WorldWideScience

Sample records for california los alamos

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  2. Notes on Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-05

    In 1954 an unknown author drafted a report, reprinted below, describing the Laboratory and the community as they existed in late 1953. This report, perhaps intended to be crafted into a public relations document, is valuable because it gives us an autobiographical look at Los Alamos during the first half of the 1950s. It has been edited to enhance readability.

  3. Los Alamos Climatology 2016 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, David Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-10

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) operates a meteorology monitoring network to support LANL emergency response, engineering designs, environmental compliance, environmental assessments, safety evaluations, weather forecasting, environmental monitoring, research programs, and environmental restoration. Weather data has been collected in Los Alamos since 1910. Bowen (1990) provided climate statistics (temperature and precipitation) for the 1961– 1990 averaging period, and included other analyses (e.g., wind and relative humidity) based on the available station locations and time periods. This report provides an update to the 1990 publication Los Alamos Climatology (Bowen 1990).

  4. Los Alamos National Lab. [Annual astronomy report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This review covers research during the period July 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991. The Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. W-74105-ENG-36. In addition to research activities, this report briefly describes facilities and equipment and lists workshops sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Progress is reported for radiation transport, hydrodynamic applications, thermonuclear applications, theoretical astrophysics, neutron stars, cosmology, instrument development, space plasma physics, data analysis (in solar physics, earth magnetosphere, solar wind, planets, asteroids, meteorites, and comets), theory, and other areas. Publications in each research area are listed.

  5. Los Alamos - A Short History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meade, Roger A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-12

    At 5:45 am on the morning of July 16, 1945, the world’s first atomic bomb exploded over a remote section of the southern New Mexican desert known as the Jornada del Muerto, the Journey of Death. Three weeks later, the atomic bombs known as Little Boy and Fat Man brought World War II to an end. Working literally around the clock, these first atomic bombs were designed and built in just thirty months by scientists working at a secret scientific laboratory in the mountains of New Mexico known by its codename, Project Y, better known to the world as Los Alamos.

  6. Proton Radiography at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos National Lab uses high energy protons to acquire multiple frame flash radiographic sequences at megahertz speeds: that is, it can make movies of the inside of explosions as they happen. The facility is primarily used to study the damage to and failure of metals subjected to the shock forces of high explosives as well as to study the detonation of the explosives themselves. Applications include improving our understanding of the underlying physical processes that drive the performance of the nuclear weapons in the United States stockpile and developing novel armor technologies in collaboration with the Army Research Lab. The principle and techniques of pRad will be described, and examples of some recent results will be shown.

  7. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-08

    For more than 30 years the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided the scientific underpinnings in nuclear physics and material science needed to ensure the safety and surety of the nuclear stockpile into the future. In addition to national security research, the LANSCE User Facility has a vibrant research program in fundamental science, providing the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons and protons to perform experiments supporting civilian research and the production of medical and research isotopes. Five major experimental facilities operate simultaneously. These facilities contribute to the stockpile stewardship program, produce radionuclides for medical testing, and provide a venue for industrial users to irradiate and test electronics. In addition, they perform fundamental research in nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, materials science, and many other areas. The LANSCE User Program plays a key role in training the next generation of top scientists and in attracting the best graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and early-career scientists. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) —the principal sponsor of LANSCE—works with the Office of Science and the Office of Nuclear Energy, which have synergistic long-term needs for the linear accelerator and the neutron science that is the heart of LANSCE.

  8. Publications of Los Alamos research 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varjabedian, K.; Dussart, S.A.; McClary, W.J.; Rich, J.A. (comps.)

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography lists unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1988. The entries, which are subdivided by broad subject categories, are cross-referenced with an author index and a numeric index.

  9. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1994. Data were collected to assess external penetrating radiation, airborne emissions, liquid effluents, radioactivity of environmental materials and food stuffs, and environmental compliance.

  10. Publications of Los Alamos research 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, C.A.; Willis, J.K. (comps.)

    1981-09-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1980. Papers published in 1980 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted-even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was pubished more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers published either separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers published in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  11. Publications of Los Alamos Research, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, C.J.; McClary, W.J.; Rich, J.A.; Rodriguez, L.L. (comps.)

    1984-10-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1983. Papers published in 1982 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted - even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was published more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-Laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers either published separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers publishd in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  12. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apt, K.E.; Lee, V.J. (comps.)

    1976-04-01

    This report documents the CY 1975 environmental monitoring program of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). Data are presented for concentrations of radioactivity measured in air, ground and surface waters, sediments, soils, and foodstuffs, and are compared with relevant U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration guides and/or data from other reporting periods. Levels of external penetrating radiation measured in the LASL environs are given. The average whole-body radiation dose to residents of Los Alamos County resulting from LASL operations is calculated. Chemical qualities of surface and ground waters in the LASL environs have been determined and compared to applicable standards. Results of related environmental studies are summarized.

  13. SEDs at Los Alamos: A Personal Memoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bederson, Benjamin

    2001-03-01

    I have written this personal memoir approximately 55 years after the events I describe. It is based almost exclusively on memory, since apart from the diary I kept while on Tinian, I have few documents concerning it. It covers my service in the U.S. Army's Special Engineering Detachment (SED) in Oak Ridge and Los Alamos in 1944-45, on Tinian island, the launching pad for the bombing raids on Japan, in the summer and fall of 1945, and my return to Los Alamos until my discharge in January 1946.

  14. A Sailor in the Los Alamos Navy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, D. L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States

    2016-12-20

    As part of the War Department’s Manhattan Engineer District (MED), Los Alamos was an Army installation during World War II, complete with a base commander and a brace of MPs. But it was a unique Army installation, having more civilian then military personnel. Even more unique was the work performed by the civilian population, work that required highly educated scientists and engineers. As the breadth, scope, and complexity of the Laboratory’s work increased, more and more technically educated and trained personnel were needed. But, the manpower needs of the nation’s war economy had created a shortage of such people. To meet its manpower needs, the MED scoured the ranks of the Army for anyone who had technical training and reassigned these men to its laboratories, including Los Alamos, as part of its Special Engineer Detachment (SED). Among the SEDs assigned to Los Alamos was Val Fitch, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1980. Another was Al Van Vessem, who helped stack the TNT for the 100 ton test, bolted together the Trinity device, and rode shotgun with the bomb has it was driven from Los Alamos to ground zero.

  15. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the University of California. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from September 23 to November 8, 1991, under the auspices of the DOE Office of Special Projects, Office of Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal LANL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors' management of ES H/quality assurance programs was conducted. This volume discusses findings concerning the environmental assessment.

  16. Critical Infrastructure Protection- Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bofman, Ryan K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been a key facet of Critical National Infrastructure since the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima exposed the nature of the Laboratory’s work in 1945. Common knowledge of the nature of sensitive information contained here presents a necessity to protect this critical infrastructure as a matter of national security. This protection occurs in multiple forms beginning with physical security, followed by cybersecurity, safeguarding of classified information, and concluded by the missions of the National Nuclear Security Administration.

  17. Los Alamos transuranic waste size reduction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briesmeister, A.; Harper, J.; Reich, B.; Warren, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    To facilitate disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste, Los Alamos National Laboratory designed and constructed the Size Reduction Facility (SRF) during the period 1977 to 1981. This report summarizes the engineering development, installation, and early test operations of the SRF. The facility incorporates a large stainless steel enclosure fitted with remote handling and cutting equipment to obtain an estimated 4:1 volume reduction of gloveboxes and other bulky metallic wastes.

  18. Los Alamos transuranic waste size reduction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briesmeister, A.; Harper, J.; Reich, B.; Warren, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    A transuranic (TRU) Waste Size Reduction Facility (SRF) was designed and constructed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the period of 1977 to 1981. This paper summarizes the engineering development, installation, and early test operations of the SRF. The facility incorporates a large stainless steel enclosure fitted with remote handling and cutting equipment to obtain an estimated 4:1 volume reduction of gloveboxes and other bulky metallic wastes.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facility Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-05

    This series of slides depicts the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The Center's 800-MeV linac produces H+ and H- beams as well as beams of moderated (cold to 1 MeV) and unmoderated (0.1 to 600 MeV) neutrons. Experimental facilities and their capabilities and characteristics are outlined. Among these are LENZ, SPIDER, and DANCE.

  20. Amphibians and Reptiles of Los Alamos County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teralene S. Foxx; Timothy K. Haarmann; David C. Keller

    1999-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that amphibians and reptiles are good indicators of environmental health. They live in terrestrial and aquatic environments and are often the first animals to be affected by environmental change. This publication provides baseline information about amphibians and reptiles that are present on the Pajarito Plateau. Ten years of data collection and observations by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the University of New Mexico, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, and hobbyists are represented.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory strategic directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecker, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    It is my pleasure to welcome you to Los Alamos. I like the idea of bringing together all aspects of the research community-defense, basic science, and industrial. It is particularly important in today`s times of constrained budgets and in fields such as neutron research because I am convinced that the best science and the best applications will come from their interplay. If we do the science well, then we will do good applications. Keeping our eye focused on interesting applications will spawn new areas of science. This interplay is especially critical, and it is good to have these communities represented here today.

  2. UC/Los Alamos Entrepreneurial Postdoctoral Fellowship Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Mariann R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clow, Shandra Deann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    The UC/Los Alamos Entrepreneurial Postdoctoral Fellowship Pilot Program (Pilot) for existing postdoctoral researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) to gain skills in entrepreneurship and commercializing technology as part of their postdoctoral experience. This program will incorporate training and mentoring during the first 6-month period, culminating in a focused 6-month Fellowship aimed at creating a new business in Northern New Mexico.

  3. Biological assessment for the effluent reduction program, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, S.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the biological assessment for the effluent recution program proposed to occur within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Potential effects on wetland plants and on threatened and endangered species are discussed, along with a detailed description of the individual outfalls resulting from the effluent reduction program.

  4. LAMPF II workshop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, February 1-4, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, H.A. (comp.)

    1982-01-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the first LAMPF II Workshop held at Los Alamos February 1 to 4, 1982. Included are the talks that were available in written form. The conclusion of the participants was that there are many exciting areas of physics that will be addressed by such a machine.

  5. Automated Medical Information System of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Eagan, Gerald D.; Grier, Robert S.

    1980-01-01

    The Medical Information System (MIS) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory automates the acquisition, storage and retrieval of medical information concerning the nine thousand project-connected personnel.

  6. CICE, The Los Alamos Sea Ice Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-05-12

    The Los Alamos sea ice model (CICE) is the result of an effort to develop a computationally efficient sea ice component for a fully coupled atmosphere–land–ocean–ice global climate model. It was originally designed to be compatible with the Parallel Ocean Program (POP), an ocean circulation model developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for use on massively parallel computers. CICE has several interacting components: a vertical thermodynamic model that computes local growth rates of snow and ice due to vertical conductive, radiative and turbulent fluxes, along with snowfall; an elastic-viscous-plastic model of ice dynamics, which predicts the velocity field of the ice pack based on a model of the material strength of the ice; an incremental remapping transport model that describes horizontal advection of the areal concentration, ice and snow volume and other state variables; and a ridging parameterization that transfers ice among thickness categories based on energetic balances and rates of strain. It also includes a biogeochemical model that describes evolution of the ice ecosystem. The CICE sea ice model is used for climate research as one component of complex global earth system models that include atmosphere, land, ocean and biogeochemistry components. It is also used for operational sea ice forecasting in the polar regions and in numerical weather prediction models.

  7. The Climate at Los Alamos; Are we measurement changes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewart, Jean Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-16

    A new report shows new graphic displays of the weather trends in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The graphs show trends of average, minimum average, and maximum average temperature for summer and winter months going back decades. Records of summer and winter precipitation are also included in the report.

  8. Los Alamos personnel and area criticality dosimeter systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilik, D.G.; Martin, R.W.

    1981-06-01

    Fissionable materials are handled and processed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Although the probability of a nuclear criticality accident is very remote, it must be considered. Los Alamos maintains a broad spectrum of dose assessment capabilities. This report describes the methods employed for personnel neutron, area neutron, and photon dose evaluations with passive dosimetry systems.

  9. Los Alamos Transuranic Waste Size Reduction Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, J.; Warren, J.

    1987-06-01

    The Los Alamos Transuranic (TRU) Waste Size Reduction Facility (SRF) is a production oriented prototype. The facility is operated to remotely cut and repackage TRU contaminated metallic wastes (e.g., glove boxes, ducting and pipes) for eventual disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The resulting flat sections are packaged into a tested Department of Transportation Type 7A metal container. To date, the facility has successfully processed stainless steel glove boxes (with and without lead shielding construction) and retention tanks. We have found that used glove boxes generate more cutting fumes than do unused glove boxes or metal plates - possibly due to deeply embedded chemical residues from years of service. Water used as a secondary fluid with the plasma arc cutting system significantly reduces visible fume generation during the cutting of used glove boxes and lead-lined glove boxes. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohen, K.; Stoker, A.; Stone, G. [and others

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1992. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1992 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, laboratory employees, or the environment.

  11. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program conducted by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in 1979. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical substances was conducted on the Laboratory site and in the surrounding region to determine compliance with appropriate standards and permit early identification of possible undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of the data for 1979 on penetrating radiation, chemical and radiochemical quality of ambient air, surface and ground water, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, food, and airborne and liquid effluents are included. Comparisons with appropriate standards and regulations or with background levels from natural or other non-LASL sources provide a basis for concluding that environmental effects attributable to LASL operations are minor and cannot be considered likely to result in any hazard to the population of the area. Results of several special studies provide documentation of some unique environmental conditions in the LASL environs.

  12. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1987. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1987 cover: external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are insignificant and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 113 refs., 33 figs., 120 tabs.

  13. Materials accounting at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, N.J.; Erkkila, B.H.; Kelso, H.F.

    1985-01-01

    The materials accounting system at Los Alamos has evolved from an ''80-column'' card system to a very sophisticated near-real-time computerized nuclear material accountability and safeguards system (MASS). The present hardware was designed and acquired in the late 70's and is scheduled for a major upgrade in Fiscal Year 1986. The history of the system from 1950 through the DYMAC of the late 70's up to the present will be discussed. The philosophy of the system along with the details of the system will be covered. This system has addressed the integrated problems of management, control, and accounting of nuclear material successfully.

  14. Materials accounting at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, N.J.; Erkkila, B.H.; Kelso, H.F.

    1985-07-20

    The materials accounting system at Los Alamos has evolved from an ''80-column'' card system to a very sophisticated near-real-time computerized nuclear material accountability and safeguards system (MASS). The present hardware was designed and acquired in the late 70's and is scheduled for a major upgrade in fiscal year 1986. The history of the system from 1950 through the DYMAC of the late 70's up to the present will be discussed. The philosophy of the system along with the details of the system will be covered. This system has addressed the integrated problems of management, control, and accounting of nuclear material successfully. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1995. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring result to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1995 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment.

  16. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1989. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1989 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 58 refs., 31 figs., 39 tabs.

  17. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gallagher, Pat [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hjeresen, Denny [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Isaacson, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johson, Scot [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morgan, Terry [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Paulson, David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rogers, David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2009-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) Environmental Programs Directorate, as required by US Department of Energy Order 450.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2007. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, air; Chapters 5 and 6, water and sediments; Chapter 7, soils; and Chapter 8, foodstuffs and biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory’s technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information.

  18. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Poff, Ben [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hjeresen, Denny [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Isaacson, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johnson, Scot [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morgan, Terry [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Paulson, David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Salzman, Sonja [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rogers, David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) environmental organization, as required by US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2009. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (air in Chapter 4; water and sediments in Chapters 5 and 6; soils in Chapter 7; and foodstuffs and biota in Chapter 8) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. The new Chapter 10 describes the Laboratory’s environmental stewardship efforts and provides an overview of the health of the Rio Grande. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory’s technical

  19. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) environmental organization, as required by US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.IA, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory's efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory's major environmental programs. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory's compliance status for 2005. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, Air; Chapters 5 and 6, Water and Sediments; Chapter 7, Soils; and Chapter 8, Foodstuffs and Biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9, new for this year, provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list ofacronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory's technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information.

  20. DOE Los Alamos National Laboratory – PV Feasibility Assessment, 2015 Update, NREL Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, Jesse [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Witt, Monica Rene [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-06

    This report summarizes solar and wind potential for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report is part of the “Los Alamos National Laboratory and Los Alamos County Renewable Generation” study.

  1. Environmental analysis of Lower Pueblo/Lower Los Alamos Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Buhl, T.E.; Stoker, A.K.; Becker, N.M.; Rodgers, J.C.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-12-01

    The radiological survey of the former radioactive waste treatment plant site (TA-45), Acid Canyon, Pueblo Canyon, and Los Alamos Canyon found residual contamination at the site itself and in the channel and banks of Acid, Pueblo, and lower Los Alamos Canyons all the way to the Rio Grande. The largest reservoir of residual radioactivity is in lower Pueblo Canyon, which is on DOE property. However, residual radioactivity does not exceed proposed cleanup criteria in either lower Pueblo or lower Los Alamos Canyons. The three alternatives proposed are (1) to take no action, (2) to construct a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon to prevent further transport of residual radioactivity onto San Ildefonso Indian Pueblo land, and (3) to clean the residual radioactivity from the canyon system. Alternative 2, to cleanup the canyon system, is rejected as a viable alternative. Thousands of truckloads of sediment would have to be removed and disposed of, and this effort is unwarranted by the low levels of contamination present. Residual radioactivity levels, under either present conditions or projected future conditions, will not result in significant radiation doses to persons exposed. Modeling efforts show that future transport activity will not result in any residual radioactivity concentrations higher than those already existing. Thus, although construction of a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon is a viable alternative, this effort also is unwarranted, and the no-action alternative is the preferred alternative.

  2. Mixed low-level waste minimization at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starke, T.P.

    1998-12-01

    During the first six months of University of California 98 Fiscal Year (July--December) Los Alamos National Laboratory has achieved a 57% reduction in mixed low-level waste generation. This has been accomplished through a systems approach that identified and minimized the largest MLLW streams. These included surface-contaminated lead, lead-lined gloveboxes, printed circuit boards, and activated fluorescent lamps. Specific waste minimization projects have been initiated to address these streams. In addition, several chemical processing equipment upgrades are being implemented. Use of contaminated lead is planned for several high energy proton beam stop applications and stainless steel encapsulated lead is being evaluated for other radiological control area applications. INEEL is assisting Los Alamos with a complete systems analysis of analytical chemistry derived mixed wastes at the CMR building and with a minimum life-cycle cost standard glovebox design. Funding for waste minimization upgrades has come from several sources: generator programs, waste management, the generator set-aside program, and Defense Programs funding to INEEL.

  3. Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) Environmental Directorate, as required by US Department of Energy Order 450.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2007. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, air; Chapters 5 and 6, water and sediments; Chapter 7, soils; and Chapter 8, foodstuffs and biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the laboratory’s technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information. In printed copies of this report or Executive Summary, we have

  4. The Los Alamos high-brightness photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    For a number of years Los Alamos National Laboratory has been developing photocathode RF guns for high-brightness electron beam applications such as free-electron lasers (FELs). Previously thermionic high-voltage guns have been the source of choice for the electron accelerators used to drive FELs. The performance of such FELs is severely limited by the emittance growth produced by the subharmonic bunching process and also by the low peak current of the source. In a photoinjector, a laser driven photocathode is placed directly in a high-gradient RF accelerating cavity. A photocathode allows unsurpassed control over the current, and the spatial and temporal profile of the beam. In addition the electrodeless emission'' avoids many of the difficulties associated with multi-electrode guns, i.e. the electrons are accelerated very rapidly to relativistic energies, and there are no electrodes to distort the accelerating fields. For the past two years we have been integrating a photocathode into our existing FEL facility by replacing our thermionic gun and subharmonic bunchers with a high-gradient 1.3 GHz photoinjector. The photoinjector, which is approximately 0.6 m in length, produces 6 MeV, 300 A, 15 ps linac, and accelerated to a final energy of 40 MeV. We have recently begun lasing at wavelengths near 3 {mu}m. 16 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Space Science at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karl

    2017-09-01

    The Space Science and Applications group (ISR-1) in the Intelligence and Space Research (ISR) division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory lead a number of space science missions for civilian and defense-related programs. In support of these missions the group develops sensors capable of detecting nuclear emissions and measuring radiations in space including γ-ray, X-ray, charged-particle, and neutron detection. The group is involved in a number of stages of the lifetime of these sensors including mission concept and design, simulation and modeling, calibration, and data analysis. These missions support monitoring of the atmosphere and near-Earth space environment for nuclear detonations as well as monitoring of the local space environment including space-weather type events. Expertise in this area has been established over a long history of involvement with cutting-edge projects continuing back to the first space based monitoring mission Project Vela. The group's interests cut across a large range of topics including non-proliferation, space situational awareness, nuclear physics, material science, space physics, astrophysics, and planetary physics.

  6. Los Alamos loses physics archive as preprint pioneer heads east

    CERN Multimedia

    Butler, D

    2001-01-01

    The Los Alamos preprint server is to move to Cornell University. Paul Ginsparg who created the server cites a lack of enthusiasm among senior staff at LANL as a major reason for his departure (1/2 page).

  7. Explosive Flux Compression: 50 Years of Los Alamos Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, C.M.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

    1998-10-18

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  8. Lujan at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an intense pulsed neutrons source operating at a power level of 80 -100 kW....

  9. Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E. (comps.)

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

  10. 1993 Northern goshawk inventory on portions of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinton, D.T.; Kennedy, P.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1994-06-01

    Northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) (hereafter referred to as goshawk) is a large forest dwelling hawk. Goshawks may be declining in population and reproduction in the southwestern United States. Reasons for the possible decline in goshawk populations include timber harvesting resulting in the loss of nesting habitat, toxic chemicals, and the effects of drought, fire, and disease. Thus, there is a need to determine their population status and assess impacts of management activities in potential goshawk habitat. Inventory for the goshawk was conducted on 2,254 ha of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to determine the presence of nesting goshawks on LANL lands. This information can be incorporated into LANL`s environmental management program. The inventory was conducted by Colorado State University personnel from May 12 to July 30, 1993. This report summarizes the results of this inventory.

  11. Cesium sorption and desorption on selected Los Alamos soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, K.S.; Chan, J.; Longmire, P.; Fowler, M.

    1995-08-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the sorptivity of cesium onto Los Alamos soils under controlled experimental conditions. Four soil profiles were collected and each soil profile which is broken into layers according to previously identified soil horizons were studied. Batch sorption isotherms were studied to quantify the chemical reactivity of each soil horizon toward cesium ion. Radioactive cesium-137 was used as sorbent and gamma counting was used to quantify the amount of sorption. Desorption experiments were conducted after the sorption experiments. Batch desorption isotherms were studied to quantify the desorption of presorbed cesium from these Los Alamos soils. This study suggests cesium may sorb strongly and irreversibly on most Los Alamos soils. The amount of cesium sorption and desorption is possibly related to the clay content of the soil sample since subsurface sample has a higher clay content than that of surface sample.

  12. Publications of Los Alamos research, 1977-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, C.J.; Garcia, C.A. (comps.)

    1983-03-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1977-1981. Papers published in those years are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted - even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was published more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-Laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers either published separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers published in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  13. Water Supply at Los Alamos 1998-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard J. Koch; David B. Rogers

    2003-03-01

    For the period 1998 through 2001, the total water used at Los Alamos from all sources ranged from 1325 million gallons (Mg) in 1999 to 1515 Mg in 2000. Groundwater production ranged from 1323 Mg in 1999 to 1506 Mg in 2000 from the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi fields. Nonpotable surface water used from Los Alamos reservoir ranged from zero gallons in 2001 to 9.3 Mg in 2000. For years 1998 through 2001, over 99% of all water used at Los Alamos was groundwater. Water use by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) between 1998 and 2001 ranged from 379 Mg in 2000 to 461 Mg in 1998. The LANL water use in 2001 was 393 Mg or 27% of the total water use at Los Alamos. Water use by Los Alamos County ranged from 872 Mg in 1999 to 1137 Mg in 2000, and averaged 1006 Mg/yr. Four new replacement wells in the Guaje field (G-2A, G-3A, G-4A, and G-5A) were drilled in 1998 and began production in 1999; with existing well G-1A, the Guaje field currently has five producing wells. Five of the old Guaje wells (G-1, G-2, G-4, G-5, and G-6) were plugged and abandoned in 1999, and one well (G-3) was abandoned but remains as an observation well for the Guaje field. The long-term water level observations in production and observation (test) wells at Los Alamos are consistent with the formation of a cone of depression in response to water production. The water level decline is gradual and at most has been about 0.7 to 2 ft per year for production wells and from 0.4 to 0.9 ft/yr for observation (test) wells. The largest water level declines have been in the Guaje field where nonpumping water levels were about 91 ft lower in 2001 than in 1951. The initial water levels of the Guaje replacement wells were 32 to 57 ft lower than the initial water levels of adjacent original Guaje wells. When production wells are taken off-line for pump replacement or repair, water levels have returned to within about 25 ft of initial static levels within 6 to 12 months. Thus, the water-level trends suggest no adverse

  14. The development of the atomic bomb, Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, R.W.

    1993-11-01

    The historical presentation begins with details of the selection of Los Alamos as the site of the Army installation. Wartime efforts of the Army Corps of Engineers, and scientists to include the leader of Los Alamos, Robert Oppenheimer are presented. The layout and construction of the facilities are discussed. The monumental design requirements of the bombs are discussed, including but not limited to the utilization of the second choice implosion method of detonation, and the production of bomb-grade nuclear explosives. The paper ends with a philosophical discussion on the use of nuclear weapons.

  15. Fifty-one years of Los Alamos Spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenimore, Edward E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-04

    From 1963 to 2014, the Los Alamos National Laboratory was involved in at least 233 spacecraft. There are probably only one or two institutions in the world that have been involved in so many spacecraft. Los Alamos space exploration started with the Vela satellites for nuclear test detection, but soon expanded to ionospheric research (mostly barium releases), radioisotope thermoelectric generators, solar physics, solar wind, magnetospheres, astrophysics, national security, planetary physics, earth resources, radio propagation in the ionosphere, and cubesats. Here, we present a list of the spacecraft, their purpose, and their launch dates for use during RocketFest

  16. Needs assessment for fire department services and resources for the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-15

    This report has been developed in response to a request from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to evaluate the need for fire department services so as to enable the Laboratory to plan effective fire protection and thereby: meet LANL`s regulatory and contractual obligations; interface with the Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies on matters relating to fire and emergency services; and ensure appropriate protection of the community and environment. This study is an outgrowth of the 1993 Fire Department Needs Assessment (prepared for DOE) but is developed from the LANL perspective. Input has been received from cognizant and responsible representatives at LANL, DOE, Los Alamos County (LAC) and the Los Alamos Fire Department (LAFD).

  17. A survey of macromycete diversity at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Bandelier National Monument, and Los Alamos County; A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarmie, N.; Rogers, F.J. [Mycology Associates, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The authors have completed a 5-year survey (1991--1995) of macromycetes found in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Bandelier National Monument. The authors have compiled a database of 1,048 collections, their characteristics, and identifications. The database represents 123 (98%) genera and 175 (73%) species reliably identified. Issues of habitat loss, species extinction, and ecological relationships are addressed, and comparisons with other surveys are made. With this baseline information and modeling of this baseline data, one can begin to understand more about the fungal flora of the area.

  18. Environmental assessment for effluent reduction, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to eliminate industrial effluent from 27 outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Proposed Action includes both simple and extensive plumbing modifications, which would result in the elimination of industrial effluent being released to the environment through 27 outfalls. The industrial effluent currently going to about half of the 27 outfalls under consideration would be rerouted to LANL`s sanitary sewer system. Industrial effluent from other outfalls would be eliminated by replacing once-through cooling water systems with recirculation systems, or, in a few instances, operational changes would result in no generation of industrial effluent. After the industrial effluents have been discontinued, the affected outfalls would be removed from the NPDES Permit. The pipes from the source building or structure to the discharge point for the outfalls may be plugged, or excavated and removed. Other outfalls would remain intact and would continue to discharge stormwater. The No Action alternative, which would maintain the status quo for LANL`s outfalls, was also analyzed. An alternative in which industrial effluent would be treated at the source facilities was considered but dismissed from further analysis because it would not reasonably meet the DOE`s purpose for action, and its potential environmental effects were bounded by the analysis of the Proposed Action and the No Action alternatives.

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), conducted March 29, 1987 through April 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the LANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LANL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey for the LANL. 65 refs., 68 figs., 73 tabs.

  20. Aqueous Nitrate Recovery Line at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finstad, Casey Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This powerpoint is part of the ADPSM Plutonium Engineering Lecture Series, which is an opportunity for new hires at LANL to get an overview of work done at TA55. It goes into detail about the aqueous nitrate recovery line at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  1. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, R.; Carton, D.; Rhyne, T. [and others

    1997-06-01

    Appendices are presented from a study performed on a concept model system for the commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Topics include a summary of information from the joint MCC/Los Alamos technology conference; a comparison of New Mexico infrastructure to other areas; a typical licensing agreement; technology screening guides; summaries of specific DOE/UC/Los Alamos documents; a bibliography; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TCRD; The Ames Center for Advanced Technology Development; Los Alamos licensing procedures; presentation of slides from monthly MCC/Los Alamos review meetings; generalized entrepreneurship model; and a discussion on receiving equity for technology.

  2. Neutron Capture Measurements Using the Dance Detector at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, J.L. [LANSCE Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Measurements (DANCE) is a 160-element BaF{sub 2} gamma-ray detector located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Centre's moderated neutron source. The high neutron flux, extending from thermal up to about 100 keV, enables neutron-capture measurements on small quantities of rare or radioactive nuclides. Targets of 1 mg and less have been studied. The performance of the detector will be discussed, and capture cross sections in the resonance region and at higher energies for several nuclides, including {sup 234,236}U will be reviewed. Los Alamos Technical Information Reference Number: LA-UR-06-4142. (authors)

  3. Evolution of the Field of Statistics at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, Richard Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-24

    Through years of technological improvements, cultural change, advances in statistical theory, revisions of federal government structure and policies, Laboratory re-organizations, offce re-locations, and so on, the practice of statistics at Los Alamos has evolved from its origins in the early 1950s, with a handful of statisticians working in LASL group T-1, to present-day group CCS-6. This report chronicles that history.

  4. Los Alamos Canyon Ice Rink Parking Flood Plain Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles Dean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Keller, David Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States

    2015-02-10

    The project location is in Los Alamos Canyon east of the ice rink facility at the intersection of West and Omega roads (Figure 1). Forty eight parking spaces will be constructed on the north and south side of Omega Road, and a lighted walking path will be constructed to the ice rink. Some trees will be removed during this action. A guardrail of approximately 400 feet will be constructed along the north side of West Road to prevent unsafe parking in that area.

  5. Nondestructive assay needs at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremesa, T.L.; Longmire, V.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility is the leading facility for research and development in the area of plutonium processing. The diverse aspects of the activities at this facility require a large and varied effort in the area of non-destructive assay (NDA). The NDA activities at the plutonium facility fall into three different categories: accountability, safeguards, and process control. This talk will describe assay methods, instruments, and future needs and directions of NDA at the plutonium facility.

  6. Los Alamos sequence analysis package for nucleic acids and proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanehisa, M I

    1982-01-01

    An interactive system for computer analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences has been developed for the Los Alamos DNA Sequence Database. It provides a convenient way to search or verify various sequence features, e.g., restriction enzyme sites, protein coding frames, and properties of coded proteins. Further, the comprehensive analysis package on a large-scale database can be used for comparative studies on sequence and structural homologies in order to find unnoted information stored i...

  7. Resource Management Technology: Los Alamos Technical Capabilities for Emergency Management,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-18

    Site on specific rock types could be conducted. e Utilize an existing numerical model based on statistical fracture mechanisms to simulate the... rock structure at and away from the wellbore and evalu- ating the effects on it of explosive and hydraulic fracturing and leaching operations. Acoustic...and metals as well as rocks . Los Alamos currently has the strongest computing capability in the world. Numerical code development is a major Laboratory

  8. James L. Tuck Los Alamos ball lightning pioneer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.

    1999-07-01

    James Tuck was well known for starting the Project Sherwood group at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1952. This group was formed to study and develop concepts for controlled fusion energy. In his later years after retiring from Controlled Fusion Division, he continued research at Los Alamos on the topic of ball lightning. He traveled widely giving lectures on both observations of others and his own experimental efforts. He collected anecdotal observations obtained from those in his lecture audiences during his travels and from responses from newspaper articles where he asked for specific information from ball lightning observers. He finally cut off this collection of data when the number of responses became overwhelming. The author's primary publication on ball lightning was a short laboratory report. He planned on publishing a book on the subject but this was never completed before his death. Tuck focused his experimental effort on attempting to duplicate the production of plasma balls claimed to be observed in US Navy submarines when a switch was opened under overload conditions with battery power. During lunch breaks he made use of a Los Alamos N-division battery bank facility to mock up a submarine power pack and switch gear. This non-funded effort was abruptly terminated when an explosion occurred in the facility. An overview of Tuck's research and views will be given. The flavor Jim's personality as well as a ball produced with his experimental apparatus will be shown using video chips.

  9. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, N. G.; Shea, N. eds.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  10. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, N G; Shea, N [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  11. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1996. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Maes, M.N.; Longmire, P.A.

    1997-12-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1996 totaled about 1,368.1 million gallons from wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi well fields. There was no water used from either the spring gallery in Water Canyon or from Guaje Reservoir during 1996. About 2.6 million gallons of water from Los Alamos Reservoir was used for lawn irrigation. The total water usage in 1996 was about 1,370.7 million gallons, or about 131 gallons per day per person living in Los Alamos County. Groundwater pumpage was up about 12.0 million gallons in 1996 compared with the pumpage in 1995. This report fulfills requirements specified in US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 (Groundwater Protection Management Program), which requires the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to monitor and document groundwater conditions below Pajarito Plateau and to protect the regional aquifer from contamination associated with Laboratory operations. Furthermore, this report also fulfills special conditions by providing information on hydrologic characteristics of the regional aquifer, including operating conditions of the municipal water supply system.

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory Economic Analysis Capability Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Information Systems and Modeling Group; Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Information Systems and Modeling Group; Pasqualini, Donatella [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Information Systems and Modeling Group; Rivera, Michael Kelly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Information Systems and Modeling Group

    2016-04-19

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed two types of models to compute the economic impact of infrastructure disruptions. FastEcon is a fast running model that estimates first-­order economic impacts of large scale events such as hurricanes and floods and can be used to identify the amount of economic activity that occurs in a specific area. LANL’s Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model estimates more comprehensive static and dynamic economic impacts of a broader array of events and captures the interactions between sectors and industries when estimating economic impacts.

  13. The Ultracold Neutron Source at Los Alamos National Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makela, M.; Hogan, G.; . Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S.; Ito, T. M.; Rios, R.; Mammei, R.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Back, H. O.; Broussard, L.; Holley, A.; Pattie, R.; Young, A. R.

    2007-04-01

    The Ultracold Neutron (UCN) source at Los Alamos National Lab (LANL) has completed a second run cycle of operation. In the LANL UCN source spallation neutrons are cooled in a moderator then down scattered in solid deuterium (via a super thermal process) to UCN temperatures (1-4 mK). The UCN reach experiments after passing through 8 meters of guide. During the 2006 run cycle several changes were made to the source and guide system. This talk will give an overview of the LANL UCN source, its current status and results from source test runs during the 2006 run cycle.

