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Sample records for california margin oxygen-minimum

  1. Meiofaunal distribution across the oxygen minimum zone of continental margin, North East Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A.; Badesab, S.; Singh, R.; Kitazato, H.

    A quantitative study of metazoan meiofauna across the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of continental margin in the N-E Arabian Sea in the depth range 500-1965 m was carried out in September-November 2008. Bottom water oxygen and sediment organic carbon...

  2. Macrofaunal community structure in the western Indian continental margin including the oxygen minimum zone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Sautya, S.; Sivadas, S.; Singh, R.; Nanajkar, M.

    group was abundant in the OMZ core (100 – 200 m) off Central Chile (Gallardo et al. 2004). Because these polychaetes are deposit-feeders (both surface and sub-surface), their predominance may reflect food availability (e.g. sediment C org and Chl... of stressful conditions such as the low DO (<0.5 ml l -1 ) has been observed in the OMZs of the Oman margin and off central Chile (Levin et al. 2000; Gallardo et al. 2004). Group 2 was restricted to the slope region (1001 m and 1524 m) where the SSDF...

  3. Sedimentary pigments and nature of organic matter within the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Arabian Sea (Indian margin)

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    Rasiq, K. T.; Kurian, S.; Karapurkar, S. G.; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2016-07-01

    Sedimentary pigments, carbon and nitrogen content and their stable isotopes were studied in three short cores collected from the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Arabian Sea (EAS). Nine pigments including chlorophyll a and their degradation products were quantified using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Astaxanthin followed by canthaxanthin and zeaxanthin were the major carotenoids detected in these cores. The total pigment concentration was high in the core collected from 500 m water depth (6.5 μgg-1) followed by 800 m (1.7 μgg-1) and 1100 m (1.1 μgg-1) depths respectively. The organic carbon did not have considerable control on sedimentary pigments preservation. Pigment degradation was comparatively high in the core collected from the 800 m site which depended not only the bottom dissolved oxygen levels, but also on the faunal activity. As reported earlier, the bottom water dissolved oxygen and presence of fauna have good control on the organic carbon accumulation and preservation at Indian margin OMZ sediments. The C/N ratios and δ13C values for all the cores conclude the marine origin of organic matter and δ15N profiles revealed signature of upwelling associated denitrification within the water column.

  4. Structure and function of nematode communities across the Indian western continental margin and its oxygen minimum zone

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    Singh, R.; Ingole, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    We studied patterns of nematode distribution along the western Indian continental margin to determine the influence of habitat heterogeneity and low oxygen levels on the community's taxonomic and functional structure. A single transect, perpendicular to the coast at 14° N latitude was sampled from 34 to 2546 m depth for biological and environmental variables during August 2007. The oxygen minimum zone extended from 102 to 1001 m. Nematodes (described and undescribed) were identified to species and classified according to biological and functional traits. A total of 110 nematode species belonging to 24 families were found along the transect. Three depth zones were identified: the shelf (depth range: 34-102 m; highest nematode mean density: 176.6 ± 37 ind 10 cm-2), the slope (525-1524 m; 124.3 ± 16 ind 10 cm-2), and the basin (2001-2546 m; 62.9 ± 2 ind 10 cm-2). Across the entire study area, the dominant species were Terschellingia longicaudata, Desmodora sp. 1, Sphaerolaimus gracilis, and Theristus ensifer; their maximum density was at shelf stations. Nematode communities in different zones differed in species composition. Chromadorita sp. 2 (2.78 %) and Sphaerolaimus gracilis (2.21 %) were dominant on the shelf, whereas Terschellingia longicaudata (4.73 %) and Desmodora sp. 1 (4.42 %) were dominant on the slope, but in the basin, Halalaimus sp. 1(1.11 %) and Acantholaimus elegans (1.11 %) were dominant. The information in a particular functional group was not a simple reflection of the information in species abundance. Ecological information captured by adult length, adult shape, and life-history strategy was less site-specific and thus differed notably from information contained in other taxonomic groups. The functional composition of nematodes was strongly linked to the organic-carbon and dissolved-oxygen concentration. Seven species were found exclusively in the oxygen minimum zone: Pselionema sp. 1, Choanolaimus sp. 2, Halichoanolaimus sp. 1, Cobbia dentata

  5. Sedimentary pigments and nature of organic matter within the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Arabian Sea (Indian margin)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rasiq, K.T.; Kurian, S.; Karapurkar, S.G.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    Sedimentary pigments, carbon and nitrogen content and their stable isotopes were studied in three short cores collected from the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Arabian Sea (EAS). Nine pigments including chlorophyll a and their degradation...

  6. Comment on "Lack of enhanced preservation of organic matter in sediments under the oxygen minimum on the Oman Margin" by T.F. Pedersen, G.B. Shimmield, and N.B. Price

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paropkari, A.L.; Mascarenhas, A.; PrakashBabu, C.

    A comment on the study on the lack of enhanced preservation of organic matter in sediments under the oxygen minimum on the Oman Margin is given. As such a negative correspondence between productivity and organic enrichment was pointed out which...

  7. Structural and functional study of the nematode community from the Indian western continental margin with reference to habitat heterogeneity and oxygen minimum zone

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    R. Singh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied patterns of nematode distribution along the western Indian continental margin to determine the influence of habitat heterogeneity and oxygen minimum on the community's taxonomic and functional structure. A single transect, perpendicular to the coast at 14° N latitude was sampled from 34 to 2546 m depth for biological and environmental variables during August 2007. Nematodes were identified to species and classified according to biological/functional traits. A total of 110 nematode species belonging to 24 families were found along the transect. Mean nematode density was higher on the shelf (176 ind 10 cm−2, 34 m depth than on the slope (124 ind 10 cm−2 or in the basin 62.9 ind 10 cm−2. Across the entire study area, the dominant species were Terschellingia longicaudata, (15.2 %, Desmodora sp 1, Sphaerolaimus gracilis, and Theristus ensifer; their maximum density was at shelf stations. Multidimensional scaling ordination (nMDS of the nematode species abundance data indicated the effect of different zones (ANOSIM; Global R = 0.607; P = 0.028, but it was not the same in case of functional traits. Only seven species were found exclusively in the oxygen minimum zone: Pselionema sp 1, Choanolaimus sp 2, Halichoanolaimus sp 1, Cobbia dentata, Daptonema sp 1, Trissonchulus sp 1, and Minolaimus sp 1. Moreover, in our study, species diversity was higher on the shelf than on the slope or in the basin. The distinctive features of all three zones as based on nematofaunal abundance were also reflected in the functional traits (feeding types, body shape, tail shape, and life history strategy. Correlation with a number of environmental variables indicated that food quality (measured as the organic carbon content and chlorophyll content and oxygen level were the major factors that influenced the nematode community (structural and functional.

  8. The second species of Gromia (Protista) from the deep sea: its natural history and association with the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone.

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    Gooday, Andrew J; Bowser, Samuel S

    2005-06-01

    We describe a gromiid protist Gromia pyriformis sp. nov., from bathyal depths on the Pakistan margin (NE Arabian Sea), an area characterised by a well-developed Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). The new species is smaller (length usually <1 mm) than the only other described deep-sea gromiid species (Gromia sphaerica) or the well-known coastal species Gromia oviformis. Its identification as a gromiid is based on the test-wall ultrastructure. This includes (i) an outer wall (165-300 nm thick) limited by an electron-opaque layer and perforated by pore structures which typically extend through its entire thickness, and (ii) inner "honeycomb membrane" structures which form a discontinuous sheet (18-20 nm thick) lying parallel to the outer wall. An outermost glycocalyx (approximately 75 nm thick), not observed in other gromiid species, is also present and imparts a finely granular appearance to the outer test surface, as seen by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Numerous rod-shaped prokaryotes are attached to the exterior of the glycocalyx. Gromia pyriformis sp. nov. typically occurs above the sediment-water interface, attached to the large arborescent foraminiferan Pelosina sp. It is confined to a very narrow bathymetric zone (approximately 1000 m water depth) in the lower portion of the OMZ, where bottom-water oxygen concentrations are approximately 0.2 ml l(-1).

  9. Effects of bottom water dissolved oxygen variability on copper and lead fractionation in the sediments across the oxygen minimum zone, western continental margin of India.

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    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Jayachandran, Saranya; Madan, Ritu; Sarkar, Arindam; Linsy, P; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the effect of varying bottom-water oxygen concentration on geochemical fractionation (operational speciation) of Cu and Pb in the underneath sediments across the oxygen minimum zone (Arabian Sea) in the west coast of India. Both, Cu and Pb were redistributed among the different binding phases of the sediments with changing dissolved oxygen level (from oxic to hypoxic and close to suboxic) in the bottom water. The average lability of Cu-sediment complexes gradually decreased (i.e., stability increased) with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations of the bottom water. Decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration increased Cu association with sedimentary organic matter. However, Pb association with Fe/Mn-oxyhydroxide phases in the sediments gradually decreased with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentration of the overlying bottom water (due to dissolution of Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide phase). The lability of Pb-sediment complexes increased with the decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration. This study suggests that bottom-water oxygen concentration is one of the key factors governing stability and lability of Cu and Pb complexes in the underneath sediment. Sedimentary organic matter and Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide binding phases were the major hosting phases for Cu and Pb respectively in the study area. Increasing lability of Pb-complexes in bottom sediments may lead to positive benthic fluxes of Pb at low oxygen environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Uptake of algal carbon and the synthesis of an "essential" fatty acid by Uvigerina ex. gr. semiornata (Foraminifera within the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone: evidence from fatty acid biomarker and 13C tracer experiments

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    K. E. Larkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Foraminifera are an important component of benthic communities in oxygen depleted settings, where they potentially play a~significant role in the processing of organic matter. We tracked the uptake of a 13C-labeled algal food source into individual fatty acids in the benthic foraminiferal species, Uvigerina ex. gr. semiornata, from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (OMZ. The tracer experiments were conducted on the Pakistan Margin during the late/post monsoon period (August–October 2003. A monoculture of the diatom Thalassiosira weisflogii was 13C-labeled and used to simulate a pulse of phytoplankton in two complementary experiments. A lander system was used for in situ incubations at 140 m and for 2.5 days duration, whilst a laboratory incubation used an oxystat system to maintain ambient dissolved oxygen concentrations. These shipboard experiments were terminated after 5 days. Uptake of diatoms was rapid, with high incorporation of diatom fatty acids into foraminifera after ~2 days in both experiments. Ingestion of the diatom food source was indicated by the increase over time in the quantity of diatom biomarker fatty acids in the foraminifera and by the high percentage of 13C in many of the fatty acids present at the endpoint of both in~situ and laboratory-based experiments. These results indicate that U. ex. gr. semiornata rapidly ingested the diatom food source and that this foraminifera will play an important role in the short-term cycling of organic matter within this OMZ environment. The experiments also suggested that U. ex. gr. semiornata consumed non-labeled bacterial food items, particularly bacteria, and synthesised the polyunsaturated fatty acid 20:4(n-6 de novo. 20:4(n-6 is often abundant in benthic fauna yet its origins and function have remained unclear. This study demonstrates that U. ex. gr. semiornata is capable of de novo synthesis of this "essential fatty acid" and is potentially a major source of this dietary nutrient

  11. Paleoceanographic insights on recent oxygen minimum zone expansion: lessons for modern oceanography.

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    Sarah E Moffitt

    Full Text Available Climate-driven Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ expansions in the geologic record provide an opportunity to characterize the spatial and temporal scales of OMZ change. Here we investigate OMZ expansion through the global-scale warming event of the most recent deglaciation (18-11 ka, an event with clear relevance to understanding modern anthropogenic climate change. Deglacial marine sediment records were compiled to quantify the vertical extent, intensity, surface area and volume impingements of hypoxic waters upon continental margins. By integrating sediment records (183-2,309 meters below sea level; mbsl containing one or more geochemical, sedimentary or microfossil oxygenation proxies integrated with analyses of eustatic sea level rise, we reconstruct the timing, depth and intensity of seafloor hypoxia. The maximum vertical OMZ extent during the deglaciation was variable by region: Subarctic Pacific (~600-2,900 mbsl, California Current (~330-1,500 mbsl, Mexico Margin (~330-830 mbsl, and the Humboldt Current and Equatorial Pacific (~110-3,100 mbsl. The timing of OMZ expansion is regionally coherent but not globally synchronous. Subarctic Pacific and California Current continental margins exhibit tight correlation to the oscillations of Northern Hemisphere deglacial events (Termination IA, Bølling-Allerød, Younger Dryas and Termination IB. Southern regions (Mexico Margin and the Equatorial Pacific and Humboldt Current exhibit hypoxia expansion prior to Termination IA (~14.7 ka, and no regional oxygenation oscillations. Our analyses provide new evidence for the geographically and vertically extensive expansion of OMZs, and the extreme compression of upper-ocean oxygenated ecosystems during the geologically recent deglaciation.

  12. Paleoceanographic insights on recent oxygen minimum zone expansion: lessons for modern oceanography.

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    Moffitt, Sarah E; Moffitt, Russell A; Sauthoff, Wilson; Davis, Catherine V; Hewett, Kathryn; Hill, Tessa M

    2015-01-01

    Climate-driven Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) expansions in the geologic record provide an opportunity to characterize the spatial and temporal scales of OMZ change. Here we investigate OMZ expansion through the global-scale warming event of the most recent deglaciation (18-11 ka), an event with clear relevance to understanding modern anthropogenic climate change. Deglacial marine sediment records were compiled to quantify the vertical extent, intensity, surface area and volume impingements of hypoxic waters upon continental margins. By integrating sediment records (183-2,309 meters below sea level; mbsl) containing one or more geochemical, sedimentary or microfossil oxygenation proxies integrated with analyses of eustatic sea level rise, we reconstruct the timing, depth and intensity of seafloor hypoxia. The maximum vertical OMZ extent during the deglaciation was variable by region: Subarctic Pacific (~600-2,900 mbsl), California Current (~330-1,500 mbsl), Mexico Margin (~330-830 mbsl), and the Humboldt Current and Equatorial Pacific (~110-3,100 mbsl). The timing of OMZ expansion is regionally coherent but not globally synchronous. Subarctic Pacific and California Current continental margins exhibit tight correlation to the oscillations of Northern Hemisphere deglacial events (Termination IA, Bølling-Allerød, Younger Dryas and Termination IB). Southern regions (Mexico Margin and the Equatorial Pacific and Humboldt Current) exhibit hypoxia expansion prior to Termination IA (~14.7 ka), and no regional oxygenation oscillations. Our analyses provide new evidence for the geographically and vertically extensive expansion of OMZs, and the extreme compression of upper-ocean oxygenated ecosystems during the geologically recent deglaciation.

  13. Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E; DeLong, Edward F

    2012-01-01

    Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, contributing to major losses of fixed nitrogen as dinitrogen (N(2)) and nitrous...... environmental genomics and geochemical studies show the presence of other relevant processes, particularly those associated with the sulfur and carbon cycles. AMZs correspond to an intermediate state between two "end points" represented by fully oxic systems and fully sulfidic systems. Modern and ancient AMZs...... and sulfidic basins are chemically and functionally related. Global change is affecting the magnitude of biogeochemical fluxes and ocean chemical inventories, leading to shifts in AMZ chemistry and biology that are likely to continue well into the future....

  14. Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones.

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    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E; DeLong, Edward F; Letelier, Ricardo M; Stewart, Frank J

    2012-10-02

    Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, contributing to major losses of fixed nitrogen as dinitrogen (N(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) gases. Anaerobic microbial processes, including the two pathways of N(2) production, denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation, are oxygen-sensitive, with some occurring only under strictly anoxic conditions. The detection limit of the usual method (Winkler titrations) for measuring dissolved oxygen in seawater, however, is much too high to distinguish low oxygen conditions from true anoxia. However, new analytical technologies are revealing vanishingly low oxygen concentrations in nitrite-rich OMZs, indicating that these OMZs are essentially anoxic marine zones (AMZs). Autonomous monitoring platforms also reveal previously unrecognized episodic intrusions of oxygen into the AMZ core, which could periodically support aerobic metabolisms in a typically anoxic environment. Although nitrogen cycling is considered to dominate the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of AMZs, recent environmental genomics and geochemical studies show the presence of other relevant processes, particularly those associated with the sulfur and carbon cycles. AMZs correspond to an intermediate state between two "end points" represented by fully oxic systems and fully sulfidic systems. Modern and ancient AMZs and sulfidic basins are chemically and functionally related. Global change is affecting the magnitude of biogeochemical fluxes and ocean chemical inventories, leading to shifts in AMZ chemistry and biology that are likely to continue well into the future.

  15. Oxygen minimum seafloor ecological (mal) functioning

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Moodley, L.; Nigam, R.; Ingole, B.S.; PrakashBabu, C.; Panchang, R.; Nanajkar, M.; Sivadas, S.; van Breugel, P.; van Ijzerloo, L.; Rutgers, R.; Heip, C.H.R.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J.J.

    preparation of experimental setups employed during this project. Thanks to Suzan Verdegaal (Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Vrije University, Amsterdam) for sediment bulk carbonate carbon isotope measurements. Peter Herman is acknowledged for valuable...., Matheson, H., McKenzie, R., 2009. Carbon and nitrogen elemental and stable isotopic compositions of surficial sediments from the Pakistan margin of the Arabian Sea. Deep Sea Research Part II, 56, 271-282. Dauwe, B., Middelburg, J.J., Herman, P.M.J., 2001...

  16. Phosphate removal in oxygen minimum zones off Africa

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    Sokoll, Sarah; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Holtappels, Moritz; Goldhammer, Tobias; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.

    2013-04-01

    The flux of limiting nutrients (N, P, Si and Fe) to the surface ocean controls phytoplankton growth and species composition. Shelf and margin sediments release considerable amounts of nutrients into the bottom water from which they are eventually transported to surface waters. However not well understood is how the flux of phosphate (P) across the benthic boundary layer (BBL) is controlled by geochemical and biologically mediated processes such as redox reaction, chelation, particle formation, sorption and desorption to organic and inorganic particles. P transformation between the dissolved and the particulate phase significantly influences the P distribution in the water column and, for example, might lead to the significant P accumulation observed for anoxic bottom waters of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off Namibia. To investigate P accumulation on particles in the water column under oxic and anoxic conditions we conducted isotope labeling experiments during two cruises in 2011 to the OMZs of Mauritania and Namibia. We applied radioactive tracer (33PO43) incubations, sequential P extraction and nanoSIMS analyses to measure particulate P formation rates and to discriminate between biotic and abiotic accumulation. Under oxic conditions, formation rates of particulate P ranged between 3.1 and 29.7 nmol P L-1 d-1 and increased in the BBL towards the seafloor. Sequential P extraction revealed that 34-67% of phosphate was taken up into biomass. Calculated cellular uptake rates of ~0.24 to 29 x 10-18 mol cell-1 d-1 were significantly above those calculated from oxygen consumption and Redfield ratio suggesting intracellular P storage. In contrast, in near anoxic bottom waters (

  17. Benthic phosphorus cycling in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

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    Lomnitz, Ulrike; Sommer, Stefan; Dale, Andrew W.; Löscher, Carolin R.; Noffke, Anna; Wallmann, Klaus; Hensen, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) that impinge on continental margins favor the release of phosphorus (P) from the sediments to the water column, enhancing primary productivity and the maintenance or expansion of low-oxygen waters. A comprehensive field program in the Peruvian OMZ was undertaken to identify the sources of benthic P at six stations, including the analysis of particles from the water column, surface sediments, and pore fluids, as well as in situ benthic flux measurements. A major fraction of solid-phase P was bound as particulate inorganic P (PIP) both in the water column and in sediments. Sedimentary PIP increased with depth in the sediment at the expense of particulate organic P (POP). The ratio of particulate organic carbon (POC) to POP exceeded the Redfield ratio both in the water column (202 ± 29) and in surface sediments (303 ± 77). However, the POC to total particulate P (TPP = POP + PIP) ratio was close to Redfield in the water column (103 ± 9) and in sediment samples (102 ± 15). This suggests that the relative burial efficiencies of POC and TPP are similar under low-oxygen conditions and that the sediments underlying the anoxic waters on the Peru margin are not depleted in P compared to Redfield. Benthic fluxes of dissolved P were extremely high (up to 1.04 ± 0.31 mmol m-2 d-1), however, showing that a lack of oxygen promotes the intensified release of dissolved P from sediments, whilst preserving the POC / TPP burial ratio. Benthic dissolved P fluxes were always higher than the TPP rain rate to the seabed, which is proposed to be caused by transient P release by bacterial mats that had stored P during previous periods when bottom waters were less reducing. At one station located at the lower rim of the OMZ, dissolved P was taken up by the sediments, indicating ongoing phosphorite formation. This is further supported by decreasing porewater phosphate concentrations with sediment depth, whereas solid-phase P concentrations were comparatively

  18. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene Mark;

    2015-01-01

    denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off...... suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein....

  19. A dissolved cobalt plume in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical South Pacific

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    Hawco, Nicholas J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Resing, Joseph A.; Twining, Benjamin S.; Saito, Mak A.

    2016-10-01

    Cobalt is a nutrient to phytoplankton, but knowledge about its biogeochemical cycling is limited, especially in the Pacific Ocean. Here, we report sections of dissolved cobalt and labile dissolved cobalt from the US GEOTRACES GP16 transect in the South Pacific. The cobalt distribution is closely tied to the extent and intensity of the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern South Pacific with highest concentrations measured at the oxycline near the Peru margin. Below 200 m, remineralization and circulation produce an inverse relationship between cobalt and dissolved oxygen that extends throughout the basin. Within the oxygen minimum zone, elevated concentrations of labile cobalt are generated by input from coastal sources and reduced scavenging at low O2. As these high cobalt waters are upwelled and advected offshore, phytoplankton export returns cobalt to low-oxygen water masses underneath. West of the Peru upwelling region, dissolved cobalt is less than 10 pM in the euphotic zone and strongly bound by organic ligands. Because the cobalt nutricline within the South Pacific gyre is deeper than in oligotrophic regions in the North and South Atlantic, cobalt involved in sustaining phytoplankton productivity in the gyre is heavily recycled and ultimately arrives from lateral transport of upwelled waters from the eastern margin. In contrast to large coastal inputs, atmospheric deposition and hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise appear to be minor sources of cobalt. Overall, these results demonstrate that oxygen biogeochemistry exerts a strong influence on cobalt cycling.

  20. Composition of organic matter in sediments of the oxygen minimum zone of the Northeastern Mexican Pacific

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    Juarez, M.; Sanchez, A.; Aguiñiga-García, S.; Lara-Mendoza, A.

    2013-05-01

    Total organic carbon (TOC) content, total nitrogen (TN) content, elemental (C and N), and isotopic (δ13C-TOC) composition of organic matter derived from both marine and terrestrial sources constrain the relative contributions from marine productivity, the mangroves, and the continental wind erosion of 36 carbonate-free surface sediments along the southwestern coast of the Baja California Peninsula. In general, the spatial patterns of TOC, TN, C:N ratio and δ13C-TOC are similar. The maximum content of TOC (14.5%) and TN (1.6%) were measured inside the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). The stable carbon isotopic compositions were enriched in 12C in surface sediments at suboxic sites within the OMZ. The C:N ratio and δ13C-TOC values indicated that the organic sediment material is predominantly of marine origin, with a minor contribution from the terrestrial source or mangroves. In the stations near to the coast, the high values of the C:N ratio and the depleted 13C values suggest a proportionally greater accumulation of terrestrial organic matter. The terrestrial-derived organic carbon content is 40% at the stations near to the coast, based on a Mixing Model of End Members. Keywords: Total organic carbon, total nitrogen, carbon stable isotopes, oxygen minimum zone, northeastern Pacific.

  1. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

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    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Löscher, Carolin; Schunck, Harald; Desai, Dhwani K; Hauss, Helena; Kiko, Rainer; Holtappels, Moritz; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz, Ruth A; Graco, Michelle I; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  2. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kalvelage

    Full Text Available Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100% in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  3. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene Mark

    2015-01-01

    denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off...... and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results......Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic...

  4. Deoxygenation alters bacterial diversity and community composition in the ocean's largest oxygen minimum zone.

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    Beman, J Michael; Carolan, Molly T

    2013-01-01

    Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) have a central role in biogeochemical cycles and are expanding as a consequence of climate change, yet how deoxygenation will affect the microbial communities that control these cycles is unclear. Here we sample across dissolved oxygen gradients in the oceans' largest OMZ and show that bacterial richness displays a unimodal pattern with decreasing dissolved oxygen, reaching maximum values on the edge of the OMZ and decreasing within it. Rare groups on the OMZ margin are abundant at lower dissolved oxygen concentrations, including sulphur-cycling Chromatiales, for which 16S rRNA was amplified from extracted RNA. Microbial species distribution models accurately replicate community patterns based on multivariate environmental data, demonstrate likely changes in distributions and diversity in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, and highlight the sensitivity of key bacterial groups to deoxygenation. Through these mechanisms, OMZ expansion may alter microbial composition, competition, diversity and function, all of which have implications for biogeochemical cycling in OMZs.

  5. Isopycnal diffusivity in the tropical North Atlantic oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köllner, Manuela; Visbeck, Martin; Tanhua, Toste; Fischer, Tim

    2017-04-01

    Isopycnal diffusivity plays an important role in the ventilation of the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). Lateral tracer transport is described by isopycnal diffusivity and mean advection of the tracer (e.g. oxygen), together they account for up to 70% of the oxygen supply for the OMZ. One of the big challenges is to separate diffusivity from advection. Isopycnal diffusivity was estimated to be Ky=(500 ± 200) m2 s-1 and Kx=(1200 ± 600) m2 s-1 by Banyte et. al (2013) from a Tracer Release Experiment (TRE). Hahn et al. (2014) estimated a meridional eddy diffusivity of 1350 m2 s-1 at 100 m depth decaying to less than 300 m2 s-1 below 800 m depth from repeated ship sections of CTD and ADCP data in addition with hydrographic mooring data. Uncertainties of the estimated diffusivities were still large, thus the Oxygen Supply Tracer Release Experiment (OSTRE) was set up to estimate isopycnal diffusivity in the OMZ using a newly developed sampling strategy of a control volume. The tracer was released in 2012 in the core of the OMZ at approximately 410 m depth and mapped after 6, 15 and 29 months in a regular grid. In addition to the calculation of tracer column integrals from vertical tracer profiles a new sampling method was invented and tested during two of the mapping cruises. The mean eddy diffusivity during OSTRE was found to be about (300 ± 130) m2 s-1. Additionally, the tracer has been advected further to the east and west by zonal jets. We compare different analysis methods to estimate isopycnal diffusivity from tracer spreading and show the advantage of the control volume surveys and control box approach. From the control box approach we are estimating the strength of the zonal jets within the OMZ core integrated over the TRE time period. References: Banyte, D., Visbeck, M., Tanhua, T., Fischer, T., Krahmann, G.,Karstensen, J., 2013. Lateral Diffusivity from Tracer Release Experiments in the Tropical North Atlantic Thermocline

  6. Nitrite oxidation in the Namibian oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füssel, Jessika; Lam, Phyllis; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Holtappels, Moritz; Günter, Marcel; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2012-06-01

    Nitrite oxidation is the second step of nitrification. It is the primary source of oceanic nitrate, the predominant form of bioavailable nitrogen in the ocean. Despite its obvious importance, nitrite oxidation has rarely been investigated in marine settings. We determined nitrite oxidation rates directly in (15)N-incubation experiments and compared the rates with those of nitrate reduction to nitrite, ammonia oxidation, anammox, denitrification, as well as dissimilatory nitrate/nitrite reduction to ammonium in the Namibian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Nitrite oxidation (≤372 nM NO(2)(-) d(-1)) was detected throughout the OMZ even when in situ oxygen concentrations were low to non-detectable. Nitrite oxidation rates often exceeded ammonia oxidation rates, whereas nitrate reduction served as an alternative and significant source of nitrite. Nitrite oxidation and anammox co-occurred in these oxygen-deficient waters, suggesting that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) likely compete with anammox bacteria for nitrite when substrate availability became low. Among all of the known NOB genera targeted via catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization, only Nitrospina and Nitrococcus were detectable in the Namibian OMZ samples investigated. These NOB were abundant throughout the OMZ and contributed up to ~9% of total microbial community. Our combined results reveal that a considerable fraction of the recently recycled nitrogen or reduced NO(3)(-) was re-oxidized back to NO(3)(-) via nitrite oxidation, instead of being lost from the system through the anammox or denitrification pathways.

  7. Glacial-interglacial Variations of Molybdenum Isotopes in the Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, C.; Frank, M.; Scholz, F.

    2015-12-01

    Mo isotopes have been widely used as a tool to constrain redox-conditions during major global events such as the oxygenation of the oceans in the Precambrian and Cretaceous Ocean Anoxic Events. In addition, Mo isotopes have considerable, yet underexplored potential to quantitatively track local redox-variation at high resolution on shorter timescales. Here we present data from piston core M77/2-024-5 that was retrieved in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone in the context of Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 754 of the Deutsche Forschungs Gemeinschaft (DFG). The age model for this core is well constrained and the core covers the last 140 ka with a hiatus between 20 and 50 ky BP. The oxygen minimum zone along the Peru continental margin is thought to have been better ventilated and therefore less pronounced during glacial periods compared to interglacials. Concentrations of redox-sensitive trace elements show high-amplitude changes and indicate periods of strongly sulphidic conditions with high Mo fixation rate and oxygenated periods with limited Mo fixation (Scholz et al 2014). Mo isotopes do not show straightforward correlations with elemental redox tracers and are only weakly correlated with Mo/U and total organic carbon (TOC). However, Mo isotopes become significantly heavier around the last glacial maximum (Δ98Mo of 0.4 permil). The observed signatures indicate that the Mo isotope composition is dominated by changes in the operating Mo delivery mechanism, i.e. particulate transport versus molecular diffusion. Our results suggest that Mo isotopes can track local redox variation therefore adding to our understanding of this complex indicator for marine environmental change. Scholz et al., (2014), Nature Geosciences, Vol. 7, Pages 433-437

  8. Behavioral ecology of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) in relation to oxygen minimum zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Julia S.; Field, John C.; Markaida, Unai; Gilly, William F.

    2013-10-01

    Habitat utilization, behavior and food habits of the jumbo or Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, were compared between an area recently inhabited in the northern California Current System (CCS) and a historically established area of residence in the Gulf of California (GOC). Low dissolved oxygen concentrations at midwater depths define the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), an important environmental feature in both areas. We analyzed vertical diving behavior and diet of D. gigas and hydrographic properties of the water column to ascertain the extent to which squid utilized the OMZ in the two areas. The upper boundary of the OMZ has been shoaling in recent decades in the CCS, and this phenomenon has been proposed to vertically compress the pelagic environment inhabited by aerobic predators. A shoaling OMZ will also bring mesopelagic communities into a depth range with more illumination during daytime, making these organisms more vulnerable to predation by visual predators (i.e. jumbo squid). Because the OMZ in the GOC is considerably shallower than in the CCS, our study provides insight into the behavioral plasticity of jumbo squid and how they may respond to a shoaling OMZ in the CCS. We propose that shoaling OMZs are likely to be favorable to jumbo squid and could be a key indirect factor behind the recent range expansion of this highly migratory predator.

  9. CO2 maximum in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmier, A.; Ruiz-Pino, D.; Garçon, V.

    2011-02-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), known as suboxic layers which are mainly localized in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems, have been expanding since the 20th "high CO2" century, probably due to global warming. OMZs are also known to significantly contribute to the oceanic production of N2O, a greenhouse gas (GHG) more efficient than CO2. However, the contribution of the OMZs on the oceanic sources and sinks budget of CO2, the main GHG, still remains to be established. We present here the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) structure, associated locally with the Chilean OMZ and globally with the main most intense OMZs (O22225 μmol kg-1, up to 2350 μmol kg-1) have been reported over the whole OMZ thickness, allowing the definition for all studied OMZs a Carbon Maximum Zone (CMZ). Locally off Chile, the shallow cores of the OMZ and CMZ are spatially and temporally collocated at 21° S, 30° S and 36° S despite different cross-shore, long-shore and seasonal configurations. Globally, the mean state of the main OMZs also corresponds to the largest carbon reserves of the ocean in subsurface waters. The CMZs-OMZs could then induce a positive feedback for the atmosphere during upwelling activity, as potential direct local sources of CO2. The CMZ paradoxically presents a slight "carbon deficit" in its core (~10%), meaning a DIC increase from the oxygenated ocean to the OMZ lower than the corresponding O2 decrease (assuming classical C/O molar ratios). This "carbon deficit" would be related to regional thermal mechanisms affecting faster O2 than DIC (due to the carbonate buffer effect) and occurring upstream in warm waters (e.g., in the Equatorial Divergence), where the CMZ-OMZ core originates. The "carbon deficit" in the CMZ core would be mainly compensated locally at the oxycline, by a "carbon excess" induced by a specific remineralization. Indeed, a possible co-existence of bacterial heterotrophic and autotrophic processes usually occurring at different depths could

  10. CO2 maximum in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Garçon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs, known as suboxic layers which are mainly localized in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems, have been expanding since the 20th "high CO2" century, probably due to global warming. OMZs are also known to significantly contribute to the oceanic production of N2O, a greenhouse gas (GHG more efficient than CO2. However, the contribution of the OMZs on the oceanic sources and sinks budget of CO2, the main GHG, still remains to be established. We present here the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC structure, associated locally with the Chilean OMZ and globally with the main most intense OMZs (O2−1 in the open ocean. To achieve this, we examine simultaneous DIC and O2 data collected off Chile during 4 cruises (2000–2002 and a monthly monitoring (2000–2001 in one of the shallowest OMZs, along with international DIC and O2 databases and climatology for other OMZs. High DIC concentrations (>2225 μmol kg−1, up to 2350 μmol kg−1 have been reported over the whole OMZ thickness, allowing the definition for all studied OMZs a Carbon Maximum Zone (CMZ. Locally off Chile, the shallow cores of the OMZ and CMZ are spatially and temporally collocated at 21° S, 30° S and 36° S despite different cross-shore, long-shore and seasonal configurations. Globally, the mean state of the main OMZs also corresponds to the largest carbon reserves of the ocean in subsurface waters. The CMZs-OMZs could then induce a positive feedback for the atmosphere during upwelling activity, as potential direct local sources of CO2. The CMZ paradoxically presents a slight "carbon deficit" in its core (~10%, meaning a DIC increase from the oxygenated ocean to the OMZ lower than the corresponding O2 decrease (assuming classical C/O molar ratios. This "carbon deficit" would be related to regional thermal mechanisms affecting faster O2 than DIC (due to the carbonate buffer effect and occurring upstream in warm waters (e.g., in the Equatorial Divergence

  11. Benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: towards a paleo-oxygenation proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemence, Caulle; Meryem, Mojtahid; Karoliina, Koho; Andy, Gooday; Gert-Jan, Reichart; Gerhard, Schmiedl; Frans, Jorissen

    2014-05-01

    Benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: towards a paleo-oxygenation proxy. C. Caulle1, M. Mojtahid1, K. Koho2,3, A. Gooday4, G. J. Reichart2,3, G. Schmiedl5, F. Jorissen1 1UMR CNRS 6112 LPG-BIAF, University of Angers, 2 bd Lavoisier, 49045 Angers Cedex 2Utrecht University, Faculty of Geosciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Budapestlaan 4, 3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands 3Royal Netherland Institute for Sea Research (Royal NIOZ), Landsdiep 4, 1797 SZ 't Horntje (Texel) 4Southampton Oceanography Centre, Empress Dock, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK 5Department of Geosciences, University of Hamburg, Bundesstraße 55, 20146 Hamburg, Germany The thermohaline circulation oxygenates the deep ocean sediment and therefore enables aerobic life on the sea-floor. In the past, interruption of this deep water formation occurred several times causing hypoxic to anoxic conditions on the sea-floor leading to major ecological turnover. A better understanding of the interaction between climate and bottom water oxygenation is therefore essential in order to predict future oceanic responses. Presently, permanent (stable over decadal timescale) low-oxygen conditions occur naturally at mid-water depths in the northern Indian Ocean (Arabian Sea). Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ) are key areas to understand the hypoxic-anoxic events and their impact on the benthic ecosystem. In this context, a good knowledge of the ecology and life cycle adaptations of the benthic foraminiferal assemblages living in these low oxygen areas is essential. A series of multicores were recovered from three transects showing an oxygen gradient across the OMZ: the Murray Ridge, the Oman margin and the Indian margin. The stations located at the same depths showed slightly different oxygen concentrations and large differences in organic matter content. These differences are mainly related to the geographic location in the Arabian Sea. We investigated at these stations live and dead benthic

  12. Organic carbon, and not copper, controls denitrification in oxygen minimum zones of the ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ward, B.B.; Tuit, C.B.; Jayakumar, A.; Rich, J.J.; Moffett, J.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    Incubation experiments under trace metal clean conditions and ambient oxygen concentrations were used to investigate the response of microbial assemblages in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) to additions of organic carbon and copper, two factors...

  13. Reconnaissance 14C Dating and the Evaluation of Mg/Li as a Temperature Proxy in Bamboo Corals from the California Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberger, M. M.; LaVigne, M.; Miller, H.; Hill, T. M.; McNichol, A. P.; Lardie Gaylord, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the face of anthropogenically induced climate changes, it is becoming increasingly important to develop high-resolution paleoceanographic records that may elucidate how ocean conditions may shift in coming decades. Recently, bamboo corals (gorgonian octocorals) have been proposed as archives of intermediate ocean conditions. This study used 'reconnaissance' radiocarbon analysis to identify the nuclear bomb 14C spike in the proteinaceous nodes of bamboo corals and to quantify radial growth rates and ages of corals spanning the eastern Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) (790-2055 m). Preliminary data suggest that these corals exhibit a wide range of growth rates (9.4-350 μm/yr) that are non-linear over time and decrease with coral age and depth. Records of Mg/Li were investigated in these corals, given that previous studies have demonstrated positive correlations between Mg/Li and temperature in benthic foraminifera and surface and deep-sea aragonitic corals, with a reduced influence of vital effects over Mg/Ca. Intracoral reproducibility observed for replicate Mg/Li timeseries within each sample (p=0.6±0.2, n=6) and strong correlations between Mg/Ca and Li/Ca (0.9±0.1, n=6) indicate similar environmental or biological drivers of Mg and Li incorporation in bamboo corals. Given the strong positive correlations between Mg/Li and water temperature across a depth transect (r2=0.87, n=6), increasing Mg/Li observed over the growth history of each of the corals more likely reflects declining growth rates resulting in decreased Li incorporation over time rather than cooling of California Margin intermediate waters. Reductions in growth rate over the lifespan of each coral (~100+ years) may be a function of natural coral growth patterns or changes in carbonate chemistry, oxygen, or food supply in a sensitive OMZ coral ecosystem.

  14. Aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in oxygen minimum layer fishes: the role of alcohol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Joseph J; Grigsby, Michelle D; Clarke, M Elizabeth

    2012-06-01

    Zones of minimum oxygen form at intermediate depth in all the world's oceans as a result of global circulation patterns that keep the water at oceanic mid-depths out of contact with the atmosphere for hundreds of years. In areas where primary production is very high, the microbial oxidation of sinking organic matter results in very low oxygen concentrations at mid-depths. Such is the case with the Arabian Sea, with O(2) concentrations reaching zero at 200 m and remaining very low (fishes (primarily lanternfishes: Mytophidae) inhabiting the Arabian Sea and California borderland perform a daily vertical migration into the low-oxygen layer, spending daylight hours in the oxygen minimum zone and migrating upward into normoxic waters at night. To find out how fishes were able to survive their daily sojourns into the minimum zone, we tested the activity of four enzymes, one (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH) that served as a proxy for anaerobic glycolysis with a conventional lactate endpoint, a second (citrate synthase, CS) that is indicative of aerobic metabolism, a third (malate dehydrogenase) that functions in the Krebs' cycle and as a bridge linking mitochondrion and cytosol, and a fourth (alcohol dehydrogenase, ADH) that catalyzes the final reaction in a pathway where pyruvate is reduced to ethanol. Ethanol is a metabolic product easily excreted by fish, preventing lactate accumulation. The ADH pathway is rarely very active in vertebrate muscle; activity has previously been seen only in goldfish and other cyprinids capable of prolonged anaerobiosis. Activity of the enzyme suite in Arabian Sea and California fishes was compared with that of ecological analogs in the same family and with the same lifestyle but living in systems with much higher oxygen concentrations: the Gulf of Mexico and the Southern Ocean. ADH activities in the Arabian Sea fishes were similar to those of goldfish, far higher than those of confamilials from the less severe minimum in the Gulf of Mexico

  15. Epi-benthic megafaunal zonation across an oxygen minimum zone at the Indian continental margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hunter, W.R.; Oguri, K.; Kitazato, H.; Ansari, Z.A.; Witte, U.

    , St John's, Canada. pp. 247-264. Billett, D.S.M., Bett, B.J., Jacobs, C.L., Rouse, I.P., and Wigham, B.D. 2006. Mass deposition of jellyfish in the deep Arabian Sea. Limnology and Oceanography. 51 (5): 2077-2083. Bluhm, H. 2001a. Re...

  16. Do Robotic Surgical Systems Improve Profit Margins? A Cross-Sectional Analysis of California Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Shen, Chan; Hu, Jim C

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between ownership of robotic surgical systems and hospital profit margins. This study used hospital annual utilization data, annual financial data, and discharge data for year 2011 from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. We first performed bivariate analysis to compare mean profit margin by hospital and market characteristics and to examine whether these characteristics differed between hospitals that had one or more robotic surgical systems in 2011 and those that did not. We applied the t test and the F test to compare mean profit margin between two groups and among three or more groups, respectively. We then conducted multilevel logistic regression to determine the association between ownership of robotic surgical systems and having a positive profit margin after controlling for other hospital and market characteristics and accounting for possible correlation among hospitals located within the same market. The study sample included 167 California hospitals with valid financial information. Hospitals with robotic surgical systems tended to report more favorable profit margins. However, multilevel logistic regression showed that this relationship (an association, not causality) became only marginally significant (odds ratio [OR] = 6.2; P = 0.053) after controlling for other hospital characteristics, such as ownership type, teaching status, bed size, and surgical volumes, and market characteristics, such as total number of robotic surgical systems owned by other hospitals in the same market area. As robotic surgical systems become widely disseminated, hospital decision makers should carefully evaluate the financial and clinical implications before making a capital investment in this technology. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Eastward shift and maintenance of Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: Understanding the paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Shiba Shankar; Panigrahi, Mruganka K.

    2016-09-01

    The dominance of Oxygen Minimum Zone in the eastern part of the Arabian Sea (ASOMZ) instead of the more bio-productive and likely more oxygen consuming western part is the first part of the paradox. The sources of oxygen to the ASOMZ were evaluated through the distributions of different water masses using the extended optimum multiparameter (eOMP) analysis, whereas the sinks of oxygen were evaluated through the organic matter remineralization, using the apparent oxygen utilization (AOU). The contributions of major source waters to the Arabian Sea viz. Indian Deep water (dIDW), Indian Central water (ICW), Persian Gulf Water (PGW) and Red Sea Water (RSW) have been quantified through the eOMP analysis which shows that the PGW and RSW are significant for the eastward shift of ASOMZ instead of voluminous ICW and dIDW. The distribution of Net Primary Production (NPP) and AOU clearly suggest the transport of organic detritus from the highly productive western Arabian Sea to its eastern counterpart which adds to the eastward shifting of ASOMZ. A revised estimate of the seasonal variation of areal extent and volume occupied by ASOMZ through analysis of latest available data reveals a distinct intensification of ASOMZ by 30% and increase in its volume by 5% during the spring-summer transition. However, during this seasonal transition the productivity in the Arabian Sea shows 100% increase in mean NPP. This disparity between ASOMZ and monsoonal variation of productivity is the other part of the paradox, which has been constrained through apparent oxygen utilization, Net Primary Production along with a variation of core depths of source waters. This study reveals a subtle balance between the circulation of marginal oxygen-rich water masses from the western Arabian Sea and organic matter remineralization in the eastern Arabian Sea in different seasons that explains the maintenance of ASOMZ throughout the year.

  18. Fish Ecology and Evolution in the World's Oxygen Minimum Zones and Implications of Ocean Deoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, N D; Levin, L A

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) and oxygen limited zones (OLZs) are important oceanographic features in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean, and are characterized by hypoxic conditions that are physiologically challenging for demersal fish. Thickness, depth of the upper boundary, minimum oxygen levels, local temperatures, and diurnal, seasonal, and interannual oxycline variability differ regionally, with the thickest and shallowest OMZs occurring in the subtropics and tropics. Although most fish are not hypoxia-tolerant, at least 77 demersal fish species from 16 orders have evolved physiological, behavioural, and morphological adaptations that allow them to live under the severely hypoxic, hypercapnic, and at times sulphidic conditions found in OMZs. Tolerance to OMZ conditions has evolved multiple times in multiple groups with no single fish family or genus exploiting all OMZs globally. Severely hypoxic conditions in OMZs lead to decreased demersal fish diversity, but fish density trends are variable and dependent on region-specific thresholds. Some OMZ-adapted fish species are more hypoxia-tolerant than most megafaunal invertebrates and are present even when most invertebrates are excluded. Expansions and contractions of OMZs in the past have affected fish evolution and diversity. Current patterns of ocean warming are leading to ocean deoxygenation, causing the expansion and shoaling of OMZs, which is expected to decrease demersal fish diversity and alter trophic pathways on affected margins. Habitat compression is expected for hypoxia-intolerant species, causing increased susceptibility to overfishing for fisheries species. Demersal fisheries are likely to be negatively impacted overall by the expansion of OMZs in a warming world.

  19. Thermal evolution of a sheared continental margin: Insights from the Ballenas transform in Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Christian; Gleadow, Andrew J. W.; Fletcher, John M.; Kohn, Barry P.

    2009-07-01

    The Ballenas transform margin in central Baja California offers an unparalleled opportunity to study the thermal behaviour of a sheared continental margin during various stages of its evolution. Apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He results from two transects perpendicular to the coast reveal a pronounced latest Pliocene to Pleistocene (~ 1.8 Ma) heating event related to the Neogene opening of the Gulf of California. Proximity to a regional pre-rift unconformity indicates that samples remained at near-surface levels since Paleogene unroofing, despite having experienced reheating to maximum paleotemperatures within or above the fission track partial annealing zone. In general, maximum paleotemperatures during overprinting decrease from > 100-120 °C near the coast to below 60 °C ca. 5-8 km further inland, suggesting lateral heat flow from a source within the Gulf of California. Heat sources related to the structural development of the Ballenas transform fault, located approximately 1.5-4.5 km offshore from the two sample transects, most likely controlled the observed reheating. Overprinting patterns do not support conductive reheating due to reburial, magmatism or frictional shear. Instead, a pronounced thermal spike in between much less overprinted neighbouring samples strongly favours convective heating by hydrothermal fluids as the dominant overprinting process. Hydrothermal activity may be caused by either deep fluid circulation along newly formed shear zones of the transform fault or, more likely, magmatic leaking along the transform fault. Latest Pliocene to Pleistocene (~ 1.8 Ma) activity on the Ballenas transform fault is closely linked to extension in the Lower and Upper Delfín basins and provides a minimum age for the structural reorganisation and the relocation of extension in the northern Gulf of California. This study shows that hydrothermal activity can cause significant thermal events in a transform margin before the passage of the spreading centre

  20. Hypoxia Tolerance and Metabolic Suppression in Oxygen Minimum Zone Euphausiids: Implications for Ocean Deoxygenation and Biogeochemical Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Brad A; Schneider, Jillian L; Kaartvedt, Stein; Wishner, Karen F; Daly, Kendra L

    2016-10-01

    The effects of regional variations in oxygen and temperature levels with depth were assessed for the metabolism and hypoxia tolerance of dominant euphausiid species. The physiological strategies employed by these species facilitate prediction of changing vertical distributions with expanding oxygen minimum zones and inform estimates of the contribution of vertically migrating species to biogeochemical cycles. The migrating species from the Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP), Euphausia eximia and Nematoscelis gracilis, tolerate a Partial Pressure (PO2) of 0.8 kPa at 10 °C (∼15 µM O2) for at least 12 h without mortality, while the California Current species, Nematoscelis difficilis, is incapable of surviving even 2.4 kPa PO2 (∼32 µM O2) for more than 3 h at that temperature. Euphausia diomedeae from the Red Sea migrates into an intermediate oxygen minimum zone, but one in which the temperature at depth remains near 22 °C. Euphausia diomedeae survived 1.6 kPa PO2 (∼22 µM O2) at 22 °C for the duration of six hour respiration experiments. Critical oxygen partial pressures were estimated for each species, and, for E. eximia, measured via oxygen consumption (2.1 kPa, 10 °C, n = 2) and lactate accumulation (1.1 kPa, 10 °C). A primary mechanism facilitating low oxygen tolerance is an ability to dramatically reduce energy expenditure during daytime forays into low oxygen waters. The ETP and Red Sea species reduced aerobic metabolism by more than 50% during exposure to hypoxia. Anaerobic glycolytic energy production, as indicated by whole-animal lactate accumulation, contributed only modestly to the energy deficit. Thus, the total metabolic rate was suppressed by ∼49-64%. Metabolic suppression during diel migrations to depth reduces the metabolic contribution of these species to vertical carbon and nitrogen flux (i.e., the biological pump) by an equivalent amount. Growing evidence suggests that metabolic suppression is a widespread strategy among migrating

  1. Hypoxia Tolerance and Metabolic Suppression in Oxygen Minimum Zone Euphausiids: Implications for Ocean Deoxygenation and Biogeochemical Cycles

    KAUST Repository

    Seibel, Brad A.

    2016-08-10

    The effects of regional variations in oxygen and temperature levels with depth were assessed for the metabolism and hypoxia tolerance of dominant euphausiid species. The physiological strategies employed by these species facilitate prediction of changing vertical distributions with expanding oxygen minimum zones and inform estimates of the contribution of vertically migrating species to biogeochemical cycles. The migrating species from the Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP), Euphausia eximia and Nematoscelis gracilis, tolerate a Partial Pressure (PO2) of 0.8 kPa at 10 °C (∼15 µM O2) for at least 12 h without mortality, while the California Current species, Nematoscelis difficilis, is incapable of surviving even 2.4 kPa PO2 (∼32 µM O2) for more than 3 h at that temperature. Euphausia diomedeae from the Red Sea migrates into an intermediate oxygen minimum zone, but one in which the temperature at depth remains near 22 °C. Euphausia diomedeae survived 1.6 kPa PO2 (∼22 µM O2) at 22 °C for the duration of six hour respiration experiments. Critical oxygen partial pressures were estimated for each species, and, for E. eximia, measured via oxygen consumption (2.1 kPa, 10 °C, n = 2) and lactate accumulation (1.1 kPa, 10 °C). A primary mechanism facilitating low oxygen tolerance is an ability to dramatically reduce energy expenditure during daytime forays into low oxygen waters. The ETP and Red Sea species reduced aerobic metabolism by more than 50% during exposure to hypoxia. Anaerobic glycolytic energy production, as indicated by whole-animal lactate accumulation, contributed only modestly to the energy deficit. Thus, the total metabolic rate was suppressed by ∼49–64%. Metabolic suppression during diel migrations to depth reduces the metabolic contribution of these species to vertical carbon and nitrogen flux (i.e., the biological pump) by an equivalent amount. Growing evidence suggests that metabolic suppression is a widespread strategy among migrating

  2. Northwest margin of California continental borderland: marine geology and tectonic evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The NW margin of the California continental border land consists of 2 NW-trending pre-Neogene lithologic belts blanketed by Miocene and younger strata. These represent facies corresponding to the subduction complex and forearc-basin deposits of a late Mesozoic and Paleogene continental-margin arc-trench system. The outer belt, which forms the acoustic basement is characterized by: 1) moderately high compressional velocities; 2) discordant and discontinuous seismic reflectors; and 3) nonfossiliferous and diverse rock types. Landward, the inner Great Valley sequence belt is characterized by: 1) intermediate compressional velocities; 2) concordant and relatively continuous reflectors, and 3) a thick turbidite sequence. Well-developed wrench-fault structures in overlying Miocene strata record a transition from Paleogene subduction to Neogene transform faulting. The timing of volcanism and uplift, and of the younger wrenching event, closely matches the plate-tectonic model of Atwater and Molnar.-from Author

  3. Metagenomic analysis of nitrogen and methane cycling in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüke, C.; Speth, D.R.; Kox, M.A.R.; Villanueva, L.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are areas in the global ocean where oxygen concentrations drop to below one percent. Low oxygen concentrations allow alternative respiration with nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptor to become prevalent in these areas, making them main contributors to oceanic nitrogen

  4. Boundaries of the Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone shaped by coherent mesoscale dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bettencourt, João H; García, Emilio Hernández; Montes, Ivonne; Sudre, Joël; Dewitte, Boris; Paulmier, Aurélien; Garçon, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen in sea water is a major factor affecting marine habitats and biogeochemical cycles. Oceanic zones with oxygen deficits represent significant portions of the area and volume of the oceans and are thought to be expanding. The Peruvian oxygen minimum zone is one of the most pronounced and lies in a region of strong mesoscale activity in the form of vortices and frontal regions, whose effect in the dynamics of the oxygen minimum zone is largely unknown. Here, we study this issue from a modeling approach and a Lagrangian point of view, using a coupled physical-biogeochemical simulation of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone and finite-size Lyapunov exponent fields to understand the link between mesoscale dynamics and oxygen variations. Our results show that, at depths between 380 and 600 meters, mesoscale structures have a relevant dual role. First, their mean positions and paths delimit and maintain the oxygen minimum zone boundaries. Second, their high frequency fluctuations entrain oxygen across t...

  5. Temporally invariable bacterial community structure in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Bandekar, M.; Gomes, J.; Shenoy, D.M.; Meena, R.M.; Naik, H.; Khandeparkar, R.; Ramaiah, N.

    of the BC during all 3 seasons. The BC varied seasonally both in the surface and DCM, whereas in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ; 250 to 1000 m) it was more or less identical during all 3 seasons in spite of significant seasonal variation in bacterial abundance...

  6. N2 production rates limited by nitrite availability in the Bay of Bengal oxygen minimum zone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bristow, L.A.; Callbeck, C.M.; Larsen, M.; Altabet, M.A.; Dekaezemacker, J.; Forth, M.; Gauns, M.; Glud, R.N.; Kuypers, M.M.M.; Lavik, G.; Milucka, J.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Pratihary, A.K.; Revsbech, N.P.; Thamdrup, B.; Treusch, A.H.; Canfield, D.E.

    A third or more of the fixed nitrogen lost from the oceans as N2 is removed by anaerobic microbial processes in open ocean oxygen minimum zones. These zones have expanded over the past decades, and further anthropogenically induced...

  7. Denitrification, nitrate turnover, and aerobic respiration by benthic foraminiferans in the oxygen minimum zone off Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgslund, Signe; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Cedhagen, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Population density, nitrate turnover, and oxygen respiration of benthic foraminiferans were investigated in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off the Chilean coast. Live foraminiferans were found predominantly in the upper 3 mm of the sediment, and the nitrate accumulating species Nonionella cf. stel...

  8. The role of benthic foraminifera in the benthic nitrogen cycle of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Glock

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery that foraminifera are able to use nitrate instead of oxygen as energy source for their metabolism has challenged our understanding of nitrogen cycling in the ocean. It was evident before that only prokaryotes and fungi are able to denitrify. Rate estimates of foraminiferal denitrification were very sparse on a regional scale. Here, we present estimates of benthic foraminiferal denitrification rates from six stations at intermediate water depths in and below the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ. Foraminiferal denitrification rates were calculated from abundance and assemblage composition of the total living fauna in both, surface and subsurface sediments, as well as from individual species specific denitrification rates. A comparison with total benthic denitrification rates as inferred by biogeochemical models revealed that benthic foraminifera account for the total denitrification on the shelf between 80 and 250 m water depth. They are still important denitrifiers in the centre of the OMZ around 320 m (29–56% of the benthic denitrification but play only a minor role at the lower OMZ boundary and below the OMZ between 465 and 700 m (3–7% of total benthic denitrification. Furthermore, foraminiferal denitrification was compared to the total benthic nitrate loss measured during benthic chamber experiments. Foraminiferal denitrification contributes 1 to 50% to the total nitrate loss across a depth transect from 80 to 700 m, respectively. Flux rate estimates ranged from 0.01 to 1.3 mmol m−2 d−1. Furthermore we show that the amount of nitrate stored in living benthic foraminifera (3 to 705 µmol L−1 can be higher by three orders of magnitude as compared to the ambient pore waters in near surface sediments sustaining an important nitrate reservoir in Peruvian OMZ sediments. The substantial contribution of foraminiferal nitrate respiration to total benthic nitrate loss at the Peruvian margin

  9. The role of benthic foraminifera in the benthic nitrogen cycle of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Glock

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The discovery that foraminifera are able to use nitrate instead of oxygen as an electron acceptor for respiration has challenged our understanding of nitrogen cycling in the ocean. It was thought before that only prokaryotes and some fungi are able to denitrify. Rate estimates of foraminiferal denitrification have been very sparse and limited to specific regions in the oceans, not comparing stations along a transect of a certain region. Here, we present estimates of benthic foraminiferal denitrification rates from six stations at intermediate water depths in and below the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ. Foraminiferal denitrification rates were calculated from abundance and assemblage composition of the total living fauna in both surface and subsurface sediments, as well as from individual species specific denitrification rates. A comparison with total benthic denitrification rates as inferred by biogeochemical models revealed that benthic foraminifera probably account for the total denitrification in shelf sediments between 80 and 250 m water depth. The estimations also imply that foraminifera are still important denitrifiers in the centre of the OMZ around 320 m (29–50% of the benthic denitrification, but play only a minor role at the lower OMZ boundary and below the OMZ between 465 and 700 m (2–6% of total benthic denitrification. Furthermore, foraminiferal denitrification has been compared to the total benthic nitrate loss measured during benthic chamber experiments. The estimated foraminiferal denitrification rates contribute 2 to 46% to the total nitrate loss across a depth transect from 80 to 700 m, respectively. Flux rate estimates range from 0.01 to 1.3 mmol m−2 d−1. Furthermore we show that the amount of nitrate stored in living benthic foraminifera (3 to 3955 μmol L−1 can be higher by three orders of magnitude as compared to the ambient pore waters in near-surface sediments sustaining an important nitrate reservoir in

  10. Rifting, rotation, detachment faulting, and sedimentation: Miocene evolution of the southern California margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, S.B.; Crouch, J.K. (Crouch, Bachman, and Associates, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The evolution of the Los Angeles and adjacent offshore Santa Monica and San Pedro basins of southern California began during the earliest Miocene. The basins formed as the result of rifting and subsequent large scale rotation of segments within a preexisting Mesozoic-Paleogene forearc basin. Clockwise rotation (less than 90{degree}) of the outer two-thirds of this fore-arc basin during the early and middle Miocene moved these once north-trending forearc strata into an east-west trend (the modern Transverse Ranges). The eastern margin of the initial rift remains in its original location and is best documented from outcrop and subsurface data in the San Joaquin Hills. What was once the western margin of the rift has been rotated to a position north of the rift, along the southern Santa Monica Mountains. The early Miocene Vaqueros sandstones. which that are entirely shallow-marine and thousands of feet thick provide evidence for initial subsidence of the rift. Widening of the rift and separation of the Santa Monica Mountains and the San Joaquin Hills in the early and middle Miocene was accompanied by detachment faulting and volcanism along the rift margins. These detachment faults can be documented in the subsurface of the San Joaquin Hills and in outcrop in the Santa Monica Mountains. A unique aspect of this inner borderland rift is the rapid uplift, exposure, erosion, and then subsidence of high pressure/temperature metamorphic basement blocks (Catalina schist) within the rift itself. These basement rocks were buried 20 to 30 km beneath the ancestral fore arc prior to rifting. They were uplifted, perhaps due to thermal effects, during pervasive early and middle Miocene volcanism within the rift. Evidence of these dramatic events is provided by the distinctive San Onofre breccia deposit exposed along the margins of the rift.

