller blocks and more block boundaries in Southern California. However, attempts to identify smaller blocks along and adjacent to the San Gorgonio section were not successful.

  6. Assessment of hydraulic restoration of San Pablo Marsh, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grismer, Mark E; Kollar, J; Syder, J

    2004-11-01

    Inter-tidal marshes are dynamic diverse ecosystems at the transition zone between terrestrial and ocean environments. Geomorphologically, inter-tidal salt marshes are vegetated land-forms at elevations slightly greater than mean tidal levels that have distributed channels formed under ebb (drainage) tidal flows that widen and deepen in the seaward direction. The drainage channels enable tidal flows to circulate sediments and nutrients through the marsh system during normal tidal events, while depositing sediments during storm or seismic events. This dynamic system encourages considerable biodiversity while simultaneously providing water quality enhancement features that service marsh terrestrial life and marine life in the estuary. Reservoir creation limiting sediment transport, anticipated large increases in sea levels as well as agricultural and urban development have resulted in significant loss of inter-tidal marshes and subsequent adverse impacts on waterfowl, infauna and fisheries. The complex and continuously changing marsh channel hydraulics and sedimentary processes have severely constrained quantitative modeling of these marsh systems such that restoration/creation efforts remain something of an empirical science and further assessments are needed. The purpose of this paper is to outline current understanding of salt marsh hydrodynamics, sediment accretion processes and subsequent response of marsh vegetation to set the stage for assessment of a marsh restoration effort along San Pablo Bay near San Francisco, California. Several kilometers of drainage channels were constructed in a 624 ha disturbed salt marsh to restore tidal circulation and vegetation so as to enhance habitat for threatened species (e.g. clapper rail, harvest mouse, delta smelt and potentially anadromous fish species). Two distinct drainage channel systems ('east' and 'west') were installed having similar channel dimensions common to salt marshes in the region, but having design bankfull

  7. El mercado transfronterizo de servicios de salud privados entre Tijuana, México y San Diego, EE. UU.

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    En este trabajo se analiza el impacto del comercio transfronterizo en los servicios de salud de Tijuana en el mercado hispano – mexicano e inclusive de otros hispanos latinoamericanos de California. Los hispanos – estadounidenses son de origen mexicano cuyas ligas culturales y familiares los mantienen regresando periódicamente a los pueblos mexicanos de donde son originarios. Los hispanos de California constituyen un mercado que se disputan las compañías aseguradoras. El turismo de hispanos q...

  8. Faults--Offshore of San Gregorio Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area,...

  9. All Prime Contract Awards by State or Country, Place, and Contractor. Part 4 (San Diego, California-Victorville, California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    0000000 010 C11000 01000400 )000 0)0 0)00 09)> I0 I (0(04 l.40000000 00o 0000 000000 0000 00 000 00 0) If COO (00 I H.(0(0(0(0(0(0 .4(0 -I(0(0(0 w4 (0...6 c C- CON-4 c N c)0N (311-46W 6 U EU-t 11 toI-* ( Mis 00 00 Es - 4 a) 0 660 C6 I0 66- (4100 (#1 W( C11000 0(0-40 U (~ 6 00004 000 66 t Cop~ 6 ) M01

  10. SummerHill Homes, San Francisco Bay Area, Fremont, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-10-01

    Building America fact sheet on SummerHill Homes of Northern California. The Villa Savona Homes in Fremont, California were built using 15% fly ash in concrete, engineered lumber for floors, high efficiency windows with Low-emissivity (Low-E) glass, and fi

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" from a Citrus Tree in San Gabriel, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F; Kumagai, L; Liang, G; Deng, X; Zheng, Z; Keremane, M; Chen, J

    2015-12-23

    The draft genome sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" strain SGCA5 from an orange citrus tree in San Gabriel, California, is reported here. SGCA5 has a genome size of 1,201,445 bp, a G+C content of 36.4%, 1,152 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 42 RNA genes.

  12. 78 FR 53038 - Interim Final Determination to Stay and Defer Sanctions; California; San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Interim Final Determination to Stay and Defer Sanctions; California; San Joaquin Valley AGENCY: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Interim final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is making an interim final determination to stay the imposition of offset sanctions and to defer...

  13. 77 FR 745 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) Correction In rule document 2011-33660 appearing on...

  14. LESSONS FROM A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF A 5-YR PERIOD OF PRESHIPMENT TESTING AT SAN DIEGO ZOO: A RISK-BASED APPROACH TO PRESHIPMENT TESTING MAY BENEFIT ANIMAL WELFARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinkovich, Matt; Wallace, Chelsea; Morris, Pat J; Rideout, Bruce; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2016-03-01

    The preshipment examination, with associated transmissible disease testing, has become standard practice in the movement of animals between zoos. An alternative disease risk-based approach, based on a comprehensive surveillance program including necropsy and preventive medicine examination testing and data, has been in practice since 2006 between the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park. A retrospective analysis, evaluating comprehensive necropsy data and preshipment testing over a 5-yr study period, was performed to determine the viability of this model for use with sending animals to other institutions. Animals (607 birds, 704 reptiles and amphibians, and 341 mammals) were shipped to 116 Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA)-accredited and 29 non-AZA-accredited institutions. The evaluation showed no evidence of the specific transmissible diseases tested for during the preshipment exam being present within the San Diego Zoo collection. We suggest that a risk-based animal and institution-specific approach to transmissible disease preshipment testing is more cost effective and is in the better interest of animal welfare than the current industry standard of dogmatic preshipment testing.

  15. Estimating natural recharge in San Gorgonio Pass watersheds, California, 1913–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevesi, Joseph A.; Christensen, Allen H.

    2015-12-21

    A daily precipitation-runoff model was developed to estimate spatially and temporally distributed recharge for groundwater basins in the San Gorgonio Pass area, southern California. The recharge estimates are needed to define transient boundary conditions for a groundwater-flow model being developed to evaluate the effects of pumping and climate on the long-term availability of groundwater. The area defined for estimating recharge is referred to as the San Gorgonio Pass watershed model (SGPWM) and includes three watersheds: San Timoteo Creek, Potrero Creek, and San Gorgonio River. The SGPWM was developed by using the U.S. Geological Survey INFILtration version 3.0 (INFILv3) model code used in previous studies of recharge in the southern California region, including the San Gorgonio Pass area. The SGPWM uses a 150-meter gridded discretization of the area of interest in order to account for spatial variability in climate and watershed characteristics. The high degree of spatial variability in climate and watershed characteristics in the San Gorgonio Pass area is caused, in part, by the high relief and rugged topography of the area.

  16. Geometrical impact of the San Andreas Fault on stress and seismicity in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingsong; Liu, Mian

    2006-04-01

    Most large earthquakes in northern and central California clustered along the main trace of the San Andreas Fault (SAF), the North American-Pacific plate boundary. However, in southern California earthquakes were rather scattered. Here we suggest that such along-strike variation of seismicity may largely reflect the geometrical impact of the SAF. Using a dynamic finite element model that includes the first-order geometric features of the SAF, we show that strain partitioning and crustal deformation in California are closely related to the geometry of the SAF. In particular, the Big Bend is shown to reduce slip rate on southern SAF and cause high shear stress and strain energy over a broad region in southern California, and a belt of high strain energy in the Eastern California Shear Zone.

  17. Adaptive Management Methods to Protect the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Water Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David

    2016-01-01

    The California Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is the hub for California's water supply, conveying water from Northern to Southern California agriculture and communities while supporting important ecosystem services, agriculture, and communities in the Delta. Changes in climate, long-term drought, water quality changes, and expansion of invasive aquatic plants threatens ecosystems, impedes ecosystem restoration, and is economically, environmentally, and sociologically detrimental to the San Francisco Bay/California Delta complex. NASA Ames Research Center and the USDA-ARS partnered with the State of California and local governments to develop science-based, adaptive-management strategies for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The project combines science, operations, and economics related to integrated management scenarios for aquatic weeds to help land and waterway managers make science-informed decisions regarding management and outcomes. The team provides a comprehensive understanding of agricultural and urban land use in the Delta and the major water sheds (San Joaquin/Sacramento) supplying the Delta and interaction with drought and climate impacts on the environment, water quality, and weed growth. The team recommends conservation and modified land-use practices and aids local Delta stakeholders in developing management strategies. New remote sensing tools have been developed to enhance ability to assess conditions, inform decision support tools, and monitor management practices. Science gaps in understanding how native and invasive plants respond to altered environmental conditions are being filled and provide critical biological response parameters for Delta-SWAT simulation modeling. Operational agencies such as the California Department of Boating and Waterways provide testing and act as initial adopter of decision support tools. Methods developed by the project can become routine land and water management tools in complex river delta systems.

  18. 76 FR 44901 - Californians for Renewable Energy, Inc., Michael E. Boyd, Robert M. Sarvey v. California Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... No: 2011-18909] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL11-52-000] Californians for Renewable Energy, Inc., Michael E. Boyd, Robert M. Sarvey v. California Public Utilities Commission, Pacific Gas and Electric Company Southern California Edison Company, San Diego Gas &...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1122 - San Diego Bay, Mission Bay and their Approaches-Regulated navigation area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... exercising rights under principles of international law, including innocent passage or force majeure, within... seas to the intersection of the maritime boundary with Mexico; thence proceeding easterly, along the maritime boundary with Mexico to its intersection with the California coast; thence proceeding...

  20. AMS analyses of I-129 from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in the Pacific Ocean waters of the Coast La Jolla--San Diego, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan-Sion, C; Enachescu, M; Petre, A R

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study we performed by using the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) method with iodine 129 (T1/2 = 15.7 My), to determine the increase of the radionuclide content in the USA West Pacific Coast waters, two years after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. The collection of the water samples took place between April and July 2013 at regular intervals of time, from the Pacific Ocean, at the cove of La Jolla, San Diego, USA. The results of the experiments showed a significant increase of the radionuclide concentration during the late spring of 2013. Compared to the isotopic ratio (129)I/(127)I, measured at a 40 km distance, offshore of Fukushima and immediately after the accident, our results show an increase on the USA West Coast that was more than a 2.5 factor higher. Also, compared with the pre-Fukushima background values, our results show an isotopic ratio of about two orders of magnitude higher. A distinct feature of the reconstructed radioactive plume was that it traveled with a speed of 12 cm s(-1), which we estimated and is consistent with the zonal speed in the Pacific. We coupled our (129)I results with the measurements from the June 2011 KOK cruise and we derived the levels of activity for (3)H and (137)Cs. On the USA West Coast, they did not exceed the international regulatory limits.

  1. Hydraulic Characteristics of the San Gregorio Creek Drainage Basin, California: a Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. R.; Snow, M. K.; Pestrong, R.; Sklar, L. S.; Vavro, M.; Sawachi, A.; Talapian, E.; Bailey, E.

    2004-12-01

    Population pressures within the greater San Francisco Bay Area are forcing development into nearby rural communities, and are impacting local environments. This study of the San Gregorio Creek Watershed is designed as a baseline for evaluating the effect increasing development within the drainage basin has on its river system. We hope to provide evidence for that impact through laboratory and field studies that provide a snap-shot of this drainage basin's current characteristics. The San Gregorio Creek watershed, in the Coast Ranges, is located in the southwestern portion of San Mateo County, California. It drains the western slopes of the Santa Cruz Mountains, in the Coast Ranges into the Pacific Ocean at the town of San Gregorio. Most of its fingertip tributaries flow into the trunk from the north and west, with elevations as high as 2050 feet. The watershed includes an area of approximately 51.6 square miles and San Gregorio Creek, the trunk stream, is roughly 12 miles long. San Gregorio Creek is a fourth order perennial stream. It is fed by a number of major tributaries, the largest of which are Alpine, Mindego, and La Honda creeks. The U.S. Geological Survey maintains a stream gauging station for San Gregorio Creek at the town of San Gregorio, where it has been monitoring stream flows for more than 30 years through its Water Resources Department. The resulting data indicate a mean discharge of 36.4 cfs. Map studies of hydraulic geometry for the drainage basin reveal geometric characteristics for San Gregorio Creek that coincide with similar streams in comparable climatic and environmental settings. Stream table studies are used to further investigate fundamental stream processes. Field studies at selected reaches throughout the drainage basin will document hydraulic characteristics. The results of this study will contribute to more comprehensive studies demonstrateing channel response to changing environmental conditions.

  2. Status of groundwater quality in the San Fernando--San Gabriel study unit, 2005--California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Michael; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 460-square-mile San Fernando--San Gabriel (FG) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study area is in Los Angeles County and includes Tertiary-Quaternary sedimentary basins situated within the Transverse Ranges of southern California. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA FG study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers) throughout California. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2005 by the USGS from 35 wells and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifers were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the CDPH database for the FG study unit. The quality of groundwater in primary aquifers may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. This study assesses the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifers of the FG study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors.

  3. A Study of the Job Satisfaction of Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) Directors and Local School District Special Education Directors in Four Counties of Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gregory Haynes, III

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare the perceived level of job satisfaction of SELPA directors with that of local school district special education directors in the counties of Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, and Orange of Southern California and to identify factors that contribute to their job satisfaction. Additionally, this…

  4. Record of Environmental Change in San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, M.

    2004-05-01

    Benthic foraminifera in a 3.52 m core recovered from San Francisco Bay, CA yield a 3,800-year sediment record of climate and environmental change. The microfaunal assemblage of the core contains abundant subtidal estuarine benthic foraminifers found today at shallow water depths (urban areas; its presence being regarded as an index for anthropogenic eutrophication. In San Francisco Bay, this species now commonly comprises over 50% of the foraminiferal fauna, peaking at over 90% at some locations. Such dominance suggests that the environmental conditions of the bay have decreased substantially in the recent past. As an arenaceous species, T. hadai's appearance also marks a possible change in the carbon budget for the bay. Whereas the four most abundant species of foraminifera prior to the T. hadai invasion have tests composed of nearly 100% calcite, T. hadai has only about 6%.

  5. Quaternary geology of Alameda County, and parts of Contra Costa, Santa Clara, San Mateo, San Francisco, Stanislaus, and San Joaquin counties, California: a digital database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helley, E.J.; Graymer, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Alameda County is located at the northern end of the Diablo Range of Central California. It is bounded on the north by the south flank of Mount Diablo, one of the highest peaks in the Bay Area, reaching an elevation of 1173 meters (3,849 ft). San Francisco Bay forms the western boundary, the San Joaquin Valley borders it on the east and an arbitrary line from the Bay into the Diablo Range forms the southern boundary. Alameda is one of the nine Bay Area counties tributary to San Francisco Bay. Most of the country is mountainous with steep rugged topography. Alameda County is covered by twenty-eight 7.5' topographic Quadrangles which are shown on the index map. The Quaternary deposits in Alameda County comprise three distinct depositional environments. One, forming a transgressive sequence of alluvial fan and fan-delta facies, is mapped in the western one-third of the county. The second, forming only alluvial fan facies, is mapped in the Livermore Valley and San Joaquin Valley in the eastern part of the county. The third, forming a combination of Eolian dune and estuarine facies, is restricted to the Alameda Island area in the northwestern corner of the county.

  6. A Study of the San Andreas Slip Rate on the San Francisco Peninsula, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, L. M.; Prentice, C.; Grove, K.; Caskey, J.; Ritz, J. F.; Leslie, S.

    2008-12-01

    The most recent large earthquake on the San Andreas Fault (SAF) along the San Francisco Peninsula was the great San Francisco earthquake of April 18, 1906, when a Mw= 7.8 event ruptured 435-470 km of the northern SAF. The slip rate for this segment of the SAF is incompletely known but is important for clarifying seismic hazard in this highly urbanized region. A previous study south of our site has found an average slip rate of 17±4 mm/yr for the late Holocene on the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the SAF. North of the Golden Gate, the SAF joins the San Gregorio Fault with an estimated slip rate of 6 mm/yr. A trench study north of where the two faults join has produced an average late Holocene slip rate of 24±3 mm/yr. To refine slip-rate estimates for the peninsula segment of the SAF, we excavated a trench across the fault where we located an abandoned channel between the San Andreas and Lower Crystal Springs reservoirs. This abandoned channel marks the time when a new channel cut across the SAF; the new channel has since been offset in a right-lateral sense about 20 m. The measured amount of offset and the age of the youngest fluvial sediments in the abandoned channel will yield a slip rate for the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the SAF. We excavated a trench across the abandoned channel and logged the exposed sediments. Our investigation revealed channel-fill alluvium incised and filled by probable debris flow sediments, and a wide fault zone in bedrock, west of the channel deposits. The most prominent fault is probably the strand that moved in 1906. We completed a total-station survey to more precisely measure the offset stream, and to confirm that the fault exposed in the trench aligns with a fence that is known to have been offset 2.8m during the 1906 earthquake. We interpret the debris flow sediments to represent the last phase of deposition prior to abandonment of the old channel. We collected samples for radiocarbon dating, optically stimulated

  7. Tidal Marsh Vegetation of China Camp, San Pablo Bay, California

    OpenAIRE

    Baye, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    China Camp (Marin County, California) preserves extensive relict stands of salt marsh vegetation developed on a prehistoric salt marsh platform with a complex sinuous tidal creek network. The low salt marsh along tidal creeks supports extensive native stands of Pacific cordgrass (Spartina foliosa). The outer salt marsh accreted following hydraulic gold mining sedimentation. It consists of a wave-scarped pickleweed-dominated (Sarcocornia pacifica) high salt marsh terrace with a broad fringing ...

  8. Mapping cumulative environmental effects, social vulnerability, and health in the San Joaquin Valley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ganlin; London, Jonathan

    2012-05-01

    To understand the social distribution of environmental hazards, methods to assess cumulative effects and their health implications are needed. We developed a cumulative environmental hazard index integrating environmental data on pollution sites, air quality, and pesticide use; a social vulnerability index to measure residents' resources to prevent or mitigate health effects; and a health index. We found that communities in California's San Joaquin Valley with high social vulnerability face more environmental burdens and have worse health conditions.

  9. Smog Nitrogen and the Rapid Acidification of Forest Soil, San Bernardino Mountains, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the rapid acidification of forest soils in the San Bernardino Mountains of southern California. After 30 years, soil to a depth of 25 cm has decreased from a pH (measured in 0.01 M CaCl2) of 4.8 to 3.1. At the 50-cm depth, it has changed from a pH of 4.8 to 4.2. We attribute this rapid cha...

  10. Seasonal Growth of Waterhyacinth in the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta, California

    OpenAIRE

    Spencer, David F.; Ksander, G. G.

    2005-01-01

    Waterhyacinth ( Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms), is a serious problem in the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta, California. There is little published information on its phenology or seasonal growth in this system. Waterhyacinths were sampled at 2 to 3 week intervals from November, 1995 to July, 1997 and the following measurements were made on individual plants: dry weight, height, number of living leaves, number of dead leaves, and the width of the largest lamina. (P...

  11. Selenium and other elements in juvenile striped bass from the San Joaquin Valley and San Francisco Estuary, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Michael K.; Palawski, Donald U.

    1990-01-01

    Concentrations of selenium and other trace elements were determined in 55 whole body samples of juvenile anadromous striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from the San Joaquin Valley and San Francisco Estuary, California. The fish (≤1 yr old—the predominant life stage in the San Joaquin Valley) were collected in September–December 1986 from 19 sites in the Valley and 3 sites in the Estuary, and analyzed for the following elements: aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), boron (B), barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), mercury (Hg), magnesium (Mg), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), strontium (Sr), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn). When compared to concentrations in whole freshwater fish measured by surveys from other waters, a few samples contained higher levels, of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Se. The median concentrations of Al, As, Cu, Fe, Mg, Se, and Sr also differed significantly (P⩽0.05) among sites. However, only Se concentrations were highest (up to 7.9 μg/g dry weight) in samples from Valley sites exposed to agricultural subsurface (tile) drainwater; concentrations were lower in samples collected elsewhere. Water quality variables—especially those strongly influenced by tile drainwater (conductivity, total dissolved solids, total alkalinity, and total hardness)—were also significantly correlated (P⩽0.05) with Se concentrations in fish. Selenium concentrations in striped bass from the Estuary were only one-fourth to one-half the concentrations measured in the most contaminated fish from the San Joaquin River.

  12. Using Back Trajectories to Analyze Volatile Organic Compound Source Distributions in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, T. B.; Gentner, D. R.; Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; Karlik, J. F.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted from a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic sources that vary in their degree of characterization. Using WRF/FLEXPART transport modeling and ~2 months of ambient in-situ VOC concentration data from two sites in the San Joaquin Valley (an urban site in Bakersfield, CA and a rural site near Visalia, CA), we assess the spatial distribution of VOC sources. Concentration Weighted Trajectory (CWT) analysis was used to statistically examine the distribution of VOC sources in California's San Joaquin Valley over six and twelve-hour back trajectory footprints. We present the overall flow patterns that determine the transport during the day and night at both San Joaquin Valley sites. The results of the CWT analysis using the ground site VOC data show clear differences in distributions between compounds and provide valuable insights into the potential sources of various classes of biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs.

  13. Status of translocated sea otters at San Nicolas Island, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbun, Galen B.; Hatfield, Brian B.; Murphey, Thomas G.

    2000-01-01

    In the 1970s about 1,650 southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were restricted to the central California coast (Riedman and Estes, 1990), and a high volume of oil was being shipped through the region. Because of the vulnerability of sea otters to contamination from oil (Costa and Kooyman, 1982; Williams and Davis, 1995) that would likely spread wide- ly along the shore after a large spill (Van- Blaricom and Jameson, 1982), the subspecies was listed as threatened in 1977 under the United States Endangered Species Act.

  14. Preliminary geologic map and digital database of the San Bernardino 30' x 60' quadrangle, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Douglas M.; Miller, Fred K.

    2003-01-01

    The San Bernardino 30'x60' quadrangle, southern California, is diagonally bisected by the San Andreas Fault Zone, separating the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains, major elements of California's east-oriented Transverse Ranges Province. Included in the southern part of the quadrangle is the northern part of the Peninsular Ranges Province and the northeastern part of the oil-producing Los Angeles basin. The northern part of the quadrangle includes the southern part of the Mojave Desert Province. Pre-Quaternary rocks within the San Bernardino quadrangle consist of three extensive, well-defined basement rock assemblages, the San Gabriel Mountains, San Bernardino Mountains, and the Peninsular Ranges assemblages, and a fourth assemblage restricted to a narrow block bounded by the active San Andreas Fault and the Mill Creek Fault. Each of these basement rock assemblages is characterized by a relatively unique suite of rocks that was amalgamated by the end of the Cretaceous and (or) early Cenozoic. Some Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks are unique to specific assemblages, and some overlap adjacent assemblages. A few Miocene and Pliocene units cross the boundaries of adjacent assemblages, but are dominant in only one. Tectonic events directly and indirectly related to the San Andreas Fault system have partly dismembered the basement rocks during the Neogene, forming the modern-day physiographic provinces. Rocks of the four basement rock assemblages are divisible into an older suite of Late Cretaceous and older rocks and a younger suite of post-Late Cretaceous rocks. The age span of the older suite varies considerably from assemblage to assemblage, and the point in time that separates the two suites varies slightly. In the Peninsular Ranges, the older rocks were formed from the Paleozoic to the end of Late Cretaceous plutonism, and in the Transverse Ranges over a longer period of time extending from the Proterozoic to metamorphism at the end of the Cretaceous

  15. 33 CFR 334.961 - Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, California, naval danger zone off the northwest shore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Island, California, naval danger zone off the northwest shore. 334.961 Section 334.961 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.961 Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, California, naval danger zone...

  16. Fine-scale delineation of the location of and relative ground shaking within the San Andreas Fault zone at San Andreas Lake, San Mateo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Prentice, C.S.; Sickler, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is seismically retrofitting the water delivery system at San Andreas Lake, San Mateo County, California, where the reservoir intake system crosses the San Andreas Fault (SAF). The near-surface fault location and geometry are important considerations in the retrofit effort. Because the SAF trends through highly distorted Franciscan mélange and beneath much of the reservoir, the exact trace of the 1906 surface rupture is difficult to determine from surface mapping at San Andreas Lake. Based on surface mapping, it also is unclear if there are additional fault splays that extend northeast or southwest of the main surface rupture. To better understand the fault structure at San Andreas Lake, the U.S. Geological Survey acquired a series of seismic imaging profiles across the SAF at San Andreas Lake in 2008, 2009, and 2011, when the lake level was near historical lows and the surface traces of the SAF were exposed for the first time in decades. We used multiple seismic methods to locate the main 1906 rupture zone and fault splays within about 100 meters northeast of the main rupture zone. Our seismic observations are internally consistent, and our seismic indicators of faulting generally correlate with fault locations inferred from surface mapping. We also tested the accuracy of our seismic methods by comparing our seismically located faults with surface ruptures mapped by Schussler (1906) immediately after the April 18, 1906 San Francisco earthquake of approximate magnitude 7.9; our seismically determined fault locations were highly accurate. Near the reservoir intake facility at San Andreas Lake, our seismic data indicate the main 1906 surface rupture zone consists of at least three near-surface fault traces. Movement on multiple fault traces can have appreciable engineering significance because, unlike movement on a single strike-slip fault trace, differential movement on multiple fault traces may exert compressive and

  17. Marine magnetic survey and onshore gravity and magnetic survey, San Pablo Bay, northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, David A.; Denton, Kevin M.; Watt, Janet T.

    2016-09-12

    IntroductionFrom November 2011 to August 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected more than 1,000 line-kilometers (length of lines surveyed in kilometers) of marine magnetic data on San Pablo Bay, 98 onshore gravity stations, and over 27 line-kilometers of ground magnetic data in northern California. Combined magnetic and gravity investigations were undertaken to study subsurface geologic structures as an aid in understanding the geologic framework and earthquake hazard potential in the San Francisco Bay Area. Furthermore, marine magnetic data illuminate local subsurface geologic features in the shallow crust beneath San Pablo Bay where geologic exposure is absent.Magnetic and gravity methods, which reflect contrasting physical properties of the subsurface, are ideal for studying San Pablo Bay. Exposed rock units surrounding San Pablo Bay consist mainly of Jurassic Coast Range ophiolite, Great Valley sequence, Franciscan Complex rocks, Miocene sedimentary rocks, and unconsolidated alluvium (Graymer and others, 2006). The contrasting magnetic and density properties of these rocks enable us to map their subsurface extent.