  14. Auditing nuclear weapons quality programs at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the problems involved in introducing quality assurance on a broad scale in a national laboratory are discussed. A philosophy of how QA can be utilized beneficially in research and development activities is described briefly, and our experiences at Los Alamos in applying QA to nuclear weapons activities are outlines. The important role of audits is emphasized; audits are used not merely to determine the effectiveness of QA programs but also to explain and demonstrate the usefulness of QA to a generally sceptical body of engineers and scientists. Finally, some ways of easing the application of QA in the future are proposed. 1 ref.

  15. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the neutrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, N.G. [ed.

    1997-12-31

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  16. Mac configuration management at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Allan B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) had a need for central configuration management of non-Windows computers. LANL has three to five thousand Macs and an equal number of Linux based systems. The primary goal was to be able to inventory all non-windows systems and patch Mc OS X systems. LANL examined a number of commercial and open source solutions and ultimately selected Puppet. This paper will discuss why we chose Puppet, how we implemented it, and some lessons we learned along the way.

  17. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results.

  18. Groundwater level status report for 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2009-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2008 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 28 intermediate wells, 8 regional/intermediate wells, 106 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 166 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  19. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the safety and health assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within the safety and health programs at LANL, performance was assessed in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Explosives Safety, Natural Phenomena, and Medical Services.

  20. Groundwater level status report for 2010, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2011-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2010 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 194 monitoring wells, including 63 regional aquifer wells (including 10 regional/intermediate wells), 34 intermediate wells, 97 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 162 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells and seasonal responses to snowmelt runoff observed in intermediate wells.

  1. Groundwater level status report for 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2010-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2009 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 55 regional aquifer wells (including 11 regional/intermediate wells), 26 intermediate wells, 98 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 161 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  2. Bradbury science museum: your window to Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deck, Linda Theresa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2009-03-05

    The Bradbury Science Museum is the public's window to Los Alamos National Laboratory and supports the Community Program Office's mission to develop community support to accomplish LANL's national security and science mission. It does this by stimulating interest in and increasing basic knowledge of science and technology in northern New Mexico audiences, and increasing public understanding and appreciation of how LANL science and technology solve our global problems. In performing these prime functions, the Museum also preserves the history of scientific accomplishment at the Lab by collecting and preserving artifacts of scientific and historical importance.

  3. Los Alamos safeguards program overview and NDA in safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keepin, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the Los Alamos safeguards program has developed, tested, and implemented a broad range of passive and active nondestructive analysis (NDA) instruments (based on gamma and x-ray detection and neutron counting) that are now widely employed in safeguarding nuclear materials of all forms. Here very briefly, the major categories of gamma ray and neutron based NDA techniques, give some representative examples of NDA instruments currently in use, and cite a few notable instances of state-of-the-art NDA technique development. Historical aspects and a broad overview of the safeguards program are also presented.

  4. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athas, W.F.

    1996-04-01

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980`s. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report.

  5. The Los Alamos universe: Using multimedia to promote laboratory capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindel, J.

    2000-03-01

    This project consists of a multimedia presentation that explains the technological capabilities of Los Alamos National Laboratory. It takes the form of a human-computer interface built around the metaphor of the universe. The project is intended promote Laboratory capabilities to a wide audience. Multimedia is simply a means of communicating information through a diverse set of tools--be they text, sound, animation, video, etc. Likewise, Los Alamos National Laboratory is a collection of diverse technologies, projects, and people. Given the ample material available at the Laboratory, there are tangible benefits to be gained by communicating across media. This paper consists of three parts. The first section provides some basic information about the Laboratory, its mission, and its needs. The second section introduces this multimedia presentation and the metaphor it is based on along with some basic concepts of color and user interaction used in the building of this project. The final section covers construction of the project, pitfalls, and future improvements.

  6. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Abdallah, J., Jr.; Clark, R. E. H.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Cunningham, R. T.; Hakel, P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-07-01

    The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suite can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.

  7. Fuels Inventories in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Region: 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balice, R.G.; Oswald, B.P.; Martin, C.

    1999-03-01

    Fifty-four sites were surveyed for fuel levels, vegetational structures, and topographic characteristics. Most of the surveyed sites were on Los Alamos National Laboratory property, however, some surveys were also conducted on U.S. Forest Service property. The overall vegetation of these sites ranged from pinon-juniper woodlands to ponderosa pine forests to mixed conifer forests, and the topographic positions included canyons, mesas, and mountains. The results of these surveys indicate that the understory fuels are the greatest in mixed conifer forests and that overstory fuels are greatest in both mixed conifer forests and ponderosa pine forests on mesas. The geographic distribution of these fuels would suggest a most credible wildfire scenario for the Los Alamos region. Three major fires have occurred since 1954 and these fires behaved in a manner that is consistent with this scenario. The most credible wildfire scenario was also supported by the results of BEHAVE modeling that used the fuels inventory data as inputs. Output from the BEHAVE model suggested that catastrophic wildfires would continue to occur during any season with sufficiently dry, windy weather.

  8. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management and organization assessment of environment, safety, and health (ES H) activities performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and onsite contractor personnel. The objectives of the assessment were to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of management systems and practices in terms of ensuring environmental compliance and the safety and health of workers and the general public, (2) identify key findings, and (3) identify root causes for all ES H findings and concerns. The scope of the assessment included examinations of the following from an ES H perspective: (1) strategic and program planning; (2) organizational structure and management configuration; (3) human resource management, including training and staffing; (4) management systems, including performance monitoring and assessment; (5) conduct of operations; (6) public and institutional interactions; and (7) corporate'' parent support.

  9. The legacy and future of CFD at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, N.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.

    1996-06-01

    The early history is presented of the prolific development of CFD methods in the Fluid Dynamics Group (T-3) at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the years from 1958 to the late 1960`s. Many of the currently used numerical methods--PIC, MAC, vorticity-stream-function, ICE, ALE methods and the {kappa}-{var_epsilon} method for turbulence--originated during this time. The rest of the paper summarizes the current research in T-3 for CFD, turbulence and solids modeling. The research areas include reactive flows, multimaterial flows, multiphase flows and flows with spatial discontinuities. Also summarized are modern particle methods and techniques developed for large scale computing on massively parallel computing platforms and distributed processors.

  10. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory - An Isolated Nuclear Research Establishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Norris E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Early in his twenty-five year career as the Director of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Norris Bradbury wrote at length about the atomic bomb and the many implications the bomb might have on the world. His themes were both technical and philosophical. In 1963, after nearly twenty years of leading the nation’s first nuclear weapons laboratory, Bradbury took the opportunity to broaden his writing. In a paper delivered to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s symposium on the “Criteria in the Selection of Sites for the Construction of Reactors and Nuclear Research Centers,” Bradbury took the opportunity to talk about the business of nuclear research and the human component of operating a scientific laboratory. This report is the transcript of his talk.

  11. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1991. Environmental protection group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewart, J.; Kohen, K.L. [comps.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1991. Routine monitoring for radiation and for radioactive and chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1991 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment.

  12. The Laser Safety Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyer, R.

    1997-02-01

    The Laser Safety Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was formalized in April, 1991, with the publication of a document, {open_quotes}Lasers,{close_quotes} modeled on the ANSIZ136.1 standard. This program has received such wide acceptance by the laser community and line managers that the original Laser Safety Program document has become a Laboratory standard on lasers. As a benchmark of the success of this program is that the Laboratory has experienced no disabling eye injuries because of laser operations since July, 1990, to be compared with a disabling laser eye injury that used to average one every eighteen months prior to the time the formal program was established. The Laboratory Laser Safety Program and program elements will be presented and discussed.

  13. Plans for an Ultra Cold Neutron source at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seestrom, S.J.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Greene, G.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) can be produced at spallation sources using a variety of techniques. To date the technique used has been to Bragg scatter and Doppler shift cold neutrons into UCN from a moving crystal. This is particularly applicable to short-pulse spallation sources. We are presently constructing a UCN source at LANSCE using method. In addition, large gains in UCN density should be possible using cryogenic UCN sources. Research is under way at Gatchina to demonstrate technical feasibility of be a frozen deuterium source. If successful, a source of this type could be implemented at future spallation source, such as the long pulse source being planned at Los Alamos, with a UCN density that may be two orders of magnitude higher than that presently available at reactors. (author)

  14. Pajarito Plateau archaeological survey and excavations. [Los Alamos Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, C.R.

    1977-05-01

    Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory lands were surveyed to locate pre-Columbian Indian ruins. The survey results will permit future construction to be planned so that most of the ancient sites in the area can be preserved. Indian occupation of the area occurred principally from late Pueblo III times (late 13th century) until early Pueblo V (about the middle of the 16th century). There are evidences of sporadic Indian use of the area for some 10,000 years. One Folsom point has been found, as well as many other archaic varieties of projectile points. Continued use of the region well into the historic period is indicated by pictographic art that portrays horses. In addition to an account of the survey, the report contains summaries of excavations made on Laboratory lands between 1950 and 1975.

  15. Common ground: An environmental ethic for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, F.L.

    1991-01-01

    Three predominant philosophies have characterized American business ethical thinking over the past several decades. The first phase is the ethics of self-interest'' which argues that maximizing self-interest coincidentally maximizes the common good. The second phase is legality ethics.'' Proponents argue that what is important is knowing the rules and following them scrupulously. The third phase might be called stake-holder ethics.'' A central tenant is that everyone affected by a decision has a moral hold on the decision maker. This paper will discuss one recent initiative of the Los Alamos National Laboratory to move beyond rules and regulations toward an environmental ethic that integrates the values of stakeholder ethics'' into the Laboratory's historical culture and value systems. These Common Ground Principles are described. 11 refs.

  16. Scheduling at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1999-02-01

    The centerpieces of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) are a half-mile long 800-MeV proton linear accelerator and proton storage ring. The accelerator, storage ring, and target stations provide the protons and spallation neutrons that are used in the numerous basic research and applications experimental programs supported by the US Department of Energy. Experimental users, facility maintenance personnel, and operations personnel must work together to achieve the most program benefit within defined budget and resource constraints. In order to satisfy the experimental users programs, operations must provide reliable and high quality beam delivery. Effective and efficient scheduling is a critical component to achieve this goal. This paper will detail how operations scheduling is presently executed at the LANSCE accelerator facility.

  17. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  18. Environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report presents environmental data that characterize environmental performance and addresses compliance with environmental standards and requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1996. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive nonradioactive materials at Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1996 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions; and concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, the municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs. Using comparisons with standards and regulations, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. Laboratory operations were in compliance with all major environmental regulations.

  19. Experiments on planar plasma flow switches at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benage, J.F. Jr.; Wysocki, F.J.; Bowers, R.; Oona, H. [and others

    1997-12-01

    The authors have performed a series of experiments on the Colt facility at Los Alamos to study the performance of plasma flow switches and to understand the important physics issues which affect that performance. These experiments were done in planar geometry on a small machine to allow for better diagnostic access and a higher repetition rate. The Colt facility is a capacitor bank which stores 300 kJ at maximum charge and produced a peak current of 1.1 MA in 2.0 microseconds for these experiments. The diagnostics used for these experiments included an array of b-dot probes, visible framing pictures, visible spectroscopy, and laser interferometry. Characteristics of the switch are determined from spatial and temporal profiles of the magnetic field and the spatial profile and temperature of the switch plasma. Here the authors present results from experiments for a variety of switch conditions.

  20. Defense programs industrial partnerships at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freese, K.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Industrial Partnership Office

    1996-10-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Defense Programs face unprecedented challenges of stewardship for an aging nuclear stockpile, cessation of nuclear testing, reduced federal budgets, and a smaller manufacturing complex. Partnerships with industry are essential in developing technology, modernizing the manufacturing complex, and maintaining the safety and reliability of the nation`s nuclear capability. The past decade of federal support for industrial partnerships has promoted benefits to US industrial competitiveness. Recent shifts in government policy have re-emphasized the importance of industrial partnerships in accomplishing agency missions. Nevertheless, abundant opportunities exist for dual-benefit, mission-driven partnerships between the national laboratories and industry. Experience at Los Alamos National Laboratory with this transition is presented.

  1. Pinon Pine Tree Study, Los Alamos National Laboratory: Source document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. R. Fresquez; J. D. Huchton; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    One of the dominant tree species growing within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM, lands is the pinon pine (Pinus edulis) tree. Pinon pine is used for firewood, fence posts, and building materials and is a source of nuts for food--the seeds are consumed by a wide variety of animals and are also gathered by people in the area and eaten raw or roasted. This study investigated the (1) concentration of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup tot}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soils (0- to 12-in. [31 cm] depth underneath the tree), pinon pine shoots (PPS), and pinon pine nuts (PPN) collected from LANL lands and regional background (BG) locations, (2) concentrations of radionuclides in PPN collected in 1977 to present data, (3) committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from the ingestion of nuts, and (4) soil to PPS to PPN concentration ratios (CRs). Most radionuclides, with the exception of {sup 3}H in soils, were not significantly higher (p < 0.10) in soils, PPS, and PPN collected from LANL as compared to BG locations, and concentrations of most radionuclides in PPN from LANL have decreased over time. The maximum net CEDE (the CEDE plus two sigma minus BG) at the most conservative ingestion rate (10 lb [4.5 kg]) was 0.0018 mrem (0.018 {micro}Sv). Soil-to-nut CRs for most radionuclides were within the range of default values in the literature for common fruits and vegetables.

  2. 2016 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Minimization Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzman, Sonja L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); English, Charles Joe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-02

    Waste minimization and pollution prevention are goals within the operating procedures of Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). The US Department of Energy (DOE), inclusive of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Office of Environmental Management, and LANS are required to submit an annual hazardous waste minimization report to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in accordance with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. The report was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Section 2.9 of the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. This report describes the hazardous waste minimization program, which is a component of the overall Pollution Prevention (P2) Program, administered by the Environmental Stewardship Group (EPC-ES). This report also supports the waste minimization and P2 goals of the Associate Directorate of Environmental Management (ADEM) organizations that are responsible for implementing remediation activities and describes its programs to incorporate waste reduction practices into remediation activities and procedures. This report includes data for all waste shipped offsite from LANL during fiscal year (FY) 2016 (October 1, 2015 – September 30, 2016). LANS was active during FY2016 in waste minimization and P2 efforts. Multiple projects were funded that specifically related to reduction of hazardous waste. In FY2016, there was no hazardous, mixed-transuranic (MTRU), or mixed low-level (MLLW) remediation waste shipped offsite from the Laboratory. More non-remediation hazardous waste and MLLW was shipped offsite from the Laboratory in FY2016 compared to FY2015. Non-remediation MTRU waste was not shipped offsite during FY2016. These accomplishments and analysis of the waste streams are discussed in much more detail within this report.

  3. 2013 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Minimization Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzman, Sonja L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); English, Charles J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Waste minimization and pollution prevention are inherent goals within the operating procedures of Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). The US Department of Energy (DOE) and LANS are required to submit an annual hazardous waste minimization report to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in accordance with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. The report was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Section 2.9 of the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. This report describes the hazardous waste minimization program (a component of the overall Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention [WMin/PP] Program) administered by the Environmental Stewardship Group (ENV-ES). This report also supports the waste minimization and pollution prevention goals of the Environmental Programs Directorate (EP) organizations that are responsible for implementing remediation activities and describes its programs to incorporate waste reduction practices into remediation activities and procedures. LANS was very successful in fiscal year (FY) 2013 (October 1-September 30) in WMin/PP efforts. Staff funded four projects specifically related to reduction of waste with hazardous constituents, and LANS won four national awards for pollution prevention efforts from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In FY13, there was no hazardous, mixedtransuranic (MTRU), or mixed low-level (MLLW) remediation waste generated at the Laboratory. More hazardous waste, MTRU waste, and MLLW was generated in FY13 than in FY12, and the majority of the increase was related to MTRU processing or lab cleanouts. These accomplishments and analysis of the waste streams are discussed in much more detail within this report.

  4. NEPA and NHPA- successful decommissioning of historic Manhattan Project properties at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGehee, E.D.; Pendergrass, A.K.

    1997-05-21

    This paper describes experiences at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the process of planning and executing decommissioning and decontamination activities on a number of properties constructed as part of the Manhattan project. Many of these buildings had been abandoned for many years and were in deteriorating condition, in addition to being contaminated with asbestos, lead based paints and high explosive residues. Due to the age and use of the structures they were evaluated against criteria for the National Register of Historic Places. This process is briefly reviewed, along with the results, as well as actions implemented as a result of the condition and safety of the structures. A number of the structures have been decontaminated and demolished. Planning is still ongoing for the renovation of one structure, and the photographic and drawing records of the properties is near completion.

  5. Ecological baseline studies in Los Alamos and Guaje Canyons County of Los Alamos, New Mexico. A two-year study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxx, T.S. [comp.

    1995-11-01

    During the summers of 1993 and 1994, the Biological Resource Evaluations Team (BRET) of the Environmental Protection Group (ESH-8) conducted baseline studies within two canyon systems, Los Alamos and Guaje Canyons. Biological data was collected within each canyon to provide background and baseline information for Ecological Risk models. Baseline studies included establishment of permanent vegetation plots within each canyon along the elevational gradient. Then, in association with the various vegetation types, surveys were conducted for ground dwelling insects, birds, and small mammals. The stream channels associated with the permanent vegetation plots were characterized and aquatic macroinvertebrates collected within the stream monthly throughout a six-month period. The Geographic Position System (GPS) in combination with ARC INFO was used to map the study areas. Considerable data was collected during these surveys and are summarized in individual chapters.

  6. Setting priorities for action plans at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.C.

    1992-09-30

    This report summarizes work done by Applied Decision Analysis (ADA) for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under Subcontract Number 9-XQ2-Y3837-1 with the University of California. The purpose of this work was to develop a method of setting priorities for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) deficiencies at Los Alamos. The deficiencies were identified by a DOE Tiger Team that visited LANL in the fall of 1991, and by self assessments done by the Laboratory. ADA did the work described here between October 1991 and the end of September 1992. The ADA staff working on this project became part of a Risk Management Team in the Laboratory`s Integration and Coordination Office (ICO). During the project, the Risk Management Team produced a variety of documents describing aspects of the action-plan prioritization system. Some of those documents are attached to this report. Rather than attempt to duplicate their contents, this report provides a guide to those documents, and references them whenever appropriate.

  7. The Los Alamos Science Pillars The Science of Signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Joshua E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Eugene J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-13

    As a national security science laboratory, Los Alamos is often asked to detect and measure the characteristics of complex systems and to use the resulting information to quantify the system's behavior. The Science of Signatures (SoS) pillar is the broad suite of technical expertise and capability that we use to accomplish this task. With it, we discover new signatures, develop new methods for detecting or measuring signatures, and deploy new detection technologies. The breadth of work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in SoS is impressive and spans from the initial understanding of nuclear weapon performance during the Manhattan Project, to unraveling the human genome, to deploying laser spectroscopy instrumentation on Mars. Clearly, SoS is a primary science area for the Laboratory and we foresee that as it matures, new regimes of signatures will be discovered and new ways of extracting information from existing data streams will be developed. These advances will in turn drive the development of sensing instrumentation and sensor deployment. The Science of Signatures is one of three science pillars championed by the Laboratory and vital to supporting our status as a leading national security science laboratory. As with the other two pillars, Materials for the Future and Information Science and Technology for Predictive Science (IS&T), SoS relies on the integration of technical disciplines and the multidisciplinary science and engineering that is our hallmark to tackle the most difficult national security challenges. Over nine months in 2011 and 2012, a team of science leaders from across the Laboratory has worked to develop a SoS strategy that positions us for the future. The crafting of this strategy has been championed by the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences Directorate, but as you will see from this document, SoS is truly an Institution-wide effort and it has engagement from every organization at the Laboratory. This process tapped the insight and

  8. 2015 Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School Research Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowee, Misa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chen, Yuxi [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Desai, Ravindra [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Hassan, Ehab [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Kalmoni, Nadine [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Lin, Dong [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Depascuale, Sebastian [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Hughes, Randall Scott [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zhou, Hong [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-11-24

    The fifth Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School was held June 1st - July 24th, 2015, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). With renewed support from the Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures (IGPPS) and additional support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, we hosted a new class of five students from various U.S. and foreign research institutions. The summer school curriculum includes a series of structured lectures as well as mentored research and practicum opportunities. Lecture topics including general and specialized topics in the field of space weather were given by a number of researchers affiliated with LANL. Students were given the opportunity to engage in research projects through a mentored practicum experience. Each student works with one or more LANL-affiliated mentors to execute a collaborative research project, typically linked with a larger ongoing research effort at LANL and/or the student’s PhD thesis research. This model provides a valuable learning experience for the student while developing the opportunity for future collaboration. This report includes a summary of the research efforts fostered and facilitated by the Space Weather Summer School. These reports should be viewed as work-in-progress as the short session typically only offers sufficient time for preliminary results. At the close of the summer school session, students present a summary of their research efforts. Titles of the papers included in this report are as follows: Full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of whistler wave generation, Hybrid simulations of the right-hand ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in a sub-Alfvénic plasma flow, A statistical ensemble for solar wind measurements, Observations and models of substorm injection dispersion patterns, Heavy ion effects on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: hybrid study, Simulating plasmaspheric electron densities with a two

  9. Small Mammal Sampling in Mortandad and Los Alamos Canyons, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Kathy; Sherwood, Sherri; Robinson, Rhonda

    2006-08-15

    As part of an ongoing ecological field investigation at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a study was conducted that compared measured contaminant concentrations in sediment to population parameters for small mammals in the Mortandad Canyon watershed. Mortandad Canyon and its tributary canyons have received contaminants from multiple solid waste management units and areas of concern since establishment of the Laboratory in the 1940s. The study included three reaches within Effluent and Mortandad canyons (E-1W, M-2W, and M-3) that had a spread in the concentrations of metals and radionuclides and included locations where polychlorinated biphenyls and perchlorate had been detected. A reference location, reach LA-BKG in upper Los Alamos Canyon, was also included in the study for comparison purposes. A small mammal study was initiated to assess whether potential adverse effects were evident in Mortandad Canyon due to the presence of contaminants, designated as contaminants of potential ecological concern, in the terrestrial media. Study sites, including the reference site, were sampled in late July/early August. Species diversity and the mean daily capture rate were the highest for E-1W reach and the lowest for the reference site. Species composition among the three reaches in Mortandad was similar with very little overlap with the reference canyon. Differences in species composition and diversity were most likely due to differences in habitat. Sex ratios, body weights, and reproductive status of small mammals were also evaluated. However, small sample sizes of some species within some sites affected the analysis. Ratios of males to females by species of each site (n = 5) were tested using a Chi-square analysis. No differences were detected. Where there was sufficient sample size, body weights of adult small mammals were compared between sites. No differences in body weights were found. Reproductive status of species appears to be similar across sites. However, sample

  10. Environmental Assessment for Electrical Power System Upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-03-09

    The ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) follows the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. In this case, the DOE decision to be made is whether to construct and operate a 19.5-mile (mi) (31-kilometer [km]) electric transmission line (power line) reaching from the Norton Substation, west across the Rio Grande, to locations within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Areas (TAs) 3 and 5 at Los Alamos, New Mexico. The construction of one electric substation at LANL would be included in the project as would the construction of two line segments less than 1,200 feet (ft) (366 meters [m]) long that would allow for the uncrossing of a portion of two existing power lines. Additionally, a fiber optics communications line would be included and installed concurrently as part of the required overhead ground conductor for the power line. The new power line would improve the reliability of electric service in the LANL and Los Aktrnos County areas as would the uncrossing of the crossed segments of the existing lines. Additionally, installation of the new power line would enable the LANL and the Los Alamos County electric grid, which is a shared resource, to be adapted to accommodate the future import of increased power when additional power service becomes available in the northern New Mexico area. Similarly, the fiber optics line would allow DOE to take advantage of

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory: 21st century solutions to urgent national challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcbranch, Duncan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has been called upon to meet urgent national challenges for more than 65 years. The people, tools, and technologies at Los Alamos are a world class resource that has proved decisive through our history, and are needed in the future. We offer expertise in nearly every science, technology, and engineering discipline, a unique integrated capability for large-scale computing and experimentation, and the proven ability to deliver solutions involving the most complex and difficult technical systems. This white paper outlines some emerging challenges and why the nation needs Los Alamos, the premier National Security Science Laboratory, to meet these challenges.

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory 1995 self assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-30

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Safeguards and Security (S and S) Assurance Program (AP) is designed to ensure the adequacy and effectiveness of the LANL S and S program. The Assurance Program provides a mechanism for discovering deficiencies, determining causes, conducting risk assessments, implementing corrective actions, and documenting the assessment process. Selection of organizations for self assessments is based on the criteria established in the LANL S and S Assurance Program. For FY 1995, 12 organizations were selected for self assessments, these organizations are identified fin the schedule at Appendix A. The S and S topical areas selected for review in each organization varied depending on their security interests and included: Program Planning and Management (PPM); Protection Program Operations (PPO); Material Control and Accountability (MC and A); Computer and Communications Security (COMPSEC and COMSEC); Information Security (INFOSEC); Personnel Security (PERSEC); and Operational Security (OPSEC). The objective was to ascertain the effectiveness of S and S programs in each organization, its formality of operations, and its integration with the overall Laboratory S and S program. The goal was to meet both the DOE self-assessment requirements and the UC performance criteria and document the results.

  13. The FIGARO Facility at Los Alamos : capabilities and first results /

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, M. J. (Matthew J.); Zanini, L.; O' Donnell, J. M.; Aprahamian, A. (Ani); Saladin, J. X.; Haight, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    A new beam line at the fast neutron spallation source at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has been constructed for studies of neutron-induced reactions producing gamma rays, internal conversion electrons or neutrons. This facility, called FIGARO (Fast neutron-Induced GAmma-Ray Observer), follows on the great successes of GEANIE (described in other contributions to this Conference), by detecting de-excitation gamma rays with high-resolution germanium detectors. FIGARO has fewer gamma-ray detectors than GEANIE, but instead offers other features including: extremely good collimation of the neutron beam for background reduction, a flexible experimental area to optimize detection efficiency and to allow evaluation of other detectors such as ICEBALL-II for internal conversion electrons, inclusion of neutron detectors for the study of neutron-gamma coincidences, beam time to relieve the scheduling pressure on GEANIE, and a PC-based data acquisition system. Our initial measurements include level density studies through 59Co(n,xgamma) reactions to complement our previous 59Co(n,xalpha) measurements, reaction studies of MeV neutrons on 99Tc with the goal of determining cross sections relevant to transmutation and neutron transport in the design of facilities to incinerate nuclear waste, and an assessment of measuring internal conversion electrons, rather than gamma rays, produced by neutron excitation of actinides.

  14. The FIGARO facility at Los Alamos. Capabilities and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, Robert; Devlin, Matthew; Zanini, Luca; O' donnell, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aprahamian, Ani [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Saladin, Juerg [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2002-08-01

    A new beam line at the fast neutron spallation source at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has been constructed for studies of neutron-induced reactions producing gamma rays, internal conversion electrons or neutrons. This facility, called FIGARO (Fast neutron-Induced GAmma-Ray Observer), follows on the great successes of GEANIE (described in other contributions to this Conference), by detecting de-excitation gamma rays with high-resolution germanium detectors. FIGARO has fewer gamma-ray detectors than GEANIE, but instead offers other features including: extremely good collimation of the neutron beam for background reduction, a flexible experimental area to optimize detection efficiency and to allow evaluation of other detectors such as ICEBALL-II for internal conversion electrons, inclusion of neutron detectors for the study of neutron-gamma coincidences, beam time to relieve the scheduling pressure on GEANIE, and a PC-based data acquisition system. Our initial measurements include level density studies through {sup 59}Co(n, xgamma) reactions to complement our previous {sup 59}Co(n, xalpha) measurements, reaction studies of MeV neutrons on {sup 99}Tc with the goal of determining cross sections relevant to transmutation and neutron transport in the design of facilities to incinerate nuclear waste, and an assessment of measuring internal conversion electrons, rather than gamma rays, produced by neutron excitation of actinides. (author)

  15. The NHMFL Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Chuck

    2014-03-01

    National user facilities provide scientists and industrial development companies with access to specialized experimental capabilities to enable development of materials and solve long standing technical problems. Magnetic fields have become an indispensable tool for researchers to better understand and manipulate ground states of electronic materials. As magnetic field intensities are increased the quantum nature of these materials become exponentially more likely to be observed and this is but one of the drivers to go further in high magnetic field generation. At the Los Alamos branch of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory we have significant efforts in extremely high magnetic field generation and experimentation. In direct opposition with our efforts are the tremendous electro-mechanical forces exerted on our magnets and the electromagnetic interference that couples to the sample under study and the diagnostic equipment. Challenges in magnetic field generation and research will be presented. Various methods of pulsed high magnetic field generation and experimentation capabilities will be reviewed, including our recent ``World Record'' for the highest non-destructive magnetic field. NSF-DMR 1157490.

  16. Chemical decontamination technical resources at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Murray E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    This document supplies information resources for a person seeking to create planning or pre-planning documents for chemical decontamination operations. A building decontamination plan can be separated into four different sections: Pre-planning, Characterization, Decontamination (Initial response and also complete cleanup), and Clearance. Of the identified Los Alamos resources, they can be matched with these four sections: Pre-planning -- Dave Seidel, EO-EPP, Emergency Planning and Preparedness; David DeCroix and Bruce Letellier, D-3, Computational fluids modeling of structures; Murray E. Moore, RP-2, Aerosol sampling and ventilation engineering. Characterization (this can include development projects) -- Beth Perry, IAT-3, Nuclear Counterterrorism Response (SNIPER database); Fernando Garzon, MPA-11, Sensors and Electrochemical Devices (development); George Havrilla, C-CDE, Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering; Kristen McCabe, B-7, Biosecurity and Public Health. Decontamination -- Adam Stively, EO-ER, Emergency Response; Dina Matz, IHS-IP, Industrial hygiene; Don Hickmott, EES-6, Chemical cleanup. Clearance (validation) -- Larry Ticknor, CCS-6, Statistical Sciences.

  17. Atlas - a new pulsed power tool at Los Alamos

    CERN Document Server

    Scudder, D W; Ballard, E O; Barr, G W; Cochrane, J C; Davis, H A; Griego, J R; Hadden, E S; Hinckley, W B; Hosack, K W; Martínez, J E; Mills, D; Padilla, J N; Parker, J V; Parsons, W M; Reinovsky, R E; Stokes, J L; Thompson, M C; Tom, C Y; Wysocki, F J; Vigil, B N; Elizondo, J; Miller, R B; Anderson, H D; Campbell, T N; Owens, R S

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. The Atlas pulsed power driver has recently been commissioned at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The paper provides an overview of the Atlas facility, its initial experimental program and plans for the future. The reader desiring more detailed information is referred to papers in this conference by Keinigs et al. on materials studies, Cochrane et al. on machine performance and Ballard et al. on fabrication and assembly. Atlas is a high current generator capable of driving 30 megamps through a low- inductance load. It has been designed to require minimal maintenance, provide excellent diagnostic access, and rapid turnaround. Its capacitor bank stores 23.5 megajoules in a four-stage Marx configuration which erects to 240 kV at maximum charge. It has a quarter-cycle time of 4.5 microseconds. It will typically drive cylindrical aluminum liners in a z-pinch configuration to velocities up to 10 mm/msec while maintaining the inner surface in the solid state. Diagnostic access incl...

  18. Electrical Engineering in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Michael James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-30

    The field of electrical engineering plays a significant role in particle accelerator design and operations. Los Alamos National Laboratories LANSCE facility utilizes the electrical energy concepts of power distribution, plasma generation, radio frequency energy, electrostatic acceleration, signals and diagnostics. The culmination of these fields produces a machine of incredible potential with uses such as isotope production, neutron spallation, neutron imaging and particle analysis. The key isotope produced in LANSCE isotope production facility is Strontium-82 which is utilized for medical uses such as cancer treatment and positron emission tomography also known as PET scans. Neutron spallation is one of the very few methods used to produce neutrons for scientific research the other methods are natural decay of transuranic elements from nuclear reactors. Accelerator produce neutrons by accelerating charged particles into neutron dense elements such as tungsten imparting a neutral particle with kinetic energy, this has the benefit of producing a large number of neutrons as well as minimizing the waste generated. Utilizing the accelerator scientist can gain an understanding of how various particles behave and interact with matter to better understand the natural laws of physics and the universe around us.

  19. Wildlife use of NPDES outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxx, T.; Blea-Edeskuty, B.

    1995-09-01

    From July through October of 1991, the Biological Resources Evaluation Team (BRET) surveyed 133 of the 140 National Pollutant Discharge and Elimination System outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of the survey was to determine the use of these wastewater outfalls by wildlife. BRET observed wildlife or evidence of wildlife (scat, tracks, or bedding) by 35 vertebrate species in the vicinity of the outfalls, suggesting these animals could be using water from outfalls. Approximately 56% of the outfalls are probably used or are suitable for use by large mammals as sources of drinking water. Additionally, hydrophytic vegetation grows in association with approximately 40% of the outfalls-a characteristic that could make these areas eligible for wetland status. BRET recommends further study to accurately characterize the use of outfalls by small and medium-sized mammals and amphibians. The team also recommends systematic aquatic macroinvertebrate studies to provide information on resident communities and water quality. Wetland assessments may be necessary to ensure compliance with wetland regulations if LANL activities affect any of the outfalls supporting hydrophytic vegetation.

  20. Los Alamos High-Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelius, W.D.; Bender, S.; Meier, K.; Thode, L.E.; Watson, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The 10-/mu/m Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) facility is being upgraded. The conventional electron gun and bunchers have been replaced with a much more compact 6-MeV photoinjector accelerator. By adding existing parts from previous experiments, the primary beam energy will be doubled to 40 MeV. With the existing 1-m wiggler (/lambda//sub w/ = 2.7 cm) and resonator, the facility can produce photons with wavelengths from 3 to 100 /mu/m when lasing on the fundamental mode and produce photons in the visible spectrum with short-period wigglers or harmonic operation. After installation of a 150/degree/ bend, a second wiggler will be added as an amplifier. The installation of laser transport tubes between the accelerator vault and an upstairs laboratory will provide experimenters with a radiation-free environment for experiments. Although the initial experimental program of the upgraded facility will be to test the single accelerator-master oscillator/power amplifier configuration, some portion of the operational time of the facility can be dedicated to user experiments. 13 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Explorer at Los Alamos: A library for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, M.; McDonald, J.

    1998-03-01

    Since 1993, Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been developing World Wide Web (WWW) applications to facilitate access to vast quantities of information critical to the successful operation of a nuclear weapons facility Explorer is a web-based tool that integrates full-text search and retrieval technology, custom user in interface faces, user-friendly navigation tools, extremely large document collections, and data collection and workflow applications. Explorer`s first major thrust was to enable quick access to regulatory and policy information used by Department of Energy facilities throughout the country. Today, Explorer users can easily search document collections containing, millions of pages of information scattered across Web sites around the country. Over fifteen large applications containing multiple collections are searchable through Explorer, and the subject areas range from DOE regulations to quality management-related resources to technology transfer opportunities. Explorer has succeeded because it provides quick and easy access to stored data across the Web; it saves time and reduces costs in comparison with traditional information distribution, access, and retrieval methods.