  11. Model Simulation of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific Oxygen Minimum Zone during the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Birgit; Segschneider, Joachim; Xu, Xu; Park, Wonsun; Latif, Mojib

    2016-04-01

    The intensification/expansion of the tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), as observed during the last decades, is usually assigned to anthropogenic climate change. However, natural variability may also affect OMZ variations. To assess the amplitude of natural (millennial-scale) variability in the oxygen minimum zone in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP), a global coupled climate-ocean biogeochemical model has been applied to the mid-Holocene (approx. 6 kyrs BP). We find that during the mid-Holocene, the ETSP OMZ may have been better ventilated than today, which is entirely due to ocean circulation effects in the model. The enhanced ventilation is overriding the effect of increased biological production which in large parts of the equatorial Pacific, is driving oxygen towards lower values. The model result is in qualitative agreement with proxy data.

  12. Productivity variations, oxygen minimum zone and their impact on organic enrichment in the sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paropkari, A.L.

    Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 152 Productivity variations, oxygen minimum zone and their impact on organic enrichment in the sediments Anil L. Paropkari National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403 004. parop...@nio.org Introduction Organic carbon is a very important component in marine sediments. It is derived either from land as organic detritus or is derived from oceanic surface productivity. The concentration of organic matter in the sediments depends on the quantity...

  13. Seismic Images of Faulting and Fossil Subduction of the Southern Baja California Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, A.; Fletcher, J. M.; Lizarralde, D.; Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Holbrook, S.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Axen, G. J.; Gorman, A. R.

    2003-12-01

    From September to November 2002, a marine geophysics experiment was carried out, using 2 ships and onshore personell, recording deep MCS (Multichannel Seismics), wide angle, gravity, magnetic and bathymetric data. The main objective of this experiment is to better understand the continental breakup processes and the rifting of the Baja California Peninsula from Mexico mainland. An array of airguns with a total air volume of 8000 cu.in. was the seismic source and a 6000 km-long, 480-channel streamer was used to record the deep MCS data. This equipment was towed by the R/V Maurice Ewing. A series of stacked and migrated sections have been obtained, showing a number of noticeable structures. To the W of the line corresponding to the Pacific margin, the fossil trench is covered by recent sediments, that are part of the Magdalena Fan. Towards the E, near the slope break, the Tosco-Abreojos fault zone is clearly imaged, showing some extensional component. Further to the E, an old syncline is covered in erosive unconformity by recent sediments. In the eastern part of the section, a half-graben structure can be observed. Under this structure, a reflective zone can be interpreted as the mylonitic zone corresponding to a detachment. Some basement scarpments seem to be parallel faults to the semigraben master fault. Other normal faults in the sediments of the basin are synthetic and antithetic with it. The master fault probably is the continuation to the S of the Santa Margarita-San Lazaro fault, reported previously as a detachment in Santa Margarita and Magdalena islands. The seismic line in the Gulf of California margin begins at a conspicuous slope at the mouth of the La Paz Bay, and corresponds to the same strike-slip fault observed in Partida and Espiritu Santo islands. The rest of the line is characterized by numerous strike-slip and normal faults, producing strong bathymetric variations.

  14. Three-dimensional distribution of larval fish habitats in the shallow oxygen minimum zone in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean off Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, S. M.; Sánchez-Velasco, L.; Beier, E.; Godínez, Victor M.; Barton, Eric D.; Tamayo, A.

    2015-07-01

    Three-dimensional distribution of larval fish habitats was analyzed, from the upper limit of the shallow oxygen minimum zone (~0.2 mL/L) to the sea surface, in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean off Mexico in February 2010. The upper limit rises from ~250 m depth in the entrance of the Gulf of California to ~80 m depth off Cabo Corrientes. Three larval fish habitats were defined statistically: (i) a Gulf of California habitat dominated by Anchoa spp. larvae (epipelagic species), constrained to the oxygenated surface layer (>3.5 mL/L) in and above the thermocline (~60 m depth), and separated by a salinity front from the Tropical Pacific habitat; (ii) a Tropical Pacific habitat, dominated by Vinciguerria lucetia larvae (mesopelagic species), located throughout the sampled water column, but with the highest abundance in the oxygenated upper layer above the thermocline; (iii) an Oxygen Minimum habitat defined mostly below the thermocline in hypoxic (tropical Pacific off Mexico, the shallow hypoxic water does not have dramatic effects on the total larval fish abundance but appears to affect species composition.

  15. Effects of latitudinal changes in the oxygen minimum zone of the northeast Pacific on the distribution of bathyal benthic decapod crustaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiol, Vanesa; Hendrickx, Michel E.; Serrano, David

    2017-03-01

    The presence of an Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) is one of the major characteristics of the eastern Pacific. The OMZ changes strongly adjacent to Mexico in its thickness and intensity. The ecological impacts of those changes were studied by examining the community structures of bathyal benthic and bentho-pelagic decapod crustaceans, and their oceanographic contexts, on the Mexican Pacific slope along a wide latitudinal range (16-32°N). Decapod crustaceans were collected with a benthic sledge from 48 stations between 865 and 2165 m in three main areas: offshore of northern Baja California (NBC), off southern Baja California (SBC) and in the southern Mexican Pacific (SMP). Physical-chemical parameters were measured in the water column, and sediment composition was analyzed for each station. The narrowing and weakening of the OMZ north of ca. 26°N was confirmed. Water with dissolved oxygen size.

  16. A cryptic sulfur cycle in oxygen-minimum-zone waters off the Chilean coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Don E; Stewart, Frank J; Thamdrup, Bo; De Brabandere, Loreto; Dalsgaard, Tage; Delong, Edward F; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Ulloa, Osvaldo

    2010-12-03

    Nitrogen cycling is normally thought to dominate the biogeochemistry and microbial ecology of oxygen-minimum zones in marine environments. Through a combination of molecular techniques and process rate measurements, we showed that both sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation contribute to energy flux and elemental cycling in oxygen-free waters off the coast of northern Chile. These processes may have been overlooked because in nature, the sulfide produced by sulfate reduction immediately oxidizes back to sulfate. This cryptic sulfur cycle is linked to anammox and other nitrogen cycling processes, suggesting that it may influence biogeochemical cycling in the global ocean.

  17. Nitrogen fixation in sediments along a depth transect through the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    OpenAIRE

    Gier, Jessica; Sommer, Stefan; Carolin R Löscher; Dale, Andrew W.; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Treude, Tina

    2016-01-01

    The potential coupling of nitrogen (N2) fixation and sulfate reduction (SR) was explored in sediments of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Sediment samples were retrieved by a multiple corer at six stations along a depth transect (70–1025 m water depth) at 12° S, covering anoxic and hypoxic bottom water conditions. Benthic N2 fixation, determined by the acetylene reduction assay, was detected at all sites, with highest rates between 70 and 253 m and lower rates at grea...

  18. Nematode abundance at the oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Adam A.; Lambshead, P. John D.; Hawkins, Lawrence E.; Mitchell, Nicola; Levin, Lisa A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper supports the hypothesis that low oxygen does not influence deep-sea nematode abundance by investigating an oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the Oman slope in the Arabian Sea. Correlation with a number of environmental variables indicated that food quality (measured as the hydrogen index) rather than oxygen was the major predictor of nematode abundance. Nematode abundance was also positively correlated with abundance of total macrofauna, annelids, spionid polychaetes and macrofaunal tube builders. Comparison with published data showed Arabian Sea nematode abundance to be similar to that of the Porcupine Seabight and Bay of Biscay regions of the northeast Atlantic, which also receive significant quantities of phytodetritus but have no OMZ.

  19. Microbial Nitrogen Transformations in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Peru, 01 February 1985 to 05 March 1985 (NODC Accession 9200026)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NITROP - 85 was the major field of experiment of an N.S.F. funded program entitled "Microbial Nitrogen Transformations in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Peru". this...

  20. Nitrous oxide production in the eastern tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qixing; Altabet, Mark; Arevalo-Martinez, Damian; Bange, Hermann; Ma, Xiao; Marandino, Christa; Sun, Mingshuang; Grundle, Damian

    2017-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important climate active trace gas that contributes to both atmospheric warming and ozone destruction, and the ocean is an important source of N2O to the atmosphere. Dissolved oxygen concentrations play an important role in regulating N2O production in the ocean, such that under low oxygen conditions major shifts in the predominant production pathways (i.e. nitrification vs. denitrification) can occur and the magnitude of production may increase substantially. To this end, major oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are responsible for a disproportionately high amount of marine N2O production. During the October 2015 ASTRA-OMZ cruise to the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP), one of the three major oceanic OMZs, we measured a suite of N2O parameters which included N2O concentrations, N2O production, and natural abundance N2O isotope (i.e. del 15N and del 18O) and isotopomer (i.e. 15N site-preference) signatures. Based on the results from these measurements, our presentation will demonstrate how N2O production and the different production pathways change along the oxygen concentration gradients from the oxygenated surface waters through the oxygen minimum layer. Our data could better constrain the importance of the ETSP-OMZ as source of marine N2O. Results from this work will provide insights into how N2O cycling responds to ocean deoxygenation as a result of climate change.

  1. Oxygen sensitivity of anammox and coupled N-cycle processes in oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Jensen, Marlene Mark; Contreras, Sergio;

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient measurements indicate that 30–50% of the total nitrogen (N) loss in the ocean occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). This pelagic N-removal takes place within only ,0.1% of the ocean volume, hence moderate variations in the extent of OMZs due to global warming may have a large impact on ...... of ocean de-oxygenation on oceanic N-cycling.......Nutrient measurements indicate that 30–50% of the total nitrogen (N) loss in the ocean occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). This pelagic N-removal takes place within only ,0.1% of the ocean volume, hence moderate variations in the extent of OMZs due to global warming may have a large impact......, the oceanic volume potentially acting as a N-sink increases tenfold. The predicted expansion of OMZs may enlarge this volume even further. Our study provides the first robust estimates of O2 sensitivities for processes directly and indirectly connected with N-loss. These are essential to assess the effects...

  2. Bathymetric contours of the continental margin offshore of Washington, Oregon, and California based on data available in the late 1980s.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Bathymetric contours (contour interval 100 m) of the continental margin offshore of Washington, Oregon, and California (cowbat) were compiled from various sources...

  3. Bathymetric grid (1000 m) of the continental margin offshore of Washington, Oregon, and California based on data available in the late 1980s.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Cowbatg.tif is a 1000-m resolution bathymetric grid of the continental margin offshore of Washington, California, and Oregon. The grid was generated from bathymetric...

  4. Bathymetric grid (1000 m) of the continental margin offshore of Washington, Oregon, and California based on data available in the late 1980s.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Cowbatg.tif is a 1000-m resolution bathymetric grid of the continental margin offshore of Washington, California, and Oregon. The grid was generated from bathymetric...

  5. Systematics of past changes in ocean ventilation: a comparison of Cretaceous Ocean Anoxic Event 2 and Pleistocene to Holocene Oxygen Minimum Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schönfeld

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Present day oceans are generally well ventilated except mid-depth oxygen minimum zones (OMZs under high surface water productivity regimes, regions of sluggish circulation, and restricted marginal basins. In the Mesozoic, however, entire oceanic basins transiently became dysoxic or even anoxic. In particular the Cretaceous Ocean Anoxic Events (OAEs were characterised by laminated organic-carbon rich shales and low-oxygen indicating trace fossil assemblages preserved in the sedimentary record. Yet both, qualitative and quantitative assessments of intensity and extent of Cretaceous near-bottom water oxygenation have been hampered by deep or long-term diagenesis and the evolution of marine biota serving as oxygen indicators in today's ocean. Sedimentary features similar to those found in Cretaceous strata were observed in deposits underlying Recent OMZs, where bottom-water oxygen levels, the flux of organic matter, and benthic life are well known. Their implications for constraining past bottom-water oxygenation are addressed in this review, with emphasis on comparing OMZ sediments from the Peruvian upwelling with deposits of the late Cenomanian OAE 2 from the Atlantic NW African shelf. Holocene laminated sediments were encountered at bottom-water oxygen levels of −1 under the Peruvian upwelling and −1 in California Borderland basins and the Pakistan Margin. Changes of sediment input on seasonal to decadal time scales are necessary to create laminae of different composition. However, bottom currents may shape similar textures that are difficult to discern from primary seasonal laminae in sediment cores. The millimetre-sized trace fossil Chondrites was commonly found in Cretaceous strata and Recent oxygen-depleted environments where its diameter increased with oxygen levels from 5 to 45 μmol kg−1. This ichnogenus has not been reported from Peruvian sediments but cm-sized crab burrows appeared around 10 μmol kg−1, which may indicate a

  6. Oxygen distribution and aerobic respiration in the north and south eastern tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiano, Laura; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Dalsgaard, Tage

    2014-01-01

    Highly sensitive STOX O-2 sensors were used for determination of in situ O-2 distribution in the eastern tropical north and south Pacific oxygen minimum zones (ETN/SP OMZs), as well as for laboratory determination of O-2 uptake rates of water masses at various depths within these OMZs. Oxygen...... was generally below the detection limit (few nmol L-1) in the core of both OMZs, suggesting the presence of vast volumes of functionally anoxic waters in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Oxygen was often not detectable in the deep secondary chlorophyll maximum found at some locations, but other secondary maxima...... efficiently at extremely low oxygen concentrations with apparent half-saturation concentrations (K-m values) ranging from about 10 to about 200 nmol L-1. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd....

  7. Oxygen sensitivity of anammox and coupled N-cycle processes in oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Jensen, Marlene Mark; Contreras, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    on the global N-cycle. We examined the effect of oxygen (O2) on anammox, NH3 oxidation and NO3 2 reduction in 15N-labeling experiments with varying O2 concentrations (0–25 mmol L21) in the Namibian and Peruvian OMZs. Our results show that O2 is a major controlling factor for anammox activity in OMZ waters...... of ocean de-oxygenation on oceanic N-cycling.......Nutrient measurements indicate that 30–50% of the total nitrogen (N) loss in the ocean occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). This pelagic N-removal takes place within only ,0.1% of the ocean volume, hence moderate variations in the extent of OMZs due to global warming may have a large impact...

  8. Microbial removal of fixed nitrogen in an oceanic oxygen minimum zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Tage; Thamdrup, Bo; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    minimum zone (OMZ) characterized by an anoxic, nitrate- and nitrite-rich layer of ~200 m thickness downwards from 30 – 90 m water depth. Oxygen minimum zones account for less than 0.1% of the ocean volume but play a disproportionally large role in biogeochemical cycling and account for 20 – 40......We quantified the removal of fixed nitrogen as N2 production by anammox and N2 and N2O production by denitrification over a distance of 1900 km along the coast of Chile and Peru, using short-term incubations with 15N-labeled substrates. The eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) holds an oxygen......% of the oceanic fixed nitrogen removal. We applied the novel STOX sensor for oxygen with detection limits around 10 nM and found that oxygen concentrations were below detection the core of the OMZ and that removal of fixed nitrogen almost only occurred when oxygen was below detection. The removal of fixed...

  9. Dissimilatory sulfur cycling in oxygen minimum zones: an emerging metagenomics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Frank J

    2011-12-01

    Biological diversity in marine OMZs (oxygen minimum zones) is dominated by a complex community of bacteria and archaea whose anaerobic metabolisms mediate key steps in global nitrogen and carbon cycles. Molecular and physiological studies now confirm that OMZs also support diverse micro-organisms capable of utilizing inorganic sulfur compounds for energy metabolism. The present review focuses specifically on recent metagenomic data that have helped to identify the molecular basis for autotrophic sulfur oxidation with nitrate in the OMZ water column, as well as a cryptic role for heterotrophic sulfate reduction. Interpreted alongside marker gene surveys and process rate measurements, these data suggest an active sulfur cycle with potentially substantial roles in organic carbon input and mineralization and critical links to the OMZ nitrogen cycle. Furthermore, these studies have created a framework for comparing the genomic diversity and ecology of pelagic sulfur-metabolizing communities from diverse low-oxygen regions.

  10. The metabolic response of pteropods to acidification reflects natural CO2-exposure in oxygen minimum zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Wishner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Shelled pteropods (Thecosomata are a group of holoplanktonic mollusks that are believed to be especially sensitive to ocean acidification because their aragonitic shells are highly soluble. Despite this concern, there is very little known about the physiological response of these animals to conditions of elevated carbon dioxide. This study examines the oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion of five pteropod species, collected from tropical regions of the Pacific Ocean, to elevated levels of carbon dioxide (0.10%, 1000 ppm. Our results show that pteropods that naturally migrate into oxygen minimum zones, such as Hyalocylis striata, Clio pyramidata, Cavolinia longirostris and Creseis virgula, were not affected by carbon dioxide at the levels and duration tested. Diacria quadridentata, which does not migrate, responds to high carbon dioxide conditions with reduced oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion. This indicates that the natural chemical environment of individual species may influence their resilience to ocean acidification.

  11. Ammonium and nitrite oxidation at nanomolar oxygen concentrations in oxygen minimum zone waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Laura A; Dalsgaard, Tage; Tiano, Laura; Mills, Daniel B; Bertagnolli, Anthony D; Wright, Jody J; Hallam, Steven J; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Thamdrup, Bo

    2016-09-20

    A major percentage of fixed nitrogen (N) loss in the oceans occurs within nitrite-rich oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) via denitrification and anammox. It remains unclear to what extent ammonium and nitrite oxidation co-occur, either supplying or competing for substrates involved in nitrogen loss in the OMZ core. Assessment of the oxygen (O2) sensitivity of these processes down to the O2 concentrations present in the OMZ core (Michaelis-Menten model, indicating a high-affinity component with a Km of just a few nanomolar. As the communities of ammonium and nitrite oxidizers were similar to other OMZs, these kinetics should apply across OMZ systems. The high O2 affinities imply that ammonium and nitrite oxidation can occur within the OMZ core whenever O2 is supplied, for example, by episodic intrusions. These processes therefore compete with anammox and denitrification for ammonium and nitrite, thereby exerting an important control over nitrogen loss.

  12. Sedimentology of seismo-turbidites off the Cascadia and northern California active tectonic continental margins, Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez Pastor, Julia; Nelson, Hans; Goldfinger, Chris; Escutia, Carlota

    2013-04-01

    Holocene turbidites from turbidite channel systems along the active tectonic continental margins of the Cascadia subduction zone (offshore Vancouver Island to Mendocino Triple Junction) and the northern San Andreas Transform Fault (the Triple Junction to San Francisco Bay), have been analyzed for sedimentologic features related to their seismic origin. Centimeter thick silt/sand beds (turbidite base) capped by mud layers (turbidite tail) and interbedded with hemipelagic silty clay intervals with high biogenic content have been characterized by visual core descriptions, grain-size analysis, X-ray radiographs and physical properties. Along the northern California margin in upstream single tributary canyons and channels, most turbidites are uni-pulsed (classic fining up) whereas downstream below multiple tributary canyon and channel confluences, most deposits are stacked turbidites. Because each set of stacked turbidites has no hemipelagic sediment between each turbidite unit and each unit has a distinct mineralogy from a different tributary canyon, we interpret that a stacked turbidite is deposited by several coeval turbidity currents fed by multiple tributary canyons and channels with synchronous triggering from a single San Andreas Fault earthquake. The Cascadia margin is characterized by individual multi-pulsed turbidites that contain multiple coarse-grained sub-units without hemipelagic sediment between pulses. Because the number and character of multiple coarse-grained pulses for each correlative multi-pulsed turbidite is almost always constant both upstream and downstream in different channel systems for 600 km along the margin,we interpret that the earthquake shaking or aftershock signature is usually preserved, for the much stronger Cascadia (≥9 Mw) compared to weaker California (≥8Mw) earthquakes, which result in upstream uni-pulsed turbidites and downstream stacked turbidites. Consequently, both the strongest (≥9 Mw) great earthquakes and downstream

  13. Abundance and diversity of bacteria in oxygen minimum drinking water reservoir sediments studied by quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-han; Huang, Ting-lin; Chen, Sheng-nan; Yang, Xiao; Lv, Kai; Sekar, Raju

    2015-04-01

    Reservoir sediment is one of the most stressful environments for microorganisms due to periodically oxygen minimum conditions. In this study, the abundance and composition of bacteria associated with sediments from three drinking water reservoirs (Zhoucun, ZCR; Shibianyu, SBYR; and Jinpen, JPR) were investigated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and 16S rRNA-based 454 pyrosequencing. The results of physico-chemical analysis of sediments showed that the organic matter and total nitrogen were significantly higher in ZCR as compared to JPR (P oxygen minimum and stressful freshwater environments.

  14. Structure and function of nematode communities across the Indian western continental margin and its oxygen minimum zone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, R.; Ingole, B.S.

    functional group was not a simple reflection of the information in species abundance. Ecological information captured by adult length, adult shape, and life-history strategy was less sitespecific and thus differed notably from information contained in other...

  15. Hypoxia tolerance and antioxidant defense system of juvenile jumbo squids in oxygen minimum zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trübenbach, Katja; Teixeira, Tatiana; Diniz, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2013-10-01

    Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) is a large oceanic squid endemic off the Eastern Tropical Pacific that undertakes diel vertical migrations into mesopelagic oxygen minimum zones. One of the expected physiological effects of such migration is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the surface, promoted by the transition between hypoxia and reoxygenation states. The aim of this study was to investigate the energy expenditure rates and the antioxidant stress strategies of juvenile D. gigas under normoxia and hypoxia, namely by quantifying oxygen consumption rates, antioxidant enzyme activities [including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], heat shock protein expression (Hsp70/Hsc70), and lipid peroxidation [malondialdehyde (MDA) levels]. A high significant decrease (68%) in squid's metabolic rates was observed during hypoxia (p0.05), with the latter indicating no enhancement of lipid peroxidation (i.e. cellular damage) at the warmer and normoxic surface waters. The understanding of such physiological strategies that are linked to oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation phases may provide valuable information about how this species is quickly responding to the impacts of environmental stressors coupled with global climate change.

  16. Protist communities in a marine oxygen minimum zone off Costa Rica by 454 pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, H.; Rocke, E.; Kong, L.; Xia, X.; Liu, H.; Landry, M. R.

    2015-08-01

    Marine planktonic protists, including microalgae and protistan grazers, are an important contributor to global primary production and carbon and mineral cycles, however, little is known about their population shifts along the oxic-anoxic gradient in the water column. We used 454 pyrosequencing of the 18S rRNA gene and gene transcripts to study the community composition of whole and active protists throughout a water column in the Costa Rica Dome, where a stable oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) exists at a depth of 400~700 m. A clear shift of protist composition from photosynthetic Dinoflagellates in the surface to potential parasitic Dinoflagellates and Ciliates in the deeper water was revealed along the vertical profile at both rRNA and rDNA levels. Those protist groups recovered only at the rDNA level represent either lysed aggregates sinking from the upper waters or potential hosts for parasitic groups. UPGMA clustering demonstrated that total and active protists in the anoxic core of OMZ (550 m) were distinct from those in other water depths. The reduced community diversity and presence of a parasitic/symbiotic trophic lifestyle in the OMZ, especially the anoxic core, suggests that OMZs can exert a selective pressure on protist communities. Such changes in community structure and a shift in trophic lifestyle could result in a modulation of the microbial loop and associated biogeochemical cycling.

  17. Acoustic observation of living organisms reveals the upper limit of the oxygen minimum zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Bertrand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs are expanding in the World Ocean as a result of climate change and direct anthropogenic influence. OMZ expansion greatly affects biogeochemical processes and marine life, especially by constraining the vertical habitat of most marine organisms. Currently, monitoring the variability of the upper limit of the OMZs relies on time intensive sampling protocols, causing poor spatial resolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using routine underwater acoustic observations of the vertical distribution of marine organisms, we propose a new method that allows determination of the upper limit of the OMZ with a high precision. Applied in the eastern South-Pacific, this original sampling technique provides high-resolution information on the depth of the upper OMZ allowing documentation of mesoscale and submesoscale features (e.g., eddies and filaments that structure the upper ocean and the marine ecosystems. We also use this information to estimate the habitable volume for the world's most exploited fish, the Peruvian anchovy (Engraulis ringens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This opportunistic method could be implemented on any vessel geared with multi-frequency echosounders to perform comprehensive high-resolution monitoring of the upper limit of the OMZ. Our approach is a novel way of studying the impact of physical processes on marine life and extracting valid information about the pelagic habitat and its spatial structure, a crucial aspect of Ecosystem-based Fisheries Management in the current context of climate change.

  18. N2 production rates limited by nitrite availability in the Bay of Bengal oxygen minimum zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bristow, Laura A.; Callbeck, Cameron M.; Larsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    A third or more of the fixed nitrogen lost from the oceans as N2 is removed by anaerobic microbial processes in open ocean oxygen minimum zones. These zones have expanded over the past decades, and further anthropogenically induced expansion could accelerate nitrogen loss. However, in the Bay of ...

  19. Carbon processing at the deep-sea floor of the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: A tracer approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozzato, L.; van Oevelen, D.; Moodley, L.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    We have elucidated the trophic interactions in the foodweb of sediments from and close to the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea. Sediment cores from inside (885 m depth) and outside (1791 m depth) the OMZ were manipulated onboard by adding 13C-enriched phytodetritus. The incorporation of

  20. Modelling nitrite dynamics and associated feedback processes in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashifane, T. B.; Vichi, M.; Waldron, H. N.; Machu, E.; Garçonc, V.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding nitrite dynamics in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) is a challenge as it represents an intermediary nitrogen species with a short turnover time. Nitrite is also reduced to nitrogen in OMZs, preventing its accumulation. This creates difficulties in detecting nitrite with colorimetric methods as concentrations may occur below detection limits in some regions. Nitrite concentrations are key to understanding intermediate nitrogen processes and their implication for nitrogen loss in OMZs. A coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied in the Benguela OMZ to study nitrite dynamics and its associated feedback processes. Simulated results show occurrence of primary and secondary nitrite maxima in the Benguela shelf waters. The primary nitrite maxima in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification and nitrate assimilation as they occur in association with the nitracline. Secondary nitrite maxima accumulate in the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF) OMZ and are attributed to denitrification. The secondary nitrite maxima are consumed by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) off Walvis Bay. Nitrite maxima are restricted to the shelf off Walvis Bay and advected offshore in the ABF region. Interchanges between the poleward South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the equatorward, well-aerated Eastern South Atlantic Central Water (ESACW) drive the seasonality of nitrogen processes in the Benguela. Subsequent nitrite reduction in the Benguela OMZ leads to nitrous oxide production, with high concentrations occurring in the ABF region as a result of nitrification and denitrification. Off Walvis Bay, nitrous oxide production is low since nitrite is consumed by anammox. Nitrous oxide production occurs in thermocline, intermediate and deeper water masses in the ABF region. High N fluxes in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification as compared to anammox and denitrification. Results from this study demonstrate the role of intermediate nitrogen species in nitrogen feedback

  1. Anammox bacteria and the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium in the oxygen minimum zone off northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Alexander; Molina, Verónica; Thamdrup, Bo; Woebken, Dagmar; Lavik, Gaute; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Ulloa, Osvaldo

    2009-07-01

    Anammox is the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium by nitrite or nitrate to yield N 2. This process, along with conventional denitrification, contributes to nitrogen loss in oxygen-deficient systems. Anammox is performed by a special group of bacteria belonging to the Planctomycetes phylum. However, information about the distribution, activity, and controlling factors of these anammox bacteria is still limited. Herein, we examine the phylogenetic diversity, vertical distribution, and activity of anammox bacteria in the coastal upwelling region and oxygen minimum zone off northern Chile. The phylogeny of anammox bacteria was studied using primers designed to specifically target 16S rRNA genes from Planctomycetes in samples taken during a cruise in 2004. Anammox bacteria-like sequences affiliated with Candidatus "Scalindua spp." dominated the 16S rRNA gene clone library. However, 62% of the sequences subgrouped separately within this cluster and together with a single sequence retrieved from the suboxic zone of the freshwater Lake Tanganyika. The vertical distribution and activity of anammox bacteria were explored through CARD-FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization with catalyzed reporter deposition) and 15N labeling incubations, respectively, at two different open-ocean stations during a second cruise in 2005. Anammox bacterial CARD-FISH counts (up to 3000 cells ml -1) and activity (up to 5.75 nmol N 2 L -1 d -1) were only detected at the station subjected directly to the upwelling influence. Anammox cell abundance and activity were highest at 50 m depth, which is the upper part of the OMZ. In this layer, a high abundance of cyanobacteria and a marked nitrogen deficit were also observed. Thus, our results show the presence of a new subcluster within the marine anammox phylogeny and indicate high vertical variability in the abundance and activity of anammox bacteria that could be related to an intensification of carbon and nitrogen cycling in the upper part of the OMZ.

  2. Contrasting biogeochemistry of nitrogen in the Atlantic and Pacific oxygen minimum zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ryabenko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present new data for the stable isotope ratio of inorganic nitrogen species from the contrasting oxygen minimum zones (OMZs of the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic, south of Cape Verde, and the Eastern Tropical South Pacific off Peru. Differences in minimum oxygen concentration and corresponding N-cycle processes for the two OMZs are reflected in strongly contrasting δ15N distributions. Pacific surface waters are marked by strongly positive values for δ15N-NO3 reflecting fractionation associated with subsurface N-loss and partial NO3 utilization. This contrasts with negative values in NO3 depleted surface waters of the Atlantic which are lower than can be explained by N supply via N2 fixation. We suggest the negative values reflect inputs of nitrate, possibly transient, associated with deposition of Saharan dust. Strong signals of N-loss processes in the subsurface Pacific OMZ are evident in the isotope and N2O data, both of which are compatible with a contribution of canonical denitrification to overall N-loss. However the apparent N isotope fractionation factor observed is relatively low (εd = 11.4 ‰ suggesting an effect of influence from denitrification in sediments. Identical positive correlation of N2O vs. AOU for waters with oxygen concentrations [O2] > 50 μmol l−1 in both regions reflect a nitrification source. Sharp decrease in N2O concentrations is observed in the Pacific OMZ due to denitrification under oxygen concentrations O2 < 5 μmol l−1.

  3. Oxygen minimum zone dynamics and anammox in the Gulf of Alaska (IODP Site U1419)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zindorf, Mark; März, Christian; Rush, Darci; Talbot, Helen; Crawford, Alexandra; Wagner, Thomas; van der Land, Cees; Sidgwick, Frances

    2017-04-01

    In the modern northeast Pacific Ocean, an oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) occurs in depths of 700 to 1300 metres. Under current climatic conditions, this OMZ extends northwards into the Gulf of Alaska and is most pronounced during spring and autumn and disappears during winter. While its modern behaviour is well constrained, the extent of this OMZ in the past, especially in the Gulf of Alaska, is not well understood. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) only takes place under suboxic to anoxic conditions. With the BHT-isomer (bacteriohopanetetrol-stereoisomer) the involved microorganisms leave a distinct biomarker trace in sedimentary organic matter. This biomarker is well preserved compared to other anammox biomarkers (e.g., ladderanes) and while BHT is produced by a broad range of microbes, the BHT-isomer is only produced by anammox bacteria. The ratio between BHT and BHT-isomer can, therefore, be used as a reliable proxy for suboxic-anoxic conditions in the overlying water column at the time of deposition. We present the application of this BHT-isomer at a new high-resolution record at the continental shelf off Alaska (IODP Expedition 341 Site U1419) that provides a 60 ka record of paleo-environmental conditions. The BHT-isomer displays significant variability and partly very high concentrations, indicating periods of sub- or anoxic conditions in the overlying water column. Elemental ratios such as Cu/Al, Mo/Al, S/Al and U/Al, which are commonly used as inorganic proxies for water column oxygenation do not show the same pattern in the respective intervals. However, these proxies can be affected by authigenic mineral formation in the course of early diagenesis, redistributing elements in the sediment column which impact their usefulness as paleo-redox-proxies. In contrast, the BHT-isomer ratio appears to be a robust proxy for water column oxygenation and not sensitive to early diagenesis.

  4. Microbial eukaryote diversity in the marine oxygen minimum zone off northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Joshua eParris

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular surveys are revealing diverse eukaryotic assemblages in oxygen-limited ocean waters. These communities may play pivotal ecological roles through autotrophy, feeding, and a wide range of symbiotic associations with prokaryotes. We used 18S rRNA gene sequencing to provide the first snapshot of pelagic microeukaryotic community structure in two cellular size fractions (0.2-1.6 µm, >1.6 µm from seven depths through the anoxic oxygen minimum zone (OMZ off northern Chile. Sequencing of >154,000 amplicons revealed contrasting patterns of phylogenetic diversity across size fractions and depths. Protist and total eukaryote diversity in the >1.6 µm fraction peaked at the chlorophyll maximum in the upper photic zone before declining by ~50% in the OMZ. In contrast, diversity in the 0.2-1.6 µm fraction, though also elevated in the upper photic zone, increased four-fold from the lower oxycline to a maximum at the anoxic OMZ core. Dinoflagellates of the Dinophyceae and endosymbiotic Syndiniales clades dominated the protist assemblage at all depths (~40-70% of sequences. Other protist groups varied with depth, with the anoxic zone community of the larger size fraction enriched in euglenozoan flagellates and acantharean radiolarians (up to 18% and 40% of all sequences, respectively. The OMZ 0.2-1.6 µm fraction was dominated (11-99% by Syndiniales, which exhibited depth-specific variation in composition and total richness despite uniform oxygen conditions. Metazoan sequences, though confined primarily to the 1.6 µm fraction above the OMZ, were also detected within the anoxic zone where groups such as copepods increased in abundance relative to the oxycline and upper OMZ. These data, compared to those from other low-oxygen sites, reveals variation in OMZ microeukaryote composition, helping to identify clades with potential adaptations to oxygen-depletion.

  5. Giant hydrogen sulfide plume in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru supports chemolithoautotrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Schunck

    Full Text Available In Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems nutrient-rich waters are transported to the ocean surface, fuelling high photoautotrophic primary production. Subsequent heterotrophic decomposition of the produced biomass increases the oxygen-depletion at intermediate water depths, which can result in the formation of oxygen minimum zones (OMZ. OMZs can sporadically accumulate hydrogen sulfide (H2S, which is toxic to most multicellular organisms and has been implicated in massive fish kills. During a cruise to the OMZ off Peru in January 2009 we found a sulfidic plume in continental shelf waters, covering an area >5500 km(2, which contained ∼2.2×10(4 tons of H2S. This was the first time that H2S was measured in the Peruvian OMZ and with ∼440 km(3 the largest plume ever reported for oceanic waters. We assessed the phylogenetic and functional diversity of the inhabiting microbial community by high-throughput sequencing of DNA and RNA, while its metabolic activity was determined with rate measurements of carbon fixation and nitrogen transformation processes. The waters were dominated by several distinct γ-, δ- and ε-proteobacterial taxa associated with either sulfur oxidation or sulfate reduction. Our results suggest that these chemolithoautotrophic bacteria utilized several oxidants (oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide and nitrous oxide to detoxify the sulfidic waters well below the oxic surface. The chemolithoautotrophic activity at our sampling site led to high rates of dark carbon fixation. Assuming that these chemolithoautotrophic rates were maintained throughout the sulfidic waters, they could be representing as much as ∼30% of the photoautotrophic carbon fixation. Postulated changes such as eutrophication and global warming, which lead to an expansion and intensification of OMZs, might also increase the frequency of sulfidic waters. We suggest that the chemolithoautotrophically fixed carbon may be involved in a negative feedback loop that

  6. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kiko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ. At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2 and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2 compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2 and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply considerably fuels bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation – a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2 does not result in a downregulation of ammonium excretion. Here we show that exposure to OMZ conditions can result in strong depression of respiration and ammonium excretion in calanoid copepods and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic and the Eastern Tropical South Pacific. These physiological responses need to be taken into account when estimating DVM-mediated fluxes of carbon and nitrogen into OMZs.

  7. Nitrogen fixation in sediments along a depth transect through the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gier, J.; Sommer, S.; Löscher, C. R.; Dale, A. W.; Schmitz, R. A.; Treude, T.

    2015-09-01

    Benthic nitrogen (N2) fixation and sulfate reduction (SR) were investigated in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Sediment samples, retrieved by a multiple corer were taken at six stations (70-1025 m) along a depth transect at 12° S, covering anoxic and hypoxic bottom water conditions. Benthic N2 fixation was detected at all sites, with high rates measured in OMZ mid-waters between the 70 and 253 m and lowest N2 fixation rates below 253 m down to 1025 m water depth. SR rates were decreasing with increasing water depth, with highest rates at the shallow site. Benthic N2 fixation depth profiles largely overlapped with SR depth profiles, suggesting that both processes are coupled. The potential of N2 fixation by SR bacteria was verified by the molecular analysis of nifH genes. Detected nifH sequences clustered with SR bacteria that have been demonstrated to fix N2 in other benthic environments. Depth-integrated rates of N2 fixation and SR showed no direct correlation along the 12° S transect, suggesting that the benthic diazotrophs in the Peruvian OMZ are being controlled by additional various environmental factors. The organic matter availability and the presence of sulfide appear to be major drivers for benthic diazotrophy. It was further found that N2 fixation was not inhibited by high ammonium concentrations. N2 fixation rates in OMZ sediments were similar to rates measured in other organic-rich sediments. Overall, this work improves our knowledge on N sources in marine sediments and contributes to a better understanding of N cycling in OMZ sediments.

  8. Facets of diazotrophy in the oxygen minimum zone waters off Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loescher, Carolin R; Großkopf, Tobias; Desai, Falguni D; Gill, Diana; Schunck, Harald; Croot, Peter L; Schlosser, Christian; Neulinger, Sven C; Pinnow, Nicole; Lavik, Gaute; Kuypers, Marcel M M; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2014-11-01

    Nitrogen fixation, the biological reduction of dinitrogen gas (N2) to ammonium (NH4(+)), is quantitatively the most important external source of new nitrogen (N) to the open ocean. Classically, the ecological niche of oceanic N2 fixers (diazotrophs) is ascribed to tropical oligotrophic surface waters, often depleted in fixed N, with a diazotrophic community dominated by cyanobacteria. Although this applies for large areas of the ocean, biogeochemical models and phylogenetic studies suggest that the oceanic diazotrophic niche may be much broader than previously considered, resulting in major implications for the global N-budget. Here, we report on the composition, distribution and abundance of nifH, the functional gene marker for N2 fixation. Our results show the presence of eight clades of diazotrophs in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off Peru. Although proteobacterial clades dominated overall, two clusters affiliated to spirochaeta and archaea were identified. N2 fixation was detected within OMZ waters and was stimulated by the addition of organic carbon sources supporting the view that non-phototrophic diazotrophs were actively fixing dinitrogen. The observed co-occurrence of key functional genes for N2 fixation, nitrification, anammox and denitrification suggests that a close spatial coupling of N-input and N-loss processes exists in the OMZ off Peru. The wide distribution of diazotrophs throughout the water column adds to the emerging view that the habitat of marine diazotrophs can be extended to low oxygen/high nitrate areas. Furthermore, our statistical analysis suggests that NO2(-) and PO4(3-) are the major factors affecting diazotrophic distribution throughout the OMZ. In view of the predicted increase in ocean deoxygenation resulting from global warming, our findings indicate that the importance of OMZs as niches for N2 fixation may increase in the future.

  9. A Novel Teflon-membrane Gas Tension Device for Denitrification-studies in Oxygen Minimum Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, A. C.; McNeil, C. L.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Altabet, M. A.; Johnson, B.; Bourbonnais, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) are global hotspots for the biogeochemical transformation of biologically-available forms of nitrogen to unusable nitrogen-gas. We present a new Teflon-membrane based Gas Tension Device (GTD) for measuring the excess N2 signal generated by denitrification and anammox in OMZs, with a hydrostatic pressure-independent response and a depth range from 0 - 550 m, a significant advancement from previous GTD models. The GTD consists of a 4/1000" thick by 2" diameter Teflon-membrane with a water-side plenum connected to SeaBird 5T pump. Dissolved gases in the water equilibrate across the membrane with a low-dead-volume housing connected to a high-precision quart pressure sensor. Laboratory data characterizing the GTD will be presented. The e-folding (response) time ranges from 14 min at continuous (100%) pumping to 28 min at pulse (10%) pumping. We also demonstrate the pressure dependence of the partial pressures from Henry's Law in the laboratory for pure nitrogen, pure oxygen, and standard atmospheric ratios of gases. GTD's were field tested on two floats deployed in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ for 15 days that targeted a productive mesoscale surface eddy originating from the Mexican coast. We anticipated that high organic carbon export should stimulate denitrification within the OMZ below. The floats profiled between the surface and 400 m depth and concurrently measured T, S, PAR, O2 (SBE 43 and Optode), and nitrate (SUNA). The N2-profiles from the GTDs are validated against independently measured N2/Ar ratio data collected during the deployment.

  10. Changing depositional environments during the Late Quatrnary along the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thamban, M.

    Sedimentalogical and palaeoceanographic studies were carried out on two sediment cores collected within the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ - between 150 to 1200 m water depth) along the western continental margin of India. The glacial to interglacial...

  11. Microbial Ecological Niche Partitioning Affects N2 gas Production in the Largest Marine Oxygen Minimum Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsman, C. A.; Penn, J. L.; Devol, A.; Palevsky, H. I.; Deutsch, C. A.; Keil, R.; Ward, B. B.; Rocap, G.

    2016-02-01

    Up to half of oceanic N2 production occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). In the Eastern Tropical North Pacific OMZ in April 2012, we measured a nine station coast to open ocean transect of N2 gas in the heart of the ETNP OMZ. Depth profiles of excess N2 gas had dual maxima located at the top of the OMZ and at 300m. An ecosystem biogeochemical model of the ETNP was also found to produce dual maxima at stations with a shallow OMZ. The model indicated that high N2 production rates caused the upper N2 maxima while long water residence time caused the deeper maxima. At a low productivity open ocean station where dual N2 maxima were observed, we obtained a depth profile of metagenomic sequences from both free living and >30 μm fractions to determine which N2 producing microbes were living in these three ecological niches. We use a phylogenetically-aware approach to identify metagenomic sequences by placing them on reference trees, which allows us to utilize them in a semi-quantitative manner. Overall, genes for denitrification (napA, nirS, nirK, qnor, nosZ) were enriched on particles while anammox was free-living. However, separation of genes into phylotypes indicated that the system is more complicated. For example, 4 out of 5 N2O reductase denitrifier phylotypes were actually free-living, while the fifth, most abundant phylotype was particle-attached. In the water column, denitrifier and anammox genes were spatially separated with depth with denitrifiers focused on the top section of the OMZ and with anammox becoming abundant slightly deeper and being more dominant at the deep N2 maxima. Interestingly, different phylotypes of denitrifiers have different depth profiles, implying individual adaptations and niches. The presence of measurable ammonia (>200 nM) at the top 20m of the OMZ along with the very low numbers of anammox bacteria is consistent with recent shoaling of the OMZ at the time of sampling. Thus the spatial separation of denitrifiers and anammox at the

  12. Oxygen sensitivity of anammox and coupled N-cycle processes in oxygen minimum zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Jensen, Marlene M; Contreras, Sergio; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Lam, Phyllis; Günter, Marcel; LaRoche, Julie; Lavik, Gaute; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient measurements indicate that 30-50% of the total nitrogen (N) loss in the ocean occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). This pelagic N-removal takes place within only ~0.1% of the ocean volume, hence moderate variations in the extent of OMZs due to global warming may have a large impact on the global N-cycle. We examined the effect of oxygen (O(2)) on anammox, NH(3) oxidation and NO(3)(-) reduction in (15)N-labeling experiments with varying O(2) concentrations (0-25 µmol L(-1)) in the Namibian and Peruvian OMZs. Our results show that O(2) is a major controlling factor for anammox activity in OMZ waters. Based on our O(2) assays we estimate the upper limit for anammox to be ~20 µmol L(-1). In contrast, NH(3) oxidation to NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) reduction to NO(2)(-) as the main NH(4)(+) and NO(2)(-) sources for anammox were only moderately affected by changing O(2) concentrations. Intriguingly, aerobic NH(3) oxidation was active at non-detectable concentrations of O(2), while anaerobic NO(3)(-) reduction was fully active up to at least 25 µmol L(-1) O(2). Hence, aerobic and anaerobic N-cycle pathways in OMZs can co-occur over a larger range of O(2) concentrations than previously assumed. The zone where N-loss can occur is primarily controlled by the O(2)-sensitivity of anammox itself, and not by any effects of O(2) on the tightly coupled pathways of aerobic NH(3) oxidation and NO(3)(-) reduction. With anammox bacteria in the marine environment being active at O(2) levels ~20 times higher than those known to inhibit their cultured counterparts, the oceanic volume potentially acting as a N-sink increases tenfold. The predicted expansion of OMZs may enlarge this volume even further. Our study provides the first robust estimates of O(2) sensitivities for processes directly and indirectly connected with N-loss. These are essential to assess the effects of ocean de-oxygenation on oceanic N-cycling. © 2011 Kalvelage et al.

  13. Oxygen sensitivity of anammox and coupled N-cycle processes in oxygen minimum zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kalvelage

    Full Text Available Nutrient measurements indicate that 30-50% of the total nitrogen (N loss in the ocean occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs. This pelagic N-removal takes place within only ~0.1% of the ocean volume, hence moderate variations in the extent of OMZs due to global warming may have a large impact on the global N-cycle. We examined the effect of oxygen (O(2 on anammox, NH(3 oxidation and NO(3(- reduction in (15N-labeling experiments with varying O(2 concentrations (0-25 µmol L(-1 in the Namibian and Peruvian OMZs. Our results show that O(2 is a major controlling factor for anammox activity in OMZ waters. Based on our O(2 assays we estimate the upper limit for anammox to be ~20 µmol L(-1. In contrast, NH(3 oxidation to NO(2(- and NO(3(- reduction to NO(2(- as the main NH(4(+ and NO(2(- sources for anammox were only moderately affected by changing O(2 concentrations. Intriguingly, aerobic NH(3 oxidation was active at non-detectable concentrations of O(2, while anaerobic NO(3(- reduction was fully active up to at least 25 µmol L(-1 O(2. Hence, aerobic and anaerobic N-cycle pathways in OMZs can co-occur over a larger range of O(2 concentrations than previously assumed. The zone where N-loss can occur is primarily controlled by the O(2-sensitivity of anammox itself, and not by any effects of O(2 on the tightly coupled pathways of aerobic NH(3 oxidation and NO(3(- reduction. With anammox bacteria in the marine environment being active at O(2 levels ~20 times higher than those known to inhibit their cultured counterparts, the oceanic volume potentially acting as a N-sink increases tenfold. The predicted expansion of OMZs may enlarge this volume even further. Our study provides the first robust estimates of O(2 sensitivities for processes directly and indirectly connected with N-loss. These are essential to assess the effects of ocean de-oxygenation on oceanic N-cycling.

  14. Meiofauna distributions at the oxygen minimum zone in Changjiang (Yangtze) River Estuary waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Er; ZHANG Zhinan; ZHANG Yan

    2006-01-01

    A quantitative study on meiofauna was carried out along a transect throughout the Changjiang Estuary's oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the East China Sea. There exist two distinct station groups in the OMZ: the fine-grained hypoxic area and the more fine-grained anoxic area. Meiofauna abundance ranged from (101.5±31.0) ind./cm2 (hypoxic area) to (369.9±123.9) ind./cm2 (anoxic area) along the transect. Free-living marine nematodes were the numerically dominant meiofauna at every station. The anoxic area differed significantly in meiofauna abundance and vertical distribution pattern from the hypoxic area. Within the anoxic area, nematodes abundance increased and amounted to over 90% of the total meiofauna; about 50% of nematodes were found in the 2~5 and 5~8 cm layers. At hypoxic stations, about over 85% were restricted to the top 2 cm. Benthic copepod abundance and dominance decreased consistently with the oxygen gradient. The pattern of meiofauna biomass was similar to that of abundance. The correlation analysis of the meiofauna numbers and environmental parameters indicated that abundance and biomass of total meiofauna and nematodes had significant or highly significant (P<0.05 or P<0.01) correlations with Chl a and Pha a, but no significant (P>0.05) correlations with bottom-water oxygen (BWO2). On the other hand, there was a highly significant positive correlation between benthic copepod abundance and bottom-water oxygen (P<0.05). The investigation on the nematode community structure indicated that two different nematode communities existed in hypoxic and anoxic areas. In certain way, the shift in nematode species composition distinguishes the anoxia to hypoxia. Nematode diversity was generally lower within the anoxic stations than the hypoxic ones, but the difference was not significant. Indices of the nematode community structure varied in relation to the bottom-water oxygen together with bottom-water temperature, Chl a concentration and median grain

  15. Slow Growth and High Substrate Affinity of Anammox Bacteria in an Oxygen Minimum Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, L. A.; Padilla, C. C.; Sarode, N. D.; Stewart, F. J.; Thamdrup, B.

    2016-02-01

    A major percentage of total fixed nitrogen (N) loss in the oceans occurs within oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) via denitrification or anammox. Anammox has been suggested as the dominant N loss pathway in these regions, but the regulation of this process remains understudied in aquatic systems, with work to date mainly coming from laboratory-scale bioreactors. Sampling was undertaken in the anoxic, coastal basin of the Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica to assess the growth and substrate kinetics of anammox bacteria in a marine OMZ. Anammox rates showed a strong dependence on nanomolar concentrations of both NH4+ and NO2-. A single Michaelis-Menten curve fitted for each substrate produced apparent half saturation constants (Km) of 335 ± 292 nM NH4+ and 167 ± 192 nM NO2- respectively. NO2- has a dual role to play in anammox metabolism, as an electron acceptor in the energy generating reaction and as an electron donor in the carbon fixation step; hence growth is associated with NO3- production. Using acetylene as an inhibitor for anammox, we were able to assess NO2- oxidation by anammox bacteria, producing a mean ratio of N2 to NO3- production of 0.26 ± 0.04, which is in direct agreement with that observed in bioreactors. This allowed calculation of a carbon fixation rate, which when combined with enumeration of anammox bacteria through qPCR allowed us to determine the first doubling time for anammox bacteria (predominately Ca. Scalindua) in the marine environment. Doubling times at the peak of anammox activity fell in the range 65 to 123 days, which is at the high end of those seen in laboratory setups. Anammox bacteria have a high affinity for both NH4+ and NO2- and are thus able to compete for these highly sought after substrates in OMZs. However, the slow growth of these bacteria will delay their response to injections of substrate, for example from inputs of fresh organic matter, and it will therefore ultimately influence their contribution to fixed N loss in the oceans.

  16. The flow field of the upper hypoxic Eastern Tropical North Atlantic oxygen minimum zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Stramma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A subsurface low oxygen zone is located in the eastern tropical North Atlantic Ocean (ETNA in the upper ocean with the core of the hypoxic (O2 ≤ 60 μmol kg−1 oxygen minimum zone (OMZ at 400 to 500 m depth. The poorly known subsurface circulation in the OMZ region is derived from observations and data assimilation results. Measurements in the eastern tropical North Atlantic in November/December 2008, in November/December 2009 and October/November 2010 of velocity, oxygen and of a tracer (CF3SF5 that was released in April 2008 at ∼ 8° N, 23° W (at ∼ 330 m depth show circulation in the upper part of the OMZ with spreading to the east in the North Equatorial Countercurrent (NECC region and northwestward around the Guinea Dome. Three floats equipped with oxygen sensors deployed at ∼ 8° N, 23° W with parking depths at 330, 350 and 400 m depths were used to estimate velocity along the float trajectory at the surface and at the park depth. South of 9° N, the zonal surface velocity estimate from float data alternate seasonally. At the 350 m park depth north of 9° N a cyclonic northwestward flow across the OMZ was observed. The northward shift into the upper OMZ and the cyclonic flow around the Guinea Dome seem to be connected to a strong Atlantic Meridional Mode (AMM event in 2009. A near-surface cyclonic circulation cell east of the Cape Verde Islands expands into the OMZ layer. The circulation of the upper OMZ mirrors the near surface circulation. Oxygen measurements from the cruises used here, as well as other recent cruises up to the year 2014 confirm the continuous deoxygenation trend in the upper OMZ since the 1960's near the Guinea Dome. The three floats deployed with the tracer show spreading paths consistent with the overall observed tracer spreading. Mesoscale eddies may modify the oxygen distribution in the OMZs. Oxygen sensors on the floats remained well calibrated for more than 20 months and so the oxygen profiles can be

  17. Across-slope relations between the biological populations, the euphotic zone and the oxygen minimum layer off the coast of Oman during the southwest monsoon (August, 1994)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, P. J.; Fasham, M. J. R.; Weeks, A. R.; Hemmings, J. C. P.; Roe, H. S. J.; Pugh, P. R.; Holley, S.; Crisp, N. A.; Angel, M. V.

    1998-01-01

    An area some 120×70 km off the eastern coast of Oman (containing the UK JGOFS Arabesque station) was intensively studied over a 17 day period in August 1994, with the objective of determining the relationships between the biological populations, the oxygen minimum layer and the dynamic hydrography of the euphotic zone. The outer margin of the area was delimited by a rectangle of 15 full depth CTD casts and the hydrography was further defined by two Seasoar surveys within the box. Midwater trawls were used to sample the populations at three stations, oceanic, slope and shelf edge respectively. Day and night samples of macroplankton and micronekton were taken at each station to determine the extent of diel vertical migration and the effect of the hypoxic region on these migrations. Concurrent ADCP data were used to follow the migrations and spatial changes in real time. Despite the limited area studied the patterns of upwelling and their temporal and spatial changes were complex. Coastal upwelling was observed directly only at the southwestern edge of the area during both Seasoar surveys. Persian Gulf Water was a consistent but spatially discrete feature of the region at depths of 200-300 m. Arabian Sea Surface Water was present at the eastern margin of the first survey. Between these two water masses was a large area with small horizontal gradients and variable silicate and chlorophyll levels. Satellite data suggest that this water may have been advected as a filament from a more northerly coastal source. Very marked changes took place in the hydrography and in the phytoplankton composition and abundance at the reference station at 19°N 59°E over the 16 day period between visits. The highest biomass of plankton and micronekton (expressed as wet volume or as carbon) occurred in the upper 100 m, closely correlated with the relatively high oxygen levels at these depths. Gelatinous animals predominated in these layers, with additional swarms of swimming crabs. Quite

  18. Sink or link? The bacterial role in benthic carbon cycling in the Arabian sea oxygen minimum zone

    OpenAIRE

    Pozzato, L.; van Oevelen, D.; Moodley, L; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial loop, the consumption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by bacteria and subsequent transfer of bacterial carbon to higher trophic levels, plays a prominent role in pelagic aquatic food webs. However, its role in sedimentary ecosystems is not well documented. Here we present the results of isotope tracer experiments performed under in situ oxygen conditions in sediments from inside and outside the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) to study the importance of the microbial loop...

  19. Influence of diagenesis on the stable isotopic composition of biogenic carbonates from the Gulf of Tehuantepec oxygen minimum zone

    OpenAIRE

    Blanchet, Cécile; Kasten, S.; Vidal, Laurence; Poulton, S.W.; Ganeshram, R.; Thouveny, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In order to evaluate the influence of diagenetic and post-sampling processes on the stable oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of biogenic carbonates, we conducted a multiproxy study of organic-rich sediments from the eastern Pacific oxygen minimum zone. Core MD02-2520, which was retrieved from the Gulf of Tehuantepec (Mexico), has seasonal laminations and covers the last 40 kyr. Together with the presence of gypsum crystals and inorganic calcite aggregates, the occ...

  20. Deformation from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake near the southwest margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kevin M.; Ellen, Stephen D.; Peterson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to pavement and near-surface utility pipes, caused by the 17 October 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake, provides evidence for ground deformation in a 663 km2 area near the southwest margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California (USA). A total of 1427 damage sites, collected from more than 30 sources, are concentrated in four zones, three of which lie near previously mapped faults. In one of these zones, the channel lining of Los Gatos Creek, a 2-km-long concrete strip trending perpendicular to regional geologic structure, was broken by thrusts that were concentrated in two belts, each several tens of meters wide, separated by more than 300 m of relatively undeformed concrete.