  18. Pleistocene Brawley and Ocotillo Formations: Evidence for initial strike-slip deformation along the San Felipe and San Jacinto fault zonez, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, S.M.; Janecke, S.U.; Dorsey, R.J.; Housen, B.A.; Langenheim, V.E.; McDougall, K.A.; Steeley, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    We examine the Pleistocene tectonic reorganization of the Pacific-North American plate boundary in the Salton Trough of southern California with an integrated approach that includes basin analysis, magnetostratigraphy, and geologic mapping of upper Pliocene to Pleistocene sedimentary rocks in the San Felipe Hills. These deposits preserve the earliest sedimentary record of movement on the San Felipe and San Jacinto fault zones that replaced and deactivated the late Cenozoic West Salton detachment fault. Sandstone and mudstone of the Brawley Formation accumulated between ???1.1 and ???0.6-0.5 Ma in a delta on the margin of an arid Pleistocene lake, which received sediment from alluvial fans of the Ocotillo Formation to the west-southwest. Our analysis indicates that the Ocotillo and Brawley formations prograded abruptly to the east-northeast across a former mud-dominated perennial lake (Borrego Formation) at ???1.1 Ma in response to initiation of the dextral-oblique San Felipe fault zone. The ???25-km-long San Felipe anticline initiated at about the same time and produced an intrabasinal basement-cored high within the San Felipe-Borrego basin that is recorded by progressive unconformities on its north and south limbs. A disconformity at the base of the Brawley Formation in the eastern San Felipe Hills probably records initiation and early blind slip at the southeast tip of the Clark strand of the San Jacinto fault zone. Our data are consistent with abrupt and nearly synchronous inception of the San Jacinto and San Felipe fault zones southwest of the southern San Andreas fault in the early Pleistocene during a pronounced southwestward broadening of the San Andreas fault zone. The current contractional geometry of the San Jacinto fault zone developed after ???0.5-0.6 Ma during a second, less significant change in structural style. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermal-maturity trends within Franciscan rocks near Big Sur, California: Implications for offset along the San Gregorio San Simeon Hosgri fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Michael B.; Laughland, Matthew M.; Shelton, Kevin L.; Sedlock, Richard L.

    1995-09-01

    Conventional neotectonic interpretations place the Lucia and Point Sur subterranes of the Franciscan subduction complex on opposite sides of the San Gregorio San Simeon Hosgri dextral fault system and connect that system through the Sur fault zone. Our reconstructed paleotemperature contours, however, are not offset across the San Simeon segment, so differential displacement between the subterranes after peak heating appears to have been negligible. One explanation is that dextral slip on the faults has totaled only 5 10 km. A second possibility is that a discrete Hosgri San Simeon segment extends offshore of the amalgamated Point Sur and Lucia subterranes and that an en echelon stepover transfers dextral slip eastward to the San Gregorio Palo Colorado segment. In either case, the Sur fault zone appears to play a relatively insignificant role in the late Cenozoic tectonic evolution of central California.

  20. Spatial and temporal trends of contaminants in eggs of wading birds from San Francisco Bay, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hothem, R.L.; Marois, K.C.; Wainwright, S.E. [National Biological Service, Davis, CA (United States); Roster, D.L. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Newark, CA (United States). San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge; King, K.A. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Phoenix, AZ (United States). Ecological Services; Keldsen, T.J. [National Biological Service, Fort Collins, CO (United States). Midcontinent Ecological Science Center

    1995-08-01

    Between 1989 and 1991, reproduction by black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) and snowy egrets (Egretta thula) was studied at sites in San Francisco Bay. Eggs were collected from these and other bay sites and from South Wilbur Flood Area, a reference site in California`s San Joaquin Valley. Eggs were analyzed for inorganic trace elements, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Results were compared among sites and years and with results of previous studies. There was some evidence of impaired reproduction, but concentrations of contaminants were generally lower than threshold levels for such effects. Egg hatchability was generally good, with predation being the factor that most limited reproductive success. Mean PCB concentrations were generally higher in eggs from the south end of San Francisco Bay than from the north, but the only temporal change, an increase, was observed at Alcatraz Island. There were spatial differences for p,p{prime}-DDE in night-heron eggs in 1990, but the highest mean concentration of DDE was in night-heron eggs from South Wilbur in 1991. Temporal declines in maximum concentrations of DDE in eggs were observed in the bay, but means did not change significantly over time. At Bair Island in the southern end of the bay, mean concentrations of mercury decreased while selenium increased in night-heron eggs over time, but there were no clear bay-wide spatial or temporal trends for either element.

  1. Survival and natality rate observations of California sea lions at San Miguel Island, California conducted by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 1987-09-20 to 2014-09-25 (NCEI Accession 0145167)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains initial capture and marking data for California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) pups at San Miguel Island, California and subsequent...

  2. Location and Shallow Structure of the Frijoles Strand of the San Gregorio Fault Zone, Pescadero, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Lent, C.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M. R.; Steedman, C. E.; Prentice, C. S.

    2003-12-01

    The San Gregorio fault is one of the principal faults of the San Andreas fault system in the San Francisco Bay area. Located west of the active trace of the San Andreas fault and near the coast, the San Gregorio fault zone consists of at least two northwest-southeast-trending strands, the Coastways and Frijoles faults. Little is known about the slip history on the San Gregorio, and information for the Frijoles fault is especially scarce, as it lies mostly offshore. To better understand the contribution of the San Gregorio fault zone to slip along the San Andreas fault system, we conducted a high-resolution, seismic imaging investigation of the Frijoles fault to locate near-surface, onshore, branches of the fault that may be suitable for paleoseismic trenching. Our seismic survey consisted of a 590-meter-long, east-west-trending, combined seismic reflection and refraction profile across Butano Creek Valley, in Pescadero, California. The profile included 107 shot points and 120 geophones spaced at 5-m increments. Seismic sources were generated by a Betsy Seisgun in 0.3-m-deep holes. Data were recorded on two Geometrics Strataview RX-60 seismographs at a sampling rate of 0.5 ms. Seismic p-wave velocities, determined by inverting first-arrival refractions using tomographic methods, ranged from 900 m/s in the shallow subsurface to 5000 m/s at 200 m depth, with higher velocities in the western half of the profile. Migrated seismic reflection images show clear, planar layering in the top 100-200 meters on the eastern and western ends of the seismic profile. However, to within the shallow subsurface, a 200-m-long zone near the center of the profile shows disturbed stratigraphic layers with several apparent fault strands approaching within a few meters of the surface. The near-surface locations of the imaged strands suggest that the Frijoles fault has been active in the recent past, although further paleoseismic study is needed to detail the slip history of the San Gregorio

  3. Dual-system Tectonics of the San Luis Range and Vicinity, Coastal Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    The M 6.5 "San Simeon" earthquake of December 22, 2003, occurred beneath the Santa Lucia Range in coastal central California, and resulted in around $250,000,000 property damage and two deaths from collapse of an historic building in the town of Paso Robles, located 40 km from the epicenter. The earthquake and more than 10,000 aftershocks were well recorded by nearby seismographs, which permitted detailed analysis of the event (eg: McLaren et al., 2008). This analysis facilitated evaluation of the hazard of the occurrence of a similar event in the nearby San Luis Range, located along the coast west of the city of San Luis Obispo some 55 km south of the San Simeon epicenter. The future occurrence of earthquakes analogous to the 2003 event in this area had been proposed in the late 1960’s (eg: Benioff and Smith, 1967; Richter, 1969) but the apparent hazard of such occurrences came to be overshadowed by the discovery of the “Hosgri” strike slip fault passing close to the area in the offshore. However data accumulated since the early 1970’s clearly demonstrate the hazard as being partitioned between nearby earthquakes of strike slip origin, and underlying earthquakes of thrust origin analogous to that of the 2003 San Simeon earthquake. And for the onshore San Luis Range area, an underlying actively seismogenic thrust wedge appears to provide the maximum potential seismic ground motion; exceeding that potentially resulting from large events on nearby strike slip faults of the San Simeon-Hosgri system, for onshore sites. Understanding and documentation of the geology, geomorphology, tectonics and seismogenesis of the San Luis Range and vicinity has recently experienced a quantum improvement as both new and accumulated data have been analysed. An integrated interpretation of all available data now clearly shows that a dual “side by side” system of active tectonics exists in the region. Essentially the most obvious evidence for this is seen simply in the

  4. Nuevas fronteras para la innovación tecnológica: colaboración y cooperación en la región Tijuana-San Diego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva Celaya Tentori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La manera en que se constituyen formas de colaboración y cooperación en regiones binacionales alude a procesos complejos de interacción entre actores institucionales. Las diferencias y las enormes asimetrías, que en lo general prevalecen entre países con grados de desarrollo distintos, dificulta la construcción de agendas comunes. Esta situación se ha puesto de manifiesto en el área de Tijuana- San Diego, en donde parecen abrirse oportunidades para la implementación de acciones conjuntas orientadas a la innovación tecnológica, que corresponden a un modelo peculiar de colaboración. Aquí se intenta responder las siguientes preguntas sobre la región Tijuana-San Diego: ¿bajo qué marco de acción pública se promueve la colaboración trasfronteriza para el desarrollo económico?; ¿cuáles fueron las condiciones en las que se gestaron las capacidades territoriales actuales que dan soporte al sector productivo?; ¿cuáles son las características del entramado institucional?; ¿qué formas de cooperación o colaboración existen, para fomentar la trasferencia de conocimiento tecnológico y la innovación desde el entorno?

  5. San Andreas fault zone, California: M≥5.5 earthquake history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppozada, Tousson R.; Branum, D.M.; Reichle, M.S.; Hallstrom, C.L.

    2002-01-01

    The San Andreas fault zone has been a very significant source of major California earthquakes. From 1812 to 1906 it generated four major earthquakes of M 7 or larger in two pairs on two major portions of the fault. A pair of major earthquakes occurred on the central to southern region, where the 1857 faulting overlapped the 1812 earthquake faulting. A pair of major earthquakes occurred on the northern region, where the 1906 faulting overlapped the 1838 earthquake faulting. Also, earthquakes of M 7 occurred in the San Francisco Bay area on the Hayward fault in 1868 and the Santa Cruz Mountains near Loma Prieta in 1989 and on the Imperial fault near the border with Mexico in 1940.

  6. Recurrence of seismic migrations along the central California segment of the San Andreas fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M.D.; Allen, S.S.

    1973-01-01

    VERIFICATIONS of tectonic concepts1 concerning seafloor spreading are emerging in a manner that has direct bearing on earthquake prediction. Although the gross pattern of worldwide seismicity contributed to the formulation of the plate tectonic hypothesis, it is the space-time characteristics of this seismicity that may contribute more toward understanding the kinematics and dynamics of the driving mechanism long speculated to originate in the mantle. If the lithosphere is composed of plates that move essentially as rigid bodies, then there should be seismic edge effects associated with this movement. It is these interplate effects, especially seismic migration patterns, that we discuss here. The unidirectional propagation at constant velocity (80 km yr-1 east to west) for earthquakes (M???7.2) on the Antblian fault for the period 1939 to 1956 (ref. 2) is one of the earliest observations of such a phenomenon. Similar studies3,4 of the Alaska Aleutian seismic zone and certain regions of the west coast of South America suggest unidirectional and recurring migrations of earthquakes (M???7.7) occur in these areas. Between these two regions along the great transform faults of the west coast of North America, there is some evidence 5 for unidirectional, constant velocity and recurrent migration of great earthquakes. The small population of earthquakes (M>7.2) in Savage's investigation5 indicates a large spatial gap along the San Andreas system in central California from 1830 to 1970. Previous work on the seismicity of this gap in central California indicates that the recurrence curves remain relatively constant, independent of large earthquakes, for periods up to a century6. Recurrence intervals for earthquakes along the San Andreas Fault have been calculated empirically by Wallace7 on the basis of geological evidence, surface measurements and assumptions restricted to the surficial seismic layer. Here we examine the evidence for recurrence of seismic migrations along

  7. A brief history of oil and gas exploration in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California: Chapter 3 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kenneth I.; Gautier, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The Golden State got its nickname from the Sierra Nevada gold that lured so many miners and settlers to the West, but California has earned much more wealth from so-called “black gold” than from metallic gold. The San Joaquin Valley has been the principal source for most of the petroleum produced in the State during the past 145 years. In attempting to assess future additions to petroleum reserves in a mature province such as the San Joaquin Basin, it helps to be mindful of the history of resource development. In this chapter we present a brief overview of the long and colorful history of petroleum exploration and development in the San Joaquin Valley. This chapter relies heavily upon the work of William Rintoul, who wrote extensively on the history of oil and gas exploration in California and especially in the San Joaquin Valley. No report on the history of oil and gas exploration in the San Joaquin Valley would be possible without heavily referencing his publications. We also made use of publications by Susan Hodgson and a U.S. Geological Survey Web site, Natural Oil and Gas Seeps in California (http://seeps.wr.usgs.gov/seeps/index.html), for much of the material describing the use of petroleum by Native Americans in the San Joaquin Valley. Finally, we wish to acknowledge the contribution of Don Arnot, who manages the photograph collection at the West Kern Oil Museum in Taft, California. The collection consists of more than 10,000 photographs that have been scanned and preserved in digital form on CD-ROM. Many of the historical photographs used in this paper are from that collection. Finally, to clarify our terminology, we use the term “San Joaquin Valley” when we refer to the geographical or topographical feature and the term “San Joaquin Basin” when we refer to geological province and the rocks therein.

  8. Deep crustal heterogeneity along and around the San Andreas fault system in central California and its relation to the segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigami, Kin'ya

    2000-04-01

    The three-dimensional distribution of scatterers in the crust along and around the San Andreas fault system in central California is estimated using an inversion analysis of coda envelopes from local earthquakes. I analyzed 3801 wave traces from 157 events recorded at 140 stations of the Northern California Seismic Network. The resulting scatterer distribution shows a correlation with the San Gregorio, San Andreas, Hayward, and Calaveras faults. These faults seem to be almost vertical from the surface to ˜15 km depth. Some of the other scatterers are estimated to be at shallow depths, 0-5 km, below the Diablo Range, and these may be interpreted as being generated by topographic roughness. The depth distribution of scatterers shows relatively stronger scattering in the lower crust, at ˜15-25 km depth, especially between the San Andreas fault and the Hayward-Calaveras faults. This suggests a subhorizontal detachment structure connecting these two faults in the lower crust. Several clusters of scatterers are located along the San Andreas fault at intervals of ˜20-30 km from south of San Francisco to the intersection with the Calaveras fault. This part of the San Andreas fault appears to consist of partially locked segments, also ˜20-30 km long, which rupture during M6-7 events, and segment boundaries characterized by stronger scattering and stationary microseismicity. The segment boundaries delineated by the present analysis correspond with those estimated from the slip distribution of the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and from the fault geometry as reported by the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities [1990], although the segment boundaries along the San Andreas fault in and around the San Francisco Bay area are still uncertain.

  9. Emissions of organic carbon and methane from petroleum and dairy operations in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentner, D. R.; Ford, T. B.; Guha, A.; Boulanger, K.; Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Gilman, J. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.; Atlas, E.; Lonneman, W. A.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Beaver, M. R.; St. Clair, J. M.; Wennberg, P. O.; VandenBoer, T. C.; Markovic, M. Z.; Murphy, J. G.; Harley, R. A.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-05-01

    Petroleum and dairy operations are prominent sources of gas-phase organic compounds in California's San Joaquin Valley. It is essential to understand the emissions and air quality impacts of these relatively understudied sources, especially for oil/gas operations in light of increasing US production. Ground site measurements in Bakersfield and regional aircraft measurements of reactive gas-phase organic compounds and methane were part of the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) project to determine the sources contributing to regional gas-phase organic carbon emissions. Using a combination of near-source and downwind data, we assess the composition and magnitude of emissions, and provide average source profiles. To examine the spatial distribution of emissions in the San Joaquin Valley, we developed a statistical modeling method using ground-based data and the FLEXPART-WRF transport and meteorological model. We present evidence for large sources of paraffinic hydrocarbons from petroleum operations and oxygenated compounds from dairy (and other cattle) operations. In addition to the small straight-chain alkanes typically associated with petroleum operations, we observed a wide range of branched and cyclic alkanes, most of which have limited previous in situ measurements or characterization in petroleum operation emissions. Observed dairy emissions were dominated by ethanol, methanol, acetic acid, and methane. Dairy operations were responsible for the vast majority of methane emissions in the San Joaquin Valley; observations of methane were well correlated with non-vehicular ethanol, and multiple assessments of the spatial distribution of emissions in the San Joaquin Valley highlight the dominance of dairy operations for methane emissions. The petroleum operations source profile was developed using the composition of non-methane hydrocarbons in unrefined natural gas associated with crude oil. The observed source profile is

  10. Rapid Post-Miocene tectonic rotation associated with the San Gregorio Fault Zone in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Eric J.; Horns, Daniel M.; Verosub, Kenneth L.

    1991-12-01

    Paleomagnetic measurements of samples from the Mio-Pliocene Purisima Formation demonstrate that the Pomponio tectonic block of central coastal California has rotated clockwise by approximately 35° to 55° within the last 2.5 million years. The most likely interpretation of this data is that the Pomponio block is broken into several small blocks which have rotated by various amounts. The data suggest that rotations contribute to vertical deformation and secondary faulting within the central San Andreas Fault System, and that they play an important role in the accommodation of shear along the fault system.

  11. Produced water chemistry data for samples from four petroleum wells, Southern San Joaquin Valley, California, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin; McMahon, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board collected produced water samples from four petroleum wells in the southern San Joaquin Valley on November 5, 2014. This digital dataset contains the site information, analyzing laboratories and methods, and water chemistry and quality control results for these samples. Water chemistry results include concentrations of dissolved hydrocarbon gases and their isotopic composition; concentrations of inorganic constituents including salinity, major ions, and nutrients; dissolved organic carbon; and stable isotopes of water and strontium dissolved in water. Samples were analyzed by 5 laboratories operated or contracted by the USGS.

  12. Structure of the San Fernando Valley region, California: implications for seismic hazard and tectonic history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenheim, V.E.; Wright, T.L.; Okaya, D.A.; Yeats, R.S.; Fuis, G.S.; Thygesen, K.; Thybo, H.

    2011-01-01

    Industry seismic reflection data, oil test well data, interpretation of gravity and magnetic data, and seismic refraction deep-crustal profiles provide new perspectives on the subsurface geology of San Fernando Valley, home of two of the most recent damaging earthquakes in southern California. Seismic reflection data provide depths to Miocene–Quaternary horizons; beneath the base of the Late Miocene Modelo Formation are largely nonreflective rocks of the Middle Miocene Topanga and older formations. Gravity and seismic reflection data reveal the North Leadwell fault zone, a set of down-to-the-north faults that does not offset the top of the Modelo Formation; the zone strikes northwest across the valley, and may be part of the Oak Ridge fault system to the west. In the southeast part of the valley, the fault zone bounds a concealed basement high that influenced deposition of the Late Miocene Tarzana fan and may have localized damage from the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Gravity and seismic refraction data indicate that the basin underlying San Fernando Valley is asymmetric, the north part of the basin (Sylmar subbasin) reaching depths of 5–8 km. Magnetic data suggest a major boundary at or near the Verdugo fault, which likely started as a Miocene transtensional fault, and show a change in the dip sense of the fault along strike. The northwest projection of the Verdugo fault separates the Sylmar subbasin from the main San Fernando Valley and coincides with the abrupt change in structural style from the Santa Susana fault to the Sierra Madre fault. The Simi Hills bound the basin on the west and, as defined by gravity data, the boundary is linear and strikes ~N45°E. That northeast-trending gravity gradient follows both the part of the 1971 San Fernando aftershock distribution called the Chatsworth trend and the aftershock trends of the 1994 Northridge earthquake. These data suggest that the 1971 San Fernando and 1994 Northridge earthquakes reactivated portions of

  13. Valley aggradation in the San Gabriel Mountains, California: climate change versus catastrophic landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherler, D.; Lamb, M. P.; Rhodes, E. J.; Avouac, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The San Gabriel Mountains (SGM) in Southern California, rate amongst the most rapidly uplifting and eroding mountains in the United States. Their steep slopes and sensitivity to wildfires, flash floods, landslides, and debris flows account for imminent hazards to nearby urban areas that might be accentuated by climatic and other environmental changes. Previous studies suggested that river terraces along the North Fork of the San Gabriel River, record temporal variations in sediment supply and river transport capacity that are representative for the SGM and related to climatic changes during the Quaternary. Based on field observations, digital topographic analysis, and dating of Quaternary deposits, we suggest that valley aggradation in the North Fork San Gabriel Canyon was spatially confined and a consequence of the sudden supply of unconsolidated material to upstream reaches by one of the largest known landslides in the SGM. New 10Be-derived surface exposure ages from the landslide deposits, previously assumed to be early to middle Pleistocene in age, indicate at least three Holocene events at ~8-9 ka, ~4-5 ka, and ~0.5-1 ka. The oldest landslide predates the valley aggradation period, which is constrained by existing 14C ages and new luminescence ages to ~7-8 ka. The spatial distribution, morphology, and sedimentology of the river terraces are consistent with deposition from far-travelling debris flows that originated within the landslide deposits. Valley aggradation in the North Fork San Gabriel Canyon therefore resulted from locally enhanced sediment supply that temporarily overwhelmed river capacity but the lack of similar deposits in other parts of the SGM argues against a regional climatic signal. So far, there exists no evidence that in the San Gabriel Mountains, climatic changes can cause sustained increases in hillslope sediment supply that lead to river aggradation and terrace formation.

  14. Preliminary Geologic Map of the San Fernando 7.5' Quadrangle, Southern California: A Digital Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerkes, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    The city of San Fernando sits atop a structurally complex, sedimentologically diverse, and tectonically evolving late Tertiary-Quaternary basin situated within the Transverse Ranges of southern California. The surrounding San Fernando Valley (SFV) contains the headwaters of the Los Angeles River and its tributaries. Prior to the advent of flood control, the valley floor was composed of active alluvial fans and floodplains. Seasonal streams emanating from Pacoima and Big Tujunga Canyons drain the complex western San Gabriel Mountains and deposit coarse, highly permeable alluvium that contains generally high-quality ground water. The more shallow western part derives mainly from Tertiary and pre-Tertiary sedimentary rocks, and is underlain by less permeable, fine-grained deposits containing persistent shallow ground water and poorer water quality. Home of the 1971 San Fernando and the 1994 Northridge earthquakes, the SFV experienced near-record levels of strong ground motion in 1994 that caused widespread damage from strong shaking and ground failure. A new map of late Quaternary deposits of the San Fernando area shows that the SFV is a structural trough that has been filled from the sides, with the major source of sediment being large drainages in the San Gabriel Mountains. Deposition on the major alluvial fan of Tujunga Wash and Pacoima Wash, which issues from the San Gabriel Mountains, and on smaller fans, has been influenced by ongoing compressional tectonics in the valley. Late Pleistocene deposits have been cut by active faults and warped over growing folds. Holocene alluvial fans are locally ponded behind active uplifts. The resulting complex pattern of deposits has a major effect on liquefaction hazards. Young sandy sediments generally are highly susceptible to liquefaction where they are saturated, but the distribution of young deposits, their grain size characteristics, and the level of ground water all are complexly dependent on the tectonics of the valley

  15. Transportation impacts to wildlife on state route 37 in northern San Pablo Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, Bryan R.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2002-01-01

    State Route 37 bisects conservation lands managed by San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service) and Napa-Sonoma Marshes Wildlife Area (California Department of Fish and Game) in Solano and Sonoma Counties. The 2-lane highway connects Interstates 101 and 80 in northern San Francisco Bay and experiences ~26,000 vehicles per day. Road-killed wildlife between Napa River and Tolay Creek bridges (14.7 km) were counted in 2000 to ascertain species composition, relative abundance, and relative occurence (animal fatality interval). The primary objectives of the study were to determine if endangered salt marsh harvest mice (Reithrodontomys raviventris), California clapper rails (Rallus longirostris), or other species of concern were represented, and to collect baseline data on transportation impacts to wildlife in the area. During 51 surveys, 291 dead birds (54.6%) and mammals (45.4%) were observed. Endangered species were not positively identified dead on the highway. In total, 28 bird, 10 mammal and 1 reptile species were positively identified along this section of highway that traverses tidal marsh and diked baylands (i.e., salt ponds, seasonal wetlands, and oat-hay agriculture fields). The mean animal fatality interval for both lanes was one road-kill every 2.1km (2.1 km SD).

  16. Emissions of organic carbon and methane from petroleum and dairy operations in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Gentner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum and dairy operations are prominent sources of gas-phase organic compounds in California's San Joaquin Valley. Ground site measurements in Bakersfield and aircraft measurements of reactive gas-phase organic compounds were made in this region as part of the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change project to determine the sources contributing to regional gas-phase organic carbon emissions. Using a combination of near-source and downwind data, we assess the composition and magnitude of emissions from these prominent sources that are relatively understudied compared to motor vehicles We also developed a statistical modeling method with the FLEXPART-WRF transport and meteorological model using ground-based data to assess the spatial distribution of emissions in the San Joaquin Valley. We present evidence for large sources of paraffinic hydrocarbons from petroleum extraction/processing operations and oxygenated compounds from dairy (and other cattle operations. In addition to the small straight-chain alkanes typically associated with petroleum operations, we observed a wide range of branched and cyclic alkanes that have limited previous in situ measurements or characterization in emissions from petroleum operations. Observed dairy emissions were dominated by ethanol, methanol, and acetic acid, and methane. Dairy operations were responsible for the vast majority of methane emissions in the San Joaquin Valley; observations of methane were well-correlated with non-vehicular ethanol, and multiple assessments of the spatial distribution of emissions in the San Joaquin Valley highlight the dominance of dairy operations for methane emissions. The good agreement of the observed petroleum operations source profile with the measured composition of non-methane hydrocarbons in unrefined natural gas associated with crude oil suggests a fugitive emissions pathway during petroleum extraction, storage, or processing with

  17. San Andreas Fault, California, M 5.5 or greater Earthquakes 1800-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppozada, T.; Branum, D.; Reichle, M.; Hallstrom, C.