  2. Results from the Argonne, Los Alamos, JAERI collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, J.; Smith, D.; Greenwood, L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Haight, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-07-01

    Four sample packets containing elemental Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu, Nb, Ag, Eu, Tb and Hf have been irradiated in three distinct accelerator neutron fields, at Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA, and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Japan. The acquired experimental data include differential cross sections and integral cross sections for the continuum neutron spectrum produced by 7-MeV deuterons incident on thick Be-metal target. The U-238(n,f) cross section was also measured at 10.3 MeV as a consistency check on the experimental technique. This the third progress report on a project which has been carried out under the auspices of an IAEA Coordinated Research Program entitled ``Activation Cross Sections for the Generation Of Long-lived Radionuclides of Importance in Fusion Reactor Technology``. The present report provides the latest results from this work. Comparison is made between the 14.7-MeV cross-section values obtained from the separate investigations at Argonne and JAERI. Generally, good agreement observed within the experimental errors when consistent sample parameters, radioactivity decay data and reference cross values are employed. A comparison is also made between the experimental results and those derived from calculations using a nuclear model. Experimental neutron information on the Be(d,n) neutron spectrum was incorporated in the comparisons for the integral results. The agreement is satisfactory considering the various uncertainties that are involved.

  3. New Mexicans` perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    Since May, 1990, the Institute for Public Policy (IPP) has published Quarterly Profiles (QPs) of New Mexico`s citizenry. Each QP has focused on a different issue, but they have all asked a set of standard items, including questions about the public`s perceptions of the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL). Each year, the IPP has used the University of New Mexico`s Survey Research Center to conduct a telephone survey of a representative random sample of New Mexicans, and respondents were asked whether they had favorable or unfavorable views of LANL and the degree to which they perceived LANL as an environmentally responsible institution. As a result of this sustained research effort, the IPP now has a collection of fifteen consecutive QPs. With an aggregate sample size of over 8800, we are now able to make precise statistical inferences with greater confidence than was possible when using individual QP samples. Such an extremely large sample mitigates two kinds of common survey research problems.

  4. Architect and engineering costs at Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The objective of this audit was to determine whether architect and engineering (A-E) costs at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories were reasonable in comparison with industry standards.

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, D.

    1995-09-01

    This report is quarterly progress report on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Included in the report are dicussions on teacher and faculty enhancement, curriculum improvement, student support, educational technology, and institutional improvement.

  6. NM - Risk and injury assessment of radionuclides to Los Alamos fauna

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an assessment of environmental contaminants associated with the Los Alamos National Laboratory. One objective of the study is to determine if a significant...

  7. Floodplain Assessment for the Middle Los Alamos Canyon Aggregate Area Investigations in Technical Area 02 at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles Dean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-22

    The proposed action being assessed in this document occurs in TA-02 in the bottom of Los Alamos Canyon. The DOE proposes to conduct soil sampling at AOC 02-011 (d), AOC 02- 011(a)(ii), and SWMU 02-005, and excavate soils in AOC 02-011(a)(ii) as part of a corrective actions effort. Additional shallow surface soil samples (soil grab samples) will be collected throughout the TA-02 area, including within the floodplain, to perform ecotoxicology studies (Figures 1 and 2). The excavation boundaries in AOC 02-011(a)(ii) are slightly within the delineated 100-year floodplain. The project will use a variety of techniques for soil sampling and remediation efforts to include hand/digging, standard hand auger/sampling, excavation using machinery such as backhoe and front end loader and small drill rig. Heavy equipment will traverse the floodplain and spoils piles will be staged in the floodplain within developed or previously disturbed areas (e.g., existing paved roads and parking areas). The project will utilize and maintain appropriate best management practices (BMPs) to contain excavated materials, and all pollutants, including oil from machinery/vehicles. The project will stabilize disturbed areas as appropriate at the end of the project.

  8. Environmental assessment for the proposed CMR Building upgrades at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-04

    In order to maintain its ability to continue to conduct uninterrupted radioactive and metallurgical research in a safe, secure, and environmentally sound manner, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. The building was built in the early 1950s to provide a research and experimental facility for analytical chemistry, plutonium and uranium chemistry, and metallurgy. Today, research and development activities are performed involving nuclear materials. A variety of radioactive and chemical hazards are present. The CMR Building is nearing the end of its original design life and does not meet many of today`s design codes and standards. The Proposed Action for this Environmental Assessment (EA) includes structural modifications to some portions of the CMR Building which do not meet current seismic criteria for a Hazard Category 2 Facility. Also included are upgrades and improvements in building ventilation, communications, monitoring, and fire protection systems. This EA analyzes the environmental effects of construction of the proposed upgrades. The Proposed Action will have no adverse effects upon agricultural and cultural resources, wetlands and floodplains, endangered and threatened species, recreational resources, or water resources. The Proposed Action would have negligible effects on human health and transportation, and would not pose a disproportionate adverse health or environmental impact on minority or low-income populations within an 80 kilometer (50 mile) radius of the CMR Building.

  9. 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory Riparian Inventory Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hansen, Leslie A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keller, David C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zemlick, Catherine M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-03-29

    A total length of 36.7 kilometers of riparian habitat were inventoried within LANL boundaries between 2007 and 2011. The following canyons and lengths of riparian habitat were surveyed and inventoried between 2007 and 2011. Water Canyon (9,669 m), Los Alamos Canyon (7,131 m), Pajarito Canyon (6,009 m), Mortandad Canyon (3,110 m), Two-Mile Canyon (2,680 m), Sandia Canyon (2,181 m), Three-Mile Canyon (1,883 m), Canyon de Valle (1,835 m), Ancho Canyon (1,143 m), Canada del Buey (700 m), Sandia Canyon (221 m), DP Canyon (159 m) and Chaquehui Canyon (50 m). Effluent Canyon, Fence Canyon and Potrillo Canyon were surveyed but no areas of riparian habitat were found. Stretches of inventoried riparian habitat were classified for prioritization of treatment, if any was recommended. High priority sites included stretches of Mortandad Canyon, LA Canyon, Pajarito Canyon, Two-Mile Canyon, Sandia Canyon and Water Canyon. Recommended treatment for high priority sites includes placement of objects into the stream channel to encourage sediment deposition, elimination of channel incision, and to expand and slow water flow across the floodplain. Additional stretches were classified as lower priority, and, for other sites it was recommended that feral cattle and exotic plants be removed to aid in riparian habitat recovery. In June 2011 the Las Conchas Wildfire burned over 150,000 acres of land in the Jemez Mountains and surrounding areas. The watersheds above LA Canyon, Water Canyon and Pajarito Canyon were burned in the Las Conchas Wildfire and flooding and habitat alteration were observed in these canyon bottoms (Wright 2011). Post fire status of lower priority areas may change to higher priority for some of the sites surveyed prior to the Las Conchas Wildfire, due to changes in vegetation cover in the adjacent upland watershed.

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeln, Terri G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-25

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory considers the use of biodiesel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlin, M. K. (Marla K.)

    2002-01-01

    A new EPA-approved alternative fuel, called biodiesel, may soon be used at Los Alamos National Laboratory in everything from diesel trucks to laboratory equipment. Biodiesel transforms vegetable oils into a renewable, cleaner energy source that can be used in any machinery that uses diesel fuel. For the past couple years, the Laboratory has been exploring the possibility of switching over to soybean-based biodiesel. This change could lead to many health and environmental benefits, as well as help reduce the nation's dependence on foreign oil. Biodiesel is a clean, renewable diesel fuel substitute made from soybean and other vegetable oil crops, as well as from recycled cooking oils. A chemical process breaks down the vegetable oil into a usable form. Vegetable oil has a chain of about 18 carbons and ordinary diesel has about 12 or 13 carbons. The process breaks the carbon chains of the vegetable oil and separates out the glycerin (a fatty substance used in creams and soaps). The co-product of glycerin can be used by pharmaceutical and cosmetic companies, as well as many other markets. Once the chains are shortened and the glycerin is removed from the oil, the remaining liquid is similar to petroleum diesel fuel. It can be burned in pure form or in a blend of any proportion with petroleum diesel. To be considered an alternative fuel source by the EPA, the blend must be at least 20 percent biodiesel (B20). According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), biodiesel is America's fastest growing alternative fuel.

  12. Environmental Assessment for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-03

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a need to improve the management of wastewater resulting from high explosives (HE) research and development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL`s current methods off managing HE-contaminated wastewater cannot ensure that discharged HE wastewater would consistently meet the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE needs to enhance He wastewater management to e able to meet both present and future regulatory standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE also proposes to incorporate major pollution prevention and waste reduction features into LANL`s existing HE production facilities. Currently, wastewater from HE processing buildings at four Technical Areas (TAs) accumulates in sumps where particulate HE settles out and barium is precipitated. Wastewater is then released from the sumps to the environment at 15 permitted outfalls without treatment. The released water may contain suspended and dissolved contaminants, such as HE and solvents. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes two alternatives, the Proposed Action and the Alternative Action, that would meet the purpose and need for agency action. Both alternatives would treat all HE process wastewater using sand filters to remove HE particulates and activated carbon to adsorb organic solvents and dissolved HE. Under either alternative, LANL would burn solvents and flash dried HE particulates and spent carbon following well-established procedures. Burning would produce secondary waste that would be stored, treated, and disposed of at TA-54, Area J. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility.

  13. Monitoring Sensitive Bat Species at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberg, Kari M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Bats play a critical role in ecosystems and are vulnerable to disturbance and disruption by human activities. In recent decades, bat populations in the United States and elsewhere have decreased tremendously. There are 47 different species of bat in the United States and 28 of these occur in New Mexico with 15 different species documented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and surrounding areas. Euderma maculatum(the spotted bat) is listed as “threatened” by the state of New Mexico and is known to occur at LANL. Four other species of bats are listed as “sensitive” and also occur here. In 1995, a four year study was initiated at LANL to assess the status of bat species of concern, elucidate distribution and relative abundance, and obtain information on roosting sites. There have been no definitive studies since then. Biologists in the Environmental Protection Division at LANL initiated a multi-year monitoring program for bats in May 2013 to implement the Biological Resources Management Plan. The objective of this ongoing study is to monitor bat species diversity and seasonal activity over time at LANL. Bat species diversity and seasonal activity were measured using an acoustic bat detector, the Pettersson D500X. This ultrasound recording unit is intended for long-term, unattended recording of bat and other high frequency animal calls. During 2013, the detector was deployed at two locations around LANL. Study sites were selected based on proximity to water where bats may be foraging. Recorded bat calls were analyzed using Sonobat, software that can help determine specific species of bat through their calls. A list of bat species at the two sites was developed and compared to lists from previous studies. Species diversity and seasonal activity, measured as the number of call sequences recorded each month, were compared between sites and among months. A total of 17,923 bat calls were recorded representing 15 species. Results indicate that there is a

  14. Upgrades and Enclosure of Building 15 at Technical Area 40: Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plimpton, Kathryn D [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Garcia, Kari L. M [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brunette, Jeremy Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McGehee, Ellen D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos Field Office (Field Office) proposes to upgrade and enclose Building 15 at Technical Area (TA) 40, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Building TA-40-15, a Cold War-era firing site, was determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (Register) in DX Division’s Facility Strategic Plan: Consolidation and Revitalization at Technical Areas 6, 8, 9, 14, 15, 22, 36, 39, 40, 60, and 69 (McGehee et al. 2005). Building TA-40-15 was constructed in 1950 to support detonator testing. The firing site will be enclosed by a steel building to create a new indoor facility that will allow for year-round mission capability. Enclosing TA-40-15 will adversely affect the building by altering the characteristics that make it eligible for the Register. In compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, the Field Office is initiating consultation for this proposed undertaking. The Field Office is also requesting concurrence with the use of standard practices to resolve adverse effects as defined in the Programmatic Agreement among the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos Field Office, the New Mexico State Historic Preservation Office and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Concerning Management of the Historic Properties at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico.

  15. Wide-area Gigabit networking: Los Alamos HIPPI-SONET Gateway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. John, W.B.; DuBois, D.H.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a HIPPI-SONET Gateway which has been designed by members of the Computer Network Engineering Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Gateway has been used in the CASA Gigabit Testbed at Caltech, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the San Diego Supercomputer Center to provide communications between the sites. This paper will also make some qualitative statements as to lessons learned during the deployment and maintenance of this wide area network. We report record throughput for transmission of data across a wide area network. We have sustained data rates using the TCP/IP protocol of 550 Mbits/second and the rate of 792 Mbits/second for raw HIPPI data transfer over the 2,000 kilometers from the San Diego Supercomputer Center to the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory Human and Intellectual Capital for Sustaining Nuclear Deterrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAlpine, Bradley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current human and intellectual capital at Los Alamos National Laboratory, through specific research into the statistics and demographics as well as numerous personal interviews at all levels of personnel. Based on this information, a series of recommendations are provided to assist Los Alamos National Laboratory in ensuring the future of the human and intellectual capital for the nuclear deterrence mission. While the current human and intellectual capital is strong it stands on the precipice and action must be taken to ensure Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains leadership in developing and sustaining national nuclear capabilities. These recommendations may be applicable to other areas of the nuclear enterprise, including the Air Force, after further research and study.

  17. Photos of Lansmont PDT 80 drop test machine at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-21

    The Los Alamos RP-SVS Radiation Protection Services group designed and constructed a drop tower facility for TA- 55 support work. The drop mechanism was supplied by the Lansmont company in Monterey CA. Los Alamos staffers Murray Moore and Yong Tao have noticed that the system is not dropping loads correctly, and they have photographed aspects of the PDT- 80 model system. The first 10 photos show the platen loaded with a cylindrical steel bar. The next 10 photos are of the roller-cam mechanism in the drop tower, and the last 2 photos indicate the amount of looseness in the platen when it is being pulled by a person.

  18. Los Alamos plutonium facility applied systems integration project status report for period ending August 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirk, D.G.; Bearse, R.C.; Marshall, R.S.; Baker, A.L.; Thomas, C.C. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    The conceptual design of an on-line, near-real-time nondestructive assay instrumentation network for the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility is complete. Analysis of instrument history data indicates that the instrument certification procedures need improvement. Analysis of exhaust filter data has led to the derivation of a buildup prediction equation that is a function of throughput. This suggests that development of a generalized model is possible. A number of routine reports are now available from the Plutonium Facility/Los Alamos Safeguards System including inventories and active reports.

  19. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume II. Engineering design reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, R.A.; Draper, W.E.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

    1982-10-01

    This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawings, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

  20. Los Alamos National Security, LLC Request for Interest (RFI) for Investment Mentors to participate in the Laboratory’s Entrepreneurial Postdoctoral Pilot.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clow, Shandra Deann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is committed to understanding how the role of venture funding, new investment mechanisms, and fostering the development of a culture of entrepreneurship may enhance the Laboratory and bring strength and creativity to its people. LANL, in partnership with the University of California (UC), has created the Entrepreneurial Postdoctoral Fellowship Pilot (Pilot) to provide an immersion-based learning opportunity to post-doctoral researchers to develop and practice skills in entrepreneurship and comercialization.

  1. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Mechanical Shock Sensors for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. E. Klingsporn

    2005-11-14

    This document lists the requirements for the fiber optic mechanical shock sensor for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) project and provides detailed process steps for fabricating, testing, and assembling the fiber shock sensors for delivery to Los Alamos.

  2. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2008 water year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, David; Cata, Betsy; Kuyumjian, Gregory

    2009-09-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  3. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2002 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Shaull; D. Ortiz; M.R. Alexander; R.P. Romero

    2003-03-03

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 34 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data from 16 stations.

  4. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, R.; Cartron, D.; Rhyne, T.; Schulze, M.; Welty, L.

    1997-06-01

    Over the past decade, numerous companies have been formed to commercialize research results from leading U.S. academic and research institutions. Emerging small businesses in areas such as Silicon Valley, Boston`s Route 128 corridor, and North Carolina`s Research Triangle have been especially effective in moving promising technologies from the laboratory bench to the commercial marketplace--creating new jobs and economic expansion in the process. Unfortunately, many of the U.S. national laboratories have not been major participants in this technology/commercialization activity, a result of a wide variety of factors which, until recently, acted against successful commercialization. This {open_quotes}commercialization gap{close_quotes} exists partly due to a lack, within Los Alamos in particular and the DOE in general, of in-depth expertise and experience in such business areas as new business development, securities regulation, market research and the determination of commercial potential, the identification of entrepreneurial management, marketing and distribution, and venture capital sources. The immediate consequence of these factors is the disappointingly small number of start-up companies based on technologies from Los Alamos National Laboratory that have been attempted, the modest financial return Los Alamos has received from these start-ups, and the lack of significant national recognition that Los Alamos has received for creating and commercializing these technologies.

  5. A Wildfire Behavior Modeling System at Los Alamos National Laboratory for Operational Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.W. Koch; R.G.Balice

    2004-11-01

    To support efforts to protect facilities and property at Los Alamos National Laboratory from damages caused by wildfire, we completed a multiyear project to develop a system for modeling the behavior of wildfires in the Los Alamos region. This was accomplished by parameterizing the FARSITE wildfire behavior model with locally gathered data representing topography, fuels, and weather conditions from throughout the Los Alamos region. Detailed parameterization was made possible by an extensive monitoring network of permanent plots, weather towers, and other data collection facilities. We also incorporated a database of lightning strikes that can be used individually as repeatable ignition points or can be used as a group in Monte Carlo simulation exercises and in other randomization procedures. The assembled modeling system was subjected to sensitivity analyses and was validated against documented fires, including the Cerro Grande Fire. The resulting modeling system is a valuable tool for research and management. It also complements knowledge based on professional expertise and information gathered from other modeling technologies. However, the modeling system requires frequent updates of the input data layers to produce currently valid results, to adapt to changes in environmental conditions within the Los Alamos region, and to allow for the quick production of model outputs during emergency operations.

  6. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2006 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.P. Romero, D. Ortiz, G. Kuyumjian

    2007-08-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 44 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data for 44 stations.

  7. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory waste management technology development activities. Summary progress report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.J. (comp.)

    1980-10-01

    Summary reports on the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy-sponsored waste management technology development projects at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory describe progress for calendar year 1979. Activities in airborne, low-level, and transuranic waste management areas are discussed. Work progress on waste assay, treatment, disposal, and environmental monitoring is reviewed.

  8. Mapping the future of CIC Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes three scenario-based strategic planning workshops run for the CIC Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during November and December, 1995. Each of the two-day meetings was facilitated by Northeast Consulting Resources, Inc. (NCRI) of Boston, MA. using the Future Mapping{reg_sign} methodology.

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1995 quality program status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1996-07-01

    This status report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project`s (YMP`s) quality assurance program for January 1 to September 30, 1995. The report includes major sections on program activities and trend analysis.

  10. Tritium operating safety seminar, Los Alamos, New Mexico, July 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-01

    A seminar for the exchange of information on tritium operating and safety problems was held at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The topics discussed are: (1) material use (tubing, lubricants, valves, seals, etc.); (2) hardware selection (valves, fittings, pumps, etc.); (3) biological effects; (4) high pressure; (5) operating procedures (high pressure tritium experiment at LLL); (6) incidents; and (7) emergency planning. (TFD)

  11. Los Alamos neutron science user facility - control system risk mitigation & updates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieck, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-05

    LANSCE User Facility is seeing continuing support and investments. The investment will sustain reliable facility operations well into the next decade. As a result, the LANSCE User Facility will continue to be a premier Neutron Science Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  12. Calculation of Moments from Measurements by the Los Alamos Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. F. Thomsen; E. Noveroske; J. E. Borovsky; D. J. McComas

    1999-05-01

    The various steps involved in computing the moments (density, velocity, and temperature) of the ion and electron distributions measured with the Los Alamos Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer (MPA) are described. The assumptions, constants, and algorithms contained in the FORTRAN code are presented, as well as the output parameters produced by the code.

  13. Encoded physics knowledge in checking codes for nuclear cross section libraries at Los Alamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. Kent

    2017-09-01

    Checking procedures for processed nuclear data at Los Alamos are described. Both continuous energy and multi-group nuclear data are verified by locally developed checking codes which use basic physics knowledge and common-sense rules. A list of nuclear data problems which have been identified with help of these checking codes is also given.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory Training Capabilities (Possible Applications in the Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-04

    The briefing provides an overview of the training capabilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that can be applied to nonproliferation/responsible science education at nuclear institutes in the Former Soviet Union, as part of the programmatic effort under the Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention program (GIPP).

  15. Evaluation of Macroinvertebrate Communities and Habitat for Selected Stream Reaches at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.J. Henne; K.J. Buckley

    2005-08-12

    This is the second aquatic biological monitoring report generated by Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) Water Quality and Hydrology Group. The study has been conducted to generate impact-based assessments of habitat and water quality for LANL waterways. The monitoring program was designed to allow for the detection of spatial and temporal trends in water and habitat quality through ongoing, biannual monitoring of habitat characteristics and benthic aquatic macroinvertebrate communities at six key sites in Los Alamos, Sandia, Water, Pajarito, and Starmer's Gulch Canyons. Data were collected on aquatic habitat characteristics, channel substrate, and macroinvertebrate communities during 2001 and 2002. Aquatic habitat scores were stable between 2001 and 2002 at all locations except Starmer's Gulch and Pajarito Canyon, which had lower scores in 2002 due to low flow conditions. Channel substrate changes were most evident at the upper Los Alamos and Pajarito study reaches. The macroinvertebrate Stream Condition Index (SCI) indicated moderate to severe impairment at upper Los Alamos Canyon, slight to moderate impairment at upper Sandia Canyon, and little or no impairment at lower Sandia Canyon, Starmer's Gulch, and Pajarito Canyon. Habitat, substrate, and macroinvertebrate data from the site in upper Los Alamos Canyon indicated severe impacts from the Cerro Grande Fire of 2000. Impairment in the macroinvertebrate community at upper Sandia Canyon was probably due to effluent-dominated flow at that site. The minimal impairment SCI scores for the lower Sandia site indicated that water quality improved with distance downstream from the outfall at upper Sandia Canyon.

  16. Federal enclaves: The community culture of Department of Energy cities Livermore, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Patrick Kerry

    During the Second World War, the United States Government funded the research of nuclear fusion to create the first atomic weapons. To accomplish this task, the Manhattan Engineering District recruited scientists and engineers to remote sites in New Mexico, Tennessee, and Washington. During the five decades of the Cold War, the congressionally created Atomic Energy Commission, and later the Department of Energy (DOE), funded and operated numerous facilities throughout the United States. The mission of the facilities was to design and stockpile atomic weapons and to further the understanding of nuclear energy. This dissertation examines the influences of the United States federal government on three communities associated with these facilities, Los Alamos, New Mexico, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Livermore, California. As isolated secret cities, these environments each created complex community structures. This work identifies how, unlike other community settings, the influences of the federal government, both directly and indirectly, created distinctive patterns of behavior within the residents of each city. Examining these behaviors within the framework of the dissertation's chapters provides the necessary context to understand fully the community culture of these Department of Energy cities. This work addresses contemporary community settings in new ways. It approaches the topic broadly by examining five specific areas of community interaction: social, political, business and economic, educational, and ethical. Through the use of oral history methodology and techniques, the researcher captured significant information from respondents. This approach provides valuable insights to the behavior and interaction of the individual populations while revealing important insights all aspects of each town's community culture.

  17. The Characterization of Biotic and Abiotic Media Upgradient and Downgradient of the Los Alamos Canyon Weir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.R. Fresquez

    2006-01-15

    As per the Mitigation Action Plan for the Special Environmental Analysis of the actions taken in response to the Cerro Grande Fire, sediments, vegetation, and small mammals were collected directly up- and downgradient of the Los Alamos Canyon weir, a low-head sediment control structure located on the northeastern boundary of Los Alamos National Laboratory, to determine contaminant impacts, if any. All radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U) and trace elements (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Tl) in these media were low and most were below regional upper level background concentrations (mean plus three sigma). The very few constituents that were above regional background concentrations were far below screening levels (set from State and Federal standards) for the protection of the human food chain and the terrestrial environment.

  18. Keeping the Momentum and Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Robert Ernest [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dion, Heather M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dry, Donald E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kinman, William Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); LaMont, Stephen Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Podlesak, David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-22

    LANL has 70 years of experience in nuclear forensics and supports the community through a wide variety of efforts and leveraged capabilities: Expanding the understanding of nuclear forensics, providing training on nuclear forensics methods, and developing bilateral relationships to expand our understanding of nuclear forensic science. LANL remains highly supportive of several key organizations tasked with carrying forth the Nuclear Security Summit messages: IAEA, GICNT, and INTERPOL. Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements. Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material and environmental forensic characterization. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met. Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  19. Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Status report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkin, D.M.; Boring, A.M. [comps.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Center for Materials Science (CMS) from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991, and is the nineth such annual report. It has been a year of remarkable progress in building the programs of the Center. The extent of this progress is described in detail. The CMS was established to enhance the contribution of materials science and technology to the Laboratory`s defense, energy and scientific missions, and the Laboratory. In carrying out these responsibilities it has accepted four demanding missions: (1) Build a core group of highly rated, established materials scientists and solid state physicists. (2) Promote and support top quality, interdisciplinary materials research programs at Los Alamos. (3) Strengthen the interactions of materials science and Los Alamos with the external materials science community. and (4) Establish and maintain modern materials research facilities in a readily accessible, central location.

  20. Overview of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Inertial Confinement Fusion Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is focused on preparing for a National Ignition Facility. Target physics research is addressing specific issues identified for the Ignition Facility target, and materials experts are developing target fabrication techniques necessary for the advanced targets. We are also working with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the design of the National Ignition Facility target chamber. Los Alamos is also continuing to develop the KrF laser-fusion driver for ICF. We are modifying the Aurora laser to higher intensity and shorter pulses and are working with the Naval Research Laboratory on the development of the Nike KrF laser. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1994 quality program status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1996-03-01

    This status report is for calendar year 1994. It summarizes the annual activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP or Project) quality assurance program. By identifying the accomplishments of the quality program, a baseline is established that will assist in decision making, improve administrative controls and predictability, and allow us to annually identify adverse trends and to evaluate improvements. This is the fourth annual status report.

  2. Plan for increasing public participation in cleanup decisions for the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    This document describes a plan for involving the public in decisions related to cleaning up sites suspected of being contaminated with chemicals or radioactivity at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In this section we describe the purpose of the Environmental Remediation Project, our past efforts to communicate with the northern New Mexico community, and the events that brought about our realization that less traditional, more innovative approaches to public involvement are needed.

  3. Geochemistry of Background Sediment Samples at Technical Area 39, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric V. McDonald; Katherine Campbell; Patrick A. Longmire; Steven L. Reneau

    1998-11-01

    This report presents results of chemical analyses of 24 analytes in 16 background sediment samples collected from Ancho Canyon and Indio Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 39, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Preliminary upper tolerance limits (UTLS) for sediments are calculated from this data set but, because of the small sample size, these UTLs exceed the maximum values in the data set by up to 50'ZO and will require revision as more background sediment data are obtained.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory Meteorology Monitoring Program: 2016 Data Completeness/ Quality Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, David Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-15

    This report summarizes data completeness by tower and by instrument for 2016 and compares that data with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2015 standards. This report is designed to make data users aware of data completeness and any data quality issues. LANL meteorology monitoring goals include 95% completeness for all measurements. The ANSI 2015 standard requires 90% completeness for all measurements. This report documents instrument/tower issues as they impact data completeness.

  5. Characterization and immobilization of cesium-137 in soil at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ningping; Mason, C.F.V.; Turney, W.R.J.R.

    1996-06-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is a major contaminant in soils of Technical Area 21 (TA-21) and is mainly associated with soil particles {<=}2.00 mm. Cesium-137 was not leached by synthetic groundwater or acid rainwater. Soil erosion is a primary mechanism of {sup 137}Cs transport in TA-21. The methodology that controls soil particle runoff can prevent the transport of {sup 137}Cs.

  6. On-line performance calculations for the Los Alamos National Security and Resources Study Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, H.S.; Hedstrom, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The National Security and Resources Study Center at Los Alamos, New Mexico, has been heavily instrumented to permit monitoring of the performance of the solar heating and cooling system. The monitoring system includes a computer, which provides the capability for doing real-time engineering calculations. This capability permits data compression and allows the researcher to interact with the system and to see immediately the results of changing the system parameters.

  7. Transuranic waste assay instrumentation: new developments and directions at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, D.A.; Umbarger, C.J.; West, L.; Smith, W.J.; Cates, M.R.; Noel, B.W.; Honey, F.J.; Franks, L.A.; Pigg, J.L.; Trundle, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is developing assay instrumentation for the quantitative analysis of transuranic materials found in bulk solid wastes generated by Department of Energy facilities and by the commercial nuclear power industry. This also includes wastes generated in the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities and wastes generated during burial ground exhumation. The assay instrumentation will have a detection capability for the transuranics of less than 10 nCi of activity per gram of waste whenever practicable.

  8. Integrating the digital library puzzle: The library without walls at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luce, R. E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Current efforts at the Research Library, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to develop digital library services are described. A key principle of LANL`s approach to delivering library information is the integration of products into a common interface and the use of the Web as the medium of service provision. Products described include science databases such as the SciSearch at LANL and electronic journals. Project developments described have significant ramifications for delivering library services over the Internet.

  9. Preparation of fused chloride salts for use in pyrochemical plutonium recovery operations at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fife, K.W.; Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.; Williams, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    The Plutonium Metal Technology Group at Los Alamos routinely uses pyrochemical processes to produce and purify plutonium from impure sources. The basic processes (metal production, metal purification, and residue treatment) involve controlling oxidation and reduction reactions between plutonium and its compounds in molten salts. Current production methods are described, as well as traditional approaches and recent developments in the preparation of solvent salts for electrorefining, molten salt extraction, lean metal (pyroredox) purification, and direct oxide reduction.

  10. 2003 Los Alamos National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-04

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Los Alamos National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  11. The Criticality Safety Information Resource Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, B.D.; Meade, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pruvost, N.L. [Galaxy Computer Services, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The mission of the Criticality Safety Information Resource Center (CSIRC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the preservation of primary documentation supporting criticality safety. In many cases, but not all, this primary documentation consists of experimentalists` logbooks. Experience has shown that the logbooks and other primary information are vulnerable to being discarded. Destruction of these logbooks results in a permanent loss to the criticality safety community.

  12. Forest surveys and wildfire assessment in the Los Alamos Region; 1998-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randy G. Balice; Jay D. Miller; Brian P. Oswald; Carl Edminster; Stephen R. Yool

    2000-06-01

    To better understand the structural characteristics of vegetation in the Los Alamos region, the authors conducted two years of field surveys and associated analyses. This report introduces field methods, lists the summarized field data, and discusses the results of preliminary spatial analyses. During 1998 and 1999, seventy-six terrestrial plant communities were sampled for topographic characteristics, soil surface features, and vegetational conditions. A nested, randomized design was used to select the plot locations and to guide the sampling of the plot. The samples included a variety of fuel types, including surface fuels and ground fuels, shrubby and small tree fuels, and overstory fuels. Species composition data were also collected. The fuels data were summarized by vegetation type and evaluated for the topographic and spatial relationships of major field categories. The results of these analyses indicate that many of the fuels categories depend on topographic factors in a linear and curvilinear fashion. In particular, middle elevations within the Los Alamos region tend to support more surface fuels and ground fuels, whereas large-diameter trees are most dense at higher elevations and are specific to community types at these elevations. Small-diameter trees occur in more dense stands at lower and middle elevations and on specific soil and topographic conditions. Areas that burned in 1954 were found to be relatively free of fuels. The implications are that the western portions of the Los Alamos region are at risk from wildfire during dry, summer periods.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1992 quality program status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, S.L.; Burningham, A.; Chavez, P. [and others

    1994-03-01

    This status report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project`s quality assurance program for calendar year 1992. The report includes major sections on Program Activities and Trend Analysis. Program Activities are discussed periodically at quality meetings. The most significant issue addressed in 1992 has been the timely revision of quality administrative procedures. The procedure revision process was streamlined from 55 steps to 7. The number of forms in procedures was reduced by 38%, and the text reduced by 29%. This allowed revision in 1992 of almost half of all implementing procedures. The time necessary to complete the revision process (for a procedure) was reduced from 11 months to 3 months. Other accomplishments include the relaxation of unnecessarily strict training requirements, requiring quality assurance reviews only from affected organizations, and in general simplifying work processes. All members of the YMP received training to the new Orientation class Eleven other training classed were held. Investigators submitted 971 records to the Project and only 37 were rejected. The software program has 115 programs approved for quality-affecting work. The Project Office conducted 3 audits and 1 survey of Los Alamos activities. We conducted 14 audits and 4 surveys. Eight corrective action reports were closed, leaving only one open. Internally, 22 deficiencies were recognized. This is a decrease from 65 in 1991. Since each deficiency requires about 2 man weeks to resolve, the savings are significant. Problems with writing acceptable deficiency reports have essentially disappeared. Trend reports for 1992 were examined and are summarized herein. Three adverse trends have been closed; one remaining adverse trend will be closed when the affected procedures are revised. The number of deficiencies issued to Los Alamos compared to other participants is minimal.

  14. Geological site characterization for the proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reneau, S.L.; Raymond, R. Jr. [eds.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the results of geological site characterization studies conducted from 1992 to 1994 on Pajarito Mesa for a proposed Los Alamos National Laboratory Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (MWDF). The MWDF is being designed to receive mixed waste (waste containing both hazardous and radioactive components) generated during Environmental Restoration Project cleanup activities at Los Alamos. As of 1995, there is no Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted disposal site for mixed waste at the Laboratory, and construction of the MWDF would provide an alternative to transport of this material to an off-site location. A 2.5 km long part of Pajarito Mesa was originally considered for the MWDF, extending from an elevation of about 2150 to 2225 m (7060 to 7300 ft) in Technical Areas (TAs) 15, 36, and 67 in the central part of the Laboratory, and planning was later concentrated on the western area in TA-67. The mesa top lies about 60 to 75 m (200 to 250 ft) above the floor of Pajarito Canyon on the north, and about 30 m (100 ft) above the floor of Threemile Canyon on the south. The main aquifer used as a water supply for the Laboratory and for Los Alamos County lies at an estimated depth of about 335 m (1100 ft) below the mesa. The chapters of this report focus on surface and near-surface geological studies that provide a basic framework for siting of the MWDF and for conducting future performance assessments, including fulfillment of specific regulatory requirements. This work includes detailed studies of the stratigraphy, mineralogy, and chemistry of the bedrock at Pajarito Mesa by Broxton and others, studies of the geological structure and of mesa-top soils and surficial deposits by Reneau and others, geologic mapping and studies of fracture characteristics by Vaniman and Chipera, and studies of potential landsliding and rockfall along the mesa-edge by Reneau.

  15. Igniting the Light Elements: The Los Alamos Thermonuclear Weapon Project, 1942-1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, Anne C. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The American system of nuclear weapons research and development was conceived and developed not as a result of technological determinism, but by a number of individual architects who promoted the growth of this large technologically-based complex. While some of the technological artifacts of this system, such as the fission weapons used in World War II, have been the subject of many historical studies, their technical successors--fusion (or hydrogen) devices--are representative of the largely unstudied highly secret realms of nuclear weapons science and engineering. In the postwar period a small number of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's staff and affiliates were responsible for theoretical work on fusion weapons, yet the program was subject to both the provisions and constraints of the US Atomic Energy Commission, of which Los Alamos was a part. The Commission leadership's struggle to establish a mission for its network of laboratories, least of all to keep them operating, affected Los Alamos's leaders' decisions as to the course of weapons design and development projects. Adapting Thomas P. Hughes's ''large technological systems'' thesis, I focus on the technical, social, political, and human problems that nuclear weapons scientists faced while pursuing the thermonuclear project, demonstrating why the early American thermonuclear bomb project was an immensely complicated scientific and technological undertaking. I concentrate mainly on Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Theoretical, or T, Division, and its members' attempts to complete an accurate mathematical treatment of the ''Super''--the most difficult problem in physics in the postwar period--and other fusion weapon theories. Although tackling a theoretical problem, theoreticians had to address technical and engineering issues as well. I demonstrate the relative value and importance of H-bomb research over time in the postwar era to

  16. Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles Dean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Keller, David Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thompson, Brent E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory’s (LANL) Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan (HMP) fulfills a commitment made to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the “Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Mitigation Action Plan” (DOE 1996). The HMP received concurrence from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in 1999 (USFWS consultation numbers 2-22-98-I-336 and 2-22-95-I-108). This 2017 update retains the management guidelines from the 1999 HMP for listed species, and updates some descriptive information.