  1. Redox sensitive elements in foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Glock

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Testing order to assess their potential as a proxy for redox conditions the element/Ca ratios of the redox sensitive elements Mn and Fe were determined in tests of benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ. Prior to the determination of the element/Ca ratios the distributions of Ca, Mn, Fe, Mg, Ba, Al, Si, P and S in tests of the shallow infaunal species Uvigerina peregrina and Bolivina spissa were mapped with an electron microprobe (EMP. An Fe rich phase which is also enriched in Al, Si, P and S was found on the inner test surface of U. peregrina. The element distributions of a specimen treated with an oxidative cleaning procedure show the absence of this phase. EMP maps of B. spissa also identified a similar phase which too could be removed with oxidative cleaning. Neither in B. spissa nor in U. peregrina were any hints for diagenetic (oxyhydroxide or carbonate coatings found. Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca ratios of single specimens of B. spissa from different locations have been determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS. Bulk analyses using solution ICP-MS of several samples were compared to the SIMS data. The difference between SIMS analyses on single specimens and ICP-MS bulk analyses from the same sampling sites was 14.0–134.8 μmol mol−1 for the Fe/Ca and 1.68 μmol mol−1 for the Mn/Ca ratios. This amounts to 3–29 % for the Fe/Ca and 21.5 % for the Mn/Ca ratios of the overall variability between the samples of the different sampling sites. The Mn/Ca ratios in the calcite were generally relatively low (2.21–9.93 μmol mol−1 but of the same magnitude as in the pore waters (1.37–6.67 μmol mol−1. Comparison with sediment pore water data showed that Mn/Ca in the foraminiferal calcite is proportional to the Mn/Ca ratio in the top cm of the pore water. The lowest Fe/Ca ratio in tests of B. spissa (87.0 μmol mol

  2. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, Rainer; Hauss, Helena; Buchholz, Friedrich; Melzner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs) that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2, and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply could fuel bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation - a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean considerably. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2) does not result in a down-regulation of ammonium excretion. We exposed calanoid copepods from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA; Undinula vulgaris and Pleuromamma abdominalis) and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP; Euphausia mucronata) and the ETNA (Euphausia gibboides) to different temperatures, carbon dioxide and oxygen levels to study their survival, respiration and excretion rates at these conditions. An increase in temperature by 10 °C led to an approximately 2-fold increase of the respiration and excretion rates of U. vulgaris (Q10, respiration = 1.4; Q10, NH4-excretion = 1.6), P. abdominalis (Q10, respiration = 2.0; Q10, NH4-excretion = 2.4) and

  3. Regional variability of slope stability: Application to the Eel margin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Locat, J.; Dartnell, P.; Israel, K.; Florence, Wong

    1999-01-01

    Relative values of downslope driving forces and sediment resisting forces determine the locations of submarine slope failures. Both of these vary regionally, and their impact can be addressed when the data are organized in a Geographic Information System (GIS). The study area on the continental margin near the Eel River provides an excellent opportunity to apply GIS spatial analysis techniques for evaluation of slope stability. In this area, swath bathymetric mapping shows seafloor morphology and distribution of slope steepness in fine detail, and sediment analysis of over 70 box cores delineates the variability of sediment density near the seafloor surface. Based on the results of ten geotechnical studies of submarine study areas, we developed an algorithm that relates surface sediment density to the shear strength appropriate to the type of cyclic loading produced by an earthquake. Strength and stress normalization procedures provide results that are conceptually independent of subbottom depth. Results at depth are rigorously applicable if sediment lithology does not vary significantly and consolidation state can be estimated. Otherwise, the method applies only to shallow-seated slope failure. Regional density, slope, and level of anticipated seismic shaking information were combined in a GIS framework to yield a map that illustrates the relative stability of slopes in the face of seismically induced failure. When a measure of predicted relative slope stability is draped on an oblique view of swath bathymetry, a variation in this slope stability is observed on an otherwise smooth slope along the mid-slope region north of a plunging anticline. The section of slope containing diffuse, pockmarked gullies has a lower measure of stability than a separate section containing gullies that have sharper boundaries and somewhat steeper sides. Such an association suggests that our slope-stability analysis relates to the stability of the gully sides. The remainder of the

  4. Evidence for benthic-pelagic food web coupling and carbon export from California margin bamboo coral archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Hill

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea bamboo corals (order Gorgonacea, family Isididae are known to record changes in water mass chemistry over decades to centuries. These corals are composed of a two-part skeleton of calcite internodes segmented by gorgonin organic nodes. We examine the spatial variability of bamboo coral organic node 13C/12C and 15N/14N from thirteen bamboo coral specimens sampled along the California margin (37–32° N; 792 to 2136 m depth. Radiocarbon analyses of the organic nodes show the presence of the anthropogenic bomb spike, indicating the corals utilize a surface-derived food source (pre-bomb D14C values of ∼ −100‰, post-bomb values to 82‰. Carbon and nitrogen isotope data from the organic nodes (13C = −15.9‰ to −19.2‰ 15N = 13.8‰ to 19.4‰ suggest selective feeding on surface-derived organic matter or zooplankton. A strong relationship between coral 15N and habitat depth indicate a potential archive of changing carbon export, with decreased 15N values reflecting reduced microbial degradation (increased carbon flux at shallower depths. Using four multi-centennial length coral records, we interpret long-term 15N stability in the California Current. Organic node 13C values record differences in carbon isotope fractionation dictated by nearshore vs. offshore primary production. These findings imply strong coupling between primary production, pelagic food webs, and deep-sea benthic communities.

  5. Tectono-Stratigraphy of the Seeps on the Guaymas Basin at the Sonora Margin, Gulf of California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa Albornoz, L. J.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Bandy, W. L.; Escobar-Briones, E. G.; Godfroy, A.; Fouquet, Y.

    2013-05-01

    Recently several hydrothermal and gas seeps systems has been located precisely at the Sonora margin within the Guaymas Basin (GB), Gulf of California. Since late 1970's , several marine studies had reported two main hydrothermal systems in the Guaymas Rift (one at the Northern Rift, and other at the Southern Rift) and a cold seeps system at the Satellite Basin in the Sonora-margin lower edge. During the campaign BIG10, onboard the IFREMER vessel, NO L'Atalante, the EM122 echo-sounder log more than 30,000 water column acoustic images, which allows us to create a data base of the bubble plumes active systems on the northern part of the GB and the Sonora Margin. These plumes are the expression on the water column of an active seeps site during the cruise time. These images document the presence of the cold seep activity around the scarp of the Guaymas Transform Fault (GTF), and within the Satellite Basin. Few active plumes are first located off-axis, on both sides of the Northern Rift. Although it is not observed any plume within NR. Sub-bottom profiles and bathymetric data logged during the campaign GUAYRIV10, onboard the UNAM vessel, BO EL PUMA, are analyzed to determine the shallow tectonic-stratigraphy of GB near the Sonora Margin. We analyze 17 high-resolution seismic profiles (13 with NE-SW strike and 3 with NW-SE strike). From this data set, the continental shelf stratigraphy at the Sonora Margin tilts toward the slope, showing 3 low angle unconformities due to tectonics and slope angle changes. The strata slope changes angle up to 60°. However, the constant trans-tension shear along the GTF causes gravitation instability on the slope, generating a few submarine landslides close to the Northern Rift, and the rotation of blocks, tilting toward the shelf. To the north, the GTF splits in two fault escarpments, forming a narrow pull-apart basin, known as Satellite Basin. The submarine canyon from the Sonora River flows through the Satellite Basin into the GB

  6. Partitioning and speciation of trace metal diagenesis in differing depositional environments in the sediments of the Oman margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alagarsamy, R.; Wolff, G.A; Chester, R.

    Organic-rich sediment samples collected from a transect within, and below, the Oman Margin oxygen minimum zone (OMZ)were analysed using a sequential leaching technique to characterise the diagenetic behaviour and speciation of Mn and Fe...

  7. Ascension Submarine Canyon, California - Evolution of a multi-head canyon system along a strike-slip continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, D.K.; Mullins, H.T.; Greene, H. Gary

    1986-01-01

    Ascension Submarine Canyon, which lies along the strike-slip (transform) dominated continental margin of central California, consists of two discrete northwestern heads and six less well defined southeastern heads. These eight heads coalesce to form a single submarine canyon near the 2700 m isobath. Detailed seismic stratigraphic data correlated with 19 rock dredge hauls from the walls of the canyon system, suggest that at least one of the two northwestern heads was initially eroded during a Pliocene lowstand of sea level ???3.8 m.y. B.P. Paleogeographic reconstructions indicate that at this time, northwestern Ascension Canyon formed the distal channel of nearby Monterey Canyon and has subsequently been offset by right-lateral, strike-slip faulting along the San Gregorio fault zone. Some of the six southwestern heads of Ascension Canyon may also have been initially eroded as the distal portions of Monterey Canyon during late Pliocene-early Pleistocene sea-level lowstands (???2.8 and 1.75 m.y. B.P.) and subsequently truncated and offset to the northwest. There have also been a minimum of two canyon-cutting episodes within the past 750,000 years, after the entire Ascension Canyon system migrated to the northwest past Monterey Canyon. We attribute these late Pleistocene erosional events to relative lowstands of sea level 750,000 and 18,000 yrs B.P. The late Pleistocene and Holocene evolution of the six southeastern heads also appears to have been controlled by structural uplift of the Ascension-Monterey basement high at the southeastern terminus of the Outer Santa Cruz Basin. We believe that uplift of this basement high sufficiently oversteepened submarine slopes to induce gravitational instability and generate mass movements that resulted in the erosion of the canyon heads. Most significantly, though, our results and interpretations support previous proposals that submarine canyons along strike-slip continental margins can originate by tectonic trunction and lateral

  8. The Effects of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration on Deep-sea Foraminifera in two California Margin Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricketts, Erin R

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deep-sea sequestration of CO2 is being considered as a possible mitigation tool to decrease atmospheric CO2 concentrations and its associated negative effects. This study is the first to investigate potential effects of liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) injection on deep-sea foraminiferal assemblages. Foraminifera are ideal for this ecological impact investigation because of differing test composition (calcareous and non-calcareous) and thickness, and diverse epifaunal and infaunal depth preferences. The experiment was conducted August-September 2003, at 3600m off the coast of Monterey Bay, California, aboard the R/V Western Flyer using the ROV Tiburon. The pH of the site was monitored throughout the experiment by Seabird CTDs. Sediment push-cores were collected (both from the experimental and control sites) and stained to distinguish live (stained) from dead (unstained) individuals. Effects of CO2 injection on assemblages have been tracked both vertically (to 10cm depth below sea floor) and horizontally (up to 10m from CO2 injection sites), as well as between live and dead individuals. Within the corrals and underlying sediments severe pH changes (to near 4.0) were seen while over the experimental area small average reductions in ocean pH (-0.05 units) and large episodic excursions (-1.7 units) were measured resulting from CO2 injection. Exposure to this gradient of low pH caused increased mortality and dissolution of calcareous forms within corrals, as far as 5m from the injection site, and to at least 10cm depth in the sediments. This experiment revealed several major effects of CO2 injection on foraminiferal assemblages in surficial sediments: 1) total number of foraminifera in a sample decreases; 2) foraminiferal species richness decreases in both stained and unstained specimens; and 3) percentage of stained (live) forms increases. Down-core trends (to 10cm below sea floor) have revealed: 1) percent agglutinated forms decline and calcareous forms increase

  9. Discovery and Description of Extinct Asphalt Volcanoes Along the Southern California Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, D. L.; Reddy, C.; Ventura, G. T.; Nelson, R. K.

    2007-12-01

    of extinct asphalt volcanoes along the Pacific margin of North America, and provides an important window into the activity of cold seeps by capturing important structures that are unlikely to survive into the geologic record.

  10. Decadal to centennial fluctuations in the intensity of the eastern tropical North Pacific oxygen minimum zone during the last 1200 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tems, Caitlin E.; Berelson, William M.; Thunell, Robert; Tappa, Eric; Xu, Xiaomei; Khider, Deborah; Lund, Steve; González-Yajimovich, Oscar; Hamann, Yvonne

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), located below highly productive marine regions, are sites of microbially mediated denitrification and biogeochemical cycling that have global significance. The intensity of OMZs fluctuates naturally; however, the degree of these fluctuations and a comprehensive understanding of the factors that drive these fluctuations on decadal to centennial time scales is lacking. Our high-resolution (near-annual) record of δ15Nsed from laminated sediments at the Pescadero Slope in the Gulf of California (eastern tropical North Pacific) fluctuates between maximum values of 10.5‰ and minimum values of 8.0‰ over the past 1200 years. An analysis of the relationship between δ15NO3- and [O2] in the water column suggests that the observed range of δ15Nsed values is equivalent to an approximately 8 µM fluctuation in O2 content and that these changes can occur in less than 25 years. Our findings show that the OMZ typically intensifies quickly and contracts gradually; the average rate of OMZ intensification (-0.24 µM O2/yr) is twice as fast as the rate of OMZ reoxygenation. Spectral analyses of the δ15Nsed record and Br/Cl counts, with the latter are used as a proxy for organic carbon preservation, suggest that the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Suess (deVries) solar cycle (solar irradiance) may influence the intensity of the OMZ and carbon production/export during the late Holocene. Coherence between δ15Nsed and weight percent organic carbon also suggests that similar mechanisms influence both OMZ fluctuations and variation in organic carbon production/export.

  11. Feeding ecology of the copepod Lucicutia aff. L. grandis near the lower interface of the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Marcia M.; Wishner, Karen F.

    Feeding ecology of the calanoid copepod Lucicutia aff. L. grandis collected in the Arabian Sea at one station during the Spring Intermonsoon and during the Southwest Monsoon of 1995 was studied with transmission electron microscopy of gut-contents. Highest abundances of these animals occurred from ˜400 to 1100 m, near the lower interface of the oxygen minimum zone and at the inflection point where oxygen starts to increase. We expected that their gut-contents would include particles and cells that had sunk relatively undegraded from surface waters as well as those from within the oxygen minimum zone, and that gut-contents would differ between the Spring Intermonsoon and the more productive SW Monsoon. Overall, in both seasons Lucicutia aff. L. grandis was omnivorous, and consumed a variety of detrital particles, prokaryotic and eukaryotic autotrophs, gram-negative bacteria including metal-precipitating bacteria, aggregates of probable gram-positive bacteria, microheterotrophs, virus-like particles and large virus-like particles, as well as cuticle and cnidarian tissue. Few significant differences in types of food consumed were seen among life stages within or among various depth zones. Amorphous, unidentifiable material was significantly more abundant in guts during the Spring Intermonsoon than during the late SW Monsoon, and recognizable cells made up a significantly higher portion of gut-contents during the late SW Monsoon. This is consistent with the Intermonsoon as a time when organic material is considerably re-worked by the surface water microbial loop before leaving the euphotic zone. In both seasons Lucicutia aff. L. grandis had consumed what appeared to be aggregates of probable gram-positive bacteria, similar to those we had previously found in gut-contents of several species of zooplankton from the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern tropical Pacific. By intercepting sinking material, populations of Lucicutia aff. L. grandis act as a filter for carbon

  12. Paralarvae of the complex Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis-Dosidicus gigas (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) in the northern limit of the shallow oxygen minimum zone of the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean (April 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Velasco, Laura; Ruvalcaba-Aroche, Erick D.; Beier, Emilio; Godínez, Victor M.; Barton, Eric D.; Díaz-Viloria, Noe; Pacheco, María. R.

    2016-03-01

    The three-dimensional distribution of the paralarvae of the complex Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis-Dosidicus gigas (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) was analyzed at the northern limit of the shallow oxygen minimum zone in the Eastern Tropical Pacific in April 2012. The upper limit of the oxygen minimum water (˜44 µmol/kg or 1 mL/L) rises from ˜100 m depth in the entrance of the Gulf of California to ˜20 m depth off Cabo Corrientes. Most of the paralarvae of this complex, dominated by D. gigas, were concentrated in the Gulf entrance, between the thermocline (˜20 to ˜50 m depth) and the sea surface, in the warmest (>19°C) oxygenated (>176 µmol/kg) layer. The highest abundance of paralarvae was detected in an anticyclonic eddy (˜120 km diameter and >500 m deep), which contained lower-salinity water (<35 g/kg), consistent with formation in the California Current. Lower paralarvae abundance was recorded further south off Cabo Corrientes, where hypoxic layers were elevated as water shoaled nearshore. Almost no paralarvae were found in the north of the study area beyond the strong salinity front (˜34.8-35.4 g/kg) that bounded the anticyclone. These results showed an affinity of the paralarvae for lower-salinity, oxygenated water, illustrated by the influence of the mesoscale anticyclonic eddy and the salinity front in their distribution. Based on this study, it can be concluded that the expansion of the depth range of hypoxic water observed in the Eastern Tropical Pacific may be increasing environmental stress on the paralarvae by vertically restricting their habitat, and so affecting their survival.

  13. Fixed-nitrogen loss associated with sinking zooplankton carcasses in a coastal oxygen minimum zone (Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Lundgaard, Ann Sofie Birch; Morales Ramirez, Alvaro

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean are of key importance for pelagic fixed-nitrogen loss (N-loss) through microbial denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). Recent studies document that zooplankton is surprisingly abundant in and around OMZs and that the microbial community...... associated with carcasses of a large copepod species mediates denitrification. Here, we investigate the complex N-cycling associated with sinking zooplankton carcasses exposed to the steep O2 gradient in a coastal OMZ (Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica). 15N-stable-isotope enrichment experiments revealed...... that the carcasses of abundant copepods and ostracods provide anoxic microbial hotspots in the pelagic zone by hosting intense anaerobic N-cycle activities even in the presence of ambient O2. Carcass-associated anaerobic N-cycling was clearly dominated by dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) at up...

  14. Metabolic physiology of the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas: Implications for vertical migration in a pronounced oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rui; Seibel, Brad A.

    2010-07-01

    The Humboldt (or jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is an active predator endemic to the Eastern Pacific that undergoes diel vertical migrations into a pronounced oxygen minimum layer (OML). Here, we investigate the physiological mechanisms that facilitate these migrations and assess the associated costs and benefits. Exposure to hypoxic conditions equivalent to those found in the OML (∼10 μM O 2 at 10 °C) led to a significant reduction in the squid’s routine metabolic rate (RMR), from 8.9 to 1.6 μmol O 2 g -1 h -1 ( p gigas may repay any oxygen debt accumulated during the daytime. The dive to deeper water may minimize exposure to stressful surface temperatures when most prey have migrated to depth during the daytime. The physiological and ecological strategies demonstrated here may have facilitated the recent range expansion of this species into northern waters where expanding hypoxic zones prohibit competing top predators.

  15. Osseous skeletal material and fish scales in marine sediments under the oxygen minimum zone off northern and central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milessi, Andrés C.; Sellanes, Javier; Gallardo, Víctor A.; Lange, Carina B.

    2005-08-01

    The significance of whale falls for the study of the biogeography, evolution and biodiversity of deep-sea biota has been recently recognized by international programs since large carcasses are known to give rise to biogenic chemosynthetic ecosystems. However, the plain accumulation of smaller bone material in the shallower settings of the continental shelf and upper slope under the hypoxic conditions of the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ), has received much less attention. Here we describe new findings of skeletal material and fish scales in marine sediments under the OMZ off northern and central Chile which, combined with previous reports for the study area, lead us to suggest the existence of a band in the benthos of accumulation of bones and scales extending at least twenty degrees in latitude (18-38° S). Future studies should focus on the characterization of biotic communities living upon these resources in order to elucidate their peculiarities and importance in the Eastern South Pacific.

  16. Sink or link? The bacterial role in benthic carbon cycling in the Arabian sea oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzato, L.; Van Oevelen, D.; Moodley, L.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2013-06-01

    The bacterial loop, the consumption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by bacteria and subsequent transfer of bacterial carbon to higher trophic levels, plays a prominent role in pelagic aquatic food webs. However, its role in sedimentary ecosystems is not well documented. Here we present the results of isotope tracer experiments performed under in situ oxygen conditions in sediments from inside and outside the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) to study the importance of the microbial loop in this setting. Particulate organic matter, added as phytodetritus, was processed by bacteria, protozoa and metazoans, while dissolved organic matter was processed only by bacteria and there was very little, if any, transfer to higher trophic levels within the experimental period. This lack of significant transfer of bacterial-derived carbon to metazoan consumers indicates that the bacterial loop is rather inefficient in these sediments. Moreover, metazoans directly consume labile particulate organic matter resources and thus compete with bacteria for phytodetritus.

  17. Sink or link? The bacterial role in benthic carbon cycling in the Arabian sea oxygen minimum zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pozzato

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial loop, the consumption of dissolved organic matter (DOM by bacteria and subsequent transfer of bacterial carbon to higher trophic levels, plays a prominent role in pelagic aquatic food webs. However, its role in sedimentary ecosystems is not well documented. Here we present the results of isotope tracer experiments performed under in situ oxygen conditions in sediments from inside and outside the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ to study the importance of the microbial loop in this setting. Particulate organic matter, added as phytodetritus, was processed by bacteria, protozoa and metazoans, while dissolved organic matter was processed only by bacteria and there was very little, if any, transfer to higher trophic levels within the experimental period. This lack of significant transfer of bacterial-derived carbon to metazoan consumers indicates that the bacterial loop is rather inefficient in these sediments. Moreover, metazoans directly consume labile particulate organic matter resources and thus compete with bacteria for phytodetritus.

  18. Large multicellular filamentous bacteria under the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern South Pacific: a forgotten biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Victor Ariel; Espinoza, Carola

    2007-09-01

    In the soft reduced sediments of the continental shelf, below the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the eastern South Pacific (ESP), peculiar microbial communities have been disclosed which include a variety of large prokaryotes, protists and small metazoans. Dominant among the prokaryotes are large multi-cellular filamentous bacteria which, according to their size range, are roughly divided into megabacteria and macrobacteria. The former group is made up of a few species of Gamma Proteobacteria of the genera Thioploca and Beggiatoa and the second group includes a diversity of phenotypes. Protists include ciliates, flagellates, and foraminifers and the metazoans are mostly nematodes and small polychaetes. A significant similarity has been found in the exploitation of the area/volume relationship among these large bacteria and their fossil analog forms as described from pre-Cambrian rocks. For the same reason, the latter have mostly been referred to as algae or cyanobacteria in the literature. The presence of these seemingly ancient bacteria in the sediments of the oxygen minimum zones of the ESP, one of the most productive but also ecologically most inefficient marine ecosystems of the world, suggests that such setting must have prevailed throughout the geological history of the planet allowing for their survival and further that it might be considered an analog of Proterozoic ocean conditions. These non-cyanobacterial communities offer an alternative hypothesis to students of the evolution of life on Earth and may be of special interest to astrobiologists looking for life or traces of life in terrestrial or extraterrestrial environments since these do not necessarily imply a photosynthesis-based metabolism.

  19. Flux and accumulation of sedimentary particles off the continental slope of Pakistan: a comparison of water column and seafloor estimates from the oxygen minimum zone, NE Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Schulz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of bioturbation, the laminated muds from the oxygen-minimum zone (OMZ off Pakistan provide a unique opportunity to precisely determine the vertical and lateral sediment fluxes in the near shore part of the northeastern Arabian Sea, and to explore the effects of the margin topography and the low oxygen conditions on the accumulation of organic matter and other particles. West of Karachi, in the Hab river area of EPT and WPT (Eastern and Western PAKOMIN Traps, 16 short sediment profiles from water depths between 250 m and 1970 m on a depth transect crossing the OMZ (~ 120 to ~ 1200 m water depth were investigated, and correlated on the basis of a thick, light-gray- to reddish-colored turbidite layer. Varve counting yielded a date for this layer of AD 1905 to 1888. We adopted the young age which agrees with 210Pb- dating, and used this isochronous stratigraphic marker bed to calculate sediment accumulation rates, that we could directly compare with the flux rates from the sediment traps installed within the water column above. All traps in the area show exceptionally high, pulsed winter fluxes of up to 5000 mg m−2 d−1 in this margin environment. The lithic flux at the sea floor is as high as 4000 mg m−2 d−1 , and agrees remarkably well with the bulk winter flux of material. This holds as well for the individual bulk components (organic carbon, calcium carbonate, opal, lithic fraction. However, the high winter flux events (HFE by their extreme mass of remobilized matter terminated the recording in the shallow traps by clogging the funnels. Based on our comparisons, we argue that HFE for the past 5000 yr most likely occurred as regular events within the upper OMZ off Pakistan. Coarse fraction and foraminiferal accumulation rates from sediment surface samples along the Hab transect show distribution patterns that seem to be a function of water depth and distance from the shelf. Some of these sediment fractions show sudden

  20. Influence of diagenesis on the stable isotopic composition of biogenic carbonates from the Gulf of Tehuantepec oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, C. L.; Kasten, S.; Vidal, L.; Poulton, S. W.; Ganeshram, R.; Thouveny, N.

    2012-04-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of diagenetic and post-sampling processes on the stable oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of biogenic carbonates, we conducted a multiproxy study of organic-rich sediments from the eastern Pacific oxygen minimum zone. Core MD02-2520, which was retrieved from the Gulf of Tehuantepec (Mexico), has seasonal laminations and covers the last 40 kyr. Together with the presence of gypsum crystals and inorganic calcite aggregates, the occurrence of large excursions in the stable oxygen and carbon isotope records of both planktonic and benthic foraminifera (as large as +3‰ in δ18O and -5‰ in δ13C) point to significant secondary transformations. Storage-related gypsum precipitation was ruled out since it implies sulfide reoxidation by oxygen that triggers biogenic calcite dissolution, which proved to be of minor importance here. Instead, precipitation of authigenic calcite during early diagenesis appears to be the most likely process responsible for the observed isotopic excursions. The δ13C composition for inorganic calcite aggregates (-5 to -7‰) suggests a major contribution from anaerobic oxidation of organic matter. The δ34S composition for gypsum crystals (-10 to +15‰) suggests a major contribution from anaerobic reoxidation of authigenic sulfides, potentially involving reactions with metal oxides and sulfur disproportionation. A minor part of the gypsum might possibly have formed as a result of local pore water salinity increases induced by gas hydrate formation.

  1. Size-fractionated diversity of eukaryotic microbial communities in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duret, Manon T; Pachiadaki, Maria G; Stewart, Frank J; Sarode, Neha; Christaki, Urania; Monchy, Sébastien; Srivastava, Ankita; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2015-05-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) caused by water column stratification appear to expand in parts of the world's ocean, with consequences for marine biogeochemical cycles. OMZ formation is often fueled by high surface primary production, and sinking organic particles can be hotspots of interactions and activity within microbial communities. This study investigated the diversity of OMZ protist communities in two biomass size fractions (>30 and 30-1.6 μm filters) from the world's largest permanent OMZ in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific. Diversity was quantified via Illumina MiSeq sequencing of V4 region of 18S SSU rRNA genes in samples spanning oxygen gradients at two stations. Alveolata and Rhizaria dominated the two size fractions at both sites along the oxygen gradient. Community composition at finer taxonomic levels was partially shaped by oxygen concentration, as communities associated with versus anoxic waters shared only ∼32% of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) (97% sequence identity) composition. Overall, only 9.7% of total OTUs were recovered at both stations and under all oxygen conditions sampled, implying structuring of the eukaryotic community in this area. Size-fractionated communities exhibited different taxonomical features (e.g. Syndiniales Group I in the 1.6-30 μm fraction) that could be explained by the microniches created on the surface-originated sinking particles.

  2. Water column biogeochemistry of oxygen minimum zones in the eastern tropical North Atlantic and eastern tropical South Pacific oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, Carolin R.; Bange, Hermann W.; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Callbeck, Cameron M.; Engel, Anja; Hauss, Helena; Kanzow, Torsten; Kiko, Rainer; Lavik, Gaute; Loginova, Alexandra; Melzner, Frank; Meyer, Judith; Neulinger, Sven C.; Pahlow, Markus; Riebesell, Ulf; Schunck, Harald; Thomsen, Sören; Wagner, Hannes

    2016-06-01

    Recent modeling results suggest that oceanic oxygen levels will decrease significantly over the next decades to centuries in response to climate change and altered ocean circulation. Hence, the future ocean may experience major shifts in nutrient cycling triggered by the expansion and intensification of tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are connected to the most productive upwelling systems in the ocean. There are numerous feedbacks among oxygen concentrations, nutrient cycling and biological productivity; however, existing knowledge is insufficient to understand physical, chemical and biological interactions in order to adequately assess past and potential future changes. In the following, we summarize one decade of research performed in the framework of the Collaborative Research Center 754 (SFB754) focusing on climate-biogeochemistry interactions in tropical OMZs. We investigated the influence of low environmental oxygen conditions on biogeochemical cycles, organic matter formation and remineralization, greenhouse gas production and the ecology in OMZ regions of the eastern tropical South Pacific compared to the weaker OMZ of the eastern tropical North Atlantic. Based on our findings, a coupling of primary production and organic matter export via the nitrogen cycle is proposed, which may, however, be impacted by several additional factors, e.g., micronutrients, particles acting as microniches, vertical and horizontal transport of organic material and the role of zooplankton and viruses therein.

  3. Zooplankton Responses to Low-Oxygen Condition upon a Shallow Oxygen Minimum Zone in the Upwelling Region off Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, P.; Escribano, R.

    2015-12-01

    A shallow oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is a critical component in the coastal upwelling ecosystem off Chile. This OMZ causes oxygen-deficient water entering the photic layer and affecting plankton communities having low tolerance to hypoxia. Variable, and usually species-dependent, responses of zooplankton to hypoxia condition can be found. Most dominant species avoid hypoxia by restricting their vertical distribution, while others can temporarily enter and even spent part of their life cycle within the OMZ. Whatever the case, low-oxygen conditions appear to affect virtually all vital rates of zooplankton, such as mortality, fecundity, development and growth and metabolism, and early developmental stages seem more sensitive, with significant consequences for population and community dynamics. For most study cases, these effects are negative at individual and population levels. Observations and predictions upon increasing upwelling intensity over the last 20-30 years indicate a gradual shoaling of the OMZ, and so that an expected enhancement of these negative effects of hypoxia on the zooplankton community. Unknown processes of adaptation and community-structure adjustments are expected to take place with uncertain consequences for the food web of this highly productive eastern boundary current ecosystem.

  4. On the existence of free and metal complexed sulfide in the Arabian Sea and its oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theberge, Stephen M.; Luther, George W.; Farrenkopf, Anna M.

    Free hydrogen sulfide was not detected in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea during legs D1 (September 1992) and D3 (October-November 1992) of the Netherlands Indian Ocean Programme (NIOP). However, sulfide complexed to metals was detected by cathodic stripping square wave voltammetry at 2 nM or less throughout the water column. A slight increase in sulfide was measured in the OMZ relative to the surface waters and may be related to sulfur release from organic matter during decomposition. Sulfide complexes are of two general types at low concentrations of metal and sulfide. First, metals such as Mn, Fe, Co and Ni form complexes with bisulfide ion (HS -) that are kinetically labile to dissociation and are reactive. Second, metals such as Cu and Zn form multinuclear complexes with sulfide (S 2-) that are kinetically inert to dissociation; thus, they are less reactive than free (bi)sulfide and the labile metal bisulfide complexes. Zinc and copper sulfide complexes are important in allowing hydrogen sulfide to persist in seawater which contains measurable oxygen.

  5. Sink or link? The bacterial role in benthic carbon cycling in the Arabian Sea's oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzato, L.; Van Oevelen, D.; Moodley, L.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2013-11-01

    The bacterial loop, the consumption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by bacteria and subsequent transfer of bacterial carbon to higher trophic levels, plays a prominent role in pelagic food webs. However, its role in sedimentary ecosystems is not well documented. Here we present the results of isotope tracer experiments performed under in situ oxygen conditions in sediments from inside and outside the Arabian Sea's oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) to study the importance of the microbial loop in this setting. Particulate organic matter, added as phytodetritus, was processed by bacteria, protozoa and metazoans, while dissolved organic matter was processed only by bacteria and there was very little, if any, transfer to higher trophic levels within the 7 day experimental period. This lack of significant transfer of bacterial-derived carbon to metazoan consumers indicates that the bacterial loop is rather inefficient, in sediments both inside and outside the OMZ. Moreover, metazoans directly consumed labile particulate organic matter resources and thus competed with bacteria for phytodetritus.

  6. Characterization of phosphorus species in sediments from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: Combining sequential extractions and X-ray spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraal, Peter; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Behrends, Thilo; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2015-01-01

    The bulk phosphorus (P) distribution in sediment samples from the oxygen minimum zone of the northern Arabian Sea was determined using two methods: sequential chemical extraction (the ‘SEDEX’ procedure) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of the phosphorus K-edge. Our

  7. The effects of oxygen on process rates and gene expression of anammox and denitrification in the Eastern South Pacific oxygen minimum zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Tage; Stewart, Frank; De Brabandere, Loreto

    Oxygen concentrations were consistently below our detection limit of 90 nM for a distance of > 2000 km in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) along the coasts of Chile and Peru. In most cases, anammox and denitrification were only detected when in situ oxygen concentrations were below detection, with d...

  8. Mimicking the oxygen minimum zones: stimulating interaction of aerobic archaeal and anaerobic bacterial ammonia oxidizers in a laboratory-scale model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, J.; Haaijer, S.C.M.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.; van Niftrik, L.; Stahl, D.A.; Könneke, M.; Rush, D.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hu, Y.Y.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) rather than marine ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) may provide nitrite to anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria. Here we demonstrate the cooperation between marine anammox bacteria and nitrifiers in a laboratory-scale

  9. Metabolic suppression during protracted exposure to hypoxia in the jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas, living in an oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Brad A; Häfker, N Sören; Trübenbach, Katja; Zhang, Jing; Tessier, Shannon N; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Rosa, Rui; Storey, Kenneth B

    2014-07-15

    The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas, can survive extended forays into the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Previous studies have demonstrated reduced oxygen consumption and a limited anaerobic contribution to ATP production, suggesting the capacity for substantial metabolic suppression during hypoxic exposure. Here, we provide a more complete description of energy metabolism and explore the expression of proteins indicative of transcriptional and translational arrest that may contribute to metabolic suppression. We demonstrate a suppression of total ATP demand under hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen, PO2 =0.8 kPa) in both juveniles (52%) and adults (35%) of the jumbo squid. Oxygen consumption rates are reduced to 20% under hypoxia relative to air-saturated controls. Concentrations of arginine phosphate (Arg-P) and ATP declined initially, reaching a new steady state (~30% of controls) after the first hour of hypoxic exposure. Octopine began accumulating after the first hour of hypoxic exposure, once Arg-P breakdown resulted in sufficient free arginine for substrate. Octopine reached levels near 30 mmol g(-1) after 3.4 h of hypoxic exposure. Succinate did increase through hypoxia but contributed minimally to total ATP production. Glycogenolysis in mantle muscle presumably serves to maintain muscle functionality and balance energetics during hypoxia. We provide evidence that post-translational modifications on histone proteins and translation factors serve as a primary means of energy conservation and that select components of the stress response are altered in hypoxic squids. Reduced ATP consumption under hypoxia serves to maintain ATP levels, prolong fuel store use and minimize the accumulation of acidic intermediates of anaerobic ATP-generating pathways during prolonged diel forays into the OMZ. Metabolic suppression likely limits active, daytime foraging at depth in the core of the OMZ, but confers an energetic advantage over competitors that must

  10. Trophic ecology and vertical patterns of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in zooplankton from oxygen minimum zone regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rebecca L.; Wakeham, Stuart; McKinney, Rick; Wishner, Karen F.

    2014-08-01

    The unique physical and biogeochemical characteristics of oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) influence plankton ecology, including zooplankton trophic webs. Using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes, this study examined zooplankton trophic webs in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ. δ13C values were used to indicate zooplankton food sources, and δ15N values were used to indicate zooplankton trophic position and nitrogen cycle pathways. Vertically stratified MOCNESS net tows collected zooplankton from 0 to 1000 m at two stations along a north-south transect in the ETNP during 2007 and 2008, the Tehuantepec Bowl and the Costa Rica Dome. Zooplankton samples were separated into four size fractions for stable isotope analyses. Particulate organic matter (POM), assumed to represent a primary food source for zooplankton, was collected with McLane large volume in situ pumps. The isotopic composition and trophic ecology of the ETNP zooplankton community had distinct spatial and vertical patterns influenced by OMZ structure. The most pronounced vertical isotope gradients occurred near the upper and lower OMZ oxyclines. Material with lower δ13C values was apparently produced in the upper oxycline, possibly by chemoautotrophic microbes, and was subsequently consumed by zooplankton. Between-station differences in δ15N values suggested that different nitrogen cycle processes were dominant at the two locations, which influenced the isotopic characteristics of the zooplankton community. A strong depth gradient in zooplankton δ15N values in the lower oxycline suggested an increase in trophic cycling just below the core of the OMZ. Shallow POM (0-110 m) was likely the most important food source for mixed layer, upper oxycline, and OMZ core zooplankton, while deep POM was an important food source for most lower oxycline zooplankton (except for samples dominated by the seasonally migrating copepod Eucalanus inermis). There was no consistent isotopic progression among the four

  11. Tectonic and eustatic controls of late quaternary shelf sedimentation along the Central California (Santa Cruz) continental margin: high-resolution seismic stratigraphic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Henry T.; Nagel, David K.; Dominguez, Laura L.

    1985-07-01

    A high-resolution "uniboom", seismic stratigraphic investigation of a portion of the central California continental shelf has demonstrated that depositional patterns and sequences are controlled largely by an interplay of glacioeustatic sea-level fluctuations superimposed on local tectonics. Wrench tectonics, associated with active right-lateral shear along the San Gregorio fault zone, and the Pigeon Point Basement High control the location, distribution and overall geometry of depositional sequences via en echelon folding and differential subsidence. Areas of relatively thick and thin late Quaternary sediments conform in large part with structures produced during wrenching. Glacioeustatic sea-level oscillations have also shaped depositional patterns and sequences. Correlation of our seismic stratigraphic data with a southern California continental margin sea-level curve, suggests that during the last glacial maximum, approximately 18,000 yrs ago, a relative lowstand resulted in the erosion of a distinct unconformity upon which late Quaternary sediments have accumulated. A rapid rise of sea level to a relative stillstand, approximately 12,000 yrs ago, produced a concave-up, marine terrace profile across the mid-shelf, that has since been infilled with as much as 22 m of Holocene clastic sediments. A relative drop of sea level, approximately 11,000 yrs ago, allowed sediments to build seaward as a series of prograding clinoforms that form the basal sequences of the late Quaternary sediment fill. The succeeding Holocene transgression partially eroded the top of this earlier regressive sequence, and has now established a typical, wave-graded shelf along which sediments fine in a seaward direction to water depths of 90-100 m. At greater shelf water depths, surface sediments coarsen and appear to be relicts of previous relative sea-level lowstands. The presence of now submerged and buried marine terraces along both the central and southern California continental margins

  12. Sedimentary phosphorus and iron cycling in and below the oxygen minimum zone of the northern Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kraal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate phosphorus (P and iron (Fe cycling in sediments along a depth transect from within to well below the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ in the northern Arabian Sea (Murray Ridge. Pore-water and solid-phase analyses show that authigenic formation of calcium phosphate minerals (Ca-P is largely restricted to where the OMZ intersects the seafloor topography, likely due to higher depositional fluxes of reactive P. Nonetheless, increased ratios of organic carbon to organic P (Corg/Porg and to total reactive P (Corg/Preactive in surface sediments indicate that the overall burial efficiency of P relative to Corg decreases under the low bottom water oxygen concentrations (BWO in the OMZ. The relatively constant Fe/Al ratio in surface sediments along the depth transect suggest that corresponding changes in Fe burial are limited. Sedimentary pyrite contents are low throughout the ~25-cm sediment cores at most stations, as commonly observed in the Arabian Sea OMZ. However, pyrite is an important sink for reactive Fe at one station in the OMZ. A reactive transport model (RTM was applied to quantitatively investigate P and Fe diagenesis at an intermediate station at the lower boundary of the OMZ (bottom water O2: ~14 μ mol l−1. The RTM results contrast with earlier findings in showing that Fe redox cycling can control authigenic apatite formation and P burial in Arabian Sea sediment. In addition, results suggest that a large fraction of the sedimentary Ca-P is not authigenic, but is instead deposited from the water column and buried. Dust is likely a major source of this Ca-P. Inclusion of the unreactive Ca-P pool in the Corg/P ratio leads to an overestimation of the burial efficiency of reactive P relative to Corg along the depth transect. Moreover, the unreactive Ca-P accounts for ~85% of total Ca-P burial. In general, our results reveal

  13. Intensification and deepening of the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone in response to increase in Indian monsoon wind intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachkar, Zouhair; Smith, Shafer; Levy, Marina

    2017-04-01

    The decline in oxygen supply to the ocean associated with global warming of sea-surface temperatures is expected to expand the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). This global trend can be attenuated or amplified by regional processes. In the Arabian Sea, the World's thickest OMZ is highly vulnerable to changes in the Indian monsoon wind. Evidence from paleo records and future climate projections indicate strong variations of the Indian monsoon wind intensity over climatic timescales. Yet, the response of the OMZ to these wind changes remains poorly understood and its amplitude and timescale unexplored. Here, we investigate the impacts of perturbations in Indian monsoon wind intensity (from -50% to +50%) on the size and intensity of the Arabian Sea OMZ, and examine the biogeochemical and ecological implications of these changes. To this end, we conducted a series of eddy-resolving simulations of the Arabian Sea using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS) coupled to a nitrogen based Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) ecosystem model that includes a representation of the O2 cycle. We show that the Arabian Sea productivity increases and its OMZ expands and deepens in response to monsoon wind intensification. These responses are dominated by the perturbation of the summer monsoon wind, whereas the changes in the winter monsoon wind play a secondary role. While the productivity responds quickly and nearly linearly to wind increase (i.e., on a timescale of years), the OMZ response is much slower (i.e., a timescale of decades). Our analysis reveals that the OMZ expansion at depth is driven by increased oxygen biological consumption, whereas its surface weakening is induced by increased lateral ventilation. The enhanced lateral ventilation favors episodic intrusions of oxic waters in the lower epipelagic zone (100-200m) of the western and central Arabian Sea, leading to intermittent expansions of habitats and a more frequent alternation of hypoxic and oxic

  14. Ventilation rates and activity levels of juvenile jumbo squid under metabolic suppression in the oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trübenbach, Katja; Pegado, Maria R; Seibel, Brad A; Rosa, Rui

    2013-02-01

    The Humboldt (jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is a part-time resident of the permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the Eastern Tropical Pacific and, thereby, it encounters oxygen levels below its critical oxygen partial pressure. To better understand the ventilatory mechanisms that accompany the process of metabolic suppression in these top oceanic predators, we exposed juvenile D. gigas to the oxygen levels found in the OMZ (1% O(2), 1 kPa, 10 °C) and measured metabolic rate, activity cycling patterns, swimming mode, escape jet (burst) frequency, mantle contraction frequency and strength, stroke volume and oxygen extraction efficiency. In normoxia, metabolic rate varied between 14 and 29 μmol O(2) g(-1) wet mass h(-1), depending on the level of activity. The mantle contraction frequency and strength were linearly correlated and increased significantly with activity level. Additionally, an increase in stroke volume and ventilatory volume per minute was observed, followed by a mantle hyperinflation process during high activity periods. Squid metabolic rate dropped more than 75% during exposure to hypoxia. Maximum metabolic rate was not achieved under such conditions and the metabolic scope was significantly decreased. Hypoxia changed the relationship between mantle contraction strength and frequency from linear to polynomial with increasing activity, indicating that, under hypoxic conditions, the jumbo squid primarily increases the strength of mantle contraction and does not regulate its frequency. Under hypoxia, jumbo squid also showed a larger inflation period (reduced contraction frequency) and decreased relaxed mantle diameter (shortened diffusion pathway), which optimize oxygen extraction efficiency (up to 82%/34%, without/with consideration of 60% potential skin respiration). Additionally, they breathe 'deeply', with more powerful contractions and enhanced stroke volume. This deep-breathing behavior allows them to display a stable ventilatory volume per

  15. Ostracoda (Arthropoda, Crustacea) in a Miocene oxygen minimum zone, Trinidad, West Indies: A test of the Platycopid Signal Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brent; Coimbra, João C.; Hayek, Lee-Ann C.

    2014-10-01

    Studies of Recent ostracodes around the area of South America shed little light on the paleoenvironmental interpretation of Miocene assemblages. Consequently, interpretations of the Miocene ostracode assemblages must be supplemented using evidence from better documented taxa. Benthic foraminifera in samples from the Lower to Middle Miocene Brasso Formation at Brasso Village, Trinidad, have previously been used to distinguish three sample groupings (Beneath, Within and Above) around an oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), this being a layer of water within which dissolved oxygen concentrations can be as low as 0.1-1.0 mL/L. Using these same samples and the foraminiferal assemblage demarcations relative to the OMZ, this paper examines the associated and rich ostracode fauna of the Brasso Formation. The mean recovery of ostracode valves per sample was approximately three times greater in the Within OMZ sample group than in either of the Beneath OMZ or Above OMZ groups, perhaps reflecting the exclusion of macro-predators from within the OMZ. Individual rarefaction of species richness S to N = 300 valves was conducted for each sample group. This showed that S did not differ between the sample groups, ranging from 22.4 to 24.8. We used all ostracode species to model group separation. Based upon the Mahalanobis' criterion, we obtained significant group separation using a model with four taxa: Munseyella ex gr. minuta, Argilloecia posterotruncata, Munseyella sp. and Xestoleberis sp., while a fifth, Argilloecia spp., provided a significant but minor increase in separation probabilities over all groups. The two most abundant species (Bradleya sp., Gangamocytheridea reticulata) were thus not the best species for detecting the OMZ. Platycopid ostracodes of the genus Cytherella were found throughout the section, rather than concentrated within the OMZ, which contradicts the Platycopid Signal Hypothesis that OMZs are characterized by platycopid dominance. The total distribution and

  16. Seasonal variability of the oxygen minimum zone off Peru in a high-resolution regional coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Oscar; Dewitte, Boris; Montes, Ivonne; Garçon, Veronique; Ramos, Marcel; Paulmier, Aurélien; Pizarro, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    In addition to being one of the most productive upwelling systems, the oceanic region off Peru is embedded in one of the most extensive oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the world ocean. The dynamics of the OMZ off Peru remain uncertain, partly due to the scarcity of data and to the ubiquitous role of mesoscale activity on the circulation and biogeochemistry. Here we use a high-resolution coupled physical/biogeochemical model simulation to investigate the seasonal variability of the OMZ off Peru. The focus is on characterizing the seasonal cycle in dissolved O2 (DO) eddy flux at the OMZ boundaries, including the coastal domain, viewed here as the eastern boundary of the OMZ, considering that the mean DO eddy flux in these zones has a significant contribution to the total DO flux. The results indicate that the seasonal variations of the OMZ can be interpreted as resulting from the seasonal modulation of the mesoscale activity. Along the coast, despite the increased seasonal low DO water upwelling, the DO peaks homogeneously over the water column and within the Peru Undercurrent (PUC) in austral winter, which results from mixing associated with the increase in both the intraseasonal wind variability and baroclinic instability of the PUC. The coastal ocean acts therefore as a source of DO in austral winter for the OMZ core, through eddy-induced offshore transport that is also shown to peak in austral winter. In the open ocean, the OMZ can be divided vertically into two zones: an upper zone above 400 m, where the mean DO eddy flux is larger on average than the mean seasonal DO flux and varies seasonally, and a lower part, where the mean seasonal DO flux exhibits vertical-zonal propagating features that share similar characteristics than those of the energy flux associated with the annual extratropical Rossby waves. At the OMZ meridional boundaries where the mean DO eddy flux is large, the DO eddy flux has also a marked seasonal cycle that peaks in austral winter (spring

  17. Bottom trawling and oxygen minimum zone influences on continental slope benthic community structure off Vancouver Island (NE Pacific)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leo, Fabio C.; Gauthier, Maéva; Nephin, Jessica; Mihály, Steven; Juniper, S. Kim

    2017-03-01

    Understanding responses of benthic ecosystems to cumulative impacts of natural stressors, long-term ocean change and increasing resource exploitation is an emerging area of interest for marine ecologists and environmental managers. Few, if any, studies have quantitatively addressed cumulative effects in the deep sea. We report here on a study from the continental slope off Vancouver Island (Canada) in the northeast Pacific Ocean, where the Oxygen Minimum Zone impinges on seabed habitats that are subjected to widespread bottom trawling, primarily by the fishery for thornyhead (Sebastolobus ssp.). We examined how the benthic megafauna in this area was influenced by varying levels of dissolved oxygen and trawling activity, along a depth gradient that was also likely to shape community composition. Continuous video and sonar records from two ROV surveys (50 linear km total; depth range 300-1400 m) respectively provided data on faunal attributes (composition, abundance and diversity) and the frequency of trawl door marks on the seabed. Faunal and trawl data were compiled in a geo-referenced database along with corresponding dissolved oxygen data, and pooled into 500 m segments for statistical analysis. Trawl mark occurrence peaked between 500 and 1100 m, corresponding to areas of slope subjected to hypoxia (<1.4 ml l-1) and severe hypoxia (<0.5 ml l-1). A combined total of 266,251 megafauna organisms from 87 taxa were enumerated in the two transects. Significant megafaunal assemblages according to depth, trawling intensity and bottom water dissolved oxygen concentration were identified by PERMANOVA analyses, with characterizing taxa identified for all three factors. Depth, dissolved oxygen and trawl mark density accounted for 21% to 52% of the variability in benthic community structure according to multiple regression (DISTLM) models. Species richness was highest at intermediate depths and in areas subject to intermediate levels of trawling, and higher under hypoxia

  18. Zooplankton associated with the oxygen minimum zone system in the northern upwelling region of Chile during March 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Ruben; Hidalgo, Pamela; Krautz, Cristina

    2009-07-01

    Zooplankton in the coastal upwelling region off northern Chile may play a significant biogeochemical role by promoting carbon flux into the subsurface OMZ (oxygen minimum zone). This work identifies the dominant zooplankton species inhabiting the area influenced by the OMZ in March 2000 off Iquique (20°S, northern Chile). Abundance and vertical distribution studies revealed 17 copepod and 9 euphausiid species distributed between the surface and 600 m at four stations sampled both by day and by night. Some abundant species remained in the well-oxygenated upper layer (30 m), with no evidence of diel vertical migration, apparently restricted by a shallow (40-60 m) oxycline. Other species, however, were found closely associated with the OMZ. The large-sized copepod Eucalanus inermis was found below the oxycline and performed diel vertical migrations into the OMZ, whereas the very abundant Euphausia mucronata performed extensive diel vertical migrations between the surface waters and the core of the OMZ (200 m), even crossing it. A complete assessment of copepods and euphausiids revealed that the whole sampled water column (0-600 m) is occupied by distinct species having well-defined habitats, some of them within the OMZ. Ontogenetic migrations were evident in Eucalanidae and E. mucronata. Estimates of species biomass showed a substantial (>75% of total zooplankton biomass) daily exchange of C between the photic layer and the OMZ. Both E. inermis and E. mucronata can actively exchange about 37.8 g C m -2 d -1 between the upper well-oxygenated (0-60 m) layer and the deeper (60-600 m) OMZ layer. This migrant biomass may contribute about 7.2 g C m -2 d -1 to the OMZ system through respiration, mortality, and production of fecal pellets within the OMZ. This movement of zooplankton in and out of the OMZ, mainly as a result of the migratory behavior of E. mucronata, suggests a very efficient mechanism for introducing large amounts of freshly produced carbon into the OMZ

  19. Effects of bottom water dissolved oxygen variability on copper and lead fractionation in the sediments across the oxygen minimum zone, western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Chakraborty, S.; Jayachandran, S.; Madan, R.; Sarkar, Arindam; Linsy, P.; Nath, B.N.

    , Worcestershire, UK.). The detailed procedure has been described in the literature by Ramaswamy and Rao (2006). The sand data is presented in weight percentage (wt %) and the silt and clay in vol (%) in this study. Total inorganic carbon (TIC), total nitrogen... (TN) and total sedimentary organic carbon (TOC) The surface sediment samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC), total inorganic carbon (TIC), and total nitrogen (TN) contents in the sediments. The TC and TN contents in sediments were determined...

  20. Composition of modern sand from the Sierra Nevada, California, USA: Implications for actualistic petrofacies of continental-margin magmatic arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Ingersoll, Raymond V.; Eastmond, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    The Sierra Nevada of California represents the roots of a long-lived magmatic arc (primarily Cretaceous) that is presently being dissected as the range is uplifted, beginning in the south and progressing northward. This dissection is occurring concurrently with northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction, south of which magmatic-arc activity is absent, and north of which magmatic-arc activity continues. A north-to-south transect along the Sierra Nevada represents transitions of activ...

  1. Structural basins, terrain contacts, and large fault displacements on the central California continental margin, constrained by seismic data and submersible observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, T. M.; Caress, D.; Aiello, I.; Greene, G.; Lewis, S.; Paull, C.; Silver, E.; Stakes, D.

    2002-05-01

    A synthesis of reprocessed multichannel seismic data and lithologies based on ROV sampling defines a series of block faulted basement rocks off-shore central California in the Monterey Bay region with lithologies associated with either Salinia or Franciscan microterrains and their overlying sediments. In 1990, the USGS conducted a multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection survey (cruise L-3-90-NC) off the central California coast between Monterey Bay and Bodega Bay. Sixty-two MCS lines were collected on the R/V S. P. Lee using a 2.6 km long, 48-channel streamer and a tuned 2400 cubic inch array of ten airguns. We have reprocessed several critical lines and reviewed the entire dataset to map basement structures and the lithostratigraphy of sediments. From preliminary analyses of the MCS data, the development of Smooth Ridge appears controlled by two prominent basement highs forming a trapped basin for sediment accumulation. Meanders in the lower Monterey Canyon, seen in bathymetric data, are constrained by these uplifted basement blocks. The lithologies of basement samples collected by ROV show spatial relationships that correlate with the seismic character. Faulted contacts between the blocks of the Franciscan and Salinia microterrains are consistent with 100+ Km of right slip displacement on the San Gregorio fault zone. These contacts are onlapped by Tertiary sediments forming a series of basins such as Smooth Ridge aligned along the continental margin. On-going analyses of these data will allow for a better understanding of the Monterey Bay regional tectonics and contribute to the mapping of the western edge of the paleo-subduction zone along central California.

  2. Authigenic carbon entombed in methane-soaked sediments from the northeastern transform margin of the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California

    OpenAIRE

    Paull, C. K.; Ussler, W.; E. T. Peltzer; Brewer, P.G.; Keaten, R.; Mitts, P. J.; Nealon, J. W.; Greinert, J.; Herguera, J.C.; Perez, M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive ROV-based sampling and exploration of the seafloor was conducted along an eroded transform-parallel fault scarp on the northeastern side of the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California to observe the nature of fluids venting from the seafloor, measure the record left by methane-venting on the carbonates from this area, and determine the association with gas hydrate. One gas vent vigorous enough to generate a water-column gas plume traceable for over 800 m above the seafloor was found...

  3. Oxygen minimum zone of the open Arabian Sea: variability of oxygen and nitrite from daily to decadal time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Banse

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ of the Arabian Sea is the thickest of the three oceanic OMZs, which is of global biogeochemical significance because of denitrification in the upper part leading to N2 and N2O production. The residence time of the OMZ water is believed to be less than a decade. The upper few hundred meters of this zone are nearly anoxic but non-sulfidic and still support animal (metazoan pelagic life, possibly as a result of episodic injections of O2 by physical processes. The very low O2 values obtained with the new STOX sensor in the eastern tropical South Pacific probably also characterize the Arabian Sea OMZ, but there is no apparent reason as to why the temporal trends of the historic data should not hold. We report on discrete measurements of dissolved O2 and NO2-, besides temperature and salinity, made between 1959 and 2004 well below the tops of the sharp pycno- and oxyclines near 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 m depth. We assemble nearly all O2 determinations (originally, 849 values, 695 in the OMZ by the visual endpoint detection of the iodometric Winkler procedure, which in our data base yields about 0.04 mL L−1 (∼2 μM O2 above the endpoint from modern automated titration methods. We find 632 values acceptable (480 from 150 stations in the OMZ. The data are grouped in zonally-paired boxes of 1° lat. and 2° long. centered at 8°, 10°, 12°, 15°, 18°, 20°, and 21° N along 65° E and 67° E. The latitudes of 8–12° N, outside the OMZ, are only treated in passing. The principal results are as follows: (1 an O2 climatology for the upper OMZ reveals a marked seasonality at 200 to 500 m depth with O2 levels during the northeast monsoon and spring intermonsoon season elevated over those during the southwest monsoon season (median difference, 0.08 mL L−1 [3.5 μM]. The medians of the slopes of the seasonal regressions of O2 on year for the NE and SW monsoon seasons are −0.0043 and −0.0019 mL L−1 a−1

  4. Oxygen minimum zone of the open Arabian Sea: variability of oxygen and nitrite from daily to decadal time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banse, K.; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Narvekar, P. V.; Postel, J. R.; Jayakumar, D. A.

    2013-09-01

    The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea is the thickest of the three oceanic OMZs, which is of global biogeochemical significance because of denitrification in the upper part leading to N2 and N2O production. The residence time of the OMZ water is believed to be less than a decade. The upper few hundred meters of this zone are nearly anoxic but non-sulfidic and still support animal (metazoan) pelagic life, possibly as a result of episodic injections of O2 by physical processes. The very low O2 values obtained with the new STOX sensor in the eastern tropical South Pacific probably also characterize the Arabian Sea OMZ, but there is no apparent reason as to why the temporal trends of the historic data should not hold. We report on discrete measurements of dissolved O2 and NO2-, besides temperature and salinity, made between 1959 and 2004 well below the tops of the sharp pycno- and oxyclines near 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 m depth. We assemble nearly all O2 determinations (originally, 849 values, 695 in the OMZ) by the visual endpoint detection of the iodometric Winkler procedure, which in our data base yields about 0.04 mL L-1 (∼2 μM) O2 above the endpoint from modern automated titration methods. We find 632 values acceptable (480 from 150 stations in the OMZ). The data are grouped in zonally-paired boxes of 1° lat. and 2° long. centered at 8°, 10°, 12°, 15°, 18°, 20°, and 21° N along 65° E and 67° E. The latitudes of 8-12° N, outside the OMZ, are only treated in passing. The principal results are as follows: (1) an O2 climatology for the upper OMZ reveals a marked seasonality at 200 to 500 m depth with O2 levels during the northeast monsoon and spring intermonsoon season elevated over those during the southwest monsoon season (median difference, 0.08 mL L-1 [3.5 μM]). The medians of the slopes of the seasonal regressions of O2 on year for the NE and SW monsoon seasons are -0.0043 and -0.0019 mL L-1 a-1, respectively (-0.19 and -0.08 μM a-1

  5. A structurally controlled fan-delta complex at the southern margin of the peninsular range forearc basin complex (Baja California)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, W.R.; Busby-Spera, C. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A confined trunk fan delta and its structurally controlled tributary fan deltas are extremely well exposed along the southern margin of the Rosario embayment. This fan-delta complex consists of nonmarine to deep marine deposits almost continuously exposed for over 20 km in the down-paleoslope direction. Facies and stratal patterns in the fan-delta complex were controlled by local faulting, climatic variation, and eustasy, resulting in relative sea level fluctuations. Basin bathymetry and drainage patterns were controlled by a series of half-grabens that formed along north-south-trending faults that lay along the northern margin of an east-west-trending depression. Breccias were initially shed into the north-south-trending half-grabens; axial drainage systems were later established within the grabens, making up the tributary fan deltas. These tributary fan deltas fed a voluminous trunk fan delta confined to the east-west-trending depression. The trunk and tributary fan delta deposits show two major progradational to retrogradational cycles that record relative sea level fluctuations. Progradation in the shallow-marine environment is represented by conglomerate channels cut into ripple-laminated or bioturbated siltstone and HCS sandstones, overlain by conglomerate mouth bar deposits interstratified with nearshore sandstone deposits. Retrogradation in the shallow marine environment is recorded by either a vertical clastic facies transition or a clastic-carbonate facies transition. The clastic facies transition consists of nearshore sandstone deposits overlain by offshore bioturbated siltstones. The clastic-carbonate facies transition consists of the development of red algal patch reefs and rhodoliths on top of fan-delta conglomeratic lobes, mudstone and sandstone bank channel margins, or paleobasement highs. The clastic-carbonate facies transition reflects low sediment supply controlled by climatic conditions.