    2001-12-01

    The San Andreas fault has been the most significant source of major California earthquakes since 1800. From 1812 to 1906 it generated four major earthquakes of M 7.2 or greater in two pairs on two major regions of the fault. A pair of major earthquakes occurred on the Central to Southern region, where the 1857 faulting overlapped the 1812 earthquake faulting. And a pair of major earthquakes occurred on the Northern region, where the 1906 faulting overlapped the 1838 earthquake faulting. The 1812 earthquake resulted from a rupture of up to about 200 km, from the region of Cajon Pass to as far as about 50 km west of Fort Tejon (Sieh and others, 1989). This rupture is the probable source of both the destructive 1812.12.8 "San Juan Capistrano" and the 1812.12.21 "Santa Barbara Channel" earthquakes. The 1838 earthquake's damage effects throughout the Bay area, from San Francisco to Santa Clara Valley and Monterey, were unequalled by any Bay area earthquake other than the 1906 event. The mainshock's effects, and numerous strong probable aftershocks in the San Juan Bautista vicinity in the following three years, suggest 1838 faulting from San Francisco to San Juan Bautista, and M about 7.4. The 630 km length of the San Andreas fault between San Francisco and Cajon Pass ruptured in the 1838 and 1857 earthquakes, except for about 75 km between Bitterwater and San Juan Bautista. The 1840-1841 probable aftershocks of the 1838 event occurred near San Juan Bautista, and the foreshocks and aftershocks of the 1857 event occurred near Bitterwater. In the Bitterwater area, strong earthquakes continued to occur until the 1885 earthquake of M 6.5. Near Parkfield, 40 to 70 km southeast of Bitterwater, M 5.5 or greater earthquakes have occurred from the 1870s to the 1960s. In the total Bitterwater to Parkfield zone bracketing the northern end of the 1857 rupture, the seismicity and moment release has decreased steadily since 1857, and has tended to migrate southeastward with time. The

  18. Depth and velocity data in the Lower San Joaquin River, California, 2011-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marineau, Mathieu D.; Wright, Scott A.; Whealdon-Haught, Dan; Kinzel, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    This data release contains water depth, depth-averaged water velocity, and river stationing (based on 2012 ortho-imagery) in select locations in the Lower San Joaquin River, California, 2011-2014. Between 2011 and 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), collected approximately 105 channel cross-sections and multiple longitudinal profiles, which comprised of nearly 150,000 streamflow-velocity measurements and 246,000 water-depth measurements in various reaches and subreaches of the Lower San Joaquin River between Orestimba Creek and Sturgeon Bend. The data collection locations in the Lower San Joaquin River were selected based on discussions with USFWS to overlap with their sturgeon monitoring sites and areas that may provide beneficial spawning habitat (such as adjacent to gravel bars or known deep scour holes, etc.). An acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was primarily used to collect the depth and velocity data, however, in 2011 a multibeam sonar was used to map bathymetry in some areas.

  19. Spatial and temporal trends of contaminants in eggs of wading birds from San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothem, R.L.; Roster, D.L.; King, K.A.; Keldsen, T.J.; Marois, Katherine C.; Wainwright, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    Between 1989 and 1991, reproduction by black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) and snowy egrets (Egretta thula) was studied at sites in San Francisco Bay. Eggs were collected from these and other bay sites and from South Wilbur Flood Area, a reference site in California's San Joaquin Valley. Eggs were analyzed for inorganic trace elements, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Results were compared among sites and years and with results of previous studies. There was some evidence of impaired reproduction, but concentrations of contaminants were generally lower than threshold levels for such effects. Egg hatchability was generally good, with predation being the factor that most limited reproductive success. Mean PCB concentrations were generally higher in eggs from the south end of San Francisco Bay than from the north, but the only temporal change, an increase, was observed at Alcatraz Island. There were spatial differences for p,p'-DDE in night-heron eggs in 1990, but the highest mean concentration of DDE was in night-heron eggs from South Wilbur in 1991. Temporal declines in maximum concentrations of DDE in eggs were observed in the bay, but means did not change significantly over time, At Bair Island in the southern end of the bay, mean concentrations of mercury decreased while selenium increased in night-heron eggs over time, but there were no clear bay-wide spatial or temporal trends for either element.

  20. IBC's 23rd Antibody Engineering and 10th Antibody Therapeutics Conferences and the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 2-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, John; Begent, Richard H J; Chester, Kerry; Huston, James S; Bradbury, Andrew; Scott, Jamie K; Thorpe, Philip E; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M; Weiner, Louis M

    2012-01-01

    Now in its 23rd and 10th years, respectively, the Antibody Engineering and Antibody Therapeutics conferences are the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society. The scientific program covers the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development from basic science through clinical development. In this preview of the conferences, the chairs provide their thoughts on sessions that will allow participants to track emerging trends in (1) the development of next-generation immunomodulatory antibodies; (2) the complexity of the environment in which antibodies must function; (3) antibody-targeted central nervous system (CNS) therapies that cross the blood brain barrier; (4) the extension of antibody half-life for improved efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD); and (5) the application of next generation DNA sequencing to accelerate antibody research. A pre-conference workshop on Sunday, December 2, 2012 will update participants on recent intellectual property (IP) law changes that affect antibody research, including biosimilar legislation, the America Invents Act and recent court cases. Keynote presentations will be given by Andreas Plückthun (University of Zürich), who will speak on engineering receptor ligands with powerful cellular responses; Gregory Friberg (Amgen Inc.), who will provide clinical updates of bispecific antibodies; James D. Marks (University of California, San Francisco), who will discuss a systems approach to generating tumor targeting antibodies; Dario Neri (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich), who will speak about delivering immune modulators at the sites of disease; William M. Pardridge (University of California, Los Angeles), who will discuss delivery across the blood-brain barrier; and Peter Senter (Seattle Genetics, Inc.), who will present his vision for the future of antibody-drug conjugates. For more information on these meetings or to register to attend, please visit www

  1. 78 FR 21580 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ...: Submit comments, identified by docket number EPA-R09-OAR- 2013-0103, by one of the following methods: 1... characters, any form of encryption, and be free of any defects or viruses. Docket: Generally, documents...

  2. International Symposium on Information Theory Held in San Diego, California on 14-19 January 1990: Abstracts of Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Kuhlmann Universidad Nacional Autdnoma de Afe.ico, Facultad de Ingenieria , Divisioh de Estudios de Posgrado, P.O. Box 70-256, 04510 Merico, D.F. A waveform...Inazumi, and Shigeichi Hirasawa Dept. of Management Information, Yokohama College of Commerce, Yokohama 230, Japan; Dept. of Industrial Engineering...dominates the industry popular Ŗ, 7" and ŕ, 7" codes (which we term "The Sevens Killer Code") is presented. Low-Complexity Maximum-Likelihood

  3. Annual Systems Engineering Conference (11th) Held in San Diego, California on October 20-23, 2008. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-23

    CapabilitiesOSGi All BPMN , BPEL, DEX, EDI Msgs Contained in W3C WSDL SOAP Msgs AAP Asset & Logistics Information AAP Commitments UDDI APIs UDDI...APIs OASIS WS-BPEL AAP Collaborative Net-Centric Model (OMG BPMN Business Process Modeling Notation) mapsTo mapsTo mapsTo AAP Business DEXs Messages...processes and activities defined which are then supported by the processes and activities in the BPMN model. Supply Chain Council – SCOR Supply Chain

  4. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Military Testing Association (21st), San Diego, California, 15-19 October 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Structures. The Journal of Mathmatice Pychology , 1977. 473(IS), I11-158. Slovic. P.. Fischhoff, B, & Lichtenst.ein, S. Behavioral Decision Theory. The...Interrupted Tasks, Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology. 1963. Vol. 66, No. 4, 401-404. 8. Skinner, B. F. The Behavior Of Organisms. New York

  5. International Conference on Crystal Growth (10th) Held in San Diego, California, on 16-21 August 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-14

    Growth of GaSb Single Crystals Processing a-Men -,uric Iodide by Zone Refining P. G. Mo. H. Z. Tan . - X. Du. and X. 0. Fan A. Burger,* S. H. NMorgan...T7umhua, Wu Zihe, Peng Weiqing, ZJang Qimeng, Xiao Zhongchao , Zhou Jianmin, Zhang Shmngxiu and Xie Sanwen South-West Institute of Technical Physics... Tan , LX. Du and X.Q. Fan Shanghai Institute of Metallurgy, Chinese Academy of Sciences 865 Chang Ning Road, Shanghai 200050, China As is known, the

  6. International Conference on Crystal Growth (10th) (ICCG-10) Held in San Diego, California on August 16 - 21, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-21

    Novel Technique for Czochralskl Growth of GaSb Single Crystals Processing a-Mercuric Iodide by Zone Refining P. G. Mo. H. Z~ Tan . L X Ou. and XC 0...Zihe. Peng Weiqing, Zheng Qimeng. Xiao Zhongchao , Zhou Jianmin, Zhang Shengxia and Xie Sanwen South-West Institute of Technical Physics Chengdu...SINGLE CRYSTALS PG. Mo, H.Z. Tan , LX. Du and X.Q. Fan Shanghai Institute of Metallurgy, Chinese Academy of Sciences 865 Chang Ning Road, Shanghai

  7. Telegraph Canyon Creek, City of Chula Vista, San Diego County, California. Detailed Report for Flood Control. Volume 2. Technical Appendixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    occurred within 40 miles of’ the site. Most of these earthquakes appear to be related to activity on the Elsinore, Agua Caliente, and offshore faults. The...device would be required by the Sweetwater Authority to prevent contamination of potable water lines. TELEGRAPH CANYON CREEK - - Recommended Plant List A

  8. Speech Recognition: Proceedings of a Workshop Held in San Diego, California on March 24-26, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    34NINETEEN" "EIGHTY" " SEMEN ". If it is referred to as a cardinal number It would be represented as "ONE" "THOUSAND" "NINE" "HUNDRED" "EIGHTY" "SEVEN...v^r4R7xvy"/ training data, radurad tha arror rata to (vl.lOi 1S.92S). Augaantinq tha obaarvatlona with 20 aa temporal differences of tha iml...capatra further reduced tha arror rata to (v1,d2,1Q: 10.508). The above ayatana all used Individually trained variance vectors for each node. Tha

  9. IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory Held in San Diego, California on 14-19 January 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Time-Selective Fading Christian Schlegel Commumncations Group, ASEA BROWN BOVERI Corporate Research, 5405 Baden, Switzerland Trells -coded modulation (TCM...for digital transmission over nonlinear channels with a finite memory It is well known that trells -code modulation (TCM) encoders can be modeled as

  10. Proceedings of the REAPS Technical Symposium (6th) Held in San Diego, California on September 11-13, 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    has been involved in the implementation of interactive graphics, DNC/CNC, group technology, photogrammetry, robotics and automated inspection systems...NET SHAPE • MICRO ELECTRONICS • VHSIC • COMPOSITE MATERIALS • HIGH POWER LASERS • ROBOTICS • COMPUTER AIDED • ELECTRO-OPTICS MANUFACTURING SUMMARY... Repowered from steam to diesel propulsion. GLB- Great Lakes BulkShip DYB -Dry-BulkShip T -Tanker Note: All numbers indicate DWT in thousands, e.g., T-35

  11. 78 FR 921 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego APCD, Northern Sierra AQMD, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    ... the Clean Air Act (CAA or the Act). DATES: Any comments on this proposal must arrive by February 6... Recovery Requirements, SDAPCD Rule 61.4 Transfer of Volatile Organic Compounds into Vehicle Fuel Tanks... Gasoline into Vehicle Fuel Tanks. In the Rules and Regulations section of this Federal Register, we...

  12. Proceedings of Damping 󈨟, 13-15 February 1991, San Diego, California; Volume 1 (Pages AAC-1 through DCC-19)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Fluids The Vibration Damping Effect of an Electrorheological Fluid GAB Stephen A. Austin Modelling of Nonlinear Dilatation Response of Fluids...Struc- GBB tures Dr. Andreas von Flotow and D. W. Vos Passive Control of a Flexible Planar Truss Using A Reaction Mass GBC Actuator Capt. Steven G...Multi- Actuator Control Experiment To show the applicability of the procedure to the solution of realistic dynamics and control problems which

  13. Advanced Transformer Demonstration And Validation Project Summary Report Based On Experiences At Nas, North Island, San Diego. California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    OPERATIONAL CONTROLS *FAN CONI.TO SWITCH The ton wcano w~ tdh con be in fte automabc, iwnua, c off podiuon. in automatic tum UM an V4d off at ft p.~mouy...TRIDENT TRAINING FAC / ANDFRSON, KTNGS nAV, rA UNITED TECHNOLOGIES / IB, WINDSOR LOC,.S. "T UNIV OF NEW MEXICO / NMERI (FALK), AI,BITOtItROI’E, NM UNIV

  14. International Neural Network Society Annual Meeting (1994) Held in San Diego, California on 5-9 June 1994. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-09

    that mathematical morphology had as part of its background an attempt to mathematically quantify the ideas of the gestalt psychologists [1]. Although a...stimolazione omog6nea. Rivista di Psicologia , 49, 7-30. Kanizsa, G. (1974). Contours without gradients or cognitive contours. Italian Journal of

  15. New materials by low temperature condensation. Progress report. [Department of Applied Physics and Information Science, Univ. of California, San Diego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, H.L.

    1972-09-01

    The study of new materials prepared mostly by the technique of inert gas ion sputtering is reported. Heat capacity measurement was chosen as the basic tool for the study of material properties. Sputtering experiments were done on Nb/sub 3/Al and Nb/sub 3/(Al, Ge), Ag-base alloys with magnetic impurities, molybdenum-sulfide complex, and other metastable phases. Heat capacity measurements were made on V/sub 3/Si and Nb/sub 3/Sn, ZrZn/sub 2/, Mo isotopes, Mo-S complex, disordered systems, and sapphire and thin films. 3 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  16. International Neural Network Society Annual Meeting (1994) Held in San Diego, California on 5-9 June 1994. Volume 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-09

    cell image inspection- a task for artificial neural networks. Network, 3, 15-18. 16. Simpson, J.L. (1990). Incidence and timing of pregnancy losses... Teen . on Neural Networks 2, 302-309. [3] Corradit, V. and White, H., (1992), Regularized neural networks: some convergence rate results, Manuscript... Africa Abstract In this paper we explore the Elman recurrent network by constructing and ie.entifying finite state automata (FSA) for the addition task

  17. Image Understanding Workshop. Proceedings of a Workshop Held in San Diego, California on January 26-29, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    e.g. point-in-polygon 582, Cambridge, MA., April 1988. We intend to capitalize on this abstraction to streamline [2] C.C. McConnell and D.T. Lawton. IU...in psycological experiments, only rough qualitative explana- the previous section to them correspondingly. It is tion is given in his paper...new correspondence c, it must compute quired at position B . Model line segments are labeled E ch(c). Towith capital letters, data line segments by

  18. Conference on Aerospace Transparent Materials and Enclosures Held in San Diego, California on 9-13 August 1993. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    THE INPACT RESISTANCI OF DIRECTLY FORMED TRANSPARENCIES 1140 W. R. Braisted and M. A. Hueluman. University of Dayton. and W. R. Pinnell , Flight...Frank. University of Dayton, and W. R. Pinnell , Flight Dynamics Directote DIMENSIONAL MAPPING AND SHRINKAGE CHARACTERIZATION OF LARGE, THICK-WALLED...paced to coincide with specific upcoming spares buys. As a case example, let’s examine the transarency subsystem for an existing bomber. The current

  19. International Neural Network Society Annual Meeting (1994) Held in San Diego, California on 5-9 June 1994. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-09

    Cerebral Cortex, 1, 62-79. [6] Eichenbaum , H., & Buckingham, J. (1991). In M. Gabriel & J. Moore (Eds.), Learning and Computational Neuroscience...Analysis: Forecasting and Control, Holden- Day, 1976. 131 Connor, J.T., Atlas, L.E. and Martin , D., Recurrent neural networks and load forecasting, in...Park, Pennsylvania 16802 Washington, D. C. 20375 e-mail: cloth~essc.psu.edu e-mail: bachmann@radar.nrl.navy.mil t Martin Marietta Services o SWL 2231

  20. International Neural Network Society Annual Meeting (1994) Held in San Diego, California on 5-9 June 1994. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-09

    Piriform cortex and olfactory object recognition. In: J. L. Davis and H. Eichenbaum (eds.), Olfaction: A Model System for Computational Neuroscience...173. Wang, D., L. Buhmann, and C. von der Malsburg, 1991. Pattern segmentation in associative memory. In: J. L. Davis and H. Eichenbaum (eds...well-trained subjects ( Martin & Ghez, 1991) and that stimulation of Red Nucleus can facilitate motoneurons while simultaneously inhibiting Renshaw

  1. 33 CFR 165.T11-304 - Safety zone; Sea World Summer Nights Fireworks; Mission Bay, San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of this safety zone and will announce that fact via Broadcast Notice to Mariners. (c) Definitions... of the Port. (d) Regulations. (1) Entry into, transit through or anchoring within this safety zone is... representative. (2) Mariners requesting permission to transit through the safety zone may request...

  2. Geophysical Surveys of the San Andreas and Crystal Springs Reservoir System Including Seismic-Reflection Profiles and Swath Bathymetry, San Mateo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, David P.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes geophysical data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in San Andreas Reservoir and Upper and Lower Crystal Springs Reservoirs, San Mateo County, California, as part of an effort to refine knowledge of the location of traces of the San Andreas Fault within the reservoir system and to provide improved reservoir bathymetry for estimates of reservoir water volume. The surveys were conducted by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the USGS for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC). The data were acquired in three separate surveys: (1) in June 2007, personnel from WCMG completed a three-day survey of San Andreas Reservoir, collecting approximately 50 km of high-resolution Chirp subbottom seismic-reflection data; (2) in November 2007, WCMG conducted a swath-bathymetry survey of San Andreas reservoir; and finally (3) in April 2008, WCMG conducted a swath-bathymetry survey of both the upper and lower Crystal Springs Reservoir system. Top of PageFor more information, contact David Finlayson.

  3. The San Andreas Transform System and the Tectonics of California: An Alternative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, J. P.; Kaus, B.; Becker, T. W.

    2006-12-01

    Pacific - North America displacement in California is distributed over a zone of intracontinental deformation 400 km wide, and incorporates large regions of transtensional and transpressional deformation. This pattern of deformation is not easily explicable in terms of brittle Coulomb failure, which should localize deformation on to a single fault. There is no consensus at present on what controls the width of this zone or the distribution of strain within it. We model the transform as a weak ductile shear zone, terminating at either end in an effectively stress-free boundary. The shear zone exerts a shear-stress boundary condition on the stronger but deformable continental lithosphere either side. Stress and strain-rate decrease away from the shear zone because of its limited length in relation to the scale of the plates. Force balance in a sheet of deformable material with free upper and lower surfaces requires lateral gradients in horizontal shear-strain rate to be balanced by longitudinal gradients in horizontal stretching rate. Analytical estimates and 3D numerical modeling demonstrate that these gradients will create zones of lithospheric thickening and thinning distributed anti-symmetrically about the shear zone. Lithospheric thickening in the Transverse Ranges and the Klamath Mountains, and thinning in the Eastern California shear zone and the San Francisco Bay area, correspond reasonably well to these predictions. This provides a test for the length- scales concept, and a powerful predictive tool for understanding the tectonics of California and other intracontinental transforms.

  4. Distributed Plate Boundary Deformation Across the San Andreas Fault System, Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, M.; Titus, S. J.; Demets, C.; Tikoff, B.

    2007-12-01

    Plate boundaries are now recognized as broad zones of complex deformation as opposed to narrow zones with discrete offsets. When assessing how plate boundary deformation is accommodated, both spatially and temporally, it is therefore crucial to understand the relative contribution of the discrete and distributed components of deformation. The creeping segment of the San Andreas fault is an ideal location to study the distribution of plate boundary deformation for several reasons. First, the geometry of the fault system in central California is relatively simple. Plate motion is dominated by slip along the relatively linear strike-slip San Andreas fault, but also includes lesser slip along the adjacent and parallel Hosgri-San Gregorio and Rinconada faults, as well as within the borderlands between the three fault strands. Second, the aseismic character of the San Andreas fault in this region allows for the application of modern geodetic techniques to assess creep rates along the fault and across the region. Third, geologic structures within the borderlands are relatively well-preserved allowing comparison between modern and ancient rates and styles of deformation. Continuous GPS stations, alignment arrays surveys, and other geodetic methods demonstrate that approximately 5 mm/yr of distributed slip is accumulated (on top of the fault slip rate) across a 70-100 km wide region centered on the San Andreas fault. New campaign GPS data also suggest 2-5 mm/yr of deformation in the borderlands. These rates depend on the magnitude of the coseismic and postseismic corrections that must be made to our GPS time series to compensate for the 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes, which rupture faults outside, but near the edges of our GPS network. The off-fault deformation pattern can be compared to the style of permanent deformation recorded in the geologic record. Fold and thrust belts in the borderlands are better developed in the Tertiary sedimentary rocks west of

  5. 78 FR 2952 - Foreign-Trade Zone 3-San Francisco, California; Application for Expansion and Expansion of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... on January 9, 2013. FTZ 3 was approved by the Board on March 10, 1948 (Board Order 12, 13 FR 1459, 3/19/48) and the zone was reorganized under the ASF on October 7, 2010 (Board Order 1718, 75 FR 64708... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 3--San Francisco, California; Application for Expansion...

  6. Fault rocks from the SAFOD core samples : implications for weakening at shallow depths along the San Andreas Fault, California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holdsworth, R.E.; van Diggelen, E.W.E.; Spiers, C.J.; Bresser, J.H.P. de; Walker, R.J.; Bown, L.

    2011-01-01

    The drilling of a deep borehole across the actively creeping Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault Zone (SAFZ), California, and collection of core materials permit direct geological study of fault zone processes at 2–3 km depth. The three drill cores sample both host and fault rocks and pass th

  7. Age Determination of the Remaining Peat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; de Fontaine, Christian S.; Knifong, Donna L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California was once a 1,400 square kilometer (km2) tidal marsh, which contained a vast layer of peat ranging up to 15 meters (m) thick (Atwater and Belknap, 1980). Because of its favorable climate and highly fertile peat soils, the majority of the Delta was drained and reclaimed for agriculture during the late 1800s and early 1900s. Drainage of the peat soils changed the conditions in the surface layers of peat from anaerobic (having no free oxygen present) to aerobic (exposed to the atmosphere). This change in conditions greatly increased the decomposition rate of the peat, which consists largely of organic (plant) matter. Thus began the process of land-surface subsidence, which initially was a result of peat shrinkage and compaction, and later largely was a result of oxidation by which organic carbon in the peat essentially vaporized to carbon dioxide (Deverel and others, 1998; Ingebritsen and Ikehara, 1999). Because of subsidence, the land-surface elevation on farmed islands in the Delta has decreased from a few meters to as much as 8 m below local mean sea level (California Department of Water Resources, 1995; Steve Deverel, Hydrofocus, Inc., written commun., 2007). The USGS, in collaboration with the University of California at Davis, and Hydrofocus Inc. of Davis, California, has been studying the formation of the Delta and the impact of wetland reclamation on the peat column as part of a project called Rates and Evolution of Peat Accretion through Time (REPEAT). The purpose of this report is to provide results on the age of the remaining peat soils on four farmed islands in the Delta.

  8. Liquefaction-induced lateral spreading in Oceano, California, during the 2003 San Simeon Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.; Di Alessandro, Carola; Boatwright, John; Tinsley, John C.; Sell, Russell W.; Rosenberg, Lewis I.

    2004-01-01

    The December 22, 2003, San Simeon, California, (M6.5) earthquake caused damage to houses, road surfaces, and underground utilities in Oceano, California. The community of Oceano is approximately 50 miles (80 km) from the earthquake epicenter. Damage at this distance from a M6.5 earthquake is unusual. To understand the causes of this damage, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted extensive subsurface exploration and monitoring of aftershocks in the months after the earthquake. The investigation included 37 seismic cone penetration tests, 5 soil borings, and aftershock monitoring from January 28 to March 7, 2004. The USGS investigation identified two earthquake hazards in Oceano that explain the San Simeon earthquake damage?site amplification and liquefaction. Site amplification is a phenomenon observed in many earthquakes where the strength of the shaking increases abnormally in areas where the seismic-wave velocity of shallow geologic layers is low. As a result, earthquake shaking is felt more strongly than in surrounding areas without similar geologic conditions. Site amplification in Oceano is indicated by the physical properties of the geologic layers beneath Oceano and was confirmed by monitoring aftershocks. Liquefaction, which is also commonly observed during earthquakes, is a phenomenon where saturated sands lose their strength during an earthquake and become fluid-like and mobile. As a result, the ground may undergo large permanent displacements that can damage underground utilities and well-built surface structures. The type of displacement of major concern associated with liquefaction is lateral spreading because it involves displacement of large blocks of ground down gentle slopes or towards stream channels. The USGS investigation indicates that the shallow geologic units beneath Oceano are very susceptible to liquefaction. They include young sand dunes and clean sandy artificial fill that was used to bury and convert marshes into developable lots. Most of

  9. Maps of Quaternary Deposits and Liquefaction Susceptibility in the Central San Francisco Bay Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Robert C.; Knudsen, Keith L.; Sowers, Janet M.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Koehler, Richard D.; Randolph, Carolyn E.; Brooks, Suzanna K.; Gans, Kathleen D.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a map and database of Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility for the urban core of the San Francisco Bay region. It supercedes the equivalent area of U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 00-444 (Knudsen and others, 2000), which covers the larger 9-county San Francisco Bay region. The report consists of (1) a spatial database, (2) two small-scale colored maps (Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility), (3) a text describing the Quaternary map and liquefaction interpretation (part 3), and (4) a text introducing the report and describing the database (part 1). All parts of the report are digital; part 1 describes the database and digital files and how to obtain them by downloading across the internet. The nine counties surrounding San Francisco Bay straddle the San Andreas fault system, which exposes the region to serious earthquake hazard (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1999). Much of the land adjacent to the Bay and the major rivers and streams is underlain by unconsolidated deposits that are particularly vulnerable to earthquake shaking and liquefaction of water-saturated granular sediment. This new map provides a consistent detailed treatment of the central part of the 9-county region in which much of the mapping of Open-File Report 00-444 was either at smaller (less detailed) scale or represented only preliminary revision of earlier work. Like Open-File Report 00-444, the current mapping uses geomorphic expression, pedogenic soils, inferred depositional environments, and geologic age to define and distinguish the map units. Further scrutiny of the factors controlling liquefaction susceptibility has led to some changes relative to Open-File Report 00-444: particularly the reclassification of San Francisco Bay mud (Qhbm) to have only MODERATE susceptibility and the rating of artificial fills according to the Quaternary map units inferred to underlie them (other than dams - adf). The two colored

  10. Community and home gardens increase vegetable intake and food security of residents in San Jose, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Algert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As of 2013, 42 million American households were involved in growing their own food either at home or in a community garden plot. The purpose of this pilot study was to document the extent to which gardeners, particularly less affluent ones, increase their vegetable intake when eating from either home or community garden spaces. Eighty-five community gardeners and 50 home gardeners from San Jose, California, completed a survey providing information on demographic background, self-rated health, vegetable intake and the benefits of gardening. The gardeners surveyed were generally low income and came from a variety of ethnic and educational backgrounds. Participants in this study reported doubling their vegetable intake to a level that met the number of daily servings recommended by the U.S. Dietary Guidelines. Growing food in community and home gardens can contribute to food security by helping provide access to fresh vegetables and increasing consumption of vegetables by gardeners and their families.