  17. Geochemical Processes Controlling Chromium Transport in the Vadose Zone and Regional Aquifer, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, P.; Ding, M.; Rearick, M.; Vaniman, D.; Katzman, D.

    2008-12-01

    The environmental aqueous geochemistry of Cr is of considerable interest to physical scientists and toxicologists in quantifying the fate and transport of this metal in surface and subsurface environments. Chromium(VI) solutions were released from cooling towers to a stream channel within Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM from 1956 to 1971. These solutions have migrated 293 m depth through the vadose zone, containing several saturated zones, to the regional water table. Concentrations of total dissolved Cr, mainly as Cr(VI), in the regional aquifer range between 0.17 to 8.46 mM. The regional aquifer is characterized by calcium-sodium-bicarbonate solution, contains dissolved oxygen (0.09 to 0.22 mM), and has a circumneutral pH (6.8 to 8.3). Geochemical processes controlling the fate and transport of Cr in groundwater at Los Alamos include a combination of adsorption and precipitation reactions within aquifer systems. Vadose zone material containing hydrous ferric oxide, smectite, silica glass, and calcite widely range in their ability to adsorb Cr(VI) under basic pH conditions. Overall, the vadose zone at Los Alamos is relatively oxidizing, however, basalt flows are locally reducing with respect to Fe. Ferrous iron concentrated within the Cerros del Rio basalt has been shown through batch experiments to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) resulting in precipitation of chromium(III) hydroxide. Regional aquifer material, consisting of silicates, oxides, and calcite, vary in the amount of Fe(II) available in reactive minerals to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The results of our studies (1) directly assess the relationship between mineralogical characterization and transport behavior of Cr using site-specific hydrogeologic material and (2) provide site-specific adsorption and precipitation parameters obtained through the experiments to refine the fate and transport modeling of Cr within the vadose zone and regional aquifer. Natural attenuation of Cr at Los

  18. Nondestructive assay instruments for the DYMAC program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    A real-time, nuclear materials control system, called DYMAC, will begin operation in November at the new plutonium processing facility at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The DYMAC system relies on three types of nondestructive assay instruments to control nuclear material dynamically: weighing instruments, neutron counters, and gamma counters. Remoted electronic balances and load cells weigh the nuclear material in process. DYMAC uses two types of neutron counters, thermal-neutron coincidence counters and fast-neutron coincidence counters. There are two types of gamma counters, one assays liquids and another solids; both are gamma spectroscopy instruments which use germanium detectors.

  19. MANHATTAN DISTRICT HISTORY PROJECT Y THE LOS ALAMOS PROJECT VOL. II AUGUST 1945 THROUGH DECEMBER 1946

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truslow, E. C.; Smith, R. C.

    1961-12-01

    THESE TWO VOLUMES CONSTITUTE A RECORD OF THE TECHNICAL, ADMINISTRATIVE , AND POLICY-MAKING ACTIVITIES OF THE LOS ALAMOS PROJECT (PROJECT Y) FROM ITS INCEPTION UNDER THE MANHATTAN DISTRICT THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ATOMIC BOMB (VOL. I), AND DURING THE PERIOD FOLLOWING THE END OF WORLD WAR II UNTIL THE MANHATTAN DISTRICT RELINQUISHED CONTROL TO THE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION AS OF JANUARY 1947 (VOL. II). ALTHOUGH SEC URITY REGULATIONS HAVE REQUIRED SOME DELETIONS IN THE ORIGINAL TEXT OF THE TWO VOLUMES, EVERY EFFORT HAS BEEN MADE TO RETAIN THE ORIGINAL LANGUGAGE AND EXPERSSIONS OF THE AUTHORS.

  20. MANHATTAN DISTRICT HISTORY PROJECT Y THE LOS ALAMOS PROJECT VOL. I INCEPTION UNTIL AUGUST 1945

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, D.

    1961-12-01

    THESE TWO VOLUMES CONSTITUTE A RECORD OF THE TECHNICAL, ADMINISTRATIVE , AND POLICY-MAKING ACTIVITIES OF THE LOS ALAMOS PROJECT (PROJECT Y) FROM ITS INCEPTION UNDER THE MANHATTAN DISTRICT THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ATOMIC BOMB (VOL. I), AND DURING THE PERIOD FOLLOWING THE END OF WORLD WAR II UNTIL THE MANHATTAN DISTRICT RELINQUISHED CONTROL TO THE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION AS OF JANUARY 1947 (VOL. II). ALTHOUGH SECURITY REGULATIONS HAVE REQUIRED SOME DELETIONS IN THE ORIGINAL TEXT OF THE TWO VOLUMES, EVERY EFFORT HAS BEEN MADE TO RETAIN THE ORIGINAL LANGUAGE AND EXPRESSIONS OF THE AUTHORS.

  1. Los Alamos experimental capabilities: Ancho Canyon high explosives and pulse power facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    This document outlines the Ancho Canyon testing facility comprehensive material characterization capabilities. These include the high explosive (HE) firing sites, a full complement of gun facilities, and variety of pulse power capacitor bank systems of various energies. The explosive fabrication capability at Los Alamos allows the design and testing of unique HE experimental assemblies. Depending on the hydrodynamic requirements, these explosive systems can vary widely in cost. Years of experience have enabled the development of a comprehensive set of diagnostics to monitor these experiments.

  2. Los Alamos experimental capabilities: Ancho Canyon high explosives and pulse power facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C.E.

    1993-02-01

    This document outlines the Ancho Canyon testing facility comprehensive material characterization capabilities. These include the high explosive (HE) firing sites, a full complement of gun facilities, and variety of pulse power capacitor bank systems of various energies. The explosive fabrication capability at Los Alamos allows the design and testing of unique HE experimental assemblies. Depending on the hydrodynamic requirements, these explosive systems can vary widely in cost. Years of experience have enabled the development of a comprehensive set of diagnostics to monitor these experiments.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory Northern New Mexico Seismic Network and seismicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cash, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Northern New Mexico Seismic Network (NNMSN) is described and the research conducted there briefly discussed. Its purpose is to: (1) monitor seismic activity that can pose a risk to the Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) monitor induced seismicity that might result from the Laboratory's experimental activities, such as the Hot Dry Rock project; (3) provide data for research in test ban verification; and (4) provide data for fundamental research in seismology, tectonics, and geologic structure of the Rio Grande Rift and the Jemez Mountains. (ACR)

  4. Climate Change and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Adaptation Challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Kimberly M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hjeresen, Dennis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Silverman, Josh [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been adapting to climate change related impacts that have been occurring on decadal time scales. The region where LANL is located has been subject to a cascade of climate related impacts: drought, devastating wildfires, and historic flooding events. Instead of buckling under the pressure, LANL and the surrounding communities have integrated climate change mitigation strategies into their daily operations and long-term plans by increasing coordination and communication between the Federal, State, and local agencies in the region, identifying and aggressively managing forested areas in need of near-term attention, addressing flood control and retention issues, and more.

  5. Initial electron-beam characterizations for the Los Alamos APEX Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Apgar, S.A.; Feldman, D.W.; O' Shea, P.G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W. (Naval Surface Warfare Center, Silver Spring, MD (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The ongoing upgrade of the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Facility involves the addition of a photoelectric injector (PEI) and acceleration capability to about 40 MeV. The electron-beam and high-speed diagnostics provide key measurements of charge, beam position and profile, divergence emittance, energy (centroid, spread, slew, and extraction efficiency), micropulse duration, and phase stability. Preliminary results on the facility include optical transition radiation interferometer measurements of divergence (1 to 2 mrad), FEL extraction efficiency (0.6 {plus minus} 0.2%), and drive laser phase stability (< 2 ps (rms)). 10 refs.

  6. Initial electron-beam characterizations for the Los Alamos APEX Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Apgar, S.A.; Feldman, D.W.; O`Shea, P.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The ongoing upgrade of the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Facility involves the addition of a photoelectric injector (PEI) and acceleration capability to about 40 MeV. The electron-beam and high-speed diagnostics provide key measurements of charge, beam position and profile, divergence emittance, energy (centroid, spread, slew, and extraction efficiency), micropulse duration, and phase stability. Preliminary results on the facility include optical transition radiation interferometer measurements of divergence (1 to 2 mrad), FEL extraction efficiency (0.6 {plus_minus} 0.2%), and drive laser phase stability (< 2 ps [rms]). 10 refs.

  7. Trails Management at LANL - A Presentation to the Los Alamos County Parks and Recreation Board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pava, Daniel Seth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory’s (LANL) trail management program goals include reduce risk of damage and injury to property, human life, and health, and sensitive natural and cultural resources from social trail use at LANL, facilitate the establishment of a safe viable network of linked trails, maintain security of LANL operations, and many more, respect the wishes of local Pueblos, adapt trail use to changing conditions in a responsive manner, and maintain the recreational functionality of the DOE lands. There are approximately 30 miles of LANL trails. Some are open to the public and allow bicycles, horses, hikers, and runners. Know the rules of the trails to stay safe.

  8. Research on fission induced plasmas and nuclear pumped lasers at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmick, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    A program of research on gaseous uranium and uranium plasmas is being conducted at The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory under sponsorship of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The objective of this work is twofold: (1) to demonstrate the proof of principle of a gaseous uranium fueled reactor, and (2) pursue fundamental research on nuclear pumped lasers. The relevancy of the two parallel programs is embodied in the possibility of a high-performance uranium plasma reactor being used as the power supply for a nuclear pumped laser system. The accomplishments in the two above fields are summarized

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Project Publications (1979-1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhala, E.R.; Klein, S.H. [comps.

    1997-06-01

    This over-350 title publication list reflects the accomplishments of Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project researchers, who, since 1979, have been conducting multidisciplinary research to help determine if Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is a suitable site for a high-level waste repository. The titles can be accessed in two ways: by year, beginning with 1996 and working back to 1979, and by subject area: mineralogy/petrology/geology, volcanism, radionuclide solubility/ground-water chemistry; radionuclide sorption and transport; modeling/validation/field studies; summary/status reports, and quality assurance.

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Project publications (1979--1994)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowker, L.M.; Espinosa, M.L.; Klein, S.H. [comps.

    1995-11-01

    This over-300 title publication list reflects the accomplishments of Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project researchers, who, since 1979, have been conducting multidisciplinary research to help determine if Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is a suitable site for a high-level waste repository. The titles can be accessed in two ways: by year, beginning with 1994 and working back to 1979, and by subject area: mineralogy/petrology/geology, volcanism, radionuclide solubility/groundwater chemistry; radionuclide sorption and transport; modeling/validation/field studies; summary/status reports, and quality assurance.

  11. New Mexicans` images and perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Winter, 1992--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-01-01

    This report uses survey data to profile New Mexico residents` images and perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The survey results are the responses of a representative, stratified random sample of 992 New Mexico households to a set of questions asked in October, 1992. The data allow statistical inference to the general population`s responses to the same set of questions at the time the survey was administered. The results provide an overview of New Mexico residents` current images and perceptions of the Laboratory. The sample margin of error is plus or minus 3.5% at the 95% confidence level.

  12. An analysis of background noise in selected canyons of Los Alamos County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huchton, K.; Koch, S.W.; Robinson, R.

    1997-10-01

    The authors recorded background noise levels in six canyons within Los Alamos County in order to establish a baseline for future comparisons and to discover what noises animals are exposed to. Noise level measurements were taken within each canyon, beginning at an established starting point and at one-mile intervals up to four miles. The primary source of noise above 55 dBA was vehicular traffic. One clap of thunder provided the highest recorded noise level (76 dBA). In general, the level of noise, once away from highways and parking lots, was well below 60 dBA.

  13. Modelling surface motion and spall at the Nevada Test Site. Los Alamos Source Region Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    App, F.N.; Brunish, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    Spallation of the ground surface accompanies all underground nuclear explosions of significant yield. This report discusses computer modelling used to investigate the physical processes that govern spallation and the amplitude and wavelength of motion at the free surface under a variety of conditions. Four events are selected: MERLIN which was conducted in desert alluvium; HEARTS which was conducted in tuff beneath the water table in Yucca Flat; TOWANDA which was conducted beneath the water table on Pahute Mesa; and HOUSTON which was conducted above the water table in very dense rock and Pahute Mesa. These span the range of test environments for Los Alamos underground nuclear tests.

  14. Environmental Assessment for Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1997-10-07

    As part of its initiative to fulfill its responsibilities to provide support for the incorporated County of Los Alamos (the County) as an Atomic Energy Community, while simultaneously fulfilling its obligations to enhance the self-sufficiency of the County under authority of the Atomic Energy Community Act of 1955 and the Defense Authorization Act, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease undeveloped land in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to the County for private sector use as a research park. The Proposed Action is intended to accelerate economic development activities within the County by creating regional employment opportunities through offering federal land for private sector lease and use. As a result of the proposed land lease, any government expenditures for providing infrastructure to the property would be somewhat supplemented by tenant purchase of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) expertise in research and development activities. The presence of a research park within LANL boundaries is expected to allow private sector tenants of the park to be able to quickly and efficiently call upon LANL scientific expertise and facility and equipment capabilities as part of their own research operations and LANL research personnel, in turn, would be challenged in areas complementary to their federally funded research. In this way a symbiotic relationship would be enjoyed by both parties while simultaneously promoting economic development for the County through new job opportunities at the Research Park and at LANL, new indirect support opportunities for the community at large, and through payment of the basic building space leases. A ''sliding-scale'' approach (DOE 1993) is the basis for the analysis of effects in this Environmental Assessment (EA). That is, certain aspects of the Proposed Action have a greater potential for creating adverse environmental effects than others; therefore, they are discussed in greater detail in this EA

  15. Statistical analyses of the background distribution of groundwater solutes, Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longmire, Patrick A.; Goff, Fraser; Counce, D. A. (Dale A.); Ryti, R. T. (Randall T.); Dale, Michael R.; Britner, Kelly A

    2004-01-01

    Background or baseline water chemistry data and information are required to distingu ish between contaminated and non-contaminated waters for environmental investigations conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (referred to as the Laboratory). The term 'background' refers to natural waters discharged by springs or penetrated by wells that have not been contaminated by LANL or other municipal or industrial activities, and that are representative of groundwater discharging from their respective aquifer material. These investigations are conducted as part of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project, Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), Laboratory Surveillance Program, the Hydrogeologic Workplan, and the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS). This poster provides a comprehensive, validated database of inorganic, organic, stable isotope, and radionuclide analyses of up to 136 groundwater samples collected from 15 baseline springs and wells located in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. The region considered in this investigation extends from the western edge of the Jemez Mountains eastward to the Rio Grande and from Frijoles Canyon northward to Garcia Canyon. Figure 1 shows the fifteen stations sampled for this investigation. The sampling stations and associated aquifer types are summarized in Table 1.

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic waste quality assurance project plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-14

    This Transuranic (TRU) Waste Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) serves as the quality management plan for the characterization of transuranic waste in preparation for certification and transportation. The Transuranic Waste Characterization/Certification Program (TWCP) consists of personnel who sample and analyze waste, validate and report data; and provide project management, quality assurance, audit and assessment, and records management support, all in accordance with established requirements for disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. This QAPjP addresses how the TWCP meets the quality requirements of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and the technical requirements of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The TWCP characterizes and certifies retrievably stored and newly generated TRU waste using the waste selection, testing, sampling, and analytical techniques and data quality objectives (DQOs) described in the QAPP, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Certification Plan (Certification Plan), and the CST Waste Management Facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria and Certification [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)]. At the present, the TWCP does not address remote-handled (RH) waste.

  17. Los Alamos County Fire Department LAFD: TA-55 PF-4 Facility Familiarization Tour, OJT 55260

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Victor Stephen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-13

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) will conduct familiarization tours for Los Alamos County Fire Department (LAFD) personnel at the Plutonium Facility (PF-4) at Technical Area (TA)-55. These familiarization tours are official LANL business; the purpose of these tours is to orient the firefighters to the facility so that they can respond efficiently and quickly to a variety of emergency situations. This orientation includes the ingress and egress of the area and buildings, layout and organization of the facility, evacuation procedures and assembly points, and areas of concern within the various buildings at the facility. LAFD firefighters have the skills and abilities to perform firefighting operations and other emergency response tasks that cannot be provided by other LANL personnel who have the required clearance level. This handout provides details of the information, along with maps and diagrams, to be presented during the familiarization tours. The handout will be distributed to the trainees at the time of the tour. A corresponding checklist will also be used as guidance during the familiarization tours to ensure that all required information is presented to LAFD personnel.

  18. Feral Cattle in the White Rock Canyon Reserve at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hansen, Leslie A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-27

    At the request of the Los Alamos Field Office (the Field Office), Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists placed remote-triggered wildlife cameras in and around the mouth of Ancho Canyon in the White Rock Canyon Reserve (the Reserve) to monitor use by feral cattle. The cameras were placed in October 2012 and retrieved in January 2013. Two cameras were placed upstream in Ancho Canyon away from the Rio Grande along the perennial flows from Ancho Springs, two cameras were placed at the north side of the mouth to Ancho Canyon along the Rio Grande, and two cameras were placed at the south side of the mouth to Ancho Canyon along the Rio Grande. The cameras recorded three different individual feral cows using this area as well as a variety of local native wildlife. This report details our results and issues associated with feral cattle in the Reserve. Feral cattle pose significant risks to human safety, impact cultural and biological resources, and affect the environmental integrity of the Reserve. Regional stakeholders have communicated to the Field Office that they support feral cattle removal.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, D.H.

    1995-02-01

    During the 1994 summer institute NTEP teachers worked in coordination with LANL and the Los Alamos Middle School and Mountain Elementary School to gain experience in communicating on-line, to gain further information from the Internet and in using electronic Bulletin Board Systems (BBSs) to exchange ideas with other teachers. To build on their telecommunications skills, NTEP teachers participated in the International Telecommunications In Education Conference (Tel*ED `94) at the Albuquerque Convention Center on November 11 & 12, 1994. They attended the multimedia keynote address, various workshops highlighting many aspects of educational telecommunications skills, and the Telecomm Rodeo sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Rodeo featured many presentations by Laboratory personnel and educational institutions on ways in which telecommunications technologies can be use din the classroom. Many were of the `hands-on` type, so that teachers were able to try out methods and equipment and evaluate their usefulness in their own schools and classrooms. Some of the presentations featured were the Geonet educational BBS system, the Supercomputing Challenge, and the Sunrise Project, all sponsored by LANL; the `CU-seeMe` live video software, various simulation software packages, networking help, and many other interesting and useful exhibits.

  20. Floodplain statement of findings for corrective actions in Potrillo Canyon technical area-36, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, David Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-18

    In 2014, baseline storm water monitoring samples for Potrillo Canyon Sample Management Area at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) exceeded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Individual Permit No. NM0030759 target action level (TAL) of 15 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) for gross-alpha radioactivity (393 pCi/L) and a TAL of 30 pCi/L for radium-226 and radium-228 (95.9 pCi/L). Consequently, erosion control measures within the management area are proposed to minimize sediment migration, a corrective action under the permit that is a requirement of the New Mexico Environment Department consent decree and a good management practice to limit off-site sediment migration. The area proposed for erosion controls consists of portions of Technical Area 36 that were used as firing sites primarily involving high explosives (HE) and metal (e.g., depleted uranium, lead, copper, aluminum, and steel), small-explosives experiments and burn pits (burn pits were used for burning and disposal of test debris). In addition, underground explosive tests at an approximate depth of 100 feet were also conducted. These watershed-based storm water controls will focus on addressing erosion occurring within the floodplain through mitigating and reducing both current and future channelization and head cutting.

  1. Waste processing cost recovery at Los Alamos National Laboratory--analysis and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, Steven Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is implementing full cost recovery for waste processing in fiscal year 2009 (FY2009), after a transition year in FY2008. Waste processing cost recovery has been implemented in various forms across the nuclear weapons complex and in corporate America. The fundamental reasoning of sending accurate price signals to waste generators is economically sound, and leads to waste minimization and reduced waste expense over time. However, Los Alamos faces significant implementation challenges because of its status as a government-owned, contractor-operated national scientific institution with a diverse suite of experimental and environmental cleanup activities, and the fact that this represents a fundamental change in how waste processing is viewed by the institution. This paper describes the issues involved during the transition to cost recovery and the ultimate selection of the business model. Of the six alternative cost recovery models evaluated, the business model chosen to be implemented in FY2009 is Recharge Plus Generators Pay Distributed Direct. Under this model, all generators who produce waste must pay a distributed direct share associated with their specific waste type to use a waste processing capability. This cost share is calculated using the distributed direct method on the fixed cost only, i.e., the fixed cost share is based on each program's forecast proportion of the total Los Alamos volume forecast of each waste type. (Fixed activities are those required to establish the waste processing capability, i.e., to make the process ready, permitted, certified, and prepared to handle the first unit ofwaste. Therefore, the fixed cost ends at the point just before waste begins 'to be processed. The activities to actually process the waste are considered variable.) The volume of waste actually sent for processing is charged a unit cost based solely on the variable cost of disposing of that waste. The total cost recovered each

  2. An Overview of the Los Alamos Program on Asteroid Mitigation by a Nuclear Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R.; Gisler, G. R.; Plesko, C. S.; Ferguson, J.

    2014-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is standing up a new program to address the mitigation of a potentially hazardous objects (PHO) by using nuclear explosives. A series of efforts at Los Alamos have been working this problem for the last few years in an informal fashion. We now have a funded program to dedicate time to this important mission. The goal of our project is to study the effectiveness of using a nuclear explosive to mitigate (alter orbit or destroy) an PHO on an Earth crossing path. We are also pursuing studies of impact hazards should the international leadership decide not to organize a mission for active mitigation of a PHO. Such impact hazards are characterized as local, regional or global. Impact hazards include: a direct hit in an urban area (potentially catastrophic but highly unlikely); the generation a significant tsunami from an ocean impact close to a coastline and regional and global effects from medium to large impactors. Previous studies at Los Alamos have looked at 2D and 3D simulations in the deep ocean from large bolides, as well as impacts that have global consequences. More recent work has included radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of momentum transfer (and enhancement) from a low energy (10 kt) stand-off source, as well as surface and subsurface high energy explosions (100 kt - 10 Mt) for example PHOs. The current program will carefully look at two main aspects of using a standoff nuclear source: 1) a computational study for the optimum height-of-burst (HOB) of a stand-off burst using our best energy coupling techniques for both neutrons and x-rays; and 2) as a function of the nuclear energy produced and the HOB what is the optimum energy field: neutrons or x-rays. This team is also working with NNSA and NASA Goddard to compare numerical results for these complicated simulations on a well defined series of test problems involving both kinetic impactors and stand-off nuclear energy sources. Results will be shown by the co-authors on

  3. Real-time alpha monitoring of a radioactive liquid waste stream at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.D.; Whitley, C.R.; Rawool-Sullivan, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This poster display concerns the development, installation, and testing of a real-time radioactive liquid waste monitor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The detector system was designed for the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility so that influent to the plant could be monitored in real time. By knowing the activity of the influent, plant operators can better monitor treatment, better segregate waste (potentially), and monitor the regulatory compliance of users of the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System. The detector system uses long-range alpha detection technology, which is a nonintrusive method of characterization that determines alpha activity on the liquid surface by measuring the ionization of ambient air. Extensive testing has been performed to ensure long-term use with a minimal amount of maintenance. The final design was a simple cost-effective alpha monitor that could be modified for monitoring influent waste streams at various points in the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System.

  4. Extrinsic and intrinsic complexities of the Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearse, R.C.; Longmire, V.L.; Roberts, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of the data obtained in one year of plutonium accounting at Los Alamos reveals significant complexity. Much of this complexity arises from the complexity of the processes themselves. Additional complexity is induced by errors in the data entry process. It is important to note that there is no evidence that this complexity is adversely affecting the accounting in the plant. We have been analyzing transaction data from fiscal year 1983 processing. This study involved 62,595 transactions. The data have been analyzed using the relational database program INGRES on a VAX 11/780 computer. This software allows easy manipulation of the original data and subsets drawn from it. We have been attempting for several years to understand the global features of the TA-55 accounting data. This project has underscored several of the system's complexities. Examples that will be reported here include audit trails, lot-name multiplicity, etc.

  5. Extrinsic and intrinsic complexities of the Los Alamos plutonium processing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearse, R.C.; Roberts, N.J.; Longmire, V.L.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of the data obtained in one year of plutonium accounting at Los Alamos reveals significant complexity. Much of this complexity arises from the complexity of the processes themselves. Additional complexity is induced by errors in the data entry process. It is important to note that there is no evidence that this complexity is adversely affecting the accounting in the plant. The authors have been analyzing transaction data from fiscal year 1983 processing. This study involved 62,595 transactions. The data have been analyzed using the relational database program INGRES on a VAX 11/780 computer. This software allows easy manipulation of the original data and subsets drawn from it. The authors have been attempting for several years to understand the global features of the TA-55 accounting data. This project has underscored several of the system's complexities.

  6. Comparison of Uncertainty of Two Precipitation Prediction Models at Los Alamos National Lab Technical Area 54

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shield, Stephen Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Meteorological inputs are an important part of subsurface flow and transport modeling. The choice of source for meteorological data used as inputs has significant impacts on the results of subsurface flow and transport studies. One method to obtain the meteorological data required for flow and transport studies is the use of weather generating models. This paper compares the difference in performance of two weather generating models at Technical Area 54 of Los Alamos National Lab. Technical Area 54 is contains several waste pits for low-level radioactive waste and is the site for subsurface flow and transport studies. This makes the comparison of the performance of the two weather generators at this site particularly valuable.

  7. MANHATTAN: The View From Los Alamos of History's Most Secret Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Alan Brady [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-22

    This presentation covers the political and scientific events leading up to the creation of the Manhattan Project. The creation of the Manhattan Project’s three most significant sites--Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Hanford--is also discussed. The lecture concludes by exploring the use of the atomic bombs at the end of World War II. The presentation slides include three videos. The first is a short clip of the 100-ton Test. The 100-Ton Test was history’s largest measured blast at that point in time; it was a pre-test for Trinity, the world’s first nuclear detonation. The second clip features views of Trinity followed a short statement by the Laboratory’s first director, J. Robert Oppenheimer. The final clip shows Norris Bradbury talking about arms control.

  8. Status of the Ultracold Neutron Source at Los Alamos National Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, R.

    2007-10-01

    The ultracold neutron (UCN) source at Los Alamos (LANL) is currently in its third year of operation. High energy neutrons are produced via spallation from the LANSCE 800 MeV proton beam directed onto a tungsten target. These neutrons are then reflected and partially moderated in a Be ``flux trap'' (surrounded also by a layer of graphite), within which is located a cold polyethylene moderator. A small percentage of the cold neutrons are downscatttered within solid deuterium to colder temperatures (1-4 mK) and are then guided to the experimental area through 4-in diameter stainless steel guides. Modifications were made to the source for the 2006 and 2007 run cycles to increase UCN production. This talk will give an overview of the LANL UCN source, it's current status, and results from the 2006 and 2007 source test runs.

  9. Preliminary modeling of moisture movement in the tuff beneath Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddis, A.M. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Hydrology

    1992-08-05

    An area of upper/middle Mortandad Canyon on the Los Alamos National Laboratory is modeled in cross-section. UNSAT2, a finite element model (FEM) is used to predict moisture movement. Hydraulic characteristics of the tuff are described by van Genuchten parameters determined from laboratory tests on cores taken from a borehole within the cross-section. Material properties are distributed horizontal planar in space to cover the solution domain with required initial conditions. An estimate of seepage flux from a thin perched alluvial aquifer into the upper surface of the tuff is taken from a lumped parameter model. Moisture redistribution for a ponded boundary condition and a larger flux is investigated. A composite simulation using material properties from two separate coreholes is also evaluated.

  10. Workshop on stability in superconducting magnets, Los Alamos, New Mexico, July 25--29, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Rogers, J.D. (comps.)

    1978-06-01

    The week-long Workshop on Stability in Superconducting Magnets sponsored by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory was a delightful technical success. Experts in theory and practice from all areas of the superconducting community met to discuss the intricacies of the stability problem. Detailed theory, recent data, computer interpretations of both, and engineering or design solutions to assure stability were presented. Emphasis of the workshop was mostly on the aspects of heat transfer necessary to promote stability and recovery. For the use of the attendees we have compiled Martin Wilson's talk of July 31; several summaries of the main sessions, as presented by rapporteurs on August 4; brief synopses of some of the working group sessions; a conference review by Wilson; and a list of attendees.

  11. Optical transition radiation measurements for the Los Alamos and Boeing Free-Electron Laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Feldman, D.W.; Apgar, S.A.; Calsten, B.E.; Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) measurements of the electron-beam emittance have been performed at a location just before the wiggler in the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. Beam profiles and beam divergence patterns from a single macropulse were recorded simultaneously using two intensified charge-injection device (CID) television cameras and an optical beamsplitter. Both single-foil OTR and two-foil OTR interference experiments were performed. Preliminary results are compared to a reference variable quadrupole, single screen technique. New aspects of using OTR properties for pointing the e-beam on the FEL oscillator axis, as well as measuring e-beam emittance are addressed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Remedial action at the Acid/Pueblo Canyon site, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-10-01

    The Acid/Pueblo Canyon site (TA-45) was designated in 1976 for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). During the period 1943 to 1964 untreated and treated liquid wastes generated by nuclear weapons research activities at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) were discharged into the two canyons. A survey of the site conducted by LASL in 1976 to 1977 identified two areas where radiological contamination exceeded criteria levels. The selected remedial action was based on extensive radiological characterization and comprehensive engineering assessments and comprised the excavation and disposal of 390 yd/sup 3/ of contaminated soil and rock. This document describes the background to the remedial action, the parties involved in administering and executing it, the chronology of the work, verification of the adequacy of the remedial action, and the cost incurred. 14 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  13. Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, Steven Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-26

    Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a new Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed lowlevel, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's TA-54 Area G. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to ten sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. Three passes of the analysis were required to assess different site scenarios: 1) a fully consolidated CWC with both transfer/storage and LL W disposal in one location (45 acre minimum), 2) CWC transfer/storage only (12 acre minimum), and 3) LLW disposal only (33 acre minimum). The top site choice for all three options is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. TA-54 East, Zone 4 also deserves consideration as a LLW disposal site.

  14. Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, David Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hathcock, Charles Dean [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-11-17

    Los Alamos National Laboratory’s (LANL) Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan (HMP) fulfills a commitment made to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the “Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Mitigation Action Plan” (DOE 1996). The HMP received concurrence from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in 1999 (USFWS consultation numbers 2-22-98-I-336 and 2-22-95-I-108). This 2015 update retains the management guidelines from the 1999 HMP for listed species, updates some descriptive information, and adds the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) and Yellow-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) which were federally listed in 2014 (Keller 2015: USFWS consultation number 02ENNM00- 2015-I-0538).

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    The National Teacher Enhancement program (NTEP) is a three-year, multi-laboratory effort funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy to improve elementary school science programs. The Los Alamos National Laboratory targets teachers in northern New Mexico. FY96, the third year of the program, involved 11 teams of elementary school teachers (grades 4-6) in a three-week summer session, four two-day workshops during the school year and an on-going planning and implementation process. The teams included twenty-one teachers from 11 schools. Participants earned a possible six semester hours of graduate credit for the summer institute and two hours for the academic year workshops from the University of New Mexico. The Laboratory expertise in the earth and environmental science provided the tie between the Laboratory initiatives and program content, and allowed for the design of real world problems.

  16. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory April 29-May 2, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses Capability Reviews to assess the quality and institutional integration of science, technology and engineering (STE) and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of LANL STE. The capabilities are deliberately chosen to be crosscutting over the Laboratory and therefore will include experimental, theoretical and simulation disciplines from multiple line organizations. Capability Reviews are designed to provide a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. The principal product of the Capability Review is the report that includes the review committee's assessments, recommendations, and recommendations for STE.

  17. PROCESS MODELING AND ANALYSIS FOR RECOVERY OF PUBE SOURCES AT LOS ALAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. KORNREICH; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains one of the premier plutonium processing facilities in the country. The plutonium facility supports several defense- and nondefense-related missions. This paper describes process-modeling efforts focused on the operations related to the Radioactive Source Recovery Program, which recovers the plutonium from plutonium-beryllium neutron sources. This program accomplishes at least two goals: it is evidence of good stewardship of a national resource, plutonium, and destroys a potential health hazard, the neutron source, by separating the plutonium from the beryllium in sources that are no longer being used in various industries or the military. We examine the processes related to source recovery operations in terms of throughput, ionizing radiation exposure to workers, and mass balances using two discrete-event simulation tools: Extend{trademark}, which is commercially available; and ProMoS, which is in-house software specifically tailored for modeling nuclear-materials operations.

  18. Accelerator technology for the Los Alamos ATW (accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos concept for accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW) employs a high-power proton linear accelerator to generate intense fluxes of thermal neutrons (>10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}-s) through spallation on a lead-bismuth target. The nominal beam energy for an ATW accelerator is 1.6 GeV, with average current requirements ranging from 250 mA to 30 mA, depending on application specifics. A recent study of accelerator production of tritium (APT) led to the development of a detailed point design for a 1.6 GeV, 250 mA cw proton linac. The accelerator design was reviewed by the Energy Research Advisory Board (ERAB) and found to be technically sound. The Panel concluded that linac of this power level could now be implemented within the existing technology base, given an adequate component development program and an integrated engineering demonstration of the front end.

  19. Implementation of the DYMAC system at the new Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility. Phase II report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malanify, J.J.; Amsden, D.C.

    1982-08-01

    The DYnamic Materials ACcountability System - called DYMAC - performs accountability functions at the new Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility where it began operation when the facility opened in January 1978. A demonstration program, DYMAC was designed to collect and assess inventory information for safeguards purposes. It accomplishes 75% of its design goals. DYMAC collects information about the physical inventory through deployment of nondestructive assay instrumentation and video terminals throughout the facility. The information resides in a minicomputer where it can be immediately sorted and displayed on the video terminals or produced in printed form. Although the capability now exists to assess the collected data, this portion of the program is not yet implemented. DYMAC in its present form is an excellent tool for process and quality control. The facility operator relies on it exclusively for keeping track of the inventory and for complying with accountability requirements of the US Department of Energy.

  20. Derivation of Authorized Limits for Land Transfer at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perona, Ralph [Neptune and Company, Inc., Bellingham, WA (United States); Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mirenda, Richard J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-14

    This report documents the calculation of Authorized Limits for radionuclides in soil to be used in the transfer of property by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Authorized Limits support the evaluation process to clear land for release under different uses even though the soil contains small residual amounts of radioactivity. The Authorized Limits are developed for four exposure scenarios: residential, commercial/industrial, construction worker, and recreational. Exposure to radionuclides in soil under these scenarios is assessed for exposure routes that include incidental ingestion of soil; inhalation of soil particulates; ingestion of homegrown produce (residential only); and external irradiation from soil. Inhalation and dermal absorption of tritiated water vapor in air are also assessed.