  6. Oxygen minimum zone of the open Arabian Sea: variability of oxygen and nitrite from daily to decadal timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banse, K.; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Narvekar, P. V.; Postel, J. R.; Jayakumar, D. A.

    2014-04-01

    The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea is the thickest of the three oceanic OMZ. It is of global biogeochemical significance because of denitrification in the upper part leading to N2 and N2O production. The residence time of OMZ water is believed to be less than a decade. The upper few hundred meters of this zone are nearly anoxic but non-sulfidic and still support animal (metazoan) pelagic life, possibly as a result of episodic injections of O2 by physical processes. We report on discrete measurements of dissolved O2 and NO2-, temperature and salinity made between 1959 and 2004 well below the tops of the sharp pycnocline and oxycline near 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 m depth. We assemble nearly all O2 determinations (originally there were 849 values, 695 of which came from the OMZ) by the visual endpoint detection of the iodometric Winkler procedure, which in our data base yields about 0.04 mL L-1 (~ 2 μM) O2 above the endpoint from modern automated titration methods. We acknowledge that much lower (nanomolar) O2 values have been measured recently with the STOX (Switchable Trace amount OXygen) sensor in the eastern tropical South Pacific, and that similar conditions may also prevail in the Arabian Sea OMZ. In spite of the error in O2 measurements at vanishingly low levels, we argue that the temporal trends of the historic data should still hold. We find 632 values acceptable (480 from 150 stations in the OMZ). The data are grouped in zonally paired boxes of 1° lat. and 2° long. centered at 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, 20, and 21° N along 65 and 67° E. The latitudes of 8-12° N, outside the OMZ, are treated in passing. The principal results are as follows: (1) an O2 climatology for the upper OMZ reveals a marked seasonality at 200 to 500 m depth with O2 levels during the northeast monsoon and spring intermonsoon seasons elevated over those during the southwest monsoon season (median difference, 0.08 mL L-1 [~ 3.5 μM]). The medians of the slopes of the

  7. Holocene late Pleistocene non-tropical carbonate sediments and tectonic history of the western rift basin margin of the southern Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfar, Jochen; Godinez-Orta, Lucio; Goodfriend, Glenn A.; Mucciarone, David A.; Ingle, James C.; Holden, Peter

    2001-10-01

    that late Pleistocene uplift along the eastern side of the island could be as high as 310 mm/ka whereas downdropping along the western side of the island occurred at a rate of up to 15 mm/ka. Isla Espiritu Santo therefore constitutes part of the uplifted shoulder of the western margin of the Gulf of California rift basin. Patterns of vertical tectonic movements of Isla Espiritu Santo together with fault offsets on the surrounding seafloor and slump features on steep submarine slopes, point to continuous activity of the La Paz and Espiritu Santo faults. Results of this study will assist in recognizing and interpreting similar settings along ancient non-tropical rift basin margins worldwide and especially in the Neogene of the Gulf of California.

  8. Map restoration of an early Pliocene horizon along the Hosgri-Purisima-Lompoc fault system, central California margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorlien, C.C.; Kamerling, M.J. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)); Mayerson, D. (Minerals Management Service, Camarillo, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the San Gregorio-Sur-San Simeon-Hosgri fault system, an important element of the Neogene California transform system. The Hosgri fault proper (top 1-2 km) is located in the hanging-wall of a 10 to 20 km wide zone of mostly E-dipping faults, the Hosgri-Purisima-Lompoc fault system. These faults have undergone Miocene extension, and have been reactivated by post-Miocene contraction or transpression. This wider fault system is truncated against or merges with the E-striking faults in northwestern Santa Barbara Channel. From this starting point of zero displacement, right-lateral displacement on a N- S fault can not be more than the sum of N-S shortening east of it, the N-S extension west of it, and the right-lateral slip fed into it by other faults. We are using a 3-D map restoration technique to quantify the displacements along this fault system. Depth-contoured folded surfaces are flattened using the software UNFOLD, and the restored surfaces are fit back together across faults using an interactive graphic program. Displacements are calculated by comparing the restored surface to the present state with respect to a relatively-fixed block. Our mapping of the early Pliocene top Sisquoc horizon indicates that broad, gentle folds characterize the Point Arguello oil field. Folds located between Point Arguello and Point Sal, are characterized by abrupt changes in amplitude, symmetry, and vergence along strike. The folded surface is unfaulted over wide areas, despite dips up to 45[degrees]. These folds are the result of basin inversion along former rift border faults. Folds are amplified where the basin fill is transpressed against NW-striking restraining bends in a regional NNW-striking system of right-reverse-oblique faults.

  9. Map restoration of an early Pliocene horizon along the Hosgri-Purisima-Lompoc fault system, central California margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorlien, C.C.; Kamerling, M.J. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mayerson, D. [Minerals Management Service, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the San Gregorio-Sur-San Simeon-Hosgri fault system, an important element of the Neogene California transform system. The Hosgri fault proper (top 1-2 km) is located in the hanging-wall of a 10 to 20 km wide zone of mostly E-dipping faults, the Hosgri-Purisima-Lompoc fault system. These faults have undergone Miocene extension, and have been reactivated by post-Miocene contraction or transpression. This wider fault system is truncated against or merges with the E-striking faults in northwestern Santa Barbara Channel. From this starting point of zero displacement, right-lateral displacement on a N- S fault can not be more than the sum of N-S shortening east of it, the N-S extension west of it, and the right-lateral slip fed into it by other faults. We are using a 3-D map restoration technique to quantify the displacements along this fault system. Depth-contoured folded surfaces are flattened using the software UNFOLD, and the restored surfaces are fit back together across faults using an interactive graphic program. Displacements are calculated by comparing the restored surface to the present state with respect to a relatively-fixed block. Our mapping of the early Pliocene top Sisquoc horizon indicates that broad, gentle folds characterize the Point Arguello oil field. Folds located between Point Arguello and Point Sal, are characterized by abrupt changes in amplitude, symmetry, and vergence along strike. The folded surface is unfaulted over wide areas, despite dips up to 45{degrees}. These folds are the result of basin inversion along former rift border faults. Folds are amplified where the basin fill is transpressed against NW-striking restraining bends in a regional NNW-striking system of right-reverse-oblique faults.

  10. Common catabolic enzyme patterns in a microplankton community of the Humboldt Current System off northern and central-south Chile: Malate dehydrogenase activity as an index of water-column metabolism in an oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, R. R.; Quiñones, R. A.

    2009-07-01

    An extensive subsurface oxygen minimum zone off northern and central-south Chile, associated with the Peru-Chile undercurrent, has important effects on the metabolism of the organisms inhabiting therein. Planktonic species deal with the hypoxic and anoxic environments by relying on biochemical as well as physiological processes related to their anaerobic metabolisms. Here we characterize, for the first time, the potential enzymatic activities involved in the aerobic and anaerobic energy production pathways of microplanktonic organisms (catabolic pathways in the oxygen minimum zone. Malate dehydrogenase had the highest oxidizing activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) in the batch of catabolic enzymatic activities assayed, including potential pyruvate oxidoreductases activity, the electron transport system, and dissimilatory nitrate reductase. Malate dehydrogenase correlated significantly with almost all the enzymes analyzed within and above the oxygen minimum zone, and also with the oxygen concentration and microplankton biomass in the water column of the Humboldt Current System, especially in the oxygen minimum zone off Iquique. These results suggest a possible specific pattern for the catabolic activity of the microplanktonic realm associated with the oxygen minimum zone spread along the Humboldt Current System off Chile. We hypothesize that malate dehydrogenase activity could be an appropriate indicator of microplankton catabolism in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas.

  11. Archaeal and anaerobic methane oxidizer communities in the Sonora Margin cold seeps, Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Adrien; Cruaud, Perrine; Pignet, Patricia; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Godfroy, Anne; Toffin, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Cold seeps, located along the Sonora Margin transform fault in the Guaymas Basin, were extensively explored during the 'BIG' cruise in June 2010. They present a seafloor mosaic pattern consisting of different faunal assemblages and microbial mats. To investigate this mostly unknown cold and hydrocarbon-rich environment, geochemical and microbiological surveys of the sediments underlying two microbial mats and a surrounding macrofaunal habitat were analyzed in detail. The geochemical measurements suggest biogenic methane production and local advective sulfate-rich fluxes in the sediments. The distributions of archaeal communities, particularly those involved in the methane cycle, were investigated at different depths (surface to 18 cm below the sea floor (cmbsf)) using complementary molecular approaches, such as Automated method of Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA), 16S rRNA libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction with new specific primer sets targeting methanogenic and anaerobic methanotrophic lineages. Molecular results indicate that metabolically active archaeal communities were dominated by known clades of anaerobic methane oxidizers (archaeal anaerobic methanotroph (ANME)-1, -2 and -3), including a novel 'ANME-2c Sonora' lineage. ANME-2c were found to be dominant, metabolically active and physically associated with syntrophic Bacteria in sulfate-rich shallow sediment layers. In contrast, ANME-1 were more prevalent in the deepest sediment samples and presented a versatile behavior in terms of syntrophic association, depending on the sulfate concentration. ANME-3 were concentrated in small aggregates without bacterial partners in a restricted sediment horizon below the first centimetres. These niche specificities and syntrophic behaviors, depending on biological surface assemblages and environmental availability of electron donors, acceptors and carbon substrates, suggest that ANME could support

  12. I/Ca ratios in benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone: analytical methodology and evaluation as proxy for redox conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Glock

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we explore the correlation of I/Ca ratios in three calcitic and one aragonitic foraminiferal species. I/Ca ratios are evaluated as possible proxies for changes in ambient redox conditions across the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone to the ambient oxygen concentrations in the habitat of the foraminiferal species studied. We test cleaning and measurement methods to determine I/Ca ratios in benthic foraminifera from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone. All species show a positive trend in their I/Ca ratios as a function of higher oxygen concentrations and these trends are all statistically significant except for the aragonitic species Hoeglundina elegans. The most promising species appears to be Uvigerina striata which shows a highly statistically significant correlation between I/Ca ratios and bottom water (BW oxygenation (I/Ca = 0.032(± 0.004[O2]BW + 0.29(± 0.03, R2 = 0.61, F = 75, P 2]BW correlations, and the individual variability of single tests severely interfere with the observed I/Ca–[O2]BW relationship.

  13. N-cycling and balancing of the N-deficit generated in the oxygen minimum zone over the Namibian shelf—An isotope-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Birgit; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Flohr, Anita; Rixen, Tim; Schlarbaum, Tim; Mohrholz, Volker; van der Plas, Anja

    2013-03-01

    northern Benguela upwelling system is a nutrient-replete region with high plankton biomass production and a seasonally changing oxygen minimum zone. Nitrate:phosphate ratios in fresh upwelling water are low due to denitrification in the near-seafloor oxygen minimum zone and phosphate efflux from sediments. This makes the region a candidate for substantial dinitrogen fixation, for which evidence is scarce. Nutrient and oxygen data, N isotope data of nitrate, nitrogen isotope ratios of particulate matter, particulate organic carbon content, and suspended matter concentrations on a transect across the shelf and upper slope at 23°S illustrate N-cycling processes and are the basis for estimating the contribution of N-sources and N-sinks to the reactive nitrogen pool. It appears that N-removal due to denitrification exceeds N gain by N2 fixation and physical mixing processes by a factor of >6, although inorganic N:P ratios again increase as surface water is advected offshore. Nitrate and ammonium regeneration, nutrient assimilation with N:P < 16, shelf break mixing, atmospheric input, and N2 fixation all contribute to the restoration of inorganic N:P ratios back to Redfield conditions, but in seasonally changing proportions. The Benguela upwelling system thus is a nutrient source for the oceanic-mixed layer where N-sources and N-sinks are not in balance and Redfield conditions can only re-adjust by advection and mixing processes integrated over time.

  14. Diffuse Spectral Reflectance Records from the Northeast Pacific Oxygen Minimum Zone: Evidence for Rapid Shifts in Carbonate and Organic Carbon throughout the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvisico, J. G.; OConnell, S.; Ortiz, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Sediment cores collected within the Oxygen Minimum Zone (O2 Soledad Basin, desirable for its high sedimentation rates (100-120cm/kyr) and its 200 m sill depth. We maintain the hypothesis that variations in carbonate and organic carbon seen through the Diffuse Spectral Reflectance (DSR) will preferentially show the effects of local production on the spatial/temporal extent of the Oxygen Minimum Zone due to the circulation restrictions imposed on the basin by its shallow sill depth. The summer's work involved compiling a composite proxy record of variations in organic carbon through R-mode factor analysis of the Diffuse Spectral Reflectance signal, which was then further constrained through coulometry to provide confidence points for reflectance-derived proxy values. Through the compilation of the five piston core records, a continuous, high frequency climatic proxy record of changes in productivity was constructed over the past 15 Ka. Organic carbon shifts within the Soledad record also contain a periodicity within the time scale bounds of the present day Pacific Decadal Oscillation (20-50 year quasi-cyclicity) discerned initially from various forms of autospectral time series analysis, suggesting a connection between the two processes. The Soledad DSR record has also shown strong positive correlations to other high-resolution global paleoclimate proxy records, through which we hope to further elucidate rapid climate teleconnections between high and low latitude climate instability during the past 15 Ka.

  15. A high resolution paleo-record of export production using deep-sea coral stable isotope values from a unique HNLC zone on the California Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The Sur Ridge, located ~30 km off the Big Sur coast of central California, represents a unique system within the highly productive California Current ecosystem. Its unique high nutrient, but low chlorophyll characteristics are not fully understood. Time series of bulk stable carbon (δ13C) and stable nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes can help us better understand past changes in nutrient dynamics and phytoplankton community baselines for this region in order to better predict future changes. Deep-sea proteinaceous corals are particularly powerful paleoarchives of past ocean conditions. These organisms serve as "living sediment traps," incorporating the stable isotope values of exported particulate organic material (POM) from the surface into their growth layers. The longevity of bamboo corals (Isidella, up to 400 years) makes them excellent resources for creating high resolution, centennial time series of δ13C and δ15N dynamics. Bamboo corals used in this study were harvested during summer of 2014 from 1220 to 1300 m depths. Two corals were milled in sub-millimeter intervals to generate a 200 year time series at approximately three year temporal resolution. Over the past 200 years, deep-sea coral δ13C values ranged from -15.7 to -19.0‰ and δ15N values ranged from 14.4 to 15.9‰, consistent with earlier data from the CA margin. The δ13C records were characterized by long periods of remarkable stability, contrasted with several large shifts (~1900 and ~1960) in δ13C of approximately 1‰. We hypothesize that these shifts likely reflect changes in plankton composition or production associated with regional climate shifts. The δ15N data were more dynamic, including several large shifts (1940 - 1960), as well as periods of apparent decadal scale oscillation (1825 - 1925 and 1965 - present). These shifts may reflect changes in the source or utilization of nitrogen at the base of the food web. Together, these data give us a first look at baseline stability of

  16. Structural and Seismic Stratigrapic study in the Center of the Magdalena Shelf in the Western Margin of Baja California Based on Seismic Reflection Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Escobar, Mario; Salazar-Cárdenas, Rosa M.; Munguía, Luis; Martín, Arturo; Suárez-Vidal, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    The Magdalena Shelf is a shallow, low-relief surface located along the Baja California Pacific margin. As part of a forearc basin, the shelf was a convergent margin setting before the oblique divergent plate boundary formed in the Gulf of California at 12 Ma. It is thought that since 12-8 Ma, this basin has been a transtensional or strike-slip basin. To constrain the geometry, structural characteristics and some stratigraphic relationships, an active-source, seismic-reflection study was carried out in the central part of the shelf. As a result, the analyzed data show faults, basins and unconformities. Two out of four observed basins are clearly controlled by the Santa Margarita and San Lázaro faults that dip ~40° NE; a third basin is controlled by the Tosco-Abreojos fault. These three basins are part of the deformation zone that is associated with the Tosco-Abreojos fault system. The Iray-Margarita basin, on the other hand, is a fourth basin located at the northeast sector of the study area. An additional feature observed is a stepover lying between the overlapping ends of the Santa Margarita and San Lázaro faults. Small faults oriented sub-parallel to the above major faults are present, mainly throughout the western sector of the study area. Some of those minor faults cut through the seafloor indicating recent tectonic activity. Santa Margarita, San Lázaro and Tosco-Abreojos are also the names given to half-grabens controlled by the active faults that have the same names. The first two basins are affected by many more small faults in comparison with what we see in the third basin. Tectonically, this means that those two basins are the more active in the area of study. In all four basins, the upper seismic sequence consists of sediments controlled by faults of Neogene age. We found that the Iray-Santa Margarita basin is the deepest of all four basins (beyond the resolution of the data, >5 km), and lack of minor faults there indicates that the basin is not

  17. Structural and Seismic Stratigrapic study in the Center of the Magdalena Shelf in the Western Margin of Baja California Based on Seismic Reflection Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Escobar, Mario; Salazar-Cárdenas, Rosa M.; Munguía, Luis; Martín, Arturo; Suárez-Vidal, Francisco

    2016-10-01

    The Magdalena Shelf is a shallow, low-relief surface located along the Baja California Pacific margin. As part of a forearc basin, the shelf was a convergent margin setting before the oblique divergent plate boundary formed in the Gulf of California at 12 Ma. It is thought that since 12-8 Ma, this basin has been a transtensional or strike-slip basin. To constrain the geometry, structural characteristics and some stratigraphic relationships, an active-source, seismic-reflection study was carried out in the central part of the shelf. As a result, the analyzed data show faults, basins and unconformities. Two out of four observed basins are clearly controlled by the Santa Margarita and San Lázaro faults that dip ~40° NE; a third basin is controlled by the Tosco-Abreojos fault. These three basins are part of the deformation zone that is associated with the Tosco-Abreojos fault system. The Iray-Margarita basin, on the other hand, is a fourth basin located at the northeast sector of the study area. An additional feature observed is a stepover lying between the overlapping ends of the Santa Margarita and San Lázaro faults. Small faults oriented sub-parallel to the above major faults are present, mainly throughout the western sector of the study area. Some of those minor faults cut through the seafloor indicating recent tectonic activity. Santa Margarita, San Lázaro and Tosco-Abreojos are also the names given to half-grabens controlled by the active faults that have the same names. The first two basins are affected by many more small faults in comparison with what we see in the third basin. Tectonically, this means that those two basins are the more active in the area of study. In all four basins, the upper seismic sequence consists of sediments controlled by faults of Neogene age. We found that the Iray-Santa Margarita basin is the deepest of all four basins (beyond the resolution of the data, >5 km), and lack of minor faults there indicates that the basin is not

  18. The supra-detachment tectono-sedimentary record of rifted margins: the example of the Los Barriles Basin, SE Baja California Sur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Emmanuel; Robin, Cécile; Geoffroy, Laurent; Strzerzynski, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    The study of rifted margins have shown that the main controlling structures are changing from classical high-angle faults to low-angle detachment fault dominated extension when the crust thins to less than 10 km, which is the case in hyper-extended, magma-poor rifted margins. While the stratigraphic record related to classical high-angle faulting is well constrained, little is known about the tectono-sedimentary evolution of hyper-extended rift systems. A major question remains, how supra-detachment tectono-sedimentary systems are recorded in the stratigraphic record? This remains largely unexplored and must be better constrained by observations. In our poster, we present preliminary results from our study of a rift basin floored by a low-angle detachment system exposed at the southeastern edge of the Baja California Peninsula in the so-called Los Barriles area in the Gulf of California. This area represents one of the best examples of an active transtensional rift system from which the tectono-sedimentary evolution of the rift to drift transition can be studied in the field. The syn-tectonic sedimentary sequence is floored by a detachment fault and is limited oceanward by an extensional allochthon. The syn- to post-tectonic stratigraphy can be summarized into 4 main formations: (1) The Pescadero fluvial fm. (no available ages) evolves upsection from poorly organized polymictic in components and faulted breccias to more granitic and stratified conglomerates. It overlies the extensional allochthon and is tilted continentwards. The channel incisions show EW paleoflows and the upper Pescadero fm. is transitional to the following Refugio fm. (2) The overlying Refugio fm. (Lower Pliocene) occurs as thick marine sandy deposits within the basin axis, is granitic in composition and has average paleocurrents directions trending N-S. The upper part of the fm. is transitional to the following Barriles fm. (3) The Barriles fm. (Upper Miocene - Lower Pleistocene) occurs as very

  19. Oxygen at nanomolar levels reversibly suppresses process rates and gene expression in anammox and denitrification in the oxygen minimum zone off Northern Chil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Tage; Stewart, Frank J.; Thamdrup, Bo

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A major percentage (20 to 40%) of global marine fixed-nitrogen loss occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Concentrations of O2 and the sensitivity of the anaerobic N2-producing processes of anammox and denitrification determine where this loss occurs. We studied experimentally how O2...... at nanomolar levels affects anammox and denitrification rates and the transcription of nitrogen cycle genes in the anoxic OMZ off Chile. Rates of anammox and denitrification were reversibly suppressed, most likely at the enzyme level. Fiftypercent inhibition of N2 and N2O production by denitrification....... This O2 concentration did not suppress the transcription of other dissimilatory nitrogen cycle genes, including nitrate reductase (narG), hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo), and nitrite reductase (nirK). However, taxonomic characterization of transcripts suggested inhibition of narG transcription...

  20. The first report of a microdiverse anammox bacteria community in waters of Colombian Pacific, a transition area between prominent oxygen minimum zones of the eastern tropical Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-González, M; Molina, V; Rodríguez-Rubio, E; Ulloa, O

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidizers contribute to the removal of fixed nitrogen in oxygen-deficient marine ecosystems such as oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). Here we surveyed for the first time the occurrence and diversity of anammox bacteria in the Colombian Pacific, a transition area between the prominent South and North Pacific OMZs. Anammox bacteria were detected in the coastal and oceanic areas of the Colombian Pacific in low oxygen (Pacific, Arabian Sea and Black Sea. Anammox bacteria-like sequences from the Colombian Pacific were grouped together with sequences retrieved from the distinct OMZ's marine subclusters (Peru, Northern Chile and Arabian Sea) within Candidatus ‘Scalindua spp’. Moreover, some anammox bacteria OTUs shared a low similarity with environmental phylotypes (86–94%). Our results indicated that a microdiverse anammox community inhabits the Colombian Pacific, generating new questions about the ecological and biogeochemical differences influencing its community structure.

  1. Moderate rates of late Quaternary slip along the northwestern margin of the Basin and Range Province, Surprise Valley fault, northeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; Machette, Michael N.; Mahan, Shannon; Lidke, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The 86-km-long Surprise Valley normal fault forms part of the active northwestern margin of the Basin and Range province in northeastern California. We use trench mapping and radiocarbon, luminescence, and tephra dating to estimate displacements and timing of the past five surface-rupturing earthquakes on the central part of the fault near Cedarville. A Bayesian OxCal analysis of timing constraints indicates earthquake times of 18.2 ± 2.6, 10.9 ± 3.2, 8.5 ± 0.5, 5.8 ± 1.5, and 1.2 ± 0.1 ka. These data yield recurrence intervals of 7.3 ± 4.1, 2.5 ± 3.2, 2.7 ± 1.6, and 4.5 ± 1.5 ka and an elapsed time of 1.2 ± 0.1 ka since the latest surface-rupturing earthquake. Our best estimate of latest Quaternary vertical slip rate is 0.6 ?? 0.1 mm/a. This late Quaternary rate is remarkably similar to long-term (8-14 Ma) minimum vertical slip rates (>0.4-0.5 ± 0.3 mm/a) calculated from recently acquired seismic reflection and chronologic and structural data in Surprise Valley and the adjacent Warner Mountains. However, our slip rate yields estimates of extension that are lower than recent campaign GPS determinations by factors of 1.5-4 unless the fault has an unusually shallow (30°-35°) dip as suggested by recently acquired seismic reflection data. Coseismic displacements of 2-4.5 ± 1 m documented in the trench and probable rupture lengths of 53-65 km indicate a history of latest Quaternary earthquakes of M 6.8-7.3 on the central part of the. Surprise Valley fault.

  2. Community benthic paleoecology from high-resolution climate records: Mollusca and foraminifera in post-glacial environments of the California margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, Sarah E.; Kroeker, Kristy J.; Hill, Tessa M.; Roopnarine, Peter; Kennett, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Paleoecological reconstructions of past climate are often based on a single taxonomic group with a consistent presence. Less is known about the relationship between multi-taxon community-wide change and climate variability. Here we reconstruct paleoecological change in a Late Quaternary (16.1-3.4 ka) sediment core from the California margin (418 m below sea level) of Santa Barbara Basin (SBB), USA, using Mollusca (Animalia) and Foraminifera (Rhizaria) microfossils. Building upon previous investigations, we use multivariate ordination and cluster analyses to interpret community-scale changes in these distinctly different taxonomic groups across discrete climate episodes. The strongest differences between seafloor biological communities occurred between glacial (prior to Termination IA, 14.7 ka) and interglacial climate episodes. Holocene communities were well partitioned, indicating that sub-millennial oceanographic variability was recorded by these microfossils. We document strong evidence of chemosynthetic trophic webs and sulfidic environments (from gastropod Alia permodesta and bivalve Lucinoma aequizonata), which characterized restricted intervals previously interpreted as well oxygenated (such as the Pre-Bølling Warming). Mollusc records indicate first-order trophic energetic shifts between detrital and chemosynthetically-fixed carbon. Molluscs associated with widely different physiological preferences occur here within single, decadal intervals of sediment, and as such mollusc assemblages may reflect significant inter-decadal oceanographic variability. Foraminifera assemblages provide exceptional records of the sequential, chronological progression of the deglacial climatic and oceanographic events, whereas mollusc assemblages reflect non-chronological similarities in reoccurring communities. Foraminifera taxa that drive community similarity here are also independently recognized as marker species for seafloor hypoxia regimes, which provides support for the

  3. Provenance of Conglomerates within a Late Cretaceous Turbidite Channel System on the North American Margin: the Rosario Formation, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Thisiane; Kneller, Benjamin; Morton, Andrew; Armelenti, Garibaldi; Pantopoulos, George; De Ros, Luiz Fernando

    2017-04-01

    The Rosario Formation forms part of the Peninsular Ranges forearc basin complex, which crops out discontinuously along the Pacific coast of the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico. This study concerns the upper, deep marine part of the Rosario Formation , which includes several slope channel systems, one of these, the San Fernando channel systems consists of five channel complex sets (CCS1 to CCS5), each characterized by three filling stages. Stage I consists of predominantly clast­ and matrix-supported conglomerates, with subordinate medium to coarse grained sandstones. Stage II consists of units of clast-supported conglomerates with subordinate medium to coarse-grained sandstones, separated by mainly thinly-bedded turbidites (intercalation of thin beds of fine-grained sandstones and mudstones). Stage III consists mainly of hemipelagic mudstones. The main objective of this research is to determine source area and to compare the coarse fraction and finer fraction (fragments <2 cm) from conglomerates of each channel set, combining provenance methodology such as heavy minerals, clast counting, geochemistry, bulk petrography and U/Pb in detrital zircons by LA-ICPMS and SHRIMP. The heavy minerals assembly identified were Ca amphibole, epidote, clinozoisite, titanite, garnet, tourmaline, apatite, rutile and zircon, among them amphiboles are by far the most abundant detrital mineral. Clast counting and petrographic characterization showed that the pebble fraction of the conglomerates is constituted at least 18 different, and the majority being composed by pyroclastic, porphyritic volcanic and sandstone rocks. Bulk quantification indicates that the main provenance tectonic mode of the fine fraction of the conglomerates can be interpreted as dissected magmatic arc, with subordinate uplifted basement and recycled orogenic contributions. The preliminary conclusion is that the sedimentary supply to the Rosario Formation was mostly derived from volcanic and plutonic rocks of

  4. Late Pleistocene to Holocene sedimentation and hydrocarbon seeps on the continental shelf of a steep, tectonically active margin, southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Lorenson, T.D.; Ryan, Holly F.; Wong, Florence L.; Sliter, Ray W.; Conrad, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Small, steep, uplifting coastal watersheds are prolific sediment producers that contribute significantly to the global marine sediment budget. This study illustrates how sedimentation evolves in one such system where the continental shelf is largely sediment-starved, with most terrestrial sediment bypassing the shelf in favor of deposition in deeper basins. The Santa Barbara-Ventura coast of southern California, USA, is considered a classic area for the study of active tectonics and of Tertiary and Quaternary climatic evolution, interpretations of which depend upon an understanding of sedimentation patterns. High-resolution seismic-reflection data over >570 km2 of this shelf show that sediment production is concentrated in a few drainage basins, with the Ventura and Santa Clara River deltas containing most of the upper Pleistocene to Holocene sediment on the shelf. Away from those deltas, the major factor controlling shelf sedimentation is the interaction of wave energy with coastline geometry. Depocenters containing sediment 5-20 m thick exist opposite broad coastal embayments, whereas relict material (bedrock below a regional unconformity) is exposed at the sea floor in areas of the shelf opposite coastal headlands. Locally, natural hydrocarbon seeps interact with sediment deposition either to produce elevated tar-and-sediment mounds or as gas plumes that hinder sediment settling. As much as 80% of fluvial sediment delivered by the Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers is transported off the shelf (some into the Santa Barbara Basin and some into the Santa Monica Basin via Hueneme Canyon), leaving a shelf with relatively little recent sediment accumulation. Understanding factors that control large-scale sediment dispersal along a rapidly uplifting coast that produces substantial quantities of sediment has implications for interpreting the ancient stratigraphic record of active and transform continental margins, and for inferring the distribution of hydrocarbon resources

  5. Shotgun metagenomic data reveals signifcant abundance but low diversity of Candidatus Scalindua marine anammox bacteria in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    laura eVillanueva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox bacteria are responsible for a significant portion of the loss of fixed nitrogen from the oceans, making them important players in the global nitrogen cycle. To date, marine anammox bacteria found in both water columns and sediments worldwide belong almost exclusively to Candidatus Scalindua species. Recently the genome assembly of a marine anammox enrichment culture dominated by Candidatus Scalindua profunda became available and can now be used as a template to study metagenome data obtained from various oxygen minimum zones. Here, we sequenced genomic DNA from suspended particulate matter recovered at the upper (170 m deep and center (600 m area of the oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea by SOLiD and Ion Torrent technology. The genome of Candidatus Scalindua profunda served as a template to collect reads. Based on the mapped reads marine anammox Abundance was estimated to be at least 0.4% in the upper and 1.7% in the center area. Single nucleotide variation (SNV analysis was performed to assess diversity of the Candidatus Scalindua populations. Most highly covered were the two diagnostic anammox genes hydrazine synthase (scal_01318c, hzsA and hydrazine dehydrogenase (scal_03295, hdh, while other genes involved in anammox metabolism (narGH, nirS, amtB, focA and ACS had a lower coverage but could still be assembled and analyzed. The results show that Candidatus Scalindua is abundantly present in the Arabian Sea OMZ, but that the diversity within the ecosystem is relatively low.

  6. Bathymetric preference of four major genera of rectilinear benthic foraminifera within oxygen minimum zone in Arabian Sea off central west coast of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhijit Mazumder; Rajiv Nigam

    2014-04-01

    Fifty two surface sediment samples collected from the region off Goa, central west coast of India from water depths of 15–3300 m were analyzed with special emphasis on foraminiferal content. Rectilinear benthic foraminiferal morphogroup shows a high relative abundance within Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ), both shallow marine (50–60 m water depth) and intermediate to deep water (150–1500 m water depth). We gave special emphasis on four rectilinear foraminiferal genera, namely Fursenkoina, Bolivina, Bulimina and Uvigerina to observe their individual distribution among OMZ. We found genus Fursenkoina predominates at the shallow water OMZ, within the water depth zone of 50–60 m. Within 150–1500 m water depth, which is considered as intermediate to deep water OMZ in this region, genus Uvigerina shows its highest abundance above 1000 m water depth, whereas genus Bulimina shows its affinity with deeper water environment (< 1000 m water depth). Genus Bolivina does not show any such depth preference, except its higher abundance in only intermediate to deep water OMZ. This depth differentiation among four rectilinear benthic foraminiferal genera presents the basic data for palaeoclimatic study based on the extent and intensity of OMZ along with the palaeobathymetry study.

  7. The 2006 Bahía Asunción Earthquake Swarm: Seismic Evidence of Active Deformation Along the Western Margin of Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguía, Luis; Mayer, Sergio; Aguirre, Alfredo; Méndez, Ignacio; González-Escobar, Mario; Luna, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The study of the Bahía Asunción earthquake swarm is important for two reasons. First, the earthquakes are clear evidence of present activity along the zone of deformation on the Pacific margin of Baja California. The swarm, with earthquakes of magnitude M w of up to 5.0, occurred on the coastline of the peninsula, showing that the Tosco-Abreojos zone of deformation is wider than previously thought. Second, the larger earthquakes in the swarm caused some damage and much concern in Bahía Asunción, a small town located in the zone of epicenters. We relocated the larger earthquakes with regional and/or local seismic data. Our results put the earthquake sources below the urban area of Bahía Asunción, at 40-50 km to the north of the teleseismically determined epicenters. In addition, these new locations are in the area of epicenters of many smaller events that were located with data from local temporary stations. This area trends in an E-W direction and has dimensions of approximately 15 km by 10 km. Most earthquakes had sources at depths that are between 4 and 9 km. A composite focal mechanism for the smaller earthquakes indicated right-lateral strike-slip motion and pure-normal faulting occurred during this swarm. Interestingly, the ANSS earthquake catalog of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) reported each one of these faulting styles for two large events of the swarm, with one of these earthquakes occurring 2 days before the other one. We associate the earthquake with strike-slip mechanism with the San Roque Fault, and the earthquake with the normal faulting style with the Asunción Fault. However, there is need of further study to verify this possible relation between the faults and the earthquakes. In addition, we recorded peak accelerations of up to 0.63 g with an accelerometer installed in Bahía Asunción. At this site, an earthquake of M w 4.9 produced those high values at a distance of 4.1 km. We also used the acceleration dataset from this site

  8. A model study of warming-induced phosphorus-oxygen feedbacks in open-ocean oxygen minimum zones on millennial timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Daniela; Kemena, Tronje P.; Meissner, Katrin J.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Observations indicate an expansion of oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) over the past 50 years, likely related to ongoing deoxygenation caused by reduced oxygen solubility, changes in stratification and circulation, and a potential acceleration of organic matter turnover in a warming climate. The overall area of ocean sediments that are in direct contact with low-oxygen bottom waters also increases with expanding OMZs. This leads to a release of phosphorus from ocean sediments. If anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions continue unabated, higher temperatures will cause enhanced weathering on land, which, in turn, will increase the phosphorus and alkalinity fluxes into the ocean and therefore raise the ocean's phosphorus inventory even further. A higher availability of phosphorus enhances biological production, remineralisation and oxygen consumption, and might therefore lead to further expansions of OMZs, representing a positive feedback. A negative feedback arises from the enhanced productivity-induced drawdown of carbon and also increased uptake of CO2 due to weathering-induced alkalinity input. This feedback leads to a decrease in atmospheric CO2 and weathering rates. Here, we quantify these two competing feedbacks on millennial timescales for a high CO2 emission scenario. Using the University of Victoria (UVic) Earth System Climate Model of intermediate complexity, our model results suggest that the positive benthic phosphorus release feedback has only a minor impact on the size of OMZs in the next 1000 years. The increase in the marine phosphorus inventory under assumed business-as-usual global warming conditions originates, on millennial timescales, almost exclusively (> 80 %) from the input via terrestrial weathering and causes a 4- to 5-fold expansion of the suboxic water volume in the model.

  9. Oxidative stress in deep scattering layers: Heat shock response and antioxidant enzymes activities of myctophid fishes thriving in oxygen minimum zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Rita; Trübenbach, Katja; Teixeira, Tatiana; Lopes, Vanessa M.; Pires, Vanessa; Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Calado, Ricardo; Diniz, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2013-12-01

    Diel vertical migrators, such as myctophid fishes, are known to encounter oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) during daytime in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and, therefore, have to cope with temperature and oxidative stress that arise while ascending to warmer, normoxic surface waters at night-time. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant defense strategies and heat shock response (HSR) in two myctophid species, namely Triphoturus mexicanus and Benthosema panamense, at shallow and warm surface waters (21 kPa, 20-25 °C) and at hypoxic, cold (≤1 kPa, 10 °C) mesopelagic depths. More specifically, we quantified (i) heat shock protein concentrations (HSP70/HSC70) (ii) antioxidant enzyme activities [including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], and (iii) lipid peroxidation [malondialdehyde (MDA) levels]. HSP70/HSC70 levels increased in both myctophid species at warmer, well-oxygenated surface waters probably to prevent cellular damage (oxidative stress) due to increased oxygen demand under elevated temperatures and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. On the other hand, CAT and GST activities were augmented under hypoxic conditions, probably as preparatory response to a burst of oxyradicals during the reoxygenation phase (while ascending). SOD activity decreased under hypoxia in B. panamense, but was kept unchanged in T. mexicanus. MDA levels in B. panamense did not change between the surface and deep-sea conditions, whereas T. mexicanus showed elevated MDA and HSP70/HSC70 concentrations at warmer surface waters. This indicated that T. mexicanus seems to be not so well tuned to temperature and oxidative stress associated to diel vertical migrations. The understanding of such physiological strategies that are linked to oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation phases may provide valuable information about how different species might respond to the impacts of environmental stressors (e.g. expanding mesopelagic hypoxia

  10. A model study of warming-induced phosphorus–oxygen feedbacks in open-ocean oxygen minimum zones on millennial timescales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Niemeyer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Observations indicate an expansion of oxygen minimum zones (OMZs over the past 50 years, likely related to ongoing deoxygenation caused by reduced oxygen solubility, changes in stratification and circulation, and a potential acceleration of organic matter turnover in a warming climate. The overall area of ocean sediments that are in direct contact with low-oxygen bottom waters also increases with expanding OMZs. This leads to a release of phosphorus from ocean sediments. If anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions continue unabated, higher temperatures will cause enhanced weathering on land, which, in turn, will increase the phosphorus and alkalinity fluxes into the ocean and therefore raise the ocean's phosphorus inventory even further. A higher availability of phosphorus enhances biological production, remineralisation and oxygen consumption, and might therefore lead to further expansions of OMZs, representing a positive feedback. A negative feedback arises from the enhanced productivity-induced drawdown of carbon and also increased uptake of CO2 due to weathering-induced alkalinity input. This feedback leads to a decrease in atmospheric CO2 and weathering rates. Here, we quantify these two competing feedbacks on millennial timescales for a high CO2 emission scenario. Using the University of Victoria (UVic Earth System Climate Model of intermediate complexity, our model results suggest that the positive benthic phosphorus release feedback has only a minor impact on the size of OMZs in the next 1000 years. The increase in the marine phosphorus inventory under assumed business-as-usual global warming conditions originates, on millennial timescales, almost exclusively (> 80 % from the input via terrestrial weathering and causes a 4- to 5-fold expansion of the suboxic water volume in the model.

  11. Shotgun metagenomic data reveals significant abundance but low diversity of “Candidatus Scalindua” marine anammox bacteria in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Laura; Speth, Daan R.; van Alen, Theo; Hoischen, Alexander; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria are responsible for a significant portion of the loss of fixed nitrogen from the oceans, making them important players in the global nitrogen cycle. To date, marine anammox bacteria found in both water columns and sediments worldwide belong almost exclusively to “Candidatus Scalindua” species. Recently the genome assembly of a marine anammox enrichment culture dominated by “Candidatus Scalindua profunda” became available and can now be used as a template to study metagenome data obtained from various oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Here, we sequenced genomic DNA from suspended particulate matter recovered at the upper (170 m deep) and center (600 m) area of the OMZ in the Arabian Sea by SOLiD and Ion Torrent technology. The genome of “Candidatus Scalindua profunda” served as a template to collect reads. Based on the mapped reads marine anammox Abundance was estimated to be at least 0.4% in the upper and 1.7% in the center area. Single nucleotide variation (SNV) analysis was performed to assess diversity of the “Candidatus Scalindua” populations. Most highly covered were the two diagnostic anammox genes hydrazine synthase (scal_01318c, hzsA) and hydrazine dehydrogenase (scal_03295, hdh), while other genes involved in anammox metabolism (narGH, nirS, amtB, focA, and ACS) had a lower coverage but could still be assembled and analyzed. The results show that “Candidatus Scalindua” is abundantly present in the Arabian Sea OMZ, but that the diversity within the ecosystem is relatively low. PMID:24550902

  12. The impact of ocean deoxygenation on iron release from continental margin sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, Florian; McManus, James; Mix, Alan C; Hensen, Christian; Schneider, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    In the oceans’ high-nitrate–low-chlorophyll regions, such as the Peru/Humboldt Current system and the adjacent eastern equatorial Pacific1, primary productivity is limited by the micronutrient iron. Within the Peruvian upwelling area, bioavailable iron is released from the reducing continental margin sediments2. The magnitude of this seafloor source could change with fluctuations in the extension or intensity of the oxygen minimum zones3, 4. Here we show that measurements of molybdenum, urani...

  13. On the role of circulation and mixing in the ventilation of oxygen minimum zones with a focus on the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, P.; Bange, H. W.; Banyte, D.; Dengler, M.; Didwischus, S.-H.; Fischer, T.; Greatbatch, R. J.; Hahn, J.; Kanzow, T.; Karstensen, J.; Körtzinger, A.; Krahmann, G.; Schmidtko, S.; Stramma, L.; Tanhua, T.; Visbeck, M.

    2015-01-01

    Ocean observations are analysed in the framework of Collaborative Research Center 754 (SFB 754) "Climate-Biogeochemistry Interactions in the Tropical Ocean" to study (1) the structure of tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), (2) the processes that contribute to the oxygen budget, and (3) long-term changes in the oxygen distribution. The OMZ of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA), located between the well-ventilated subtropical gyre and the equatorial oxygen maximum, is composed of a deep OMZ at about 400 m in depth with its core region centred at about 20° W, 10° N and a shallow OMZ at about 100 m in depth, with the lowest oxygen concentrations in proximity to the coastal upwelling region off Mauritania and Senegal. The oxygen budget of the deep OMZ is given by oxygen consumption mainly balanced by the oxygen supply due to meridional eddy fluxes (about 60%) and vertical mixing (about 20%, locally up to 30%). Advection by zonal jets is crucial for the establishment of the equatorial oxygen maximum. In the latitude range of the deep OMZ, it dominates the oxygen supply in the upper 300 to 400 m and generates the intermediate oxygen maximum between deep and shallow OMZs. Water mass ages from transient tracers indicate substantially older water masses in the core of the deep OMZ (about 120-180 years) compared to regions north and south of it. The deoxygenation of the ETNA OMZ during recent decades suggests a substantial imbalance in the oxygen budget: about 10% of the oxygen consumption during that period was not balanced by ventilation. Long-term oxygen observations show variability on interannual, decadal and multidecadal timescales that can partly be attributed to circulation changes. In comparison to the ETNA OMZ, the eastern tropical South Pacific OMZ shows a similar structure, including an equatorial oxygen maximum driven by zonal advection but overall much lower oxygen concentrations approaching zero in extended regions. As the shape of the OMZs is set

  14. Nitrate and Nitrite Variability at the Seafloor of an Oxygen Minimum Zone Revealed by a Novel Microfluidic In-Situ Chemical Sensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Yücel

    Full Text Available Microfluidics, or lab-on-a-chip (LOC is a promising technology that allows the development of miniaturized chemical sensors. In contrast to the surging interest in biomedical sciences, the utilization of LOC sensors in aquatic sciences is still in infancy but a wider use of such sensors could mitigate the undersampling problem of ocean biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the first underwater test of a novel LOC sensor to obtain in situ calibrated time-series (up to 40 h of nitrate+nitrite (ΣNOx and nitrite on the seafloor of the Mauritanian oxygen minimum zone, offshore Western Africa. Initial tests showed that the sensor successfully reproduced water column (160 m nutrient profiles. Lander deployments at 50, 100 and 170 m depth indicated that the biogeochemical variability was high over the Mauritanian shelf: The 50 m site had the lowest ΣNOx concentration, with 15.2 to 23.4 μM (median=18.3 μM; while at the 100 site ΣNOx varied between 21.0 and 30.1 μM over 40 hours (median = 25.1 μM. The 170 m site had the highest median ΣNOx level (25.8 μM with less variability (22.8 to 27.7 μM. At the 50 m site, nitrite concentration decreased fivefold from 1 to 0.2 μM in just 30 hours accompanied by decreasing oxygen and increasing nitrate concentrations. Taken together with the time series of oxygen, temperature, pressure and current velocities, we propose that the episodic intrusion of deeper waters via cross-shelf transport leads to intrusion of nitrate-rich, but oxygen-poor waters to shallower locations, with consequences for benthic nitrogen cycling. This first validation of an LOC sensor at elevated water depths revealed that when deployed for longer periods and as a part of a sensor network, LOC technology has the potential to contribute to the understanding of the benthic biogeochemical dynamics.

  15. Nitrate and Nitrite Variability at the Seafloor of an Oxygen Minimum Zone Revealed by a Novel Microfluidic In-Situ Chemical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Mustafa; Beaton, Alexander D.; Dengler, Marcus; Mowlem, Matthew C.; Sohl, Frank; Sommer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics, or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) is a promising technology that allows the development of miniaturized chemical sensors. In contrast to the surging interest in biomedical sciences, the utilization of LOC sensors in aquatic sciences is still in infancy but a wider use of such sensors could mitigate the undersampling problem of ocean biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the first underwater test of a novel LOC sensor to obtain in situ calibrated time-series (up to 40 h) of nitrate+nitrite (ΣNOx) and nitrite on the seafloor of the Mauritanian oxygen minimum zone, offshore Western Africa. Initial tests showed that the sensor successfully reproduced water column (160 m) nutrient profiles. Lander deployments at 50, 100 and 170 m depth indicated that the biogeochemical variability was high over the Mauritanian shelf: The 50 m site had the lowest ΣNOx concentration, with 15.2 to 23.4 μM (median=18.3 μM); while at the 100 site ΣNOx varied between 21.0 and 30.1 μM over 40 hours (median = 25.1μM). The 170 m site had the highest median ΣNOx level (25.8 μM) with less variability (22.8 to 27.7 μM). At the 50 m site, nitrite concentration decreased fivefold from 1 to 0.2 μM in just 30 hours accompanied by decreasing oxygen and increasing nitrate concentrations. Taken together with the time series of oxygen, temperature, pressure and current velocities, we propose that the episodic intrusion of deeper waters via cross-shelf transport leads to intrusion of nitrate-rich, but oxygen-poor waters to shallower locations, with consequences for benthic nitrogen cycling. This first validation of an LOC sensor at elevated water depths revealed that when deployed for longer periods and as a part of a sensor network, LOC technology has the potential to contribute to the understanding of the benthic biogeochemical dynamics. PMID:26161958

  16. On the role of circulation and mixing in the ventilation of oxygen minimum zones with a focus on the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brandt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ocean observations carried out in the framework of the Collaborative Research Center 754 (SFB 754 "Climate-Biogeochemistry Interactions in the Tropical Ocean" are used to study (1 the structure of tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs, (2 the processes that contribute to the oxygen budget, and (3 long-term changes in the oxygen distribution. The OMZ of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA, located between the well-ventilated subtropical gyre and the equatorial oxygen maximum, is composed of a deep OMZ at about 400 m depth with its core region centred at about 20° W, 10° N and a shallow OMZ at about 100 m depth with lowest oxygen concentrations in proximity to the coastal upwelling region off Mauritania and Senegal. The oxygen budget of the deep OMZ is given by oxygen consumption mainly balanced by the oxygen supply due to meridional eddy fluxes (about 60% and vertical mixing (about 20%, locally up to 30%. Advection by zonal jets is crucial for the establishment of the equatorial oxygen maximum. In the latitude range of the deep OMZ, it dominates the oxygen supply in the upper 300 to 400 m and generates the intermediate oxygen maximum between deep and shallow OMZs. Water mass ages from transient tracers indicate substantially older water masses in the core of the deep OMZ (about 120–180 years compared to regions north and south of it. The deoxygenation of the ETNA OMZ during recent decades suggests a substantial imbalance in the oxygen budget: about 10% of the oxygen consumption during that period was not balanced by ventilation. Long-term oxygen observations show variability on interannual, decadal and multidecadal time scales that can partly be attributed to circulation changes. In comparison to the ETNA OMZ the eastern tropical South Pacific OMZ shows a similar structure including an equatorial oxygen maximum driven by zonal advection, but overall much lower oxygen concentrations approaching zero in extended regions. As the shape of the

  17. Late Quaternary changes in surface productivity and oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the northwestern Arabian Sea: Micropaleontologic and sedimentary record at ODP site 728A

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajai K Rai; S S Das

    2011-02-01

    Changes in the abundance of selected planktic foraminiferal species and some sedimentological parameters at ODP site 728A were examined to understand the fluctuations in the surface productivity and deep sea oxygenation in the NW Arabian Sea during last ∼540 kyr. The increased relative abundances of high fertility taxa, i.e., Globigerinita glutinata and Globigerina bulloides mainly during interglacial intervals indicate intense upwelling. Strong SW summer monsoon probably increased the upwelling in the western Arabian Sea during interglacial intervals and caused high surface productivities due to the lateral transport of eutrophic waters. Most of the glacial periods (i.e., MIS 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12) are characterized by higher relative abundances of Neogloboquadrina pachyderma and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei associated with Globigerinoides ruber. The more stratified condition and deep mixed layer due to increased NE winter monsoon are mainly responsible for the higher relative abundances of N. pachyderma during glacial periods. Some of the glacial intervals (i.e., MIS 6 and 8) are also characterized by pteropod spikes reflecting deepening of aragonite compensation depth (ACD) and relatively less intense oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in this region due to deep sea mixing and thermocline ventilation, and relatively less intense surface productivity during winter monsoon. The interglacial periods are largely devoid of pteropod shells indicating more aragonite dissolution due to increased intensity of OMZ in the northwestern Arabian Sea. In general, the interglacial periods are characterized by low sediment accumulation rates than the glacial intervals. On an average, the total biogenic carbonate percentages were higher during interglacial and during periods of higher surface productivity. Most terrigenous material was trapped on shelf during intervals of high sea level stands of interglacial, whereas more erosion of shelf increased the sedimentation rates during glacial

  18. Bathymetric preference of four major genera of rectilinear benthic foraminifera within oxygen minimum zone in Arabian Sea off central west coast of India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumder, A.; Nigam, R.

    Congress, XXI Session (Copenhagen) 22 7–19. Bernhard J M 1992 Benthic foraminiferal distribution and biomass related to porewater oxygen content: Central California continental slope and rise; Deep-Sea Res. 39 585–605. Bernhard J M 1993 Experimental...

  19. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Surveillance in Marginalized Populations, Tijuana, Mexico, and West Nile Virus Knowledge among Hispanics, San Diego, California, 2006

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-10

    This podcast describes public health surveillance and communication in hard to reach populations in Tijuana, Mexico, and San Diego County, California. Dr. Marian McDonald, Associate Director of CDC's Health Disparities in the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, discusses the importance of being flexible in determining the most effective media for health communications.  Created: 8/10/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.   Date Released: 8/10/2010.

  20. Nitrogen transfers and air-sea N2O fluxes in the upwelling off Namibia within the oxygen minimum zone: a 3-D model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paulmier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available As regions of high primary production and being often associated to Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs, Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N cycle. Indeed, by exporting the Organic Matter (OM and nutrients produced in the coastal region to the open ocean, EBUS can play an important role in sustaining primary production in subtropical gyres. Losses of fixed inorganic N, through denitrification and anammox processes and through nitrous oxide (N2O emissions to the atmosphere, take place in oxygen depleted environments such as EBUS, and alleviate the role of these regions as a source of N. In the present study, we developed a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical (ROMS/BioBUS model for investigating the full N budget in the Namibian sub-system of the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS. The different state variables of a climatological experiment have been compared to different data sets (satellite and in situ observations and show that the model is able to represent this biogeochemical oceanic region. The N transfer is investigated in the Namibian upwelling system using this coupled model, especially in the Walvis Bay area between 22° S and 24° S where the OMZ is well developed (O2 2 l−1. The upwelling process advects 24.2 × 1010 mol N yr−1 of nitrate enriched waters over the first 100 m over the slope and over the continental shelf. The meridional advection by the alongshore Benguela current brings also nutrient-rich waters with 21.1 × 1010 mol N yr−1. 10.5 × 1010 mol N yr−1 of OM are exported outside of the continental shelf (between 0 and 100-m depth. 32.4% and 18.1% of this OM are exported by advection in the form of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Matters (DOM and POM, respectively, however vertical sinking of POM represents the main contributor (49.5% to OM export outside of the first 100-m depth of the water column on the continental shelf. The continental slope also represents a net N

  1. The Oligocene-Miocene San Gregorio Formation of Baja California Sur, Mexico: An early record of coastal upwelling along the eastern Pacific margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, K.A.; Ledesma, M.; Garrison, R.E. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)); Fonseca, C. (Univ. Autonoma de Baja California Sur, La Paz (Mexico))

    1991-02-01

    The Oligocene-Miocene San Gregorio Formation (Tsg) is a lithologically diverse package of siltstones, biosiliceous sediments, tuffs, and phosphorites. In the northern part of the study area (near La Purisima), the Tsg is richly biosiliceous, organic rich, and finely laminated; in many respects, the Tsg resembles the Hames member of the Monterey formation in the Salinas basin of California. In the south, the Tsg is thinner, detritus rich, and contains minable phosphorite reserves. Allochthonous phosphatic beds are prominent throughout the formation; many of these deposits apparently imported burrowing crustacea into anoxic paleoenvironments. The authors conclude that iterative episodes of turbulent transport of well-sorted (peloidal and coated grain) phosphatic sediment commonly resulted in depositional amalgamation of discrete event beds; varying degrees of postdepositional homogenization by infauna resulted in crudely stratified to massive (and economically minable) phosphorite beds. The authors regard the association of organic-rich and finely laminated biosiliceous sediments with phosphorites as a primary index of sedimentation in an upwelling environment. In addition, they observed thick, cross-stratified accumulations of barnacle conquina; they attribute this low diversity deposit to cool-water deposition on a carbonate shoal. The distinctive occurrence of cool water carbonates at near tropical paleolatitudes suggests the ecologically limiting effect of cold upwelled waters.

  2. Formation of Fe-Mn crusts within a continental margin environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Tracey A.; Hein, James R.; Paytan, Adina; Clague, David A.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines Fe-Mn crusts that form on seamounts along the California continental-margin (CCM), within the United States 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone. The study area extends from approximately 30° to 38° North latitudes and from 117° to 126° West longitudes. The area of study is a tectonically active northeast Pacific plate boundary region and is also part of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre with currents dominated by the California Current System. Upwelling of nutrient-rich water results in high primary productivity that produces a pronounced oxygen minimum zone. Hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts forming along the CCM show distinct chemical and mineral compositions compared to open-ocean crusts. On average, CCM crusts contain more Fe relative to Mn than open-ocean Pacific crusts. The continental shelf and slope release both Fe and Mn under low-oxygen conditions. Silica is also enriched relative to Al compared to open-ocean crusts. This is due to the North Pacific silica plume and enrichment of Si along the path of deep-water circulation, resulting in Si enrichment in bottom and intermediate waters of the eastern Pacific.The CCM Fe-Mn crusts have a higher percentage of birnessite than open-ocean crusts, reflecting lower dissolved seawater oxygen that results from the intense coastal upwelling and proximity to zones of continental slope pore-water anoxia. Carbonate fluorapatite (CFA) is not present and CCM crusts do not show evidence of phosphatization, even in the older sections. The mineralogy indicates a suboxic environment under which birnessite forms, but in which pH is not high enough to facilitate CFA deposition. Growth rates of CCM crusts generally increase with increasing water depth, likely due to deep-water Fe sources mobilized from reduced shelf and slope sediments.Many elements of economic interest including Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, W, and Te have slightly or significantly lower concentrations in CCM crusts relative to crusts from the Pacific

  3. Associations of major and trace components in time-series settling particle samples from Cuenca Alfonso, SW Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castañeda, A. P.; Shumilin, E.; Silverberg, N.; Morton-Bermea, O.; Hernandez-Alvarez, E.; Aguirre-Bahena, F.