  11. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Conflict: Strategic Insights for California's Policymakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazezi, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta - a major water supply source in California and a unique habitat for many native and invasive species--is on the verge of collapse due to a prolonged conflict over how to manage the Delta. There is an urgent need to expedite the resolution of this conflict because the continuation of the status quo would leave irreversible environmental consequences for the entire state. In this paper a systematic technique is proposed for providing strategic insights into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta conflict. Game theory framework is chosen to systematically analyze behavioral characteristics of decision makers as well as their options in the conflict with respect to their preferences using a formal mathematical language. The Graph Model for Conflict Resolution (GMCR), a recent game-theoretic technique, is applied to model and analyze the Delta conflict in order to better understand the options, preferences, and behavioral characteristics of the major decision makers. GMCR II as a decision support system tool based on GMCR concept is used to facilitate the analysis of the problem through a range of non-cooperative game theoretic stability definitions. Furthermore, coalition analysis is conducted to analyze the potential for forming partial coalitions among decision makers, and to investigate how forming a coalition can influence the conflict resolution process. This contribution shows that involvement of the State of California is necessary for developing an environmental-friendly resolution for the Delta conflict. It also indicates that this resolution is only achievable through improving the fragile levee systems and constructing a new water export facility.

  12. The California Border Health Collaborative: A Strategy for Leading the Border to Better Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Edwards Matthews III

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There are hundreds of departments and organizations working on border health issues in the California/Baja California border region trying to protect and improve health without a collaborative structure that integrates jurisdictions and organizations. As a result, there is a need to effectively improve the health in the border region by coordinating these organizations to work together and benefit from each other’s best practices. The newly developed California Border Health Collaborative (CBHC can provide the leadership and collaborative culture to positively improve the health of the border region. This article aims to describe the development process of this collaborative to include key ingredients to success, the roles of mulit-level jurisdictions, and policy implications.This article describes the methods used to develop key aspects of collaborative leadership, strategic alignment and a common vision toward the building of this collective impact approach to border health. In addition, we describe the role of key local County (County of San Diego Live Well San Diego initiative, State, (California Department of Public Health- Office of Binational Border Health, Federal (US-Mexico Border Health Commission’s Leaders across Borders, Academia (e.g., University of California San Diego and San Diego State University and non-profit entities (e.g., Project Concern International, San Ysidro Health Center in forming the BHCC. Evaluating the consortium development process included a literature review of similar processes, a review of internal documents and an analysis of developmental events. To this point the CBHC has built a strong, cohesive collaborative on the U.S. side of the border. It is sharing and leveraging local expertise to address many border health issues. Even more importantly, the BHCC has reached a key stage in which it can effectively engage its Baja California, Mexico counterparts in a manner that will prove extremely powerful

  13. Geodetic measurement of deformation east of the San Andreas fault in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Lisowski, Michael; Solomon, Sean C.

    Triangulation and trilateration data from two geodetic networks located between the San Andreas fault and the Great Valley have been used to calculate shear strain rates in the Diablo Range and to estimate the slip rate along the Calaveras and Paicines faults in central California. The shear strain rates, γ1 and γ2, were estimated independently from angle changes using Prescott's method and from the simultaneous reduction for station position and strain parameters using the DYNAP method with corrections to reduce the triangulation and trilateration data to a common reference surface. On the basis of Prescott's method, the average shear strain rate across the Diablo Range for the time period between 1962 and 1982 is 0.15±0.08 μrad/yr, with the orientation of the most compressive strain (β) at N16°E±14°. Utilizing corrections for the deflection of the vertical and the geoid reference ellipsoid separation computed on the basis of local gravity observations, γ = 0.19±0.09 μrad/yr and β = N16°E±13°. Although γ is not significantly greater than zero, at the 95% confidence level the orientation of β is similar to the direction of maximum compressive strain indicated by the orientation of major fold structures in the region (N25°E). We infer that the measured strain is due to compression across the folds of this area; the average shear straining corresponds to a relative shortening rate of 5.7±2.7 mm/yr. In contrast to the situation throughout most of the Coast Ranges where fold axes have orientations approximately parallel to the San Andreas fault, within the Diablo Range between Hollister and Coalinga the trends of the fold axes are different and are thought to be controlled by reactivation of older structures. From trilateration measurements made between 1972 and 1987 on lines that are within 10 km of the San Andreas fault, a slip rate of 10-12 mm/yr was calculated for the Calaveras-Paicines fault south of Hollister. The slip rate on the Paicines

  14. Pelagic nekton abundance and distribution in the northern Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyrer, Frederick; Slater, Steven B.; Portz, Donald E.; Odom, Darren; Morgan-King, Tara L.; Brown, Larry R.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the habitats occupied by species is fundamental for the development of effective conservation and management actions. The collapse of pelagic fish species in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California, has triggered a need to better understand factors that drive their distribution and abundance. A study was conducted in summer–fall 2014 in an attempt to identify physical and biological habitat conditions that drive the abundance and distribution of pelagic species in the northern region of the system. The study was conducted in the three largest channels in the northern Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta by dimension, volume, and flow capacity. The pelagic community was dominated by three nonnative species, Siberian prawn Exopalaemon modestus, which comprised 56% of the total number of organisms, and two fish species, Threadfin Shad Dorosoma petenense and Mississippi Silversides Menidia audens, which together comprised 43% of the total number of organisms. Total fish and total shrimp abundance were sensitive to the most extreme values of turbidity and temperature encountered and positively associated with total zooplankton biomass. The results suggested that habitat conditions in terminal channels, historically a common feature on the landscape, support higher abundances of pelagic species and zooplankton than open-ended channels. These results provide resource managers with useful information on the habitat associations of pelagic species and on how the future distribution and abundance of pelagic species will likely change in response to climate or other ecological factors.

  15. Heavy Metals Concentration Levels in Soils throughout the East San Francisco Bay Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, K.; Ramirez, N.; Diaz, J.; Cuff, K.; Adarkwah, N.

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that soils near structures made of pressure treated wood created before 2003 often contain high levels of arsenic, which was widely used in the processing of such wood. One such study, conducted by student scientists affiliated with the SF ROCKS program at San Francisco State University, found high levels of arsenic in soils collected from several children's play areas in San Francisco (Negrete, et al., 2006). Due to the known health risks associated with high concentrations of arsenic, and given a general lack of data related to soils of the East San Francisco Bay Area, the current study was initiated to determine whether or not dangerously high levels of arsenic exist in soils near public schools and playgrounds located in Richmond and Oakland, California. Soil samples were collected from approximately 100 locations in and around such areas, and analyzed for arsenic and a variety of other heavy metals concentration levels using an ICP spectrometer. Preliminary results demonstrate arsenic levels that exceed the EPA's 0.4 ppm action limit in 27 of the 100 sites from which samples were collected. Also, strong correlations between arsenic and various metals in the soil were found, such as arsenic with chromium (0.7022) and nickel (0.6588). Additionally, dangerously high levels of arsenic and lead were found in soils collected along the shores of a small lake fed by Leona Creek on the campus of Mills College in the Oakland foothills, approximately 2 kilometers downstream from a former iron sulphide mine. This occurrence constitutes evidence that the owner of the mine has not complied with recent orders from a local regulatory agency to make sure that mine effluents are safe.

  16. Climate Change and Conservation Planning in California: The San Francisco Bay Area Upland Habitat Goals Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branciforte, R.; Weiss, S. B.; Schaefer, N.

    2008-12-01

    Climate change threatens California's vast and unique biodiversity. The Bay Area Upland Habitat Goals is a comprehensive regional biodiversity assessment of the 9 counties surrounding San Francisco Bay, and is designing conservation land networks that will serve to protect, manage, and restore that biodiversity. Conservation goals for vegetation, rare plants, mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles, and invertebrates are set, and those goals are met using the optimization algorithm MARXAN. Climate change issues are being considered in the assessment and network design in several ways. The high spatial variability at mesoclimatic and topoclimatic scales in California creates high local biodiversity, and provides some degree of local resiliency to macroclimatic change. Mesoclimatic variability from 800 m scale PRISM climatic norms is used to assess "mesoclimate spaces" in distinct mountain ranges, so that high mesoclimatic variability, especially local extremes that likely support range limits of species and potential climatic refugia, can be captured in the network. Quantitative measures of network resiliency to climate change include the spatial range of key temperature and precipitation variables within planning units. Topoclimatic variability provides a finer-grained spatial patterning. Downscaling to the topoclimatic scale (10-50 m scale) includes modeling solar radiation across DEMs for predicting maximum temperature differentials, and topographic position indices for modeling minimum temperature differentials. PRISM data are also used to differentiate grasslands into distinct warm and cool types. The overall conservation strategy includes local and regional connectivity so that range shifts can be accommodated.

  17. Historic and Holocene environmental change in the San Antonio Creek Basin, mid-coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Anderson, R.; Ejarque, Ana; Rice, Johnathan; Smith, Susan J.; Lebow, Clayton G.

    2015-03-01

    Using a combination of pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs (NPPs) and charcoal particle stratigraphies from sediment cores from two sites, along with historical records, we reconstructed paleoenvironmental change in mid-coastal California. The San Antonio Creek section contains a discontinuous, Holocene-length record, while Mod Pond includes a continuous late Holocene record. Together the records allow for interpretation of most of the present interglacial. The longer record documents coastal sage scrub and chaparral dominated by woodland elements early in the Holocene to about 9000 yr ago, a potential decline in woodland communities with drying conditions during the middle Holocene to about 4800 yr ago, and an expansion of coastal sage scrub with grassland during the late Holocene. Evidence for climatic fluctuations during the last 1000 yr at Mod Pond is equivocal, suggesting that the Medieval Climate Anomaly-Little Ice Age had modest impact on the Mod Pond environment. However, evidence of significant environmental change associated with cultural transitions in the 18th-19th centuries is stark. Introduction of non-native plants, establishment of cattle and sheep grazing, missionization of the native population, changes in burning practices during the Spanish period and enhanced cropping activities during North American settlement worked together to substantially modify the mid-California coastal landscape in about a century's time.

  18. Subsidence due to Excessive Groundwater Withdrawal in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, F.; Harter, T.; Sneed, M.

    2011-12-01

    Francis Corbett1, Thomas Harter1 and Michelle Sneed2 1Department of Land Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis. 2U.S. Geological Survey Western Remote Sensing and Visualization Center, Sacramento. Abstract: Groundwater development within the Central Valley of California began approximately a century ago. Water was needed to supplement limited surface water supplies for the burgeoning population and agricultural industries, especially within the arid but fertile San Joaquin Valley. Groundwater levels have recovered only partially during wet years from drought-induced lows creating long-term groundwater storage overdraft. Surface water deliveries from Federal and State sources led to a partial alleviation of these pressure head declines from the late 1960s. However, in recent decades, surface water deliveries have declined owing to increasing environmental pressures, whilst water demands have remained steady. Today, a large portion of the San Joaquin Valley population, and especially agriculture, rely upon groundwater. Groundwater levels are again rapidly declining except in wet years. There is significant concern that subsidence due to groundwater withdrawal, first observed at a large scale in the middle 20th century, will resume as groundwater resources continue to be depleted. Previous subsidence has led to problems such as infrastructure damage and flooding. To provide a support tool for groundwater management on a naval air station in the southern San Joaquin Valley (Tulare Lake Basin), a one-dimensional MODFLOW subsidence model covering the period 1925 to 2010 was developed incorporating extensive reconstruction of historical subsidence and water level data from various sources. The stratigraphy used for model input was interpreted from geophysical logs and well completion reports. Gaining good quality data proved problematic, and often values needed to be estimated. In part, this was due to the historical lack of awareness/understanding of

  19. Social Disparities in Drinking Water Quality in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, I.; Balazs, C.; Hubbard, A.; Morello-Frosch, R.

    2011-12-01

    Social Disparities in Drinking Water Quality in California's San Joaquin Valley Carolina Balazs, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Alan Hubbard and Isha Ray Little attention has been given to research on social disparities and environmental justice in access to safe drinking water in the USA. We examine the relationship between nitrate and arsenic concentrations in community water systems (CWS) and the ethnic and socioeconomic characteristics of their customers. We hypothesized that systems in the San Joaquin Valley that serve a higher proportion of minority (especially Latino) residents, and/or lower socioeconomic status (proxied by rates of home ownership) residents, have higher nitrate levels and higher arsenic levels. We used water quality monitoring datasets (1999-2001) to estimate nitrate as well as arsenic levels in CWS, and source location and Census block group data to estimate customer demographics. We found that percent Latino was associated with a .04 mg NO3/L increase in a CWS' estimated nitrate ion concentration (95% CI, -.08, .16) and rate of home ownership was associated with a .16 mg NO3/L decrease (95% CI, -.32, .002). We also found that each percent increase in home ownership rate was associated with a .30 ug As/L decrease in arsenic concentrations (pMoore E, Matalon E, Balazs C, Clary J, Firestone L, De Anda S, Guzman, M. 2011. The human costs of nitrate-contaminated drinking water in the San Joaquin Valley. Oakland, CA: Pacific Institute. Morello-Frosch R, Pastor M, Sadd J. 2001. Environmental justice and southern california's 'riskscape': The distribution of air toxics exposures and health risks among diverse communities. Urban Affairs Review 36(4): 551-578. National Research Council. 2001. Arsenic in drinking water 2001 update. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. U.S. Census Bureau. 2000. Census of population and housing, 2000 [united states]: Summary tape file 3. Washington D.C.: U.S. Census Bureau. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 2011a

  20. Groundwater quality in the Madera and Chowchilla subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s untreated groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Madera and Chowchilla subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley constitute one of the study units being evaluated. The Madera-Chowchilla study unit is about 860 square miles and consists of the Madera and Chowchilla groundwater subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley Basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003; Shelton and others, 2009). The study unit has hot, dry summers and cool, moist winters. Average annual rainfall ranges from 11 to 15 inches, most of which occurs between November and February. The main surface-water features in the study unit are the San Joaquin, Fresno, and Chowchilla Rivers, and the Madera and Chowchilla canals. Land use in the study unit is about 69 percent (%) agricultural, 28% natural (mainly grasslands), and 3% urban. The primary crops are orchards and vineyards. The largest urban area is the city of Madera. The primary aquifer system is defined as those parts of the aquifer corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. In the Madera-Chowchilla study unit, these wells typically are drilled to depths between 200 and 800 feet, consist of a solid casing from land surface to a depth of about 140 to 400 feet, and are perforated below the solid casing. Water quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from that in the shallower and deeper parts of the aquifer system. The primary aquifer system in the study unit consists of Quaternary-age alluvial-fan and fluvial deposits that were formed by the rivers draining the Sierra Nevada. Sediments consist of gravels, sands

  1. Equatorial origin for Lower Jurassic radiolarian chert in the Franciscan Complex, San Rafael Mountains, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Murchey, B.L.; Bogar, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    Lower Jurassic radiolarian chert sampled at two localities in the San Rafael Mountains of southern California (???20 km north of Santa Barbara) contains four components of remanent magnetization. Components A, B???, and B are inferred to represent uplift, Miocene volcanism, and subduction/accretion overprint magnetizations, respectively. The fourth component (C), isolated between 580?? and 680??C, shows a magnetic polarity stratigraphy and is interpreted as a primary magnetization acquired by the chert during, or soon after, deposition. Both sequences are late Pliensbachian to middle Toarcian in age, and an average paleolatitude calculated from all tilt-corrected C components is 1?? ?? 3?? north or south. This result is consistent with deposition of the cherts beneath the equatorial zone of high biologic productivity and is similar to initial paleolatitudes determined for chert blocks in northern California and Mexico. This result supports our model in which deep-water Franciscan-type cherts were deposited on the Farallon plate as it moved eastward beneath the equatorial productivity high, were accreted to the continental margin at low paleolatitudes, and were subsequently distributed northward by strike-slip faulting associated with movements of the Kula, Farallon, and Pacific plates. Upper Cretaceous turbidites of the Cachuma Formation were sampled at Agua Caliente Canyon to determine a constraining paleolatitude for accretion of the Jurassic chert sequences. These apparently unaltered rocks, however, were found to be completely overprinted by the A component of magnetization. Similar in situ directions and demagnetization behaviors observed in samples of other Upper Cretaceous turbidite sequences in southern and Baja California imply that these rocks might also give unreliable results.

  2. The San Andreas fault in the San Francisco Bay region, California: Structure and kinematics of a Young plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachens, R.C.; Zoback, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Recently acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data delineate offset and/or truncated magnetic rock bodies of the Franciscan Complex that define the location and structure of, and total offset across, the San Andreas fault in the San Francisco Bay region. Two distinctive magnetic anomalies caused by ultramafic rocks and metabasalts east of, and truncated at, the San Andreas fault have clear counterparts west of the fault that indicate a total right-lateral offset of only 22 km on the Peninsula segment, the active strand that ruptured in 1906. The location of the Peninsula segment is well defined magnetically on the northern peninsula where it goes offshore, and can be traced along strike an additional ~6 km to the northwest. Just offshore from Lake Merced, the inferred fault trace steps right (northeast) 3 km onto a nearly parallel strand that can be traced magnetically northwest more than 20 km as the linear northeast edge of a magnetic block bounded by the San Andreas fault, the Pilarcitos fault, and the San Gregorio-Hosgri fault zone. This right-stepping strand, the Golden Gate segment, joins the eastern mapped trace of the San Andreas fault at Bolinas Lagoon and projects back onshore to the southeast near Lake Merced. Inversion of detailed gravity data on the San Francisco Peninsula reveals a 3 km wide basin situated between the two strands of the San Andreas fault, floored by Franciscan basement and filled with Plio-Quaternary sedimentary deposits of the Merced and Colma formations. The basin, ~1 km deep at the coast, narrows and becomes thinner to the southeast along the fault over a distance of ~12 km. The length, width, and location of the basin between the two strands are consistent with a pull-apart basin formed behind the right step in the right-lateral strike-slip San Andreas fault system and currently moving southeast with the North American plate. Slight nonparallelism of the two strands bounding the basin (implying a small component of convergence

  3. Late Quaternary Faulting along the San Juan de los Planes Fault Zone, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, M. M.; Coyan, J. A.; Arrowsmith, J.; Maloney, S. J.; Gutierrez, G.; Umhoefer, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    As a result of continued distributed deformation in the Gulf Extensional Province along an oblique-divergent plate margin, active normal faulting is well manifest in southeastern Baja California. By characterizing normal-fault related deformation along the San Juan de los Planes fault zone (SJPFZ) southwest of La Paz, Baja California Sur we contribute to understanding the patterns and rates of faulting along the southwest gulf-margin fault system. The geometry, history, and rate of faulting provide constraints on the relative significance of gulf-margin deformation as compared to axial system deformation. The SJPFZ is a major north-trending structure in the southern Baja margin along which we focused our field efforts. These investigations included: a detailed strip map of the active fault zone, including delineation of active scarp traces and geomorphic surfaces on the hanging wall and footwall; fault scarp profiles; analysis of bedrock structures to better understand how the pattern and rate of strain varied during the development of this fault zone; and a gravity survey across the San Juan de los Planes basin to determine basin geometry and fault behavior. The map covers a N-S swath from the Gulf of California in the north to San Antonio in the south, an area ~45km long and ~1-4km wide. Bedrock along the SJPFZ varies from Cretaceous Las Cruces Granite in the north to Cretaceous Buena Mujer Tonalite in the south and is scarred by shear zones and brittle faults. The active scarp-forming fault juxtaposes bedrock in the footwall against Late Quaternary sandstone-conglomerate. This ~20m wide zone is highly fractured bedrock infused with carbonate. The northern ~12km of the SJPFZ, trending 200°, preserves discontinuous scarps 1-2km long and 1-3m high in Quaternary units. The scarps are separated by stretches of bedrock embayed by hundreds of meters-wide tongues of Quaternary sandstone-conglomerate, implying low Quaternary slip rate. Further south, ~2 km north of the

  4. Geomorphic Expression of a Miocene Dike Complex, San Joaquin Hills, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, R. J.; Ta, L.; Williams, D.; Werner, A.; Bernardino, M.; Peterson, R.; McCormick, C.; Escobedo, D.; Nagy, B.

    2009-12-01

    Miocene transtension during development of the North American-Pacific plate boundary in southern California coincided with extensive magmatism and emplacement of a 15-16 Ma basaltic to andesitic dike and sill complex in the San Joaquin Hills, Orange County. Intrusions cut through and altered a thick Mesozoic to Cenozoic marine and nonmarine siliciclastic sedimentary succession. Hydrothermally altered sandstone within 20 meters of the contact are cemented with secondary microcrystalline quartz and illite, and locally with calcite. Cementation plus removal of iron oxides from redbeds rendered the altered sandstones more resistant to erosion than the highly weathered dikes or unaltered sedimentary strata. These Miocene dikes exert a profound influence on modern topography due to differential susceptibilities of the dikes and altered wall rock to chemical and physical weathering. At vegetated inland sites, where chemical weathering is important, plagioclase feldspar in dolerite intrusions alter to smectitic clays, and the dikes weather to recessive, brush-covered soils on valleys and slopes. In contrast, altered and hardened sedimentary wall rocks stand up in resistant relief. Many of the wall rocks form the high ridges of the uplifted and dissected San Joaquin Hills and control the geometry of drainages by forming resistant ledges that set local base level and by offsetting stream drainages. Differential erosion of the soft weathered mafic dikes and hard, resistant wall rocks produced a sharp contrast that forms most of the steepest slopes in the study area. Coastal exposures of andesitic dikes, where physical weathering dominates, display a contrary behavior. Igneous dikes are more resistant to wave erosion and form prominent headlands jutting out into the ocean, whereas sedimentary wall rocks are more easily eroded back to form flanking cliffs or sand-covered beaches.

  5. Seismic velocity structure and seismotectonics of the eastern San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebeck, J.L.; Michael, A.J.; Brocher, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Hayward Fault System is considered the most likely fault system in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, to produce a major earthquake in the next 30 years. To better understand this fault system, we use microseismicity to study its structure and kinematics. We present a new 3D seismic-velocity model for the eastern San Francisco Bay region, using microseismicity and controlled sources, which reveals a ???10% velocity contrast across the Hayward fault in the upper 10 km, with higher velocity in the Franciscan Complex to the west relative to the Great Valley Sequence to the east. This contrast is imaged more sharply in our localized model than in previous regional-scale models. Thick Cenozoic sedimentary basins, such as the Livermore basin, which may experience particularly strong shaking during an earthquake, are imaged in the model. The accurate earthquake locations and focal mechanisms obtained by using the 3D model allow us to study fault complexity and its implications for seismic hazard. The relocated hypocenters along the Hayward Fault in general are consistent with a near-vertical or steeply east-dipping fault zone. The southern Hayward fault merges smoothly with the Calaveras fault at depth, suggesting that large earthquakes may rupture across both faults. The use of the 3D velocity model reveals that most earthquakes along the Hayward fault have near-vertical strike-slip focal mechanisms, consistent with the large-scale orientation and sense of slip of the fault, with no evidence for zones of complex fracturing acting as barriers to earthquake rupture.

  6. Holocene geologic slip rate for the Banning strand of the southern San Andreas Fault, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Peter O.; Behr, Whitney M.; Rood, Dylan; Sharp, Warren D.; Rockwell, Thomas; Kendrick, Katherine J.; Salin, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Northwest directed slip from the southern San Andreas Fault is transferred to the Mission Creek, Banning, and Garnet Hill fault strands in the northwestern Coachella Valley. How slip is partitioned between these three faults is critical to southern California seismic hazard estimates but is poorly understood. In this paper, we report the first slip rate measured for the Banning fault strand. We constrain the depositional age of an alluvial fan offset 25 ± 5 m from its source by the Banning strand to between 5.1 ± 0.4 ka (95% confidence interval (CI)) and 6.4 + 3.7/−2.1 ka (95% CI) using U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate clast coatings and 10Be cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating of surface clasts. We calculate a Holocene geologic slip rate for the Banning strand of 3.9 + 2.3/−1.6 mm/yr (median, 95% CI) to 4.9 + 1.0/−0.9 mm/yr (median, 95% CI). This rate represents only 25–35% of the total slip accommodated by this section of the southern San Andreas Fault, suggesting a model in which slip is less concentrated on the Banning strand than previously thought. In rejecting the possibility that the Banning strand is the dominant structure, our results highlight an even greater need for slip rate and paleoseismic measurements along faults in the northwestern Coachella Valley in order to test the validity of current earthquake hazard models. In addition, our comparison of ages measured with U-series and 10Be exposure dating demonstrates the importance of using multiple geochronometers when estimating the depositional age of alluvial landforms.

  7. Geophysical evidence for Quaternary deformation within the offshore San Andreas Fault System, Point Reyes Peninsula, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stozek, B.

    2010-12-01

    Our previous work studying the rate and style of uplift of marine terraces on the Point Reyes Peninsula indicates the peninsula has been undergoing differential uplift due to interacting fault geometries in the offshore zone. To better understand offshore fault interactions, recently collected mini-sparker seismic reflection data acquired by the USGS and multi-beam bathymetric data acquired by California State University at Monterey Bay within the 3-mile (5 km) limit offshore of the Point Reyes Peninsula, are being used to reinterpret the tectono-stratigraphic framework of the San Andreas fault (SAF) system. Eight offshore Shell exploratory well logs that provide seismic velocity and paleontologic data are being used in conjunction with industry multichannel (deep-penetration) seismic reflection profiles to provide age control and extend the analyses beyond 3 mile limit of the high-resolution data. Isopach and structure maps of key stratigraphic intervals were generated to show how the stratigraphic units are influenced by fault interactions. These datasets allow for new interpretations of the offshore Neogene stratigraphy and the evolution of the Point Reyes fault, an offshore component of the SAF system. Observations of Quaternary sedimentary sequences in the high-resolution mini-sparker dataset provide evidence of localized areas of subsidence and uplift within the offshore SAF system. For example, the most recent angular unconformity above the Point Reyes fault deepens to the north where the fault bends from an east-west to a more northerly orientation. Stratigraphic horizons in the offshore zone are correlated with the same geologic units exposed on the Point Reyes Peninsula. Both unconformity-bounded sedimentary sequences mapped on reflection profiles in the offshore and marine terraces that have been uplifted on the peninsula are tied to sea-level fluctuations. Our new interpretation of the Point Reyes fault zone will be incorporated into a kinematic fault

  8. Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in California's San Joaquin Valley: Characterizing Large Point Source Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Duren, R. M.; Miller, C. E.; Aubrey, A. D.; Falk, M.; Holland, L.; Hook, S. J.; Hulley, G. C.; Johnson, W. R.; Kuai, L.; Kuwayama, T.; Lin, J. C.; Thorpe, A. K.; Worden, J. R.; Lauvaux, T.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is an important atmospheric pollutant that contributes to global warming and tropospheric ozone production. Methane mitigation could reduce near term climate change and improve air quality, but is hindered by a lack of knowledge of anthropogenic methane sources. Recent work has shown that methane emissions are not evenly distributed in space, or across emission sources, suggesting that a large fraction of anthropogenic methane comes from a few "super-emitters." We studied the distribution of super-emitters in California's southern San Joaquin Valley, where elevated levels of atmospheric CH4 have also been observed from space. Here, we define super-emitters as methane plumes that could be reliably detected (i.e., plume observed more than once in the same location) under varying wind conditions by airborne thermal infrared remote sensing. The detection limit for this technique was determined to be 4.5 kg CH4 h-1 by a controlled release experiment, corresponding to column methane enhancement at the point of emissions greater than 20% above local background levels. We surveyed a major oil production field, and an area with a high concentration of large dairies using a variety of airborne and ground-based measurements. Repeated airborne surveys (n=4) with the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer revealed 28 persistent methane plumes emanating from oil field infrastructure, including tanks, wells, and processing facilities. The likelihood that a given source type was a super-emitter varied from roughly 1/3 for processing facilities to 1/3000 for oil wells. 11 persistent plumes were detected in the dairy area, and all were associated with wet manure management. The majority (11/14) of manure lagoons in the study area were super-emitters. Comparing to a California methane emissions inventory for the surveyed areas, we estimate that super-emitters comprise a minimum of 9% of inventoried dairy emissions, and 13% of inventoried oil emissions in this region.