  1. A checklist of plant and animal species at Los Alamos National Laboratory and surrounding areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinojosa, H. [comp.

    1998-02-01

    Past and current members of the Biology Team (BT) of the Ecology Group have completed biological assessments (BAs) for all of the land that comprises Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within these assessments are lists of plant and animal species with the potential to exist on LANL lands and the surrounding areas. To compile these lists, BT members examined earlier published and unpublished reports, surveys, and data bases that pertained to the biota of this area or to areas that are similar. The species lists that are contained herein are compilations of the lists from these BAs, other lists that were a part of the initial research for the performance of these BAs, and more recent surveys.

  2. The Criticality Safety Information Resource Center (CSIRC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, B.D.; Meade, R.A.; Pruvost, N.L.

    1999-09-20

    The Criticality Safety Information Resource Center (CSIRC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a program jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in conjunction with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 97-2. The goal of CSIRC is to preserve primary criticality safety documentation from U.S. critical experimental sites and to make this information available for the benefit of the technical community. Progress in archiving criticality safety primary documents at the LANL archives as well as efforts to make this information available to researchers are discussed. The CSIRC project has a natural linkage to the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP). This paper raises the possibility that the CSIRC project will evolve in a fashion similar to the ICSBEP. Exploring the implications of linking the CSIRC to the international criticality safety community is the motivation for this paper.

  3. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, N.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vanta, E.B. [Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, FL (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  4. LAVA (Los Alamos Vulnerability and Risk Assessment Methodology): A conceptual framework for automated risk analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.T.; Lim, J.J.; Phillips, J.R.; Tisinger, R.M.; Brown, D.C.; FitzGerald, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed an original methodology for performing risk analyses on subject systems characterized by a general set of asset categories, a general spectrum of threats, a definable system-specific set of safeguards protecting the assets from the threats, and a general set of outcomes resulting from threats exploiting weaknesses in the safeguards system. The Los Alamos Vulnerability and Risk Assessment Methodology (LAVA) models complex systems having large amounts of ''soft'' information about both the system itself and occurrences related to the system. Its structure lends itself well to automation on a portable computer, making it possible to analyze numerous similar but geographically separated installations consistently and in as much depth as the subject system warrants. LAVA is based on hierarchical systems theory, event trees, fuzzy sets, natural-language processing, decision theory, and utility theory. LAVA's framework is a hierarchical set of fuzzy event trees that relate the results of several embedded (or sub-) analyses: a vulnerability assessment providing information about the presence and efficacy of system safeguards, a threat analysis providing information about static (background) and dynamic (changing) threat components coupled with an analysis of asset ''attractiveness'' to the dynamic threat, and a consequence analysis providing information about the outcome spectrum's severity measures and impact values. By using LAVA, we have modeled our widely used computer security application as well as LAVA/CS systems for physical protection, transborder data flow, contract awards, and property management. It is presently being applied for modeling risk management in embedded systems, survivability systems, and weapons systems security. LAVA is especially effective in modeling subject systems that include a large human component.

  5. Capabilities for high explosive pulsed power research at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goforth, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oona, Henn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaul, A M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Research on topics requiring high magnetic fields and high currents have been pursued using high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) techniques since the 1950s at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We have developed many sophisticated HEPr systems through the years, and most of them depend on technology available from the nuclear weapons program. Through the 1980s and 1990s, our budgets would sustain parallel efforts in zpinch research using both HEPr and capacitor banks. In recent years, many changes have occurred that are driven by concerns such as safety, security, and environment, as well as reduced budgets and downsizing of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) complex due to the end of the cold war era. In this paper, we review the teclmiques developed to date, and adaptations that are driven by changes in budgets and our changing complex. One new Ranchero-based solid liner z-pinch experimental design is also presented. Explosives that are cast to shape instead of being machined, and initiation systems that depend on arrays of slapper detonators are important new tools. Some materials that are seen as hazardous to the environment are avoided in designs. The process continues to allow a wide range of research however, and there are few, if any, experiments that we have done in the past that could not be perform today. The HErr firing facility at Los Alamos continues to have a 2000 lb. high explosive limit, and our 2.4 MJ capacitor bank remains a mainstay of the effort. Modem diagnostic and data analysis capabilities allow fewer personnel to achieve better results, and in the broad sense we continue to have a robust capability.

  6. Source document compilation: Los Alamos investigations related to the environment, engineering, geology, and hydrology, 1961--1990. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purtymun, W.D. [comp.

    1994-03-01

    This document is a compilation of informal reports, letters, and memorandums regarding geologic and hydrologic studies and investigations such as foundation investigations for structures, drilling or coring for environmental studies, development of water supply, or construction of test or observation wells for monitoring. Also included are replies requested for specific environmental, engineering, geologic, and hydrologic problems. The purpose of this document is to preserve and make the original data available to the environmental studies that are now in progress at Los Alamos and provide a reference for and supplement the LAMS report ``Records of Observation Wells, Test Holes, Test Wells, Supply Wells, Springs, and Surface water stations at Los Alamos: with Reference to the Geology and Hydrology,`` which is in preparation. The informal reports and memorandums are listed chronologically from December 1961 to January 1990. Item 208 is a descriptive history of the US Geological Survey`s activities at Los Alamos from 1946 through 1972. The history includes a list of published and unpublished reports that cover geology, hydrology, water supply, waste disposal, and environmental monitoring in the Los Alamos area.

  7. Source document compilation: Los Alamos investigations related to the environment, engineering, geology, and hydrology, 1961--1990. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purtymun, W.D. [comp.

    1994-03-01

    This document is a compilation of informal reports, letters, and memorandums regarding geologic and hydrologic studies and investigations such as foundation investigations for structures, drilling or coring for environmental studies, development of water supply, or construction of test or observation wells for monitoring. Also included are replies requested for specific environmental, engineering, geologic, and hydrologic problems. The purpose of this document is to preserve and make the original data available to the environmental studies that are now in progress at Los Alamos and provide a reference for and supplement the LAMS report ``Records of Observation Wells, Test Holes, Test Wells, Supply Wells, Springs, and Surface water stations at Los Alamos: with Reference to the Geology and Hydrology,`` which is in preparation. The informal reports and memorandums are listed chronologically from December 1961 to January 1990. Item 208 is a descriptive history of the US Geological Survey`s activities at Los Alamos from 1946 through 1972. The history includes a list of published and unpublished reports that cover geology, hydrology, water supply, waste disposal, and environmental monitoring in the Los Alamos area.

  8. Status of laser fusion. [Review of research at KMSF, LLL, Los Alamos, and Univ. of Rochester Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1975-10-20

    During 1974-1975, first generation laser implosion experiments have been performed at the KMSF, Livermore, Los Alamos, and University of Rochester Laboratories. Several significant results were achieved in these experiments. The fuel underwent large entropy changes during implosion and did not reach high densities. Consequently, the sensitivity to fluid and plasma instabilities was greatly reduced. A summary of these implosion experiments is presented.

  9. Hydraulic Conductivity Estimates from Particle Size Distributions of Sediments from the Los Alamos Chromium Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.; Reimus, P. W.; Ding, M.

    2015-12-01

    Chromium used in Los Alamos National Laboratory cooling towers was released as effluent onto laboratory property between 1956 and 1972. As a result, the underlying regional aquifer is contaminated with chromium (VI), a toxin and carcinogen. The highest concentration of chromium is ~1 ppm in monitoring well R-42, exceeding the New Mexico drinking water standard of 50 ppb. The chromium plume is currently being investigated to identify an effective remediation method. Geologic heterogeneity within the aquifer causes the hydraulic conductivity within the plume to be spatially variable. This variability, particularly with depth, is crucial for predicting plume transport behavior. Though pump tests are useful for obtaining estimates of site specific hydraulic conductivity, they tend to interrogate hydraulic properties of only the most conductive strata. Variations in particle size distribution as a function of depth can complement pump test data by providing estimates of vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity. Samples were collected from five different sonically-drilled core holes within the chromium plume at depths ranging from 732'-1125' below the surface. To obtain particle size distributions, the samples were sieved into six different fractions from the fine sands to gravel range (>4 mm, 2-4 mm, 1.4-2 mm, 0.355-1.4 mm, 180-355 µm, and smaller than 180 µm). The Kozeny-Carmen equation (k=(δg/µ)(dm2/180)(Φ3/(1-Φ)2)), was used to estimate permeability from the particle size distribution data. Pump tests estimated a hydraulic conductivity varying between 1 and 50 feet per day. The Kozeny-Carmen equation narrowed this estimate down to an average value of 2.635 feet per day for the samples analyzed, with a range of 0.971 ft/day to 6.069 ft/day. The results of this study show that the Kozeny-Carmen equation provides quite specific estimates of hydraulic conductivity in the Los Alamos aquifer. More importantly, it provides pertinent information on the expected

  10. University of New Mexico-Los Alamos National Laboratory Program in Volcanology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, F.; Fischer, T.; Baldridge, W.; Wohletz, K.; Smith, G.; Heiken, G.; Valentine, G.; Elston, W.

    2002-05-01

    The UNM-LANL Program in Volcanology was a vision of Wolf Elston in the late 1980s. Finally established in mid-1992, the program takes advantage of the extensive volcanic record preserved in northern New Mexico, and of the unique expertise and exceptional research facilities existing at the two institutions. Courses are directed toward upper division and graduate level students. The Los Alamos participants are adjunct professors and they take an active role in creating courses, advising thesis candidates, and providing research support. The curriculum is flexible but has a core upper division class in Physical Volcanology. Other classes offered in various years have included Volcanology and Human Affairs; Magmatic and Geothermal Systems; Tectonics and Magma Generation; Volcanoes of North America; Instrumentation for Volcanology; and Advanced Igneous Petrology. Perhaps the most renowned class in the program is the Volcanology Summer Field Course offered in even numbered years. This 3.5-week class is based in the Jemez Mountains volcanic field, which contains the famous Valles caldera (1.2 Ma to 50 ka). All types of calc-alkaline to alkalic domes, flows, tuffs, and intrusions, plus derivative sediments, mineralized zones, and thermal fluids are available for instructional purposes. Students are required to complete nine rigorous field exercises starting with basic instruction in pyroclastic fall, flow, and surge, then progressing towards hydrothermally altered, intracaldera resurgent dome and moat deposits in an active hot spring and fumarole system. The class is open to graduate students, advanced undergraduates, and private sector employees with special needs. Enrollment is competitive with limited financial support and limited space for 17 students. Evening lectures, study time, lodging, and meals are provided at the UNM-owned Young's Ranch built in the 1920s, nestled in a canyon flanked by orange cliffs of Bandelier Tuff. About 120 students from 12 countries have

  11. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory May 4-7, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoniette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g ., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors. LANL has defined fourteen

  12. Assessment of Options for the Treatment of Nitrate Salt Wastes at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Bruce Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stevens, Patrice Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-17

    This paper summarizes the methodology used to evaluate options for treatment of the remediated nitrate salt waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The method selected must enable treatment of the waste drums, which consist of a mixture of complex nitrate salts (oxidizer) improperly mixed with sWheat Scoop®1, an organic kitty litter and absorbent (fuel), in a manner that renders the waste safe, meets the specifications of waste acceptance criteria, and is suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant located in Carlsbad, New Mexico. A Core Remediation Team was responsible for comprehensively reviewing the options, ensuring a robust, defensible treatment recommendation. The evaluation process consisted of two steps. First, a prescreening process was conducted to cull the list on the basis for a decision of feasibility of certain potential options with respect to the criteria. Then, the remaining potential options were evaluated and ranked against each of the criteria in a consistent methodology. Numerical scores were established by consensus of the review team. Finally, recommendations were developed based on current information and understanding of the scientific, technical, and regulatory situation. A discussion of the preferred options and documentation of the process used to reach the recommended treatment options are presented.

  13. Measurements of air contaminants during the Cerro Grande fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhart, Craig

    2010-08-01

    Ambient air sampling for radioactive air contaminants was continued throughout the Cerro Grande fire that burned part of Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the fire, samples were collected more frequently than normal because buildup of smoke particles on the filters was decreasing the air flow. Overall, actual sampling time was 96% of the total possible sampling time for the May 2000 samples. To evaluate potential human exposure to air contaminants, the samples were analyzed as soon as possible and for additional specific radionuclides. Analyses showed that the smoke from the fire included resuspended radon decay products that had been accumulating for many years on the vegetation and the forest floor that burned. Concentrations of plutonium, americium, and depleted uranium were also measurable, but at locations and concentrations comparable to non-fire periods. A continuous particulate matter sampler measured concentrations that exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM-10 (particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter). These high concentrations were caused by smoke from the fire when it was close to the sampler.

  14. Los Alamos geostationary orbit synoptic data set: a compilation of energetic particle data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.N.; Higbie, P.R.; Belian, R.D.; Aiello, W.P.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Tech, E.R.; Halbig, M.F.; Payne, J.B.; Robinson, R.; Kedge, S.

    1981-08-01

    Energetic electron (30 to 2000 keV) and proton (145 keV to 150 MeV) measurements made by Los Alamos National Laboratory sensors at geostationary orbit 6.6 R/sub E/ are summarized. The data are plotted in terms of daily average spectra, 3-h local time averages, and in a variety of statistical formats. The data summarize conditions from mid-1976 through 1978 (S/C 1976-059) and from early 1977 through 1978 (S/C 1977-007). The compilations correspond to measurements at 35/sup 0/W, 70/sup 0/W, and 135/sup 0/W geographic longitude and, thus, are indicative of conditions at 9/sup 0/, 11/sup 0/, and 4.8/sup 0/ geomagnetic latitude, respectively. Most of this report is comprised of data plots that are organized according to Carrington solar rotations so that the data can be easily compared to solar rotation-dependent interplanetary data. As shown in prior studies, variations in solar wind conditions modulate particle intensity within the terrestrial magnetosphere. The effects of these variations are demonstrated and discussed. Potential uses of the Synoptic Data Set by the scientific and applications-oriented communities are also discussed.

  15. Biotic survey of Los Alamos radioactive liquid-effluent receiving areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miera, F.R. Jr.; Bostick, K.V.; Hakonson, T.E.; Nyhan, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary study was completed of the vegetation and small mammal communities and associated climatology in three canyon liquid waste receiving areas at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Data were gathered on plant and animal composition, distribution, and biomass, along with air temperature, humidity, and precipitation, as a function of elevation and where data were available with season. Initial studies of the understory vegetation in the spring of 1974 indicate grass species to be dominant at higher elevations, with forb species becoming dominant at lower elevations. Generally, the highest total mass estimates for standing green vegetation were obtained in the study sites located in the upper portions of the canyons where precipitation is greatest, and where the terrain and intermittent stream flow result in a wetter habitat. Fourteen species of small mammals were trapped or observed in canyon study areas during two trapping sessions of May--June 1974 and December 1974--February 1975. A greater number of species and the highest rodent biomass estimates in the spring were generally associated with the ponderosa pine/pinion--juniper woodland in the upper reaches of the canyons, and were lowest in the pinion--juniper woodland at the lower portions of the canyons. This trend was observed in only one of the canyons during the winter season. Climatological data gathered in the three canyons since 1973 are also presented to serve as a data base for future reference.

  16. Studies of fission fragment properties at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tovesson Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear data related to the fission process are needed for a wide variety of research areas, including fundamental science, nuclear energy and non-proliferation. While some of the relevant data have been measured to the required accuracies there are still many aspects of fission that need further investigation. One such aspect is how Total Kinetic Energy (TKE, fragment yields, angular distributions and other fission observables depend on excitation energy of the fissioning system. Another question is the correlation between mass, charge and energy of fission fragments. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE we are studying neutron-induced fission at incident energies from thermal up to hundreds of MeV using the Lujan Center and Weapons Neutron Research (WNR facilities. Advanced instruments such as SPIDER (time-of-flight and kinetic energy spectrometer, the NIFFTE Time Projection Chamber (TPC, and Frisch grid Ionization Chambers (FGIC are used to investigate the properties of fission fragments, and some important results for the major actinides have been obtained.

  17. Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, November 1993--October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, S.

    1995-08-01

    The Ecological Studies Team (EST) of ESH-20 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies gather water quality measurements and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from permanent sampling sites. Reports by Bennett (1994) and Cross (1994) discuss previous EST aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands those findings. EST collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates at five permanent stations within the canyon from November 1993 through October 1994. The two upstream stations are located below outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. Some water quality parameters are different at the first three stations from those expected of natural streams in the area, indicating degraded water quality due to effluent discharges. The aquatic habitat at the upper stations has also been degraded by sedimentation and channelization. The macroinvertebrate communities at these stations are characterized by low diversities and unstable communities. In contrast, the two downstream stations appear to be in a zone of recovery, where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams of the area. The two lower stations have increased macroinvertebrate diversity and stable communities, further indications of downstream water quality improvement.

  18. Market assessment of environmental issues affecting coal use for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-20

    This is a market assessment of environmental issues affecting coal use through 2020. It was prepared by Los Alamos National Laboratories for the Fossil Energy R&D Program. It is based on interviews of representatives of 8 coal, coal technology, electricity and environmental groups concerned with the future of energy and the environment. Interviewees generally agreed that the U.S. and other countries would continue to need to use coal into the middle of the next century. The size of the market for coal would be determined by the ability of coal and coal technologies to meet environmental requirements at costs that would compete with natural gas. Outside the U.S., three interviewees suggested that there is a market for low cost coal technologies that will reduce the environmental impact of coal use, particularly in developing countries that have few alternative sources of energy. The principal environmental concerns mentioned in these interviews were: efficiency and carbon, air toxics, and NO{sub x}. Several also mentioned potential modifications to the SO{sub x} standards, a fine particulate standard, bottom and fly ash, and methane from coalbeds.

  19. The Tragic Bazooka Accident at Los Alamos on July 14, 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, Cary Bradford [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-27

    In recent years the Laboratory has made information (documents, photographs, and perspectives) regarding the occupational explosives accidents that killed seven men in the late 1950s more accessible to the public. While pursuing this effort, we were reminded of similar tragedies that occurred to children of the community. The purpose of this paper is to make information that has come into our hands more available to the public regarding these accidents. Following this introduction, a brief synopsis is provided for each accident. The appendices contain source documents for the 1962 accident that are not generally available. The community of Los Alamos, New Mexico was born out of a military post created to support the secret Manhattan Project during World War II. Security was provided by military police and some training exercises were conducted using live ordnance. In two instances unexploded ordnance (UXO) from this era was found “in the field” by residents hiking in the local area and brought into town. Tragically, handling these “bazooka” rounds as “dud” munitions resulted in death for one child and injury to several others. The first accident occurred on Saturday, September 6, 1947, which resulted in injuries to two boys, ages 5 and 12. The second accident occurred on Saturday, July 14, 1962 and resulted in the death of one five-year-old boy, and injuries to four other children, ages 6 to 10 years-old. The latter accident is the primary focus of the paper.

  20. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2007-09-28

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. Modification Number 1 to this Title V Operating Permit was issued on June 15, 2006 (Permit No P-100M1) and includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2006. LANL's 2006 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  1. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Environmental Stewardship Group

    2010-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2009. LANL's 2009 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  2. Advances in and uses of gamma-ray field instrumentation at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Russo, P.A.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, S.E. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); Ianakiev, K. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energetics, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1994-02-01

    We are developing a set of tools to be used by the Safeguards Assay Group to solve problems found in safeguards and the domestic nuclear industry. The tools are also applicable to problems dealing with the environment, defense, and other areas of national and international interest. We have used extensively the advances in hardware and software since our last multichannel analyzer (MCA) development activities over a decade ago. We are also using our experience with and feedback from users of our previous instruments. In analyzing the instrument needs of our constituents and the characteristics of our previous instruments, which we think have inhibited their broader use, we have concluded that uses for an MCA-type instrument are widely varied and fundamentally changing,and that any new instruments should include a versatile, widely used hardware interface, which is as independent as possible of hardware standards, and which is readily interfaced to the computers or controllers rapidly evolving in the commercial sector. In addition, software tools must be provided that allow Los Alamos, users, and third parties to quickly and conveniently develop software specific to the user or the measurement to control the basic instrument we develop. This paper deals mainly with a miniature and modular multi-channel analyzer (M{sup 3}CA) and its applications.

  3. An overview of the Los Alamos Crestone Project : uses for astrophysical problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, R. P. (Robert P.); Gittings, M. L. (Michael L.); Gisler, Galen R.; Coker, R. F. (Robert F.); New, K. C. (Kimberly C.); Hueckstaedt, R. M. (Robert M.)

    2004-01-01

    The Los Alamos Crestone Project is part of the Department of Energy's (DoE) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program. The main goal of this project is to investigate the use of continuous adaptive mesh refinement (CAMR) techniques for application to problems of interest to the Laboratory. An overview of the astrophysical simulations performed with the SAGE/RAGE codes will be shown here, including asteroid impacts in the deep-ocean, asteroid impacts on the continental shelf (e.g. - Chicxulub - the dinosaur killer), calculations of massive black holes at the galactic center, and calculations of supernova explosions. Examples of these simulations will be shown. We have shown that the SAGE and RAGE codes of the Crestone Project have been very successful products of the DoE's Advanced Simulation and Computing program. It is clear to those performing massively-parallel computations, that the use of thousands of processors in parallel is fundamentally changing the way we think about computer simulations. The Crestone Project codes are fully utilizing each new ASC supercomputer as they become available. The SAGE and RAGE codes are sophisticated Continuous Adaptive Mesh Refinement hydrodynamics codes for large parallel simulations. SAGE and RAGE are becoming useful tools for astrophysical applications. Further research is starting in a wider variety of areas, including cosmological studies with Mike Norman's group at UCSD.

  4. The Influence of Ergonomics Training on Employee Behavior at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puckett, Leslie Guthrie [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2001-01-01

    A survey of employee behavior was conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of ergonomic behavior that decreased the chance of having a work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) among employees. The null hypothesis was tested to determine if there was a significant difference in ergonomic behavior between trained and untrained employees. The LANL employees were stratified by job series and then randomly selected to participate. The data were gathered using an electronic self-administered behavior questionnaire. The study population was composed of 6931 employees, and the response rate was 48%. The null hypothesis was rejected for twelve out of fifteen questions on the questionnaire. Logistic regression results indicate that the trained participants were more likely to report the risk-avoiding behavior, which supported the rejection of the null hypothesis for 60% of the questions. There was a higher frequency that the beneficial or risk-avoiding behavior was reported by the uninjured participants. Job series analysis revealed that ergonomics is an important issue among participants from all the job series. It also identified the occupational specialist classification (an administrative job), as the job series with the most occurrences of undesired ergonomic behaviors. In conclusion, there was a significant difference between the trained and untrained participants of the beneficial ergonomic behavior in the reported risk reducing behaviors.

  5. Emissions inventory report summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for calendar year 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory’s potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2008. LANL’s 2008 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  6. Options assessment report: Treatment of nitrate salt waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Bruce Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stevens, Patrice Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-16

    This report documents the methodology used to select a method of treatment for the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The method selected should treat the containerized waste in a manner that renders the waste safe and suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository, under specifications listed in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (DOE/CBFO, 2013). LANL recognized that the results must be thoroughly vetted with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and the a modification to the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit is a necessary step before implementation of this or any treatment option. Likewise, facility readiness and safety basis approvals must be received from the Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents LANL's preferred option, and the documentation of the process for reaching the recommended treatment option for RNS and UNS waste, and is presented for consideration by NMED and DOE.

  7. Options Assessment Report: Treatment of Nitrate Salt Waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Bruce Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stevens, Patrice Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-17

    This report documents the methodology used to select a method of treatment for the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The method selected should treat the containerized waste in a manner that renders the waste safe and suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository, under specifications listed in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (DOE/CBFO, 2013). LANL recognizes that the results must be thoroughly vetted with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and that a modification to the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit is a necessary step before implementation of this or any treatment option. Likewise, facility readiness and safety basis approvals must be received from the Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents LANL’s preferred option, and the documentation of the process for reaching the recommended treatment option for RNS and UNS waste, and is presented for consideration by NMED and DOE.

  8. The Integrated Cloud-based Environmental Data Management System at Los Alamos National Laboratory - 13391

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz Paige, Karen; Gomez, Penny; Patel, Nita P.; EchoHawk, Chris; Dorries, Alison M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS M996, Los Alamos, NM, 87544 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In today's world, instant access to information is taken for granted. The national labs are no exception; our data users expect immediate access to their data. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected over ten million records, and the data needs to be accessible to scientists as well as the public. The data span a wide range of media, analytes, time periods, formats, and quality and have traditionally existed in scattered databases, making comprehensive work with the data impossible. Recently, LANL has successfully integrated all their environmental data into a single, cloud-based, web-accessible data management system. The system combines data transparency to the public with immediate access required by the technical staff. The use of automatic electronic data validation has been critical to immediate data access while saving millions of dollars and increasing data consistency and quality. The system includes a Google Maps based GIS tool that is simple enough for people to locate potentially contaminated sites near their home or workplace, and complex enough to allow scientists to plot and trend their data at the surface and at depth as well as over time. A variety of formatted reports can be run at any desired frequency to report the most current data available in the data base. The advanced user can also run free form queries of the data base. This data management system has saved LANL time and money, an increasingly important accomplishment during periods of budget cuts with increasing demand for immediate electronic services. (authors)

  9. Comparative distribution of plutonium in contaminated ecosystems at Oak Ridge, Tennessee and Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlman, R.C.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Hakonson, T.E.

    1977-04-01

    Most of the plutonium entering aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems of the United States originates from nuclear weapons testing and from the burnup of the SNAP-9A satellite power source (Hanson 1975). But in the future, local ecosystems may receive small quantities of Pu released from nuclear facilities such as those at Oak Ridge, Los Alamos and other sites. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the distribution of Pu in two contaminated ecosystems which are representative of humid and semi-arid environments of the United States. Results summarized in terms of inventories for the respective ecosystems several decades after initial contamination are used to anticipate the longer term (i.e., decades or centuries) behavior of Pu in the environment. One important question is whether the availability of this element to plants and other organisms will change after it is subjected to weathering and ecological processes of the environment. It is pointed out that potential radiological toxicity and long physical half-lives of Pu dictate that its behavior in ecosystems be understood.

  10. Validation test for CAP88 predictions of tritium dispersion at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelotti, Erika; Green, Andrew; Whicker, Jeffrey; Eisele, William; Fuehne, David; McNaughton, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Gaussian plume models, such as CAP88, are used regularly for estimating downwind concentrations from stack emissions. At many facilities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) requires that CAP88 be used to demonstrate compliance with air quality regulations for public protection from emissions of radionuclides. Gaussian plume models have the advantage of being relatively simple and their use pragmatic; however, these models are based on simplifying assumptions and generally they are not capable of incorporating dynamic meteorological conditions or complex topography. These limitations encourage validation tests to understand the capabilities and limitations of the model for the specific application. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has complex topography but is required to use CAP88 for compliance with the Clean Air Act Subpart H. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of the CAP88 predictions against ambient air measurements using released tritium as a tracer. Stack emissions of tritium from two LANL stacks were measured and the dispersion modeled with CAP88 using local meteorology. Ambient air measurements of tritium were made at various distances and directions from the stacks. Model predictions and ambient air measurements were compared over the course of a full year's data. Comparative results were consistent with other studies and showed the CAP88 predictions of downwind tritium concentrations were on average about three times higher than those measured, and the accuracy of the model predictions were generally more consistent for annual averages than for bi-weekly data.

  11. Klystron Modulator Design for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reass, William A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baca, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Partridge, Edward R. [retired; Rees, Daniel E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-22

    This paper will describe the design of the 44 modulator systems that will be installed to upgrade the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator RF system. The klystrons can operate up to 86 kV with a nominal 32 Amp beam current with a 120 Hz repetition rate and 15% duty cycle. The klystrons are a mod-anode design. The modulator is designed with analog feedback control to ensure the klystron beam current is flat-top regulated. To achieve fast switching while maintaining linear feedback control, a grid-clamp, totem-pole modulator configuration is used with an 'on' deck and an 'off' deck. The on and off deck modulators are of identical design and utilize a cascode connected planar triode, cathode driven with a high speed MOSFET. The derived feedback is connected to the planar triode grid to enable the flat-top control. Although modern design approaches suggest solid state designs may be considered, the planar triode (Eimac Y-847B) is very cost effective, is easy to integrate with the existing hardware, and provides a simplified linear feedback control mechanism. The design is very compact and fault tolerant. This paper will review the complete electrical design, operational performance, and system characterization as applied to the LANSCE installation.

  12. The Management of Silica in Los Alamos National Laboratory Tap Water - A Study of Silica Solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlberg, C.; Worland, V.P.; Kozubal, M.A.; Erickson, G.F.; Jacobson, H.M.; McCarthy, K.T.

    1999-07-01

    Well water at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has a silica (SiO{sub 2}) content of 60 to 100 mg/L, with 4 mg/L of magnesium, 13 mg/L calcium and lesser concentrations of other ions. On evaporation in cooling towers, when the silica concentration reaches 150 to 220 mg/L, silica deposits on heat transfer surfaces. When the high silica well water is used in the reprocessing of plutonium, silica remains in solution at the end of the process and creates a problem of removal from the effluent prior to discharge or evaporation. The work described in this Report is divided into two major parts. The first part describes the behavior of silica when the water is evaporated at various conditions of pH and in the presence of different classes of anions: inorganic and organic. In the second part of this work it was found that precipitation (floccing) of silica was a function of solution pH and mole ratio of metal to silica.

  13. Defense, basic, and industrial research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longshore, A.; Salgado, K. [comps.

    1995-10-01

    The Workshop on Defense, Basic, and Industrial Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss the use of neutrons in science-based stockpile stewardship, The workshop began with presentations by government officials, senior representatives from the three weapons laboratories, and scientific opinion leaders. Workshop participants then met in breakout sessions on the following topics: materials science and engineering; polymers, complex fluids, and biomaterials; fundamental neutron physics; applied nuclear physics; condensed matter physics and chemistry; and nuclear weapons research. They concluded that neutrons can play an essential role in science-based stockpile stewardship and that there is overlap and synergy between defense and other uses of neutrons in basic, applied, and industrial research from which defense and civilian research can benefit. This proceedings is a collection of talks and papers from the plenary, technical, and breakout session presentations. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. Los Alamos neutron science center nuclear weapons stewardship and unique national scientific capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberg, Kurt F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-15

    This presentation gives an overview of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and its contributions to science and the nuclear weapons program. LANSCE is made of multiple experimental facilities (the Lujan Center, the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), the Ultra-Cold Neutron facility (UCN), the proton Radiography facility (pRad) and the Isotope Production Facility (IPF)) served by the its kilometer long linear accelerator. Several research areas are supported, including materials and bioscience, nuclear science, materials dynamics, irradiation response and medical isotope production. LANSCE is a national user facility that supports researchers worldwide. The LANSCE Risk Mitigation program is currently in progress to update critical accelerator equipment to help extend the lifetime of LANSCE as a key user facility. The Associate Directorate of Business Sciences (ADBS) plays an important role in the continued success of LANSCE. This includes key procurement support, human resource support, technical writing support, and training support. LANSCE is also the foundation of the future signature facility MARIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes).

  15. Modeling the New UCN source at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the UCNtau Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Thomas; Young, Albert; Clayton, Steven; Makela, Mark; Saunders, Andy

    2017-09-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center uses a linear proton accelerator to make an ultracold neutron (UCN) source for use in experiments including the UCNtau and the nEDM experiments. The proton beam strikes a tungsten target, producing free neutrons through spallation. The target is embedded in beryllium and graphite moderators, coupling produced neutrons to a bucket-shaped cold moderator of polyethylene beads at 45K that surrounds a solid deuterium converter, where they are down-scattered to ultracold energies. The UCN source was upgraded over the summer of 2016 and Data taken from the 2016-2017 run cycle shows that continuous running decreases the neutron output caused by layers of deuterium frost building up on the surface of the crystal or in the low temperature part of the UCN guide, and/or other possible changes to the shape, temperature profile or energy content of the deuterium. We have simulated the source deterioration with a simple model for surface roughness and deuterium snow, to understand the expected correlations between the UCN flux and spectrum exiting from the source as snow accumulates. We plan to use the output of our simulation to compare a set of monitor detectors used to establish the output of the flux and to monitor spectral changes important for UCNtau.

  16. Upgrades to the ultracold neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattie, Robert; LANL-nEDM Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The spallation-driven solid deutrium-based ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided a facility for precision measurements of fundamental symmetries via the decay observables from neutron beta decay for nearly a decade. In preparation for a new room temperature neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) experiment and to increase the statistical sensitivity of all experiments using the source an effort to increase the UCN output is underway. The ultimate goal is to provide a density of 100 UCN/cc or greater in the nEDM storage cell. This upgrade includes redesign of the cold neutron moderator and UCN converter geometries, improved coupling and coating of the UCN transport system through the biological shielding, optimization of beam timing structure, and increase of the proton beam current. We will present the results of the MCNP and UCN transport simulations that led to the new design, which will be installed spring 2016, and UCN guide tests performed at LANSCE and the Institut Laue-Langevin to study the UCN transport properties of a new nickel-based guide coating.

  17. Tritium concentrations in bees and honey at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1979-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Pratt, L.H.

    1997-01-01

    Honeybees are effective monitors of environmental pollution. The objective of this study was to summarize tritium ({sup 3}H) concentrations in bees and honey collected from within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) over an 18-year period. Based on the long-term average, bees from nine out of eleven hives and honey from six out of eleven hives on LANL lands contained {sup 3}H that was significantly higher (p <0.05) than background. The highest average concentration of {sup 3}H in bees (435 pCi mL{sup -1}) collected over the years was from LANL`s Technical Area (TA) 54-a low-level radioactive waste disposal site (Area G). Similarly, the highest average concentration of {sup 3}H in honey (709 pCi mL{sup - 1}) was collected from a hive located near three {sup 3}H storage ponds at LANL TA-53. The average concentrations of {sup 3}H in bees and honey from background hives was 1.0 pCi mL{sup -1} and 1.5 pCi ML{sup -1}, respectively. Although the concentrations of 3H in bees and honey from most LANL and perimeter (White Rock/Pajarito Acres) areas were significantly higher than background, most areas, with the exception of TA-53 and TA-54, generally exhibited decreasing 3H concentrations over time.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at selected burning grounds at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, B.W.; Minor, L.K.M.; Flucas, B.J.

    1998-02-01

    A commercial immunoassay field test (IFT) was used to rapidly assess the total concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soil at selected burning grounds within the explosives corridor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Results were compared with analyses obtained from LANL Analytical Laboratory and from a commercial laboratory. Both used the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Methods 8270 and 8310. EPA`s Method 8270 employs gas chromatography and mass spectral analyses, whereas EPA`s Method 8310 uses an ultraviolet detector in a high-performance liquid chromatography procedure. One crude oil sample and one diesel fuel sample, analyzed by EPA Method 8270, were included for references. On an average the IFT results were lower for standard samples and lower than the analytical laboratory results for the unknown samples. Sites were selected to determine whether the PAHs came from the material burned or the fuel used to ignite the burn, or whether they are produced by a high-temperature chemical reaction during the burn. Even though the crude oil and diesel fuel samples did contain measurable quantities of PAHs, there were no significant concentrations of PAHs detected in the ashes and soil at the burning grounds. Tests were made on fresh soil and ashes collected after a large burn and on aged soil and ashes known to have been at the site more than three years. Also analyzed were twelve-year-old samples from an inactive open burn cage.