    2007-12-01

    Cuenca Alfonso is a natural sedimentation basin in Bahía de La Paz, southern Baja California Peninsula, an arid subtropical region characterized by limited land runoff with a productive surface layer overlying a well-developed Oxygen Minimum Zone. A time-series sediment trap program was initiated in 2002 to help understand the processes controlling variations in the biogeochemistry of this environment. INAA, ICP-MS and ICP-OES analyses, as well as flame AAS were made for major and trace elements in 105 subsamples of material collected at 350 m depth during 2002-2005. Principal component analysis, including data for organic and inorganic carbon, biogenic silica and the lithogenic fraction, yielded four factors. Factor 1 (25% of the total variance) showed high eigenvalues for the classical terrigenous aluminosilicate elements: Al, Fe, Mn Sc. High loadings also occurred for the group of light to medium REEs (except for Eu). The latter are frequently associated with acid source rocks, such the granites and rhyolitic volcanics exposed on the margin of the bay. Factor 2 (18%) grouped mainly REEs, with high loading on the heavier members of the series that are more typical of basic rocks (thick sequences of andesitic volcanics occur to the NW), as well as Ni and Rb. Factor 3 (12%) appears to represent carbonate organism production, with high loadings for Cinorg, Ca and moderate levels for Corg and Cu, while %litho is moderately negative, as is biogenic silica. The fourth factor (9%) is characterized by high negative loadings for Cd, Co, Se and moderately negative values for Corg. Moderate positive loadings occur only for Sr and, at lower levels, for U, Sb and %lithogenic. This suggests that this grouping is related to particles that have been partially transformed within the Oxygen Minimum Zone. The results will be examined for distinctive periods within the time-series, such as the hurricane-influenced months of August-September 2003, the generally very low fluxes

  4. The potential of energy farming in the southeastern California desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, V.

    1980-04-01

    The use of energy forms to provide future sources of energy for California is considered. Marginal desert lands in southeastern California are proposed for the siting of energy farms using acacia, eucalyptus, euphorbia, guayule, jojoba, mesquite, or tamarisk.

  5. Margin requirements, margin loans, and margin rates: practice and principles

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Fortune

    2000-01-01

    The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System establishes initial margin requirements under Regulations T, U, and X. Recent margin loan increases, both in aggregate value and relative to market capitalization, have rekindled the debate about using margin requirements as an instrument to affect the prices of common stocks. Proponents of a more active margin requirement policy see the regulations as instruments for affecting the level and volatility of stock prices by influencing investo...

  6. Oxygen minimum seafloor ecological (mal) functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moodley, L.; Nigam, R.; Ingole, B.; Prakash Babu, C.; Panchang, R.; Nanajkar, M.; Sivadas, S.; van Breugel, P.; van IJzerloo, L.; Rutgers, R.; Heip, C.H.R.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Although organic matter (OM) settling on the seafloor is generally rapidly recycled, a key ecological process, large scale burial events manifest itself in the marine sedimentary record as organic carbon (Corg)-rich layers. Presently, this prevails under certain oceanic settings such as the oxygen m

  7. Oxygen minimum seafloor ecological (mal) functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moodley, L.; Nigam, R.; Ingole, B.; Babu, C.P.; Panchang, R.; Nanajkar, M.; Sivadas, S.; van Breugel, P.; van Ijzerloo, L.; Rutgers, R.; Heip, C.H.R.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Although organic matter (OM) settling on the seafloor is generally rapidly recycled, a key ecological process, large scale burial events manifest itself in the marine sedimentary record as organic carbon (C(org))-rich layers. Presently, this prevails under certain oceanic settings such as the oxygen

  8. California Bioregions

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California regions developed by the Inter-agency Natural Areas Coordinating Committee (INACC) were digitized from a 1:1,200,000 California Department of Fish and...

  9. Response of export production and dissolved oxygen concentrations in oxygen minimum zones to pCO2 and temperature stabilization scenarios in the biogeochemical model HAMOCC 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Teresa; Heinze, Christoph; Hughlett, Taylor; Winguth, Arne M. E.

    2017-02-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the ocean is an important component of marine biogeochemical cycles and will be greatly altered as climate change persists. In this study a global oceanic carbon cycle model (HAMOCC 2.0) is used to address how mechanisms of oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) expansion respond to changes in CO2 radiative forcing. Atmospheric pCO2 is increased at a rate of 1 % annually and the model is stabilized at 2 ×, 4 ×, 6 ×, and 8 × preindustrial pCO2 levels. With an increase in CO2 radiative forcing, the OMZ in the Pacific Ocean is controlled largely by changes in particulate organic carbon (POC) export, resulting in increased remineralization and thus expanding the OMZs within the tropical Pacific Ocean. A potential decline in primary producers in the future as a result of environmental stress due to ocean warming and acidification could lead to a substantial reduction in POC export production, vertical POC flux, and thus increased DO concentration particularly in the Pacific Ocean at a depth of 600-800 m. In contrast, the vertical expansion of the OMZs within the Atlantic is linked to increases POC flux as well as changes in oxygen solubility with increasing seawater temperature. Changes in total organic carbon and increase sea surface temperature (SST) also lead to the formation of a new OMZ in the western subtropical Pacific Ocean. The development of the new OMZ results in dissolved oxygen concentration of ≤ 50 µmol kg-1 throughout the equatorial Pacific Ocean at 4 times preindustrial pCO2. Total ocean volume with dissolved oxygen concentrations of ≤ 50 µmol kg-1 increases by 2.4, 5.0, and 10.5 % for the 2 ×, 4 ×, and 8 × CO2 simulations, respectively.

  10. Electric energy demand and supply prospects for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, H. G. M.

    1978-01-01

    A recent history of electricity forecasting in California is given. Dealing with forecasts and regulatory uncertainty is discussed. Graphs are presented for: (1) Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and Pacific Gas and Electric present and projected reserve margins; (2) California electricity peak demand forecast; and (3) California electricity production.

  11. Organic carbon production, mineralization and preservation on the Peruvian margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Dale

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon cycling in Peruvian margin sediments (11° S and 12° S was examined at 16 stations from 74 m on the inner shelf down to 1024 m water depth by means of in situ flux measurements, sedimentary geochemistry and modeling. Bottom water oxygen was below detection limit down to ca. 400 m and increased to 53 μM at the deepest station. Sediment accumulation rates and benthic dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes decreased rapidly with water depth. Particulate organic carbon (POC content was lowest on the inner shelf and at the deep oxygenated stations (< 5% and highest between 200 and 400 m in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ, 15–20%. The organic carbon burial efficiency (CBE was unexpectedly low on the inner shelf (< 20% when compared to a global database, for reasons which may be linked to the frequent ventilation of the shelf by oceanographic anomalies. CBE at the deeper oxygenated sites was much higher than expected (max. 81%. Elsewhere, CBEs were mostly above the range expected for sediments underlying normal oxic bottom waters, with an average of 51 and 58% for the 11° S and 12° S transects, respectively. Organic carbon rain rates calculated from the benthic fluxes alluded to a very efficient mineralization of organic matter in the water column, with a Martin curve exponent typical of normal oxic waters (0.88 ± 0.09. Yet, mean POC burial rates were 2–5 times higher than the global average for continental margins. The observations at the Peruvian margin suggest that a lack of oxygen does not affect the degradation of organic matter in the water column but promotes the preservation of organic matter in marine sediments.

  12. Marginalization of the Youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Rosendal

    2009-01-01

    The article is based on a key note speach in Bielefeld on the subject "welfare state and marginalized youth", focusing upon the high ambition of expanding schooling in Denmark from 9 to 12 years. The unintended effect may be a new kind of marginalization.......The article is based on a key note speach in Bielefeld on the subject "welfare state and marginalized youth", focusing upon the high ambition of expanding schooling in Denmark from 9 to 12 years. The unintended effect may be a new kind of marginalization....

  13. Practical Marginalized Multilevel Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Michael E; Swihart, Bruce J; Caffo, Brian S; Zeger, Scott L

    2013-01-01

    Clustered data analysis is characterized by the need to describe both systematic variation in a mean model and cluster-dependent random variation in an association model. Marginalized multilevel models embrace the robustness and interpretations of a marginal mean model, while retaining the likelihood inference capabilities and flexible dependence structures of a conditional association model. Although there has been increasing recognition of the attractiveness of marginalized multilevel models, there has been a gap in their practical application arising from a lack of readily available estimation procedures. We extend the marginalized multilevel model to allow for nonlinear functions in both the mean and association aspects. We then formulate marginal models through conditional specifications to facilitate estimation with mixed model computational solutions already in place. We illustrate the MMM and approximate MMM approaches on a cerebrovascular deficiency crossover trial using SAS and an epidemiological study on race and visual impairment using R. Datasets, SAS and R code are included as supplemental materials.

  14. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  15. Ocean margins workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the refocusing of its marine research program to emphasize the study of ocean margins and their role in modulating, controlling, and driving Global Change phenomena. This is a proposal to conduct a workshop that will establish priorities and an implementation plan for a new research initiative by the Department of Energy on the ocean margins. The workshop will be attended by about 70 scientists who specialize in ocean margin research. The workshop will be held in the Norfolk, Virginia area in late June 1990.

  16. "We call ourselves marginalized"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nanna Jordt

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, indigenous knowledge has been added to the environmental education agenda in an attempt to address the marginalization of non-western perspectives. While these efforts are necessary, the debate is often framed in terms of a discourse of victimization that overlooks the agency o...... argue that researchers not only need to pay attention to how certain voices are marginalized in Environmental Education research and practice, but also to how learners as agents respond to, use and negotiate the marginalization of their perspectives....

  17. Indian Ocean margins

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    The most important biogeochemical transformations and boundary exchanges in the Indian Ocean seem to occur in the northern region, where the processes originating at the land-ocean boundary extend far beyond the continental margins. Exchanges across...

  18. Learning unbelievable marginal probabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Pitkow, Xaq; Miller, Ken D

    2011-01-01

    Loopy belief propagation performs approximate inference on graphical models with loops. One might hope to compensate for the approximation by adjusting model parameters. Learning algorithms for this purpose have been explored previously, and the claim has been made that every set of locally consistent marginals can arise from belief propagation run on a graphical model. On the contrary, here we show that many probability distributions have marginals that cannot be reached by belief propagation using any set of model parameters or any learning algorithm. We call such marginals `unbelievable.' This problem occurs whenever the Hessian of the Bethe free energy is not positive-definite at the target marginals. All learning algorithms for belief propagation necessarily fail in these cases, producing beliefs or sets of beliefs that may even be worse than the pre-learning approximation. We then show that averaging inaccurate beliefs, each obtained from belief propagation using model parameters perturbed about some le...

  19. Oligocene tectonics and sedimentation, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    During the Oligocene epoch, California was marked by extensive nonmarine sedimentation, in contrast to its pre-Oligocene and post-Oligocene depositional history. The Oligocene continental deposits are especially widespread in southern California and fill a number of small and generally partly restricted basins. Fluvial facies in many basins prograded over previously deposited lower Tertiary turbidites. Volcanism, from widespread centers, was associated with the nonmarine sedimentation. However, some basins remained marine and a few contain Oligocene turbidites and pelagic sediments deposited at bathyal depths. The Oligocene redbeds of California do not form a post-orogenic molasse sequence comparable to the Old Red Sandstone or Alpine molasse. They are synorogenic and record local uplift of basins and surrounding source areas. Late Cretaceous to contemporary orogenesis in California has been generally characterized by the formation of small restricted basins of variable depth adjacent to small upland areas in response to strike-slip faulting. Deposition of Oligocene redbeds was associated with climatic change from warm and humid to cold and semiarid, and a global lowering of sea level. Oligocene tectonism occurred during the transition from subduction of the Farallon Plate to initiation of the modern San Andreas transform system. However, the major influence that caused uplift, formation of fault-bounded basins, and extensive redbed deposition, especially in southern California, was the approach of the Pacific-Farallon spreading ridge to the western margin of California. ?? 1984.

  20. Continental margin sedimentation: from sediment transport to sequence stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P.M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P. M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2007-01-01

    This volume on continental margin sedimentation brings together an expert editorial and contributor team to create a state-of-the-art resource. Taking a global perspective, the book spans a range of timescales and content, ranging from how oceans transport particles, to how thick rock sequences are formed on continental margins. - Summarizes and integrates our understanding of sedimentary processes and strata associated with fluvial dispersal systems on continental shelves and slopes - Explores timescales ranging from particle transport at one extreme, to deep burial at the other - Insights are presented for margins in general, and with focus on a tectonically active margin (northern California) and a passive margin (New Jersey), enabling detailed examination of the intricate relationships between a wide suite of sedimentary processes and their preserved stratigraphy - Includes observational studies which document the processes and strata found on particular margins, in addition to numerical models and laboratory experimentation, which provide a quantitative basis for extrapolation in time and space of insights about continental-margin sedimentation - Provides a research resource for scientists studying modern and ancient margins, and an educational text for advanced students in sedimentology and stratigraphy

  1. Masculinity at the margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sune Qvotrup

    2010-01-01

    This article analyses how young marginalized ethnic minority men in Denmark react to the othering they are subject to in the media as well as in the social arenas of every day life. The article is based on theoretically informed ethnographic fieldwork among such young men as well as interviews an...

  2. From Borders to Margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Noel

    2009-01-01

    upon Deleuze's philosophy to set out an ontology in which the continual reformulation of entities in play in ‘post-international' society can be grasped.  This entails a strategic shift from speaking about the ‘borders' between sovereign states to referring instead to the ‘margins' between a plethora...

  3. Marginally Deformed Starobinsky Gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, A.; Joergensen, J.; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We show that quantum-induced marginal deformations of the Starobinsky gravitational action of the form $R^{2(1 -\\alpha)}$, with $R$ the Ricci scalar and $\\alpha$ a positive parameter, smaller than one half, can account for the recent experimental observations by BICEP2 of primordial tensor modes....

  4. "We call ourselves marginalized"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nanna Jordt

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, indigenous knowledge has been added to the environmental education agenda in an attempt to address the marginalization of non-western perspectives. While these efforts are necessary, the debate is often framed in terms of a discourse of victimization that overlooks the agency o...

  5. Masculinity at the margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sune Qvotrup

    2010-01-01

    of critique although in a masculinist way. These reactions to othering represent a challenge to researchers interested in intersectionality and gender, because gender is reproduced as a hierarchical form of social differentiation at the same time as racism is both reproduced and resisted.......This article analyses how young marginalized ethnic minority men in Denmark react to the othering they are subject to in the media as well as in the social arenas of every day life. The article is based on theoretically informed ethnographic fieldwork among such young men as well as interviews...... and other types of material. Taking the concepts of othering, intersectionality and marginality as point of departure the article analyses how these young men experience othering and how they react to it. One type of reaction, described as stylization, relies on accentuating the latently positive symbolic...

  6. Actively stressed marginal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sheinman, M; MacKintosh, F C

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of motor-generated stresses in disordered three dimensional fiber networks using a combination of a mean-field, effective medium theory, scaling analysis and a computational model. We find that motor activity controls the elasticity in an anomalous fashion close to the point of marginal stability by coupling to critical network fluctuations. We also show that motor stresses can stabilize initially floppy networks, extending the range of critical behavior to a broad regime of network connectivities below the marginal point. Away from this regime, or at high stress, motors give rise to a linear increase in stiffness with stress. Finally, we demonstrate that our results are captured by a simple, constitutive scaling relation highlighting the important role of non-affine strain fluctuations as a susceptibility to motor stress.

  7. Actively stressed marginal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, M; Broedersz, C P; MacKintosh, F C

    2012-12-07

    We study the effects of motor-generated stresses in disordered three-dimensional fiber networks using a combination of a mean-field theory, scaling analysis, and a computational model. We find that motor activity controls the elasticity in an anomalous fashion close to the point of marginal stability by coupling to critical network fluctuations. We also show that motor stresses can stabilize initially floppy networks, extending the range of critical behavior to a broad regime of network connectivities below the marginal point. Away from this regime, or at high stress, motors give rise to a linear increase in stiffness with stress. Finally, we demonstrate that our results are captured by a simple, constitutive scaling relation highlighting the important role of nonaffine strain fluctuations as a susceptibility to motor stress.

  8. Biogeochemical and Microbial Survey of Gravity Cores from the Guaymas Basin and Sonora Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, A.; Mckay, L. J.; Chanton, J.; Hensen, C.; Turner, T.; Aiello, I. W.; Ravelo, A. C.; Mortera, C.; Teske, A.

    2015-12-01

    During the cruise "Guaymas14" with RV El Puma (Oct. 14-25, 2014), 15 sediment cores were obtained from the Guaymas Basin Ridge flanks and the Sonora Margin, to contrast the shallow subsurface sediments of the seafloor set at this spreading center and its adjacent continental margin. Here we present biogeochemical profiles of porewater dissolved gases and stable ions, along with high-throughout 16S rRNA gene sequencing of selected samples. Cores from the NW and SE ends of the Guaymas Basin ridge flanks were not sulfidic, and showed neither sulfate depletion nor methane accumulation. In contrast, samples of compression-impacted Sonora Margin on the NE edge of Guaymas Basin and from the upper Sonora Margin beneath the oxygen minimum zone showed an abundance of sulfide, DIC with sulfate depletion, and accumulation of biogenic methane (δ13C-CH4 ca. -85 to -88 ‰) at supersaturated concentrations below sulfate-replete sediment. Samples from an attenuated off-axis seep site on the NW flank of Guaymas Basin differed from both Sonora Margin and Guaymas Basin. The off-axis seep sediments contained 1 to 1.5 mM methane, with distinct δ13C -isotopic content (δ13C-CH4 near -60 ‰); intermediate to the biogenic methane of the Sonora Margin and the hydrothermally produced methane at Guaymas Basin. Unaltered sulfate and low sulfide concentrations indicate insufficiently reduced conditions, suggesting the methane was not produced in situ. Porewater DIC concentrations in the old seep site and the control site were similar to each other (3-5 mM), and lower than in the Sonora Margin sites (ca. 20-40 mM), indicating low bioremineralization in the old seep site and control sediments. Diverse seafloor habitats are expected to result in distinct microbiota that range from strictly anaerobic seep specialists and methane-cycling archaea in the Sonora Margin to diversified heterotrophic communities in the off-axis ridge flank sediments of Guaymas Basin; high-throughput sequencing should

  9. MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

    2004-11-01

    A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

  10. Iberian Atlantic Margins Group investigates deep structure of ocean margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Iberian Atlantic Margins Group; Banda, Enric; Torne, Montserrat

    With recent seismic reflection data in hand, investigators for the Iberian Atlantic Margins project are preparing images of the deep continental and oceanic margins of Iberia. In 1993, the IAM group collected near vertical incidence seismic reflection data over a total distance of 3500 km along the North and Western Iberian Margins, Gorringe Bank Region and Gulf of Cadiz (Figure 1). When combined with data on the conjugate margin off Canada, details of the Iberian margin's deep structure should aid in distinguishing rift models and improve understanding of the processes governing the formation of margins.The North Iberian passive continental margin was formed during a Permian to Triassic phase of extension and matured during the early Cretaceous by rotation of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to Eurasia. From the late Cretaceous to the early Oligocene period, Iberia rotated in a counterclockwise direction around an axis located west of Lisbon. The plate boundary between Iberia and Eurasia, which lies along the Pyrenees, follows the north Spanish marginal trough, trends obliquely in the direction of the fossil Bay of Biscay triple junction, and continues along the Azores-Biscay Rise [Sibuet et al., 1994]. Following the NE-SW convergence of Iberia and Eurasia, the reactivation of the North Iberian continental margin resulted in the formation of a marginal trough and accretionary prism [Boillot et al., 1971].

  11. The oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea during 1995

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Morrison, J.M.; Codispoti, L.A.; Smith, S.L.; Wishner, K.; Flagg, C.; Gardner, W.D.; Gaurin, S.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Manghnani, V.; Prosperie, L.; Gundersen, J.S.

    showed string relationships to the oxygen profiles, especially in locations where the OMZ was pronounced, but the biological responses to the OMZ varied with type of organism. ADCP acoustic backscatter measurements show diel vertical migration of plankton...

  12. NC10 bacteria in marine oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padilla, Cory C; Bristow, Laura A; Sarode, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the NC10 phylum link anaerobic methane oxidation to nitrite denitrification through a unique O2-producing intra-aerobic methanotrophy pathway. A niche for NC10 in the pelagic ocean has not been confirmed. We show that NC10 bacteria are present and transcriptionally active in oceanic....... rRNA and mRNA transcripts assignable to NC10 peaked within the OMZ and included genes of the putative nitrite-dependent intra-aerobic pathway, with high representation of transcripts containing the unique motif structure of the nitric oxide (NO) reductase of NC10 bacteria, hypothesized...

  13. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high-inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  14. El Niño and similar perturbation effects on the benthos of the Humboldt, California, and Benguela Current upwelling ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. E. Arntz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available To a certain degree, Eastern Boundary Current (EBC ecosystems are similar: Cold bottom water from moderate depths, rich in nutrients, is transported to the euphotic zone by a combination of trade winds, Coriolis force and Ekman transport. The resultant high primary production fuels a rich secondary production in the upper pelagic and nearshore zones, but where O2 exchange is restricted, it creates oxygen minimum zones (OMZs at shelf and upper slope (Humboldt and Benguela Current or slope depths (California Current. These hypoxic zones host a specifically adapted, small macro- and meiofauna together with giant sulphur bacteria that use nitrate to oxydise H2S. In all EBC, small polychaetes, large nematodes and other opportunistic benthic species have adapted to the hypoxic conditions and co-exist with sulphur bacteria, which seem to be particularly dominant off Peru and Chile. However, a massive reduction of macrobenthos occurs in the core of the OMZ. In the Humboldt Current area the OMZ ranges between <100 and about 600 m, with decreasing thickness in a poleward direction. The OMZ merges into better oxygenated zones towards the deep sea, where large cold-water mega- and macrofauna occupy a dominant role as in the nearshore strip. The Benguela Current OMZ has a similar upper limit but remains shallower. It also hosts giant sulphur bacteria but little is known about the benthic fauna. However, sulphur eruptions and intense hypoxia might preclude the coexistence of significant mega- und macrobenthos. Conversely, off North America the upper limit of the OMZ is considerably deeper (e.g., 500–600 m off California and Oregon, and the lower boundary may exceed 1000m. The properties described are valid for very cold and cold (La Niña and "normal" ENSO conditions with effective upwelling of nutrient-rich bottom water. During warm (El Niño episodes, warm water masses of low oxygen concentration from oceanic and equatorial regions enter the upwelling

  15. California Political Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a series of district layers pertaining to California'spolitical districts, that are derived from the California State Senateand State Assembly information....

  16. Gaussian quantum marginal problem

    CERN Document Server

    Eisert, J; Sanders, B C; Tyc, T

    2007-01-01

    The quantum marginal problem asks what local spectra are consistent with a given state of a composite quantum system. This setting, also referred to as the question of the compatibility of local spectra, has several applications in quantum information theory. Here, we introduce the analogue of this statement for Gaussian states for any number of modes, and solve it in generality, for pure and mixed states, both concerning necessary and sufficient conditions. Formally, our result can be viewed as an analogue of the Sing-Thompson Theorem (respectively Horn's Lemma), characterizing the relationship between main diagonal elements and singular values of a complex matrix: We find necessary and sufficient conditions for vectors (d1, ..., dn) and (c1, ..., cn) to be the symplectic eigenvalues and symplectic main diagonal elements of a strictly positive real matrix, respectively. More physically speaking, this result determines what local temperatures or entropies are consistent with a pure or mixed Gaussian state of ...

  17. Workers' marginal costs of commuting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Ommeren, Jos; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    This paper applies a dynamic search model to estimate workers' marginal costs of commuting, including monetary and time costs. Using data on workers' job search activity as well as moving behaviour, for the Netherlands, we provide evidence that, on average, workers' marginal costs of one hour...

  18. Digital data for depth to basement in the deep-sea basins of the Pacific continental margin (cowbsm) based on data collected in 1984.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital vector data for the contours of depth to basement for the deep-sea basins of the Pacific continental margin offshore of Washington, Oregon, and California....

  19. Digital data for depth to basement in the deep-sea basins of the Pacific continental margin (cowbsm) based on data collected in 1984.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital vector data for the contours of depth to basement for the deep-sea basins of the Pacific continental margin offshore of Washington, Oregon, and California....

  20. Estimating Marginal Returns to Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Pedro; Heckman, James J.; Vytlacil, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This paper estimates marginal returns to college for individuals induced to enroll in college by different marginal policy changes. The recent instrumental variables literature seeks to estimate this parameter, but in general it does so only under strong assumptions that are tested and found wanting. We show how to utilize economic theory and local instrumental variables estimators to estimate the effect of marginal policy changes. Our empirical analysis shows that returns are higher for individuals with values of unobservables that make them more likely to attend college. We contrast our estimates with IV estimates of the return to schooling. PMID:25110355

  1. Marginal Solutions for the Superstring

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    We construct a class of analytic solutions of WZW-type open superstring field theory describing marginal deformations of a reference D-brane background. The deformations we consider are generated by on-shell vertex operators with vanishing operator products. The superstring solution exhibits an intriguing duality with the corresponding marginal solution of the {\\it bosonic} string. In particular, the superstring problem is ``dual'' to the problem of re-expressing the bosonic marginal solution in pure gauge form. This represents the first nonsingular analytic solution of open superstring field theory.

  2. Great earthquakes along the Western United States continental margin: implications for hazards, stratigraphy and turbidite lithology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Nelson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the importance of great earthquakes (Mw ≳ 8 for hazards, stratigraphy of basin floors, and turbidite lithology along the active tectonic continental margins of the Cascadia subduction zone and the northern San Andreas Transform Fault by utilizing studies of swath bathymetry visual core descriptions, grain size analysis, X-ray radiographs and physical properties. Recurrence times of Holocene turbidites as proxies for earthquakes on the Cascadia and northern California margins are analyzed using two methods: (1 radiometric dating (14C method, and (2 relative dating, using hemipelagic sediment thickness and sedimentation rates (H method. The H method provides (1 the best estimate of minimum recurrence times, which are the most important for seismic hazards risk analysis, and (2 the most complete dataset of recurrence times, which shows a normal distribution pattern for paleoseismic turbidite frequencies. We observe that, on these tectonically active continental margins, during the sea-level highstand of Holocene time, triggering of turbidity currents is controlled dominantly by earthquakes, and paleoseismic turbidites have an average recurrence time of ~550 yr in northern Cascadia Basin and ~200 yr along northern California margin. The minimum recurrence times for great earthquakes are approximately 300 yr for the Cascadia subduction zone and 130 yr for the northern San Andreas Fault, which indicates both fault systems are in (Cascadia or very close (San Andreas to the early window for another great earthquake.

    On active tectonic margins with great earthquakes, the volumes of mass transport deposits (MTDs are limited on basin floors along the margins. The maximum run-out distances of MTD sheets across abyssal-basin floors along active margins are an order of magnitude less (~100 km than on passive margins (~1000 km. The great earthquakes along the Cascadia and northern California margins

  3. [Sinaloa: the geography of marginalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo Hernandez, J R

    1993-01-01

    Sinaloa's State Population Program for 1993-98 contains the objective of promoting integration of demographic criteria into the planning process. The action program calls for establishing indicators of economic and social inequality so that conditions of poverty and margination can be identified. To further these goals, the State Population Council used data from the National Population Council project on regional inequality and municipal margination in Mexico to analyze margination at the state level. Nine indicators of educational status, housing conditions, spatial distribution, and income provide information that allows the definition of municipios and regions that should receive priority in economic and social development programs. The index of municipal margination (IMM) is a statistical summary of the nine indicators, which are based on information in the 1990 census. As of March 1990, 9.9% of Sinaloa's population over age 15 was illiterate and 37.4% had incomplete primary education. 91.0% had electricity, but 18.7% lacked indoor toilet facilities and 19.4% had no piped water. 23.7% of houses had dirt floors. 60% of households were crowded, defined as having more than two persons per bedroom. 43.5% of the state population lived in localities with fewer than 5000 inhabitants, where service delivery is difficult and costly. 55.6% of the economically active population was judged to earn less than the amount needed to satisfy essential needs. All except one municipio bordering the Pacific ocean had low or very low indicators of margination, while all those in the sierra had a medium or high degree of margination. Sinaloa's statewide IMM was eighteenth among Mexico's 32 federal entities, with Chiapas showing the highest degree of margination and the Federal District the lowest.

  4. California Condor Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These Data identify (in general) the areas where critical habitat for the California Condor occur. Critical habitat for the species consists of the following 10...

  5. Maximum margin Bayesian network classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernkopf, Franz; Wohlmayr, Michael; Tschiatschek, Sebastian

    2012-03-01

    We present a maximum margin parameter learning algorithm for Bayesian network classifiers using a conjugate gradient (CG) method for optimization. In contrast to previous approaches, we maintain the normalization constraints on the parameters of the Bayesian network during optimization, i.e., the probabilistic interpretation of the model is not lost. This enables us to handle missing features in discriminatively optimized Bayesian networks. In experiments, we compare the classification performance of maximum margin parameter learning to conditional likelihood and maximum likelihood learning approaches. Discriminative parameter learning significantly outperforms generative maximum likelihood estimation for naive Bayes and tree augmented naive Bayes structures on all considered data sets. Furthermore, maximizing the margin dominates the conditional likelihood approach in terms of classification performance in most cases. We provide results for a recently proposed maximum margin optimization approach based on convex relaxation. While the classification results are highly similar, our CG-based optimization is computationally up to orders of magnitude faster. Margin-optimized Bayesian network classifiers achieve classification performance comparable to support vector machines (SVMs) using fewer parameters. Moreover, we show that unanticipated missing feature values during classification can be easily processed by discriminatively optimized Bayesian network classifiers, a case where discriminative classifiers usually require mechanisms to complete unknown feature values in the data first.

  6. Satellite-Based Investigations of the Transition from an Oceanic to Continental Transform Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. Meghan

    1998-01-01

    Detailed characterization of neotectonics evolution of the Valle de San Felipe and Arroyo Grande regions in northern Baja California. Reoccupied GEOMEX GPS sites, and occupied a regional GPS (Global Positioning System) network. The Baja California peninsula in Mexico offers a unique setting for studying the kinematic evolution of a complex, active strike-slip/rift plate boundary. We are currently conducting remote sensing, geologic, and geodetic studies of this boundary. The combined data sets will yield instantaneous and time integrated views of its evolution. This proposal solicits renewed funding from NASA to support remote sensing and geologic studies. During the late Cenozoic, Baja California has been the locus of changing fault geometry that has accommodated components of the relative motion between the North America and Pacific plates. Contemporary slip between the two plates occurs in a broad zone that encompasses much of southern California and the Baja California Peninsula. The transfer of slip across this zone in southern California is relatively well understood. South of the border, the geometry and role of specific faults and structural provinces in transferring plate margin deformation across the peninsula is enigmatic. Results We use Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery of the Baja California Peninsula to identify recent and active faults, and then conduct field studies that characterize the temporal and spatial structural evolution of the plate margin. These data address questions concerning the neotectonic development of the Gulf of California, the Baja California Peninsula, and their role in evolution of the post-Miocene Pacific - North American plate boundary. Moreover, these studies provide constraints on the geometry of active faults, allowing more exact understanding of the results of ongoing NASA-supported geodetic experiments. In addition, anticipated publication of the TM scenes will provide a widely available geological data base for relatively

  7. Profit margins in Japanese retailing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.A. Potjes; A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractUsing a rich data source, we explain differences and developments in profit margins of medium-sized stores in Japan. We conclude that the protected environment enables the retailer to pass on all operating costs to the customers and to obtain a relatively high basic income. High service

  8. Profit margins in Japanese retailing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.A. Potjes; A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractUsing a rich data source, we explain differences and developments in profit margins of medium-sized stores in Japan. We conclude that the protected environment enables the retailer to pass on all operating costs to the customers and to obtain a relatively high basic income. High service

  9. Respiration in ocean margin sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the study of respiration in ocean margin sediments and the assessments of tools needed for this purpose. The first study was on the biological pump and global respiration patterns in the deep ocean using an empirical model based on sediment oxygen consumption data. In this

  10. Respiration in ocean margin sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the study of respiration in ocean margin sediments and the assessments of tools needed for this purpose. The first study was on the biological pump and global respiration patterns in the deep ocean using an empirical model based on sediment oxygen consumption data.

  11. Water use in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Justin; Sneed, Michelle; Rogers, Laurel Lynn; Metzger, Loren F.; Rewis, Diane; House, Sally F.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the USGS National Water Use Compilation, the California Water Science Center works in cooperation with local, State, and Federal agencies as well as academic and private organizations to collect and report total water withdrawals for California. The 2010 California water use data are aggregated here, in this website, for the first time. The California Water Science Center released these data ahead of the online USGS National Water Use Compilation circular report, in response to increased interest associated with current drought conditions. The national report is expected to be released late in 2014. The data on this website represents the most current California water use data available in the USGS National Water Use Compilation. It contains a section on water use in California for 2010. Water-use estimates are compiled by withdrawal source type, use category, and county. Withdrawal source types include groundwater, both fresh and saline,

  12. The Margins of Medieval Manuscripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Kavčič

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Shortly after the mid-thirteenth century, various images began to fill the margins in both religious and secular texts. Many factors influenced the emergence of this type of manuscript decoration, but it has generally been attributed to the revived interest in nature and the Gothic inclination for humorous and anecdotic detail. After highlighting other possible reasons for the occurrence of marginal illumination, this paper introduces two manuscripts from the Archiepiscopal Archives in Ljubljana. The manuscripts show numerous facial drawings affixed to some of the letters. This article addresses how to interpret such drawings and stresses that they do not necessarily function as symbolic images or images with any specific didactic value. Quite the opposite, these drawings seem not to have any meaning and are oft en merely indications of an illuminator’s sense of humor. Because of their exaggerated facial expressions, these drawings could be perceived as the true predecessors of modern caricature.

  13. Respiration in ocean margin sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the study of respiration in ocean margin sediments and the assessments of tools needed for this purpose. The first study was on the biological pump and global respiration patterns in the deep ocean using an empirical model based on sediment oxygen consumption data. In this thesis the depth dependence of respiration patterns was modelled using a compiled data set of sediment oxygen consumption rates. We showed that the depth relationship can best be described by a do...

  14. Additional record of Janetogalathea californiensis (Anomura: Galatheidae from the central Gulf of California, Mexico, with notes on its distribution Registro adicional de Janetogalathea californiensis (Anomura: Galatheidae del Golfo de California central, México, con notas de su distribución

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel E. Hendrickx

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of galatheids Janetogalathea californiensis (Benedict, 1902 were collected in the northern portion of the Central Gulf of California and represent the third record for this species in the area. Illustrations of the material collected in the Gulf of California are provided and some differences are noted when compared to the description of the paralec-totypes. Depth range of the species is discussed and set at 87-786 m. The presence of a wide and deep Oxygen Minimum Zone in the area is believed to limit the dispersion of J. californiensis to the south and to deeper water of the gulf.Especímenes del galateido Janetogalathea californiensis (Benedict, 1902 fueron recolectados en la porción norte del golfo de California central, y representan el tercer registro de esta especie en el área. En base a ilustraciones de material recolectado en el Golfo de California, se indican algunas diferencias con respecto a la redescripción de los paralectotipos. Se discute la distribución batimétrica de la especie de la que se define un intervalo que va de 87 a 786 m de profundidad. Los resultados sugieren que la presencia de una amplia y profunda capa de oxígeno mínimo en el área podría ser la causa que limita la dispersión de J. californiensis hacia el sur y en aguas más profundas del golfo.

  15. Southern California Particle Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the Southern California Particle Center, center researchers will investigate the underlying mechanisms that produce the health effects associated with exposure to...

  16. Living (Rose Bengal stained benthic foraminiferal faunas along a strong bottom-water oxygen gradient on the Indian margin (Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Caulle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rose Bengal stained foraminiferal assemblages were analysed along a five-station bathymetric transect across the core and the lower part of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ on the Indian margin of the Arabian Sea. Sediment cores were collected using the manned submersible Shinkai 6500 during RV Yokosuka cruise YK08-11 in the post-monsoon season (October 2008 at water depths ranging from 535 to 2000 m, along a gradient from almost anoxic to well-oxygenated (0.3 to 108 μM bottom waters. Stained foraminiferal densities were very high in the OMZ core (535 m and decreased with depth. The faunas were dominated (40–80% by non-calcareous taxa at all stations. These were mainly species of Reophax and Lagenammina but also included delicate monothalamous taxa (organic-walled "allogromiids", agglutinated saccamminids, psammosphaerids and tubular forms. These new data from the Indian margin are compared to previous studies from the Murray Ridge, the Pakistan margin and the Oman margin. The fact that similar species were found at sites with comparable bottom-water oxygen concentrations but with very different surface water productivity suggests that, within the strongly developed Arabian Sea OMZ, bottom-water oxygen concentration, and not the organic flux to the sea floor, is the main factor controlling the species composition of the foraminiferal communities. Several foraminiferal species (e.g. Praeglobobulimina sp. 1, Ammodiscus sp. 1, Bolivina aff. dilatata were confined to the core of the OMZ and are presently known only from the Arabian Sea. Because of their association with extremely low-oxygen concentration, these species may prove to be good indicators of past OMZ variability in the Arabian Sea.

  17. Margin Requirements and Equity Option Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitzemann, Steffen; Hofmann, Michael; Uhrig-Homburg, Marliese

    In equity option markets, traders face margin requirements both for the options themselves and for hedging-related positions in the underlying stock market. We show that these requirements carry a significant margin premium in the cross-section of equity option returns. The sign of the margin pre...

  18. Examining the diversity and distribution of microbial communities from newly discovered methane seeps along the Cascadia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabrook, S.; Thurber, A. R.; Embley, R. W.; Raineault, N.; Baumberger, T.; Merle, S. G.

    2016-12-01

    Methane seeps provide biogeochemical and microbial heterogeneity in deep-sea habitats. In June of 2016 the E/V Nautilus, exploring for methane seeps along the Cascadia continental margin, discovered over 450 bubble streams, indicative of active seepage, and collected biological samples at 6 of the resulting newly discovered seeps. These seeps covered a range of depths, latitudes, habitat types and biogeochemical environments and included: Juan de Fuca (150m), Astoria canyon (800m and 500m), Nehalem Bank (185m), Heceta SW (1200m), SW Coquille Bank (600m), and Klamath Knoll seep (700m). Geologic environment types included continental shelf, canyons and slopes, and these sites spanned the zone of hydrate stability and the Oxygen Minimum Zone. A range of seep-specific habitat were found and sampled including: reduced sediments, microbial mats, methane hydrates, clam beds (Calyptogena spp.), Siboglinidae tubeworm assemblages and sparse assemblages of stalked barnacles. Here, we present an initial characterization of the microbial communities collected via push cores by a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) at the six aforementioned sites. With high throughput amplicon sequencing of the V4-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene, we characterize the diversity and microbial composition of the seep sites sampled. This characterization is furthered with digital drop PCR of the pmoA gene (involved with aerobic methanotrophy) to allow for a comparison of the community composition with functional gene abundance of critical microbial processes. These data will be placed in the greater biogeochemical context of the region, including direct comparison with paired gas-tight sampling at key locations. The results of these analyses will provide the first microbial description of this broad range of seep ecosystems along the Cascadia Margin adding to our overall understanding of microbial diversity, the dominant physiological processes at seep ecosystems, and the connection between community

  19. Authentic Assessment in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Leadership, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Describes the teacher-developed California Assessment Program (CAP) writing measure, designed to support California's reform curriculum and based on matrix sampling techniques. This program will be supplemented by literature and mathematics assessments. The greatest challenge is designing an assessment to match the state's new history and social…

  20. California's English Learner Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    English Learner (EL) students in California's schools are numerous and diverse, and they lag behind their native-English-speaking peers. Closing the achievement gap for EL students has been a long-standing goal for California educators, and there are some signs of success. Now that EL funding and curriculum issues are receiving a fresh level of…

  1. California wood energy program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary Brittner

    1983-01-01

    Many varieties of eucalyptus adapt well to growing conditions in the coastal and central valley regions of California. The California Department of Forestry is conducting growth research on a variety of sites throughout the state with many species. Eucalyptus is an excellent fuelwood and has potential for other uses, including chemical feedstocks. Plantations...

  2. Biomass energy and marginal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassany, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the conditions and effects of a possible development of the biomass energy upgrading in uneconomical or not rentable areas. The physical, social and economical characteristics of these regions (in France) are described; then the different types of biomass are presented (agricultural wastes, energetic cultures, forest and land products and residues, food processing effluents, municipal wastes) as well as the various energy process (production of alcohol, methane, thermochemical processes, vegetable oils). The development and the feasability of these processes in marginal areas are finally analyzed taking into account the accessibility of the biomass and the technical and commercial impacts.

  3. Paleogene continental margin truncation in southwestern Mexico: Geochronological evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Peter; MoráN-Zenteno, Dante; HernáNdez-Bernal, Maria Del Sol; SolíS-Pichardo, Gabriela; Tolson, Gustavo; KöHler, Hermann

    1995-12-01

    The reasons for, and mechanisms of, continental margin truncation in SW Mexico where Mesozoic-Cenozoic plutons are situated directly on the Pacific coast, are not yet well understood. Large-scale dextral and/or sinistral displacements of the continental margin terranes, now forming parts of Baja California or the Chortis block, have been proposed. The well-defined along-coast NW-SE decreasing granitoid intrusion age trend (˜1.2 cm/yr in the 100 Ma-40 Ma time interval) between Puerto Vallarta and Zihuatanejo is interpreted by us to be a geometric artifact of oblique continental margin truncation rather than the consequence of a sinistral offset of the Chortis block from those latitudes toward the SE. Changes in the dip and velocity of the NNW-SSE trending Cretaceous-Tertiary subduction zone resulted in a landward migration of the magmatic arc. Taking into account certain stratigraphic affinities of Chortis and the Oaxaca and Mixteca terranes, together with the known displacement rates along the North America-Caribbean Plate boundary, the northwesternmost paleoposition of the Chortis block with respect to SW Mexico was near Zihuatanejo. In contrast, between Zihuatanejo and the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, the cessation of the Tertiary magmatism decreased more rapidly (˜7.7 cm/yr), although the trend is not so obvious. Starting in the late Eocene, Chortis moved about 1100 km to the SE along a transform boundary associated with the opening of the Cayman Trough. Based on our geochronological data and structural relationships between mylonite zones and plutons in the Acapulco-Tehuantepec area, we propose an approximately 650 km SE movement of Chortis from about 40-25 Ma, with a velocity of 6.5-4.3 cm/yr. Since this is considerably slower than the decreasing age trend obtained by us using the geochronological data, we consider batholith formation in this segment to predate and postdate the offshore passage of the North America-Farallon-Caribbean triple junction. Geological

  4. Comparison of submarine gully morphologies in passive and active margin settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C.; Shumaker, L.; Johnstone, S.; Graham, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Passive and active tectonic margins have inherently different hypsometry, due to local patterns of deformation and subsequent impacts on the style of sedimentation. One way we can analyze and compare the two settings is through observation of submarine gullies, which are small channel features that form along the continental slope as it descends to the ocean floor. By documenting the geometries of gullies that have formed on passive margins and gullies that have formed on active margins, we attempt to distinguish differences in gully morphologies in these two settings. We manually mapped over 600 gullies and interfluves from shaded relief and contour maps generated from bathymetric data across the globe, including the coast of California, the Beaufort Sea, and the Black Sea. We extrapolated and plotted elevation profiles of the gullies along their downslope distance, and compared a range of gully properties, such as length, spacing, and slope, to look at the correlations among those elements of gullies and their tectonic setting. We find that gullies forming on active margins show the greatest variability in their slopes, exhibiting both the steepest and the shallowest slopes of the dataset. The slopes of the passive margin gullies fall within the range of the active margin gully slopes, but interestingly, we note patterns in the ranges of gully steepness at different localities. These results differ from our our anticipation that active margin gullies are steeper than passive margin gullies, but suggest that gullies in all settings display a variety of morphologies. Additional mapping of active margin gullies will better determine if there are morphological differences between the two settings.

  5. Dynamics of the continental margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    On 18--20 June 1990, over 70 oceanographers conducting research in the ocean margins of North America attended a workshop in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The purpose of the workshop was to provide the Department of Energy with recommendations for future research on the exchange of energy-related materials between the coastal and interior ocean and the relationship between the ocean margins and global change. The workshop was designed to optimize the interaction of scientists from specific research disciplines (biology, chemistry, physics and geology) as they developed hypotheses, research questions and topics and implementation plans. The participants were given few restraints on the research they proposed other than realistic time and monetary limits. The interdisciplinary structure of the meeting promoted lively discussion and creative research plans. The meeting was divided into four working groups based on lateral, vertical, air/sea and sediment/water processes. Working papers were prepared and distributed before the meeting. During the meeting the groups revised the papers and added recommendations that appear in this report, which was reviewed by an Executive Committee.

  6. Horizontal movements, vertical-habitat utilization and diet of the jumbo squid ( Dosidicus gigas) in the Pacific Ocean off Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzino, Gastón; Gilly, William F.; Markaida, Unai; Salinas-Zavala, César A.; Ramos-Castillejos, Jorge

    2010-07-01

    We deployed four pop-up archival-transmitting (PAT) tags on jumbo squid ( Dosidicus gigas) collected in the Pacific Ocean off the main entrance to Magdalena Bay on the Baja California peninsula in June 2005. This is the first successful deployment of PAT tags on jumbo squid in an area outside the Gulf of California. Summary data were obtained through the ARGOS satellite system for three of the tags; the fourth tag was physically recovered. All of the tagged squid tended to remain on the shallow continental shelf for several days after tagging and then moved offshore into deeper water. Three of the four squid appeared to migrate in a general southerly direction while the fourth remained offshore of Magdalena Bay. All of the squid spent most daylight hours at depths that were associated with the hypoxic oxygen minimum layer, and at night they spent a majority of time in the upper 50 m of the water column. Stomach content analysis and tag temperature-depth data during the first days after tagging revealed that the squid were feeding on pelagic red crabs ( Pleuroncodes planipes) and several larger, neritic fishes over the continental shelf off Magdalena Bay during a seasonal nearshore upwelling. Comparison of our results with those previously collected in the Gulf of California reveal that Dosidicus gigas can vary its behavior and diet to suit local environmental conditions. This adaptability is likely to be an important factor in the ability of D. gigas to invade and colonize new areas.

  7. Aeromagnetic legacy of early Paleozoic subduction along the Pacific margin of Gondwana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, C.; Moore, D.; Damaske, D.; Mackey, T.

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of the aeromagnetic signatures and geology of southeastern Australia and northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, with similar data from ancient subduction zones in California and Japan, provides a framework for reinterpretation of the plate tectonic setting of the Pacific margin of early Paleozoic Gondwana. In our model, the plutons in the Glenelg (south-eastern Australia) and Wilson (northern Victoria Land) zones formed the roots of continental-margin magmatic arcs. Eastward shifting of arc magmatism resulted in the Stavely (south-eastern Australia) and Bowers (northern Victoria Land) volcanic eruptions onto oceanic forearc crust. The turbidites in the Stawell (southeastern Australia) and Robertson Bay (northern Victoria Land zones) shed from the Glenelg and Wilson zones, respectively, were deposited along the trench and onto the subducting oceanic plate. The margin was subsequently truncated by thrust faults and uplifted during the Delamerian and Ross orogenies, leading to the present-day aeromagnetic signatures.

  8. A new species of Ceanothus from northern Baja California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Steve; Keeley, Jon E.

    2002-01-01

    Ceanothus bolensis S. Boyd & J. Keeley is a new species in the subgenus Cerastes from northwestern Baja California, Mexico. It is well represented at elevations above 1000 m on Cerro Bola, a basaltic peak approximately 35 km south of the U.S./Mexican border. It is characterized by small, obovate to oblanceolate, cupped, essentially glabrous leaves with sparsely toothed margins, pale blue flowers, and globose fruits lacking horns. Principal components analysis on morphological traits shows it to be distinct from other members of Cerastes which are distributed away from the coast in southern California and Baja California, Mexico. These phenetic comparisons also suggest that Ceanothus otayensis should not be subsumed under C. crassifolius, as treated in the Jepson Manual, but rather should be retained at specific rank as well.

  9. California Harpoon Fishery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vessel logbook and landings data from harpoon vessels that fish within 200 miles of the California coast, from 1974 to present. The harpoon...

  10. California Data Exchange Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to make July &28;Water Smart Month.&29; &28;Conserving ... Remote sensors today indicate that statewide, snowpack water content is 54 percent of ... California ranked first, along with Texas, on ...

  11. Coastal California Digital Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital ortho-imagery dataset is a survey of coastal California. The project area consists of approximately 3774 square miles. The project design of the digital...

  12. University of Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The focus of the University of Southern California (USC) Children''s Environmental Health Center is to develop a better understanding of how host susceptibility and...

  13. California Tribal Gasoline Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is proposing a draft general permit under the Clean Air Act Federal Indian Country Minor NSR program for gasoline dispensing facilities, such as gas stations, located in Indian country within the geographical boundaries of California.

  14. California Watershed Hydrologic Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset is intended to be used as a tool for water-resource management and planning activities, particularly for site-specific and localized studies requiring a...

  15. Kelp distribution off California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set delineates kelp beds (Nereocystis leutkeana and Macrocystis spp.) along the Pacific Coast of California. Multiple years of kelp mapping data for the...

  16. Earthquakes in Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — There have been many earthquake occurrences in Southern California. This set of slides shows earthquake damage from the following events: Imperial Valley, 1979,...

  17. California Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a result of the California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: a collaboration between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center and Marine Conservation...

  18. Variaciones del sistema de surgencia de Punta Angamos (23 S y la Zona de Mínimo Oxígeno durante el pasado reciente: Una aproximación desde el registro sedimentario de la Bahía Mejillones del Sur Variations of Punta Angamos upwelling system (23 S and the Oxygen Minimum Zone during the recent past: An approximation from sedimentary record of Mejillones del Sur Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JORGE VALDÉS

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Parámetros geoquímicos (carbono orgánico, sílice biogénica y cadmio y petrográficos (materia orgánica estudiados en un testigo de sedimento de la Bahía Mejillones del Sur fueron utilizados para inferir variaciones en la productividad biológica superficial y la oxigenación subsuperficial durante los últimos 2.000 años. Este estudio demuestra que al interior de la bahía la productividad ha disminuido hacia el presente mientras que la Zona de Mínimo Oxígeno se ha intensificado. Se plantea que las variaciones de la productividad se deben a un desplazamiento del centro de surgencia de Punta Angamos, más cerca o más lejos de la bahía y/o a cambios en su intensidad asociados al régimen de vientos locales. Por su parte, la oxigenación estaría influenciada por el ascenso o descenso de la Zona de Mínimo Oxígeno presente en el área. Una correlación de estos resultados con estudios de bioindicadores realizados en otros testigos de la Bahía Mejillones permiten reforzar la hipótesis de que eventos como la Pequeña Edad del Hielo y el Episodio Cálido de la Edad Media han quedado registrados en esta bahía del norte de Chile. Según el presente estudio, el primer periodo estaría caracterizado por un aumento de la productividad superficial y un descenso en la oxigenación subsuperficial de la bahía, mientras que el segundo periodo presentaría características opuestas.Geochemical (organic carbon, biogenic silica and cadmium and petrographic (organic matter parameters analyzed in a sediment core of Mejillones del Sur Bay, have been used to reconstruct past variations in superficial biological productivity and subsuperficial oxygenation, during the last 2,000 years. This study tends to demonstrate that into the bay, the productivity has diminished up to the present, while the Oxygen Minimum Zone has intensified. Productivity variations can be attributed to changes in the upwelling intensity associated to changes in local wind system

  19. Performance Evaluation of Portfolios with Margin Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Ding; Zhongbao Zhou; Helu Xiao; Chaoqun Ma; Wenbin Liu

    2014-01-01

    In financial markets, short sellers will be required to post margin to cover possible losses in case the prices of the risky assets go up. Only a few studies focus on the optimization and performance evaluation of portfolios in the presence of margin requirements. In this paper, we investigate the theoretical foundation of DEA (data envelopment analysis) approach to evaluate the performance of portfolios with margin requirements from a different perspective. Under the mean-variance framework,...

  20. Tracking California seafloor seeps with bathymetry, backscatter and ROVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, Daniel L.; Yun, Janet; Maher, Norman; Barry, James; Greene, Gary

    2002-11-01

    The California (USA) margin includes two different tectonic regimes: subduction north of the Mendocino Triple Junction and translation south. Both margins include seeps, and their distribution can be inferred using seafloor bathymetry and backscatter as well as subsurface seismic data. Anomalous bathymetric and backscatter features related to fluid expulsion include headless submarine canyons, fault zones, anticlines, pockmarks, and mud volcanoes. Anomalous backscatter may be caused by authigenic carbonate (related to the bacterial oxidation of methane) or cold seep clams—both have an impedance and roughness that may be higher than the surrounding seafloor. Remote-operated vehicle (ROV) dives to such suspect seep sites document the presence of extensive authigenic carbonate, areally restricted cold seep communities, carpets of chemoautotrophic bacteria, and bubbling gas. Our operations in the Monterey Bay, on the translational California margin, and the Eel River basin, on the convergent margin, indicate that bathymetric and backscatter maps of the seafloor, if sufficiently high resolution, can be used to map seep sites, and that the distribution of such seeps can be used to constrain subsurface conduits of fluid flow. ROVs, due to their combination of visualization, propulsion, manipulation, sonar, and navigation, provide an excellent platform for ground-truthing, mapping, and sampling seafloor seeps.

  1. Faster Algorithms for Privately Releasing Marginals

    OpenAIRE

    Thaler, Justin R; Ullman, Jonathan Robert; Vadhan, Salil P.

    2012-01-01

    We study the problem of releasing $k$-way marginals of a database $D \\in (\\{0,1\\}^d)^n$, while preserving differential privacy. The answer to a $k$-way marginal query is the fraction of $D$'s records $x \\in \\{0,1\\}^d$ with a given value in each of a given set of up to $k$ columns. Marginal queries enable a rich class of statistical analyses of a dataset, and designing efficient algorithms for privately releasing marginal queries has been identified as an important open problem in private data...

  2. Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1989-03-01

    Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. [Resection margins in conservative breast cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Fernández, Francisco Javier; Ayllón Terán, María Dolores; Lombardo Galera, María Sagrario; Rioja Torres, Pilar; Bascuñana Estudillo, Guillermo; Rufián Peña, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Conservative breast cancer surgery is facing a new problem: the potential tumour involvement of resection margins. This eventuality has been closely and negatively associated with disease-free survival. Various factors may influence the likelihood of margins being affected, mostly related to the characteristics of the tumour, patient or surgical technique. In the last decade, many studies have attempted to find predictive factors for margin involvement. However, it is currently the new techniques used in the study of margins and tumour localisation that are significantly reducing reoperations in conservative breast cancer surgery. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. On the evaluation of marginal expected shortfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    In the analysis of systemic risk, Marginal Expected Shortfall may be considered to evaluate the marginal impact of a single stock on the market Expected Shortfall. These quantities are generally computed using log-returns, in particular when there is also a focus on returns conditional distribution....... In this case, the market log-return is only approximately equal to the weighed sum of equities log-returns. We show that the approximation error is large during turbulent market phases, with a subsequent impact on Marginal Expected Shortfall. We then suggest how to improve the evaluation of Marginal Expected...

  5. Optimizing Surgical Margins in Breast Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preya Ananthakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate surgical margins in breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer have traditionally been viewed as a predictor of local recurrence rates. There is still no consensus on what constitutes an adequate surgical margin, however it is clear that there is a trade-off between widely clear margins and acceptable cosmesis. Preoperative approaches to plan extent of resection with appropriate margins (in the setting of surgery first as well as after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, include mammography, US, and MRI. Improvements have been made in preoperative lesion localization strategies for surgery, as well as intraoperative specimen assessment, in order to ensure complete removal of imaging findings and facilitate margin clearance. Intraoperative strategies to accurately assess tumor and cavity margins include cavity shave techniques, as well as novel technologies for margin probes. Ablative techniques, including radiofrequency ablation as well as intraoperative radiation, may be used to extend tumor-free margins without resecting additional tissue. Oncoplastic techniques allow for wider resections while maintaining cosmesis and have acceptable local recurrence rates, however often involve surgery on the contralateral breast. As systemic therapy for breast cancer continues to improve, it is unclear what the importance of surgical margins on local control rates will be in the future.

  6. On the Marginal Stability of Glassy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Le; Baity-Jesi, Marco; Müller, Markus; Wyart, Matthieu

    2015-03-01

    In various glassy systems that are out of equilibrium, like spin glasses and granular packings, the dynamics appears to be critical: avalanches involving almost the whole system could happen. A recent conceptual breakthrough argues that such glassy systems sample the ensemble of marginal stable states, which inevitably results into critical dynamics. However, it is unclear how the marginal stability is dynamically guaranteed. We investigate this marginal stability assumption by studying specifically the critical athermal dynamics of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model. We discuss how a pseudo-gap in the density distribution of local fields characterizing the marginal stability arises dynamically.

  7. Multiproxy Study of a Holocene Record From Western Pescadero Basin, Gulf of California, Mexico: Paleoclimatic inferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Valdez, M.; Roy, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    A sedimentary sequence (gravity core T-56, 256 cm length) from Pescadero Basin on the western side of the Gulf of California is analyzed as part of a multiproxy study. The core was collected within the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) at 597 m depth, aboard of the R/V "El Puma". Pescadero basin is located at mouth of the gulf; in a location sensitive to record the changes in the gulf and the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The sedimentary sequence is analyzed to contribute to understanding the climatic variability in the southern part of the gulf of California during the Holocene using geochemistry (major and trace elements and Corg), magnetic properties and benthic foraminifera assemblages as proxy of changes in paleoproductivity, paleoprecipitation and bottom water oxygenation. The core is characterized by silty-clay sediments, and exhibits a turbidite between 130 and 235 cm, distinguished by sandy sediments and reworking material. From 130 cm to the top it shows a visible laminated structure. Chronology is based on six AMS radiocarbon dates, and estimated sedimentation rates are 0.22, 0.18, 0.17 and 0.05 mm/yr. The core covers c. last 10,500 years. Variations in major and trace elements (Ti, K, Al, K, Zr) and magnetic susceptibility indicate fluctuations in terrigenous input related to changes in hydrological conditions, Benthic foraminifera assemblages and Corg along the sequence indicate that Pescadero basin is sensitive to paleoceanographic changes. Corg and benthic foraminiferal assemblages show downcore variations related to paleoproductivity changes. For the Early Holocene, low values of Corg and epifaunal benthic foraminifera suggest oxic conditions in bottom waters and strong stratification with low productivity. Organic carbon shows higher values towards the bottom of the core, for the last 1300 years.