  9. Remote Sensing Soil Salinity Map for the San Joaquin Vally, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudiero, E.; Skaggs, T. H.; Anderson, R. G.; Corwin, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Soil salinization is a major natural hazard to worldwide agriculture. We present a remote imagery approach that maps salinity within a range (i.e., salinities less than 20 dS m-1, when measured as the electrical conductivity of the soil saturation extract), accuracy, and resolution most relevant to agriculture. A case study is presented for the western San Joaquin Valley (WSJV), California, USA (~870,000 ha of farmland) using multi-year Landsat 7 ETM+ canopy reflectance and the Canopy Response Salinity Index (CRSI). Highly detailed salinity maps for 22 fields (542 ha) established from apparent soil electrical conductivity directed sampling were used as ground-truth (sampled in 2013), totaling over 5000 pixels (30×30 m) with salinity values in the range of 0 to 35.2 dS m-1. Multi-year maximum values of CRSI were used to model soil salinity. In addition, soil type, elevation, meteorological data, and crop type were evaluated as covariates. The fitted model (R2=0.73) was validated: i) with a spatial k-folds (i.e., leave-one-field-out) cross-validation (R2=0.61), ii) versus salinity data from three independent fields (sampled in 2013 and 2014), and iii) by determining the accuracy of the qualitative classification of white crusted land as extremely-saline soils. The effect of land use change is evaluated over 2396 ha in the Broadview Water District from a comparison of salinity mapped in 1991 with salinity predicted in 2013 from the fitted model. From 1991 to 2013 salinity increased significantly over the selected study site, bringing attention to potential negative effects on soil quality of shifting from irrigated agriculture to fallow-land. This is cause for concern since over the 3 years of California's drought (2010-2013) the fallow land in the WSJV increased from 12.7% to 21.6%, due to drastic reduction in water allocations to farmers.

  10. Shallow Mesozoic layered gabbros of the Shadow Mountains, San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David K.; Cohen, Lewis H.

    1996-10-01

    Jurassic hornblende gabbros intrude as a conspicuous 9 km 2 arcuate complex within Paleozoic metasedimentary pendants of the Shadow Mountains, San Bernardino County, California. This complex is significant because it: (1) displays evidence of processes active in magma chambers which are crystallizing cumulus phases; (2) resembles many mid-Mesozoic plutons described in the western and central Sierra Nevada and western Mojave desert which may all be petrologically related; and (3) may be used as a diagnostic tectonic marker for Mesozoic tectonic reconstructions of the Mojave Desert and western Cordillera. The gabbroic body is unusual for its compact, near-circular plan, conspicuous banding and layering and reverse geochemical zonation. The mafic complex was intruded as a hydrous magma and was emplaced as a concentric epizonal pluton. Oxygen isotopic data indicate the melt was mantle derived but has been contaminated by assimilation of metasediments. The gabbro was likely generated by reaction of olivine with fractionated melt from the melting of a low MgO basalt under water-saturated conditions. The banding and layering is ascribed to the cyclic ascent of felsic rejected solute along the walls of the chamber and its accumulation near the roof of the complex. Cooling was facilitated by conduction and the presence of pendant rocks at uppermost levels. The Shadow Mountains gabbros resemble other gabbroic bodies of similar Jurassic age throughout the Sierra Nevada, Mojave Desert and Transverse Ranges, California (Lahren and Schweickert, 1994; Miller and Glazner, 1995). These intrusions are useful as markers of subsequent large-scale tectonic crustal displacements affecting the western Mojave Desert and Sierra Nevada. In particular, the Shadow Mountains gabbros show age, mineralogie and textural affinities with correlative gabbroic complexes in the central Sierra Nevada 400 km to the north. All these plutonic bodies may represent subvolcanic sources of the Jurassic

  11. Rainfall and Seasonal Movement of the Weeks Creek Landslide, San Mateo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Reid, Mark E.; Jodicke, Walter; Pearson, Chris; Wilcox, Grant

    2007-01-01

    through Lower Oligocene). These sedimentary bedrock materials are locally intruded by Oligocene diabase and capped by Oligocene through Miocene basalt of the Mindego Formation (Brabb, 1980; Cole and others, 1994). Within the active landslide, as documented from multiple borings by Cole and others (1994), deeply weathered mudstone and sandstone of the San Lorenzo Formation extends to a depth of about 10 to 13 m, where the active shear zone is located. Beneath this, within the deeper prehistoric landslide, mudstone extends to a depth of about 24 to 32 m and is underlain by strong diabase bedrock. The basal rupture surface of the prehistoric landslide is located near the mudstone/diabase contact (Cole and others, 1994). The historically active section of the Weeks Creek landslide, which is crossed by the La Honda road (California Highway 84, fig. 1), was first noticed to partially move during the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake (Lawson, 1908). It has moved repeatedly over the ensuing years but generally only during wet rainy seasons. For some of these active years, ground cracks and lateral displacements were recorded by local residents Walter Jodicke and Chris Pearson, as well as by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel. In spring 2006, fresh ground cracks were noted in parts of the prehistoric, previously inactive section of the landslide. In this report, we present daily rainfall measurements from 1973 through 2006 obtained at the landslide site and summarize available observations of slope movement over that period. In addition, we present more detailed observations of rainfall, ground-water pressure, and slope movement for three water years spanning the period 1981-1984. We conclude with some preliminary observations about rainfall and slope movement at this site.

  12. AFSC/NMML/CCEP: Natality rates of California sea lions at San Miguel Island, California during 1987-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem Program (AFSC/NOAA) initiated a long-term marking program of California sea lions (Zalophus...

  13. Air Pollution Distribution Patterns in the San Bernardino Mountains of Southern California: a 40-Year Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Bytnerowicz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the mid-1950s, native pines in the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM in southern California have shown symptoms of decline. Initial studies in 1963 showed that ozone (O3 generated in the upwind Los Angeles Basin was responsible for the injury and decline of sensitive trees. Ambient O3 decreased significantly by the mid-1990s, resulting in decreased O3 injury and improved tree growth. Increased growth of trees may also be attributed to elevated atmospheric nitrogen (N deposition. Since most of the N deposition to mixed conifer forest stands in the SBM results from dry deposition of nitric acid vapor (HNO3 and ammonia (NH3, characterization of spatial and temporal distribution of these two pollutants has become essential. Although maximum daytime O3 concentrations over last 40 years have significantly decreased (~3-fold, seasonal means have been reduced much less (~1.5-fold, with 2-week long means occasionally exceeding 100 ppb in the western part of the range. In the same area, significantly elevated concentrations of HNO3 and NH3, up to 17.5 and 18.5 μg/m3 as 2-week averages, respectively, have been determined. Elevated levels of O3 and increased N deposition together with long-term drought predispose the SBM forests to massive bark beetle attacks making them susceptible to catastrophic fires.

  14. Changes in causes of death among persons with AIDS: San Francisco, California, 1996-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Sandra K; Vu, Annie; Hsu, Ling Chin; Hessol, Nancy A

    2014-10-01

    The increased life expectancy among HIV-infected persons treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), risk behaviors, and co-morbidities associated with ART place HIV-infected persons at risk for non-HIV-related causes of death. We used the San Francisco HIV/AIDS registry to identify deaths that occurred from January 1996 through December 2011. Temporal trends in AIDS- and non-AIDS-related mortality rates, the proportion of underlying and contributory causes of death, and the ratio of observed deaths in the study population to expected number of deaths among California men aged 20-79 (standardized mortality ratio [SMR]) of underlying causes of death were examined. A total of 5338 deaths were identified. The annual AIDS-related death rate (per 100 deaths) declined from 10.8 in 1996 to 0.9 in 2011 (p<0.0001), while the annual death rate from non-AIDS-related causes declined from 2.1 in 1996 to 0.9 in 2011 (p<0.0001). The proportion of deaths due to all types of heart disease combined, all non-AIDS cancers combined, mental disorders resulting from substance abuse, drug overdose, suicide and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease increased significantly over time. The SMRs for liver diseased decreased significantly over time but remained elevated. Our data highlight the importance of age-related causes of death as well as deaths from causes that are, at least in part, preventable.

  15. Modification of a Community Garden to Attract Native Bee Pollinators in Urban San Luis Obispo, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbin W. Thorp

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gardens have become increasingly important places for growing nutritional food, for conserving biodiversity, for biological and ecological research and education, and for community gathering. Gardens can also be designed with the goal of attracting specific wildlife, like birds and butterflies, but pollinators, like bees, can also be drawn to specially planned and modified gardens. A community garden in San Luis Obispo, California provided the setting for modification with the goal of attracting native bee pollinators by planting known bee-attractive plants. The local gardeners participated in a survey questionnaire and focused interviews to provide their input and interest in such a project. Presentations on our work with native bees in urban environments and gardening to attract bees were also given to interested gardeners. Work of this type also benefited from a lead gardener who managed donated bee plants and kept up momentum of the project. Modification of the garden and monitoring of native bees started in 2007 and continued through the growing season of 2009. Diversity of collected and observed native bees has increased each year since 2007. To date, 40 species in 17 genera of mostly native bees has been recorded from the garden, and this number is expected to increase through time.

  16. Smog Nitrogen and the Rapid Acidification of Forest Soil, San Bernardino Mountains, Southern California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne A. Wood

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the rapid acidification of forest soils in the San Bernardino Mountains of southern California. After 30 years, soil to a depth of 25 cm has decreased from a pH (measured in 0.01 M CaCl2 of 4.8 to 3.1. At the 50-cm depth, it has changed from a pH of 4.8 to 4.2. We attribute this rapid change in soil reactivity to very high rates of anthropogenic atmospheric nitrogen (N added to the soil surface (72 kg ha–1 year–1 from wet, dry, and fog deposition under a Mediterranean climate. Our research suggests that a soil textural discontinuity, related to a buried ancient landsurface, contributes to this rapid acidification by controlling the spatial and temporal movement of precipitation into the landsurface. As a result, the depth to which dissolved anthropogenic N as nitrate (NO3 is leached early in the winter wet season is limited to within the top ~130 cm of soil where it accumulates and increases soil acidity.

  17. Preliminary geologic map of the Fontana 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Douglas M.; Digital preparation by Bovard, Kelly R.

    2003-01-01

    Open-File Report 03-418 is a digital geologic data set that maps and describes the geology of the Fontana 7.5’ quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California. The Fontana quadrangle database is one of several 7.5’ quadrangle databases that are being produced by the Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP). These maps and databases are, in turn, part of the nation-wide digital geologic map coverage being developed by the National Cooperative Geologic Map Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). General Open-File Report 03-418 contains a digital geologic map database of the Fontana 7.5’ quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California that includes: 1. ARC/INFO (Environmental Systems Research Institute, http://www.esri.com) version 7.2.1 coverages of the various elements of the geologic map. 2. A Postscript file (fon_map.ps) to plot the geologic map on a topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units diagram (CMU), a Description of Map Units (DMU), and an index map. 3. An Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) file (fon_grey.eps) created in Adobe Illustrator 10.0 to plot the geologic map on a grey topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units (CMU), a Description of Map Units (DMU), and an index map. 4. Portable Document Format (.pdf) files of: a. the Readme file; includes in Appendix I, data contained in fon_met.txt b. The same graphics as plotted in 2 and 3 above.Test plots have not produced precise 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following

  18. Final Environmental Statement : Acquisition of lands for the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Federal Government proposes to acquire approximately 23,000 acres of land in the South San Francisco Bay region, Alameda, San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties, to...

  19. 77 FR 66548 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is approving revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District... State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District's Rule 4352,...

  20. Hybrid system of generating electricity, solar eolic diesel San Juanico, Baja California Sur, Mexico; Sistema hibrido de generacion electrica, eolico solar diesel San Juanico, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta, Javier [Comision Federal de Electricidad, La Paz, Baja California Sur (Mexico); Johnston, Peter [Technology Development, Arizona (United States); Napikoski, Chester [Generation Engineering, Arizona (United States); Escutia, Ricardo [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Baja California Sur (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), and the northamerican electric company Arizona Public Service (APS), made an agreement of collaboration to develop a project of generating electricity with the use of renewable resources. The premises that where agreed on are the following: 1. Focus the project a rural community. 2. The cost of the whole project should be lower than compared to the interconnection to a conventional system. 3. Acceptance of the community, and the governmental authorities. 4. Sustentability of the operation of the system. Several technical and economical analysis where done, such as the evaluation of the solar and eolic resources, study of the environmental impact, negotiation agreements so it would be possible to obtain de economical resources from Niagara Mohawk (NIMO), and the USAID, all of this thru the supervising of the Sandia National Laboratories. After the anemometric and solar radiation measures where made, it was considered that the community of San Juanico, en Baja California Sur, Mexico, was the most feasible one, it was necessary also to consider the aspects of logistics, socials, size of the community and as a detonator for the economic activities of tourism and fishing. The APS formulated the executive project in accordance with the recommendations of the different areas of CFE. The project consists basically in the installation of 10 wind generators of 10 Kw, a battery bank for 432 KWh, plus a diesel generator for emergencies of 80 Kw. Besides the civil and electromechanical installation. It was necessary to involve the community in the knowledge and followup of the project form it's, considering that this factor would be essential, so it could be successful. Lamps of low consumption where installed on the houses and street lightning, to optimize the system. The patronato that is a civil association of the community, is in charge of the administration of the system, it receives support from personnel of CFE. The income

  1. 美国圣地亚哥创新集群发展的原因探析%The Discussions on Reasons of the Development of San Diego's Innovation Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卓泽林

    2015-01-01

    Innovation Cluster is major developmental strategy for promoting industrial innovation, economic development and enhancing the national competitiveness. San Diego's Innovation Cluster is the third largest technology innovation center while also belongs to the world's a real biotechnology industry Cluster. Its rapidly rise is accused to The role of regional land use decisions and of state infrastructure Investments、The major commitment of time and resources by the private sector and encouraging local culture of collaboration between academic, public and private sectors.%创新集群是推动产业创新、促进经济发展和增强国家竞争力的重大发展战略,圣地亚哥创新集群是美国第三大科技中心和世界上唯一的一个真正的生物科技产业集聚区,其快速崛起主要是因为州政府土地政策的大力扶持、高效率、专业化的技术创新与服务机构以及鼓励创新与强调知识应用的文化传统。

  2. LESSONS FROM A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF A 5-YR PERIOD OF QUARANTINE AT SAN DIEGO ZOO: A RISK-BASED APPROACH TO QUARANTINE ISOLATION AND TESTING MAY BENEFIT ANIMAL WELFARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Chelsea; Marinkovich, Matt; Morris, Pat J; Rideout, Bruce; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2016-03-01

    Quarantine is designed primarily to prevent the introduction of transmissible diseases to zoological collections. Improvements in preventive medicine, disease eradication, and comprehensive pathology programs call into question current industry quarantine standards. Disease risk analysis was used at the San Diego Zoo (SDZ) and the SDZ Safari Park to eliminate quarantine isolation and transmissible disease testing for animals transferred between the two institutions. To determine if a risk-based approach might be valid between other institutions and SDZ, we reviewed quarantine data for animals arriving at SDZ from 81 Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA)-accredited and 124 other sources (e.g., non-AZA-accredited institutions, private breeders, private dealers, governmental bodies) over a 5-yr period (2009-2013). No mammal or herptile failed quarantine due to transmissible diseases of concern. Approximately 2.5% of incoming birds failed quarantine due to transmissible disease; however, all 14 failed individuals were obtained from three nonaccredited sources (private breeders, confiscation). The results of our study suggest that a risk-based approach could be used to minimize or eliminate quarantine for the transfer of animals from institutions with comprehensive disease surveillance programs and/or preshipment testing practices. Quarantine isolation with testing remains an essential defense against introducing transmissible diseases of concern when there is a lack of health knowledge about the animals being received.

  3. IBC's 21st Annual Antibody Engineering and 8th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and 2010 Annual Meeting of the Antibody Society. December 5-9, 2010, San Diego, CA USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Samantha O; Teillaud, Jean-Luc; Wurch, Theirry; Reichert, Janice M; Dunlop, Cameron; Huber, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The 21st Annual Antibody Engineering and 8th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2010 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5-9, 2010 in San Diego, CA. The conferences were organized with a focus on antibody engineering only on the first day and a joint engineering/therapeutics session on the last day. Delegates could select from presentations that occurred in two simultaneous sessions on days 2 and 3. Day 1 included presentations on neutralizing antibodies and the identification of vaccine targets, as well as a historical overview of 20 years of phage display utilization. Topics presented in the Antibody Engineering sessions on day 2 and 3 included antibody biosynthesis, structure and stability; antibodies in a complex environment; antibody half-life; and targeted nanoparticle therapeutics. In the Antibody Therapeutics sessions on days 2 and 3, preclinical and early stage development and clinical updates of antibody therapeutics, including TRX518, SYM004, MM111, PRO140, CVX-241, ASG-5ME, U3-1287 (AMG888), R1507 and trastuzumab emtansine, were discussed, and perspectives were provided on the development of biosimilar and biobetter antibodies, including coverage of regulatory and intellectual property issues. The joint engineering/therapeutics session on the last day focused on bispecific and next-generation antibodies.

  4. IBC's 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, December 5-8, 2011, San Diego, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Dunlop, D Cameron; Sircar, Aroop; Wurch, Thierry; Falkowska, Emilia; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Piccione, Emily C; Brack, Simon; Berger, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5-8, 2011 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew ~800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a preview to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 4, 2011 focused on antibodies as probes of structure. The Antibody Engineering Conference comprised eight sessions: (1) structure and dynamics of antibodies and their membrane receptor targets; (2) model-guided generation of binding sites; (3) novel selection strategies; (4) antibodies in a complex environment: targeting intracellular and misfolded proteins; (5) rational vaccine design; (6) viral retargeting with engineered binding molecules; (7) the biology behind potential blockbuster antibodies and (8) antibodies as signaling modifiers: where did we go right, and can we learn from success? The Antibody Therapeutics session comprised five sessions: (1)Twenty-five years of therapeutic antibodies: lessons learned and future challenges; (2) preclinical and early stage development of antibody therapeutics; (3) next generation anti-angiogenics; (4) updates of clinical stage antibody therapeutics and (5) antibody drug conjugates and bispecific antibodies.

  5. Commercial Whaling, Especially for Gray Whales, Eschrichtius robustus, and Humpback Whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, at California and Baja California Shore Stations in the 19th Century (1854–1899)

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Shore whaling along North America’s California and Baja California coasts during 1854–99 was ancillary to the offshore and alongshore American whale fishery, which had begun in the North Pacific in the early 1800’s and was flourishing by the 1840’s. From its inception at Monterey, Calif., in the mid 1850’s, the shore fishery, involving open boats deployed from land to catch and tow whales for processing, eventually spread from Monterey south to San Diego and Baja California and north...

  6. Structure of the 1906 near-surface rupture zone of the San Andreas Fault, San Francisco Peninsula segment, near Woodside, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, C.M.; Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Grove, Karen; Goldman, M.R.

    2016-07-08

    High-resolution seismic-reflection and refraction images of the 1906 surface rupture zone of the San Andreas Fault near Woodside, California reveal evidence for one or more additional near-surface (within about 3 meters [m] depth) fault strands within about 25 m of the 1906 surface rupture. The 1906 surface rupture above the groundwater table (vadose zone) has been observed in paleoseismic trenches that coincide with our seismic profile and is seismically characterized by a discrete zone of low P-wave velocities (Vp), low S-wave velocities (Vs), high Vp/Vs ratios, and high Poisson’s ratios. A second near-surface fault strand, located about 17 m to the southwest of the 1906 surface rupture, is inferred by similar seismic anomalies. Between these two near-surface fault strands and below 5 m depth, we observed a near-vertical fault strand characterized by a zone of high Vp, low Vs, high Vp/Vs ratios, and high Poisson’s ratios on refraction tomography images and near-vertical diffractions on seismic-reflection images. This prominent subsurface zone of seismic anomalies is laterally offset from the 1906 surface rupture by about 8 m and likely represents the active main (long-term) strand of the San Andreas Fault at 5 to 10 m depth. Geometries of the near-surface and subsurface (about 5 to 10 m depth) fault zone suggest that the 1906 surface rupture dips southwestward to join the main strand of the San Andreas Fault at about 5 to 10 m below the surface. The 1906 surface rupture forms a prominent groundwater barrier in the upper 3 to 5 m, but our interpreted secondary near-surface fault strand to the southwest forms a weaker barrier, suggesting that there has been less or less-recent near-surface slip on that strand. At about 6 m depth, the main strand of the San Andreas Fault consists of water-saturated blue clay (collected from a hand-augered borehole), which is similar to deeply weathered serpentinite observed within the main strand of the San Andreas Fault at

  7. Regional nitrate and pesticide trends in ground water in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, K.R.; Shelton, James L.; Dubrovsky, N.M.

    2008-01-01

    Protection of ground water for present and future use requires monitoring and understanding of the mechanisms controlling long-term quality of ground water. In this study, spatial and temporal trends in concentrations of nitrate and pesticides in ground water in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California, were evaluated to determine the long-term effects of agricultural and urban development on regional ground-water quality. Trends in concentrations of nitrate, the nematocide 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane, and the herbicide simazine during the last two decades are generally consistent with known nitrogen fertilizer and pesticide use and with the position of the well networks in the regional ground-water flow system. Concentrations of nitrate and pesticides are higher in the shallow part of the aquifer system where domestic wells are typically screened, whereas concentrations are lower in the deep part of the aquifer system where public-supply wells are typically screened. Attenuation processes do not seem to significantly affect concentrations. Historical data indicate that concentrations of nitrate have increased since the 1950s in the shallow and deep parts of the aquifer system. Concentrations of nitrate and detection of pesticides in the deep part of the aquifer system will likely increase as the proportion of highly affected water contributed to these wells increases with time. Because of the time of travel between the water table and the deep part of the aquifer system, current concentrations in public-supply wells likely reflect the effects of 40- to 50-yr-old management practices. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  8. A new method to identify earthquake swarms applied to seismicity near the San Jacinto Fault, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Shearer, Peter M.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding earthquake clustering in space and time is important but also challenging because of complexities in earthquake patterns and the large and diverse nature of earthquake catalogues. Swarms are of particular interest because they likely result from physical changes in the crust, such as slow slip or fluid flow. Both swarms and clusters resulting from aftershock sequences can span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Here we test and implement a new method to identify seismicity clusters of varying sizes and discriminate them from randomly occurring background seismicity. Our method searches for the closest neighbouring earthquakes in space and time and compares the number of neighbours to the background events in larger space/time windows. Applying our method to California's San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ), we find a total of 89 swarm-like groups. These groups range in size from 0.14 to 7.23 km and last from 15 min to 22 d. The most striking spatial pattern is the larger fraction of swarms at the northern and southern ends of the SJFZ than its central segment, which may be related to more normal-faulting events at the two ends. In order to explore possible driving mechanisms, we study the spatial migration of events in swarms containing at least 20 events by fitting with both linear and diffusion migration models. Our results suggest that SJFZ swarms are better explained by fluid flow because their estimated linear migration velocities are far smaller than those of typical creep events while large values of best-fitting hydraulic diffusivity are found.

  9. Regional nitrate and pesticide trends in ground water in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, Karen R; Shelton, Jennifer L; Dubrovsky, Neil M

    2008-01-01

    Protection of ground water for present and future use requires monitoring and understanding of the mechanisms controlling long-term quality of ground water. In this study, spatial and temporal trends in concentrations of nitrate and pesticides in ground water in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California, were evaluated to determine the long-term effects of agricultural and urban development on regional ground-water quality. Trends in concentrations of nitrate, the nematocide 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane, and the herbicide simazine during the last two decades are generally consistent with known nitrogen fertilizer and pesticide use and with the position of the well networks in the regional ground-water flow system. Concentrations of nitrate and pesticides are higher in the shallow part of the aquifer system where domestic wells are typically screened, whereas concentrations are lower in the deep part of the aquifer system where public-supply wells are typically screened. Attenuation processes do not seem to significantly affect concentrations. Historical data indicate that concentrations of nitrate have increased since the 1950s in the shallow and deep parts of the aquifer system. Concentrations of nitrate and detection of pesticides in the deep part of the aquifer system will likely increase as the proportion of highly affected water contributed to these wells increases with time. Because of the time of travel between the water table and the deep part of the aquifer system, current concentrations in public-supply wells likely reflect the effects of 40- to 50-yr-old management practices.

  10. Waterbird egg mercury concentrations in response to wetland restoration in south San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Herzog, Mark P.; Hartman, Christopher A.; Watts, Trevor C.; Barr, Jarred R.

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of 50–90 percent of 15,100 acres of former salt evaporation ponds to tidal marsh habitat in the south San Francisco Bay, California, is planned as part of the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project. This large-scale habitat restoration may change the bioavailability of methylmercury. The South Bay already is known to have high methylmercury concentrations, with methylmercury concentrations in several waterbirds species more than known toxicity thresholds where avian reproduction is impaired. In this 2013 study, we continued monitoring bird egg mercury concentrations in response to the restoration of the Pond A8/A7/A5 Complex to a potential tidal marsh in the future. The restoration of the Pond A8/A7/A5 Complex began in autumn 2010, and the Pond A8 Notch was opened 5 feet (one of eight gates) to muted tidal action on June 1, 2011, and then closed in the winter. In autumn 2010, internal levees between Ponds A8, A7, and A5 were breached and water depths were substantially increased by flooding the Pond A8/A7/A5 Complex in February 2011. In June 2012, 15 feet (three of eight gates) of the Pond A8 Notch was opened, and then closed in December 2012. In June 2013, 15 feet of the Pond A8 Notch again was opened, and the Pond A8/A7/A5 Complex was a relatively deep and large pond with muted tidal action in the summer. This report synthesizes waterbird data from the 2013 breeding season, and combines it with our prior study’s data from 2010 and 2011.