  19. Distribution and diversity of fungal species in and adjacent to the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balice, R.G.; Jarmie, N.; Rogers, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    Fungi have demonstrated their ability to diversify and specialize to take advantage of new environments (Murphy 1996). These species are essential to the normal functioning of ecosystems and the impacts of human activities may be harmful to fungi. There is a need to inventory fungi throughout the range of their environments. Previously archived information representing 43 sample locations was used to perform a preliminary evaluation of the distributions and diversity of fungal species at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and in adjacent environments. Presence-absence data for 71 species of fungi in five habitats, pinon-juniper, canyon-bottom ponderosa pine, ponderosa pine, canyon-bottom mixed conifer, and mixed conifer were analyzed. The results indicate that even though fungi occur in each of the habitats, fungal species are not distributed evenly among these habitats. The richness of fungal species is greater in the canyon-bottom mixed conifer and mixed conifer habitats than in the pinon-juniper, canyon-bottom ponderosa pine or ponderosa pine habitats. All but three of the fungal species were recorded in either the canyon-bottom mixed conifer or the mixed conifer habitats, and all but seven of the fungal species were found in the mixed conifer habitat.

  20. Characteristics and performance of the Los Alamos VUV beamline at the NSLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, R. J.; Trela, W. J.; Michaud, F. D.; Southworth, S. H.; Alkire, R. W.; Roy, P.; Rothe, R.; Walsh, P. J.; Shinn, N.

    1988-04-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Los Alamos VUV synchrotron radiation beamline, U3C, on the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The beamline uses separate function optics to collect and focus the horizontally and vertically diverging beam. The monochromator is a grazing incidence Rowland circle instrument of the extended grasshopper design (ERG). A postmonochromator refocusing mirror is used to focus or collimate the diverging beam from the monochromator. The beamline control and diagnostics systems are also discussed. Particular emphasis in the design has been placed on the reduction of stray and harmonic light. Higher order light is reduced by a grazing angle mirror low pass filter installed immediately downstream from the monochromator while stray light is reduced through the use of baffles and thin film filters. Also included in the line is a differential pumping section that permits gas phase and other experiments requiring pressures in the 10 -5 to 10 -4 Torr range to be coupled to the beamline.

  1. Biological Assessment of the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally Listed Threatened and Endangered Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Leslie A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2006-09-19

    This biological assessment considers the effects of continuing to operate Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally listed threatened or endangered species, based on current and future operations identified in the 2006 Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS; DOE In Prep.). We reviewed 40 projects analyzed in the SWEIS as well as two aspects on ongoing operations to determine if these actions had the potential to affect Federally listed species. Eighteen projects that had not already received U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) consultation and concurrence, as well as the two aspects of ongoing operations, ecological risk from legacy contaminants and the Outfall Reduction Project, were determined to have the potential to affect threatened or endangered species. Cumulative impacts were also analyzed.

  2. User Guide for the Plotting Software for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Weapons Analysis Tools Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, Timothy James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-02

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Plotting Software for the Nuclear Weapons Analysis Tools is a Java™ application based upon the open source library JFreeChart. The software provides a capability for plotting data on graphs with a rich variety of display options while allowing the viewer interaction via graph manipulation and scaling to best view the data. The graph types include XY plots, Date XY plots, Bar plots and Histogram plots.

  3. Los Alamos National Security, LLC Request for Information from industrial entities that desire to commercialize Laboratory-developed Extremely Low Resource Optical Identifier (ELROI) tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, Michael Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) is the manager and operator of the Los Alamos National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LANS is a mission-centric Federally Funded Research and Development Center focused on solving the most critical national security challenges through science and engineering for both government and private customers.

  4. First record of single event upset on the ground, Cray-1 computer memory at Los Alamos in 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grider, Gary A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Iwanchuk, Paul N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morrison, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Normand, Eugene [EN ASSOCIATES, LLC; Wert, Jerry L [BOEING RESEARCH AND TEC; Johnson, Steve [CRAY, INC.

    2010-01-01

    Records of bit flips in the Cray-1 computer installed at Los Alamos in 1976 lead to an upset rate in the Cray-1 's bipolar SRAMs that correlates with the SEUs being induced by the atmospheric neutrons. In 1976 the Cray Research Company delivered its first supercomputer, the Cray-1, installing it at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Los Alamos had competed with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Cray-1 and won, reaching an agreement with Seymour Cray to install the machine for a period of six months for free, after which they could decide whether to buy, lease or return it. As a result, Los Alamos personnel kept track of the computer reliability and performance and so we know that during those six months of operation, 152 memory parity errors were recorded. The computer memory consisted of approximately 70,000 1Kx1 bipolar ECL static RAMs, the Fairchild 10415. What the Los Alamos engineers didn't know is that those bit flips were the result of single event upsets (SEUs) caused by the atmospheric neutrons. Thus, these 152 bit flips were the first recorded SEUs on the earth, and were observed 2 years before the SEUs in the Intel DRAMs that had been found by May and Woods in 1978. The upsets in the DRAMs were shown to have been caused by alpha particles from the chip packaging material. In this paper we will demonstrate that the Cray-1 bit flips, which were found through the use of parity bits in the Cray-1, were likely due to atmospheric neutrons. This paper will follow the same approach as that of the very first paper to demonstrate single event effects, which occurred in satellite flip-flop circuits in 1975. The main difference is that in the four events that occurred over the course of 17 satellite years of operation were shown to be due to single event effects just a few years after those satellite anomalies were recorded. In the case of the Cray-1 bit flips, there has been a delay of more than 30 years between the occurrence of the bit

  5. Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, S.; Nottelman, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Biology Team of ESH-20 (the Ecology Group) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies measure water quality parameters and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from sampling sites within the upper canyon stream. Reports by Bennett and Cross discuss previous aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands the previous findings. The Biology Team collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates monthly at three sampling stations within Sandia Canyon in 1995. The two upstream stations occur near a cattail (Typha latifolia) dominated marsh downstream from outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. The third station is approximately 1.5 miles downstream from the outfalls within a mixed conifer forest. All water chemistry parameters measured in Sandia Canyon during 1995 fell within acceptable State limits and scored in the {open_quotes}good{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} ranges when compared to an Environmental Quality Index. However, aquatic macroinvertebrates habitats have been degraded by widespread erosion, channelization, loss of wetlands due to deposition and stream lowering, scour, limited acceptable substrates, LANL releases and spills, and other stressors. Macroinvertebrate communities at all the stations had low diversities, low densities, and erratic numbers of individuals. These results indicate that although the stream possesses acceptable water chemistry, it has reduced biotic potential. The best developed aquatic community occurs at the sampling station with the best habitat and whose downstream location partially mitigates the effects of upstream impairments.

  6. Environmental analysis of Acid/middle Pueblo Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Buhl, T.E.; Stoker, A.K.; Hansen, W.R.

    1982-08-01

    The radiological survey of the former radioactive waste treatment plant site (TA-45), Acid Canyon, and Pueblo Canyon found residual radioactivity at the site itself and in the channel and banks of Acid, Pueblo, and lower Los Alamos Canyons, all the way to the Rio Grande. The largest reservoir of radioactive material is in lower Pueblo Canyon, which is on DOE property. The only areas where residual radioactivity exceeds the proposed cleanup criteria are at the former vehicle decontamination facility, located between the former treatment plant site and Acid Canyon, around the former untreated waste outfall and for a short distance below, and in two small areas farther down in Acid Canyon. The three alternatives proposed are (1) to take no action, (2) to fence the areas where the residual radioactivity exceeds the proposed criteria (minimal action), and (3) to clean up the former vehicle decontamination facility and around the former untreated waste outfall. Calculations based on actual measurements indicate that the annual dose at the location having the greatest residual radioactivity would be about 12% of the applicable guideline. Most doses are much smaller than that. No environmental impacts are associated with either the no-action or minimal action alternatives. The impact associated with the cleanup alternative is very small. The preferred alternative is to clean up the areas around the former vehicle decontamination facility and the untreated waste outfall. This course of action is recommended not because of any real danger associated with the residual radioactivity, but rather because the cleanup operation is a minor effort and would conform with the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) philosophy.

  7. Reengineering of Analytical Data Management for the Environmental Restoration Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, S.; Dorries, A.; Nasser, K.; Scherma, S.

    2003-02-27

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for the characterization, clean up, and monitoring of over 2,124 identified potential release sites (PRS). These PRSs have resulted from operations associated with weapons and energy related research which has been conducted at LANL since 1942. To accomplish mission goals, the ER Project conducts field sampling to determine possible types and levels of chemical contamination as well as their geographic extent. Last fiscal year, approximately 4000 samples were collected during ER Project field sampling campaigns. In the past, activities associated with field sampling such as sample campaign planning, paperwork, shipping and analytical laboratory tracking; verification and order fulfillment; validation and data quality assurance were performed by multiple groups working with a variety of software applications, databases and hard copy reports. This resulted in significant management and communication difficulties, data delivery delays, and inconsistent processes; it also represented a potential threat to overall data integrity. Creation of an organization, software applications and a data process that could provide for cost-effective management of the activities and data mentioned above became a management priority, resulting in a development of a reengineering task. This reengineering effort--currently nearing completion--has resulted in personnel reorganization, the development of a centralized data repository, and a powerful web-based sample management system that allows for an appreciably streamlined and more efficient data process. These changes have collectively cut data delivery times, allowed for larger volumes of samples and data to be handled with fewer personnel, and resulted in significant cost savings. This paper will provide a case study of the reengineering effort undertaken by the ER Project of its analytical data management process. It includes

  8. Nonradioactive Ambient Air Monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2001--2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gladney; J.Dewart, C.Eberhart; J.Lochamy

    2004-09-01

    During the spring of 2000, the Cerro Grande forest fire reached Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and ignited both above-ground vegetation and disposed materials in several landfills. During and after the fire, there was concern about the potential human health impacts from chemicals emitted by the combustion of these Laboratory materials. Consequently, short-term, intensive air-monitoring studies were performed during and shortly after the fire. Unlike the radiological data from many years of AIRNET sampling, LANL did not have an adequate database of nonradiological species under baseline conditions with which to compare data collected during the fire. Therefore, during 2001 the Meteorology and Air Quality Group designed and implemented a new air-monitoring program, entitled NonRadNET, to provide nonradiological background data under normal conditions. The objectives of NonRadNET were to: (1) develop the capability for collecting nonradiological air-monitoring data, (2) conduct monitoring to develop a database of typical background levels of selected nonradiological species in the communities nearest the Laboratory, and (3) determine LANL's potential contribution to nonradiological air pollution in the surrounding communities. NonRadNET ended in late December 2002 with five quarters of data. The purpose of this paper is to organize and describe the NonRadNET data collected over 2001-2002 to use as baseline data, either for monitoring during a fire, some other abnormal event, or routine use. To achieve that purpose, in this paper we will: (1) document the NonRadNET program procedures, methods, and quality management, (2) describe the usual origins and uses of the species measured, (3) compare the species measured to LANL and other area emissions, (4) present the five quarters of data, (5) compare the data to known typical environmental values, and (6) evaluate the data against exposure standards.

  9. The Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School: Career and Research Benefits to Students and Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowee, M.

    2015-12-01

    This last summer we held the 5th Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School. This 8-week long program is designed for mid-career graduate students in related fields to come to LANL, receive lectures on space physics and space environment topics, and carry out a research project under the mentorship of LANL staff members. We accept typically 6-8 students to the program, with a strong applicant pool to choose from. This type of summer school program is relatively unique in the space physics community—there are several other summer schools but they are of shorter duration and do not include the mentor-research project aspect which builds a strong one-on-one connection between the summer student and his/her LANL mentor(s). From the LANL perspective, this program was intended to have several benefits including building collaborations between LANL staff and universities and recruitment of potential postdocs. From the student perspective, this program is not only an educational opportunity but a strong networking opportunity and a chance to enhance their professional skills and publication record. Students are permitted to work on projects directly related to their thesis or on projects in areas that are completely new to them. At the end of the summer school, the students also develop their presentation skills by preparing and giving AGU-style presentations on their research projects to the research group. Over the past five years the summer school has increased in popularity, and the feedback from the student participants has been very positive. Alumni of the program have continued collaborations with their mentors, resulting in publications and conference presentations, and one postdoc hire to date.

  10. Unsaturated Groundwater Flow Beneath Upper Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dander, David Carl [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1998-10-15

    Mortandad Canyon is a discharge site for treated industrial effluents containing radionuclides and other chemicals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. This study was conducted to develop an understanding of the unsaturated hydrologic behavior below the canyon floor. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the hypothetical performance of the vadose zone above the water table. Numerical simulations of unsaturated groundwater flow at the site were conducted using the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer (FEHM) code. A two-dimensional cross-section along the canyon's axis was used to model flow between an alluvial groundwater system and the regional aquifer approximately 300 m below. Using recharge estimated from a water budget developed in 1967, the simulations showed waters from the perched water table reaching the regional aquifer in 13.8 years, much faster than previously thought. Additionally, simulations indicate that saturation is occurring in the Guaje pumice bed an d that the Tshirege Unit 1B is near saturation. Lithologic boundaries between the eight materials play an important role in flow and solute transport within the system. Horizontal flow is shown to occur in three thin zones above capillary barriers; however, vertical flow dominates the system. Other simulations were conducted to examine the effects of changing system parameters such as varying recharge inputs, varying the distribution of recharge, and bypassing fast-path fractured basalt of uncertain extent and properties. System sensitivity was also explored by changing model parameters with respect to size and types of grids and domains, and the presence of dipping stratigraphy.

  11. Los molokanos rusos de Baja California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Adams Muranaka

    1987-09-01

    Full Text Available La finalidad de esta investigación es aproximarse un poco más y averiguar quiénes son los molokanos y por qué huyeron de la Rusia imperial. Con este fin es necesario buscar las fuentes de la cristiandad ortodoxa. La separación de la iglesia católica y el catolicismo griego se dio en 1054, y seiscientos años después en 1654, sobreviene otra separación entre los ortodoxos rusos, de allí surgen los "creyentes a la antigua". En 1905, una colonia de agricultores rusos se estableció en el norte de Baja California, en el valle de Guadalupe, la cual ahora es conocida como Francisco Zarco o "colonia rusa". Aunque este artículo no llega a una conclusión para clasificar a este grupo, se espera que este estudio ilustre el parentesco étnico entre todos los colonos del valle. Se pueden diseñar algunas líneas susceptibles para su uso posterior en las que los lugares arqueológicos sugieren la etnicidad; aunque sin contar con la información histórica.

  12. Bombs, Bosons and Beer Cans-Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pynn, Roger

    1997-04-01

    The neutron scattering community is justifiably proud of the contributions it has made to basic research in many areas of science. Information obtained using neutrons has contributed strongly to our basic understanding of phenomena in diverse systems of interest to physicists, chemists and biologists - think, for example, of how little we would know about excitations in quantum fluids, the spin-density-wave state of chromium, electronic back-donation in the bonding of organometallic compounds, or the conformation of proteins and DNA in nucleosomes without neutron scattering. However, illustrious as this history of neutron scattering may be, it is not the only type of contribution neutrons have made to our modern scientific and technological enterprise. Increasingly in recent years, we have witnessed the application of neutrons to later parts of the R&D cycle, to problems that have been called ''strategic research'' and even in areas that are ''applied research'' or ''product development''. The purpose of my talk at this meeting is to illustrate this aspect of research at spallation neutron sources, using examples of work that has been done at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Some of this work is driven by the fact that our principal funding agency, the Office of Defense Programs within the U.S. Department of Energy, has a need to master the science behind technologies relevant to nuclear weapons. Even so, most of the examples I have picked are equally relevant to the industrial sector and several would not shame even the most devout proponent of ''pure'' research. To demonstrate the breadth of the research performed at LANSCE, I will describe examples of recent experiments in the following areas: materials texture; temperature and particle velocity measurement in reacting high explosives; radiographic imaging with protons; chemical bonding in metal-dihydride complexes; and the structure of thin adhesive layers. LANSCE operates a user program and

  13. Materials capability review Los Alamos National Laboratory, May 3-6, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoinette [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    , environment for conducting science, technology and engineering. The specific charge for the Materials Capability Review is to assess the Los Alamos Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled, 'First Principles Predictive Capabilities for Transuranic Materials: Mott Insulators to Correlated Metals' using the criteria performance, quality, and relevance for the current status of the project. The committee is requested to provide advice on future direction of the project.

  14. Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. J. Gonzales; P. R. Fresquez; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

    2000-03-01

    This report summarizes and evaluates the concentrations of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr, and total U in understory and overstory vegetation collected from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), its perimeter, and regional background areas in 1998. Comparisons to conservative toxicity reference value safe limits were also made. The arithmetic mean LANL radionuclide concentrations in understory were 501 pCi L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 3}H, 0.581 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs, 0.001 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 238}Pu, 0.008 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 239,240}Pu, 0.007 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 241}Am, 1.46 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 90}Sr, and 0.233 {micro}g ash g{sup {minus}1} for total uranium. The mean LANL radionuclide concentrations in overstory were 463 pCi L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 3}H, 1.51 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs, 0.0004 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} {sup 238}Pu, 0.008 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 239,240}Pu, 0.014 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 241}Am, 1.97 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 90}Sr, and 0.388 {micro}g ash g{sup {minus}1} for total uranium. Concentrations of radionuclides and total U in both understory and overstory vegetation at LANL generally were not statistically higher than in perimeter and regional background vegetation ({alpha} = 0.05). The exceptions were LANL {sup 3}H > perimeter {sup 3}H (understory) and LANL {sup 3}H background {sup 3}H (overstory). All maximum radionuclide concentrations were lower than toxicity reference values. With the exception of total U, the relationship between contaminant concentration in soil vs. vegetation was insignificant ({alpha} = 0.05). Generally, as the concentration of total U in soil decreased, the concentration in vegetation increased. This held true for both understory and overstory and regardless of whether data were separated by general location (LANL, perimeter, and background) or not. There was no

  15. Aerosol Optical Properties of Smoke from the Las Conchas Wildfire, Los Alamos, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkowski, K.; Dubey, M. K.; Flowers, B. A.; Aiken, A. C.; Klein, B. Z.; Mazzoleni, C.; Sharma, N.; China`, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Las Conchas wildfire in Northern New Mexico started on June, 26 2011 and spread rapidly, eventually burning an area of 634 km2 (245 mi2). Due to the close proximity to the fire, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was shut down and the town evacuated for several days. Immediately after LANL reopened (7/6/2011) the Earth and Environmental Sciences Division (EES-14) attained unique measurements of the smoke by sampling the ambient air. Three Integrated Photoacoustic/Nephelometer Spectrometers (DMT Inc.) were set up to measure aerosol light absorption and scattering coefficients. A University of Northwest Switzerland thermodenuder was used to remove compounds that are volatile at temperatures up to 200C. The aerosol's optical properties were measured before and after denuding the sample at 405nm (blue), 532nm (green), 781nm (red), and for non-denuded particles also at 375nm (ultraviolet). The aerosol size distributions were measured after the denuder with a Laser Aerosol Spectrometer (LAS, TSI Inc.) and black carbon was measured with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2, DMT Inc.). Additionally, ambient measurements of Total Particulate Matter (PM2.5 and PM10) were collected continuously at the LANL air monitoring stations. These measurements are used in conjunction with numerical simulations to determine the bulk optical properties of the aerosol. Aerosols in wildfire smoke are composed of organic and black carbon (soot) particles that are formed during wood combustion and pyrolysis. The optical properties of the smoke particles are complex and lead to large uncertainties in assessing the global climate. During the measurement period, the Las Conchas fire provided very high particle concentrations (up to 200 μg/m3) that were exploited to investigate their optical properties. By heating the particles to temperatures ranging from 75 to 200C in the denuder, volatile organics were removed and the optical properties of the remaining particles were measured

  16. Moisture Monitoring at Area G, Technical Area 54, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2016 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, Daniel Glenn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Birdsell, Kay Hanson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jennings, Terry L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-17

    Hydrological characterization and moisture monitoring activities provide data required for evaluating the transport of subsurface contaminants in the unsaturated and saturated zones beneath Area G, and for the Area G Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis. These activities have been ongoing at Area G, Technical Area 54 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory since waste disposal operations began in 1957. This report summarizes the hydrological characterization and moisture monitoring activities conducted at Area G. It includes moisture monitoring data collected from 1986 through 2016 from numerous boreholes and access tubes with neutron moisture meters, as well as data collected by automated dataloggers for water content measurement sensors installed in a waste disposal pit cover, and buried beneath the floor of a waste disposal pit. This report is an update of a nearly identical report by Levitt et al., (2015) that summarized data collected through early 2015; this report includes additional moisture monitoring data collected at Pit 31 and the Pit 38 extension through December, 2016. It also includes information from the Jennings and French (2009) moisture monitoring report and includes all data from Jennings and French (2009) and the Draft 2010 Addendum moisture monitoring report (Jennings and French, 2010). For the 2015 version of this report, all neutron logging data, including neutron probe calibrations, were investigated for quality and pedigree. Some data were recalculated using more defensible calibration data. Therefore, some water content profiles are different from those in the Jennings and French (2009) report. All of that information is repeated in this report for completeness. Monitoring and characterization data generally indicate that some areas of the Area G vadose zone are consistent with undisturbed conditions, with water contents of less than five percent by volume in the top two layers of the Bandelier tuff at Area G. These data also

  17. Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, Steven Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-05

    Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a potential Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed low-level, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area (TA)-54. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to seven sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. The top site choice is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. The seven sites are as follows. TA-18/36 (62 acres) is located on Potrillo Drive that intersects Pajarito Road at the bottom of a steep grade. It has some blast zone issues on its southwest side and some important archeological sites on the southeast section. TA-60 (50 acres) is located at the end of Eniwetok Road off Diamond Drive, east of TA-3. Most of the site is within a fifty foot-deep ravine (that may have contamination in the drainage), with a small section on the mesa above. TA-63/52/46 (110 acres) lies to the north of Pajarito Road along Puye Road. It is centrally located in a brown field industrial area, with good access to generators on a controlled road. TA-46 (22 acres) is a narrow site on the south side of Pajarito Road across from TA-46 office buildings. TA-48 (14 acres) is also narrow, and is located on the north side of Pajarito Road near the west vehicle access portal (VAP). TA-51 (19 acres) is located on the south side of Pajarito Road at the top of the hill above TA-18 near the current entrance to the TA-54. TA-54 West (16 acres) is just north of the entrance to TA-54 at Pajarito Road and is close to Zone 4. Although it is near the San Ildefonso Pueblo property line, there may be adequate set-back for sight screening.

  18. Geochemical Processes Controlling Chromium Attenuation within the Sandia Canyon Wetland, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, P.; Heikoop, J. M.; Ding, M.; Rearick, M.; Katzman, D.; Linhoff, B.

    2009-12-01

    The environmental aqueous geochemistry of Cr is of considerable interest to physical scientists and toxicologists in quantifying the fate and transport of this metal in surface and subsurface environments. Cooling tower water averaging between 0.14 to 0.35 mM Cr(VI) was released to a stream channel within Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM from 1956 to 1972. Since 1951, releases of water into Sandia Canyon created a wetland that has expanded over the years. This wetland contains between 5,700 and 27,000 kg Cr(III) representing 21 to 49% of the total Cr released from cooling tower discharges. Chemical analyses show that over 99.7% of the Cr is stable as Cr(III) in the wetland. Concentrations of reductants including Fe(II) and solid organic matter greatly exceed concentrations of oxidants such as Mn(IV). One reaction describing the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in the presence of solid organic matter containing hydroquinone (C6H6O2), which provides part of the reduction capacity is: 1.5C6H6O2 + CrO42- + 2H+ → 1.5C6H4O2 + H2O + Cr(OH)3. Evaluation of the extent of Cr(VI) reduction within the Sandia Canyon wetland is based on measured concentrations of Cr(III) in the organic-rich sediments (up to 3,740 mg/kg) and average pore-water concentrations of total dissolved Cr less than 0.29 μM. Following reduction, dissolved Cr(III) species either adsorb onto sediments or precipitate as amorphous Cr(OH)3. Chromium(III) also potentially coprecipitates as FexCr1-x(OH)3 in portions of the wetland. Solid organic matter present in wetlands is characterized by a net-negative surface charge above pH 4.8 produced from aliphatic and aromatic carboxylates. This surface-active functional group provides numerous binding sites for cationic Cr(III) species including Cr 3+, CrOH2+, and Cr(OH)2+. Quantifying the mechanisms for Cr reduction within the Sandia wetland is important for understanding long-term fate and transport of this metal within the Sandia watershed.

  19. Evaluation of the Likelihood for Thermal Runaway for Nitrate Salt Containers in Storage at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heatwole, Eric Mann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gunderson, Jake Alfred [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parker, Gary Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-25

    In order to handle and process the existing Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Nitrate Salt drums it is necessary to quantify the risk. One of the most obvious dangers is a repeat of the original violent reaction (2015), which would endanger nearby workers, not only with radioactive contamination, but also with large amounts of heat, dangerous corrosive gases and the physical dangers associated with a bursting drum. If there still existed a high probability of violent reaction, then these drums should only be accessed remotely. The objective of the work reported herein is to determine the likelihood of a similar violent event occurring.

  20. Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility – Fiscal Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Birdsell, Kay H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-29

    As a condition to the disposal authorization statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis (PA/CA) are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year (FY) 2015 annual review for Area G.

  1. Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

    2010-09-01

    The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50–100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

  2. Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdsell, Kay Hanson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Atchley, Adam Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Elizabeth D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-24

    As a condition to the disposal authorization statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis (PA/CA) maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the PA/CA are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year (FY) 2016 annual review for Area G.

  3. An Overview of the Los Alamos Inertial Confinement Fusion and High-Energy-Density Physics Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Physics Division

    2016-07-15

    The Los Alamos Inertial Confinement Fusion and Science Programs engage in a vigorous array of experiments, theory, and modeling. We use the three major High Energy Density facilities, NIF, Omega, and Z to perform experiments. These include opacity, radiation transport, hydrodynamics, ignition science, and burn experiments to aid the ICF and Science campaigns in reaching their stewardship goals. The ICF program operates two nuclear diagnostics at NIF, the neutron imaging system and the gamma reaction history instruments. Both systems are being expanded with significant capability enhancements.

  4. LA-UR-14-27684, Analysis of Wildland Fire Hazard to the TWF at Los Alamos National Labs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbertson, Sarah [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-02

    Wildfires represent an Anticipated Natural Phenomena Hazard for LANL and the surrounding area. The TWF facility is located in a cleared area and is surrounded on three sides by roadway pavement. Therefore, direct propagation of flames to the facility is not considered the most credible means of ignition. Rather, fires started by airborne transport of burning brands constitute the most significant wildland fire threat to the TWF. The purpose of this document is to update LA-UR-13-24529, Airborne Projection of Burning Embers – Planning and Controls for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities, to be specific to the TWF site and operations.

  5. Option study of an orthogonal X-ray radiography axis for pRad at LANSCE area C, Los Alamos.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Bryan Velten; Johnson, David L.; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Jones, Peter (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-01

    We report on an option study of two potential x-ray systems for orthogonal radiography at Area C in the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The systems assessed are expected to be near equivalent systems to the presently existing Cygnus capability at the Nevada Test Site. Nominal dose and radiographic resolution of 4 rad (measured at one meter) and 1 mm spot are desired. Both a system study and qualitative design are presented as well as estimated cost and schedule. Each x-ray system analyzed is designed to drive a rod-pinch electron beam diode capable of producing the nominal dose and spot.

  6. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory energy-related history, research, managerial reorganization proposals, actions taken, and results. History report, 1945--1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammel, E.F.

    1997-03-01

    This report documents the development of major energy-related programs at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory between 1945 and 1979. Although the Laboratory`s primary mission during that era was the design and development of nuclear weapons and most of the Laboratory`s funding came from a single source, a number of factors were at work that led to the development of these other programs. Some of those factors were affected by the Laboratory`s internal management structure and organization; others were the result of increasing environmental awareness within the general population and the political consequences of that awareness; still others were related to the increasing demand for energy and the increasing turmoil in the energy-rich Middle East. This report also describes the various activities in Los Alamos, in Washington, and in other areas of the world that contributed to the development of major energy-related programs at Los Alamos. The author has a unique historical perspective because of his involvement as a scientist and manager at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory during the time period described within the report. In addition, in numerous footnotes and references, he cites a large body of documents that include the opinions and perspectives of many others who were involved at one time or another in these programs. Finally the report includes a detailed chronology of geopolitical events that led to the development of energy-related programs at Los Alamos.

  7. Los Alamos nEDM Experiment and Demonstration of Ramsey's Method on Stored UCNs at the LANL UCN Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Steven; Chupp, Tim; Cude-Woods, Christopher; Currie, Scott; Ito, Takeyasu; Liu, Chen-Yu; Long, Joshua; MacDonald, Stephen; Makela, Mark; O'Shaughnessy, Christopher; Plaster, Brad; Ramsey, John; Saunders, Andy; LANL nEDM Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory ultracold neutron (UCN) source was recently upgraded for a factor of 5 improvement in stored density, providing the statistical precision needed for a room temperature neutron electric dipole moment measurement with sensitivity 3 ×10-27 e . cm, a factor 10 better than the limit set by the Sussex-RAL-ILL experiment. Here, we show results of a demonstration of Ramsey's separated oscillatory fields method on stored UCNs at the LANL UCN source and in a geometry relevant for a nEDM measurement. We argue a world-leading nEDM experiment could be performed at LANL with existing technology and a short lead time, providing a physics result with sensitivity intermediate between the current limit set by Sussex-RAL-ILL, and the anticipated limit from the complex, cryogenic nEDM experiment planned for the next decade at the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS-nEDM). This work was supported by the Los Alamos LDRD Program, Project 20140015DR.

  8. Migration of Sr-20, Cs-137, and Pu-239/240 in Canyon below Los Alamos outfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J.M.; Mason, C.F.V.; Boak, J.M.; Longmire, P.A.

    1996-04-01

    Technical Area-21 (TA-21) of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is on a mesa bordered by two canyons DP Canyon and Los Alamos (LA) Canyon. DP Canyon is a small semiarid watershed with a well defined channel system where the stream flow is ephemeral. TA-21 has had a complex history of waste disposal as research to determine the chemical and metallurgical properties of nuclear materials occurred here from 1945-1978. Due to these operations, the TA-21 mesa top and bordering canyons have been monitored and characterized by the LANL Environmental Restoration Program. Results identify radionuclide values at outfall. 21-011 (k) which exceed Screening Action Levels, and points along DP Canyon which exceed regional background levels. The radiocontaminants considered in this study are strontium-90, cesium-137, and plutonium-239. This research examines sediment transport and speciation of radionuclide contaminant migration from a source term named SWMU 21-011 (k) down DP Canyon. Three dimensional surface plots of data from 1977-1994 are used to portray the transport and redistribution of radioactive contaminants in an alluvial stream channel. An overall decrease in contamination concentration since 1983 has been observed which could be due to more stringent laboratory controls and also to the removal of main plutonium processing laboratories to another site.

  9. 1993 Annual PCB Document for Los Alamos National Laboratory EPA Region VI, January 1, 1993 through December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wechsler, R.J.; Sandoval, T.M.; Bryant, D.E.; Hupke, L.; Esquibel, L.

    1995-12-31

    This document, the {open_quotes}1993 Annual PCB Document for Los Alamos National Laboratory{close_quotes} was prepared to fulffill the requirements of the federal PCB (Polychlorinated Biphenyl) regulation: 40 CFR 761 Subpart J General Records and Reports. The PCB Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Environmental Protection Group, compiled this 1993 Annual PCB Document. The overall format generally follows the sequence of the applicable regulations. Subsection 1.2 cross references those regulatory requirements with the applicable Document Section. The scope of this document also includes status summaries of various aspects of LANL`s PCB Management Program. The intent of this approach to the Annual Document is to provide an overview of LANL`s PCB Management Program and to increase the usefulness of this document as a management tool. Section 2.0, {open_quotes}Status of the PCB Management Program{close_quotes}, discusses the use, generation of waste, and storage of PCBs at LANL. Section 3.0 is the 1993 Annual Document Log required by 761.180(a). This Section also discusses the PCB Management Program`s policies for reporting under those regulatory requirements. Sections 4.0 and 5.0 contain the 1993 Annual Records for off-site and on-site disposal as required by 761.180(b). There is a tab for each manifest and its associated continuation sheets, receipt letters, and certificates of disposal.

  10. Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Outdoor Fire Range Upgrades at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-27

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement actions in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is partially located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to upgrade the existing outdoor shooting range facilities at TA-72. These upgrades will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel. In order to remain current on training requirements, the firing ranges at TA-72 will be upgraded which will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel (Figure 1). These upgrades will allow for an increase in class size and more people to be qualified at the ranges. Some of these upgrades will be built within the 100-year floodplain. The upgrades include: concrete pads for turning target systems and shooting positions, new lighting to illuminate the firing range for night fire, a new speaker system for range operations, canopies at two locations, an impact berm at the far end of the 300-yard mark, and a block wall for road protection.

  11. Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Engineered Erosion Controls at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-27

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement engineering controls in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to rehabilitate the degraded channel in lower Sandia Canyon where it crosses through the outdoor firing range at TA-72 to limit the loss of sediment and dissipate floodwater leaving LANL property (Figure 1). The proposed construction of these engineered controls is part of the New Mexico Environment Department's (NMED) approved LANL Individual Storm Water Permit. The purpose of this project is to install storm water controls at Sandia Watershed Site Monitoring Area 6 (S-SMA-6). Storm water controls will be designed and installed to meet the requirements of NPDES Permit No. NM0030759, commonly referred to as the LANL Individual Storm Water Permit (IP). The storm water control measures address storm water mitigation for the area within the boundary of Area of Concern (AOC) 72-001. This action meets the requirements of the IP for S-SMA-6 for storm water controls by a combination of: preventing exposure of upstream storm water and storm water generated within the channel to the AOC and totally retaining storm water falling outside the channel but within the AOC.

  12. Radiological survey and decontamination of the former main technical area (TA-1) at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlquist, A.J.; Stoker, A.K.; Trocki, L.K. (comps.)