  8. Values and marginal preferences in international business

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maseland, Robbert; van Hoorn, Andre

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper in this journal, Maseland and van Hoorn argued that values surveys tend to conflate values and marginal preferences. This assertion has been challenged by Brewer and Venaik, who claim that the wording of most survey items does not suggest that these elicit marginal preferences. Thi

  9. Marginal Utility and Convex Indifference Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews discussion of the relationship between marginal utility and indifference curves which has been presented in recent issues of "Economics." Concludes that indifference analysis does not embody the assumptions of marginal utility theory and that there is no simple relationship between these concepts that does not entail unacceptable…

  10. The homogeneous marginal utility of income assumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demuynck, T.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a test to verify if every agent from a population of heterogeneous consumers has the same marginal utility of income function. This homogeneous marginal utility of income assumption is often (implicitly) used in applied demand studies because it has nice aggregation properties and facilit

  11. Tumor margin detection using optical biopsy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Li, Jiyou; Li, Zhongwu; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Ke; Pu, Yang; He, Yong; Zhu, Ke; Li, Qingbo; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to use the Resonance Raman (RR) and fluorescence spectroscopic technique for tumor margin detection with high accuracy based on native molecular fingerprints of breast and gastrointestinal (GI) tissues. This tumor margins detection method utilizes advantages of RR spectroscopic technique in situ and in real-time to diagnose tumor changes providing powerful tools for clinical guiding intraoperative margin assessments and postoperative treatments. The tumor margin detection procedures by RR spectroscopy were taken by scanning lesion from center or around tumor region in ex-vivo to find the changes in cancerous tissues with the rim of normal tissues using the native molecular fingerprints. The specimens used to analyze tumor margins include breast and GI carcinoma and normal tissues. The sharp margin of the tumor was found by the changes of RR spectral peaks within 2 mm distance. The result was verified using fluorescence spectra with 300 nm, 320 nm and 340 nm excitation, in a typical specimen of gastric cancerous tissue within a positive margin in comparison with normal gastric tissues. This study demonstrates the potential of RR and fluorescence spectroscopy as new approaches with labeling free to determine the intraoperative margin assessment.

  12. Assessing the Costs of Adequacy in California Public Schools: A Cost Function Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazeki, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a cost function is used to estimate the costs for California districts to meet the achievement goals set out for them by the state. I calculate estimates of base costs (i.e., per pupil costs in a district with relatively low levels of student need) and marginal costs (i.e., the additional costs associated with specific student…

  13. Training Needs for Substance Abuse Treatment and Assessment among Rehabilitation Counselors: California State Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Lee Za; Lee, Dal-Yob; Cha, Grace; Arokiasamy, Charles

    2008-01-01

    One hundred rehabilitation counselors in California reported that about 90% of consumers with whom they worked with had substance abuse and cooccurring issues, yet about half rated their graduate training in substance abuse treatment and assessment as poor and their practices as marginally proficient. The correlation analysis revealed that…

  14. The Story of California = La Historia de California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Nick

    "The Story of California" is a history and geography of the state of California, intended for classroom use by limited-English-proficient, native Spanish-speaking students in California's urban middle schools. The book is designed with the left page in English and the right page in Spanish to facilitate student transition into comfortable use of…

  15. The Story of California = La Historia de California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Nick

    "The Story of California" is a history and geography of the state of California, intended for classroom use by limited-English-proficient, native Spanish-speaking students in California's urban middle schools. The book is designed with the left page in English and the right page in Spanish to facilitate student transition into…

  16. The Story of California = La Historia de California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Nick

    "The Story of California" is a history and geography of the state of California, intended for classroom use by limited-English-proficient, native Spanish-speaking students in California's urban middle schools. The book is designed with the left page in English and the right page in Spanish to facilitate student transition into…

  17. Ecoregion sections of California deserts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The dataset delineates ecological sections within California deserts. These deserts occupy the southeastern portion of California and include two ecoregional...

  18. Performance Evaluation of Portfolios with Margin Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In financial markets, short sellers will be required to post margin to cover possible losses in case the prices of the risky assets go up. Only a few studies focus on the optimization and performance evaluation of portfolios in the presence of margin requirements. In this paper, we investigate the theoretical foundation of DEA (data envelopment analysis approach to evaluate the performance of portfolios with margin requirements from a different perspective. Under the mean-variance framework, we construct the optimization model and portfolio possibility set on considering margin requirements. The convexity of the portfolio possibility set is proved and the concept of efficiency in classical economics is extended to the portfolio case. The DEA models are then developed to evaluate the performance of portfolios with margin requirements. Through the simulations carried out in the end, we show that, with adequate portfolios, DEA can be used as an effective tool in computing the efficiencies of portfolios with margin requirements for the performance evaluation purpose. This study can be viewed as a justification of DEA into performance evaluation of portfolios with margin requirements.

  19. Collapse of the California Current during glacial maxima linked to climate change on land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, T D; Schuffert, J D; Andreasen, D; Heusser, L; Lyle, M; Mix, A; Ravelo, A C; Stott, L D; Herguera, J C

    2001-07-06

    Time series of alkenone unsaturation indices gathered along the California margin reveal large (4 degrees to 8 degrees C) glacial-interglacial changes in sea surface temperature (SST) over the past 550,000 years. Interglacial times with SSTs equal to or exceeding that of the Holocene contain peak abundances in the pollen of redwood, the distinctive component of the temperate rainforest of the northwest coast of California. In the region now dominated by the California Current, SSTs warmed 10,000 to 15,000 years in advance of deglaciation at each of the past five glacial maxima. SSTs did not rise in advance of deglaciation south of the modern California Current front. Glacial warming along the California margin therefore is a regional signal of the weakening of the California Current during times when large ice sheets reorganized wind systems over the North Pacific. Both the timing and magnitude of the SST estimates suggest that the Devils Hole (Nevada) calcite record represents regional but not global paleotemperatures, and hence does not pose a fundamental challenge to the orbital ("Milankovitch") theory of the Ice Ages.

  20. Deformation in the Central Gulf of California from Geodetic data (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, C.; Malservisi, R.; Amelung, F.

    2009-12-01

    The spatial and temporal variation of lithospheric strain provides important information for understanding the rifting process at continental margins. However, in the Gulf of California rift system even the modern strain distribution is poorly known. Our geodetic study aims on filling this gap of knowledge by quantifying the plate boundary deformation in the Gulf of California considering different timescales. In the past, Plattner et al. (2007) determined the Baja California - North America rigid plate relative motion, which is comparable with 3Myr-average seafloor spreading rates in the Gulf of California. Here, we study interseismic deformation in the central Gulf of California and coseismic strain release during the August 2009 earthquakes. Our analysis is based on InSAR data acquired by Envisat over a broad area across Baja California, islands in the central Gulf of California, and Sonora. Data from 1993 to May 2009 are used for studying interseismic strain accumulation, considering both, a time-independent model, and a time-dependent model. InSAR data from 2009 only is used in modeling the coseismic displacement during the August 3rd 2009 M 6.9 earthquake. Our modeling results provide information on the modern strain accumulation pattern and fault slip in the Gulf of California. Furthermore, we characterize the parameters of strain accumulation, in particular the Ballenas transform fault.

  1. Comparative organic geochemistry of Indian margin (Arabian Sea sediments: estuary to continental slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cowie

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface sediments from sites across the Indian margin of the Arabian Sea were analysed for their carbon and nitrogen compositions (elemental and stable isotopic, grain size distributions and biochemical indices of organic matter (OM source and/or degradation state. Site locations ranged from the estuaries of the Mandovi and Zuari rivers to depths of ~ 2000 m on the continental slope, thus spanning nearshore muds and sands on the shelf and both the semi-permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ on the upper slope (~ 200–1300 m and the seasonal hypoxic zone that impinges on the shelf. Source indices showed mixed marine and terrigenous OM within the estuaries, and overwhelming predominance (80%+ of marine OM on the shelf and slope. Thus, riverine OM is heavily diluted by autochthonous marine OM and/or is efficiently remineralised within or immediately offshore of the estuaries. Any terrigenous OM that is exported appears to be retained in nearshore muds; lignin phenols indicate that the small terrigenous OM content of slope sediments is of different origin, potentially from rivers to the north. Organic C contents of surface shelf and slope sediments varied from < 0.5 wt % in relict shelf sands to over 7 wt % at slope sites within the OMZ, decreasing to ≤ 1 wt % at 2000 m. Major variability (~ 5 wt % was found at slope sites within the OMZ of similar depth and near-identical bottom-water oxygen concentration. A strong relationship between organic C and sediment grain size was seen for sediments within the OMZ, but lower C loadings were found for sites on the shelf and below the OMZ. Diagenetic indices confirmed that lower C content below the OMZ is associated with greater extent of OM degradation, but that C-poor shelf sediments are not consistently more degraded than those within the OMZ. Together, the results indicate that OM enrichment on the upper slope can be explained by physical controls (winnowing and/or dilution on the shelf and progressive OM

  2. Higher Education in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Policy Institute of California, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Higher education enhances Californians' lives and contributes to the state's economic growth. But population and education trends suggest that California is facing a large shortfall of college graduates. Addressing this short­fall will require strong gains for groups that have been historically under­represented in higher education. Substantial…

  3. FELLOWS ADDRESS California Dreaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van Kees

    2017-01-01

    California was the first jurisdiction to mandate a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. This target was subsequently endorsed by the G8 in 2009 and the European Commission in 2014, and is the guiding principle of the 2015 Paris Agreement. To achieve these

  4. Women of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Harry

    This publication points out the achievements of women who contributed to the development and history of California from the 16th century, when the Spanish Conquistadores moved westward into the San Francisco Bay area, to the gold rush of 1848, and during the following period when women helped stabilize society on the rugged frontier. Women not…

  5. Evidence for fast seismic lid structure beneath the Californian margin and its implication on regional plate deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, V. H.; Graves, R. W.; Wei, S.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithospheric structure of the Pacific and North American plates play an important role in modulating plate deformation along the California margin. Pure path models indicate that the Pacific plate has a fast thick (80km) lid overlaying a strong low velocity zone (LVZ) extending to beyond 300 km depth. In contrast, the North America structure is characterized by a relatively thin (25-35km) lid and a shallow LVZ. Vertical ray paths have similar travel times across the plate boundary for the two models, making resolution of the transitional structure difficult. Earthquakes such as the 2014 March 10 Mw 6.8 Mendocino and 2014 August 25 Mw 6.0 Napa events recorded at regional distances across California provide an opportunity to study horizontal paths and track the lateral variation in the lower crust-uppermost mantle structure under the Californian margin. Observations from both Napa and Mendocino events show direct SH-wave arrivals at Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) stations are systematically earlier (up to 10 s) for coastal and island stations relative to inland sites. The shift in SH arrival times may be due to features such as varying crustal thickness, varying upper mantle velocity and the presence of a fast seismic lid. To test the different hypotheses, we perform extensive forward modeling using both 1-D frequency-wavenumber and 3-D finite-difference approaches. The model that best fits the SH arrival times has a fast lid (Vs = 4.7 km/s) underlying the whole California margin, with the lid increasing in thickness from east to west to a maximum thickness about 70 km in the western offshore region. The fast, thick seismic lid lends strength and rigidity to the Pacific plate lithosphere in contrast with the weaker North American continental plate, which influences the overall plate deformation along the Californian margin and is in agreement with GPS measurements.

  6. New Low-Temperature Thermochronology Reveals Contrasting Modes of Continental Extension Across the Sonoran Rifted Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, B. P.; Fletcher, J. M.; Gleadow, A. J.; Calmus, T.; Nourse, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Sonoran rifted margin extends 250 km from the western flanks of the Sierra Madre Occidental to the Gulf of California and contains a classic Basin and Range morphology that indicates "broad-rift" mode of continental extension. However, new low-temperature thermochronology reveals that the Sonoran rifted margin is also internally composed of at least two temporally and spatially distinct belts that display other distinct styles of extension. Mountain ranges that lie within a narrow belt (20 km wide) along the coast of the Gulf of California between Puerto Libertad and Bahia Kino yield highly discordant apatite fission track (AFT) ages that range from 5 to 54 Ma and likely reflect the strong tilting of these tectonic blocks. The widespread occurrence of AFT ages between 5 and 7 Ma, which are typically found in the deepest crustal levels of the tilt blocks, and the presence of Quaternary scarps indicate that extension in the coastal region largely occurred from late Miocene to recent times. We infer that this belt is dominated by a "narrow-rift" mode of extension where deformation has been focused to produce the Gulf depression. Well inland from the coast (175 km east) is a belt of metamorphic core complexes that extends more than 200 km from Magdalena to Mazatan and typically yields older and more concordant AFT ages from 14 to 23 Ma. However, the presence of ages as young as 8 to 11 Ma indicate that the "metamorphic-core-complex" mode of extension in this belt likely overlapped in time with the "narrow-rift" mode of extension in the Gulf of California. We conclude that the juxtaposition of major deformation belts each with different modes of continental extension reflects the diverse processes that have affected the Sonoran margin through time.

  7. Exploration of the continental margins of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Siddiquie, H.N.; Hashimi, N.H.; Vora, K.H.; Pathak, M.C.

    In mid 1970's the National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India prepared a plan for systematic regional, geological and geophysical surveys of the continental margins of India. This involved over 75,000 km of underway (bathymetric, side scan sonar...

  8. Mental Depreciation and Marginal Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath; Fennema

    1996-11-01

    We propose that individuals practice "mental depreciation," that is, they implicitly spread the fixed costs of their expenses over time or use. Two studies explore how people spread fixed costs on durable goods. A third study shows that depreciation can lead to two distinct errors in marginal decisions: First, people sometimes invest too much effort to get their money's worth from an expense (e.g., they may use a product a lot to spread the fixed expense across more uses). Second, people sometimes invest too little effort to get their money's worth: When people add a portion of the fixed cost to the current costs, their perceived marginal (i.e., incremental) costs exceed their true marginal costs. In response, they may stop investing because their perceived costs surpass the marginal benefits they are receiving. The latter effect is supported by two field studies that explore real board plan decisions by university students.

  9. Time Safety Margin: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    safety plan as the test event approaches. Did the planners miss anything? What doesn’t make sense ? Is it too conservative or not conservative enough? The...seconds of TSM for a 10-degree dive at 150 KTAS, producing inefficiency with excessive margin. Somewhere in the middle, the restriction makes sense , but...412TW-TIH-16-01 TIME SAFETY MARGIN: THEORY AND PRACTICE WILLIAM R. GRAY, III Chief Test Pilot USAF Test Pilot School SEPTEMBER 2016

  10. Marketing margins and agricultural technology in Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman

    2000-01-01

    Improvements in agricultural productivity and reductions in marketing costs in Mozambique are analysed using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model. The model incorporates detailed marketing margins and separates household demand for marketed and home-produced goods. Individual simulations...... of improved agricultural technology and lower marketing margins yield welfare gains across the economy. In addition, a combined scenario reveals significant synergy effects, as gains exceed the sum of gains from the individual scenarios. Relative welfare improvements are higher for poor rural households...

  11. Statistical Analysis of Thermal Analysis Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center requires that each project demonstrate a minimum of 5 C margin between temperature predictions and hot and cold flight operational limits. The bounding temperature predictions include worst-case environment and thermal optical properties. The purpose of this work is to: assess how current missions are performing against their pre-launch bounding temperature predictions and suggest any possible changes to the thermal analysis margin rules

  12. Late Cretaceous Breakup of the Pacific Margin of Southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Garcia, J. C.; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2006-12-01

    As geological, geophysical and geochemical evidence keeps accumulating over the years, there seems to be a growing general acceptance that the Chortis block (nuclear Central America) occupied a position further to the NW along the present-day margin of southwestern Mexico, sometime between Early Jurassic and Neogene time. The controversy resides no longer in the sense of motion along the coast but on the timing of events and in the latitude that the Chortis block occupied at the time of detachment. Previous studies mainly confined to the northern margin of the Chortis block, confirmed a left-lateral displacement of 130 km in Neogene time. Further studies made northwestward along the Mexican coast provided a better understanding of magmatic and metamorphic processes in the area, and suggested times of detachment increased to 30 Ma (Wadge and Burke, 1983), 40 Ma (Schaaf and others, 1995), and 66 Ma (Herrmann and others, 1994). The pre- detachment westernmost position of the block has changed, depending on the model chosen, from Puerto Vallarta and beyond, to the current position. We contend that several indicators, namely: (1) the truncated nature of the Pacific coast of SW Mexico; (2) the genesis of the Kula-Farallon ridge at 85 Ma; (3) the 2,600 km of northward transport of Baja British Columbia from the present-day latitude of the Baja California Peninsula, beginning at 85 Ma; (4) the paleomagnetic counterclockwise rotations of areas both in the Chortis block and along the Mexican coast, during Late Cretaceous-Paleogene time, and (5) the systematic NW-SE decrease of radiometric dates beginning at 85 Ma in Puerto Vallarta, point to this time and region for the onset of strike- slip drifting of the Chortis block toward its current position.

  13. Investigating Mechanisms of Marginal Settlement Life Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid M. Mohammadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research was to investigate mechanisms to improve marginal settlement life in Koohdasht County in Lorestan province. This research was a sort of the survey studies and a questionnaire was compiled for collection of data. Statistical population of this study was included 1560 households; also sampling method was a sort of random sampling. Number of sample size was estimated 85 households. Questionnaire's reliability was confirmed through computing Cronbach's alpha coefficient which was 0.85. Face validity of questionnaire was confirmed by some Tehran university agricultural extension and education department scientific board members. Also data analyzed by WINspss 11.5. The results of research revealed that marginal area residents had not good financial situation but they undertook great supporting burden and in point of view access to services and life conditions had not good situation. Therefore improvement of life conditions of marginal settlement life such as fundamental infrastructure include communication systems and sanitation offloading system recognized as the most important mechanisms of marginal settlement improvement according to results of priority setting of marginal settlement situation mechanisms. Also the results of factor analysis showed that 7 main mechanisms were be effective in term of marginal settlement life improvement that in order to importance were included servicing and life condition improvement, credit-economic, civil and legal, control and prevention, population and migration control, infrastructures improvement and hygiene situation.

  14. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project IV. Structural building response; Structural Building Response Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healey, J.J.; Wu, S.T.; Murga, M.

    1980-02-01

    As part of the Phase I effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) being performed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the basic objective of Subtask IV.1 (Structural Building Response Review) is to review and summarize current methods and data pertaining to seismic response calculations particularly as they relate to the objectives of the SSMRP. This material forms one component in the development of the overall computational methodology involving state of the art computations including explicit consideration of uncertainty and aimed at ultimately deriving estimates of the probability of radioactive releases due to seismic effects on nuclear power plant facilities.

  15. Evaluation of marginal circumference and marginal thickness changes in precrimped stainless steel crowns, after recrimping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshar H

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The need for recrimping precrimped stainless steel crowns by the dentist in clinic is controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the rate of marginal circumference and marginal thickness change of precrimped stainless steel crowns after recrimping. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 primary photos were taken from margins of 30 S.S.Cs (3M, Ni-Cr related to tooth 85 with a digital camera fixed at a determined distance. Margins of crowns were crimped by 114 and 137 pliers with a controlled force (0.2 N and then 30 secondary photos were taken in the same conditions. The circumference of crown margins in primary (group A and secondary (group B photos were assessed by a digitizer system. Comparing the circumferences of crown margins in primary and secondary photos showed a significant decrease after crimping. Thickness of 30 random points on the crown margins of a crown similar to mentioned cases was measured by SEM (×150. Then similar procedures including taking a primary photo, crimping and taking a secondary photo was done for the sample crown. After significant reduction in margin circumference, thickness of 30 other random points on the crown margin were measured by SEM. Data were analyzed by paired sample t-test with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: The mean marginal circumference of precrimped stainless steel crowns was reduced by 7.3% which was significant (P<0.001. On the other hand the mean marginal thickness of sample stainless steel crown showed 18µ increase. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, marginal circumference of precrimped stainless steel crowns (3M, Ni-Cr showed a significant decrease after crimping. It is concluded that crimping the stainless steel crowns even for precrimped ones seems necessary.

  16. VENTANA WILDERNESS, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, R.C.; Fillo, P.V.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Ventana Primitive Area (now the Ventana Wilderness) in California was made. On the basis of known mineral occurrences and geologic and geochemical studies, this part of the Coast Ranges of central California contains little evidence for the existence of mineral resources. Small bodies of good quality marble are scattered through parts of the wilderness. Because of their small size these marble occurrences are not considered as having resource potential. Detailed mapping and sampling of the sulfide-bearing gneiss and schist will be needed to determine the grade and extent of these rocks and the possibility that they, in fact, could represent significant resources. The numerous thermal springs in and near the area suggest a high geothermal gradient and that geothermal-energy resources should be investigated.

  17. Potential of energy farming in the southeastern California desert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, V.

    1980-04-01

    The California Energy Commission is currently analyzing the use of energy farms to provide future sources of energy for California. Energy farms can be defined as growing plants and converting them to various forms of energy. The use of marginal desert lands in southeastern California for the siting of energy farms using acacia, Eucalyptus, euphorbia, quayule, jojoba, mesquite, or tamarisk is considered. Two hypothetical scenarios using either rainfall, or rainfall and groundwater as water sources were described to determine the maximum amount of energy produced from estimated amounts of suitable land in this area. Considering both scenarios, the maximum range of energy produced is .03 to 0.4 Quads. It is recommended that (1) genetic research be continued to increase biomass yields of these and other candidate plants grown in the desert; and (2) small test plots be established at varying desert locations to collect yield growth, and survival data. Once this information is known, the identification of the best plant(s) to use for energy farming in the California desert area will be known, as well as the cost and quantity of energy produced.

  18. Reconstructing Rodinia by Fitting Neoproterozoic Continental Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Reconstructions of Phanerozoic tectonic plates can be closely constrained by lithologic correlations across conjugate margins by paleontologic information, by correlation of orogenic belts, by paleomagnetic location of continents, and by ocean floor magmatic stripes. In contrast, Proterozoic reconstructions are hindered by the lack of some of these tools or the lack of their precision. To overcome some of these difficulties, this report focuses on a different method of reconstruction, namely the use of the shape of continents to assemble the supercontinent of Rodinia, much like a jigsaw puzzle. Compared to the vast amount of information available for Phanerozoic systems, such a limited approach for Proterozoic rocks, may seem suspect. However, using the assembly of the southern continents (South America, Africa, India, Arabia, Antarctica, and Australia) as an example, a very tight fit of the continents is apparent and illustrates the power of the jigsaw puzzle method. This report focuses on Neoproterozoic rocks, which are shown on two new detailed geologic maps that constitute the backbone of the study. The report also describes the Neoproterozoic, but younger or older rocks are not discussed or not discussed in detail. The Neoproterozoic continents and continental margins are identified based on the distribution of continental-margin sedimentary and magmatic rocks that define the break-up margins of Rodinia. These Neoproterozoic continental exposures, as well as critical Neo- and Meso-Neoproterozoic tectonic features shown on the two new map compilations, are used to reconstruct the Mesoproterozoic supercontinent of Rodinia. This approach differs from the common approach of using fold belts to define structural features deemed important in the Rodinian reconstruction. Fold belts are difficult to date, and many are significantly younger than the time frame considered here (1,200 to 850 Ma). Identifying Neoproterozoic continental margins, which are primarily

  19. Abrupt plate accelerations shape rifted continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Sascha; Williams, Simon E.; Butterworth, Nathaniel P.; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-08-01

    Rifted margins are formed by persistent stretching of continental lithosphere until breakup is achieved. It is well known that strain-rate-dependent processes control rift evolution, yet quantified extension histories of Earth’s major passive margins have become available only recently. Here we investigate rift kinematics globally by applying a new geotectonic analysis technique to revised global plate reconstructions. We find that rifted margins feature an initial, slow rift phase (less than ten millimetres per year, full rate) and that an abrupt increase of plate divergence introduces a fast rift phase. Plate acceleration takes place before continental rupture and considerable margin area is created during each phase. We reproduce the rapid transition from slow to fast extension using analytical and numerical modelling with constant force boundary conditions. The extension models suggest that the two-phase velocity behaviour is caused by a rift-intrinsic strength-velocity feedback, which can be robustly inferred for diverse lithosphere configurations and rheologies. Our results explain differences between proximal and distal margin areas and demonstrate that abrupt plate acceleration during continental rifting is controlled by the nonlinear decay of the resistive rift strength force. This mechanism provides an explanation for several previously unexplained rapid absolute plate motion changes, offering new insights into the balance of plate driving forces through time.

  20. Theory of margination in confined multicomponent suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez Rivera, Rafael; Sinha, Kushal; Graham, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In blood flow, leukocytes and platelets tend to segregate near the vessel walls; this is known as margination. Margination of leukocytes and platelets is important in physiological processes, medical diagnostics and drug delivery. A mechanistic theory is developed to describe flow-induced segregation in confined multicomponent suspensions of deformable particles such as blood. The theory captures the essential features of margination by describing it in terms of two key competing processes in these systems at low Reynolds number: wall-induced migration and hydrodynamic pair collisions. The theory also includes the effect of physical properties of the deformable particles and molecular diffusion. Several regimes of segregation are identified, depending on the value of a ``margination parameter'' M. Moreover, there is a critical value of M below which a sharp ``drainage transition'' occurs: one component is completely depleted from the bulk flow to the vicinity of the walls. Direct hydrodynamic simulations also display this transition in suspensions where the components differ in size or flexibility. The developed mechanistic theory leads to substantial insight into the origins of margination and will help in guiding development of new technologies involving multicomponent suspensions. This work was supported by NSF grant CBET-1436082.

  1. Collapse of modern carbonate platform margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, H.T.; Hine, A.C.; Gardulski, A.

    1985-01-01

    Modern carbonate platform margins in the Florida-Bahama region have been viewed as depositional or constructional features. However, recent studies have shown that carbonate escarpments, such as the Blake-Bahama and West Florida Escarpments, are erosional in origin where the platform margins have a scalloped or horse-shoe shape. Seismic reflection data from one of these crescentic features along the west Florida platform margin indicate that it originated by large scale gravity collapse (slump). This collapse structure extends for at least 120 km along the margin and has removed about 350 m of strata as young as early Neogene. Although at least three generations of slope failure are recognized, catastrophic collapse appears to have occurred in the mid-Miocene. Gravitational instability due to high rates of sediment accumulation may have been the triggering mechanism. These data suggest that submarine slumping is an important process in the retreat of limestone escarpments and in the generation of carbonate megabreccia debris flows. Scalloped platform margins occur on satellite images of northern Exuma Sound and Columbus Basin in the Bahamas. The authors suggest that large-scale submarine slumping can cause elongation of structurally controlled intraplatform basins (Exuma South), and produce anomalous horse-shoe shaped basins (Columbus Basin) by mega-collapse processes.

  2. Abrupt plate accelerations shape rifted continental margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Sascha; Williams, Simon E; Butterworth, Nathaniel P; Müller, R Dietmar

    2016-08-11

    Rifted margins are formed by persistent stretching of continental lithosphere until breakup is achieved. It is well known that strain-rate-dependent processes control rift evolution, yet quantified extension histories of Earth's major passive margins have become available only recently. Here we investigate rift kinematics globally by applying a new geotectonic analysis technique to revised global plate reconstructions. We find that rifted margins feature an initial, slow rift phase (less than ten millimetres per year, full rate) and that an abrupt increase of plate divergence introduces a fast rift phase. Plate acceleration takes place before continental rupture and considerable margin area is created during each phase. We reproduce the rapid transition from slow to fast extension using analytical and numerical modelling with constant force boundary conditions. The extension models suggest that the two-phase velocity behaviour is caused by a rift-intrinsic strength--velocity feedback, which can be robustly inferred for diverse lithosphere configurations and rheologies. Our results explain differences between proximal and distal margin areas and demonstrate that abrupt plate acceleration during continental rifting is controlled by the nonlinear decay of the resistive rift strength force. This mechanism provides an explanation for several previously unexplained rapid absolute plate motion changes, offering new insights into the balance of plate driving forces through time.

  3. Early, middle, and late Miocene basin development, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, S.B.

    1988-03-01

    Contrary to earlier models of progressive basin development related to northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction, it can now be documented that the major basins of coastal California developed at about the same time in the late Oligocene to early Miocene. This basin development is marked by rapid deepening of basin floors, subsequent changes in depositional facies from nonmarine and shallow marine to deep marine, and widespread volcanism dated at 23-20 Ma. The coastal basins likely formed by rifting and subsidence linked to the proximity of the Farallon-pacific spreading ridge and the subduction of hot young oceanic crust, but cannot be correlated to any existing models of triple junction migration. Indeed, strike-slip restored positions of the coastal basins at their inception indicate that the basins were spread out over about 800 km of the southern coast of California. The Miocene basins were likely larger than the present coastal basins, although their configurations are obscured by late Neogene faulting and erosion. It is likely, however, that paleohighs separated at least some of the margin into proximal and distal basins. With local exceptions, structuring in the Miocene basins was primarily extensional, with widespread strike-slip and thrust tectonics restricted mainly to latest Miocene and younger events. Plate reconstructions suggest several hundred kilometers of transform motion occurred along the California margin during the Miocene, but there is only limited evidence of this movement in the known history of either the basins or the major faults of California. Sedimentation during the Miocene was controlled by both oceanic conditions (biogenic component) and the relative abundance of clastic input. The clastic input was controlled by a combination of proximal vs distal basinal positions, eustatic sea level changes, and local tectonics.

  4. Black Butte Lake, Stony Creek, California Geologic and Seismologic Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Geologic Harlan Miller Tate (1982) Great Valley NNE NNW Vertical Weak Lomnitz & Seismologic Bolt (1967) Margin N75E N15W Vertical Geologic Bolt et al...of Engineers, Sacramento District, California. 78 Bolt, B.A., Lomnitz , C., and McEvilly, T.V., 1968. Seismolo gical Evidence in the Tectonics of...Division of Hines and Geology Special Report 124, R.W. Sherburne and C.J. Hagne, Editors. 83 Lomnitz , C., and Bolt, B.A., 1967. Evidence of Crustal

  5. Digital Margins : How spatially and socially marginalized communities deal with digital exclusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salemink, Koen

    2016-01-01

    The increasing importance of the Internet as a means of communication has transformed economies and societies. For spatially and socially marginalized communities, this transformation has resulted in digital exclusion and further marginalization. This book presents a study of two kinds of marginaliz

  6. Ecoregions of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Glenn E.; Omernik, James M.; Smith, David W.; Cook, Terry D.; Tallyn, Ed; Moseley, Kendra; Johnson, Colleen B.

    2016-02-23

    Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. By recognizing the spatial differences in the capacities and potentials of ecosystems, ecoregions stratify the environment by its probable response to disturbance (Bryce and others, 1999). These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across Federal agencies, State agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources in the same geographical areas (Omernik and others, 2000).The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions are hierarchical and can be identified through the analysis of the spatial patterns and the composition of biotic and abiotic phenomena that affect or reflect differences in ecosystem quality and integrity (Wiken, 1986; Omernik, 1987, 1995). These phenomena include geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another regardless of the hierarchical level. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels of ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997, map revised 2006). At level III, the continental United States contains 105 ecoregions and the conterminous United States has 85 ecoregions (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2013). Level IV, depicted here for California, is a further refinement of level III ecoregions. Explanations of the methods used to define these ecoregions are given in Omernik (1995), Omernik and others

  7. Marginalization revisited: critical, postmodern, and liberation perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J M

    1999-12-01

    Marginalization was advocated by Hall, Stevens, and Meleis in 1994 as a guiding concept for valuing diversity in knowledge development. Properties, risks, and resilience associated with the concept were detailed. This conceptualization of marginalization is reexamined here for its sociopolitical usefulness to nursing, from (1) critical theory, (2) postmodern, and (3) liberation philosophy perspectives. Additional properties are proposed to update the original conceptualization. These include: exteriority, Eurocentrism, constraint, economics, seduction, testimony, and hope. Effects of Eurocentric capitalism on all marginalized people are explored. Nursing implications include the need for interdisciplinary dialogue about the ethics of promoting and exporting Eurocentrism in nursing education and practice, and the need for integrated economic analyses of all aspects of life and health.

  8. Pathogenesis of splenic marginal zone lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Qing Du

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL is a distinct low grade B-cell lymphoma with an immunophenotype similar to that of splenic marginal zone B-cells. Like the normal splenic marginal zone B-cells, SMZLs also show variable features in somatic mutations of their rearranged immunoglobulin genes, with ∼90% of cases harbouring somatic mutations but at remarkably variable degrees, suggesting that SMZL may have multiple cell of origins, deriving from the heterogeneous B-cells of the splenic marginal zone. Notably, ∼30% of SMZLs show biased usage of IGHV1-2*04, with the expressed BCR being potentially polyreactive to autoantigens. Recent exome and targeted sequencing studies have identified a wide spectrum of somatic mutations in SMZL with the recurrent mutations targeting multiple signalling pathways that govern the development of splenic marginal zone B-cells. These recurrent mutations occur in KLF2 (20–42%, NOTCH2 (6.5–25%, NF-κB (CARD11 ∼7%, IKBKB ∼7%, TNFAIP3 7–13%, TRAF3 5%, BIRC3 6.3% and TLR (MYD88 5–13% signalling pathways. Interestingly, the majority of SMZL with KLF2 mutation have both 7q32 deletion and IGHV1-2 rearrangement, and these cases also have additional mutations in NOTCH2, or TNFAIP3, or TRAF3. There is a potential oncogenic cooperation among concurrent genetic changes, for example between the IGHV1-2 expressing BCR and KLF2 mutation in activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway, and between KLF2 and TRAF3 mutations in activation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway. These novel genetic findings have provided considerable insights into the pathogenesis of SMZL and will stimulate the research in both normal and malignant marginal zone B-cells.

  9. Working marginal reserves using Auger technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celada Tamames, B.

    1988-03-01

    Following up an idea put forward at a meeting of the PEN (National Energy Plan) R and D working party held in Ponferrada in the province of Leon, Ocicarbon contracted Geocontrol SA to carry out a study on the possible use of Auger technology for working marginal coal reserves. This article summarises the most important points in the final report on this project: current state of Auger technology, inventory of marginal coal reserves in Spain and the use of Auger technology in Spain. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Algorithms for computing the multivariable stability margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekawy, Jonathan A.; Safonov, Michael G.; Chiang, Richard Y.

    1989-01-01

    Stability margin for multiloop flight control systems has become a critical issue, especially in highly maneuverable aircraft designs where there are inherent strong cross-couplings between the various feedback control loops. To cope with this issue, we have developed computer algorithms based on non-differentiable optimization theory. These algorithms have been developed for computing the Multivariable Stability Margin (MSM). The MSM of a dynamical system is the size of the smallest structured perturbation in component dynamics that will destabilize the system. These algorithms have been coded and appear to be reliable. As illustrated by examples, they provide the basis for evaluating the robustness and performance of flight control systems.

  11. Jatropha potential on marginal land in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendimu, Mengistu Assefa

    narrative. But both the availability and suitability of “marginal” land for commercial level jatropha production is not well understood/examined, especially in Africa. Using a case study of large-scale jatropha plantation in Ethiopia, this paper examines the process of land identification for jatropha...... investments, and the agronomic performance of large-scale jatropha plantation on so-called marginal land. Although it has been argued that jatropha can be grown well on marginal land without irrigation, and thus does not compete for land and water or displace food production from agricultural land, this study...

  12. Libraries in California: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library → Libraries in California URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/california.html Libraries in California ... Alameda, CA 94501 510-522-3700 ext. 3331 http://www.alamedahospital.org Anaheim Anaheim Regional Medical Center ...

  13. California community water systems inventory dataset, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This data set contains information about all Community Water Systems in California. Data are derived from California Office of Drinking Water (ODW) Water Quality...

  14. Use of marginal organs in kidney transplantation for marginal recipients: too close to the margins of safety?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuer M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Due to organ shortage, average waiting time for a kidney in Germany is about 4 years after start of dialysis. Number of kidney grafts recovered can only be maintained by accepting older and expanded criteria donors. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of donor and recipient risk on kidney long-term function. Methods All deceased kidney transplantations were considered. We retrospectively studied 332 patients between 2002 and 2006; divided in 4 groups reflecting donor and recipient risk. Results Non-marginal recipients were less likely to receive a marginal organ (69 of 207, 33% as compared to marginal recipients, of whom two-thirds received a marginal organ (p Conclusions As we were able to show expanded criteria donor has a far bigger effect on long-term graft function than the "extra risk" recipient. Although there have been attempts to define groups of recipients who should be offered ECD kidneys primarily the discussion is still ongoing.

  15. 17 CFR 242.405 - Withdrawal of margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) REGULATIONS M, SHO, ATS, AC, AND NMS AND CUSTOMER MARGIN REQUIREMENTS FOR SECURITY FUTURES Customer Margin Requirements for Security Futures § 242.405 Withdrawal of margin. (a) By the customer. Except as otherwise... account after such withdrawal is sufficient to satisfy the required margin for the security futures...

  16. Physical and chemical effects of grain aggregates on the Palos Verdes margin, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, David E.; Eganhouse, Robert; McArthur, William

    2002-05-01

    Large discharges of wastewater and particulate matter from the outfalls of the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts onto the Palos Verdes shelf since 1937 have produced an effluent-affected sediment deposit characterized by low bulk density, elevated organic matter content, and a high percentage of fine silt and clay particles relative to underlying native sands and sandy silts. Comparison of the results of grain-size analyses using a gentle wet-sieving technique that preserves certain grain aggregates to the results of standard size analyses of disaggregated particles shows that high percentages (up to 50%) of the silt and clay fractions of the effluent-affected mud are incorporated in aggregates having intermediate diameters in the fine-to-medium sand size range (63-500 μm). Scanning electron microscope images of the aggregates show that they are predominantly oval fecal pellets or irregularly shaped fragments of pellets. Deposit-feeding polychaete worms such as Capitella sp . and Mediomastus sp ., abundant in the mud-rich effluent-affected sediment on Palos Verdes shelf, are probably responsible for most of the grain aggregates through fecal pellet production. Particle settling rates and densities, and the concentrations of organic carbon and p, p'-DDE, a metabolite of the hydrophobic pesticide DDT, were determined for seven grain-size fractions in the effluent-affected sediment. Fecal pellet grain densities ranged from about 1.2 to 1.5 g/cc, and their average settling rates were reduced to the equivalent of about one phi size relative to spherical quartz grains of the same diameter. However, repackaging of fine silt and clay grains into the sand-sized fecal pellets causes an effective settling rate increase of up to 3 orders of magnitude for the smallest particles incorporated in the pellets. Moreover, organic carbon and p, p'-DDE exhibit a bimodal distribution with relatively high concentrations in the finest size fraction (0-20 μm), as expected, and a second concentration peak associated with the sand-sized fecal pellets. The repackaging of fine-grained particles along with their adsorbed chemical compounds into relatively fast-settling pellets has important implications for the mobilization and transport of the sediment and the desorption of chemicals from grain surfaces.

  17. On the Evolution of Glaciated Continental Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverre Laberg, Jan; Rydningen, Tom Arne; Safronova, Polina A.; Forwick, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Glaciated continental margins, continental margins where a grounded ice sheet repeatedly has been at or near the shelf break, are found at both northern and southern high-latitudes. Their evolution are in several aspects different from their low-latitude counterparts where eustatic sea-level variations possess a fundamental control on their evolution and where fluvial systems provide the main sediment input. From studies of the Norwegian - Barents Sea - Svalbard and NE Greenland continental margins we propose the following factors as the main control on the evolution of glaciated continental margins: 1) Pre-glacial relief controlling the accommodation space, 2) Ice sheet glaciology including the location of fast-flowing ice streams where source area morphology exerts a fundamental control, 3) Composition of the glacigenic sediments where the clay content in previous studies have been found to be important, and 4) Sea-level controlled both by eustacy and isostacy. From three case studies, 1) the western Barents Sea, 2) part of the North Norwegian (Troms), and 3) the Mid-Norwegian margin, the influence on these factors for the sea-floor morphology, sedimentary processes of the continental slope - deep sea and continental margin architecture are discussed. The pre-glacial relief of the mid-Norwegian and Troms margins relates to the onset of rifting and plate break-up from the early Cenozoic while for the SW Barents Sea, plate shear was followed by rifting. A wide zone of extended continental crust occurs offshore mid-Norway while this zone is much narrower offshore Troms leading to a more pronounced pre-glacial relief. Regarding sediment delivery and ice sheet glaciology the western Barents Sea exemplifies very high sediment input corresponding to an estimated average erosion of the source area of ~0.4 mm/yr (SW Barents Sea), much of which is related to subglacial erosion of Mesozoic - Cenozoic sedimentary rocks from large paleo-ice streams. The mid-Norwegian margin

  18. California Tiger Salamander Range - CWHR [ds588

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  19. Giant Reed Distribution - Northern California [ds333

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Arundo Distribution layer is a compilation of Arundo donax observations in northern and central California, obtained from several sources, including Arundo...

  20. California Fish Passage Assessment Database [ds69

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Passage Assessment Database shapefile contains locations of known and potential barriers to salmonid migration in California streams with additional information...

  1. Geological features and geophysical signatures of continental margins of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.

    and classification of continental margins are in general dependent on style of continental splitting, rifting, subsidence and their proximity to the tectonic plate boundaries, at times the margins undergo for modifications by sediment deposition and volcanic... by Deccan-Reunion hotspot volcanism and Bengal Fan sedimentation respectively. Volcanism has dominated on the western continental margin of India, thereby the margin had been turned into a volcanic passive continental margin, while eastern continental...

  2. CHANCHELULLA ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Donald F.; Stebbins, Scott A.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey there seems to be little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral resources in the Chanchelulla Roadless Area, California, except for a demonstrated resource of about 7200 tons containing 0. 084 oz gold/ton, 0. 84 oz silver/ton, and accessory copper at the Chanchelulla prospect. This prospect is located on a northwest-trending quartz vein. Limestone and small amounts of magnetite occur in the area but on the basis of available data no resources are identified. No potential for energy resources was identified.

  3. Conservation issues: California chaparral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Richard W.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2016-01-01

    California chaparral, a sclerophyllous shrub-dominated plant community shaped by a Mediterranean-type climate and infrequent, high-intensity fire, is one of the most biodiverse and threatened habitats on Earth. Distinct forms of chaparral, distinguished by differing species composition, geography, and edaphic characteristics, can cover thousands of hectares with dense vegetation or be restricted to smaller communities identified by the presence of endemic species. To maintain the biodiversity of chaparral, protective land management actions will be required to mitigate the loss due to the impacts of human population growth, development, climate change, and increased fire frequencies.

  4. Puentes pretensados California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1958-09-01

    Full Text Available En Estados Unidos, el hormigón pretensado va extendiendo poco a poco su campo de aplicación. Como ejemplo de ello, en este artículo presentamos una serie de puentes pretensados construidos por el Estado de California. Hasta la fecha se han construido ya unos 40 puentes de pequeña luz, de variable número de tramos dentro de su jurisdicción territorial, y todos de hormigón pretensado; se hallan en construcción 23, 15 en desarrollo de proyecto y unos 50 en estudio.

  5. 5TH BIOTECHNOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OCEAN MARGINS PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. ARTURO MASSOL, PROGRAM CHAIR; DR. ROSA BUXEDA, PROGRAM CO-CHAIR

    2004-01-08

    BI-OMP supports DOE's mission in Climate Change Research. The program provides the fundamental understanding of the linkages between carbon and nitrogen cycles in ocean margins. Researchers are providing a mechanistic understanding of these cycles, using the tools of modern molecular biology. The models that will allow policy makers to determine safe levels of greenhouse gases for the Earth System.

  6. Recidiva tardia de linfoma da zona marginal

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha,Talita M. B.S.; Bortolheiro,Tereza C.; Costa, Eduardo; Haardt,Daniela; Roberto P. Paes; Chiattone, Carlos S.

    2009-01-01

    O linfoma de zona marginal é um linfoma de baixo grau com curso clínico indolente e potencial de recidiva.1,2 Apresentamos um caso de recidiva tardia após 25 anos de aparente remissão completa, levantando a possibilidade de recidiva de doença preexistente ou desenvolvimento de novo clone neoplásico.

  7. Large margin image set representation and classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-07-06

    In this paper, we propose a novel image set representation and classification method by maximizing the margin of image sets. The margin of an image set is defined as the difference of the distance to its nearest image set from different classes and the distance to its nearest image set of the same class. By modeling the image sets by using both their image samples and their affine hull models, and maximizing the margins of the images sets, the image set representation parameter learning problem is formulated as an minimization problem, which is further optimized by an expectation - maximization (EM) strategy with accelerated proximal gradient (APG) optimization in an iterative algorithm. To classify a given test image set, we assign it to the class which could provide the largest margin. Experiments on two applications of video-sequence-based face recognition demonstrate that the proposed method significantly outperforms state-of-the-art image set classification methods in terms of both effectiveness and efficiency.

  8. New perceptions of continrntal margin biodiversity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menot, L.; Sibuet, M.; Carney, R.S.; Levin, L.A.; Rowe, G.T.; Billett, D.S.M.; Poore, G.; Kitazato, H.; Vanreusel, A.; Galeron, J.; Lavrado, H.P.; Sellanes, J.; Ingole, B.S.; Krylova, E.

    margins to major marine laboratories in developed countries. Such studies shaped our original, sometimes naïve, conceptions of what lives on these steep depth gradients even though we perceived the deep environment from afar and at a poor resolution...

  9. Sustainable biomass production on Marginal Lands (SEEMLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Federica; Baumgarten, Wibke; Pelikan, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    Sustainable biomass production on Marginal Lands (SEEMLA) The main objective of the H2020 funded EU project SEEMLA (acronym for Sustainable Exploitation of Biomass for Bioenergy from Marginal Lands in Europe) is the establishment of suitable innovative land-use strategies for a sustainable production of plant-based energy on marginal lands while improving general ecosystem services. The use of marginal lands (MagL) could contribute to the mitigation of the fast growing competition between traditional food production and production of renewable bio-resources on arable lands. SEEMLA focuses on the promotion of re-conversion of MagLs for the production of bioenergy through the direct involvement of farmers and forester, the strengthening of local small-scale supply chains, and the promotion of plantations of bioenergy plants on MagLs. Life cycle assessment is performed in order to analyse possible impacts on the environment. A soil quality rating tool is applied to define and classify MagL. Suitable perennial and woody bioenergy crops are selected to be grown in pilot areas in the partner countries Ukraine, Greece and Germany. SEEMLA is expected to contribute to an increasing demand of biomass for bioenergy production in order to meet the 2020 targets and beyond.

  10. Female Special Education Directors: Doubly Marginalized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Charlotte Hendrick; Parmley, Pamela

    2003-01-01

    A qualitative study of five Texas female special education directors found that although participants achieved an administrative position, they were marginalized due to their leadership style, gender discrimination, and socialization. Participants also indicated a negative connection between being in special education administration and top-level…

  11. The marginal cost of public funds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleven, Henrik Jacobsen; Kreiner, Claus Thustrup

    2006-01-01

    This paper extends the theory and measurement of the marginal cost of public funds (MCF) to account for labor force participation responses. Our work is motivated by the emerging consensus in the empirical literature that extensive (participation) responses are more important than intensive (hours...

  12. RISK-INFORMED SAFETY MARGIN CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam Dinh; Ronaldo Szilard

    2009-07-01

    The concept of safety margins has served as a fundamental principle in the design and operation of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). Defined as the minimum distance between a system’s “loading” and its “capacity”, plant design and operation is predicated on ensuring an adequate safety margin for safety-significant parameters (e.g., fuel cladding temperature, containment pressure, etc.) is provided over the spectrum of anticipated plant operating, transient and accident conditions. To meet the anticipated challenges associated with extending the operational lifetimes of the current fleet of operating NPPs, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have developed a collaboration to conduct coordinated research to identify and address the technological challenges and opportunities that likely would affect the safe and economic operation of the existing NPP fleet over the postulated long-term time horizons. In this paper we describe a framework for developing and implementing a Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach to evaluate and manage changes in plant safety margins over long time horizons.

  13. Marginal Strength of Collarless Metal Ceramic Crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikka Swati

    2010-01-01

    fracture strength at margins of metal ceramic crowns cemented to metal tooth analogs. Crowns evaluated with different marginal configurations, shoulder and shoulder bevel with 0 mm, 0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 1.5 mm, were selected. Methods. Maxillary right canine typhodont tooth was prepared to receive a metal ceramic crown with shoulder margin. This was duplicated to get 20 metal teeth analogs. Then the same tooth was reprepared to get shoulder bevel configuration. These crowns were then cemented onmetal teeth analogs and tested for fracture strength atmargin on an Instron testing machine. A progressive compressive load was applied using 6.3 mm diameter rod with crosshead speed of 2.5 mm per minute. Statisticaly analysis was performed with ANOVA, Student's “t” test and “f” test. Results. The fracture strength of collarless metal ceramic crowns under study exceeded the normal biting force. Therefore it can be suggested that collarless metal ceramic crowns with shoulder or shoulder bevel margins up to 1.5 mm framework reduction may be indicated for anteriormetal ceramic restorations. Significance. k Collarless metal ceramic crowns have proved to be successful for anterior fixed restorations. Hence, it may be subjected to more clinical trials.

  14. Negative Stress Margins - Are They Real?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Lee, Darlene S.; Mohaghegh, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Advances in modeling and simulation, new finite element software, modeling engines and powerful computers are providing opportunities to interrogate designs in a very different manner and in a more detailed approach than ever before. Margins of safety are also often evaluated using local stresses for various design concepts and design parameters quickly once analysis models are defined and developed. This paper suggests that not all the negative margins of safety evaluated are real. The structural areas where negative margins are frequently encountered are often near stress concentrations, point loads and load discontinuities, near locations of stress singularities, in areas having large gradients but with insufficient mesh density, in areas with modeling issues and modeling errors, and in areas with connections and interfaces, in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) transitions, bolts and bolt modeling, and boundary conditions. Now, more than ever, structural analysts need to examine and interrogate their analysis results and perform basic sanity checks to determine if these negative margins are real.

  15. Mundhulens mikroflora hos patienter med marginal parodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2011-01-01

    Viden om marginal parodontitis’ mikrobiologi tog for alvor fart for ca. 40 år siden. Den tidlige viden var baseret på mikroskopiske og dyrkningsmæssige undersøgelser af den subgingivale plak. Anvendelsen af de nyere molekylærbiologiske metoder har betydet, at vor viden om de ætiologiske faktorer...

  16. Processes of marginalization in relation to participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagermann, Laila Colding

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses processes of marginalization in relation to the participation of two students, Amir and Saad, in the school in Copenhagen, Denmark, which they attend but also across the school and different communities outside the school. In the paper I discuss the effect of some teachers...

  17. An information criterion for marginal structural models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Robert W; Brookhart, M Alan; Cole, Stephen R; Westreich, Daniel; Schisterman, Enrique F

    2013-04-15

    Marginal structural models were developed as a semiparametric alternative to the G-computation formula to estimate causal effects of exposures. In practice, these models are often specified using parametric regression models. As such, the usual conventions regarding regression model specification apply. This paper outlines strategies for marginal structural model specification and considerations for the functional form of the exposure metric in the final structural model. We propose a quasi-likelihood information criterion adapted from use in generalized estimating equations. We evaluate the properties of our proposed information criterion using a limited simulation study. We illustrate our approach using two empirical examples. In the first example, we use data from a randomized breastfeeding promotion trial to estimate the effect of breastfeeding duration on infant weight at 1 year. In the second example, we use data from two prospective cohorts studies to estimate the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy on CD4 count in an observational cohort of HIV-infected men and women. The marginal structural model specified should reflect the scientific question being addressed but can also assist in exploration of other plausible and closely related questions. In marginal structural models, as in any regression setting, correct inference depends on correct model specification. Our proposed information criterion provides a formal method for comparing model fit for different specifications.

  18. Marginal adaptation of ceramic inserts after cementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Pfeiffer, P; Nergiz, [No Value

    2002-01-01

    The advantage of using ceramic inserts is to prevent major drawbacks of composite resins such as polymerization shrinkage, wear and microleakage. This in vitro study evaluated the marginal adaptation of two approximal ceramic insert systems after cementation to the cavities opened with ultrasonic ti

  19. The marginal costs of climate changing emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, R.S.J.; Downing, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the marginal costs of the emissions of a selected number of radiatively-active gases, three uniformly-mixed gases – carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide – and two region-specific gases – nitrogen (from aircraft) and sulphur, which influence ozone and sulphate aerosol concentrat

  20. On the concept and process of marginalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.W. Kuitenbrouwer (Joost)

    1973-01-01

    textabstractThe concept of marginalization has its genesis in the processes of transformation which have characterized the societies of Latin America (CEPAL). It is increasingly being used to denote similar processes in other parts of the world through which groups of the population are relegated to

  1. Early math intervention for marginalized students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Steffen; Tonnesen, Pia Beck

    2015-01-01

    This study is one of more substudies in the project Early Math Intervention for Marginalized Students (TMTM2014). The paper presents the initial process of this substudy that will be carried out fall 2015. In the TMTM2014 project, 80 teachers, who completed a one week course in the idea of TMTM...

  2. Structural Marginality and the Urban Social Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapferer, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    This article argues for a redefinition of "Marginality" in terms of the principles that influence the developing order of the urban formation as a whole. The emerging social order and the political participation of residents of two shanty areas in Kabwe, Zambia are traced over a period of 40 years. (Author/EB)

  3. The pre-Caledonian margin of Baltica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Torgeir B.; Jørgen Kjøll, Hans; Jakob, Johannes; Corfu, Fernando; Tegner, Christian

    2017-04-01

    It is well-documented that the pre-Caledonian margin of Baltica constituted a several hundred-km wide and more than 2000 km long passive margin. Its vestiges occur at low- to intermediate structural levels in the mountain belt, and are variably overprinted by the early- to end-Caledonian orogenic deformation and extension. Attempts to reconstruct the Caledonian margin of Baltica must be based on detailed maps integrated with studies of the rock-complexes that originally constituted the passive margin. The proximal parts of pre-Caledonian margin of Baltica are dominated by continental rift basins with coarse to fine-grained sediments deposited in the late Proterozoic through the Ediacaran and into the Lower Palaeozoic. The youngest dated clastic zircons probably record magmatism associated with initial contraction near or in the distal margin. The 'margin nappes' also comprise Baltican basement slivers and coarse to fine-grained sedimentary units as well as deep-marine basin deposits. A major change in the architecture of the passive margin units takes place across a transvers zone, which is sub-parallel to the present-day Gudbrandsdalen of South Norway. The transition is roughly parallel to the major basement lineament of the Sveconorwegian orogenic front in south Norway. The most important change across this transverse lineament is that the NE segment is magma-rich, characterized by abundant basaltic magmatism. The SW segment is magma-poor, and characterised by numerous (>100) solitary meta-peridotites, mostly meta-dunites and meta-harzburgites as well as a number of detrital serpentinites and soapstones. These are interpreted as fragments of exhumed mantle and their erosion products, respectively. The meta-peridotites emplaced structurally, and covered by dominantly deep-basin sediments, but also by coarser sedimentary breccias and conglomerates, as part of the rifted margin development. This mixed unit (mélange) was locally intruded by Late Cambrian to Early

  4. The Seismicity of Two Hyperextended Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Tim; Terje Osmundsen, Per

    2013-04-01

    A seismic belt marks the outermost edge of Scandinavia's proximal margin, inboard of and roughly parallel to the Taper Break. A similar near- to onshore seismic belt runs along its inner edge, roughly parallel to and outboard of the asymmetric, seaward-facing escarpment. The belts converge at both the northern and southern ends of Scandinavia, where crustal taper is sharp and the proximal margin is narrow. Very few seismic events have been recorded on the intervening, gently-tapering Trøndelag Platform. Norway's distribution of seismicity is systematically ordered with respect to 1) the structural templates of high-beta extension that shaped the thinning gradient during Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous time, and 2) the topographically resurgent Cretaceous-Cenozoic "accommodation phase" family of escarpments that approximate the innermost limit of crustal thinning [See Redfield and Osmundsen (2012) for diagrams, definitions, discussion, and supporting citations.] Landwards from the belt of earthquake epicenters that mark the Taper Break the crust consistently thickens, and large fault arrays tend to sole out at mid crustal levels. Towards the sea the crystalline continental crust is hyperextended, pervasively faulted, and generally very thin. Also, faulting and serpentinization may have affected the uppermost parts of the distal margin's lithospheric mantle. Such contrasting structural conditions may generate a contrasting stiffness: for a given stress, more strain can be accommodated in the distal margin than in the less faulted proximal margin. By way of comparison, inboard of the Taper Break on the gently-tapered Trøndelag Platform, faulting was not penetrative. There, similar structural conditions prevail and proximal margin seismicity is negligible. Because stress concentration can occur where material properties undergo significant contrast, the necking zone may constitute a natural localization point for post-thinning phase earthquakes. In Scandinavia

  5. Leukocyte margination in a model microvessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Jonathan B.

    2007-02-01

    The physiological inflammation response depends upon the multibody interactions of blood cells in the microcirculation that bring leukocytes (white blood cells) to the vessel walls. We investigate the fluid mechanics of this using numerical simulations of 29 red blood cells and one leukocyte flowing in a two-dimensional microvessel, with the cells modeled as linearly elastic shell membranes. Despite its obvious simplifications, this model successfully reproduces the increasingly blunted velocity profiles and increased leukocyte margination observed at lower shear rates in actual microvessels. Red cell aggregation is shown to be unnecessary for margination. The relative stiffness of the red cells in our simulations is varied by over a factor of 10, but the margination is found to be much less correlated with this than it is to changes associated with the blunting of the mean velocity profile at lower shear rates. While velocity around the leukocyte when it is near the wall depends upon the red cell properties, it changes little for strongly versus weakly marginating cases. In the more strongly marginating cases, however, a red cell is frequently observed to be leaning on the upstream side of the leukocyte and appears to stabilize it, preventing other red cells from coming between it and the wall. A well-known feature of the microcirculation is a near-wall cell-free layer. In our simulations, it is observed that the leukocyte's most probable position is at the edge of this layer. This wall stand-off distance increases with velocity following a scaling that would be expected for a lubrication mechanism, assuming that there were a nearly constant force pushing the cells toward the wall. The leukocyte's near-wall position is observed to be less stable with increasing mean stand-off distance, but this distance would have potentially greater effect on adhesion since the range of the molecular binding is so short.