  11. Marsh expansion at Calaveras Point Marsh, South San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Elizabeth Burke

    2008-07-01

    Studies of shoreline progradation along low-energy vegetated shorelines have been limited, as these environments are generally experiencing erosion rather than deposition, with extreme erosion rates frequently found. This study examined yearly changes along a vegetated shoreline at Calaveras Point Marsh, South San Francisco Bay, California, using aerial photography, to determine the roles of climatic, watershed, and coastal process in driving shoreline changes. In addition, sediment accumulation was monitored on a yearly basis at 48 locations across the marsh to determine the role of geomorphic factors in promoting accumulation. Calaveras Point Marsh was found to have expanded from 49.26 ± 5.2 to 165.7 ± 4.7 ha between 1975 and 2005. Although the rate of marsh expansion was not positively correlated with yearly variability in precipitation, local streamflow, delta outflow, water level observations, population growth, or ENSO indices, marsh growth was greater during years of higher than average temperatures. Warmer temperatures may have promoted the recruitment and growth of Spartina foliosa, a C 4 grass known to be highly responsive to temperature. Other factors, such as the formation of a coastal barrier, a recent change in the location of the mouth of the Guadalupe River, and channel readjustment in response to diking are credited with driving the bulk of the marsh expansion. Sediment accumulation was found to be high closest to channels and to the shoreline, at low elevations and in recently vegetated marsh. Globally, the pace of sea level rise exerts the primary control on wetland development and persistence. However, at local geographic scales, factors such as tectonic events, modifications to natural sediment transport pathways or land use changes may overwhelm the effects of regional sea level rise, and allow for wetlands to develop, expand and persist despite rapid sea level rise.

  12. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-236-1725, San Francisco Opera Costume Shop, San Francisco, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belanger, P.L.; Okawa, M.T.

    1986-09-01

    An employee representative of the San Francisco Opera Costume Shop requested an investigation of possible exposure to chemical substances by crafts persons and textile artists. No overexposure to chemicals was found during cloth stripping and dying operations, boot deglazing, hat lacquering, fabric painting or casting operations. During boot spray painting, two personal air samples contained methylene chloride at 11.9 and 25 parts per million; both above the NIOSH recommended criteria for methylene-chloride exposure.

  13. Bottom-up, decision support system development : a wetlandsalinity management application in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-05-10

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin ofCalifornia's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratorywildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during theannual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetland contain saltwhich, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdownperiod, negatively impacts downstream agricultural riparian waterdiverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinityto the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-pointsources, now addresses return flows from seasonally managed wetlands.Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means ofmatching wetland return flows to the assimilative capacity of the SanJoaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring anddecision support systems to implement this concept have failed forreasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed inthe context of more general challenges facing the successfulimplementation of environmental monitoring, modelling and decisionsupport systems. The paper then provides details of a current researchand development project which will ultimately provide wetland managerswith the means of matching salt exports with the available assimilativecapacity of the San Joaquin River, when fully implemented. Manipulationof the traditional wetland drawdown comes at a potential cost to thesustainability of optimal wetland moist soil plant habitat in thesewetlands - hence the project provides appropriate data and a feedback andresponse mechanism for wetland managers to balance improvements to SanJoaquin River quality with internally-generated information on the healthof the wetland resource. The author concludes the paper by arguing thatthe architecture of the current project decision support system, whencoupled with recent advances in environmental data acquisition, dataprocessing and information dissemination technology, holds

  14. The Performance of Nearshore Dredge Disposal at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California, 2005-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hansen, Jeff E.; Elias, Edwin

    2009-01-01

    Ocean Beach, California, contains an erosion hot spot in the shadow of the San Francisco ebb tidal delta that threatens valuable public infrastructure as well as the safe recreational use of the beach. In an effort to reduce the erosion at this location a new plan for the management of sediment dredged annually from the main shipping channel at the mouth of San Francisco Bay was implemented in May 2005 by the United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District (USACE). The USACE designated a temporary nearshore dredge disposal site for the annual disposal of about 230,000 m3 (300,000 yd3) of sand about 750 m offshore and slightly south of the erosion hot spot, in depths between approximately 9 and 14 m. The site has now been used three times for a total sediment disposal of about 690,000 m3 (about 900,000 yds3). The disposal site was chosen because it is in a location where strong tidal currents and open-ocean waves can potentially feed sediment toward the littoral zone in the reach of the beach that is experiencing critical erosion, as well as prevent further scour on an exposed outfall pipe. The onshore migration of sediment from the target disposal location might feed the primary longshore bar or the nearshore zone, and provide a buffer to erosion that peaks during winter months when large waves impact the region. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has been monitoring and modeling the bathymetric evolution of the test dredge disposal site and the adjacent coastal region since inception in May 2005. This paper reports on the first 2.5 years of this monitoring program effort (May 2005 to December 2007) and assesses the short-term coastal response. Here are the key findings of this report: *Approximately half of the sediment that has been placed in the nearshore dredge-disposal site during the 2.5 years of this study remains within the dredge focus area. *In the winter of 2006-7, large waves transported the dredge-mound material onshore. *High

  15. Post-Miocene Right Separation on the San Gabriel and Vasquez Creek Faults, with Supporting Chronostratigraphy, Western San Gabriel Mountains, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Larry A.; McCulloh, Thane H.; Denison, Rodger E.; Morin, Ronald W.; Enrico, Roy J.; Barron, John A.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    The right lateral San Gabriel Fault Zone in southern California extends from the northwestern corner of the Ridge Basin southeastward to the eastern end of the San Gabriel Mountains. It bifurcates to the southeast in the northwestern San Gabriel Mountains. The northern and older branch curves eastward in the range interior. The southern younger branch, the Vasquez Creek Fault, curves southeastward to merge with the Sierra Madre Fault Zone, which separates the San Gabriel Mountains from the northern Los Angeles Basin margin. An isolated exposure of partly macrofossiliferous nearshore shallow-marine sandstone, designated the Gold Canyon beds, is part of the southwest wall of the fault zone 5.5 km northwest of the bifurcation. These beds contain multiple subordinate breccia-conglomerate lenses and are overlain unconformably by folded Pliocene-Pleistocene Saugus Formation fanglomerate. The San Gabriel Fault Zone cuts both units. Marine macrofossils from the Gold Canyon beds give an age of 5.2+-0.3 Ma by 87Sr/86Sr analyses. Magnetic polarity stratigraphy dates deposition of the overlying Saugus Formation to between 2.6 Ma and 0.78 Ma. Distinctive metaplutonic rocks of the Mount Lowe intrusive suite in the San Gabriel Range are the source of certain clasts in both the Gold Canyon beds and Saugus Formation. Angular clasts of nondurable Paleocene sandstone also occur in the Gold Canyon beds. The large size and angularity of some of the largest of both clast types in breccia-conglomerate lenses of the beds suggest landslides or debris flows from steep terrain. Sources of Mount Lowe clasts, originally to the north or northeast, are now displaced southeastward by faulting and are located between the San Gabriel and Vasquez Creek faults, indicating as much as 12+-2 km of post-Miocene Vasquez Creek Fault right separation, in accord with some prior estimates. Post-Miocene right slip thus transferred onto the Vasquez Creek Fault southeast of the bifurcation. The right separation

  16. Sea level fluctuations in central California at subtidal to decadal and longer time scales with implications for San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, H.F.; Noble, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Sea level elevations from near the mouth of San Francisco Bay are used to describe the low-frequency variability of forcing of the coastal ocean on the Bay at a variety of temporal scales. About 90% of subtidal fluctuations in sea level in San Francisco Bay are driven by the sea level variations in the coastal ocean that propagate into the Bay at the estuary mouth. We use the 100-year sea level record available at San Francisco to document a 1.9 mm/yr mean sea level rise, and to determine fluctuations related to El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and other climatic events. At time scales greater than 1 year, ENSO dominates the sea level signal and can result in fluctuations in sea level of 10-15 cm. Alongshore wind stress data from central California are also analyzed to determine the impact of changes in coastal elevation at the mouth of San Francisco Bay within the synoptic wind band of 2-30 days. At least 40% of the subtidal fluctuations in sea level of the Bay are tied to the large-scale regional wind field affecting sea level variations in the coastal ocean, with little local, direct wind forcing of the Bay itself. The majority of the subtidal sea level fluctuations within the Bay that are not related to the coastal ocean sea level signal are forced by an east-west sea level gradient resulting from tidally induced variations in sea level at specific beat frequencies that are enhanced in the northern reach of the Bay. River discharge into the Bay through the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Delta also contributes to the east-west gradient, but to a lesser degree. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Confirmatory sediment analyses and solid and suspended particulate phase bioassays on sediment from Oakland Inner Harbor, San Francisco, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Apts, C.W.; Woodruff, D.L.; Barrows, M.E.; Cullinan, V.I.; Hyland, J.L.; Campbell, J.F.

    1988-12-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, was authorized by the US Congress to deepen the navigation channels of Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, California. During review of the environmental impact statement required for this dredging and disposal project, a panel of national experts approved the open-water disposal of dredged sediment from selected areas within the Inner Harbor, subject to results of confirmatory solid phase bioassays. The San Francisco District of the Corps requested the Battle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to conduct these confirmatory studies. The studies provided technical data for an evaluation of the potential environmental impact of this project. Within extremely narrow time constraints, these studies provided chemical and biological information required by ocean dumping regulations to determine suitability of the Oakland Inner Harbor and turning basin sediment for ocean disposal. 23 refs., 18 figs., 45 tabs.

  18. Mercury in birds of San Francisco Bay-Delta, California: trophic pathways, bioaccumulation, and ecotoxicological risk to avian reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Heinz, Gary; De La Cruz, Susan E. W.; Takekawa, John Y.; Miles, A. Keith; Adelsbach, Terrence L.; Herzog, Mark P.; Bluso-Demers, Jill D.; Demers, Scott A.; Herring, Garth; Hoffman, David J.; Hartman, Christopher A.; Willacker, James J.; Suchanek, Thomas H.; Schwarzbach, Steven E.; Maurer, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    San Francisco Bay Estuary in northern California has a legacy of mercury contamination, which could reduce the health and reproductive success of waterbirds in the estuary. The goal of this study was to use an integrated field and laboratory approach to evaluate the risks of mercury exposure to birds in the estuary. We examined mercury bioaccumulation, and other contaminants of concern, in five waterbird species that depend heavily on San Francisco Bay Estuary for foraging and breeding habitat: American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), Forster’s terns (Sterna forsteri), Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia), and surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata). These species have different foraging habitats and diets that represent three distinct foraging guilds within the estuary’s food web. In this report, we provide an integrated synthesis of the primary findings from this study and results are synthesized from 54 peer-reviewed publications generated to date with other unpublished results.

  19. Oiled seabird rescue at the J.V. Fitzgerald Marine Reserve, San Mateo County, California, 1968-1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, H.R.

    1997-01-01

    Records of oiled and injured seabirds at the J.V. Fitzgerald Marine Reserve, San Mateo County, California, were collated from the daily log at the Reserve for the period 1968-1995. These records serve to demonstrate that oil spills and chronic oiling have occurred frequently in this area, just south of San Francisco. Common Murres (Uria aalge) were the most frequently-oiled species rescued at the Reserve. Greater efforts should be made by wildlife rehabilitators to collate large volumes of past data (prior to the early 1990s) on oiled and injured seabirds for similar documentation of large or moderate oil spills (including undocumented or poorly-known spills), chronic oiling from small spills, and injuries from other sources.

  20. Quaternary crustal deformation along a major branch of the San Andreas fault in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, G.E.; Lajoie, K.R.; Wehmiller, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Deformed marine terraces and alluvial deposits record Quaternary crustal deformation along segments of a major, seismically active branch of the San Andreas fault which extends 190 km SSE roughly parallel to the California coastline from Bolinas Lagoon to the Point Sur area. Most of this complex fault zone lies offshore (mapped by others using acoustical techniques), but a 4-km segment (Seal Cove fault) near Half Moon Bay and a 26-km segment (San Gregorio fault) between San Gregorio and Point Ano Nuevo lie onshore. At Half Moon Bay, right-lateral slip and N-S horizontal compression are expressed by a broad, synclinal warp in the first (lowest: 125 ka?) and second marine terraces on the NE side of the Seal Cove fault. This structure plunges to the west at an oblique angle into the fault plane. Linear, joint0controlled stream courses draining the coastal uplands are deflected toward the topographic depression along the synclinal axis where they emerge from the hills to cross the lowest terrace. Streams crossing the downwarped part of this terrace adjacent to Half Moon Bay are depositing alluvial fans, whereas streams crossing the uplifted southern limb of the syncline southwest of the bay are deeply incised. Minimum crustal shortening across this syncline parallel to the fault is 0.7% over the past 125 ka, based on deformation of the shoreline angle of the first terrace. Between San Gregorio and Point Ano Nuevo the entire fault zone is 2.5-3.0 km wide and has three primary traces or zones of faulting consisting of numerous en-echelon and anastomozing secondary fault traces. Lateral discontinuities and variable deformation of well-preserved marine terrace sequences help define major structural blocks and document differential motions in this area and south to Santa Cruz. Vertical displacement occurs on all of the fault traces, but is small compared to horizontal displacement. Some blocks within the fault zone are intensely faulted and steeply tilted. One major block 0

  1. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of San Gregorio Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  2. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of San Francisco Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  3. University of California San Francisco (UCSF-1): Chemical-Genetic Interaction Mapping Strategy | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at University of California San Francisco (UCSF-1) developed a chemical-genetic interaction mapping strategy to uncover the impact of cancer gene expression on responses to a panel of emerging therapeutics. To study the impact of aberrant gene activity in isolation, they developed an isogenic model of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) using the hormone receptor negative MCF10A non-tumorigenic cell line derived from healthy breast tissue which is diploid and largely devoid of somatic alterations.

  4. Childhood asthma, air quality, and social suffering among Mexican Americans in California's San Joaquin Valley: "Nobody talks to us here".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Norah Anita; Pepper, David

    2009-10-01

    Nearly one in five Mexican American children residing in California's San Joaquin Valley (the Valley) in 2007 had an asthma attack at some point in their life. Numerous epidemiological studies have suggested that compared with other ethnic groups and Latino subgroups residing in the United States, Mexican origin children have the lowest rates of pediatric asthma. Ethnographic research conducted in central California, however, suggests otherwise. Known for its agricultural produce, extreme poverty, and poor air quality, the Valley is a magnet for the Mexican immigrant farm worker population. We conducted an exploratory ethnographic study to examine health disparities, social suffering, and childhood asthma in the Valley. Many Valley residents believe that their children's health concerns are being ignored. Open-ended interviews uncovered a largely rural community suffering not only from the effects of childhood asthma but the inability to have their experiences taken seriously.

  5. A Breeding Season Survey of the California Clapper Rail (Rallus longirostritis obsoletus) in South San Francisco Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this project was to determine the densities and nesting success, and to investigate the habitat requirements of California Clapper Rails breeding in...

  6. Hazard-evaluation and technical-assistance report HETA 90-122-l2073, technical assistance to San Francisco General Hospital and Medical Center, San Francisco, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, C.E.; Seitz, T.

    1990-10-01

    In response to a request from the Director of the Environmental Health and Safety Department of the San Francisco General Hospital and Medical Center, located in San Francisco, California, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at that site. Concern existed about exposures to hazards while operating the germicidal lamp at the facility. Germicidal lamps were used to disinfect the air in tuberculosis and aerosolized pentamidine clinics. The workers wore no protective eye wear. All rooms used a 30 watt germicidal lamp. Lower wattage bulbs in the smaller rooms would have reduced occupational ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Reflectance levels of UV radiation were quite high and varied. Worker exposure to germicidal lamp UV levels was dependent on many factors, some of the most important ones being the position of the bulb in the room, age of the bulb, obstruction of the UV radiation by objects near the bulb, and the height of the worker. While there are no consensus guidelines available on ventilation systems designed for areas where germicidal lamps are used, the provision of good room air distribution and mixing is recommended to prevent stagnant air conditions or short circuiting of supply air within the room. Bulb changers need to be aware of the need for protective clothing and gloves for protection from both the UV radiation levels as well as possible glass breakage.

  7. California GAMA Program: Ground-Water Quality Data in the Northern San Joaquin Basin Study Unit, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth; Milby Dawson, Barbara J.

    2006-01-01

    Growing concern over the closure of public-supply wells because of ground-water contamination has led the State Water Board to establish the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. With the aid of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the program goals are to enhance understanding and provide a current assessment of ground-water quality in areas where ground water is an important source of drinking water. The Northern San Joaquin Basin GAMA study unit covers an area of approximately 2,079 square miles (mi2) across four hydrologic study areas in the San Joaquin Valley. The four study areas are the California Department of Water Resources (CADWR) defined Tracy subbasin, the CADWR-defined Eastern San Joaquin subbasin, the CADWR-defined Cosumnes subbasin, and the sedimentologically distinct USGS-defined Uplands study area, which includes portions of both the Cosumnes and Eastern San Joaquin subbasins. Seventy ground-water samples were collected from 64 public-supply, irrigation, domestic, and monitoring wells within the Northern San Joaquin Basin GAMA study unit. Thirty-two of these samples were collected in the Eastern San Joaquin Basin study area, 17 in the Tracy Basin study area, 10 in the Cosumnes Basin study area, and 11 in the Uplands Basin study area. Of the 32 samples collected in the Eastern San Joaquin Basin, 6 were collected using a depth-dependent sampling pump. This pump allows for the collection of samples from discrete depths within the pumping well. Two wells were chosen for depth-dependent sampling and three samples were collected at varying depths within each well. Over 350 water-quality field parameters, chemical constituents, and microbial constituents were analyzed and are reported as concentrations and as detection frequencies, by compound classification as well as for individual constituents, for the Northern San Joaquin Basin study unit as a whole and for each individual study area

  8. Status of the Island Night Lizard and Two Non-Native Lizards on Outlying Landing Field San Nicolas Island, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellers, Gary M.; Drost, Charles A.; Murphey, Thomas G.

    2008-01-01

    More than 900 individually marked island night lizards (Xantusia riversiana) were captured on San Nicolas Island, California, between 1984 and 2007 as part of an ongoing study to monitor the status of this threatened species. Our data suggest that at least a few lizards are probably more than 20 years old, and one lizard would be 31.5 years old if it grew at an average rate for the population. Ages of 20 and 30 years seem reasonable given the remarkably slow growth during capture intervals of more than a decade for five of the lizards which we estimated to be 20 or more years old. Like other lizards, island night lizard growth rates vary by size, with larger lizards growing more slowly. In general, growth rates were somewhat greater on San Nicolas Island (compared with Santa Barbara Island), and this increase was sustained through all of the intermediate size classes. The higher growth rate may account for the somewhat larger lizards present on San Nicolas Island, although we cannot discount the possibility that night lizards on San Nicolas are merely living longer. The high percentage of small lizards in the Eucalyptus habitat might seem to reflect a healthy population in that habitat, but the high proportion of small lizards appears to be caused by good reproduction in the 1900s and substantially poorer reproduction in subsequent years. The Eucalyptus habitat has dried quite a bit in recent years. Night lizards in the Haplopappus/Grassland habitat have shown an increase in the proportion of larger lizards since 2000. There has also been an increase in the proportion of large lizards in the Rock Cobble habitat at Redeye Beach. However, there are has been some change in habitat with more elephant seals occupying the same area just above the high tide as do the night lizards. Southern alligator lizards and side-blotched lizards are both non-native on San Nicolas Island. Neither lizard causes obvious harm to island night lizards, and management time and effort should

  9. 75 FR 28509 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Association of Home Builders v. San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District, No. 08-17309...

  10. 76 FR 45212 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In this action, we are proposing to approve San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... the environment. San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District SJVUAPCD is an...

  11. IBC's 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 3-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H J; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3-6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3-5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4-5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society's special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5-6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy.

  12. Observations of basin ground motions from a dense seismic array in San Jose, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, A.; Carver, D.; Cranswick, E.; Bice, T.; Sell, R.; Hanson, S.

    2001-01-01

    We installed a dense array of 41 digital seismographs in San Jose, California, to evaluate in detail the effects of a deep sedimentary basin and shallow sedimentary deposits on earthquake ground motions. This urban array is located near the eastern edge of the Santa Clara Valley and spans the Evergreen sedimentary basin identified by gravity data. Average station spacing is 1 km, with three stations initially spaced 110 m apart. Despite the high-noise urban environment, the stations of the array successfully triggered on and recorded small local earthquakes (M 2.5-2.8 at 10-25 km distance) and larger regional events such as the M 5.0 Bolinas earthquake (90 km distance), M 4.6-5.6 earthquakes near Mammoth Lakes (270 km distance), M 4.9-5.6 events in western Nevada (420 km distance) and the M 7.1 Hector Mine earthquake (590 km distance). Maps of spectral ratios across the array show that the highest amplitudes in all frequency bands studied (0.125-8 Hz) are generally observed at stations farther from the eastern edge of the Santa Clara Valley. Larger spectral amplitudes are often observed above the western edge of the Evergreen Basin. Snapshots of the recorded wavefield crossing the array for regional events to the east reveal that large, low-frequency (0.125-0.5 Hz) arrivals after the S-wave travel from south to north across the array. A moving-window, cross-correlation analysis finds that these later arrivals are surface waves traveling from the south. The timing and propagation direction of these arrivals indicates that they were likely produced by scattering of incident S waves at the border of the Santa Clara Valley to the south of the array. It is remarkable that the largest low-frequency phases at many of the valley sites for regional events to the east are basin surface waves coming from a direction about 70 degrees different from that of the epicenters. Basin surface waves emanating from the eastern edge of the valley are also identified by the cross

  13. Probabilistic Methodology for Estimation of Number and Economic Loss (Cost) of Future Landslides in the San Francisco Bay Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovelli, Robert A.; Coe, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    The Probabilistic Landslide Assessment Cost Estimation System (PLACES) presented in this report estimates the number and economic loss (cost) of landslides during a specified future time in individual areas, and then calculates the sum of those estimates. The analytic probabilistic methodology is based upon conditional probability theory and laws of expectation and variance. The probabilistic methodology is expressed in the form of a Microsoft Excel computer spreadsheet program. Using historical records, the PLACES spreadsheet is used to estimate the number of future damaging landslides and total damage, as economic loss, from future landslides caused by rainstorms in 10 counties of the San Francisco Bay region in California. Estimates are made for any future 5-year period of time. The estimated total number of future damaging landslides for the entire 10-county region during any future 5-year period of time is about 330. Santa Cruz County has the highest estimated number of damaging landslides (about 90), whereas Napa, San Francisco, and Solano Counties have the lowest estimated number of damaging landslides (5?6 each). Estimated direct costs from future damaging landslides for the entire 10-county region for any future 5-year period are about US $76 million (year 2000 dollars). San Mateo County has the highest estimated costs ($16.62 million), and Solano County has the lowest estimated costs (about $0.90 million). Estimated direct costs are also subdivided into public and private costs.

  14. San Andreas fault geometry at Desert Hot Springs, California, and its effects on earthquake hazards and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Gandhok, G.

    2009-01-01

    The Mission Creek and Banning faults are two of the principal strands of the San Andreas fault zone in the northern Coachella Valley of southern California. Structural characteristics of the faults affect both regional earthquake hazards and local groundwater resources. We use seismic, gravity, and geological data to characterize the San Andreas fault zone in the vicinity of Desert Hot Springs. Seismic images of the upper 500 m of the Mission Creek fault at Desert Hot Springs show multiple fault strands distributed over a 500 m wide zone, with concentrated faulting within a central 200 m wide area of the fault zone. High-velocity (up to 5000 m=sec) rocks on the northeast side of the fault are juxtaposed against a low-velocity (6.0) earthquakes in the area (in 1948 and 1986) occurred at or near the depths (~10 to 12 km) of the merged (San Andreas) fault. Large-magnitude earthquakes that nucleate at or below the merged fault will likely generate strong shaking from guided waves along both fault zones and from amplified seismic waves in the low-velocity basin between the two fault zones. The Mission Creek fault zone is a groundwater barrier with the top of the water table varying by 60 m in depth and the aquifer varying by about 50 m in thickness across a 200 m wide zone of concentrated faulting.

  15. Under the Golden Gate bridge: views of the sea floor near the entrance to San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Peter; Barnard, Patrick L.; Chin, John L.; Hanes, Daniel; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Iampietro, Pat J.; Gardner, James V.

    2006-01-01

    San Francisco Bay in Northern California is one of the largest and most altered estuaries within the United States. The sea floor within the bay as well as at its entrance is constantly changing due to strong tidal currents, aggregate mining, dredge disposal, and the creation of new land using artificial fill. Understanding this dynamic sea floor is critical for addressing local environmental issues, which include defining pollution transport pathways, deciphering tectonics, and identifying benthic habitats. Mapping commercial interests such as safe ship navigation and dredge disposal is also significantly aided by such understanding. Over the past decade, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB) in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACOE) and the Center for Integrative Coastal Observation, Research and Education (CICORE) have partnered to map central San Francisco Bay and its entrance under the Golden Gate Bridge using multibeam echosounders. These sonar systems can continuously map to produce 100 percent coverage of the sea floor at meter-scale resolution and thus produce an unprecedented view of the floor of the bay. This poster shows views of the sea floor in west-central San Francisco Bay around Alcatraz and Angel Islands, underneath the Golden Gate Bridge, and through its entrance from the Pacific Ocean. The sea floor is portrayed as a shaded relief surface generated from the multibeam data color-coded for depth from light blues for the shallowest values to purples for the deepest. The land regions are portrayed by USGS digital orthophotographs (DOQs) overlaid on USGS digital elevation models (DEMs). The water depths have a 4x vertical exaggeration while the land areas have a 2x vertical exaggeration.

  16. Crustal structure of the coastal and marine San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Tom

    2002-01-01

    As of the time of this writing, the San Francisco Bay region is home to about 6.8 million people, ranking fifth among population centers in the United States. Most of these people live on the coastal lands along San Francisco Bay, the Sacramento River delta, and the Pacific coast. The region straddles the tectonic boundary between the Pacific and North American Plates and is crossed by several strands of the San Andreas Fault system. These faults, which are stressed by about 4 cm of relative plate motion each year, pose an obvious seismic hazard.