    1977-12-01

    A radiological survey was conducted on the undeveloped portions of the site of the former Main Technical Area (TA-1) of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in north-central New Mexico. Between 1943 and 1965, research work on nuclear weapons was carried out in TA-1. The area was decontaminated and demolished in stages, and beginning in 1966 the land was given to Los Alamos County or sold to private interests. The survey disclosed traces of radioactive contamination undetected or considered insignificant during original demolition in the 1950s and 1960s. The remaining contamination was removed in 1975 and 1976 to levels considered to pose no health or safety hazards and, further, to the lowest levels considered practicable. Methods used in the survey included measurement techniques for detecting alpha emitters such as uranium and plutonium, extensive surface and subsurface soil sampling, and use of conventional health physics instrumentation to provide detailed information on approximately 16 hectares (40 acres) of land. As a result of the decontamination efforts, approximately 15,000 m/sup 3/ of contaminated or potentially contaminated material was removed to an approved radioactive waste disposal site on ERDA property. Full details of the methods, findings, decision criteria, and as-left conditions are documented.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory SAVY-4000 Field Surveillance Plan Update for 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stone, Timothy Amos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Prochnow, David Adrian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weis, Eric M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-17

    The Packaging Surveillance Program section of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual 441.1-1, Nuclear Material Packaging Manual (DOE 2008), requires DOE contractors to “ensure that a surveillance program is established and implemented to ensure the nuclear material storage package continues to meet its design criteria.” The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) SAVY-4000 Field Surveillance Plan was first issued in FY 2013 (Kelly et al. 2013). The surveillance plan is reviewed annually and updated as necessary based on SAVY-4000 surveillance and other surveillance findings, as well as results of the lifetime extension studies (Blair et al. 2012, Weis et al. 2015a). The LANL SAVY-4000 Field Surveillance Plan Update was issued in 2014 (Kelly et al. 2014). This 2016 update reflects changes to the surveillance plan resulting from restrictions on handling residue materials greater than 500 g, the addition of specific engineering judgment containers, and 2015 surveillance findings. The SAVY-4000 container has a design life of five years, which was chosen as a conservative estimate of the functional properties of the materials used in the construction of the SAVY 4000 when exposed to the potential insults including temperature, corrosive materials and gases, and radiation. The SAVY-4000 container design basis is described in a safety analysis report (Anderson et al. 2013). In the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA’s) approval of the safety analysis report, it was recommended that the design life clock begin on March 2014 (Nez et al. 2014). However, it is expected that a technical basis can be developed to extend the design life of the SAVY-4000 containers to approximately 40 years (Blair et al. 2012, Weis et al. 2015a). This surveillance plan update covers five years (2015–2019) and is developed to ensure SAVY-4000 containers meet their design criteria over the current five-year design life and to gather data that can be used in developing the

  14. LOS ALAMOS NEUTRON SCIENCE CENTER CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF FUTURE POWER REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GAVRON, VICTOR I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HILL, TONY S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PITCHER, ERIC J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; TOVESSON, FREDERIK K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-09

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a large spallation neutron complex centered around an 800 MeV high-currently proton accelerator. Existing facilities include a highly-moderated neutron facility (Lujan Center) where neutrons between thermal and keV energies are produced, and the Weapons Neutron Research Center (WNR), where a bare spallation target produces neutrons between 0.1 and several hundred MeV.The LANSCE facility offers a unique capability to provide high precision nuclear data over a large energy region, including that for fast reactor systems. In an ongoing experimental program the fission and capture cross sections are being measured for a number of minor actinides relevant for Generation-IV reactors and transmutation technology. Fission experiments makes use of both the highly moderated spallation neutron spectrum at the Lujan Center, and the unmoderated high energy spectrum at WNR. By combininb measurements at these two facilities the differential fission cross section is measured relative to the {sup 235}U(n,f) standard from subthermal energies up to about 200 MeV. An elaborate data acquisition system is designed to deal with all the different types of background present when spanning 10 energy decades. The first isotope to be measured was {sup 237}Np, and the results were used to improve the current ENDF/B-VII evaluation. Partial results have also been obtained for {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu, and the final results are expected shortly. Capture cross sections are measured at LANSCE using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). This unique instrument is highly efficient in detecting radiative capture events, and can thus handle radioactive samples of half-lives as low as 100 years. A number of capture cross sections important to fast reaction applications have been measured with DANCE. The first measurement was on {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}), and the results have been submitted for publication. Other capture

  15. The impact of two Department of Energy orders on the design and cost of select plutonium facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, V.C.

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a research and development facility in northern New Mexico, owned by the federal government and operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the University of California (UC). LANL conducts research and experiments in many arenas including plutonium. Its plutonium facilities are required to meet the facility design and safety criteria of applicable DOE orders as specified in the UC contract. Although DOE 420.1, Facility Safety, superseded DOE 6430.1A, General Design Criteria, the UC contract requires LANL to adhere to DOE 6430.1A, Division 13 in its special nuclear facilities. A comparison of costs and savings relative to installation of double-wall piping at two LANL plutonium facilities is demonstrated. DOE 6430.1A is prescriptive in its design criteria whereas DOE 420.1 is a performance-based directive. The differences in these orders impact time and design costs in nuclear construction projects. LANL`s approach to integrated quality and conduct of operations for design, needs to be re-evaluated. In conclusion, there is a need for highly-technical, knowledgeable people and an integrated, quality/conduct of operations-based approach to assure that nuclear facilities are designed and constructed in a safe and cost-effective manner.

  16. Geographic Information System (GIS) Emergency Support for the May 2000 Cerro Grande Wildfire, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R.Mynard; G.N.Keating; P.M.Rich; D.R. Bleakly

    2003-05-01

    In May 2000 the Cerro Grande wildfire swept through Los Alamos, New Mexico, burning approximately 17,400 ha (43,000 acres) and causing evacuation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the communities of Los Alamos and White Rock. An integral part of emergency response during the fire was the use of geographic information system (GIS) technology, which continues to be used in support of post-fire restoration and environmental monitoring. During the fire Laboratory GIS staff and volunteers from other organizations worked to produce maps and provide support for emergency managers, including at an emergency GIS facility in Santa Fe. Subsequent to the fire, Laboratory GIS teams supported the multiagency Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER) team to provide GIS data and maps for planning mitigation efforts. The GIS teams continue to help researchers, operations personnel, and managers deal with the tremendous changes caused by the fire. Much of the work is under the auspices of the Cerro Grande Rehabilitation Project (CGRP) to promote recovery from fire damage, improve information exchange, enhance emergency management, and conduct mitigation activities. GIS efforts during the fire provided important lessons about institutional matters, working relationships, and emergency preparedness. These lessons include the importance of (1) an integrated framework for assessing natural and human hazards in a landscape context; (2) a strong GIS capability for emergency response; (3) coordinated emergency plans for GIS operations; (4) a method for employees to report their whereabouts and receive authoritative information during an evacuation; (5) GIS data that are complete, backed-up, and available during an emergency; (6) adaptation of GIS to the circumstances of the emergency; (7) better coordination in the GIS community; (8) better integration of GIS into LANL operations; and (9) a central data warehouse for data and metadata. These lessons are important for planning

  17. Classification of superficial lesions of the eye with an optical biopsy system: First trials with the Los Alamos instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickman, R.D.; Gritz, D.C.; Held, K.S. [Texas Univ. Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Bigio, I.J.; Johnson, T.; Loree, T.R.; Mourant, J.R.; Shimada, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-10-01

    the clinical diagnosis of a lesion often requires that a histological analysis be made of a physical specimen of the suspect tissue. In the present work, the authors have utilized an optical biopsy system (OBS) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory which is safe for patient use and provides a large amount of optical data from the sampled tissue. An earlier version of this system has been used to study age-related changes in the ocular lens (10). The purpose of the present study is to establish the potential clinical utility of the OBS by determining if characteristic features in the optical signatures, obtained from a variety of ophthalmic lesions, are correlated with the histological features of tissue biopsies obtained from these patients.

  18. Pursuing Community-Oriented Primary Care in a Russian Closed Nuclear City: The Sarov–Los Alamos Community Health Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyne, Robert L.; Hertzman, Philip A.

    2002-01-01

    The Russian health care system historically has not relied on medical evidence to guide practice, uses centralized management, and is burdened by overspecialization. In 1999, a community health partnership was established between Sarov, Russia, and Los Alamos, NM, 2 cities linked by their nuclear weapons histories. Health problems addressed include asthma and diabetes, pediatric dental caries, low prevalence of breastfeeding, and adolescent drug abuse and sexually transmitted diseases. A community-oriented primary care approach was adopted that includes (1) implementing a “train the trainers” strategy to educate health professionals and lay people, (2) adapting established clinical practice guidelines based on local resources, (3) restricting use of expensive or limited resources, and (4) securing commitments from local government for expendable supplies and medications. PMID:12406797

  19. Pursuing community-oriented primary care in a Russian closed nuclear city: the Sarov-Los Alamos community health partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyne, Robert L; Hertzman, Philip A

    2002-11-01

    The Russian health care system historically has not relied on medical evidence to guide practice, uses centralized management, and is burdened by overspecialization. In 1999, a community health partnership was established between Sarov, Russia, and Los Alamos, NM, 2 cities linked by their nuclear weapons histories. Health problems addressed include asthma and diabetes, pediatric dental caries, low prevalence of breastfeeding, and adolescent drug abuse and sexually transmitted diseases. A community-oriented primary care approach was adopted that includes (1) implementing a "train the trainers" strategy to educate health professionals and lay people, (2) adapting established clinical practice guidelines based on local resources, (3) restricting use of expensive or limited resources, and (4) securing commitments from local government for expendable supplies and medications.

  20. The Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore Laboratories: Integration and collaboration solving science and technology problems for the nation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    More than 40 years ago, three laboratories were established to take on scientific responsibility for the nation`s nuclear weapons - Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore. This triad of laboratories has provided the state-of-the-art science and technology to create America`s nuclear deterrent and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and reliable. These national security laboratories carried out their responsibilities through intense efforts involving almost every field of science, engineering, and technology. Today, they are recognized as three of the world`s premier research and development laboratories. This report sketches the history of the laboratories and their evolution to an integrated three-laboratory system. The characteristics that make them unique are described and some of the major contributions they have made over the years are highlighted.

  1. An assessment of Microtox{trademark} as a biomonitoring tool for whole effluent testing for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachritz, W.H. II; Morrow, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    1994-06-13

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has special discharge problems relating to potential radioactive content of the effluent discharge waters. Because of this all testing must be performed on-site and results must be rapidly determined. There is a need to examine the development of a real-time procedure for effluent biomonitoring to met these site limitations. The Microtox{trademark} unit for toxicity testing is a microbially-based test system that shows great promise to be used for WET testing. The overall goal of this study is to develop an acceptable protocol for operational biomonitoring using the Microtox {trademark} toxicity test for LANL. The specific objectives include: development of an appropriate toxicity testing protocol using the Microtox{trademark} toxicity test for whole effluent toxicity testing and evaluation of the protocol based on factors such as sensitivity, response time, cost of analysis, and simplicity of operation.

  2. Floodplain Assessment for the North Ancho Canyon Aggregate Area Cleanup in Technical Area 39 at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles Dean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-26

    This floodplain assessment was prepared in accordance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1022 Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements, which was promulgated to implement the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements under Executive Order 11988 Floodplain Management and Executive Order 11990 Wetlands Protection. According to 10 CFR 1022, a 100-year floodplain is defined as “the lowlands adjoining inland and coastal waters and relatively flat areas and flood prone areas of offshore islands.” In this action, DOE is proposing to collect soil investigation samples and remove contaminated soil within and around selected solid waste management units (SWMUs) near and within the 100-year floodplain (hereafter “floodplain”) in north Ancho Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The work is being performed to comply with corrective action requirements under the 2016 Compliance Order on Consent.

  3. Studies of annual and seasonal variations in four species of reptiles and amphibians at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, E.I.; Haarmann, T.; Keller, D.C.; Foxx, T.

    1998-11-01

    Baseline studies of reptiles and amphibians of the Pajarito wetlands at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been conducted by the Ecology group since 1990. With the gathered data from 1990--1997 (excluding 1992), they plan to determine if patterns can be found in the annual and seasonal population changes of four species of reptiles and amphibians over the past seven years. The four species studied are the Woodhouse toad, the western chorus frog, the many-linked skink, and the plateau striped whiptail lizard. Statistical analysis results show that significant changes occurred on a seasonal basis for the western chorus frog and the many-lined skink. Results indicate a significant difference in the annual population of the Woodhouse toad.

  4. Studies of Annual and Seasonal Variations in Four Species of Reptiles and Amphibians at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, D.C.; Nelson, E.I.; Mullen, M.A.; Foxx, T.S.; Haarmann, T.K.

    1998-07-01

    Baseline studies of reptiles and amphibians of the Pajarito wetlands at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been conducted by the Ecology group since 1990. With the data gathered from 1990-1997 (excluding 1992), we examined the annual and seasonal population changes of four species of reptiles and amphibians over the past seven years. The four species studied are the Woodhouse toad (Bufo woodhousii), the western chorus frog (Pseudacris triseriata), the many-lined skink (Eunzeces nudtivirgatus), and the plateau striped whiptail lizard (Cnemidophorus velox). Statistical analyses indicate a significant change on a seasonal basis for the western chorus frog and the many-lined skink. Results indicate a significant difference in the annual population of the Woodhouse toad.

  5. Medium-beta superconducting cavity tests at Los Alamos National Laboratory for high-current, proton accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, W.B.; Rusnak, B.; Chan, K.C.D.; Krawcyzk, F.; Shapiro, A.; Bibeau, R.; Gentzlinger, B.; Montoya, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Safa, H. [C.E. Saclay DSM/DAPNIA/SEA (France)

    1998-08-01

    Single-cell superconducting cavities are currently being evaluated for use in high-current proton accelerator applications being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The designs that have been evaluated so far include 0.48 and 0.64 beta cavities. The parameters that have been checked are: peak surface electric field, magnetic quench field, multipacting levels, cavity Q, and propensity for Q disease. In limited tests to date, peak surface fields of 43 MV/m, and quench fields up to 103 mT have been achieved. Q{sub 0} values have been typically 1 {times} 10{sup 10} at 2 K, with a reduction of about 30% after being held at 150 K for two hours. While some conditioning barriers were eliminated, no obvious multipactor zones were found.

  6. Environmental assessment for transuranic waste work-off plan, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Rough draft: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-26

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates transuranic (TRU) waste in a variety of programs related to national defense. TRU waste is a specific class of radioactive waste requiring permanent isolation. Most defense-related TRU waste will be permanently disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). WIPP is a deep geologic repository located in southeastern New Mexico and is now in the testing phase of development. All waste received by Wipp must conform with established Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The purpose of the proposed action is to retrieve stored TRU waste and prepare the waste for shipment to and disposal WIPP. Stored TRU waste LANL is represented by four waste forms. The facilities necessary for work-off activities are tailored to the treatment and preparation of these four waste forms. Preparation activities for newly generated TRU waste are also covered by this action.

  7. Floristic composition and plant succession on near-surface radioactive-waste-disposal facilities in the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierney, G.D.; Foxx, T.S.

    1982-03-01

    Since 1946, low-level radioactive waste has been buried in shallow landfills within the confines of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Five of these sites were studied for plant composition and successional patterns by reconnaissance and vegetation mapping. The data show a slow rate of recovery for all sites, regardless of age, in both the pinon-juniper and ponderosa pine communities. The sites are not comparable in succession or composition because of location and previous land use. The two oldest sites have the highest species diversity and the only mature trees. All sites allowed to revegetate naturally tend to be colonized by the same species that originally surrounded the sites. Sites on historic fields are colonized by the old field flora, whereas those in areas disturbed only by grazing are revegetated by the local native flora.

  8. A legacy of the ""megagoule committee,"" thirty years of explosive pulsed power research and development at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goforth, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oona, Henn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrera, Dennis H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Torres, David T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tasker, D. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meyer, R. K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atchison, W. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, C. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, R. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turchi, P. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watt, R. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-29

    In 1980, Los Alamos formed the 'Megajoule Committee' with the expressed goal of developing a one Megajoule plasma radiation source. The ensuing research and development has given rise to a wide variety of high explosive pulsed power accomplishments, and there is a continuous stream of work that continues to the present. A variety of flux compression generators (FCGs or generators) have been designed and tested, and a number of pulse shortening schemes have been investigated. Supporting computational tools have been developed in parallel with experiments. No fewer that six unique systems have been developed and used for experiments. This paper attempts to pull together the technical details, achievements, and wisdom amassed during the intervening thirty years, and notes how we would push for increased performance in the future.

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory: A guide to records series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each series of records that pertains to the epidemiologic studies conducted by the Epidemiology Section of the Occupational Medicine Group (ESH-2) at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The records described in this guide relate to occupational studies performed by the Epidemiology Section, including those pertaining to workers at LANL, Mound Plant, Oak Ridge Reservation, Pantex Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, and Savannah River Site. Also included are descriptions of other health-related records generated or collected by the Epidemiology Section and a small set of records collected by the Industrial Hygiene and Safety Group. This guide is not designed to describe the universe of records generated by LANL which may be used for epidemiologic studies of the LANL work force. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of LANL the history and functions of LANL`s Health Division and Epidemiology Section, and the various epidemiologic studies performed by the Epidemiology Section. It provides information on the methodology that HAI used to inventory and describe records housed in the offices of the LANL Epidemiology Section in Technical Area 59 and at the LANL Records Center. Other topics include the methodology used to produce the guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to records repositories.

  10. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1981. [Leading abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G. (comps.)

    1982-10-01

    This report summarizes research and development activities of the Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's Biomedical and Environmental Research program for the calendar year 1981. Individual reports describing the current status of projects have been entered individually into the data base.

  11. Los Angeles, California Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Los Angeles, California Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST)...

  12. A history of the working group to address Los Alamos community health concerns - A case study of community involvement and risk communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry Otway; Jon Johnson

    2000-01-01

    In May 1991, at a Department of Energy (DOE) public hearing at Los Alamos, New Mexico, a local artist claimed there had been a recent brain tumor cluster in a small Los Alamos neighborhood. He suggested the cause was radiation from past operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Data from the Laboratory's extensive environmental monitoring program gave no reason to believe this charge to be true but also could not prove it false. These allegations, reported in the local and regional media, alarmed the community and revealed an unsuspected lack of trust in the Laboratory. Having no immediate and definitive response, the Laboratory offered to collaborate with the community to address this concern. The Los Alamos community accepted this offer and a joint Community-Laboratory Working Group met for the first time 29 days later. The working group set as its primary goal the search for possible carcinogens in the local environment. Meanwhile, the DOE announced its intention to fund the New Mexico Department of Health to perform a separate and independent epidemiological study of all Los Alamos cancer rates. In early 1994, after commissioning 17 environmental studies and meeting 34 times, the working group decided that the public health concerns had been resolved to the satisfaction of the community and voted to disband. This paper tells the story of the artist and the working group, and how the media covered their story. It summarizes the environmental studies directed by the working group and briefly reviews the main findings of the epidemiology study. An epilogue records the present-day recollections of some of the key players in this environmental drama.

  13. High-precision geologic mapping to evaluate the potential for seismic surface rupture at TA-55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, J.N.; Lavine, A.; Vaniman, D.; WoldeGabriel, G.

    1998-06-01

    In this report the authors document results of high-precision geologic mapping in the vicinity of TA-55 that has been done to identify parts of the southern portion of the Rendija Canyon Fault, or any other faults, with the potential for seismic surface rupture. To assess the potential for surface rupture at TA-55, an area of approximately 3 square miles that includes the Los Alamos County Landfill and Twomile, Mortandad, and Sandia Canyons has been mapped in detail. Map units are mostly cooling or flow units within the Tshirege Member (1.2 Ma) of the Bandelier Tuff. Stratigraphic markers that are useful for determining offsets in the map area include a distinct welding break at or near the cooling Unit 2-Unit 3 contact, and the Unit 3-Unit 4 contact. At the County Landfill the contact between the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff and overlying Quaternary alluvium has also been mapped. The mapping indicates that there is no faulting in the near-surface directly below TA-55, and that the closest fault is about 1500 feet west of the Plutonium Facility. Faulting is more abundant on the western edge of the map area, west of TA-48 in uppermost Mortandad Canyon, upper Sandia Canyon, and at the County Landfill. Measured vertical offsets on the faults range from 1 to 8 feet on mapped Bandelier Tuff contacts. Faulting exposed at the Los Alamos County Landfill has deformed a zone over 1000 feet wide, and has a net vertical down-to-the-west displacement of at least 15 feet in the Bandelier Tuff. Individual faults at the landfill have from less than 1 foot to greater than 15 feet of vertical offset on the Bandelier Tuff. Most faults in the landfill trend N-S, N20W, or N45E. Results of the mapping indicate that the Rendija Canyon Fault does not continue directly south to TA-55. At present, the authors have insufficient data to connect faulting they have mapped to areas of known faulting to the north or south of the study area.

  14. Geology of the Western Part of Los Alamos National Laboratory (TA-3 to TA-16), Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.J.Lewis; A.Lavine; S.L.Reneau; J.N.Gardner; R.Channell; C.W.Criswell

    2002-12-01

    We present data that elucidate the stratigraphy, geomorphology, and structure in the western part of Los Alamos National Laboratory between Technical Areas 3 and 16 (TA-3 and TA-16). Data include those gathered by geologic mapping of surficial, post-Bandelier Tuff strata, conventional and high-precision geologic mapping and geochemical analysis of cooling units within the Bandelier Tuff, logging of boreholes and a gas pipeline trench, and structural analysis using profiles, cross sections, structure contour maps, and stereographic projections. This work contributes to an improved understanding of the paleoseismic and geomorphic history of the area, which will aid in future seismic hazard evaluations and other investigations. The study area lies at the base of the main, 120-m (400-ft) high escarpment formed by the Pajarito fault, an active fault of the Rio Grande rift that bounds Los Alamos National Laboratory on the west. Subsidiary fracturing, faulting, and folding associated with the Pajarito fault zone extends at least 1,500 m (5,000 ft) to the east of the main Pajarito fault escarpment. Stratigraphic units in the study area include upper units of the Tshirege Member of the early Pleistocene Bandelier Tuff, early Pleistocene alluvial fan deposits that predate incision of canyons on this part of the Pajarito Plateau, and younger Pleistocene and Holocene alluvium and colluvium that postdate drainage incision. We discriminate four sets of structures in the area between TA-3 and TA-16: (a) north-striking faults and folds that mark the main zone of deformation, including a graben in the central part of the study area; (b) north-northwest-striking fractures and rare faults that bound the eastern side of the principal zone of deformation and may be the surface expression of deep-seated faulting; (c) rare northeast-striking structures near the northern limit of the area associated with the southern end of the Rendija Canyon fault; and (d) several small east

  15. A spatially-dynamic preliminary risk assessment of the bald eagle at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, G.J.; Gallegos, A.F.; Foxx, T.S.; Fresquez, P.R.; Mullen, M.A.; Pratt, L.E.; Gomez, P.E.

    1998-04-01

    The Endangered Species Act of 1973 and the Record of Decision on the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) require that the Department of Energy protect the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), a state and federally listed species, from stressors such as contaminants. A preliminary risk assessment of the bald eagle was performed using a custom FORTRAN code, ECORSK5, and the geographical information system. Estimated exposure doses to the eagle for radionuclide, inorganic metal, and organic contaminants were derived for varying ratios of aquatic vs. terrestrial simulated diet and compared against toxicity reference values to generate hazard indices (His). HI results indicate that no appreciable impact to the bald eagle is expected from contaminants at LANL from soil ingestion and food consumption pathways. This includes a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants that assumes linear additive toxicity. Improving model realism by weighting simulated eagle foraging based on distance from potential roost sites increased the HI by 76%, but still to inconsequential levels. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, eagle habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations in order to maintain risk from contaminants at low levels.

  16. Data and Model-Driven Decision Support for Environmental Management of a Chromium Plume at Los Alamos National Laboratory - 13264

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Broxton, David; Birdsell, Kay; Reneau, Steven; Harp, Dylan; Mishra, Phoolendra [Computational Earth Science - EES-16, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 (United States); Katzman, Danny; Goering, Tim [Environmental Programs (ADEP), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 (United States); Vaniman, David; Longmire, Pat; Fabryka-Martin, June; Heikoop, Jeff; Ding, Mei; Hickmott, Don; Jacobs, Elaine [Earth Systems Observations - EES-14, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A series of site investigations and decision-support analyses have been performed related to a chromium plume in the regional aquifer beneath the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Based on the collected data and site information, alternative conceptual and numerical models representing governing subsurface processes with different complexity and resolution have been developed. The current conceptual model is supported by multiple lines of evidence based on comprehensive analyses of the available data and modeling results. The model is applied for decision-support analyses related to estimation of contaminant- arrival locations and chromium mass flux reaching the regional aquifer, and to optimization of a site monitoring-well network. Plume characterization is a challenging and non-unique problem because multiple models and contamination scenarios are consistent with the site data and conceptual knowledge. To solve this complex problem, an advanced methodology based on model calibration and uncertainty quantification has been developed within the computational framework MADS (http://mads.lanl.gov). This work implements high-performance computing and novel, efficient and robust model analysis techniques for optimization and uncertainty quantification (ABAGUS, Squads, multi-try (multi-start) techniques), which allow for solving problems with large degrees of freedom. (authors)

  17. Trace Elements, With Special Reference to Mercury, in Fish Collected Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. R. Fresquez; J. D. Huchton; M. A. Mullen

    1999-11-01

    Trace elements (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cr, Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Tl) were determined in muscle (fillet) of average sized fish (mostly carp, catfish, and sucker) collected from the confluences of major canyons that cross Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) lands with the Rio Grande (RG). Also, trace elements were determined in fish from reservoirs upstream (Abiquiu [AR]) and downstream (Cochiti [CR]) of LANL from 1991 through 1999. In general, all of the (mean) trace elements, including Hg, were either at the limits of detection (LOD) or in low concentrations at all study sites. Of the trace elements (e.g., Ba, Cu, and Hg) that were found to be above the LOD in fish muscle collected from LANL canyons/RG, none were in significantly higher (p < 0.05) concentrations than in muscle of fish collected from background locations. Mercury concentrations (mean of means) in fish from AR (all other trace elements were at LOD) were significantly higher (p < 0.10) than Hg concentrations in fish from CR, and Hg concentrations in fish collected from both reservoirs exhibited significantly (AR = p <0.05 and CR = p < 0.10) decreasing trends over time.

  18. Ray Tracing through the Edge Focusing of Rectangular Benders and an Improved Model for the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolski, Jeffrey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barlow, David B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macek, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCrady, Rodney C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Particle ray tracing through simulated 3D magnetic fields was executed to investigate the effective quadrupole strength of the edge focusing of the rectangular bending magnets in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). The particle rays receive a kick in the edge field of the rectangular dipole. A focal length may be calculated from the particle tracking and related to the fringe field integral (FINT) model parameter. This tech note introduces the baseline lattice model of the PSR and motivates the need for an improvement in the baseline model's vertical tune prediction, which differs from measurement by .05. An improved model of the PSR is created by modifying the fringe field integral parameter to those suggested by the ray tracing investigation. This improved model is then verified against measurement at the nominal PSR operating set point and at set points far away from the nominal operating conditions. Lastly, Linear Optics from Closed Orbits (LOCO) is employed in an orbit response matrix method for model improvement to verify the quadrupole strengths of the improved model.

  19. Summary of a Gas Transport Tracer Test in the Deep Cerros Del Rio Basalts, Mesita del Buey, Los Alamos NM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rahn, Thomas A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ortiz, John Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Salazar, Larry Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Snyder, Emily Elisabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-16

    Here we describe results from a tracer test in the Cerros del Rio basalt beneath Mesita del Buey, Technical Area 54 (TA-54) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory). This report follows from plans outlined in our previous Tracer Test Work Plan (LANL 2016). These activities were conducted by LANL to further characterize subsurface properties of the Cerros del Rio basalts at Material Disposal Area (MDA) L (Figure 1.1-1). The work presented follows from the “Interim Measures Work Plan for Soil-Vapor Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Material Disposal Area L, Technical Area 54, Revision 1,” submitted to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in September 2014 (LANL 2014). Remediation of the MDA L vapor plume by soil-vapor extraction (SVE) is recommended as part of the final remedy in the “Corrective Measures Evaluation Report for Material Disposal Area L, Solid Waste Management Unit 54-006, at Technical Area 54, Revision 2” to meet a remedial action objective of preventing groundwater from being impacted above a regulatory standard by the transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to groundwater through soil vapor (LANL 2011).

  20. Stratigraphy and Geologic Structure at the SCC and NISC Building Sites, Technical Area 3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavine, A.; Krier, D.; Caporuscio, F.; Gardner, J.

    1998-09-01

    Ten closely spaced, shallow (<100 ft) drill cores were obtained from the 1.22-Ma-old Bandelier Tuff at a 4-acre site for proposed construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. The goal of the investigation was to identify faults that may have potential for earthquake-induced surface ruptures at the site. Careful mapping of contact surfaces within the Bandelier Tuff was supplemented with results of geochemical analyses to establish unit boundaries with a high degree of accuracy. Analysis shows that the upper contact surface of Unit 3 of the Bandelier Tuff provides no evidence of faults beneath the building site, and that the subsurface structure is consistent with a shallowly dipping (< 2{degree}), unbroken block. Because no significant or cumulative faulting events have disturbed the site in the last 1.22 million years, it is unlikely that surface rupture will occur at the site in future large earthquakes. Uncertainty analysis suggests that this method would detect faults with {ge}2 ft of cumulative stratigraphic separation.

  1. Detection of gastrointestinal cancer by elastic scattering and absorption spectroscopies with the Los Alamos Optical Biopsy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourant, J.R.; Boyer, J.; Johnson, T.M.; Lacey, J.; Bigio, I.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bohorfoush, A. [Wisconsin Medical School, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Gastroenterology; Mellow, M. [Univ. of Oklahoma Medical School, Oklahoma City, OK (United States). Dept. of Gastroenterology

    1995-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has continued the development of the Optical Biopsy System (OBS) for noninvasive, real-time in situ diagnosis of tissue pathologies. In proceedings of earlier SPIE conferences we reported on clinical measurements in the bladder, and we report here on recent results of clinical tests in the gastrointestinal tract. With the OBS, tissue pathologies are detected/diagnosed using spectral measurements of the elastic optical transport properties (scattering and absorption) of the tissue over a wide range of wavelengths. The use of elastic scattering as the key to optical tissue diagnostics in the OBS is based on the fact that many tissue pathologies, including a majority of cancer forms, exhibit significant architectural changes at the cellular and sub-cellular level. Since the cellular components that cause elastic scattering have dimensions typically on the order of visible to near-IR wavelengths, the elastic (Mie) scattering properties will be wavelength dependent. Thus, morphology and size changes can be expected to cause significant changes m an optical signature that is derived from the wavelength-dependence of elastic scattering. Additionally, the optical geometry of the OBS beneficially enhances its sensitivity for measuring absorption bands. The OBS employs a small fiber-optic probe that is amenable to use with any endoscope or catheter, or to direct surface examination, as well as interstitial needle insertion. Data acquistion/display time is <1 second.

  2. Inspection of alleged design and construction deficiencies in the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-16

    On June 8, 1994, the Office of Inspections, Office of Inspector General (OIG), Department of Energy (DOE), received a letter dated May 31, 1994, from a complainant concerning the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The complainant alleged that the NMSF, completed in 1987, was so poorly designed and constructed that it was never usable and that DOE proposed to gut the entire facility and sandblast the walls. According to the complainant, ``these errors are so gross as to constitute professional malpractice in a commercial design setting.`` The complainant further stated that ``DOE proposes to renovate this facility to store large amounts of plutonium (as much as 30 metric tons, by some accounts), and it is imperative that the public receive some assurance that this waste will not recur and that the facility will be made safe.`` The purpose of our inspection was to determine if the allegations regarding the design and construction of the NMSF were accurate, and if so, to determine if the Government could recover damages from the Architect/Engineer and/or the construction contractor. We also reviewed the Department`s proposed actions to renovate the NMSF.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory summary plan to fabricate mixed oxide lead assemblies for the fissile material disposition program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buksa, J.J.; Eaton, S.L.; Trellue, H.R.; Chidester, K.; Bowidowicz, M.; Morley, R.A.; Barr, M.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes an approach for using existing Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel-fabrication and plutonium processing capabilities to expedite and assure progress in the MOX/Reactor Plutonium Disposition Program. Lead Assembly MOX fabrication is required to provide prototypic fuel for testing in support of fuel qualification and licensing requirements. It is also required to provide a bridge for the full utilization of the European fabrication experience. In part, this bridge helps establish, for the first time since the early 1980s, a US experience base for meeting the safety, licensing, safeguards, security, and materials control and accountability requirements of the Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In addition, a link is needed between the current research and development program and the production of disposition mission fuel. This link would also help provide a knowledge base for US regulators. Early MOX fabrication and irradiation testing in commercial nuclear reactors would provide a positive demonstration to Russia (and to potential vendors, designers, fabricators, and utilities) that the US has serious intent to proceed with plutonium disposition. This report summarizes an approach to fabricating lead assembly MOX fuel using the existing MOX fuel-fabrication infrastructure at the Laboratory.

  4. Mercury in Fish Collected Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico: 1991--2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.R. Fresquez

    2004-10-15

    Small amounts of mercury (Hg) may exist in some canyon drainage systems within Los Alamos National Laboratory lands as a result of past discharges of untreated effluents. This paper reports on the concentrations of Hg in muscle (fillets) of various types of fish species collected downstream of LANL's influence from 1991 through 2004. The mean Hg concentration in fish from Cochiti reservoir (0.22 {micro}g/g wet weight), which is located downstream of LANL, was similar to fish collected from a reservoir upstream of LANL (Abiquiu) (0.26 {micro}g/g wet weight). Mercury concentrations in fish collected from both reservoirs exhibited significantly (Abiquiu = p < 0.05 and Cochiti = p < 0.10) decreasing trends over time. Predator fish like the northern pike (Esox lucius) contained significantly higher concentrations of Hg (0.39 {micro}g/g wet weight) than bottom-feeding fish like the white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) (0.10 {micro}g/g wet weight).

  5. 2016 Results for Avian Monitoring at the TA-36 Minie Site, TA-39 Point 6, and TA-16 Burn Ground at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles Dean [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Brent E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berryhill, Jesse Tobias [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-01-23

    Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) biologists in the Environmental Compliance and Protection Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) initiated a multi-year program in 2013 to monitor avifauna at two open detonation sites and one open burn site on LANL property. Monitoring results from these efforts are compared among years and with avifauna monitoring conducted at other areas across LANL. The objectives of this study are to determine whether LANL firing site operations impact bird abundance or diversity. LANS biologists completed the fourth year of this effort in 2016. The overall results from 2016 continue to indicate that operations are not negatively affecting bird populations. Data suggest that community structure may be changing at some sites and this trend will continue to be monitored.

  6. Nuclear accident dosimetry: Los Alamos measurements at the seventeenth nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study at the Oak Ridge National Lab. , DOSAR Facility, August 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilik, D.G.; Martin, R.W.

    1981-04-01

    Teams from various US and foreign organizations participated in the Seventeenth Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Study held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) facility August 11 to 15, 1980. Criticality dosimeters were simultaneously exposed to pulses of mixed neutron and gamma radiation from the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR). This report summarizes the experimental work conducted by the Los Alamos team. In-air and phantom measurements were conducted by the Los Alamos team using area and personnel dosimeters. Combined blood sodium and sulfur fluence measurements of absorbed dose were also made. In addition, indium foils placed on phantoms were evaluated for the purpose of screening personnel for radiation exposure. All measurements were conducted for unshielded, 5-cm steel and 20-cm concrete shielding configurations. All participant dosimeters were exposed at 3 m from the center of the HPRR core.

  7. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan for the TA-60-01 Heavy Equipment Shop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Revision 3, January 2018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgin, Jillian Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    This Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) was developed in accordance with the provisions of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. §§1251 et seq., as amended), and the Multi-Sector General Permit for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Industrial Activity (U.S. EPA, June 2015) issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and using the industry specific permit requirements for Sector P-Land Transportation and Warehousing as a guide. This SWPPP applies to discharges of stormwater from the operational areas of the TA-60-01 Heavy Equipment Shop at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Los Alamos National Laboratory (also referred to as LANL or the “Laboratory”) is owned by the Department of Energy (DOE), and is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). Throughout this document, the term “facility” refers to the TA-60-01 Heavy Equipment Shop and associated areas. The current permit expires at midnight on June 4, 2020.