  6. Financial Intermediation, Monetary Uncertainty, and Bank Interest Margins Financial Intermediation, Monetary Uncertainty, and Bank Interest Margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Hernández

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Financial Intermediation, Monetary Uncertainty, and Bank Interest Margins This paper studies a simple model of financial intermediation in order to understand how the lending-borrowing spread or interest margin charged by financial intermediaries is determined in equilibrium in a monetary economy. The main conclusion of the paper concerns the effect on the spread of changes in the distribution of monetary innovations. Thus, changes in the monetary-policy-rule followed by the Central Bank which alter the volatility of inflation will have important effects on the interest margin and also on the amount of credit available to investors. A crosssection empirical analysis strongly supports our hypothesis:

  7. Progress in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gipe, P.

    1990-01-01

    Though the wind energy continues to take it on the chin in the rough and tumble of California's celebrity politics, several indicators are pointing toward a modest revival. First several new reports laud wind energy at good sites as now competitive with conventional sources. Second, utility subsidiaries are signaling their approval by cautiously venturing into the technology. Also, technological refinements and reorganizations continue while a demand for new generating capacity may be developing in the state. Three new reports all paint a picture of wind energy finally coming of age. The California Energy Commission's most recent Energy Technology Status report says that wind-generated electricity is competitive with coal, oil, gas, and most other technologies. Similarly, a staff report found that after tallying the economic, social, and environmental costs, wind was one of the least cost sources of new generation. Most recently the Electric Power Research Institute's Journal reported the wind energy, at about 8 cents/k Wh, is equivalent to generation from conventional sources.

  8. Fires in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    In what seemed like the blink of an eye, wildfires ignited in the paper-dry, drought-stricken vegetation of Southern California over the weekend of October 20, 2007, and exploded into massive infernos that forced hundreds of thousands of people to evacuate their communities. Driven by Santa Ana winds, fires grew thousands of acres in just one to two days. The fires sped down from the mountains into the outskirts of coastal cities, including San Diego. Dozens of homes have burned to the ground, and at least one person has died, according to local news reports. Several of the fires were burning completely out of control as of October 22. This image of the fires in California was captured at 1:55 p.m. U.S. Pacific Daylight Time on October 22, 2007. Places where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. Thick streamers of smoke unfurl over the Pacific Ocean. The brownish plumes are clouds of dust. Fires northwest of Los Angeles seemed calmer at the time of this image than they were the previous day.

  9. Dick Crane's California Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrow, Charles H.

    2011-03-01

    Horace Richard Crane (1907-2007) was born and educated in California. His childhood was full of activities that helped him become an outstanding experimental physicist. As a graduate student at the California Institute of Technology (1930-1934), he had the good fortune to work with Charles C. Lauritsen (1892-1968) just as he introduced accelerator-based nuclear physics to Caltech. They shared the euphoric excitement of opening up a new field with simple, ingenious apparatus and experiments. This work prepared Crane for his career at the University of Michigan (1935-1973) where in the 1950s, after making the first measurement of the electron's magnetic moment, he devised the g-2 technique and made the first measurement of the anomaly in the electron's magnetic moment. A man of direct, almost laconic style, he made lasting contributions to the exposition of physics to the general public and to its teaching in high schools, community colleges, four-year colleges, and universities. I tell how he became a physicist and describe some of his early achievements.

  10. Fundraising Practices of the University of California, the California State University, and California Private Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsevar, Kent J.

    2012-01-01

    Factors such as a declining tax revenues and an underperforming economy have been justifying the need for additional external private funding to meet the increasing needs of a growing California higher education system and ethnically diverse student body. The purpose of this study was to examine ways in which California private higher education…

  11. Ophiolite and Tectonic Development of the East Pacific Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, E. M.

    2001-12-01

    Well-preserved ophiolites represent oceanic crust and mantle formed at a spreading center and emplaced by collision of a mantle-rooted thrust fault (subduction zone) with a continental margin or island arc. Ophiolite nappes thus represent remnants of lithospheric plates; their basal thrusts (fossil subduction zones) intrinscally cannot be balanced; their displacements are unknown but very large. Many environments of formation are possible for ophiolites: mid-ocean ridge, back-arc, forearc, or intra-arc spreading vrnyrtd, but geochemistry alone is inadequate to differentiate between the possibilities; geologic field evidence is needed, as well. Mesozoic ophiolites in western North America are associated either with the Stikine-Intermontane superterrane (e.g. Sierra Nevada, Klamath Mountains, California. Guerrero terrane, Mexico?), or lie west of it (e.g. Great Valley/Coast Range ophiolite and correlatives to north and south.). The "Great Arc" of the Caribbean (Burke, 1988), including ophiolitic rocks in Cuba, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and Colombia, may also correlate with the Great Valley/Coast Range ophiolite and/or with ophiolites in the Sierra Nevada. The Wrangellia/Insular superterrane may have extended to the south and at times may have included parts of the Chortis-Choco blocks of Central America, as well as the Cordillera Occidental of Colombia and Ecuador). These relations suggest the hypothesis that in mid-late Mesozoic time, a separate intra-oceanic plate similar to the present Philippine plate, herein informally called "Americordilleria" was separated by active island arc complexes from the American andFarallon/Kula plates to the east and west, respectively. Basement rocks of the Colombian, Venezuelan, and Yucatan basins, as well as the Great Valley/Coast Range ophiolite, may represent remnants of "Americordilleria". Convergence and collision of "Americordilleria" and its island arc margins with the American continents were major factors in

  12. Giant Hydrogen Sulfide Plume in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Peru Supports Chemolithoautotrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schunck, Harald; Lavik, Gaute; Desai, Dhwani K.;

    2013-01-01

    In Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems nutrient-rich waters are transported to the ocean surface, fuelling high photoautotrophic primary production. Subsequent heterotrophic decomposition of the produced biomass increases the oxygen-depletion at intermediate water depths, which can result in the f...

  13. Abundance of dissolved polysaccharides in the oxygen minimum layer of the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Bhaskar, P.V.; Ramachandran, S.

    ) were the most abundant form of total dissolved carbohydrates (TCHO) throughout the water column sampled and accounted for 75 plus or minus and 11% of the TCHO. Hydrolysis-resistant PCHO (HR-PCHO) contributed 48 plus or minusand 16% to the PCHO...

  14. Denitrifying bacterial community composition changes associated with stages of denitrification in oxygen minimum zones

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, D.A.; O'Mullan, G.D.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Ward, B.B.

    mixing two water masses with different cell number–nitrite relationships. In addition, the assignment of stages is somewhat complicated because it combines the net result of the history of the water and in situ microbial activity. Diversity... that are characteristic of OMZs in active stages of denitrification suggest that the removal of fixed nitrogen may occur via episodically enhanced growth of denitrifying organisms in the core of an OMZ. These hot spots are driven by the episodic blooms of surface...

  15. Denitrification exceeds anammox as a nitrogen loss pathway in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bulow, S.E.; Rich, J.J.; Naik, H.; Pratihary, A.K.; Ward, B.B.

    (anammox) were investigated by measuring sup(15)N-N sub(2) production from sup(15)NH sub(4) sup(+), sup(15)NO sub(2) sup(-), and sup(46)N sub(2)O in incubations at 3-4 depths at each of the three stations in the central region of the Arabian Sea OMZ...

  16. The influence of riverine nitrogen on the dynamics of the North Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Große, Fabian; Kreus, Markus; Lenhart, Hermann; Pätsch, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The mitigation of eutrophication and its concomitants, like oxygen deficiency in bottom waters, is one of the major aspects of the ecological management of coastal marine ecosystems. In the past, biogeochemical models helped to significantly improve the understanding of the interaction of the physical and biological processes driving eutrophication. Anthropogenic river input of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) is the main driver for eutrophication. Nevertheless, the quantification of their influence in a specific region remains an important issue, since it is as crucial for an efficient management as it is difficult to obtain. During the past decade, a quantitative method applicable to biogeochemical models - often referred to as `trans-boundary nutrient transports' (TBNT) - became more and more popular in the context of marine ecosystem management. This method allows for the tracing of elements from various sources, e.g., nitrogen (N) from different rivers, throughout the whole process chain of the applied model. By this, it provides valuable information about the contributions from different sources to the overall amount and turnover of an element in different areas of the model domain. This information constitutes the basis for the quantification, evaluation and optimisation of river input reduction targets for the tributaries, which are defined in relation to their ecological consequences in the marine environment. In existing studies, the TBNT method has been applied to a variety of biogeochemical models, e.g. to quantify the atmospheric contribution to total N in the North Sea (Troost et al., 2013). This study presents a novel approach to link the TBNT method applied to N to the biological processes driving the oxygen dynamics in the bottom layer of the North Sea. For this purpose, simulations from the biogeochemical model ECOHAM (ECOlogical model HAMburg) are analysed for the years 2002 and 2010, with the focus on the southern central North Sea, the region of lowest bottom oxygen concentrations. In 2002, a year with high discharges from the European continental rivers, oxygen concentrations of less than 6 unit{mg L-1} are reached in that region, while in 2010 values stay well above 7.5 unit{mg L-1}. Mass balance calculations show that the remarkably lower values in 2002 are mainly caused by enhanced pelagic and benthic bacterial remineralisation during summer stratification (factor 1.55 higher than in 2010). The TBNT analysis reveals that almost 50 unit{%} of the bacterial consumption in that region are driven by the N supply from the Atlantic. However, the large continental rivers also account for about 23 unit{%} in 2010, and even 30 unit{%} in 2002. It further shows that in 2002, remineralisation due to N originating from these rivers is about twice as high as in 2010, representing the largest relative difference among all contributors. This demonstrates the great influence of the N input from the continental rivers on the oxygen dynamics in the North Sea minimum zone, and emphasises their importance for the eutrophication management in the southern central North Sea. {References} Troost, T. A., Blaas, M., Los, F. J. (2013). The role of atmospheric deposition in the eutrophication of the North Sea: a model analysis. Journal of Marine Systems, 125, 101-112.

  17. Late quaternary variability of the Arabian Sea monsoon and oxygen minimum zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichart, Gert-Jan

    1997-01-01

    The Monsoon Among the first Europeans observing the Asiatic monsoon was Alexander the Great during his campaign to the mouth of the Indus (325 B.C.). The oldest known records of the Arabian Sea monsoonal climate, however, are shipping documents, dated about 2300 B.C., which refer to the use of the s

  18. Microbial community structure and productivity in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlaska, Agnieszka; Wakeham, Stuart G.; Fanning, Kent A.; Taylor, Gordon T.

    2012-08-01

    Microbial abundances and activities (heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic) were profiled in the fall of 2007 along a transect of four stations in the upwelling region between the Tehuantepec Bowl, off the coast of southern Mexico, and the Costa Rica Dome. Heterotrophic potential varied with depth exhibiting relatively low maximum values of 4-8 nM leucine d-1, but varied among stations by a factor of 2. Generally, heterotrophic potential varied inversely with nitrate implying NO3- draw down by nitrate-reducing chemoorganotrophs. Dark dissolved inorganic carbon assimilation (≈chemoautotrophy) was also highly variable with depth and reached a maximum value of 6.4 μM C d-1 at one station, but only attained maxima of 0.02 and 0.2 μM C d-1 at other stations. Elevated values of chemoautotrophy corresponded with enrichments in nitrite concentrations suggesting nitrification as well as with depletions in nitrite and ammonium concentrations suggesting anammox processes. Additions of 30 μM NH4+ at selected depths stimulated chemoautotrophic activity up to 33-fold. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses revealed elevated abundances of Crenarchaeota and β-proteobacteria (up to 1.0×107 and 10.0×107 cells L-1, respectively) associated with NH4+ minima and NO3- maxima. Nitrifying β-proteobacteria were most abundant in the upper oxycline (1.1-1.8×107 cells L-1) at three stations and exhibited a secondary peak of 0.3×107 cells L-1 in the lower oxycline at one station. Anammox bacterial (Planctomycetes) abundances were as high as 2.1×106 cells L-1, but accounted for less than 1% of total DAPI counts. The concentration of diploptene (a hopanoid biomarker found in bacteria) varied from 2 to 15 pg L-1 in the upper oxycline and from 51 to 160 pg L-1 in the lower oxycline. Delta 13C values of particulate organic carbon (POC) varied from -30 to -21‰ in the water column (avg. -25‰). Distributions of isotopically light POC coincided with enrichments in diploptene, Planctomycetes cells, nitrite, and chemoautotrophy as well as with nitrate and ammonium depletions, suggesting that anammox and nitrification are important for secondary biological production in this system.

  19. The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), living in oxygen minimum zones II: Blood-oxygen binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Brad A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosidicus gigas is a large, metabolically active squid that migrates across a strong oxygen and temperature gradient in the Eastern Pacific. Here we analyze the oxygen-binding properties of the squid's respiratory protein (hemocyanin, Hc) that facilitate such activity. A high Hc-oxygen affinity, strong temperature dependence, and pronounced pH sensitivity (P50=0.009T2.03, pH 7.4; Bohr coefficient=ΔlogP50/ΔpH=-1.55+0.034T) of oxygen binding facilitate night-time foraging in the upper water column, and support suppressed oxygen demand in hypoxic waters at greater depths. Expanding hypoxia may act to alter the species habitable depth range. This analysis supports the contention that ocean acidification could limit oxygen carrying capacity in squids at warmer temperature leading to reduced activity levels or altered distribution.

  20. Habitat heterogeneity and its influence on benthic biodiversity in oxygen minimum zones

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gooday, A.J.; Bett, B.J.; Escobar, E.; Ingole, B.S.; Levin, L.A.; Neira, C.; Raman, A.V.; Sellanes, J.

    , unpublished). Values <7.0 were measured in OMZ core sediments off Peru (Neira and Sellanes unpublished). Off Costa Rica and India, the lowest oxygen values corresponded to pH values of 7.7 to 7.8 (C. Tanner, K. Oguri, personal comm.). The impact of low p...). There have been similar observations of salps and pyrosomes at 400 m at the base of a vertical slide in the core of the OMZ off Costa Rica (G. Rouse, pers. comm.) and large numbers of swimming crabs (Charybdis smithii) were found dead on the abyssal...

  1. Nitrogen Loss Processes and Nitrous Oxide Turnover in Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life and the maintenance of all ecosystems. For many ecosystems, both aquatic and terrestrial, nitrogen is the element most likely to limit the amount and rate of production. But just as ecosystems can suffer from too little nitrogen, they are also sensitive to too much nitrogen, which leads to eutrophication and structural changes in food webs. Thus the processes by which nitrogen is removed are as critical to our understanding of ecosystem function as are those by which it is added. Nitrogen loss processes in the open ocean have been the focus of research and discovery in recent years. Long thought to be dominated by the bacterial respiratory process of denitrification, N loss is now also known to occur by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). We now understand that the ratio of the two processes is controlled by the quality and quantity of organic matter supplied to the anoxic waters of the ocean's major oxygen deficient zones. Coastal environments are also major sites of N loss but excess N loading from land often ameliorates the direct dependence of anammox and denitrification on organic matter composition. The ratio is important partly because of side products: Denitrification is a significant source and sink for nitrous oxide (N2O), while anammox has no significant contribution to N2O biogeochemistry. With the anthropogenic flux of CFCs at least mostly under control, N2O emissions to the atmosphere are the greatest contribution to ozone destruction, and they also contribute to greenhouse warming. Both anthropogenic and natural sources contribute to N2O emissions, and natural sources are sensitive to anthropogenic forcing. Our direct measurements of N2O production and consumption in the ocean agree with modeling results that have implicated multiple microbial processes and complex physical and biological control of N2O fluxes in the ocean.

  2. The Impact of Medicaid Expansion on Medicaid Focused Insurers in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. McCue DBA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To gain insights into the impact of Medicaid Expansion under the Affordable Care Act, this study assesses the enrollment, utilization, and financial performance measures of California Medicaid focused health insurers. The study compares these quarterly measures, during the expansion period of 2014 to the same quarterly measures in 2013 and 2012. During 2014, Medicaid focused insurers expanded enrollment, decreased inpatient days, and generated higher profit margins.

  3. Assembling and disassembling california: A zircon and monazite geochronologic framework for proterozoic crustal evolution in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Coleman, D.S.; Vogel, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    The Mojave province in southern California preserves a comparatively complete record of assembly, postorogenic sedimentation, and rifting along the southwestern North American continental margin. The oldest exposed rocks are metasedimentary gneisses and amphibolite, enclosing intrusive suites that range from tonalite and quartz mon-zodiorite to granite with minor trondhjemite. Discrete magmatic episodes occurred at approximately 1790-1730 and 1690-1640 Ma. Evidence from detrital and premagmatic zircons indicates that recycling of 1900-1790 Ma Paleopro-terozoic crust formed the unique isotopic character of the Mojave province. Peak metamorphic conditions in the Mojave province reached middle amphibolite to granulite facies; metamorphism occurred locally from 1795 to 1640 Ma, with widespread evidence for metamorphism at 1711-1689 and 1670-1650 Ma. Structures record early, tight to isoclinal folding and penetrative west-vergent shear during the final metamorphic event in the west Mojave province. Proterozoic basement rocks are overlain by siliciclastic-carbonate sequences of Mesoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic, and Cambrian age, recording environmental change over the course of the transition from stable Mojave crust to the rifted Cordilleran margin. Neoproterozoic quartzites have diverse zircon populations inconsistent with a southwest North American source, which we infer were derived from the western conjugate rift pair within Rodinia, before establishment of the miogeocline. Neoproterozoic-Cambrian miogeoclinal clastic rocks record an end to rifting and establishment of the Cordilleran miogeocline in southern California by latest Neoproterozoic to Early Cambrian time. ?? 2009 by The University of Chicago.

  4. Strong depth-related zonation of megabenthos on a rocky continental margin (∼700-4000 m off southern Tasmania, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Thresher

    Full Text Available Assemblages of megabenthos are structured in seven depth-related zones between ∼700 and 4000 m on the rocky and topographically complex continental margin south of Tasmania, southeastern Australia. These patterns emerge from analysis of imagery and specimen collections taken from a suite of surveys using photographic and in situ sampling by epibenthic sleds, towed video cameras, an autonomous underwater vehicle and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV. Seamount peaks in shallow zones had relatively low biomass and low diversity assemblages, which may be in part natural and in part due to effects of bottom trawl fishing. Species richness was highest at intermediate depths (1000-1300 m as a result of an extensive coral reef community based on the bioherm-forming scleractinian Solenosmilia variabilis. However, megabenthos abundance peaked in a deeper, low diversity assemblage at 2000-2500 m. The S. variabilis reef and the deep biomass zone were separated by an extensive dead, sub-fossil S. variabilis reef and a relatively low biomass stratum on volcanic rock roughly coincident with the oxygen minimum layer. Below 2400 m, megabenthos was increasingly sparse, though punctuated by occasional small pockets of relatively high diversity and biomass. Nonetheless, megabenthic organisms were observed in the vast majority of photographs on all seabed habitats and to the maximum depths observed--a sandy plain below 3950 m. Taxonomic studies in progress suggest that the observed depth zonation is based in part on changing species mixes with depth, but also an underlying commonality to much of the seamount and rocky substrate biota across all depths. Although the mechanisms supporting the extraordinarily high biomass in 2000-2500 m depths remains obscure, plausible explanations include equatorwards lateral transport of polar production and/or a response to depth-stratified oxygen availability.

  5. Strong depth-related zonation of megabenthos on a rocky continental margin (∼700-4000 m) off southern Tasmania, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thresher, Ronald; Althaus, Franziska; Adkins, Jess; Gowlett-Holmes, Karen; Alderslade, Phil; Dowdney, Jo; Cho, Walter; Gagnon, Alex; Staples, David; McEnnulty, Felicity; Williams, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Assemblages of megabenthos are structured in seven depth-related zones between ∼700 and 4000 m on the rocky and topographically complex continental margin south of Tasmania, southeastern Australia. These patterns emerge from analysis of imagery and specimen collections taken from a suite of surveys using photographic and in situ sampling by epibenthic sleds, towed video cameras, an autonomous underwater vehicle and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Seamount peaks in shallow zones had relatively low biomass and low diversity assemblages, which may be in part natural and in part due to effects of bottom trawl fishing. Species richness was highest at intermediate depths (1000-1300 m) as a result of an extensive coral reef community based on the bioherm-forming scleractinian Solenosmilia variabilis. However, megabenthos abundance peaked in a deeper, low diversity assemblage at 2000-2500 m. The S. variabilis reef and the deep biomass zone were separated by an extensive dead, sub-fossil S. variabilis reef and a relatively low biomass stratum on volcanic rock roughly coincident with the oxygen minimum layer. Below 2400 m, megabenthos was increasingly sparse, though punctuated by occasional small pockets of relatively high diversity and biomass. Nonetheless, megabenthic organisms were observed in the vast majority of photographs on all seabed habitats and to the maximum depths observed--a sandy plain below 3950 m. Taxonomic studies in progress suggest that the observed depth zonation is based in part on changing species mixes with depth, but also an underlying commonality to much of the seamount and rocky substrate biota across all depths. Although the mechanisms supporting the extraordinarily high biomass in 2000-2500 m depths remains obscure, plausible explanations include equatorwards lateral transport of polar production and/or a response to depth-stratified oxygen availability.

  6. Adaptive Marginal Median Filter for Colour Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almanzor Sapena

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new filter for impulse noise reduction in colour images which is aimed at improving the noise reduction capability of the classical vector median filter. The filter is inspired by the application of a vector marginal median filtering process over a selected group of pixels in each filtering window. This selection, which is based on the vector median, along with the application of the marginal median operation constitutes an adaptive process that leads to a more robust filter design. Also, the proposed method is able to process colour images without introducing colour artifacts. Experimental results show that the images filtered with the proposed method contain less noisy pixels than those obtained through the vector median filter.

  7. Distributions with given marginals and statistical modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Fortiana, Josep; Rodriguez-Lallena, José

    2002-01-01

    This book contains a selection of the papers presented at the meeting `Distributions with given marginals and statistical modelling', held in Barcelona (Spain), July 17-20, 2000. In 24 chapters, this book covers topics such as the theory of copulas and quasi-copulas, the theory and compatibility of distributions, models for survival distributions and other well-known distributions, time series, categorical models, definition and estimation of measures of dependence, monotonicity and stochastic ordering, shape and separability of distributions, hidden truncation models, diagonal families, orthogonal expansions, tests of independence, and goodness of fit assessment. These topics share the use and properties of distributions with given marginals, this being the fourth specialised text on this theme. The innovative aspect of the book is the inclusion of statistical aspects such as modelling, Bayesian statistics, estimation, and tests.

  8. Time Domain Stability Margin Assessment Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Keith

    2017-01-01

    The baseline stability margins for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle were generated via the classical approach of linearizing the system equations of motion and determining the gain and phase margins from the resulting frequency domain model. To improve the fidelity of the classical methods, the linear frequency domain approach can be extended by replacing static, memoryless nonlinearities with describing functions. This technique, however, does not address the time varying nature of the dynamics of a launch vehicle in flight. An alternative technique for the evaluation of the stability of the nonlinear launch vehicle dynamics along its trajectory is to incrementally adjust the gain and/or time delay in the time domain simulation until the system exhibits unstable behavior. This technique has the added benefit of providing a direct comparison between the time domain and frequency domain tools in support of simulation validation.

  9. Rigidity of marginally outer trapped 2-spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Galloway, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    In a matter-filled spacetime, perhaps with positive cosmological constant, a stable marginally outer trapped 2-sphere must satisfy a certain area inequality. Namely, as discussed in the paper, its area must be bounded above by $4\\pi/c$, where $c > 0$ is a lower bound on a natural energy-momentum term. We then consider the rigidity that results for stable, or weakly outermost, marginally outer trapped 2-spheres that achieve this upper bound on the area. In particular, we prove a splitting result for 3-dimensional initial data sets analogous to a result of Bray, Brendle and Neves [10] concerning area minimizing 2-spheres in Riemannian 3-manifolds with positive scalar curvature. We further show that these initial data sets locally embed as spacelike hypersurfaces into the Nariai spacetime. Connections to the Vaidya spacetime and dynamical horizons are also discussed.

  10. Passive target tracking using marginalized particle filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A marginalized particle filtering(MPF)approach is proposed for target tracking under the background of passive measurement.Essentially,the MPF is a combination of particle filtering technique and Kalman filter.By making full use of marginalization,the distributions of the tractable linear part of the total state variables are updated analytically using Kalman filter,and only the lower-dimensional nonlinear state variable needs to be dealt with using particle filter.Simulation studies are performed on an illustrative example,and the results show that the MPF method leads to a significant reduction of the tracking errors when compared with the direct particle implementation.Real data test results also validate the effectiveness of the presented method.

  11. Marginal Loss Calculations for the DCOPF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldridge, Brent [Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); O' Neill, Richard P. [Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Castillo, Andrea R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-12-05

    The purpose of this paper is to explain some aspects of including a marginal line loss approximation in the DCOPF. The DCOPF optimizes electric generator dispatch using simplified power flow physics. Since the standard assumptions in the DCOPF include a lossless network, a number of modifications have to be added to the model. Calculating marginal losses allows the DCOPF to optimize the location of power generation, so that generators that are closer to demand centers are relatively cheaper than remote generation. The problem formulations discussed in this paper will simplify many aspects of practical electric dispatch implementations in use today, but will include sufficient detail to demonstrate a few points with regard to the handling of losses.

  12. European refiners re-adjust margins strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, R.G. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    Refiners in Europe are adjusting operating strategies to reflect the volatilities of tight operating margins. From the unexpected availability of quality crudes (e.g., Brent, 0.3% sulfur), to the role of government in refinery planning, the European refining industry is positioning itself to reverse the past few years of steadily declining profitability. Unlike expected increases in US gasoline demand, European gasoline consumption is not expected to increase, and heavy fuel oil consumption is also declining. However, diesel fuel consumption is expected to increase, even though diesel processing capacity has recently decreased (i.e., more imports). Some of the possible strategies that Europeans may adapt to improve margins and reduce volatility include: Increase conversion capacity to supply growing demand for middle distillates and LPG; alleviate refinery cash flow problems with alliances; and direct discretionary investment toward retail merchandising (unless there is a clear trend toward a widening of the sweet-sour crude price differential).

  13. Marginal longitudinal semiparametric regression via penalized splines

    KAUST Repository

    Al Kadiri, M.

    2010-08-01

    We study the marginal longitudinal nonparametric regression problem and some of its semiparametric extensions. We point out that, while several elaborate proposals for efficient estimation have been proposed, a relative simple and straightforward one, based on penalized splines, has not. After describing our approach, we then explain how Gibbs sampling and the BUGS software can be used to achieve quick and effective implementation. Illustrations are provided for nonparametric regression and additive models.

  14. Neotectonics in the northern equatorial Brazilian margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Dilce F.; Souza, Lena S. B.; Prado, Renato; Elis, Vagner R.

    2012-08-01

    An increasing volume of publications has addressed the role of tectonics in inland areas of northern Brazil during the Neogene and Quaternary, despite its location in a passive margin. Hence, northern South America plate in this time interval might have not been as passive as usually regarded. This proposal needs further support, particularly including field data. In this work, we applied an integrated approach to reveal tectonic structures in Miocene and late Quaternary strata in a coastal area of the Amazonas lowland. The investigation, undertaken in Marajó Island, mouth of the Amazonas River, consisted of shallow sub-surface geophysical data including vertical electric sounding and ground penetrating radar. These methods were combined with morphostructural analysis and sedimentological/stratigraphic data from shallow cores and a few outcrops. The results revealed two stratigraphic units, a lower one with Miocene age, and an upper one of Late Pleistocene-Holocene age. An abundance of faults and folds were recorded in the Miocene deposits and, to a minor extent, in overlying Late Pleistocene-Holocene strata. In addition to characterize these structures, we discuss their origin, considering three potential mechanisms: Andean tectonics, gravity tectonics related to sediment loading in the Amazon Fan, and rifting at the continental margin. Amongst these hypotheses, the most likely is that the faults and folds recorded in Marajó Island reflect tectonics associated with the history of continental rifting that gave rise to the South Atlantic Ocean. This study supports sediment deposition influenced by transpression and transtension associated with strike-slip divergence along the northern Equatorial Brazilian margin in the Miocene and Late Pleistocene-Holocene. This work records tectonic evidence only for the uppermost few ten of meters of this sedimentary succession. However, available geological data indicate a thickness of up to 6 km, which is remarkably thick for

  15. Negative marginal tax rates and heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Choné, Philippe; Laroque, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Heterogeneity is likely to be an important determinant of the shape of optimal tax schemes. This article addresses the issue in a model à la Mirrlees with a continuum of agents. The agents differ in their productivities and opportunity costs of work, but their labor supplies depend only on a unidimensional combination of their two characteristics. Conditions are given under which the standard result that marginal tax rates are everywhere non-negative holds. This is in particular the case when...

  16. Mining their own Business in the Margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars

    Mining has long been established in Australian public discourse as an activity that has driven the Australian economy, and guaranteed Australia against the economic ills of the rest of the West. Or put slightly differently, the positive spin on mining in public discourse and the financial market,...... of speaking about margins/marginalisation in relation to the mining industry, that is, as something conducted beyond the horizon, something which defines the horizon - and as a process through which remoteness defines the (national) self....

  17. Authigenic minerals from the continental margins

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    phosphorites have been presumed to be sedimented plankton organic matter, fish debris, and iron-redox phosphate pump. Several workers investigated the genesis of sedimentary phosphorites occurring from Precambrian to Recent and proposed different...-phosphate sediments of the western continental margin of India showed that phosphate occurred as apatite microparticles that resembled fossilized phosphate bacteria and/or microbial filaments (Fig. 3). This established the prominence of micro- environments...

  18. PENDIDIKAN ALTERNATIF UNTUK PEREMPUAN MARGINAL DI PEDESAAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnawati Tahir

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Alternative Education for Marginalized Women in Rural Areas. The study aims to find alter­native forms of education for marginalized women, the process of forming study groups and gender based learning process that serves the center of the development of education, leadership and a source of economic empowerment. The study uses qualitative methods, involving a group of women who have attended an al­ternative education. Researchers and informants from community leaders. The results showed that the form of alternative education is a method of adult education or andragogy. Study groups consisted of basic literacy and functional literacy. The learning process begins with the sharing of learning, reflection on life experience and role play method. The result is 65% of participants have increased the ability of reading, writing and numeracy, and understanding of the issues of women who have confidence in the decision making of households and communities. Abstrak: Pendidikan Alternatif untuk Perempuan Marginal di Pedesaan. Penelitian ini bertujuan mengetahui bentuk pendidikan alternatif untuk perempuan marginal, proses pembentukan kelompok belajar, dan proses pembelajaran berperspektif gender yang berfungsi menjadi pusat pengembangan pendidikan, kepemimpinan, dan sumber penguatan ekonomi. Penelitian menggunakan metode kualitatif, mengambil satu kelompok perempuan yang telah mengikuti pendidikan alternatif. Informan terdiri atas tokoh masyarakat, seperti Kepala Desa, Ketua RT/RW, dan ibu rumah tangga. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa bentuk pembelajaran pendidikan alternatif adalah metode pendidikan orang dewasa atau andragogy. Pembentukan kelompok belajar terdiri atas; kelompok baca tulis dan keaksaraan fungsional. Proses pembe­lajaran dimulai dengan sharing pembelajaran, refleksi pengalaman hidup, dan metode role play. Hasilnya 65% peserta pembelajaran mengalami peningkatan kemampuan membaca, menulis, dan berhitung, serta pema

  19. Statistical Mechanics of Soft Margin Classifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Risau-Gusman, Sebastian; Gordon, Mirta B.

    2001-01-01

    We study the typical learning properties of the recently introduced Soft Margin Classifiers (SMCs), learning realizable and unrealizable tasks, with the tools of Statistical Mechanics. We derive analytically the behaviour of the learning curves in the regime of very large training sets. We obtain exponential and power laws for the decay of the generalization error towards the asymptotic value, depending on the task and on general characteristics of the distribution of stabilities of the patte...

  20. Marginal Ice Zone: Biogeochemical Sampling with Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    ocean and base of marine food webs, are responding to changing conditions in the Arctic Ocean . The high-level project goals are to use underwater...observing array (Fig. 1). The glider sensor suite included temperature , temperature microstructure, salinity , oxygen, chlorophyll fluorescence, optical...presented at the Arctic Science Summit Week in Toyama, Japan, in April 2015 (Direct Observations of Ocean Variability Across the Arctic Marginal Ice Zone

  1. Marginal microfiltration in amalgam restorations. Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lahoud Salem, Víctor; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima. Perú.

    2014-01-01

    The present articule is review references from phenomenon of microfiltration in restorations with amalgam and yours consecuents in changes of color in the interface tooth-restorations, margin deterioted , sensitivity dentinarea postoperate, caries secondary and pulp inflamation. Besides naming the mechanicals for to reduce microfiltration, and yours effects for use of sealers dentinaries representation for the varnish cavitys and adhesive systens Conclusive indicate wath the amalgam is the ma...

  2. Marginal selenium status in northern Tasmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Jeffrey M; Ball, Madeleine J

    2011-09-01

    Se plays many important roles in humans. Marginal Se status has been associated with adverse health effects including an increased risk of chronic disease such as cancer. There are few Australian data, but the population of Tasmania, Australia, is potentially at risk of marginal Se status. A cross-sectional study of 498 men and women aged 25-84 years was undertaken to assess the Se status of the northern Tasmanian population. Se status was assessed using dietary estimates and measures of serum Se and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Mean Se intakes were 77·4 (sd 31·3) and 65·1 (sd 23·7) μg/d for men and women, respectively; 27 % of the subjects consumed less than the Australian/New Zealand estimated average requirement. Mean serum Se concentration was 89·1 (sd 15·1) μg/l; 83 % of the study subjects had serum Se concentrations below 100 μg/l and 60 % had serum Se concentration below 90 μg/l, suggesting that Se status in many subjects was inadequate for maximal GPx activity. This was supported by the positive association between serum Se and serum GPx (P < 0·001), indicating that enzyme activity was limited by Se concentrations. The lowest mean serum Se concentrations were observed in the oldest age ranges; however, the prevalence of marginal Se status was similar across age ranges and did not appear to be influenced by sex or socio-economic status. The prevalence of marginal Se status was high in all sex and age subgroups, suggesting that the northern Tasmanian population could benefit from increasing Se intakes.

  3. Marginal longitudinal semiparametric regression via penalized splines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiri, M Al; Carroll, R J; Wand, M P

    2010-08-01

    We study the marginal longitudinal nonparametric regression problem and some of its semiparametric extensions. We point out that, while several elaborate proposals for efficient estimation have been proposed, a relative simple and straightforward one, based on penalized splines, has not. After describing our approach, we then explain how Gibbs sampling and the BUGS software can be used to achieve quick and effective implementation. Illustrations are provided for nonparametric regression and additive models.

  4. Pollutant transport among California regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angevine, Wayne M.; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart; Holloway, John S.; Lerner, Brian M.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guha, Abhinav; Andrews, Arlyn; Nowak, John B.; Evan, Stephanie; Fischer, Marc L.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Bon, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Several regions within California have significant air quality issues. Transport of pollutants emitted in one region to another region may add to the impact of local emissions. In this work, Lagrangian particle dispersion model simulations show the amounts of tracers that are transported within and among four regions, Southern California, the San Francisco Bay Area, the Central Valley, and the rest of the state. The simulations cover May and June of 2010, the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change experiment period. Tracers of automobile emissions and one type of agricultural emission are used. Tracer mixing ratios are compared to airborne and ground-based measurements. The age of tracers in each location is also presented. Vertical profiles and diurnal cycles help to clarify the transport process. As is well known, Southern California emissions are transported to the east and affect the desert areas, and Bay Area automobile emissions are an important source of pollutants in the San Joaquin Valley. A novel result is that the Southern California Bight is filled with a mixture of well-aged carbon monoxide tracer from Southern California and the Bay Area. Air over the Bight is also affected by the agricultural emissions represented by the agricultural tracer, dominantly from the Central Valley where its sources are largest. There is no indication of transport from Southern California to the Central Valley. Emissions from the Central Valley do make their way to Southern California, as shown by the agricultural tracer, but automobile emissions from the Valley are insignificant in Southern California.

  5. California Enhances Energy Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    2011-11-01

    This article will discuss how my colleagues and I have promoted energy efficiency over the last 40 years. Our efforts have involved thousands of people from many different areas of expertise. The work has proceeded in several areas: • Investigating the science and engineering of energy end-use, • Assessing the potential and theoretical opportunities for energy efficiency, • Developing analytic and economic models to quantify opportunities, • Researching and developing new equipment and processes to bring these opportunities to fruition, • Participating in the development of California and later federal standards for energy performance in buildings and appliances, • Ensuring that market incentives were aligned with policies, and • Designing clear and convincing graphics to convey opportunities and results to all stakeholders.

  6. PYRAMID ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Augustus K.; Scott, Douglas F.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and mineral survey was conducted in the Pyramid Roadless Area, California. The area contains mineral showings, but no mineral-resource potential was identified during our studies. Three granodiorite samples on the west side of the roadless area contained weakly anomalous concentrations of uranium. Two samples of roof-pendant rocks, one metasedimentary rock and one metavolcanic rock, contain low concentrations of copper, and of copper and molybdenum, respectively. Although none was identified, the geologic terrane is permissive for mineral occurrences and large-scale, detailed geologic mapping of the areas of metasedimentary and metavolcanic roof pendants in the Pyramid Roadless Area could define a mineral-resource potential for tungsten and precious metals.

  7. Target margins in radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yartsev, Slav; Bauman, Glenn

    2016-11-01

    We reviewed the literature on the use of margins in radiotherapy of patients with prostate cancer, focusing on different options for image guidance (IG) and technical issues. The search in PubMed database was limited to include studies that involved external beam radiotherapy of the intact prostate. Post-prostatectomy studies, brachytherapy and particle therapy were excluded. Each article was characterized according to the IG strategy used: positioning on external marks using room lasers, bone anatomy and soft tissue match, usage of fiducial markers, electromagnetic tracking and adapted delivery. A lack of uniformity in margin selection among institutions was evident from the review. In general, introduction of pre- and in-treatment IG was associated with smaller planning target volume (PTV) margins, but there was a lack of definitive experimental/clinical studies providing robust information on selection of exact PTV values. In addition, there is a lack of comparative research regarding the cost-benefit ratio of the different strategies: insertion of fiducial markers or electromagnetic transponders facilitates prostate gland localization but at a price of invasive procedure; frequent pre-treatment imaging increases patient in-room time, dose and labour; online plan adaptation should improve radiation delivery accuracy but requires fast and precise computation. Finally, optimal protocols for quality assurance procedures need to be established.

  8. Ocean Margins Programs, Phase I research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verity, P. [ed.

    1994-08-01

    During FY 1992, the DOE restructured its regional coastal-ocean programs into a new Ocean Margins Program (OMP), to: Quantify the ecological and biogeochemical processes and mechanisms that affect the cycling, flux, and storage of carbon and other biogenic elements at the land/ocean interface; Define ocean-margin sources and sinks in global biogeochemical cycles, and; Determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or export to the interior ocean. Currently, the DOE Ocean Margins Program supports more than 70 principal and co-principal investigators, spanning more than 30 academic institutions. Research funded by the OMP amounted to about $6.9M in FY 1994. This document is a collection of abstracts summarizing the component projects of Phase I of the OMP. This phase included both research and technology development, and comprised projects of both two and three years duration. The attached abstracts describe the goals, methods, measurement scales, strengths and limitations, and status of each project, and level of support. Keywords are provided to index the various projects. The names, addresses, affiliations, and major areas of expertise of the investigators are provided in appendices.

  9. Origin and dynamics of depositionary subduction margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason P.; Silver, Eli; Kluesner, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Here we propose a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation, and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion. These feedbacks can lead to the creation of a “depositionary forearc,” a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary or erosive subduction margins by demonstrating a mode of rapid basin accretion during an erosive event at a subduction margin. A depositionary mode of forearc evolution occurs when terrigenous sediments are deposited directly on the forearc while it is being removed from below by subduction erosion. In the most extreme case, an entire forearc can be removed by a single subduction erosion event followed by depositionary replacement without involving transfer of sediments from the incoming plate. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are often shaped by interactions between slow, long-term processes, and sudden extreme events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale architecture of the forearc, with extreme events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that rapidly creates sections of a typical forearc margin. The persistent upward diversion of the megathrust is likely to affect its geometry, frictional nature, and hydrogeology. Therefore, the stresses along the fault and individual earthquake rupture characteristics are also expected to be more variable in these erosive systems than in systems with long-lived megathrust surfaces.

  10. Origin and dynamics of depositionary subduction margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason P.; Silver, Eli A.; Kluesner, Jared W.

    2016-06-01

    Here we propose a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation, and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion. These feedbacks can lead to the creation of a "depositionary forearc," a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary or erosive subduction margins by demonstrating a mode of rapid basin accretion during an erosive event at a subduction margin. A depositionary mode of forearc evolution occurs when terrigenous sediments are deposited directly on the forearc while it is being removed from below by subduction erosion. In the most extreme case, an entire forearc can be removed by a single subduction erosion event followed by depositionary replacement without involving transfer of sediments from the incoming plate. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are often shaped by interactions between slow, long-term processes, and sudden extreme events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale architecture of the forearc, with extreme events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that rapidly creates sections of a typical forearc margin. The persistent upward diversion of the megathrust is likely to affect its geometry, frictional nature, and hydrogeology. Therefore, the stresses along the fault and individual earthquake rupture characteristics are also expected to be more variable in these erosive systems than in systems with long-lived megathrust surfaces.

  11. Marginal historiography: on Stekel's account of things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Jaap

    2005-01-01

    Psychoanalytic historiography has been, and to a certain extent still is, written mainly from the victor's (Freud's) perspective. One of the first attempts to deliver an alternative account was published in 1926 by Wilhelm Stekel in a little-known paper entitled "On the History of the Analytical Movement," which he wrote in response to Freud's (1925) "An Autobiographical Study" as an attempt to supplement or even counter Freud's version. This paper offers a dialogical reading of Stekel's paper, focusing not on the question of whether or not Stekel was right, but on the problem of marginalization itself. What discursive processes contributed to the marginalization of Stekel's position, and in what sense could Stekel's paper be called an instance of self-marginalization? Analysing various intertextual links between Freud's and Stekel's accounts, the author finds that the two accounts were caught up in an antagonistic dialectic from which it was impossible to escape. Following this paper, an English translation of Stekel's 1926 account is presented here for the first time.

  12. Testing for conditional multiple marginal independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilder, Christopher R; Loughin, Thomas M

    2002-03-01

    Survey respondents are often prompted to pick any number of responses from a set of possible responses. Categorical variables that summarize this kind of data are called pick any/c variables. Counts from surveys that contain a pick any/c variable along with a group variable (r levels) and stratification variable (q levels) can be marginally summarized into an r x c x q contingency table. A question that may naturally arise from this setup is to determine if the group and pick any/c variable are marginally independent given the stratification variable. A test for conditional multiple marginal independence (CMMI) can be used to answer this question. Since subjects may pick any number out of c possible responses, the Cochran (1954, Biometrics 10, 417-451) and Mantel and Haenszel (1959, Journal of the National Cancer Institute 22, 719-748) tests cannot be used directly because they assume that units in the contingency table are independent of each other. Therefore, new testing methods are developed. Cochran's test statistic is extended to r x 2 x q tables, and a modified version of this statistic is proposed to test CMMI. Its sampling distribution can be approximated through bootstrapping. Other CMMI testing methods discussed are bootstrap p-value combination methods and Bonferroni adjustments. Simulation findings suggest that the proposed bootstrap procedures and the Bonferroni adjustments consistently hold the correct size and provide power against various alternatives.

  13. California Basin Studies (CaBS). Final contract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsline, D.S.

    1991-12-31

    The California Continental Borderland`s present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 10{sup 6} years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 10{sup 6} years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation.

  14. Essays in the California electricity reserves markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxoglou, Konstantinos

    This dissertation examines inefficiencies in the California electricity reserves markets. In Chapter 1, I use the information released during the investigation of the state's electricity crisis of 2000 and 2001 by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to diagnose allocative inefficiencies. Building upon the work of Wolak (2000), I calculate a lower bound for the sellers' price-cost margins using the inverse elasticities of their residual demand curves. The downward bias in my estimates stems from the fact that I don't account for the hierarchical substitutability of the reserve types. The margins averaged at least 20 percent for the two highest quality types of reserves, regulation and spinning, generating millions of dollars in transfers to a handful of sellers. I provide evidence that the deviations from marginal cost pricing were due to the markets' high concentration and a principal-agent relationship that emerged from their design. In Chapter 2, I document systematic differences between the markets' day- and hour-ahead prices. I use a high-dimensional vector moving average model to estimate the premia and conduct correct inferences. To obtain exact maximum likelihood estimates of the model, I employ the EM algorithm that I develop in Chapter 3. I uncover significant day-ahead premia, which I attribute to market design characteristics too. On the demand side, the market design established a principal-agent relationship between the markets' buyers (principal) and their supervisory authority (agent). The agent had very limited incentives to shift reserve purchases to the lower priced hour-ahead markets. On the supply side, the market design raised substantial entry barriers by precluding purely speculative trading and by introducing a complicated code of conduct that induced uncertainty about which actions were subject to regulatory scrutiny. In Chapter 3, I introduce a state-space representation for vector autoregressive moving average models that enables

  15. Paleontology and geochronology of the Long Beach core sites and monitoring wells, Long Beach, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Kristin; Hillhouse, John; Powell, Charles; Mahan, Shannon; Wan, Elmira; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Focus on Quaternary Stratigraphy in Los Angeles (FOQUS-LA) project was a cooperative coring program between Federal, State, and local agencies. It was designed to provide a better understanding of earthquake potentials and to develop a stratigraphic model of the western Los Angeles Basin in California. The biostratigraphic, geochronologic, and paleoecologic analyses of eight wells drilled during the FOQUS-LA project are presented. These analyses are based on microfossils (benthic and planktic foraminifers), macrofossils, paleomagnetic stratigraphy, optically stimulated luminescence, thermoluminescence, radiocarbon dating, and tephrochronology. A geochronologic framework (incorporating paleomagnetism, luminescence, and tephrochronology) was used to calibrate the sequence stratigraphic units in the FOQUS-LA wells and also was used to calibrate the ages of the microfossil stage and zonal boundaries. The results of this study show that (1) the offshore California margin zones can be used in a nearshore setting, and (2) the California margin zonal scheme refines the chronostratigraphic resolution of the benthic foraminiferal biostratigraphic framework for the Pacific Coast. Benthic foraminiferal stages are modified by the recognition of an early Hallian substage, which is a faunal change recognized throughout the Los Angeles Basin. Although no detailed macrofossil zonations exist for the Quaternary of southern California, several species, whose distribution is regulated by the climatic conditions, are useful as secondary marker species in the shallower water deposits of the Los Angeles Basin.

  16. Neogene sedimentary evolution of Baja California in relation to regional tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenes, J.; Carreño, A. L.

    1999-11-01

    During the Neogene, the tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Baja California Peninsula followed four stages: (1) during the early Miocene (22 Ma), the initiation of transform motion between Pacific and North American plates, caused a rapid subsidence in the Continental Borderland Province and in some adjacent areas.This subsidence coincided in time with with a global rise in sea level. At this time, the eastern and southern parts of the peninsula did not show any evidence of subsidence. (2) During the middle Miocene (12 Ma), normal and strike slip faulting migrated eastward, causing subsidence in the northern part of the Gulf of California, where the oldest Tertiary marine sedimentary rocks were deposited. The areas in central Baja California Sur and the central part of the Gulf itself received abundant volcanic deposits related to continental extension. (3) During the late Miocene (8 Ma), the western margin of the Peninsula changed to a slightly compressive regime, while the northern part of the Gulf contained a marine basin with upper bathyal environments. The central area of the Gulf continued receiving abundant volcanic deposits, while the Los Cabos block received marine sedimentation, correlatable with sedimentary units reported from the continental margins in Nayarit, Jalisco and Michoacán. (4) Beginning in the early Pliocene (5 Ma), the present configuration of the Gulf of California developed through right-lateral strike slip and extension in the Gulf itself. Since Pliocene times, the Gulf presents widespread marine sedimentation with deep basins reaching lower bathyal depths.

  17. Intraoperative radiological margin assessment in breast-conserving surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrai, T; Quaranta, D; Fouche, Y; Machiavello, J-C; Raoust, I; Chapellier, C; Maestro, C; Marcy, M; Ferrero, J-M; Flipo, B

    2014-04-01

    A prospective study was lead in order to analyze the accuracy of an X-ray device settled in the operating room for margin assessment, when performing breast-conserving surgery. One hundred and seventy patients were included. All lesions were visible on the preoperative mammograms. An intraoperative X-ray of the lumpectomy specimen was systematically performed for margins assessment. Final histological data were collected and the accuracy of intraoperative specimen radiography (IOSR) for margin assessment was analyzed. IOSR allowed an evaluation of margins status in 155 cases (91.2%). After final histological examination, the positive margins rate would have been 6.5% if margin assessment had relied only on IOSR. Margin assessment with a two-dimensional X-ray device would have allowed the achievement of negative margins in 93.5% of the cases. Moreover, this procedure allows important time-saving and could have a substantial economical impact. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intraoperative ultrasound control of surgical margins during partial nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feras M Alharbi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The intraoperative US control of resection margins in PN is a simple, efficient, and effective method for ensuring negative surgical margins with a small increase in warm ischemia time and can be conducted by the operating urologist.

  19. Ecological zones of California deserts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The dataset delineates ecological zones within California deserts. We derived ecological zones by reclassifying LANDFIRE vegetation biophysical setting types, plus...

  20. Bathymetry--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Bolinas, California (raster data file is included in...

  1. Flight tracks, Northern California TRACON

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the records of all the flights in the Northern California TRACON. The data was provided by the aircraft noise abatement office...

  2. Bathymetry--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Pacifica, California. The raster data file is included in...

  3. Habitat--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  4. Contours--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  5. USGS Northern California Shoreline Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has generated a comprehensive data clearinghouse of digital vector shorelines and shoreline...

  6. Bathymetry--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Pacifica, California. The raster data file is included in...

  7. Contours--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Aptos map area, California. The vector data file is...

  8. Invertebrate diversity in southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This shapefile displays mean invertebrate diversity within 5 minute grid cells. The Shannon Index of diversity was calculated from Southern California Coastal Water...

  9. DS796 California Groundwater Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The California Groundwater Units dataset classifies and delineates the State into one of three groundwater based polygon units: (1) those areas defined as alluvial...

  10. Habitat--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  11. Contours--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Aptos map area, California. The vector data file is...

  12. Contours--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  13. California Gnatcatcher Observations - 2004-2009 [ds457

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — In southern California, the coastal California gnatcatcher (CAGN) has become both the flagship species and an umbrella species identified with conservation, where...

  14. Microbial methanogenesis in the sulfate-reducing zone of surface sediments traversing the Peruvian margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltby, J.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Treude, T.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the concurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in surface sediments (0-25 cm below sea floor) at six stations (70, 145, 253, 407, 990 and 1024 m) along the Peruvian margin (12° S). This oceanographic region is characterized by high carbon export to the seafloor creating an extensive oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the shelf, both factors that could favor surface methanogenesis. Sediments sampled along the depth transect traversed areas of anoxic and oxic conditions in the bottom-near water. Net methane production (batch incubations) and sulfate reduction (35S-sulfate radiotracer incubation) were determined in the upper 0-25 cm b.s.f. of multiple cores from all stations, while deep hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (> 30 cm b.s.f., 14C-bicarbonate radiotracer incubation) was determined in two gravity cores at selected sites (78 and 407 m). Furthermore, stimulation (methanol addition) and inhibition (molybdate addition) experiments were carried out to investigate the relationship between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis.Highest rates of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in the surface sediments, integrated over 0-25 cm b.s.f., were observed on the shelf (70-253 m, 0.06-0.1 and 0.5-4.7 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively), while lowest rates were discovered at the deepest site (1024 m, 0.03 and 0.2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively). The addition of methanol resulted in significantly higher surface methanogenesis activity, suggesting that the process was mostly based on non-competitive substrates - i.e., substrates not used by sulfate reducers. In the deeper sediment horizons, where competition was probably relieved due to the decrease of sulfate, the usage of competitive substrates was confirmed by the detection of hydrogenotrophic activity in the sulfate-depleted zone at the shallow shelf station (70 m).Surface methanogenesis appeared to be correlated to the availability of labile organic matter (C / N ratio) and organic carbon degradation (DIC production

  15. Fire risk in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Seth Howard

    Fire is an integral part of ecosystems in the western United States. Decades of fire suppression have led to (unnaturally) large accumulations of fuel in some forest communities, such as the lower elevation forests of the Sierra Nevada. Urban sprawl into fire prone chaparral vegetation in southern California has put human lives at risk and the decreased fire return intervals have put the vegetation community at risk of type conversion. This research examines the factors affecting fire risk in two of the dominant landscapes in the state of California, chaparral and inland coniferous forests. Live fuel moisture (LFM) is important for fire ignition, spread rate, and intensity in chaparral. LFM maps were generated for Los Angeles County by developing and then inverting robust cross-validated regression equations from time series field data and vegetation indices (VIs) and phenological metrics from MODIS data. Fire fuels, including understory fuels which are not visible to remote sensing instruments, were mapped in Yosemite National Park using the random forests decision tree algorithm and climatic, topographic, remotely sensed, and fire history variables. Combining the disparate data sources served to improve classification accuracies. The models were inverted to produce maps of fuel models and fuel amounts, and these showed that fire fuel amounts are highest in the low elevation forests that have been most affected by fire suppression impacting the natural fire regime. Wildland fires in chaparral commonly burn in late summer or fall when LFM is near its annual low, however, the Jesusita Fire burned in early May of 2009, when LFM was still relatively high. The HFire fire spread model was used to simulate the growth of the Jesusita Fire using LFM maps derived from imagery acquired at the time of the fire and imagery acquired in late August to determine how much different the fire would have been if it had occurred later in the year. Simulated fires were 1.5 times larger

  16. Marginal phase correction of truncated Bessel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedukhin

    2000-06-01

    Approximate analytic expressions are obtained for evaluating the axial intensity and the central-lobe diameter of J0 Bessel beams transmitted through a finite-aperture phase filter. A reasonable quality factor governing the axial-intensity behavior of a phase-undistorted truncated Bessel beam is found to be the inverse square root of the Fresnel number defined, for a given aperture, from the axial point of geometrical shadow. Additional drastic reduction of axial-intensity oscillations is accomplished by using marginal phase correction of the beam instead of the well-known amplitude apodization. A procedure for analytically calculating an optimal monotonic slowly varying correction phase function is described.

  17. Potentials of marginal lands - sponateous ecosystem development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwin, Werner; Schaaf, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Marginal lands are often considered as unfertile and not productive. They are widely excluded from modern land use by conventional agriculture. Assessment of soil fertility usually shows very low productivity potentials at least for growing traditional crops. However, it can be frequently observed that natural succession at different types of marginal lands leads to very diverse and nonetheless productive ecosystems. Examples can be found at abandoned former industrial or transportation sites which were set aside and not further maintained - and also in post-mining landscapes. In one of the lignite open cast mines of the State of Brandenburg in Eastern Germany a landscape observatory was established in 2005 for observing this natural ecosystem development under marginal site conditions. The site of 6 ha is part of the post-mining landscapes of Lusatia which are often characterized by poor soil conditions and clearly reduced soil fertility. It is named "Hühnerwasser-Quellgebiet" (Chicken Creek Catchment) after a small stream that is restored again after destruction by the mining operations. It is planned to serve as the headwater of this stream and was left to an unrestricted primary succession. A comprehensive scientific monitoring program is carried out since the start of ecosystem development in 2005. The results offer exemplary insights into the establishment of interaction networks between the developing ecosystem compartments. After 10 years a large biodiversity, expressed by a high number of species, can be found at this site as the result of natural recovery processes. A large number of both tree species and individuals have settled here. Even if no economic use of the site and of the woody biomass produced by these trees is planned, an overall assessment of the biomass production was carried out. The results showed that the biomass production from natural succession without any application of fertilizers etc. is directly comparable with yields from

  18. Area inequalities for stable marginally trapped surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Jaramillo, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    We discuss a family of inequalities involving the area, angular momentum and charges of stably outermost marginally trapped surfaces in generic non-vacuum dynamical spacetimes, with non-negative cosmological constant and matter sources satisfying the dominant energy condition. These inequalities provide lower bounds for the area of spatial sections of dynamical trapping horizons, namely hypersurfaces offering quasi-local models of black hole horizons. In particular, these inequalities represent particular examples of the extension to a Lorentzian setting of tools employed in the discussion of minimal surfaces in Riemannian contexts.

  19. Formation and evolution of magma-poor margins, an example of the West Iberia margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Andres-Martinez, Miguel; Morgan, Jason P.; Ranero, Cesar R.; Reston, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The West Iberia-Newfoundland (WIM-NF) conjugate margins have been geophysically and geologically surveyed for the last 30 years and have arguably become a paradigm for magma-poor extensional margins. Here we present a coherent picture of the WIM-NF rift to drift evolution that emerges from these observations and numerical modeling, and point out important differences that may exist with other magma-poor margins world-wide. The WIM-NF is characterized by a continental crust that thins asymmetrically and a wide and symmetric continent-ocean transition (COT) interpreted to consist of exhumed and serpentinised mantle with magmatic products increasing oceanward. The architectural evolution of these margins is mainly dominated by cooling under very slow extension velocities (crust that most probably was not extremely weak at the start of rifting. These conditions lead to a system where initially deformation is distributed over a broad area and the upper, lower crust and lithosphere are decoupled. As extension progresses upper, lower, crust and mantle become tightly coupled and deformation localizes due to strengthening and cooling during rifting. Coupling leads to asymmetric asthenospheric uplift and weakening of the hanginwall of the active fault, where a new fault forms. This continued process leads to the formation of an array of sequential faults that dip and become younger oceanward. Here we show that these processes acting in concert: 1) reproduce the margin asymmetry observed at the WIM-NF, 2) explain the fault geometry evolution from planar, to listric to detachment like by having one common Andersonian framework, 3) lead to the symmetric exhumation of mantle with little magmatism, and 4) explain the younging of the syn-rift towards the basin centre and imply that unconformities separating syn- and post-rift may be diachronous and younger towards the ocean. Finally, we show that different lower crustal rheologies lead to different patterns of extension and to an

  20. The Role of Rift Obliquity in Formation of the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Scott Edmund Kelsey

    The Gulf of California illustrates how highly oblique rift geometries, where transform faults are kinematically linked to large-offset normal faults in adjacent pull-apart basins, enhance the ability of continental lithosphere to rupture and, ultimately, hasten the formation of new oceanic basins. The Gulf of California rift has accommodated oblique divergence of the Pacific and North America tectonic plates in northwestern Mexico since Miocene time. Due to its infancy, the rifted margins of the Gulf of California preserve a rare onshore record of early continental break-up processes from which to investigate the role of rift obliquity in strain localization. Using new high-precision paleomagnetic vectors from tectonically stable sites in north-central Baja California, I compile a paleomagnetic transect of Miocene ignimbrites across northern Baja California and Sonora that reveals the timing and distribution of dextral shear associated with inception of this oblique rift. I integrate detailed geologic mapping, basin analysis, and geochronology of pre-rift and syn-rift volcanic units to determine the timing of fault activity on Isla Tiburon, a proximal onshore exposure of the rifted North America margin, adjacent to the axis of the Gulf of California. The onset of strike-slip faulting on Isla Tiburon, ca. 8 - 7 Ma, was synchronous with the onset of transform faulting along a significant length of the nascent plate boundary within the rift. This tectonic transition coincides with a clockwise azimuthal shift in Pacific-North America relative motion that increased rift obliquity. I constrain the earliest marine conditions on southwest Isla Tiburon to ca. 6.4 - 6.0 Ma, coincident with a regional latest Miocene marine incursion in the northern proto-Gulf of California. This event likely flooded a narrow, incipient topographic depression along a ˜650 km-long portion of the latest Miocene plate boundary and corresponds in time and space with formation of a newly

  1. Recidiva tardia de linfoma da zona marginal Late relapse of marginal zone lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha,Talita M. B.S.; Bortolheiro,Tereza C.; Eduardo Costa; Daniela Haardt; Roberto P. Paes; Chiattone, Carlos S.