  17. Radioactive Cesium from Fukushima Japan Detected in Bluefin Tuna off California: Implications for Public Health and for Tracking Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher N. S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Bluefin tuna are highly migratory pelagic fish. Pacific bluefin tuna are spawned in waters off Japan and some juveniles migrate across the Pacific to waters off California. Bluefin that had recently migrated and caught in waters off San Diego, California in August 2011 were found to have 134Cs and 137Cs in their muscle tissue, at concentrations that could only have come from the Fukushima nuclear reactor in Japan. Bluefin tuna caught 3 years earlier off San Diego and yellowfin tuna that are resident to the eastern Pacific had no 134Cs and only background levels of 137Cs. The radioactivity in tuna attributable to these Cs isotopes was only 2.8% of that from the naturally occurring 40K, suggesting that consumption of these fish poses little risk to public health. The presence of these isotopes in animal tissues can be used to discern migratory routes and timing for those animals that use the western Pacific.

  18. Breeding Season Study of the California Clapper Rail in San Francisco Bay, 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goals of this study were to further investigate the suitability of brackish marshes in south San Francisco Bay to support breeding rails and to examine how the...

  19. 76 FR 68106 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... Unified Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  20. 76 FR 33181 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve a revision to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control..., Air pollution control, Intergovernmental relations, Ozone, Reporting and recordkeeping...

  1. 77 FR 32493 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley Unified Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... Unified Air Pollution Control District; Prevention of Significant Deterioration AGENCY: Environmental... submitted for the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (District) portion of the... authority to address disproportionate human health or environmental effects with practical, appropriate,...

  2. Geologic and bathymetric reconnaissance overview of the San Pedro shelf region, southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents a series of maps that describe the bathymetry and late Quaternary geology of the San Pedro shelf area as interpreted from seismic-reflection...

  3. 77 FR 24883 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control,...

  4. 76 FR 56706 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Intergovernmental relations, Ozone, Reporting and...

  5. 77 FR 35329 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control,...

  6. 76 FR 52623 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Intergovernmental...

  7. 2007 California Department of Water Resources Topographic LiDAR: San Joaquin Delta

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from LIDAR flights of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta conducted during late January and February of 2007. The work was conducted under contract...

  8. 76 FR 37044 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control..., Air pollution control, Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Ozone, Particulate...

  9. 76 FR 70886 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  10. 77 FR 2228 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  11. 77 FR 25384 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Intergovernmental relations, Ozone, Reporting and...

  12. 76 FR 53640 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  13. 76 FR 47076 - Revision to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of a revision to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  14. 76 FR 69135 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  15. 77 FR 35327 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control,...

  16. 78 FR 6740 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley United Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley United Air Pollution Control... CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  17. 76 FR 56134 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... protection, Air pollution control, Intergovernmental relations, Ozone, Reporting and...

  18. The Effects of Predators and Habitat on Sea Urchin Density and Behavior in Southern California Kelp Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, Kathryn D.

    2009-01-01

    It is well documented that sea urchins can have vast impacts on kelp forest community structure as a result of kelp grazing. Despite the ecological importance of sea urchins, direct field studies on the relative effects urchin predators have on shaping urchin populations are rare for southern California. I conducted surveys at three kelp forest sites near San Diego, CA, including heavily fished and marine reserve sites, to measure sea urchin size, abundance, and habitat use as well as the abu...

  19. Breschini and Haversat, eds.: Analysis of South-Central California Shell Artifacts: Studies from Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara Counties

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of South-Central Californian Shell Artifacts: Studies from Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara Counties. Gary S. Breschmi and Trudy Haversat, eds. Salinas: Coyote Press Archives of California Prehistory No. 23, 1988, xiv + 105 pp., 21 figs., 28 tables, $8.70, (paper).

  20. Proceedings of the Second Life Education Workshop, Part of the Second Life Community Convention (1st, San Francisco, California, August 18-20, 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Daniel, Ed.; Kemp, Jeremy, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This document is a compilation of 14 papers from presentations and posters of the Second Life Education Workshop at the Second Life Community Convention, presented at the Fort Mason Centre in San Francisco, California in August 2006. Following a foreword (John Bransford and Drue Gawel); preface (John Lester); and word from the chairs (Daniel…

  1. Liver lesions in demersal fishes near a large ocean outfall on the San Pedro Shelf, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmadjian, Edward; Perkins, Edwin M; Phillips, Charles R; Heilprin, Daniel J; Watts, Susan D; Diener, Douglas R; Myers, Mark S; Koerner, Kelly A; Mengel, Michael J; Robertson, George; Armstrong, Jeffrey L; Lissner, Andrew L; Frank, Victoria L

    2008-03-01

    The prevalence of toxicopathic liver lesions in demersal fish on the San Pedro Shelf, California was determined for a 15-year period (1988-2003). Fish livers were sampled at fixed locations as part of the Orange County Sanitation Districts (OCSD) ocean monitoring program. Histopathological examination of selected fish liver tissues was studied to determine whether the wastewater discharge had affected fish health. The prevalence of toxicopathic lesion classes neoplasms (NEO), preneoplastic foci of cellular alteration (FCA), and hydropic vacuolation (HYDVAC) varied among species and locations. For all species sampled, severe lesions occurred in 6.2% of the fish examined (n=7,694). HYDVAC (4.1%) was the most common toxicopathic lesion type followed by FCA (1.4%) and NEO (0.7%). HYDVAC occurred only in white croaker (Genyonemus lineatus), accounting for 84.8% of the toxicopathic lesions for this species. Prevalence of HYDVAC, NEO, and FCA in white croaker was 15.2, 2.0, and 0.7%, respectively. The prevalence of HYDVAC and NEO in white croaker increased with age and size but there was no sexual difference. A linear regression model was used for hypothesis testing to account for significant differences in fish size (and age for croakers) at the different sampling locations. This analysis showed that for HYDVAC there was no spatial or location effect for lesion rate or size/age of onset. For NEO, the model predicted that white croaker near the wastewater outfall may acquire these lesions at a smaller size/younger age, and at a higher rate, than at other sites. However, this result may be biased due to the unequal size frequency distributions and the low prevalence of NEO in white croaker at the different sampling sites. Bigmouth sole (Hippoglossina stomata) had a prevalence of FCA and NEO of 1.3 and 0.35%, respectively, but the prevalence and distribution of lesions was too few for statistical testing. There was no sexual difference for lesion prevalence in hornyhead

  2. Monitoring and modeling conditions for regional shallow landslide initiation in the San Francisco Bay area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B. D.; Stock, J. D.; Godt, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Intense winter storms in the San Francisco Bay area (SFBA) of California often trigger widespread landsliding, including debris flows that originate as shallow (initiation thresholds are available for the SFBA, antecedent soil moisture conditions also play a major role in determining the likelihood for landslide generation from a given storm. Previous research has demonstrated that antecedent triggering conditions can be obtained using pre-storm precipitation thresholds (e.g., 250-400 mm of seasonal pre-storm rainfall). However, these types of thresholds do not account for the often cyclic pattern of wetting and drying that can occur early in the winter storm season (i.e. October - December), and which may skew the applicability of precipitation-only based thresholds. To account for these cyclic and constantly evolving soil moisture conditions, we have pursued methods to measure soil moisture directly and integrate these measurements into predictive analyses. During the past three years, the USGS installed a series of four subsurface hydrology monitoring stations in shallow landslide-prone locations of the SFBA to establish a soil-moisture-based antecedent threshold. In addition to soil moisture sensors, the monitoring stations are each equipped with piezometers to record positive pore water pressure that is likely required for shallow landslide initiation and a rain gauge to compare storm intensities with existing precipitation-based thresholds. Each monitoring station is located on a natural, grassy hillslope typically composed of silty sands, underlain by sandstone, sloping at approximately 30°, and with a depth to bedrock of approximately 1 meter - conditions typical of debris flow generation in the SFBA. Our observations reveal that various locations respond differently to seasonal precipitation, with some areas (e.g., Marin County) remaining at higher levels of saturation for longer periods of time during the winter compared to other areas (e.g., the East

  3. Chinese mitten crab surveys of San Joaquin River basin and Suisun Marsh, California, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jason T.; Brown, Larry R.

    2001-01-01

    Juvenile Chinese mitten crabs (Eriocheir sinensis) are known to use both brackish and freshwater habitats as rearing areas. The objectives of this study were to examine the habitat use and potential effects of mitten crabs in the freshwater habitats of the San Joaquin River drainage up-stream of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. After several unsuccessful attempts to catch or observe mitten crabs by trapping, electrofishing, and visual observations, the study was redirected to determine the presence of crabs in the San Joaquin River (in the vicinity of Mossdale) and Suisun Marsh. Monthly surveys using baited traps in the San Joaquin River were done from June through November 2000 and in the Suisun Marsh from August through October 2000. No mitten crabs were caught in the San Joaquin River Basin and only one mitten crab was caught in Suisun Marsh. Surveys were conducted at 92 locations in the San Joaquin River Basin by deploying 352 traps for 10,752 hours of trapping effort; in Suisun Marsh, 34 locations were investigated by deploying 150 traps for 3,600 hours of trapping effort. The baited traps captured a variety of organisms, including catfishes (Ictularidae), yellowfin gobies (Acantho-gobius flavimanus), and crayfish (Decapoda). It is unclear whether the failure to capture mitten crabs in the San Joaquin River Basin and Suisun Marsh was due to ineffective trapping methods, or repre-sents a general downward trend in populations of juvenile mitten crabs in these potential rearing areas or a temporary decline related to year-class strength. Available data (since 1998) on the number of mitten crabs entrained at federal and state fish salvage facilities indicate a downward trend in the number of crabs, which may indicate a declining trend in use of the San Joaquin River Basin by juvenile mitten crabs. Continued monitoring for juvenile Chinese mitten crabs in brackish and freshwater portions of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basins is needed to better assess the

  4. Age, distribution, and stratigraphic relationship of rock units in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 5 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosford Scheirer, Allegra; Magoon, Leslie B.

    2008-01-01

    The San Joaquin Basin is a major petroleum province that forms the southern half of California’s Great Valley, a 700-km-long, asymmetrical basin that originated between a subduction zone to the west and the Sierra Nevada to the east. Sedimentary fill and tectonic structures of the San Joaquin Basin record the Mesozoic through Cenozoic geologic history of North America’s western margin. More than 25,000 feet (>7,500 meters) of sedimentary rocks overlie the basement surface and provide a nearly continuous record of sedimentation over the past ~100 m.y. Further, depositional geometries and fault structures document the tectonic evolution of the region from forearc setting to strike-slip basin to transpressional margin. Sedimentary architecture in the San Joaquin Basin is complicated because of these tectonic regimes and because of lateral changes in depositional environment and temporal changes in relative sea level. Few formations are widespread across the basin. Consequently, a careful analysis of sedimentary facies is required to unravel the basin’s depositional history on a regional scale. At least three high-quality organic source rocks formed in the San Joaquin Basin during periods of sea level transgression and anoxia. Generated on the basin’s west side, hydrocarbons migrated into nearly every facies type in the basin, from shelf and submarine fan sands to diatomite and shale to nonmarine coarse-grained rocks to schist. In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources and future additions to reserves in the San Joaquin Valley of California (USGS San Joaquin Basin Province Assessment Team, this volume, chapter 1). Several research aims supported this assessment: identifying and mapping the petroleum systems, modeling the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, and defining the volumes of rock to be analyzed for additional resources. To better understand the three dimensional

  5. A survey of molecular marker compounds in sediments of San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostettler, Frances D.; Rapp, John B.; Geological Survey (U.S.) Pereira, Wilfred E.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.

    1994-01-01

    An areal survey of surficial sediments in San Francisco Bay has been conducted to evaluate the presence of extractable organic compounds. Molecular marker compounds studied include hydrocarbons (PAH's), chlorinated pesticides, and other organic compounds that provide information on sources of organic input into the Bay. Fairly uniform source profiles are seen throughout the Bay. Biomarker profiles contain mature constituents indicating anthropogenic influences and extensive sediment reworking. The dominant input signatures in San Francisco Bay sediment are those of anthropogenic PAH's from combustion and other sources, and long chain n-alkanes and n-aldehydes from terrigenous vascular plants. A comparison of the sums of the combustion PAH's and the terrigenous n-alkanes shows that an anthropogenic influence is dominant in the most urban parts of the Bay close to shore, and in mid-Bay channel areas, and a terrigenous signature is dominant nearshore in San Pablo Bay and at the southernmost station in South Bay.

  6. Isotopic Evidence of Nitrate Sources and its Relationship to Algae in the San Joaquin River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Young, M. B.; Stringfellow, W. T.; Borglin, S. E.; Kratzer, C. R.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Schmidt, C.; Rollog, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    Many competing demands have been placed on the San Joaquin River including deep water shipping, use as agricultural and drinking water, transport of agricultural and urban runoff, and recreation. These long-established demands limit the management options and increase the importance of understanding the river dynamics. The relationships among sources of water, nitrate, and algae in the San Joaquin River must be understood before management decisions can be made to optimize aquatic health. Isotopic analyses of water samples collected along the San Joaquin River in 2005-2007 have proven useful in assessing these relationships: sources of nitrate, the productivity of the San Joaquin River, and the relationship between nitrate and algae in the river. The San Joaquin River receives water locally from wetlands and agricultural return flow, and from three relatively large tributaries whose headwaters are in the Sierra Nevada. The lowest nitrate concentrations occur during periods of high flow when the proportion of water from the Sierra Nevada is relatively large, reflecting the effect of dilution from the big tributaries and indicating that a large fraction of the nitrate is of local origin. Nitrogen isotopes of nitrate in the San Joaquin River are relatively high (averaging about 12 per mil), suggesting a significant source from animal waste or sewage and/or the effects of denitrification. The d15N of nitrate varies inversely with concentration, indicating that these high isotopic values are also a local product. The d15N values of nitrate from most of the local tributaries is lower than that in the San Joaquin suggesting that nitrate from these tributaries does not account for a significant fraction of nitrate in the river. The source of the non-tributary nitrate must be either small unmeasured surface inputs or groundwater. To investigate whether groundwater might be a significant source of nitrate to the San Joaquin River, groundwater samples are being collected

  7. Increasing Hydrogen Ion Activity of Water in Two Reservoirs Supplying the San Francisco Bay Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, J. G.

    1981-10-01

    The hydrogen ion activity (H+) of water in two Sierra Nevada reservoirs (Pardee and Hetch Hetchy) that supply the San Francisco Bay area has been increasing with time over the period 1954-1979. This conclusion is based on weekly measurements ofpH at the two reservoirs and is supported by measurements of alkalinity which decreased at Pardee over the period 1944-1979. Based on linear models, the rate of the increasing (H+) was the same at both reservoirs, and (H+) varied concomitantly from year to year, suggesting a common, general cause. Mean monthly variation in (H+) corresponded to mean monthly variation in atmospheric pollution from a nine-county area around San Francisco Bay. The most likely cause of the increasing (H+) of reservoir waters is NOx from automobile exhausts primarily from the San Francisco Bay area.

  8. 76 FR 41745 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule... Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP... Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) Rule 4682, Polystyrene, Polyethylene,...

  9. Summary of California Clapper Rail Winter Populations in the San Francisco Bay, 1989 to 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The federal and state endangered California clapper rail, Rallus longirostris obsoletus. is a species that, until very recently, was on the verge of extinction. This...

  10. Survey for the California Black Rail at Tolay Creek, San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The California Black Rail (Laterallus jamaicensis coturniculus) is the smallest and most secretive member of the rail family and has been sparsely studied. It is a...

  11. AFSC/NMML/CCEP: Food Habits of Pinnipeds at San Miguel Island, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem Program (AFSC/NOAA) collects fecal samples to examine the diet of pinnipeds, including...

  12. AFSC/NMML/CCEP: Northern fur seal demography at San Miguel Island, California, 1974 - 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem Program (AFSC/NOAA) initiated a long-term marking program of northern fur seals (Callorhinus...

  13. Mixtecos en Baja California: El caso de San Quintín

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everardo Garduño

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presentan los múltiples aspectos por los que el valle de San Quintín es un lugar propicio para la horticultura; pero sobre todo el por qué es un polo de atracción de flujos migratorios provenientes, en su mayoria, de la Mixteca oaxaqueña. El autor hace un análisis de las condiciones de vida y trabajo de todos los migrantes indígenas en San Quintín, de su proceso de aculturación y de su integración social.

  14. Geophysical investigation of the fault architecture of the San Andreas - Calaveras Fault junction in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, J. T.; Jachens, R. C.; Graymer, R. W.; Ponce, D. A.; Simpson, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    We use potential-field modeling, surface geologic mapping, and relocated seismicity (Waldhauser and Schaff, 2008) to investigate the three-dimensional structure of the San Andreas-Calaveras Fault junction to gain insight into regional tectonics, fault kinematics, and seismic hazards. South of the San Francisco Bay area, the San Andreas and Hayward-Calaveras-Paicines fault zones join to become a single San Andreas Fault. The Paicines fault is the southern-most extension of the Calaveras fault zone. At the surface, the San Andreas and Paicines faults are both creeping (Ryder and Burgmann, 2008), and parallel each other for about 65 km, separated by only 2-3 km. Approximately 175 km of slip has been transferred from the San Andreas onto the Calaveras-Hayward fault system in this area. The current geometry of this junction is not kinematically sustainable without deformation and/or slip on additional fault surfaces in the region (Burford and Savage, 1972). Dislocation modeling involving slip on detachment faults rather than on only strike-slip faults better predicts observations of geodetic displacements in the junction area, signifying the possible existence of active horizontal or dipping structures (Burgmann, 1997). Geophysical evidence suggests that the San Andreas and Paicines faults dip away from eachother within the fault junction, reflecting regional compression across the junction, and we identify multiple structures that may transfer slip through this complex structural zone. Geophysical modeling and relocated seismicity show the San Andreas fault dips steeply to the southwest within the join. Interpretation of relocated seismicity indicates multiple dipping and sub-horizontal faults. In particular, along the northern and southern portions of the junction, northeast-dipping alignments of hypocenters, if projected to the surface, correlate with the trace of the Paicines fault. In addition, we identify a laterally extensive magnetic body 1-8 km below the

  15. Santa Clara Valley water district multi-aquifer monitoring-well site, Coyote Creek Outdoor Classroom, San Jose, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R.T.; Newhouse, M.W.; Wentworth, C.M.; Williams, C.F.; Noce, T.E.; Bennett, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD), has completed the first of several multiple-aquifer monitoring-well sites in the Santa Clara Valley. This site monitors ground-water levels and chemistry in the one of the major historic subsidence regions south of San Jose, California, at the Coyote Creek Outdoor Classroom (CCOC) (fig. 1) and provides additional basic information about the geology, hydrology, geochemistry, and subsidence potential of the upper- and lower-aquifer systems that is a major source of public water supply in the Santa Clara Valley. The site also serves as a science education exhibit at the outdoor classroom operated by SCVWD.

  16. Observed and simulated ground motions in the San Bernardino basin region for the Hector Mine, California, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, R.W.; Wald, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    During the MW 7.1 Hector Mine earthquake, peak ground velocities recorded at sites in the central San Bernardino basin region were up to 2 times larger and had significantly longer durations of strong shaking than sites just outside the basin. To better understand the effects of 3D structure on the long-period ground-motion response in this region, we have performed finite-difference simulations for this earthquake. The simulations are numerically accurate for periods of 2 sec and longer and incorporate the detailed spatial and temporal heterogeneity of source rupture, as well as complex 3D basin structure. Here, we analyze three models of the San Bernardino basin: model A (with structural constraints from gravity and seismic reflection data), model F (water well and seismic refraction data), and the Southern California Earthquake Center version 3 model (hydrologic and seismic refraction data). Models A and F are characterized by a gradual increase in sediment thickness toward the south with an abrupt step-up in the basement surface across the San Jacinto fault. The basin structure in the SCEC version 3 model has a nearly uniform sediment thickness of 1 km with little basement topography along the San Jacinto fault. In models A and F, we impose a layered velocity structure within the sediments based on the seismic refraction data and an assumed depth-dependent Vp/Vs ratio. Sediment velocities within the SCEC version 3 model are given by a smoothly varying rule-based function that is calibrated to the seismic refraction measurements. Due to computational limitations, the minimum shear-wave velocity is fixed at 600 m/sec in all of the models. Ground-motion simulations for both models A and F provide a reasonably good match to the amplitude and waveform characteristics of the recorded motions. In these models, surface waves are generated as energy enters the basin through the gradually sloping northern margin. Due to the basement step along the San Jacinto fault, the

  17. Design and implementation of an emergency environmental responsesystem to protect migrating salmon in the lower San Joaquin River,California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Jacobs, Karl C.

    2006-01-30

    In the past decade tens of millions of dollars have beenspent by water resource agencies in California to restore the nativesalmon fishery in the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries. Anexcavated deep water ship channel (DWSC), through which the river runs onits way to the Bay/Delta and Pacific Ocean, experiences episodes of lowdissolved oxygen which acts as a barrier to anadromous fish migration anda threat to the long-term survival of the salmon run. An emergencyresponse management system is under development to forecast theseepisodes of low dissolved oxygen and to deploy measures that will raisedissolved oxygen concentrations to prevent damage to the fisheryresource. The emergency response management system has been designed tointeract with a real-time water quality monitoring network and is servedby a comprehensive data management and forecasting model toolbox. TheBay/Delta and Tributaries (BDAT) Cooperative Data Management System is adistributed, web accessible database that contains terabytes ofinformation on all aspects of the ecology of the Bay/Delta and upperwatersheds. The complexity of the problem dictates data integration froma variety of monitoring programs. A unique data templating system hasbeen constructed to serve the needs of cooperating scientists who wish toshare their data and to simplify and streamline data uploading into themaster database. In this paper we demonstrate the utility of such asystem in providing decision support for management of the San JoaquinRiver fishery. We discuss how the system might be expanded to havefurther utility in coping with other emergencies and threats to watersupply system serving California's costal communities.

  18. Floods of January and February 1980 in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Kenneth L.; Crippen, John R.; Knott, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    During January and February 1980, storms caused substantial rises in streamflow throughout much of California. In mid-January flooding occurred in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada and in the central coast area. In late January and mid-February, high floodflows in streams in coastal southern California caused much damage and several deaths. The Tijuana River in northern Baja California and southern San Diego County flooded many square miles of lowlands as its flow during two separate flooding episodes exceeded all records. Most reservoirs in San Diego County spilled, several for the first time since their completion. Lake Elsinore, in eastern Riverside County, caused damage to lakeside property as it filled to an elevation not reached since 1916. February flooding in southern California was caused by a series of storms separated by short intervals. Some peaks of record were observed, and streamflow throughout the area remained high for a relatively long period. In many streams, the volume of sustained flow for periods of 7 and 15 consecutive days were the greatest that have occurred during the period of record. (USGS)

  19. Phosphate oxygen isotope ratios as a tracer for sources and cycling of phosphate in North San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Karen; Kendall, Carol; Silva, Steven R.; Young, Megan; Paytan, Adina

    2006-09-01

    A seasonal analysis assesing variations in the oxygen isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) was conducted in the San Francisco Bay estuarine system, California. Isotopic fractionation of oxygen in DIP (exchange of oxygen between phosphate and environmental water) at surface water temperatures occurs only as a result of enzyme-mediated, biological reactions. Accordingly, if phospate demand is low relative to input and phosphate is not heavily cycled in the ecosystem, the oxygen isotopic composition of DIP (δ18Op) will reflect the isotopic composition of the source of phosphate to the system. Such is the case for the North San Francisco Bay, an anthropogenically impacted estuary with high surface water phosphate concentrations. Variability in the δ18Op in the bay is primarily controlled by mixing of water masses with different δ18Op signatures. The δ18Op values range from 11.4‰ at the Sacramento River to 20.1‰ at the Golden Gate. Deviations from the two-component mixing model for the North Bay reflect additional, local sources of phosphate to the estuary that vary seasonally. Most notably, deviations from the mixing model occur at the confluence of a major river into the bay during periods of high river discharge and near wastewater treatment outlets. These data suggest that δ18Op can be an effective tool for identifying P point sources and understanding phosphate dynamics in estuarine systems.

  20. 33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... anchored at a designated anchorage either inside the Federal breakwaters bounding San Pedro Bay or outside... instructions of the Captain of the Port or his or her designated representative. (3) When any LHG tank vessels approach within 500 yards of a vessel that is moored or anchored, the stationary vessel must stay moored...

  1. 33 CFR 165.1154 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... anchored at a designated anchorage either inside the Federal breakwaters bounding San Pedro Bay or outside... instructions of the Captain of the Port or his or her designated representative. (3) When a cruise ship approaches within 100 yards of a vessel that is moored, or anchored, the stationary vessel must stay...

  2. Subtropical Fruit Fly Invasions into Temperate Fruit Fly Territory in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subtropical fruit fly species including peach fruit fly, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders); melon fly, B. cucurbitae (Coquillett); oriental fruit fly, B. dorsalis (Hendel); and Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata Weidemann, have been detected in the past decade in the San Joaquin Valley of Califo...

  3. 76 FR 40660 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    .... SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District....0 for the following terms: Air Pollution Control Officer, Board, Environmental Protection Agency.... New Section 6.3 requires the SJVUAPCD Air Pollution Control Officer (APCO) to prepare and present...

  4. 75 FR 10690 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District (SJVAPCD...)(2)). List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control... Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District. (1) Rule 4104, ``Reduction of Animal Matter,''...

  5. 77 FR 50021 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: In this action, EPA is finalizing approval of San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... plans that are specifically tailored to the nature of the air pollution sources in each state. The...

  6. 76 FR 26609 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (No. 08-17309)] to overturn a District Court ruling...

  7. 77 FR 64427 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... County Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD) there is no VOC concentration limit for reinjection...

  8. 77 FR 214 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ... Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control... and air districts for evaluating air pollution control economics. 3. Farms can change owners...

  9. 76 FR 5276 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control...)(2)). List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution...

  10. 77 FR 66429 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation...

  11. 75 FR 24408 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control...)(2)). List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution...

  12. 77 FR 5709 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control...)(2)). List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution...

  13. 75 FR 1715 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control...)(2)). List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution...

  14. 75 FR 57862 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation...

  15. 76 FR 16696 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control...)(2)). List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution...

  16. 76 FR 56132 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... preempt Tribal law. List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution...

  17. Process-based, morphodynamic hindcast of decadal deposition patterns in San Pablo Bay, California, 1856-1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wegen, M.; Jaffe, B.E.; Roelvink, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the possibility of hindcasting-observed decadal-scale morphologic change in San Pablo Bay, a subembayment of the San Francisco Estuary, California, USA, by means of a 3-D numerical model (Delft3D). The hindcast period, 1856-1887, is characterized by upstream hydraulic mining that resulted in a high sediment input to the estuary. The model includes wind waves, salt water and fresh water interactions, and graded sediment transport, among others. Simplified initial conditions and hydrodynamic forcing were necessary because detailed historic descriptions were lacking. Model results show significant skill. The river discharge and sediment concentration have a strong positive influence on deposition volumes. Waves decrease deposition rates and have, together with tidal movement, the greatest effect on sediment distribution within San Pablo Bay. The applied process-based (or reductionist) modeling approach is valuable once reasonable values for model parameters and hydrodynamic forcing are obtained. Sensitivity analysis reveals the dominant forcing of the system and suggests that the model planform plays a dominant role in the morphodynamic development. A detailed physical explanation of the model outcomes is difficult because of the high nonlinearity of the processes. Process formulation refinement, a more detailed description of the forcing, or further model parameter variations may lead to an enhanced model performance, albeit to a limited extent. The approach potentially provides a sound basis for prediction of future developments. Parallel use of highly schematized box models and a process-based approach as described in the present work is probably the most valuable method to assess decadal morphodynamic development. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. High-resolution seismic velocities and shallow structure of the San Andreas fault zone at Middle Mountain, Parkfield, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Hole, J.A.; Huggins, R.; Lippus, C.