    2009-01-01

    O linfoma de zona marginal é um linfoma de baixo grau com curso clínico indolente e potencial de recidiva.1,2 Apresentamos um caso de recidiva tardia após 25 anos de aparente remissão completa, levantando a possibilidade de recidiva de doença preexistente ou desenvolvimento de novo clone neoplásico.Marginal zone lymphoma is a low grade lymphoma with an indolent course and chance to relapse. We present a case of a patient who suffered relapse after 25 years of apparently complete remission of ...

  2. en Baja California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmyra Ybañez Zepeda

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the future, the population of 60 years old or older will increase in absolute and relative numbers at a very rapid pace in Mexico. Using data from Censo general de población y vivienda 2000, Encuesta sobre migración en la frontera norte de México and Consejo Nacional de Población (Conapo, the purpose of this article is twofold: first of all, to analyze the aging process in the municipalities of Tijuana and Mexicali, located in the state of Baja California, which has a very low proportion of the eldest; and second of all, to examine the role of migration in this process. Tijuana has a younger population which is aging slowly due to a very intense immigration of young workers and potential parents. Mexicali, on the other hand, has a high percentage of a native population that is aging unrelentingly, and it also has a lower flow of immigrants who are older, and includes a high concentration of persons who had previously resided in the United States.

  3. Characterizing entanglement with global and marginal entropic measures

    CERN Document Server

    Adesso, G; De Siena, S; Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Siena, Silvio De

    2003-01-01

    We qualify the entanglement of arbitrary mixed states of bipartite quantum systems by comparing global and marginal mixednesses quantified by different entropic measures. For systems of two qubits we discriminate the class of maximally entangled states with fixed marginal mixednesses, and determine an analytical upper bound relating the entanglement of formation to the marginal linear entropies. This result partially generalizes to mixed states the quantification of entaglement with marginal mixednesses holding for pure states. We identify a class of entangled states that, for fixed marginals, are globally more mixed than product states when measured by the linear entropy. Such states cannot be discriminated by the majorization criterion.

  4. Hanging canyons of Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada: Fault-control on submarine canyon geomorphology along active continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Peter T.; Barrie, J. Vaughn; Conway, Kim W.; Greene, H. Gary

    2014-06-01

    Faulting commonly influences the geomorphology of submarine canyons that occur on active continental margins. Here, we examine the geomorphology of canyons located on the continental margin off Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, that are truncated on the mid-slope (1200-1400 m water depth) by the Queen Charlotte Fault Zone (QCFZ). The QCFZ is an oblique strike-slip fault zone that has rates of lateral motion of around 50-60 mm/yr and a small convergent component equal to about 3 mm/yr. Slow subduction along the Cascadia Subduction Zone has accreted a prism of marine sediment against the lower slope (1500-3500 m water depth), forming the Queen Charlotte Terrace, which blocks the mouths of submarine canyons formed on the upper slope (200-1400 m water depth). Consequently, canyons along this margin are short (4-8 km in length), closely spaced (around 800 m), and terminate uniformly along the 1400 m isobath, coinciding with the primary fault trend of the QCFZ. Vertical displacement along the fault has resulted in hanging canyons occurring locally. The Haida Gwaii canyons are compared and contrasted with the Sur Canyon system, located to the south of Monterey Bay, California, on a transform margin, which is not blocked by any accretionary prism, and where canyons thus extend to 4000 m depth, across the full breadth of the slope.

  5. Evidence For Decadal and Century Scale Climate and Oceanic Variability in the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, Over the Last Millenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, L.; Ravelo, A. C.; Aiello, I. W.; Stewart, Z.; Sauthoff, W.

    2015-12-01

    Linda Pineda1Ana Christina Ravelo2Ivano Aiello3Zach Stewart2Wilson Sauthoff2 Earth and Planetary Sciences Department, UCSC Ocean Sciences Department, UCSC Moss Landing Marine Lab Natural climate change affects coastal water resources, human land use, and marine biological productivity. In particular, the seasonal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is influenced by changes in global-scale temperature and pressure gradients and is responsible for spatial changes in summertime rainfall in Mesoamerica impacting regional water resources and the strength of upwelling. In October 2014, aboard the Research Vessel El Puma, a 3.9 meter long core (G14-P12) was recovered from the Northeast flank of the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California within the oxygen minimum zone (27˚52.11'N, 111˚41.51'W, water depth of 677m) to investigate changes in seasonal upwelling and Central Mexico rainfall over the last ~1000 years. The age model was developed using Pb210, C14 and lamination counting. The time interval includes the Little Ice Age and the Medieval Warm Period. Biological productivity and precipitation proxy records were produced using an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) core-scanner and a color line scanner to generate a record of bulk chemistry and color reflectance. The records indicate marked decadal and centennial scale variability in the lithologic composition of the sediment superimposed on millimeter-scale variability that reflects the presence of seasonally laminated sediments. Nitrogen isotopic and nitrogen weight % measurements were used, in combination with the scanned data, to interpret changes in nitrate utilization and biological productivity. These new records will have broad implications on the link between regional coastal environmental conditions in the Gulf of California and global climate change.

  6. Research priorities for zoonoses and marginalized infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a review and analysis of the research landscape for zoonoses and marginalized infections which affect poor populations, and a list of research priorities to support disease control. The work is the output of the Disease Reference Group on Zoonoses and Marginalized Infectious Diseases of Poverty (DRG6), which is part of an independent think tank of international experts, established and funded by the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), to identify key research priorities through review of research evidence and input from stakeholder consultations. The report covers a diverse range of diseases, including zoonotic helminth, protozoan, viral and bacterial infections considered to be neglected and associated with poverty. Disease-specific research issues are elaborated under individual disease sections and many common priorities are identified among the diseases such as the need for new and/or improved drugs and regimens, diagnostics and, where appropriate, vaccines. The disease-specific priorities are described as micro priorities compared with the macro level priorities which will drive policy-making for: improved surveillance; interaction between the health, livestock, agriculture, natural resources and wildlife sectors in tackling zoonotic diseases; and true assessment of the burden of zoonoses. This is one often disease and thematic reference group reports that have come out of the TDR Think Tank, all of which have contributed to the development of the Global Report search on Infectious Diseases of Poverty, available at: w.who.int/tdr/stewardship/global_report/en/index.html.

  7. Instability and Tsunamigenic Potential at Convergent Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Huene, R.; Ranero, C. R.; Watts, P.

    2001-12-01

    Along many convergent margins multibeam echosounding navigated with GPS has revealed large slope failures that were probably tsunamigenic. Bathymetric data combined with seismic reflection imaging indicate multiple causes. The 55-km wide Nicoya Slump resulted from the steepening slope above an underthrusting seamount on the subducting oceanic plate. This slump may have generated a 27-m high wave. Several 5-7 km wide mid-slope slides off central Nicaragua probably resulted from steepening of the continental slope by tectonic erosion. They may have generated waves 6-7 m high. A 30 km wide mid-slope slump off northern Peru may have generated a 5 m high wave. Its cause will not be understood without better seismic reflection imaging but considerable fluid venting was observed across its headwall. In the Gulf of Alaska a large slide appears to have resulted from rapid sedimentation. Tsunamigenic slope failure along convergent margins is only beginning to be resolved and the causes vary. Subducted ocean floor relief, tectonically steepened slopes, and sites of rapid sedimentation can help target potential failure and possible future tsunami hazards.

  8. Large margin classifier-based ensemble tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuru; Liu, Qiaoyuan; Yin, Minghao; Wang, ShengSheng

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, many studies consider visual tracking as a two-class classification problem. The key problem is to construct a classifier with sufficient accuracy in distinguishing the target from its background and sufficient generalize ability in handling new frames. However, the variable tracking conditions challenges the existing methods. The difficulty mainly comes from the confused boundary between the foreground and background. This paper handles this difficulty by generalizing the classifier's learning step. By introducing the distribution data of samples, the classifier learns more essential characteristics in discriminating the two classes. Specifically, the samples are represented in a multiscale visual model. For features with different scales, several large margin distribution machine (LDMs) with adaptive kernels are combined in a Baysian way as a strong classifier. Where, in order to improve the accuracy and generalization ability, not only the margin distance but also the sample distribution is optimized in the learning step. Comprehensive experiments are performed on several challenging video sequences, through parameter analysis and field comparison, the proposed LDM combined ensemble tracker is demonstrated to perform with sufficient accuracy and generalize ability in handling various typical tracking difficulties.

  9. Limit theorems for functions of marginal quantiles

    CERN Document Server

    Babu, G Jogesh; Choi, Kwok Pui; Mangalam, Vasudevan; 10.3150/10-BEJ287

    2011-01-01

    Multivariate distributions are explored using the joint distributions of marginal sample quantiles. Limit theory for the mean of a function of order statistics is presented. The results include a multivariate central limit theorem and a strong law of large numbers. A result similar to Bahadur's representation of quantiles is established for the mean of a function of the marginal quantiles. In particular, it is shown that \\[\\sqrt{n}\\Biggl(\\frac{1}{n}\\sum_{i=1}^n\\phi\\bigl(X_{n:i}^{(1)},...,X_{n:i}^{(d)}\\bigr)-\\bar{\\gamma}\\Biggr)=\\frac{1}{\\sqrt{n}}\\sum_{i=1}^nZ_{n,i}+\\mathrm{o}_P(1)\\] as $n\\rightarrow\\infty$, where $\\bar{\\gamma}$ is a constant and $Z_{n,i}$ are i.i.d. random variables for each $n$. This leads to the central limit theorem. Weak convergence to a Gaussian process using equicontinuity of functions is indicated. The results are established under very general conditions. These conditions are shown to be satisfied in many commonly occurring situations.

  10. HISTOPATHOLOGY OF MARGINAL SUPERFICIAL PERIODONTIUM AT MENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Georgescu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Premises: Sexual hormones may affect the general health condition of women, as early as puberty, continuing during pregnancy and also after menopause. Variations of the hormonal levels may cause different – either local or general – pathological modifications. Sexual hormones may also affect periodontal status, favourizing gingival inflammations and reducing periodontal resistance to the action of the bacterial plaque. Scope: Establishment of the correlations between the debut or the manifestation of menopause and the modifications produced in the superficial periodontium. Materials and method: Clinical and paraclinical investigations were performed on female patients with ages between 45 and 66 years, involving macroscopic, microscopic and radiological recording of the aspect of the superificial periodontium (gingiva. Results: Analysis of the histological sections evidenced atrophic and involutive modifications in the marginal superficial periodontium of female patients at menopause. Conclusions: Sexual hormones intervene in the histological equilibrium of the marginal superficial periodontium, influencing the periodontal health status, which explains the correlation between the subjective symptomatology specific to menopause and the histopatological aspect at epithelial level.

  11. Naturally light dilatons from nearly marginal deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Megias, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the presence of a light dilaton in CFTs deformed by a nearly-marginal operator O, in the holographic realizations consisting of confining RG flows that end on a soft wall. Generically, the deformations induce a condensate , and the dilaton mode can be identified as the fluctuation of . We obtain a mass formula for the dilaton as a certain average along the RG flow. The dilaton is naturally light whenever i) confinement is reached fast enough (such as via the condensation of O) and ii) the beta function is small (walking) at the condensation scale. These conditions are satisfied for a class of models with a bulk pseudo-Goldstone boson whose potential is nearly flat at small field and exponential at large field values. Thus, the recent observation by Contino, Pomarol and Ratazzi holds in CFTs with a single nearly-marginal operator. We also discuss the holographic method to compute the condensate , based on solving the first-order nonlinear differential equation that the beta function satisfies.

  12. Photogrammetric monitoring of glacier margin lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mulsow

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The growing number of glacier margin lakes that have developed due to glacier retreat have caused an increase of dangerous glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs in several regions over the last decade. This normally causes a flood wave downstream the glacier. Typically, such an event takes few to several hours. GLOF scenarios may be a significant hazard to life, property, nature and infrastructure in the affected areas. A GLOF is usually characterized by a progressive water level drop. By observing the water level of the lake, an imminent GLOF-event can be identified. Common gauging systems are often not suitable for the measurement task, as they may be affected by ice fall or landslides in the lake basin. Therefore, in our pilot study, the water level is observed by processing images of a terrestrial camera system observing a glacier margin lake. The paper presents the basic principle of an automatic single-camera-based GLOF early warning system. Challenges and approaches to solve them are discussed. First, results from processed image sequences are presented to show the feasibility of the concept. Water level changes can be determined at decimetre precision.

  13. The Role of Weight Shrinking in Large Margin Perceptron Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Panagiotakopoulos, Constantinos

    2012-01-01

    We introduce into the classical perceptron algorithm with margin a mechanism that shrinks the current weight vector as a first step of the update. If the shrinking factor is constant the resulting algorithm may be regarded as a margin-error-driven version of NORMA with constant learning rate. In this case we show that the allowed strength of shrinking depends on the value of the maximum margin. We also consider variable shrinking factors for which there is no such dependence. In both cases we obtain new generalizations of the perceptron with margin able to provably attain in a finite number of steps any desirable approximation of the maximal margin hyperplane. The new approximate maximum margin classifiers appear experimentally to be very competitive in 2-norm soft margin tasks involving linear kernels.

  14. Conformation of marginalized micro companies in Mexico’s northern border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aguilar Barceló

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Using some methods of multivariate analysis, particularly the cluster and discriminate analysis, we study 174 microcompanies and/or microbusiness mainly dedicated to the elaboration of foods and drinks. They belong to the marginalized segment of entrepreneurs in the Mexican border state of Baja California. We wanted to know how they behave and what the variables that define this behavior are. The results show a differentiated behavior among entrepreneurs depending on variables as age, familiar condition, education and geographic zone of origin. Nevertheless, we must emphasize the relevance of education in the quality of the management of the company as well as a signal in the market that bring up confidence to suppliers and clients. On the other hand, we corroborate that microcredits could help to improve the efficiency of many of these microcompanies and/or microbusiness under certain circumstances.

  15. "A Few of the Brightest, Cleanest Mexican Children": School Segregation as a Form of Mundane Racism in Oxnard, California, 1900-1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, David G.; Yosso, Tara J.; Barajas, Frank P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, David G. Garcia, Tara J. Yosso, and Frank P. Barajas examine the early twentieth-century origins of a dual schooling system that facilitated the reproduction of a cheap labor force and the marginalization of Mexicans in Oxnard, California. In their analysis of the 1930s Oxnard Elementary School District board minutes, alongside…

  16. Continental margin radiography from a potential field and sediment thickness standpoint: the Iberian Atlantic Margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalan, M.; Martos, Y. M.; Martin-Davila, J.; Munoz-Martin, A.; Carbo, A.; Druet, M.

    2015-07-01

    This study reviews the state of knowledge in the Iberian Atlantic margin. In order to do this, the margin has been divided into three provinces: the Galicia margin, the southern Iberian abyssal plain, and the Tagus abyssal plain. We have used potential field and sediment thickness data. This has allowed us to study the crust, setting limits for the continental crust domain, and the amplitude of the so-called ocean-continent transition, whose end marks the beginning of the oceanic crust. The study shows the continental crust in the Galician margin to be the widest, about 210 km in length, whilst the ocean-continent transition varies slightly in this province: between 65 km wide in the south and 56 km wide in the north. This result shows up some differences with the hypothesis of other authors. The situation in the southern Iberian abyssal plain is nearly the opposite. Its continental crust extends approximately 60 km, whilst the ocean-continent transition zone is 185 km long. The Tagus abyssal plain study shows a faster morphological evolution than the others, according with the amount of crustal thinning β, the ocean-continent transition domain spanning 100 km. These results support a transitional intermediate character for almost the whole Tagus plain, in contrary to what other authors have stated. (Author)

  17. The tragedy of the margins: land rights and marginal lands in Vietnam (c. 1800-1945)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kleinen

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with aspects of official land registers in pre-colonial and colonial Vietnam and their relationship with marginal lands since the eleventh century and especially since the beginning of the nineteenth century. The changing pattern of land ownership and control is studied in detail

  18. Talking (and Not Talking) about Race, Social Class and Dis/Ability: Working Margin to Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Beth A.; Connor, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we examine some of the omnipresent yet unacknowledged discourses of social and economic disadvantage and dis/ability within schools in the US. First, we document ways that social class, race, and dis/ability function within schools to further disadvantage and exclude already marginalized students. Next, we show how particular ways…

  19. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Salt Point, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Golden, Nadine E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Greene, H. Gary; Cochrane, Guy R.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Manson, Michael W.; Endris, Charles A.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Watt, Janet T.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Sliter, Ray W.; Lowe, Erik N.; Chinn, John L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology.

  20. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Pacifica, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Brian D.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Bretz, Carrie K.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Sliter, Ray W.; Ross, Stephanie L.; Golden, Nadine E.; Watt, Janet Tilden; Chinn, John L.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Manson, Michael W.; Endris, Charles A.; Cochran, Susan A.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. 

  1. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of San Francisco, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Endris, Charles A.; Manson, Michael W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Watt, Janet Tilden; Ross, Stephanie L.; Bruns, Terry R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology.

  2. California State Waters Map Series: Drakes Bay and vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Janet T.; Dartnell, Peter; Golden, Nadine E.; Greene, H. Gary; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Manson, Michael W.; Endris, Charles A.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Sliter, Ray W.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Lowe, Erik N.; Chinn, John L.; Watt, Janet T.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology.

  3. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Golden, Nadine E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Greene, H. Gary; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Watt, Janet Tilden; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Manson, Michael W.; Endris, Charles A.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Sliter, Ray W.; Lowe, Erik N.; Chinn, John L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 200 m) subsurface geology.

  4. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Refugio Beach, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Conrad, James E.; Greene, H. Gary; Seitz, Gordon G.; Endris, Charles A.; Sliter, Ray W.; Wong, Florence L.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; East, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology.

  5. Teale Urband and rural areas of California

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California Spatial Information System (CaSIL) is a project designed to improve access to geo-spatial and geo-spatial related data information throughout the state...

  6. California Least Tern Breeding Survey 1996 Season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1996, 3330-3392 pairs of the endangered California least tern (Sterna antillarum browni) nested at 35 sites along the coast of California. This 29% increase in...

  7. California Least Tern Breeding Survey 1994 Season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1994, a minimum of approximately 2,792 pairs of the endangered California least tern (Sterna antillarum browni) nested at 36 sites along the coast of California....

  8. Missing Linkages in California's Landscape [ds420

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The critical need for conserving landscape linkages first came to the forefront of conservation thinking in California in November 2000, when a statewide interagency...

  9. Teale California Office of Emergency Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California Spatial Information System (CaSIL) is a project designed to improve access to geo-spatial and geo-spatial related data information throughout the state of...

  10. California Least Tern Breeding Survey 1992 Season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1992, approximately 2,106 pairs of the endangered California Least Tern (Sterna antillarum browni) nested at 38 sites along the coast of California, from the San...

  11. California Geological Survey Geologic Map Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — All the individual maps from the Geologic Atlas of California and the Regional Geologic map series have been georeferenced for display in a GIS (and viewable online...

  12. The California stream quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Egler, Amanda L.; May, Jason T.

    2017-03-06

    In 2017, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) project is assessing stream quality in coastal California, United States. The USGS California Stream Quality Assessment (CSQA) will sample streams over most of the Central California Foothills and Coastal Mountains ecoregion (modified from Griffith and others, 2016), where rapid urban growth and intensive agriculture in the larger river valleys are raising concerns that stream health is being degraded. Findings will provide the public and policy-makers with information regarding which human and natural factors are the most critical in affecting stream quality and, thus, provide insights about possible approaches to protect the health of streams in the region.

  13. Evidence for Marginal Stability in Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Jorjadze, Ivane; Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Wyart, Matthieu; Brujic, Jasna

    2016-11-01

    We report the first measurements of the effect of pressure on vibrational modes in emulsions, which serve as a model for soft frictionless spheres at zero temperature. As a function of the applied pressure, we find that the density of states D (ω ) exhibits a low-frequency cutoff ω*, which scales linearly with the number of extra contacts per particle δ z . Moreover, for ω Soft Matter 10, 5628 (2014); S. Franz, G. Parisi, P. Urbani, and F. Zamponi, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 112, 14539 (2015)]. Finally, the degree of localization of the softest low frequency modes increases with compression, as shown by the participation ratio as well as their spatial configurations. Overall, our observations show that emulsions are marginally stable and display non-plane-wave modes up to vanishing frequencies.

  14. Regnar -- Development of a marginal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalund, K.M.; Brodersen, F.P.; Roigaard-Petersen, B. [Maersk Olie og Gas AS, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1994-12-31

    Regnar is a small marginal field located some 13 km from the main Dan F complex and is the first subsea completion in Danish waters, operated by Maersk Olie og Gas AS. A short lifetime has been predicted for the field which therefore has been developed as a low cost project, using a combination of subsea technology and minimum topside facilities. Regnar consists of a subsea x-mas tree producing through a 6 inch pipeline with a 2 1/2 inch chemical piggyback line to Dan F. The x-mas tree and the subsea choke valve are controlled from a buoy moored nearby the well. The buoy is radio linked to Dan F. The Regnar field was brought on stream on September 26, 1993.

  15. Max-margin based Bayesian classifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao-cheng HU‡; Jin-hui YU

    2016-01-01

    There is a tradeoff between generalization capability and computational overhead in multi-class learning. We propose a generative probabilistic multi-class classifi er, considering both the generalization capability and the learning/prediction rate. We show that the classifi er has a max-margin property. Thus, prediction on future unseen data can nearly achieve the same performance as in the training stage. In addition, local variables are eliminated, which greatly simplifi es the optimization problem. By convex and probabilistic analysis, an efficient online learning algorithm is developed. The algorithm aggregates rather than averages dualities, which is different from the classical situations. Empirical results indicate that our method has a good generalization capability and coverage rate.

  16. The genetics of nodal marginal zone lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Valeria; Khiabanian, Hossein; Messina, Monica; Monti, Sara; Cascione, Luciano; Bruscaggin, Alessio; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Holmes, Antony B; Arcaini, Luca; Lucioni, Marco; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Zairis, Sakellarios; Diop, Fary; Cerri, Michaela; Chiaretti, Sabina; Marasca, Roberto; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Deaglio, Silvia; Ramponi, Antonio; Tiacci, Enrico; Pasqualucci, Laura; Paulli, Marco; Falini, Brunangelo; Inghirami, Giorgio; Bertoni, Francesco; Foà, Robin; Rabadan, Raul; Gaidano, Gianluca; Rossi, Davide

    2016-09-08

    Nodal marginal zone lymphoma (NMZL) is a rare, indolent B-cell tumor that is distinguished from splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) by the different pattern of dissemination. NMZL still lacks distinct markers and remains orphan of specific cancer gene lesions. By combining whole-exome sequencing, targeted sequencing of tumor-related genes, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, we aimed at disclosing the pathways that are molecularly deregulated in NMZL and we compare the molecular profile of NMZL with that of SMZL. These analyses identified a distinctive pattern of nonsilent somatic lesions in NMZL. In 35 NMZL patients, 41 genes were found recurrently affected in ≥3 (9%) cases, including highly prevalent molecular lesions of MLL2 (also known as KMT2D; 34%), PTPRD (20%), NOTCH2 (20%), and KLF2 (17%). Mutations of PTPRD, a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase regulating cell growth, were enriched in NMZL across mature B-cell tumors, functionally caused the loss of the phosphatase activity of PTPRD, and were associated with cell-cycle transcriptional program deregulation and increased proliferation index in NMZL. Although NMZL shared with SMZL a common mutation profile, NMZL harbored PTPRD lesions that were otherwise absent in SMZL. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into the genetics of NMZL, identify PTPRD lesions as a novel marker for this lymphoma across mature B-cell tumors, and support the distinction of NMZL as an independent clinicopathologic entity within the current lymphoma classification. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. Qualitative study of the quality of sleep in marginalized individuals living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saberi P

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Parya Saberi,1 Megan Comfort,2 Nicolas Sheon,1 Mallory O Johnson1 1Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA; 2RTI International, San Francisco, CA, USA Abstract: Sleep disturbances have been reported to be higher in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individuals compared to the general population. Despite the consequences of poor quality of sleep (QOS, research regarding sleep disturbances in HIV infection is lacking and many questions regarding correlates of poor QOS, especially in marginalized populations, remain unanswered. We conducted one-on-one qualitative interviews with 14 marginalized HIV-infected individuals who reported poor QOS to examine self-reported correlates of sleep quality and explore the relationship between QOS and antiretroviral adherence. Findings suggest a complex and multidimensional impact of mental health issues, structural factors, and physical conditions on QOS of these individuals. Those reporting poor QOS as a barrier to antiretroviral adherence reported lower adherence due to falling asleep or feeling too tired to take medications in comparison to those who did not express this adherence barrier. These interviews underscore the importance of inquiries into a patient's QOS as an opportunity to discuss topics such as adherence, depression, suicidal ideation and substance use. Keywords: adherence, HIV/AIDS, interviews, qualitative research, sleep

  18. Evidence of active methanogen communities in shallow sediments of the sonora margin cold seeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Adrien; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Godfroy, Anne; Roussel, Erwan G; Cragg, Barry A; Parkes, R John; Toffin, Laurent

    2015-05-15

    In the Sonora Margin cold seep ecosystems (Gulf of California), sediments underlying microbial mats harbor high biogenic methane concentrations, fueling various microbial communities, such as abundant lineages of anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME). However, the biodiversity, distribution, and metabolism of the microorganisms producing this methane remain poorly understood. In this study, measurements of methanogenesis using radiolabeled dimethylamine, bicarbonate, and acetate showed that biogenic methane production in these sediments was mainly dominated by methylotrophic methanogenesis, while the proportion of autotrophic methanogenesis increased with depth. Congruently, methane production and methanogenic Archaea were detected in culture enrichments amended with trimethylamine and bicarbonate. Analyses of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and reverse-transcribed PCR-amplified 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from these enrichments revealed the presence of active methylotrophic Methanococcoides burtonii relatives and several new autotrophic Methanogenium lineages, confirming the cooccurrence of Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales methanogens with abundant ANME populations in the sediments of the Sonora Margin cold seeps. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling

  20. USGS California Water Science Center water programs in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulters, Michael V.

    2005-01-01

    California is threatened by many natural hazards—fire, floods, landslides, earthquakes. The State is also threatened by longer-term problems, such as hydrologic effects of climate change, and human-induced problems, such as overuse of ground water and degradation of water quality. The threats and problems are intensified by increases in population, which has risen to nearly 36.8 million. For the USGS California Water Science Center, providing scientific information to help address hazards, threats, and hydrologic issues is a top priority. To meet the demands of a growing California, USGS scientific investigations are helping State and local governments improve emergency management, optimize resources, collect contaminant-source and -mobility information, and improve surface- and ground-water quality. USGS hydrologic studies and data collection throughout the State give water managers quantifiable and detailed scientific information that can be used to plan for development and to protect and more efficiently manage resources. The USGS, in cooperation with state, local, and tribal agencies, operates more than 500 instrument stations, which monitor streamflow, ground-water levels, and surface- and ground-water constituents to help protect water supplies and predict the threats of natural hazards. The following are some of the programs implemented by the USGS, in cooperation with other agencies, to obtain and analyze information needed to preserve California's environment and resources.

  1. Aqui y Alla en California. (Here and There in California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, Ernesto

    One in the series "Coleccion Mini-Libros" (Mini-Book Collection) written in Spanish as an enrichment tool for the Spanish speaker, the booklet is a compilation of photographs accompanied by brief descriptions of various points of beauty and interest throughout the State of California. Among the points of interest described are La Sierra Nevada,…

  2. Aqui y Alla en California. (Here and There in California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, Ernesto

    One in the series "Coleccion Mini-Libros" (Mini-Book Collection) written in Spanish as an enrichment tool for the Spanish speaker, the booklet is a compilation of photographs accompanied by brief descriptions of various points of beauty and interest throughout the State of California. Among the points of interest described are La Sierra Nevada,…

  3. Lecturas de Baja California (Readings from Baja California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Gabriel Trujillo, Ed.

    This anthology/textbook is part of a Mexican series of instructional materials designed for Spanish speaking adults who are in the process of becoming literate or have recently become literate in their native language. This document presents a collection of works from important writers directed to the population of Baja California, especially to…

  4. Analysis of System Margins on Missions Utilizing Solar Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, David Y.; Landau, Damon; Randolph, Thomas; Timmerman, Paul; Chase, James; Sims, Jon; Kowalkowski, Theresa

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has conducted a study focused on the analysis of appropriate margins for deep space missions using solar electric propulsion (SEP). The purpose of this study is to understand the links between disparate system margins (power, mass, thermal, etc.) and their impact on overall mission performance and robustness. It is determined that the various sources of uncertainty and risk associated with electric propulsion mission design can be summarized into three relatively independent parameters 1) EP Power Margin, 2) Propellant Margin and 3) Duty Cycle Margin. The overall relationship between these parameters and other major sources of uncertainty is presented. A detailed trajectory analysis is conducted to examine the impact that various assumptions related to power, duty cycle, destination, and thruster performance including missed thrust periods have on overall performance. Recommendations are presented for system margins for deep space missions utilizing solar electric propulsion.

  5. Transhumant Ranchers in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulak, A.; Forero, L.; Huntsinger, L.

    2009-04-01

    There is a strong link between some of the richest, most productive lands of the western United States, including California's oak woodlands, and the traditional "transhumance" of ranchers using public ranges. Oak woodland ranchers with government grazing leases report that about half of their income stems from using government -owned montane ranges. For many, loss of these leases reduces their ranch productive capacity to a level insufficient for sustainability, augmenting the sale of ranch lands for development. Many thousands of hectares of oak woodlands are linked to the fate of government leases in this way, and this linkage limits the opportunities for conservation of oak woodlands as "working landscapes" via conservation easements. This type of conservation is the fastest growing type in California today. The first case study shows that over the past 100 years there has been a reduction in access to the natural resources needed for transhumance from three sources: competition from use of the pastures for recreation and nature preservation, management practices that have brought about change in the character of the natural resources themselves, and urban sprawl. Ranchers are leasing other properties, purchasing feed, and transporting animals to other regions to compensate. Most had increased their privately leased land over the previous five years. Though they desire to stay on their ranches, transhumant ranching is becoming increasingly difficult because of land use changes on both public and private lands and a third of ranchers believe that they may need to sell the property for development if they lose their summer permits. There are many "line camps" on Forest Service range—cabins that families or workers would stay in during the summer to tend the cattle. However, the need to support the ranch with work in town limits the ability of the household to participate in transhumance or even travel into the mountains to check on the animals. For ranching to

  6. Margin Requirements and Portfolio Optimization: A Geometric Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng Guo

    2014-01-01

    Using geometric illustrations, we investigate what implications of portfolio optimization in equilibrium can be generated by the simple mean-variance framework, under margin borrowing restrictions. First, we investigate the case of uniform marginability on all risky assets. It is shown that changing from unlimited borrowing to margin borrowing shifts the market portfolio to a riskier combination, accompanied by a higher risk premium and a lower price of risk. With the linear risk-return prefe...

  7. Marginal pricing of transmission services. An analysis of cost recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Arriaga, I.J.., Rubio, F.J. [Instituto de Investigacion Technologica, Universidad Pontificia Comillas, Madrid (Spain); Puerta, J.F.; Arceluz, J.; Marin, J. [Unidad de Planificacion Estrategica, Iberdrola, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-12-31

    The authors present an in-depth analysis of network revenues that are computed with marginal pricing, and investigate the reasons why marginal prices in actual power systems fail to recover total incurred network costs. The major causes of the failure are identified and illustrated with numerical examples. The paper analyzes the regulatory implications of marginal network pricing in the context of competitive electricity markets and provides suggestions for the meaningful allocation of network costs among users. 5 figs., 9 tabs., 8 refs.

  8. Convex games, clan games, and their marginal games

    OpenAIRE

    Branzei , Rodica; Dimitrov, Dinko; Tijs, Stef

    2005-01-01

    We provide characterizations of convex games and total clan games by using properties of their corresponding marginal games. As it turns out, a cooperative game is convex if and only if all its marginal games are superadditive, and a monotonic game satisfying the veto player property with respect to the members of a coalition C is a total clan game (with clan C) if and only if all its C-based marginal games are subadditive.

  9. Ex vivo ultrasound control of resection margins during partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Arnaud; Cerantola, Yannick; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Lhermitte, Benoît; Bensadoun, Henri; Jichlinski, Patrice

    2011-12-01

    Surgery remains the treatment of choice for localized renal neoplasms. While radical nephrectomy was long considered the gold standard, partial nephrectomy has equivalent oncological results for small tumors. The role of negative surgical margins continues to be debated. Intraoperative frozen section analysis is expensive and time-consuming. We assessed the feasibility of intraoperative ex vivo ultrasound of resection margins in patients undergoing partial nephrectomy and its correlation with margin status on definitive pathological evaluation. A study was done at 2 institutions from February 2008 to March 2011. Patients undergoing partial nephrectomy for T1-T2 renal tumors were included in analysis. Partial nephrectomy was done by a standardized minimal healthy tissue margin technique. After resection the specimen was kept in saline and tumor margin status was immediately determined by ex vivo ultrasound. Sequential images were obtained to evaluate the whole tumor pseudocapsule. Results were compared with margin status on definitive pathological evaluation. A total of 19 men and 14 women with a mean ± SD age of 62 ± 11 years were included in analysis. Intraoperative ex vivo ultrasound revealed negative surgical margins in 30 cases and positive margins in 2 while it could not be done in 1. Final pathological results revealed negative margins in all except 1 case. Ultrasound sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 97%, respectively. Median ultrasound duration was 1 minute. Mean tumor and margin size was 3.6 ± 2.2 cm and 1.5 ± 0.7 mm, respectively. Intraoperative ex vivo ultrasound of resection margins in patients undergoing partial nephrectomy is feasible and efficient. Large sample studies are needed to confirm its promising accuracy to determine margin status. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Boost invariant marginally trapped surfaces in Minkowski 4-space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haesen, S [Department of Mathematics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Ortega, M [Departamento de GeometrIa y TopologIa, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2007-11-21

    The extremal and partly marginally trapped surfaces in the Minkowski 4-space, which are invariant under the group of boost isometries, are classified. Moreover, it is shown that there do not exist extremal surfaces of this kind with constant Gaussian curvature. A procedure is given in order to construct a partly marginally trapped surface by gluing two marginally trapped surfaces which are invariant under the group of boost isometries. As an application, a proper star-surface is constructed.

  11. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of San Gregorio, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Watt, Janet T.; Golden, Nadine E.; Endris, Charles A.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Bretz, Carrie K.; Manson, Michael W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Ross, Stephanie L.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Chin, John L.; Cochran, Susan A.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California's State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of San Gregorio map area is located in northern California, on the Pacific coast of the San Francisco Peninsula about 50 kilometers south of the Golden Gate. The map area lies offshore of the Santa Cruz Mountains, part of the northwest-trending Coast Ranges that run roughly parallel to the San Andreas Fault Zone. The Santa Cruz Mountains lie between the San Andreas Fault Zone and the San Gregorio Fault system. The nearest significant onshore cultural centers in the map area are San Gregorio and Pescadero, both unincorporated communities with populations well under 1,000. Both communities are situated inland of state beaches that share their names. No harbor facilities are within the Offshore of San Gregorio map area. The hilly coastal area is virtually undeveloped grazing land for sheep and cattle. The coastal geomorphology is controlled by late Pleistocene and Holocene slip in the San Gregorio Fault system. A westward bend in the San Andreas Fault Zone, southeast of the map area, coupled with right-lateral movement along the San Gregorio Fault system have caused regional folding and uplift. The coastal area consists of high coastal bluffs and vertical sea cliffs. Coastal promontories in

  12. Marginal pricing of transmission services: An analysis of cost recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Arriaga, I.J.; Rubio, F.J. [Univ. Pontificia Comillas, Madrid (Spain); Puerta, J.F.; Arceluz, J.; Marin, J. [IBERDROLA, Bilbao (Spain). Unidad de Planificacion Estrategica

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents an in-depth analysis of network revenues computed with marginal pricing, and in particular it investigates the reasons why marginal prices fail to recover the total incurred network costs in actual power systems. The basic theoretical results are presented and the major causes of the mismatch between network costs and marginal revenues are identified and illustrated with numerical examples, some tutorial and others of realistic size. The regulatory implications of marginal network pricing in the context of competitive electricity markets are analyzed, and suggestions are provided for the meaningful allocation of the costs of the network among its users.

  13. The many ways to be marginal in a group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellemers, Naomi; Jetten, Jolanda

    2013-02-01

    Previous theory and research primarily address marginal group members on the path to achieve core membership status. The authors argue that these only represent one form of marginality and that there are many other ways to be marginal within the group. The authors develop a dynamic model in which marginality is conceptualized as resulting from group and individual negotiation about inclusion (the Marginality as Resulting From Group and Individual Negotiation About Inclusion [MARGINI] model), and where individual and group inclusion goals can converge (resulting in relatively stable forms of marginality) or diverge (resulting in less stable forms of marginality). When the marginal position is unstable, individuals can either be motivated to move toward or move further away from the group, and such changing inclusion goals are associated with different emotions and behaviors. The authors argue that one needs to understand the interplay between individual and group inclusion goals to predict and explain the full complexity and diversity of the behavior of marginal group members.

  14. Maximum-entropy distributions of correlated variables with prespecified marginals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, Hernán

    2012-12-01

    The problem of determining the joint probability distributions for correlated random variables with prespecified marginals is considered. When the joint distribution satisfying all the required conditions is not unique, the "most unbiased" choice corresponds to the distribution of maximum entropy. The calculation of the maximum-entropy distribution requires the solution of rather complicated nonlinear coupled integral equations, exact solutions to which are obtained for the case of Gaussian marginals; otherwise, the solution can be expressed as a perturbation around the product of the marginals if the marginal moments exist.

  15. Comparative biogeochemistry-ecosystem-human interactions on dynamic continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Liu, Kon-Kee; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Breitburg, Denise L.; Cloern, James; Deutsch, Curtis; Giani, Michele; Goffart, Anne; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Lachkar, Zouhair; Limburg, Karin; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, Enrique; Naqvi, Wajih; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rabouille, Christophe; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Swaney, Dennis P.; Wassman, Paul; Wishner, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    The ocean’s continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1) provide an overview of the drivers of biogeochemical variation and change on margins, (2) compare temporal trends in hydrographic and biogeochemical data across different margins (3) review ecosystem responses to these changes, (4) highlight the importance of margin time series for detecting and attributing change and (5) examine societal responses to changing margin biogeochemistry and ecosystems. We synthesize information over a wide range of margin settings in order to identify the commonalities and distinctions among continental margin ecosystems. Key drivers of biogeochemical variation include long-term climate cycles, CO2-induced warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, as well as sea level rise, eutrophication, hydrologic and water cycle alteration, changing land use, fishing, and species invasion. Ecosystem responses are complex and impact major margin services including primary production, fisheries production, nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, chemical buffering, and biodiversity. Despite regional differences, the societal consequences of these changes are unarguably large and mandate coherent actions to reduce, mitigate and adapt to multiple stressors on continental margins.

  16. Marginal distortion of thermally incompatible metal ceramic crowns with overextended margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y; Anusavice, K J

    1998-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that metal ceramic crowns with a varying axial height are more susceptible to marginal distortion during mechanical and thermal processing treatments than crowns with a uniform axial height. Copings of Pd-Cu-Ga alloy with buccal margin extensions of 0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm were prepared. Oxidized copings were veneered with experimental opaque porcelain with a mean thermal contraction coefficient (25 degrees C to 500 degrees C) that was either 2.1 ppm/degree C below (delta alpha = +2.1 ppm/degree C) or 0.1 ppm/degree C above (delta alpha = -0.1 ppm/degree C) that of the alloy. Nine groups of six specimens each were prepared for analysis. Eighteen copings from these 54 specimens were used as porcelain-free controls. All specimens were subjected to a 10-step procedure including grinding, oxidation, firing of four opaque porcelain layers (O1: 0.15 mm; O2: 0.15 mm; O3: 0.5 mm; O4: 0.5 mm), glazing, abrasive blasting for 15 seconds, removal of ceramic by dissolution in hydrogen fluoride, and a postannealing treatment. The control specimens were also subjected to this procedure with the exception of the firing of four layers of porcelain, which were not applied. Marginal gap width was determined using a measuring microscope at a magnification of 30x. Analysis of variance revealed a significant difference in mean gap width as a function of axial length. The largest gap change was associated with a 3.0-mm buccal extension and the negative mismatch condition (delta alpha < 0). Marginal distortion of crowns decreases as the axial length becomes more uniform. Analysis of crown distortion based on differences in the mean contraction coefficients of metal and porcelain alone is not recommended because it ignores the effects of metal grinding, metal sandblasting, and transient stress.

  17. HCMM: Soil moisture in relation to geologic structure and lithology, northern California. [Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Empirical observations on the ground and examination of aerial color IR photographs indicate that in grassland terrain, the vegetation overlying sandstone tends to become less vigorous sooner in the late spring season than does the area overlain by an adjacent shale unit. The reverse relationship obtains in the fall. These relationships are thought to be a reflection of the relative porosity of each of the units and hence of their ability to retain or lose soil moisture. A comparison of the optically enlarged day and nite IR imagery of the Late Mesozoic interbedded sandstone and shale units along the western margin of the Sacramento Valley, California, taken at seasonally critical times of the year (late spring/early summer and late fall/early winter) reveals subtle seasonal variations of graytone which tend to support the empirical observations after consideration of Sun angle and azimuth, and the internal consistency of the data on each set of satellite imagery.

  18. Seaward dipping reflectors along the SW continental margin of India: Evidence for volcanic passive margin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Ajay; A K Chaubey; K S Krishna; D Gopala Rao; D Sar

    2010-12-01

    Multi-channel seismic reflection profiles across the southwest continental margin of India (SWCMI) show presence of westerly dipping seismic reflectors beneath sedimentary strata along the western flank of the Laccadive Ridge –northernmost part of the Chagos –Laccadive Ridge system. Velocity structure, seismic character, 2D gravity model and geographic locations of the dipping reflectors suggest that these reflectors are volcanic in origin, which are interpreted as Seaward Dipping Reflectors (SDRs). The SDRs; 15 to 27 km wide overlain by ∼1 km thick sediment; are observed at three locations and characterized by stack of laterally continuous, divergent and off-lapping reflectors. Occurrence of SDRs along western flank of the Laccadive Ridge adjacent to oceanic crust of the Arabian Basin and 2D crustal model deduced from free-air gravity anomaly suggest that they are genetically related to incipient volcanism during separation of Madagascar from India. We suggest that (i)SWCMI is a volcanic passive margin developed during India –Madagascar breakup in the Late Cretaceous, and (ii)continent –ocean transition lies at western margin of the Laccadive Ridge, west of feather edge of the SDRs. Occurrence of SDRs on western flank of the Laccadive Ridge and inferred zone of transition from continent to ocean further suggest continental nature of crust of the Laccadive Ridge.

  19. [Issues in California Community Colleges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosz, Karen Sue, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Designed as a forum for the exchange of ideas among California community college faculty, this journal offers a series of articles addressing instructional and administrative concerns. The volume contains: (1) "Campus Life: A Book Review," by John McFarland; (2) "The Scholar in the Two-Year College: Magritte's Mermaid or Chiron?" by Susan Petit,…

  20. California Amusement Rides and Liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Adam

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-three-year-old Cristina Moreno traveled from Spain to California for her honeymoon in 2000. As part of her visit, she rode the Indiana Jones amusement ride at Disneyland with her new husband. On June 25, 2000, she suffered a brain injury, and she eventually died on September 1, 2000, as a result of injuries allegedly sustained while riding…

  1. Special Education Finance in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Laura; Warren, Paul; Murphy, Patrick; Ugo, Iwunze; Pathak, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    California's system of special education served about 718,000 students in 2014-15, or about 11.5 percent of the K-12 population. It is expensive, consuming some $12 billion in federal, state, and local dollars annually. Special education operates within a legal framework that sets it apart from the rest of the K-12 system. The state's enactment of…

  2. California School Energy Concepts, 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askin, Ralph J.; And Others

    This publication is one of the major efforts of a project designed to promote energy conservation in California schools. Suggestions are provided that can be adapted at individual school facilities to reduce energy consumption. The guide also focuses on the major concepts of the new state standards for energy conservation for new nonresidential…

  3. The cave fauna of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Elliott; James R. Reddell; D. Craig Rudolph; G.O. Graening; Thomas S. Briggs; Darrell Ubick; Rolf L. Aalbu; Jean Krejca; Steven J. Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Hidden biodiversity is revealed in this study of California's subterranean fauna, which contains distinctive elements that differentiate it from other North American regions. Since 1975, the rate of discovery of new species has accelerated with funded projects in most of the important cave areas of the state, including our own studies. Here we compile all...

  4. Stem cell therapies: California dreamin'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Kris

    2010-01-08

    Ready or not, stem cells are a step closer to the clinic, thanks to approximately $230 million awarded by CIRM to 14 California-based research groups to develop stem cell-based therapies within 4 years. But, as Kris Novak reports, some of these projects are closer to therapeutic reality than others.

  5. Heat flow in northwest Pacific marginal seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lili; LI Guanbao; LI Naisheng

    2004-01-01

    Heat flow studies in Northwest Pacific marginal seas has a more than 40 years history with more than 4000 heat flow values obtained. The regional average value is 80.4 mW/m2, which is lower than the world's 87 mW/m2, but higher than those of the Eurasia continent and the Pacific Ocean. This reflects the regional crust property in the area. The studies on distribution of the heat flow and contour pattern of heat flow in 1°×1°and 2°×2°scales in Northwest Pacific marginal seas revealed that the most high heat flow anomalies in the area were found along back-arc basins and island arc in an obviously northeasterly track. Exceptions are the Komandoskaya Basin (KMB), the Izu-Bonin Trough (IBT) and the Mariana Trough (MT), which extend in northwest. The contours of low heat flow marked the boundaries of the continent and the ocean. The present heat flow values reflect the imprint of the last thermal event and relate closely to tectonic activity. The high heat flow gradient areas have high frequency of earthquake. Therefore, the area of faulting controlled the pattern of the heat flow anomalies. Heat flow gradient in 135°direction indicated a major lithosphere transformation oceanward resulting from movement of the earth's material. In this paper, we described patterns of heat flow distribution in the Northwest Pacific, heat flow value changes in horizontal and vertical directions, combining the studies of Shi (1997) on the landforms of the island arcs in east Asia and plate movement, and the results of Shi and Zhang (1998) on heat simulation of subduction of active ocean mountain and the activity of islands arc. A preliminary model of geodynamics in the Northwest Pacific and its adjacent area was put forward. There is a great lateral heat flow gradient on the surface of the mantle between ocean and continent, which indicates that the materials in asthenosphere move from continent to ocean causing movement of the crust.

  6. Treatment of the positive surgical margin following radical prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective With increased incidence of prostate cancer and an increased number of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy in China,it will be necessary to elaborate the diagnosis,clinical significance and treatment of patients whose tumors have positive surgical margins following radical prostatectomy.Data sources Positive surgical margin,prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy were used as subject words and the medical literature in recent decades was searched using the PubMed database and the results are summarized.Study selection Using positive surgical margin,prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy as subject words the PubMed medical database produced 275 papers of pertinent literature.By further screening 28 papers were selected and they represent relatively large-scale clinical randomized and controlled clinical trials.Results A pertinent literature of 275 papers was identified and 28 papers on large clinical studies were obtained.Analysis of results indicated that the positive rate of surgical margin after radical prostatectomy is 20%-40%,and although most patients with positive surgical margins are stable for a considerable period,the data available now suggested that the presence of a positive surgical margin will have an impact on the patient's prognosis.The risk factors of positive surgical margin include preoperative prostate specific antigen level,Gleason's score and pelvic lymph node metastasis.The most common site with positive surgical margin is in apical areas of the prostate;therefore surgical technique is also a factor resulting in positive surgical margins.From data available now it appears that as long as the surgical technique is skilled,different surgical modes do not affect the rate of surgical margin.Adjuvant radiotherapy is mainly used to treat patients with positive surgical margin after radical prostatectomy,but combination with androgen deprivation therapy may increase the curative effect.Conclusion The current data indicated that

  7. Seismic margins and calibration of piping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shieh, L.C.; Tsai, N.C.; Yang, M.S.; Wong, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-funded, multiyear program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Its objective is to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure for estimating the risk of earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant and to determine major contributors to the state-of-the-art seismic and systems analysis process and explicitly includes the uncertainties in such a process. The results will be used to improve seismic licensing requirements for nuclear power plants. In Phase I of SSMRP, the overall seismic risk assessment methodology was developed and assembled. The application of this methodology to the seismic PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) at the Zion Nuclear Power Plant has been documented. This report documents the method deriving response factors. The response factors, which relate design calculated responses to best estimate values, were used in the seismic response determination of piping systems for a simplified seismic probablistic risk assessment. 13 references, 31 figures, 25 tables.

  8. Salam: Of Dislocation, Marginality and Flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efenita M. Taqueban

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reconstructs the life stories of residents of SalamCompound. The compound serves as entry point for many Muslim migrants who leave the southern Philippines. Salam is both a refuge and a halfway point. A sense of dislocation permeates the stories. Dislocation begins with the movement away from a homeland that is familiar and defining of identity. The dislocation is, in a sense, an escape, a desperate project to avoid armed conflict in the southern Philippines or a desperate enterprise in search of work.Salam is a halfway point for transients prospecting for overseas work, the staging area for a global labor exodus. The sense of dislocation is not unlike locating oneself in the margins, portrayed in the residents’ negotiated identitiesand spaces, constantly challenged, implicitly regulated. Dislocation is also depicted as flexibility, portrayed by the residents making do and their everyday creative resistance and struggle in new locations in the city. Gathered throughethnographic method, the stories offer a glimpse into the lives of the residents of the compound, how they negotiate around social constructions of identities — resisting and accommodating internal and external forces that impinge ontheir lives, revealing a rich and poignant tapestry of family relations, community ironies and an ever-impinging world beyond its walls.

  9. Vertical tectonics at an active continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlié, N.; Stern, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Direct observations of vertical movements of the earth's surface are now possible with space-based GPS networks, and have applications to resources, hazards and tectonics. Here we present data on vertical movements of the Earth's surface in New Zealand, computed from the processing of GPS data collected between 2000 and 2015 by 189 permanent GPS stations. We map the geographical variation in vertical rates and show how these variations are explicable within a tectonic framework of subduction, volcanic activity and slow slip earthquakes. Subsidence of >3 mm/yr is observed along southeastern North Island and is interpreted to be due to the locked segment of the Hikurangi subduction zone. Uplift of 1-3 mm/yr further north along the margin of the eastern North Island is interpreted as being due to the plate interface being unlocked and underplating of sediment on the subduction thrust. The Volcanic Plateau of the central North Island is being uplifted at about 1 mm/yr, which can be explained by basaltic melts being injected in the active mantle-wedge at a rate of ∼6 mm/yr. Within the Central Volcanic Region there is a 250 km2 area that subsided between 2005 and 2012 at a rate of up to 14 mm/yr. Time series from the stations located within and near the zone of subsidence show a strong link between subsidence, adjacent uplift and local earthquake swarms.

  10. A multi-class large margin classifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang TANG; Qi XUAN; Rong XIONG; Tie-jun WU; Jian CHU

    2009-01-01

    Currently there are two approaches for a multi-class support vector classifier (SVC). One is to construct and combine several binary classifiers while the other is to directly consider all classes of data in one optimization formulation. For a K-class problem (K>2), the first approach has to construct at least K classifiers, and the second approach has to solve a much larger op-timization problem proportional to K by the algorithms developed so far. In this paper, following the second approach, we present a novel multi-class large margin classifier (MLMC). This new machine can solve K-class problems in one optimization formula-tion without increasing the size of the quadratic programming (QP) problem proportional to K. This property allows us to construct just one classifier with as few variables in the QP problem as possible to classify multi-class data, and we can gain the advantage of speed from it especially when K is large. Our experiments indicate that MLMC almost works as well as (sometimes better than) many other multi-class SVCs for some benchmark data classification problems, and obtains a reasonable performance in face recognition application on the AR face database.

  11. Formation of Continental Fragments: The Tamayo Bank, Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, J.; Abera, R.; Axen, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Potential field data are used to construct a two-dimensional crustal model along a profile through the Tamayo Trough and Bank in the Gulf of California. The model is constrained by seismic reflection and refraction data, and field observations. The potential field data do not fit a model where the crust of the Tamayo trough is continental, but they fit well with a model where the Tamayo trough crust is oceanic. This implies that the Tamayo Bank is entirely bounded by oceanic crust and is a microcontinent. The oceanic crust of the Tamayo trough that separates the Tamayo Bank from the mainland of Mexico is thin (~4 km), so oceanic spreading was probably magma-starved before it ceased. This led us to come up with a model that explains the formation of microcontinents that are smaller in size and are not found in the proximity of hotspots. At first, seafloor spreading commences following continental breakup. When the magma supply to the ridge slows down, the plate boundary strengthens. Hence, the ridge may be abandoned while tectonic extension begins elsewhere, or slow spreading may continue while a new ridge starts to develop. The old spreading ridge becomes extinct. An asymmetric ocean basin forms if the ridge jumps within oceanic lithosphere; a microcontinent forms if the ridge jumps into a continental margin. This model for formation of continental fragments is applicable to other regions as well, eliminating the need of mantle plume impingement to facilitate rifting of a young continental margin and microcontinent formation.

  12. AUV Mapping and ROV Exploration of Los Frailes Submarine Canyon, Cabo Pulmo National Marine Park, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troni, G.; Caress, D. W.; Graves, D.; Thomas, H. J.; Thompson, D.; Barry, J. P.; Aburto-Oropeza, O.; Johnson, A. F.; Lundsten, L.

    2015-12-01

    the thalweg, largely bare of sediment. ROV video indicates the north wall is composed of granitic rock similar to outcrops on shore. Few fish or other animals are observed below 100 m depth, but considerable diversity exists along the canyon walls above 100 m depth. These observations are consistent with a pronounced oxygen minimum zone present below about 100 m depth.

  13. Exploration Breakthrough in Southern Margin of Junggar Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kang Zhulin; Zheng Jiandong

    1997-01-01

    @@ The Hutubi structure, located in the southern margin of Junggar Basin, is 60 km norrthwest of Urumqi and 20 km northwest of Changji (Fig. l). The Hu-2 well drilled in the Hutubi structure has gained high-yield gas flow,significant exploration breakthrough in the southern margin of Junggar Basin since the 1950s.

  14. Analytic solutions for marginal deformations in open superstring field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okawa, Y.

    2007-04-15

    We extend the calculable analytic approach to marginal deformations recently developed in open bosonic string field theory to open superstring field theory formulated by Berkovits. We construct analytic solutions to all orders in the deformation parameter when operator products made of the marginal operator and the associated superconformal primary field are regular. (orig.)

  15. Estimating Marginal Returns to Education. NBER Working Paper No. 16474

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Pedro; Heckman, James J.; Vytlacil, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper estimates the marginal returns to college for individuals induced to enroll in college by different marginal policy changes. The recent instrumental variables literature seeks to estimate this parameter, but in general it does so only under strong assumptions that are tested and found wanting. We show how to utilize economic theory and…

  16. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2009-08-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

  17. Carbonate mound development in contrasting settings on the Irish margin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Land, C.; Eisele, M.; Mienis, F; de Haas, H.; Hebbeln, D.; Reijmer, J.J.G.; van Weering, T.C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Cold-water coral carbonate mounds, formed by framework building cold-water corals, are found in several mound provinces on the Irish margin. Differences in cold-water coral mound development rates and sediment composition between mounds at the southwest Rockall Trough margin and the Galway Mound in

  18. Lorna Dee Cervantes: A Writer in the Margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Colette

    Chicana literary authors are sometimes thought to occupy the edges of two "texts," their own culture and the Anglo-American hegemony, where they are oppressed and marginalized by sexism and racism. In these margins, however, Chicana authors can dismantle stereotypes and construct new and empowering images of self. As an example of this…

  19. Challenging conservation agriculture on marginal slopes in Sehoul, Morocco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwilch, G.; Laouina, A.; Chaker, M.; Machouri, N.; Sfa, M.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2015-01-01

    In Sehoul, Morocco, the use of marginal land for agriculture became a necessity for the local population due to increased poverty and the occupation of the best land by new owners. Desertification poses an additional threat to agricultural production on marginal slopes, which are often stony and deg

  20. Molecular markers in the surgical margin of oral carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Anders; von Buchwald, Christian; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    epithelium in the surgical resection margin may explain the local recurrence rate. The purpose of this study is to investigate the presence of senescence markers, which may represent early malignant changes in the margin that in routine pathological evaluations are classified as histologically normal...