    2002-01-01

    A 5-km-long, high-resolution seismic imaging survey across the San Andreas fault (SAF) zone and the proposed San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drill site near Parkfield, California, shows that velocities vary both laterally and vertically. Velocities range from 4.0 km/sec) probably correspond to granitic rock of the Salinian block, which is exposed a few kilometers southwest of the SAF. The depth to the top of probable granitic rock varies laterally along the seismic profile but is about 600 m below the surface at the proposed SAFOD site. We observe a prominent, lateral low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath and southwest of the surface trace of the SAF. The LVZ is about 1.5 km wide at 300-m depth but tapers to about 600 m wide at 750-m depth. At the maximum depth of the velocity model (750 m), the LVZ is centered approximately 400 m southwest of the surface trace of the SAF. Similar velocities and velocity gradients are observed at comparable depths on both sides of the LVZ, suggesting that the LVZ is anomalous relative to rocks on either side of it. Velocities within the LVZ are lower than those of San Andreas fault gouge, and the LVZ is also anomalous with respect to gravity, magnetic, and resistivity measurements. Because of its proximity to the surface trace of the SAF, it is tempting to suggest that the LVZ represents a zone of fractured crystalline rocks at depth. However, the LVZ instead probably represents a tectonic sliver of sedimentary rock that now rests adjacent to or encompasses the SAF. Such a sliver of sedimentary rock implies fault strands on both sides and possibly within the sliver, suggesting a zone of fault strands at least 1.5 km wide at a depth of 300 m, tapering to about 600 m wide at 750-m depth. Fluids within the sedimentary sliver are probably responsible for observed low-resistivity values.

  19. Integrated geomorphic and geodynamic modeling of a potential blind thrust in the San Francisco Bay area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Courtney B.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Kirby, Eric

    2009-06-01

    Geometries and slip budgets of the faults in the San Francisco Bay area imply previously unrecognized fault linkages, including examples of blind thrust structures that appear to connect segments of strike-slip faults and accommodate along-strike variations in slip rate along these structures. Displacement along linking faults may be associated with the development of topography and also may serve as earthquake sources. In Marin County, California, systematic spatial patterns in landscape topography and geomorphic indices suggest that the region north of Mt. Tamalpais is experiencing differential rock uplift. We suggest that a blind thrust underlies the elevated area, creating the observed topography and possibly resolving a slip discrepancy between the Hayward and San Andreas Fault in this region. We have developed and implemented an integrative approach that combines observations from tectonic deformation and geomorphic properties to identify a potential blind thrust beneath Marin County. Elastic displacement modeling has been tested for compatibility with the blind thrust hypothesis and to assess the sensitivity of observables to fault geometry and orientation; from this, a set of plausible blind thrust structures are defined. We use a range of empirical relationships between channel steepness index and erosion rate to estimate spatial variations in erosion rate along Bolinas Ridge. By coupling these erosion estimates with elastic displacement fault modeling, we can use the resulting topographic envelopes to constrain the rate and duration of deformation. These constraints, along with spatial bounds on the possible fault models, are used to calculate potential seismic moment and moment magnitude. With an assumed recurrence interval of ~ 100 years, such blind thrusts can produce a Mw ~ 6.3 earthquake, while a longer recurrence time (~ 1000 years) results in a maximum Mw ~ 7.0 earthquake. Although such events are not likely to be catastrophic, they are large

  20. Near Surface Structure of the Frijoles Strand of the San Gregorio Fault, Point Año Nuevo, San Mateo County, California, from Seismic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, L.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Weber, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    The San Gregorio Fault Zone (SGFZ) is one of the major faults of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system in the San Francisco Bay region of California. The SGFZ is nearly 200 km long, trends subparallel to the SAF, and is located primarily offshore with two exceptions- between Point Año Nuevo and San Gregorio Beach and between Pillar Point and Moss Beach. It has a total width of 2 to 3 km and is comprised of seven known fault strands with Quaternary activity, five of which also demonstrate late Holocene activity. The fault is clearly a potential source of significant earthquakes and has been assigned a maximum likely magnitude of 7.3. To better understand the structure, geometry, and shallow-depth P-wave velocities associated with the SGFZ, we acquired a 585-m-long, high-resolution, combined seismic reflection and refraction profile across the Frijoles strand of the SGFZ at Point Año Nuevo State Park. Both P- and S-wave data were acquired, but here we present only the P-wave data. We used two 60-channel Geometrics RX60 seismographs and 120 40-Hz single-element geophones connected via cable to record Betsy Seisgun seismic sources (shots). Both shots and geophones were approximately co-located and spaced at 5-m intervals along the profile, with the shots offset laterally from the geophones by 1 m. We measured first-arrival refractions from all shots and geophones to develop a seismic refraction tomography velocity model of the upper 70 m. P-wave velocities range from about 600 m/s near the surface to more than 2400 m/s at 70 m depth. We used the refraction tomography image to infer the depth to the top of the groundwater table on the basis of the 1500 m/s velocity contour. The image suggests that the depth, along the profile, to the top of groundwater varies by about 18 m, with greater depth on the west side of the fault. At about 46 m depth, a 60- to 80-m-wide, low-velocity zone, which is consistent with faulting, is observed southwest of the Frijoles strand of the

  1. Hydrogeology, water quality, water budgets, and simulated responses to hydrologic changes in Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creek ground-water basins, San Luis Obispo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Eugene B.; Van Konyenburg, Kathryn M.

    1998-01-01

    Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creeks are underlain by thin, narrow ground-water basins that supply nearly all water used for local agricultural and municipal purposes. The creeks discharge to the Pacific Ocean near the northwestern corner of San Luis Obispo County, California. The basins contain heterogeneous, unconsolidated alluvial deposits and are underlain by relatively impermeable bedrock. Both creeks usually stop flowing during the summer dry season, and most of the pumpage during that time is derived from ground-water storage. Annual pumpage increased substantially during 1956?88 and is now a large fraction of basin storage capacity. Consequently, dry-season water levels are lower and the water supply is more vulnerable to drought. The creeks are the largest source of ground-water recharge, and complete basin recharge can occur within the first few weeks of winter streamflow. Agricultural and municipal pumpages are the largest outflows and cause dry-season water-level declines throughout the San Simeon Basin. Pumping effects are more localized in the Santa Rosa Basin because of subsurface flow obstructions. Even without pumpage, a large quantity of water naturally drains out of storage at the upper ends of the basins during the dry season. Ground water is more saline in areas close to the coast than in inland areas. Although seawater intrusion has occurred in the past, it probably was not the cause of high salinity in 1988?89. Ground water is very hard, and concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, iron, and manganese exceed drinking-water standards in some locations. Probability distributions of streamflow were estimated indirectly from a 120-year rainfall record because the periods of record for local stream-gaging stations were wetter than average. Dry-season durations with recurrence intervals between 5 and 43 years are likely to dry up some wells but not cause seawater intrusion. A winter with no streamflow is likely to occur about every 32 years and to

  2. Ambient Noise Tomography of Southern California Images Dipping San Andreas-Parallel Structure and Low-Velocity Salton Trough Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, S.; Klemperer, S. L.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography (ANT) images the entire crust but does not depend on the spatial and temporal distribution of events. Our ANT high-resolution 3D velocity model of southern California uses 849 broadband stations, vastly more than previous studies, and four years of data, 1997-1998, 2007, and 2011, chosen to include our own broadband Salton Seismic Imaging Project, a 40-station transect across the Salton Trough, as well as other campaign stations in both Mexico and the U.S.A., and permanent stations. Our shear-wave model has 0.05° x 0.05° lateral and 1 km vertical blocks. We used the Harvard Community Velocity Model (CVM-H) as the initial model for the inversion. We show significant differences relative to the CVM-H model, especially in the lower crust and upper mantle. We observe prominent low-velocity anomalies in the upper mantle under the Salton Buttes and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields, indicating high-temperatures and possibly partial-melt. Similar low-velocity zones have been previously observed along the Gulf of California. We also observe vertical to gradually dipping lateral velocity contrasts in the lower crust under the southern part of the San Andreas Fault. The east to northeast dip may represent crustal fabric sheared by movement of the Pacific plate under the North American plate prior to the initiation of transform motion.

  3. Ground-Water Quality Data in the San Fernando-San Gabriel Study Unit, 2005 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Michael; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 460 square mile San Fernando-San Gabriel study unit (SFSG) was investigated between May and July 2005 as part of the Priority Basin Assessment Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The San Fernando-San Gabriel study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within SFSG, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 52 wells in Los Angeles County. Thirty-five of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and seventeen wells were selected to aid in the evaluation of specific water-quality issues or changes in water chemistry along a historic ground-water flow path (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides and pesticide degradates], constituents of special interest [perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), 1,2,3-trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP), and 1,4-dioxane], naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, samples for matrix spikes) were collected at approximately one-fifth (11 of 52) of the wells, and the results for these

  4. Mesocarnivore Surveys on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, H O; Smith, D A; Cypher, B L; Kelly, P A; Woollett, J S

    2004-11-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), operated under cooperative agreement between the University of California and the U. S. Department of Energy, administers and operates an approximately 11 mi{sup 2} (28 km{sup 2}) test site in the remote hills at the northern end of the South Coast Ranges of Central California (Figure 1). Known as Site 300, this expanse of rolling hills and canyons supports a diverse array of grassland communities typical of lowland central California. The facility serves a variety of functions related to testing non-nuclear explosives, lasers, and weapons subsystems. The primary purpose of this project was to determine the presence of any mesocarnivores on Site 300 that use the property for foraging, denning, and other related activities. The surveys occurred from mid-September to mid-October, 2002.

  5. The San Andreas Fault in the San Francisco Bay area, California: a geology fieldtrip guidebook to selected stops on public lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffer, Philip W.

    2005-01-01

    This guidebook contains a series of geology fieldtrips with selected destinations along the San Andreas Fault in part of the region that experienced surface rupture during the Great San Francisco Earthquake of 1906. Introductory materials present general information about the San Andreas Fault System, landscape features, and ecological factors associated with faults in the South Bay, Santa Cruz Mountains, the San Francisco Peninsula, and the Point Reyes National Seashore regions. Trip stops include roadside areas and recommended hikes along regional faults and to nearby geologic and landscape features that provide opportunities to make casual observations about the geologic history and landscape evolution. Destinations include the sites along the San Andreas and Calaveras faults in the San Juan Bautista and Hollister region. Stops on public land along the San Andreas Fault in the Santa Cruz Mountains in Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties include in the Loma Prieta summit area, Forest of Nicene Marks State Park, Lexington County Park, Sanborn County Park, Castle Rock State Park, and the Mid Peninsula Open Space Preserve. Destinations on the San Francisco Peninsula and along the coast in San Mateo County include the Crystal Springs Reservoir area, Mussel Rock Park, and parts of Golden Gate National Recreation Area, with additional stops associated with the San Gregorio Fault system at Montara State Beach, the James F. Fitzgerald Preserve, and at Half Moon Bay. Field trip destinations in the Point Reyes National Seashore and vicinity provide information about geology and character of the San Andreas Fault system north of San Francisco.

  6. Investigating Sources and Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentner, D. R.; Harley, R. A.; Weber, R.; Karlik, J. F.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are regulated both as primary air pollutants and as precursors to the formation of secondary organic aerosol and tropospheric ozone. The San Joaquin Valley, a non-attainment area for ozone and PM2.5, contains a variety of point, area, and mobile VOC sources that contribute to both primary and secondary pollution. Using ambient measurements of over 100 different VOCs and Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOCs) made at multiple field sites, we assess the magnitude and importance of various VOC sources in the San Joaquin Valley. Hourly measurements were made during the spring and summer of 2010 via in-situ gas chromatography in Bakersfield, CA as part of the CalNex experiment and also at a rural site located 100 km north of Bakersfield. Additionally, in-situ measurements of fresh motor vehicle exhaust were made in Oakland's Caldecott tunnel during the summer of 2010. Measurements include a broad array of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs ranging in size from 1 to 17 carbon atoms, including many compounds with functional groups or substituents (e.g. aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, halogens, sulfur, & nitrogen). Using statistical methods of source apportionment, covariance, source receptor modeling, and air parcel back trajectories, we assess the impact of various sources on observed VOC concentrations at our field sites in the San Joaquin Valley. Prevalent sources include gasoline and diesel-vehicle exhaust, petroleum extraction/refining, biogenic emissions from agricultural crops and natural vegetation, and emissions from dairy operations and animal husbandry. We use measurements of fresh motor vehicle emissions from the Caldecott tunnel to constrain apportionment of gasoline and diesel-related VOCs and IVOCs in the San Joaquin Valley. Initial results from Bakersfield show substantial influence from local anthropogenic VOC sources, but there is evidence for transport of emissions from both anthropogenic and biogenic

  7. Pliocene Invertebrates From the Travertine Point Outcrop of the Imperial Formation, Imperial County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Charles L.

    2008-01-01

    Forty-four invertebrate taxa, including one coral, 40 mollusks (30 bivalves and 10 gastropods), and three echinoids are recognized from a thin marine interval of the Imperial Formation near Travertine Point, Imperial County, California. The Travertine Point outcrop lies about midway between exposures of the Imperial Formation around Palm Springs, Riverside County, and exposures centered at Coyote Mountain in Imperial and San Diego Counties. Based on faunal comparisons, the Travertine Point outcrop corresponds to the Imperial and San Diego outcrops. The Travertine Point fauna is inferred to have lived in subtropical to tropical waters at littoral to inner sublittorial (<50 m) water depths. Coral and molluscan species from the Travertine Point outcrop indicate a Pliocene age. Two extant bivalve mollusks present have not previously been reported as fossils Anadara reinharti and forms questionably referred to Dosinia semiobliterata.

  8. Identifying sources of dissolved organic carbon in agriculturally dominated rivers using radiocarbon age dating: Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickman, James O.; DiGiorgio, Carol L.; Davisson, M. Lee; Lucero, Delores M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    We used radiocarbon measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to resolve sources of riverine carbon within agriculturally dominated landscapes in California. During 2003 and 2004, average Δ14C for DOC was -254‰ in agricultural drains in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, -218‰ in the San Joaquin River, -175‰ in the California State Water Project and -152‰ in the Sacramento River. The age of bulk DOC transiting the rivers of California's Central Valley is the oldest reported for large rivers and suggests wide-spread loss of soil organic matter caused by agriculture and urbanization. Using DAX 8 adsorbent, we isolated and measured 14C concentrations in hydrophobic acid fractions (HPOA); river samples showed evidence of bomb-pulse carbon with average Δ14C of 91 and 76‰ for the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers, respectively, with older HPOA, -204‰, observed in agricultural drains. An operationally defined non-HPOA fraction of DOC was observed in the San Joaquin River with seasonally computed Δ14C values of between -275 and -687‰; the source of this aged material was hypothesized to be physically protected organic-matter in high clay-content soils and agrochemicals (i.e., radiocarbon-dead material) applied to farmlands. Mixing models suggest that the Sacramento River contributes about 50% of the DOC load in the California State Water Project, and agricultural drains contribute approximately one-third of the load. In contrast to studies showing stabilization of soil carbon pools within one or two decades following land conversion, sustained loss of soil organic matter, occurring many decades after the initial agricultural-land conversion, was observed in California's Central Valley.

  9. Sediment Quality Characterization Naval Station San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Current Profiler APDC Ammonium pyrolidine dithiocarbamate Ag Silver As Arsenic ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials AVS Acid Volatile Sulfide...as one method for screening measured samples to deter- mine the likelihood of ecological effects. Our study data were compiled with data from the SSC...biological data. The chemical and biological data within each subregion were then evaluated based on commonly applied screening effect thresholds. Within each

  10. Geothermal Developments at San Diego Gas & Electric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastas, George; Hoaglin, Gregory J.

    1980-12-01

    In 1972, the first well flow tests were conducted by NARCO and Magma Power to determine reservoir characteristics such as mass flow, temperature, stability, and mineral content of geothermal brine from the exploration wells. The results of these tests were encouraging. Brine temperatures were relatively hot, and salinity was less than previously experienced. Results were sufficient to justify further testing of the process design to determine an appropriate energy conversion cycle for a power plant. Both the flash cycle and binary cycle were considered. In the binary cycle, geothermal heat is transferred from hot brine to a secondary working fluid by means of heat exchangers. The heated secondary fluid expands to drive a turbine-generator. The flash cycle was rejected because the high measured noncondensible gas content of the brines seriously reduced the cycle efficiency. The reduced salinity was expected to result in reduced scaling characteristics. For these reasons the binary cycle was selected for initial design and field testing. In 1973, a series of field tests was conducted to support the design of the binary conversion cycle. Unfortunately, a rapid decline in heat exchanger performance resulting from scaling demonstrated a need to reevaluate the cycle design. A flash/binary process was chosen as the basis for facility design modifications and additional field testing. Design modifications were to use as much of the original design as possible in order to minimize cost. In March of 1974, SDG&E resumed field testing at Niland using reduced size models of the new flash/binary design. The 1974 test program confirmed the decision to modify the design, construction, and operation of the GLEF in a four-stage, flash/binary cycle configuration. In May of 1975, the design was completed and construction of the GLEF began. Startup operations were initiated and in June 1976 the facility was dedicated. In the fall of 1976 while debugging and initial operation was being accomplished, a test program was developed to provide additional basic information necessary for the design of a commercial flash/binary geothermal plant. The primary objective of the program was to develop binary heat exchanger heat design data under a variety of conditions.

  11. Late Holocene sedimentary environments of south San Francisco Bay, California, illustrated in gravity cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, Donald L.; Fregoso, Theresa A.; Wong, Florence L.; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Data are reported here from 51 gravity cores collected from the southern part of San Francisco Bay by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1990. The sedimentary record in the cores demonstrates a stable geographic distribution of facies and spans a few thousand years. Carbon-14 dating of the sediments suggests that sedimentation rates average about 1 mm/yr. The geometry of the bay floor and the character of the sediment deposited have remained about the same in the time spanned by the cores. However, the sedimentary record over periods of centuries or decades is likely to be much more variable. Sediments containing a few bivalve shells and bivalve or oyster coquinas are most often found west of the main channel and near the San Mateo Bridge. Elsewhere in the south bay, shells are rare except in the southernmost reaches where scattered gastropod shells are found.

  12. Clay Mineralogy, Authigenic Smectite Concentration, and Fault Weakening of the San Gregorio Fault; Moss Beach, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, S.; Moore, J.; Bish, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    The apparently weak nature of the San Andreas fault system poses a fundamental geophysical question. The San Gregorio fault at Moss Beach, CA is an active splay of the right-lateral San Andreas fault zone and has a total offset of about 150 km. At Moss Beach, the San Gregorio fault offsets Pliocene sedimentary rocks and consists of a clay-rich gouge zone, eastern sandstone block, and western mudstone block. In the presence of fluids, smectite clays can swell and become very weak to shearing. We studied a profile of samples across the fault zone and wall rocks to determine if there is a concentration of smectite in the gouge zone and propose a possible formation mechanism. Samples were analyzed using standard quantitative X-ray diffraction methods and software recently developed at Los Alamos National Lab. XRD results show a high smectite/illite (weak clay/strong clay) ratio in the gouge (S/I ratio=2-4), lower in the mudstone (S/I ratio=2), and very low in the sandstone (S/I ratio=1). The variability of smectite/illite ratio in the gouge zone may be evidence of preferential alteration where developed shear planes undergo progressive smectite enrichment. The amount of illite layers in illite/smectites is 5-30%, indicating little illitization; therefore, these fault rocks have not undergone significant diagenesis above 100 degrees C and illite present must be largely detrital. Bulk mineralogy shows significant anti-correlation of smectite with feldspar, especially in the gouge, suggesting authigenic smectite generation from feldspar. Under scanning-electron microscope inspection, smectites have fibrous, grain coating growth fabrics, also suggesting smectite authigenesis. If in situ production of smectite via chemical alteration is possible in active faults, it could have significant implications for self-generated weakening of faults above the smectite-to-illite transition (<150 degrees C, or 5-7km).

  13. A new species of Ammothella (Pycnogonida: Ammotheidae) from deep water off San Nicolas Island, California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dojiri, Masahiro; Cadien, B. Donald; Phillips, A. Charles

    1991-01-01

    Ammothella killix n. sp. is described from upper bathyal depths on the Cortez Ridge; it is the tenth in the genus from the eastern Pacific, and sixth from California. It differs from its congeners most noticeably in having chelifore fusion, and in bearing slender spiny tubercles on all of the follow

  14. 75 FR 1716 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule... Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation... authority to regulate sources of air pollution. The fee provision of CAA section 185 acts as an...

  15. 75 FR 60623 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule... Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation... Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD) Rule 74.15 (as amended November 8, 1994)....

  16. Navigation data for chirp seismic-reflection data collected in San Pablo Bay (northern California) during field activity 2014-639-FA from 10/06/2014 to 10/10/2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes navigation data for chirp seismic-reflection data collected in 2014 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in San Pablo Bay, northern California.

  17. Raw, high-resolution, chirp seismic-reflection data collected in San Pablo Bay (northern California) during field activity 2014-639-FA from 10/06/2014 to 10/10/2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes raw, high-resolution chirp seismic-reflection data collected in 2014 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in San Pablo Bay, northern California.

  18. Subsurface structure of the East Bay Plain ground-water basin: San Francisco Bay to the Hayward fault, Alameda County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Borchers, J.W.; Goldman, M.R.; Gandhok, G.; Ponce, D.A.; Steedman, C.E.

    2006-01-01

    The area of California between the San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Santa Clara Valley, and the Diablo Ranges (East Bay Hills), commonly referred to as the 'East Bay', contains the East Bay Plain and Niles Cone ground-water basins. The area has a population of 1.46 million (2003 US Census), largely distributed among several cities, including Alameda, Berkeley, Fremont, Hayward, Newark, Oakland, San Leandro, San Lorenzo, and Union City. Major known tectonic structures in the East Bay area include the Hayward Fault and the Diablo Range to the east and a relatively deep sedimentary basin known as the San Leandro Basin beneath the eastern part of the bay. Known active faults, such as the Hayward, Calaveras, and San Andreas pose significant earthquake hazards to the region, and these and related faults also affect ground-water flow in the San Francisco Bay area. Because most of the valley comprising the San Francisco Bay area is covered by Holocene alluvium or water at the surface, our knowledge of the existence and locations of such faults, their potential hazards, and their effects on ground-water flow within the alluvial basins is incomplete. To better understand the subsurface stratigraphy and structures and their effects on ground-water and earthquake hazards, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD), acquired a series of high-resolution seismic reflection and refraction profiles across the East Bay Plain near San Leandro in June 2002. In this report, we present results of the seismic imaging investigations, with emphasis on ground water.

  19. A review of circulation and mixing studies of San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lawrence H.

    1987-01-01

    A description of the major characteristics and remaining unknowns of circulation and mixing in San Francisco Bay has been constructed from a review of published studies. From a broad perspective San Francisco Bay is an ocean-river mixing zone with a seaward flow equal to the sum of the river inflows less evaporation. Understanding of circulation and mixing within the bay requires quantification of freshwater inflows and ocean-bay exchanges, characterization of source-water variations, and separation of the within-bay components of circulation and mixing processes. Description of net circulation and mixing over a few days to a few months illustrates best the interactions of major components. Quantification of tidal circulation and mixing is also necessary because net circulation and mixing contain a large tide-induced component, and because tidal variations are dominant in measurements of stage, currents, and salinity. The discharge of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta into Suisun Bay is approximately 90 percent of the freshwater inflow to San Francisco Bay. Annual delta discharge is characterized by a winter season of high runoff and a summer season of low runoff. For the period 1956 to 1985 the mean of monthly discharges exceeded 1,000 cubic meters per second (35,000 cubic feet per second) for the months of December through April, whereas for July through October, it was less than 400 cubic meters per second (14,000 cubic feet per second). The months of November, May, and June commonly were transition months between these seasons. Large year-to-year deviations from this annual pattern have occurred frequently. Much less is known about the ocean-bay exchange process. Net exchanges depend on net seaward flow in the bay, tidal amplitude, and longshore coastal currents, but exchanges have not yet been measured successfully. Source-water variations are ignored by limiting discussion of mixing to salinity. The bay is composed of a northern reach, which is strongly

  20. Streamflow gains and losses along San Francisquito Creek and characterization of surface-water and ground-water quality, southern San Mateo and northern Santa Clara counties, California, 1996-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Loren F.

    2002-01-01

    San Francisquito Creek is an important source of recharge to the 22-square-mile San Francisquito Creek alluvial fan ground-water subbasin in the southern San Mateo and northern Santa Clara Counties of California. Ground water supplies as much as 20 percent of the water to some area communities. Local residents are concerned that infiltration and consequently ground-water recharge would be reduced if additional flood-control measures are implemented along San Francisquito Creek. To improve the understanding of the surface-water/ground-water interaction between San Francisquito Creek and the San Francisquito Creek alluvial fan, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated streamflow gains and losses along San Francisquito Creek and determined the chemical quality and isotopic composition of surface and ground water in the study area.Streamflow was measured at 13 temporary streamflow-measurement stations to determine streamflow gains and losses along a 8.4-mile section of San Francisquito Creek. A series of five seepage runs between April 1996 and May 1997 indicate that losses in San Francisquito Creek were negligible until it crossed the Pulgas Fault at Sand Hill Road. Streamflow losses increased between Sand Hill Road and Middlefield Road where the alluvial deposits are predominantly coarse-grained and the water table is below the bottom of the channel. The greatest streamflow losses were measured along a 1.8-mile section of the creek between the San Mateo Drive bike bridge and Middlefield Road; average losses between San Mateo Drive and Alma Street and from there to Middlefield Road were 3.1 and 2.5 acre-feet per day, respectively.Downstream from Middlefield Road, streamflow gains and losses owing to seepage may be masked by urban runoff, changes in bank storage, and tidal effects from San Francisco Bay. Streamflow gains measured between Middlefield Road and the 1200 block of Woodland Avenue may be attributable to urban runoff and (or) ground-water inflow. Water