  8. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan for the TA-03-22 Power and Steam Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Revision 3, January 2018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgin, Jillian Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    This Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) was developed in accordance with the provisions of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. §§1251 et seq., as amended), and the Multi-Sector General Permit for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Industrial Activity (U.S. EPA, June 2015) issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and using the industry specific permit requirements for Sector O-Steam Electric Generating Facilities as a guide. This SWPPP applies to discharges of stormwater from the operational areas of the TA-03-22 Power and Steam Plant at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Los Alamos National Laboratory (also referred to as LANL or the “Laboratory”) is owned by the Department of Energy (DOE), and is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). Throughout this document, the term “facility” refers to the TA-03-22 Power and Steam Plant and associated areas. The current permit expires at midnight on June 4, 2020.

  9. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan for the TA-03-38 Carpenter's Shop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Revision 3, January 2018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgin, Jillian Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    This Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) was developed in accordance with the provisions of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. §§1251 et seq., as amended), and the Multi-Sector General Permit for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Industrial Activity (U.S. EPA, June 2015) issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and using the industry specific permit requirements for Sector A–Timber Products, Subsector A4 (Wood Products Facilities not elsewhere classified) as a guide. This SWPPP applies to discharges of stormwater from the operational areas of the TA-03-38 Carpenter’s Shop at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Los Alamos National Laboratory (also referred to as LANL or the “Laboratory”) is owned by the Department of Energy (DOE), and is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). Throughout this document, the term “facility” refers to the TA-03-38 Carpenter’s Shop and associated areas. The current permit expires at midnight on June 4, 2020.

  10. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan for the TA-03-38 Metals Fabrication Shop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Revision 3, January 2018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgin, Jillian Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    This Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) was developed in accordance with the provisions of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. §§1251 et seq., as amended), and the Multi-Sector General Permit for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Industrial Activity (U.S. EPA, June 2015) issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and using the industry specific permit requirements for Sector AA-Fabricated Metal Products as a guide. This SWPPP applies to discharges of stormwater from the operational areas of the TA-03-38 Metals Fabrication Shop at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Los Alamos National Laboratory (also referred to as LANL or the “Laboratory”) is owned by the Department of Energy (DOE), and is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). Throughout this document, the term “facility” refers to the TA-03-38 Metals Fabrication Shop and associated areas. The current permit expires at midnight on June 4, 2020.

  11. Characterization of the Los Alamos IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser using multiple optical paths and laser focusing optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewski, John O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bernal, John E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Fiber laser technology has been identified as the replacement power source for the existing Los Alamos TA-55 production laser welding system. An IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser was purchased, installed at SM-66 R3, and accepted in February 2008. No characterization of the laser and no welding was performed in the Feb 2008 to May 2009 interval. T. Lienert and J. Bernal (Ref. 1, July 2009) determined the existing 200 mm Rofin collimator and focus heads used with the Rofin diode pumped lasers were inadequate for use with the IPG laser due to clipping of the IPG laser beam. Further efforts in testing of the IPG laser with Optoskand fiber delivery optics and a Rofin 120 mm collimator proved problematic due to optical fiber damage. As a result, IPG design optical fibers were purchased as replacements for subsequent testing. Within the same interval, an IPG fiber-to-fiber (F2F) connector, custom built for LANL, (J. Milewski, S. Gravener, Ref.2) was demonstrated and accepted at IPG Oxford, MA in August 2009. An IPG service person was contracted to come to LANL to assist in the installation, training, troubleshooting and characterization of the multiple beam paths and help perform laser head optics characterization. The statement of work is provided below: In summary the laser system, optical fibers, F2F connector, Precitec head, and a modified Rofin type (w/120mm Optoskand collimator) IWindowIBoot system focus head (Figure 1) were shown to perform well at powers up to 6 kW CW. Power measurements, laser spot size measurements, and other characterization data and lessons learned are contained within this report. In addition, a number of issues were identified that will require future resolution.

  12. The Los Alamos.confEic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) for Space Weather Specification and Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, G.; Freidel, R.; Chen, Y.; Koller, J.; Henderson, M.

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) was developed at Los Alamos.confEnal Laboratory to assess, quantify, and predict the hazards from the natural space environment and the anthropogenic environment produced by high altitude nuclear explosions (HANE). DREAM was initially developed as a basic research activity to understand and predict the dynamics of the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. It uses Kalman filter techniques to assimilate data from space environment instruments with a physics-based model of the radiation belts. DREAM can assimilate data from a variety of types of instruments and data with various levels of resolution and fidelity by assigning appropriate uncertainties to the observations. Data from any spacecraft orbit can be assimilated but DREAM was designed to function with as few as two spacecraft inputs: one from geosynchronous orbit and one from GPS orbit. With those inputs, DREAM can be used to predict the environment at any satellite in any orbit whether space environment data are available in those orbits or not. Even with very limited data input and relatively simple physics models, DREAM specifies the space environment in the radiation belts to a high level of accuracy. DREAM has been extensively tested and evaluated as we transition from research to operations. We report here on one set of test results in which we predict the environment in a highly-elliptical polar orbit. We also discuss long-duration reanalysis for spacecraft design, using DREAM for real-time operations, and prospects for 1-week forecasts of the radiation belt environment.

  13. A spatially-dynamic preliminary risk assessment of the American peregrine falcon at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (version 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Gonzales, G.J.; Bennett, K.D. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The Endangered Species Act and the Record of Decision on the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory require protection of the American peregrine falcon. A preliminary risk assessment of the peregrine was performed using a custom FORTRAN model and a geographical information system. Estimated doses to the falcon were compared against toxicity reference values to generate hazard indices. Hazard index results indicated no unacceptable risk to the falcon from the soil ingestion pathway, including a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants that assumes a linear additive toxicity type. Scaling home ranges on the basis of maximizing falcon height for viewing prey decreased estimated risk by 69% in a canyons-based home range and increased estimated risk by 40% in a river-based home range. Improving model realism by weighting simulated falcon foraging based on distance from potential nest sites decreased risk by 93% in one exposure unit and by 82% in a second exposure unit. It was demonstrated that choice of toxicity reference values can have a substantial impact on risk estimates. Adding bioaccumulation factors for several organics increased partial hazard quotients by a factor of 110, but increased the mean hazard index by only 0.02 units. Adding a food consumption exposure pathway in the form of biomagnification factors for 15 contaminants of potential ecological concern increased the mean hazard index to 1.16 ({+-} 1.0), which is above the level of acceptability (1.0). Aroclor-1254, dichlorodiphenyltrichlorethane (DDT) and dichlorodiphenylethelyne (DDE) accounted for 81% of the estimated risk that includes soil ingestion and food consumption Contaminant pathways and a biomagnification component. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, falcon habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations. 123 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Key regulatory drivers affecting shipments of mixed transuranic waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, P.B.; Bacigalupa, G.A.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Sinkule, B.J. [and others

    1997-02-01

    A number of key regulatory drivers affect the nature, scope, and timing of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL`s) plans for mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which are planned to commence as soon as possible following WIPP`s currently anticipated November, 1997 opening date. This paper provides an overview of some of the key drivers at LANL, particularly emphasizing those associated with the hazardous waste component of LANL`s MTRU waste (MTRU, like any mixed waste, contains both a radioactive and a hazardous waste component). The key drivers discussed here derive from the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and its amendments, including the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAU), and from the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (NMHWA). These statutory provisions are enforced through three major mechanisms: facility RCRA permits; the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, set forth in the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 4, Part 1: and compliance orders issued to enforce these requirements. General requirements in all three categories will apply to MTRU waste management and characterization activities at both WIPP and LANL. In addition, LANL is subject to facility-specific requirements in its RCRA hazardous waste facility permit, permit conditions as currently proposed in RCRA Part B permit applications presently being reviewed by the New Mexico Environment Department (NNED), and facility-specific compliance orders related to MTRU waste management. Likewise, permitting and compliance-related requirements specific to WIPP indirectly affect LANL`s characterization, packaging, record-keeping, and transportation requirements for MTRU waste. LANL must comply with this evolving set of regulatory requirements to begin shipments of MTRU waste to WIPP in a timely fashion.

  15. Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, December 1992--October 1993. Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, S. [Ewing Technical Design, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-09-01

    In the summer of 1990, an accidental spill from the TA-3 Power Plant Environment Tank released more than 3,785 liters of sulfuric acid into upper Sandia Canyon. The Biological Resource Evaluation Team (BRET) of EM-8 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected aquatic samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since then. These field studies gather water quality measurements and collect macroinvertebrates from permanent sampling sites. An earlier report by Bennett (1994) discusses previous BRET aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands Bennett`s initial findings. During 1993, BRET collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates at five permanent stations within the canyon. The substrates of the upper three stations are largely sands and silts while the substrates of the two lower stations are largely rock and cobbles. The two upstream stations are located near outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent. The third station is within a natural cattail marsh, approximately 0.4 km (0.25 mi) downstream from Stations SC1 and SC2. Water quality parameters are slightly different at these first three stations from those expected of natural streams, suggesting slightly degraded water quality. Correspondingly, the macroinvertebrate communities at these stations are characterized by low diversities and poorly-developed community structures. The two downstream stations appear to be in a zone of recovery, where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams of the area. Macroinvertebrate diversity increases and community structure becomes more complex at the two lower stations, which are further indications of improved water quality downstream.

  16. Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics Lecture: Big, Bigger, Too Big? From Los Alamos to Fermilab and the SSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoddeson, Lillian

    2012-03-01

    The modern era of big science emerged during World War II. Oppenheimer's Los Alamos laboratory offered the quintessential model of a government-funded, mission-oriented facility directed by a strong charismatic leader. The postwar beneficiaries of this model included the increasingly ambitious large laboratories that participated in particle physics--in particular, Brookhaven, SLAC, and Fermilab. They carried the big science they practiced into a new realm where experiments eventually became as large and costly as entire laboratories had been. Meanwhile the available funding grew more limited causing the physics research to be concentrated into fewer and bigger experiments that appeared never to end. The next phase in American high-energy physics was the Superconducting Super Collider, the most costly pure physics project ever attempted. The SSC's termination was a tragedy for American science, but for historians it offers an opportunity to understand what made the success of earlier large high-energy physics laboratories possible, and what made the continuation of the SSC impossible. The most obvious reason for the SSC's failure was its enormous and escalating budget, which Congress would no longer support. Other factors need to be recognized however: no leader could be found with directing skills as strong as those of Wilson, Panofsky, Lederman, or Richter; the scale of the project subjected it to uncomfortable public and Congressional scrutiny; and the DOE's enforcement of management procedures of the military-industrial complex that clashed with those typical of the scientific community led to the alienation and withdrawal of many of the most creative scientists, and to the perception and the reality of poor management. These factors, exacerbated by negative pressure from scientists in other fields and a post-Cold War climate in which physicists had little of their earlier cultural prestige, discouraged efforts to gain international support. They made the SSC

  17. Los Angeles Beach Harbors, Los Angeles County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    Pacific jack mackerel, sardines and corbina. 2.69 The Port of Los Angeles is extensively used as a base for both sport and commercial boats that carry...concentrations of cadmium , chromium, lead, and nickel and other metals found in seawater, (b) the concentrations of these heavy metals found in some harbor...sediment cores be taken throughout the project area, penetrating the sediment to project depth. The analyses of these samples for mercury, cadmium

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lab has a proud history and heritage of almost 70 years of science and innovation. The people at the Laboratory work on advanced technologies to provide the best...

  19. Radionuclides and radioactivity in soils within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1974 through 1994: Concentrations, trends, and dose comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Mullen, M.A.; Ferenbaugh, J.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Perona, R.A. [ERM/Golder Los Alamos Project Team, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A soil sampling and analysis program is the most direct means of determining the concentration, inventory, and distribution of radionuclides and radioactivity in the environment within and around nuclear facilities. This report summarizes and evaluates the concentrations of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr, total uranium, and gross alpha, beta, and gamma activity in soils collected from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), perimeter, and regional (background) areas over a 21-year period (1974 through 1994). Also, trends in radionuclide concentrations and radioactivity over time and the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) were determined for each site. The upper-limit regional background concentration (95% upper-confidence level) for each radionuclide and level of radioactivity were as follows: {sup 3}H (6.34 pCi mL{sup {minus}1}), {sup 137}Cs (1.13 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), {sup 238}Pu (0.008 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), {sup 239,240}Pu (0.028 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), {sup 241}Am (0.208 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), {sup 90}Sr (0.82 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), total uranium (4.05 {micro}g dry g{sup {minus}1}); and gross alpha (35.24 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), beta (13.62 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}), and gamma (7.33 pCi dry g{sup {minus}1}) activity. Based on the average over the years, most LANL and perimeter soils contained three or more radionuclides and/or gross radioactive that were significantly higher in concentration (p < 0.05) than regional background. The net dose (TEDE minus background) for residents living on-site at LANL or along its perimeter ranged from {minus}0.3 mrem y{sup {minus}1} (east of TA-54) to 3.8 mrem y{sup {minus}1} (east of Ta-53) and from {minus}0.4 mrem y{sup {minus}1} (White Rock) to 3.6 mrem yy{sup {minus}1} (west of LANL on Forest Service land across from TA-8GT site).

  20. Application of 129I/127I Ratios in Groundwater Studies Conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, P.; Dale, M.; Granzow, K.; Yanicak, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is an operating nuclear site that has released treated effluents from three plutonium-processing facilities since the mid 1940s. The radioisotope 129I (T1/2 = 15.7 Myrs) derived from235U and 239Pu processing at LANL is locally detected in groundwater above background concentrations. This isotope provides a unique tracer for groundwater investigations conducted at LANL that helps to identify source releases linked to groundwater-flow paths in aquifers subject to binary and ternary mixing of natural- and industrial-derived waters containing chromate and other chemicals. Bromide, chlorate, chloride, nitrate, perchlorate, sulfate, and tritium were associated with multiple outfalls at LANL and, therefore, do not provide unique chemical signatures identifying a specific point of release or source. Natural and anthropogenic ratios of 129I/127I measured in groundwater samples collected at LANL were quantified using accelerator mass spectrometry at Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory, Purdue University. Anthropogenic ratios of 129I/127I range from 1,531 X 10-15 to 10,323 X 10-15 within perched-intermediate groundwater present in volcanoclastic and basalt aquifers (210 - 216 m depth). Anthropogenic ratios of 129I/127I range from 359 X 10-15 to 4,350 X 10-15 within the regional aquifer (280 m depth) consisting of volcanoclastic sediments of variable hydraulic properties. Local background ratios of 129I/127I have a narrow range of 171 X 10-15 to 378 X 10-15 in the regional aquifer. Dissolved iodide measured in groundwater at LANL is stable dominantly as iodate. Background concentrations of dissolved iodate (0.1 to 33.2 nM) are less variable compared to anthropogenic iodate (8.0 to 246 nM) in groundwater at the site. Variability in concentrations of anthropogenic iodate is controlled by heterogeneous source releases of iodate over time and non-uniform mixing of groundwater in the different aquifers.

  1. A Water Balance Study of Four Landfill Cover Designs at Material Disposal Area B in Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David D. Breshears; Fairley J. Barnes; John W. Nyhan; Johnny A. Salazar

    1998-09-01

    The goal of disposing of low-level radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose an unacceptable hazard. In order to achieve this, the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Program is comparing the performance of several different surface covers at Material Disposal Area (MDA) B in Los Alamos. Two conventional landfill were compared with an improved cover designed to minimize plant and animal intrusion and to minimize water infiltration into the underlying wastes. The conventional covers varied in depth and both conventional and improved designs had different combinations of vegetation (grass verses shrub) and gravel mulch (no mulch verses mulch). These treatments were applied to each of 12 plots and water balance parameters were measured from March1987 through June 1995. Adding a gravel mulch significantly influenced the plant covered field plots receiving no gravel mulch averaged 21.2% shrub cover, while plots with gravel had a 20% larger percent cover of shrubs. However, the influence of gravel mulch on the grass cover was even larger than the influence on shrub cover, average grass cover on the plots with no gravel was 16.3%, compared with a 42% increase in grass cover due to gravel mulch. These cover relationships are important to reduce runoff on the landfill cover, as shown by a regression model that predicts that as ground cover is increased from 30 to 90%,annual runoff is reduced from 8.8 to 0.98 cm-a nine-fold increase. We also found that decreasing the slope of the landfill cover from 6 to 2% reduced runoff from the landfill cover by 2.7-fold. To minimize the risk of hazardous waste from landfills to humans, runoff and seepage need to be minimized and evapotranspiration maximized on the landfill cover. This has to be accomplished for dry and wet years at MDA B. Seepage consisted of 1.9% and 6.2% of the precipitation in the average and

  2. Floodplain and Wetland Assessment for the Mortandad Wetland Enhancement and the DP Dissipater Projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles Dean [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-03-31

    This floodplain and wetland assessment was prepared in accordance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1022 Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements, which was promulgated to implement the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements under Executive Order 11988 Floodplain Management and Executive Order 11990 Wetlands Protection. According to 10 CFR 1022, a 100-year floodplain is defined as “the lowlands adjoining inland and coastal waters and relatively flat areas and flood prone areas of offshore islands” and a wetland is defined as “an area that is inundated or saturated by surface or groundwater at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances does support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions, including swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas.” In this action, DOE is proposing two projects to improve wetland and floodplain function at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The proposed work will comply with corrective action requirements under the Settlement Agreement and Stipulated Final Compliance Order (Settlement Agreement)1 Number HWB-14-20. The first project is located in Technical Areas (TA)-03 in upper Mortandad Canyon. The upper Mortandad wetlands have existing stormwater controls that need to be rehabilitated. Head-cut formation is occurring at the downstream portion of the wetland. This project will repair damages to the wetland and reduce the future erosion potential. The second project is located in TA-21 in Delta Prime (DP) Canyon. The intent of the DP Dissipater Project in DP Canyon is to install stormwater control structures in DP Canyon to retain low channel flows and reduce downstream sediment transport as well as peak flows during low and moderate storm events. Due to increased erosion, the stream bank in this area has unstable vertical walls within the stream channel. The DOE prepared this floodplain and wetland

  3. Analysis of Individual Carbonaceous Particles Emitted from the Las Conchas Wildfire, Los Alamos, NM, in June-July 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Gorkowski, K.; Flowers, B. A.; Aiken, A. C.; Dubey, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol emitted from biomass burning contributes significantly to atmospheric aerosol loadings regionally and globally. The net direct radiative forcing of biomass burning aerosol can be positive and/or negative and this depends on its composition, morphology and mixing state. Biomass burning aerosols can also change the cloud properties as they can act as cloud condensation nuclei. In this study we investigated biomass burning particles emitted from the Las Conchas wildfire in northern New Mexico that started on June 26, 2011 and burned an area of 245 square miles. Aerosol samples were collected on nucleopore filters at the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the third week of the wildfire event. Individual particles (~4000) were investigated using field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to distinguish different carbonaceous particles and their shape, size, elemental composition and mixing state. A thermo-denuder was used to remove compounds that are volatile at temperatures up to 200 C, leaving behind the black carbon and any compounds that did not volatize completely. Smoke particles consisted of a) tar balls, which are amorphous spherical carbonaceous organic aerosols; b) organic particles with inorganic inclusions, c) soot particles and (d) soot with various inclusions. Two distinct kinds of tar balls, "electronically" dark and bright, were found using the field-emission scanning electron microscopy and were characterized for ambient and denuded conditions to understand coating effects and aging. It was found that dark tar balls are generally larger in size than the bright ones. Additionally, the difference between the size of ambient-bright and the size of denuded-bright tar balls was larger than the difference between the size of ambient-dark and the size of denuded-dark tar balls. EDS analysis showed that 70% of the dark tar balls had higher (~60%) relative oxygen content than in the bright

  4. Solutions for implementing time-of-flight techniques in low-angle neutron scattering, as realized on the Low-Q Diffractometer at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, R.P. Jr.; Seeger, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation of small-angle (Low-momentum transfer) neutron scattering at pulsed spallation sources, using time of flight methods, has meant the introduction of some new ideas in instrument design, data acquisition, data reduction and computer management of the experiment and the data. Here we recount some of the salient aspects of solutions for implementing time of fight small-angle neutron scattering instruments at pulsed sources, as realized on the Low-Q Diffractometer, LQD, at Los Alamos. We consider, fortlier, some of the problems that are yet to be solved, and take a short excursion into the future of SANS instrumentation at pulsed sources.

  5. Solutions for implementing time-of-flight techniques in low-angle neutron scattering, as realized on the Low-Q Diffractometer at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, R.P. Jr.; Seeger, P.A.

    1992-12-01

    The implementation of small-angle (Low-momentum transfer) neutron scattering at pulsed spallation sources, using time of flight methods, has meant the introduction of some new ideas in instrument design, data acquisition, data reduction and computer management of the experiment and the data. Here we recount some of the salient aspects of solutions for implementing time of fight small-angle neutron scattering instruments at pulsed sources, as realized on the Low-Q Diffractometer, LQD, at Los Alamos. We consider, fortlier, some of the problems that are yet to be solved, and take a short excursion into the future of SANS instrumentation at pulsed sources.

  6. Annual Report on the Activities and Publications of the DHS-DNDO-NTNFC Sponsored Post-doctoral Fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, Jung Ho [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Actinide Analytical Chemistry Group; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Actinide Analytical Chemistry Group

    2015-04-10

    This report is a summary of the projects Jung Rim is working on as a DHS postdoctoral fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These research projects are designed to explore different radioanalytical methods to support nuclear forensics applications. The current projects discussed here include development of alpha spectroscopy method for 240/239Pu Isotopic ratio measurement, non-destructive uranium assay method using gamma spectroscopy, and 236U non-destructive uranium analysis using FRAM code. This report documents the work that has been performed since the start of the postdoctoral appointment.

  7. Geologic and hydrologic records of observation wells, test holes, test wells, supply wells, springs, and surface water stations in the Los Alamos area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purtymun, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    Hundreds of holes have been drilled into the Pajarito Plateau and surrounding test areas of the Los Alamos National Laboratory since the end of World War II. They range in depth from a few feet to more than 14,000 ft. The holes were drilled to provide geologic, hydrologic, and engineering information related to development of a water supply, to provide data on the likelihood or presence of subsurface contamination from hazardous and nuclear materials, and for engineering design for construction. The data contained in this report provide a basis for further investigations into the consequences of our past, present, and future interactions with the environment.

  8. Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Areas Regional Cultural History, Los Angeles County, California,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    which they named islands, such as Mormon Island. The Los ’ Bahia de los Fumos’ on Angeles River, when discovered by the account of the many smokes... immigrant groups initiated the fishing industry in and near San Pedro Bay. Young Japanese began diving for abalone off Whites Point, shown here in 1901...Magnolia Street in 1888, the Pine Avenue California Immigrant Union (CIU), which had Municipal Pier was constructed in 1893, and S been the main

  9. Multibeam mapping of the Los Angeles, California Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James V.; Dartnell, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The Los Angeles, California Margin was mapped using multibeam echosounders during three separate surveys (Figure 1). In 1996, the USGS surveyed the shelf and slope in Santa Monica Bay from Pt. Dume to south of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. The mapping was accomplished using a Kongsberg Simrad EM1000 multibeam sonar system that provided high-quality bathymetry and quantitative backscatter. In 1998, the USGS continued the mapping to the south and surveyed the outer shelf, slope, and proximal basin off Long Beach and Newport using a Kongsberg Simrad EM300 multibeam sonar system. In 1999, the Los Angeles Margin mapping was completed with the surveying of the inner Long Beach shelf from the Palos Verdes Peninsula, south to Newport. This survey used a dual Kongsberg Simrad EM3000D multibeam sonar system. These three surveys were conducted to support USGS projects studying marine pollution and geohazards along the Los Angeles Margin.

  10. The economic impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on north-central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansford, R.R. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (US); Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M. [Albuquerque Operations Office, Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (US); Ben-David, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (US). Dept. of Economics; Temple, J. [Temple (John), Albuquerque, NM (US)

    1999-08-05

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratory with a mission to enhance national military and economic security through science and technology. Its mission is to reduce the nuclear danger through stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile and through its nonproliferation and verification activities. An important secondary mission is to promote US industrial competitiveness by working with US companies in technology transfer and technology development partnerships. Los Alamos is involved in partnerships and collaborations with other federal agencies, with industry (including New Mexico businesses), and with universities worldwide. For this report, the reference period is FY 1998 (October 1, 1997, through September 30, 1998). It includes two major impact analysis: the impact of LANL activities on north-central New Mexico and the economic impacts of LANL on the state of New Mexico. Total impact represents both direct and indirect responding by business, including induced effects (responding by households). The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models developed for the three-county region and the state of New Mexico.

  11. Hepatitis E Virus in Rats, Los Angeles, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Robert H.; Engle, Ronald E.; Rood, Michael P.; Kabrane-Lazizi, Yamina; Nguyen, Hanh T.; Govindarajan, Sugantha; St. Claire, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    The role of rats in human hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections remains controversial. A genetically distinct HEV was recently isolated from rats in Germany, and its genome was sequenced. We have isolated a genetically similar HEV from urban rats in Los Angeles, California, USA, and characterized its ability to infect laboratory rats and nonhuman primates. Two strains of HEV were isolated from serum samples of 134 wild rats that had a seroprevalence of antibodies against HEV of ≈80%. Virus was transmissible to seronegative Sprague-Dawley rats, but transmission was spotty and magnitude and duration of infection were not robust. Viremia was higher in nude rats. Serologic analysis and reverse transcription PCR were comparably sensitive in detecting infection. The sequence of the Los Angeles virus was virtually identical to that of isolates from Germany. Rat HEV was not transmissible to rhesus monkeys, suggesting that it is not a source of human infection. PMID:22172320

  12. A report documenting the completion of the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the ASC level II milestone ""Visualization on the supercomputing platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patchett, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lo, Li - Ta [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mr Marle, David [KITWARE INC.; Brownlee, Carson [UNIV OF UTAH

    2011-01-24

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Los Alamos portion of the ASC Level II 'Visualization on the Supercomputing Platform' milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The milestone text is shown in Figure 1 with the Los Alamos portions highlighted in boldfaced text. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is the most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors (GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the perfromance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. In conclusion, we improved CPU-based rendering performance by a a factor of 2-10 times on our tests. In addition, we evaluated CPU and CPU-based rendering performance. We encourage production visualization experts to consider

  13. A working man`s analysis of incidents and accidents with explosives at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1946--1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsay, J.B.; Goldie, R.H.

    1998-12-31

    At the inception of the Laboratory hectic and intense work was the norm during the development of the atomic bombs. After the war the development of other weapons for the Cold War again contributed to an intense work environment. Formal Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) were not required at that time. However, the occurrence of six fatalities in 1959 during the development of a new high-energy plastic bonded explosive (94% HMX) forced the introduction SOPs. After an accident at the Department of Energy (DOE) plant at Amarillo, TX in 1977, the DOE promulgated the Department wide DOE Explosives Safety Manual. Table 1 outlines the history of the introduction of SOPs and the DOE Explosives Safety Manual. Many of the rules and guidelines presented in these documents were developed and introduced as the result of an incident or accident. However, many of the current staff are not familiar with the background of the development. To preserve as much of this knowledge as possible, they are collecting documentation on incidents and accidents involving energetic materials at Los Alamos. Formal investigations of serious accidents elucidate the multiple causes that contributed to accidents. These reports are generally buried in a file and, and are not read by more recent workers. Reports involving fatalities at Los Alamos before 1974 were withheld from the general employee. Also, these documents contain much detail and analysis that is not of interest to the field worker. The authors have collected the documents describing 116 incidents and have analyzed the contributing factors as viewed from the standpoint of the individual operator. All the incidents occurred at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and involved energetic materials in some manner, though not all occurred within the explosive handling groups. Most accidents are caused by multiple contributing factors. They have attempted to select the one or two factors that they consider as the most important relative to the

  14. Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Areas Cultural Resource Survey, Los Angeles County, California,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    came to the mainland in a at low tide were so visibletheywere later called large bay, which they named islands, such as Mormon Island. The Los ’ Bahia ...Colony Tract". In 1882 the Magnolia Street in 1888, the Pine Avenue California Immigrant Union (CIU). which had Municipal Pier was constructed in 1893...structure for its day: massive, as a gathering spot for the oldtimers, many of modern, and yet decorated with Gothic them immigrants who brought their

  15. Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

    2012-05-22

    As a condition to the Disposal Authorization Statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year 2011 annual review for Area G. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 and formally approved in 2009. These analyses are expected to provide reasonable estimates of the long-term performance of Area G and, hence, the disposal facility's ability to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) performance objectives. Annual disposal receipt reviews indicate that smaller volumes of waste will require disposal in the pits and shafts at Area G relative to what was projected for the performance assessment and composite analysis. The future inventories are projected to decrease modestly for the pits but increase substantially for the shafts due to an increase in the amount of tritium that is projected to require disposal. Overall, however, changes in the projected future inventories of waste are not expected to compromise the ability of Area G to satisfy DOE performance objectives. The Area G composite analysis addresses potential impacts from all waste disposed of at the facility, as well as other sources of radioactive material that may interact with releases from Area G. The level of knowledge about the other sources included in the composite analysis has not changed sufficiently to call into question the validity of that analysis. Ongoing environmental surveillance activities are conducted at, and in the vicinity of, Area G. However, the information generated by

  16. A human factors approach towards the design of a new glovebox glove for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Jude M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-06

    Present day glovebox gloves at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are underdeveloped and ergonomically inaccurate. This problem results in numerous sprain and strain injuries every year for employees who perform glovebox work. In addition to injuries, using the current glovebox glove design also contributes to breaches and contamination. The current glove used today at LANL has several problems: (1) The length of the fingers is incorrect, (2) the web spacing between the fingers is nonexistent, (3) the angles between each digit on the finger are incorrect, (4) the thumb is placed inaccurately, and (5) the length of the hand is incorrect. These problems present a need to correct the current glove design to decrease the risk of injuries, breaches, and contamination. Anthropometrics were researched to help find the best range of hand measurements to fix the current glove design. Anthropometrics is the measure of the human physical variation. Anthropometrics for this study were gathered from the American National Survey (ANSUR) data that was conducted by the U.S Army in 1988. The current glovebox glove uses anthropometrics from the 95th to 105th percentile range which is too large so the new gloves are going to implement data from a smaller range of percentile groups. The 105th percentile range represents measurements that exceed the human population but are needed to fit certain circumstance such as wearing several under gloves within the glovebox gloves. Anthropometrics used in this study include: 105th percentile measurements for joint circumference which was unchanged because the room for under gloves plus ease of hand insertion and extraction is needed, 80th percentile measurements for crotch length to allow workers to reach the web spacing in the glove, 20th percentile measurements for finger length to allow workers to reach the end of the glove, standard 10.5cm hand breadth to allow more room to accommodate under gloves, 45 degrees abduction angle for the

  17. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories Code-to-Code Comparison of Inter Lab Test Problem 1 for Asteroid Impact Hazard Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Robert P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Paul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Howley, Kirsten [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferguson, Jim Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gisler, Galen Ross [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Plesko, Catherine Suzanne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Managan, Rob [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Owen, Mike [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wasem, Joseph [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bruck-Syal, Megan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The NNSA Laboratories have entered into an interagency collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to explore strategies for prevention of Earth impacts by asteroids. Assessment of such strategies relies upon use of sophisticated multi-physics simulation codes. This document describes the task of verifying and cross-validating, between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), modeling capabilities and methods to be employed as part of the NNSA-NASA collaboration. The approach has been to develop a set of test problems and then to compare and contrast results obtained by use of a suite of codes, including MCNP, RAGE, Mercury, Ares, and Spheral. This document provides a short description of the codes, an overview of the idealized test problems, and discussion of the results for deflection by kinetic impactors and stand-off nuclear explosions.

  18. SWEIS Yearbook-2012 Comparison of 2012 Data to Projections of the 2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahowald, Hallie B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wright, Marjorie Alys [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) operations data for Calendar Year (CY) 2012 mostly fell within the 2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) projections. Operation levels for one LANL facility exceeded the 2008 SWEIS capability projections—Radiochemistry Facility; however, none of the capability increases caused exceedances in radioactive air emissions, waste generation, or National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge. Several facilities exceeded the2008 SWEIS levels for waste generation quantities; however, all were one-time, non-routine events that do not reflect the day-to-day operations of the Laboratory. In addition, total site-wide waste generation quantities were below SWEIS projections for all waste types, reflecting the overall levels of operations at both the Key and Non-Key Facilities. Although gas and electricity consumption have remained within the 2008 SWEIS limits for utilities, water consumption exceeded the 2008 SWEIS projections by 27 million gallons in CY 2012.

  19. “Internal Dosimetry is Multidisciplinary, Challenging, and Exciting” An interview with John Klumpp, Ph.D., Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poudel, Deepesh [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-02

    Here we want to give our student readers a good picture of what it is like to work in various types of organizations and possibly aid them in choosing a career that’s a good fit for them, we have introduced a new series in this section of the newsletter. We will be chatting with young professionals working in different settings— national laboratories, academia, hospitals, and industries—about their back - ground, their responsibilities, what they like about working for their employer, and what suggestions they have for students aspiring to a similar career. In the first installment of the series, I talked to John Klumpp of Radiation Protection Services Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory about his experiences.

  20. Dose Assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory-Derived Residual Radionuclides in Soils within Tract A-18-2 for Land Conveyance and Transfer Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-26

    In 2017, soil sampling for radiological materials was conducted within Tract A-18-2 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for land conveyance decisions. Measurements of radionuclides in soil samples were evaluated against a recreational use scenario, and all measurements were below screening action levels for each radionuclide. The total estimated dose was less than 1 mrem/yr (<10 μSv/yr) for a hypothetical recreational user (compared with a dose limit of 25 mrem/yr [250 μSv/yr]). Dose estimates were based on the 95% upper confidence levels for radionuclide concentrations within the Tract. Dose estimates less than 3 mrem/yr are considered to be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), therefore no follow-up analysis was conducted. Release of this property is consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 458.1 (DOE 2013) and Policy 412 (LANL 2014).

  1. Program management assessment of Federal Facility Compliance Agreement regarding CAA-40 C.F.R. Part 61, Subpart H at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    An assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s management system related to facility compliance with an element of the Clean Air Act was performed under contract by a team from Northern Arizona University. More specifically, a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was established in 1996 to bring the Laboratory into compliance with emissions standards of radionuclides, commonly referred to as Rad/NESHAP. In the fall of 1996, the four-person team of experienced environmental managers evaluated the adequacy of relevant management systems to implement the FFCA provisions. The assessment process utilized multiple procedures including document review, personnel interviews and re-interviews, and facility observations. The management system assessment was completed with a meeting among team members, Laboratory officials and others on November 1, 1996 and preparation of an assessment report.

  2. Pilot Project on Women and Science. A report on women scientists at the University of New Mexico and Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvaggio, R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    In the fall of 1991, through the coordinating efforts of the University of New Mexico and Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Pilot Project on Women and Science was initiated as a year-long study of women scientists at both the university and the laboratory. Its purpose was to gather information directly from women scientists in an attempt to analyze and make recommendations concerning the professional and cultural environment for women in the sciences. This report is an initial attempt to understand the ways in which women scientists view themselves, their profession, and the scientific culture they inhabit. By recording what these women say about their backgrounds and educational experiences, their current positions, the difficult negotiations many have made between their personal and professional lives, and their relative positions inside and outside the scientific community, the report calls attention both to the individual perspectives offered by these women and to the common concerns they share.

  3. Cerro Grande Fire Impact to Water Quality and Stream Flow near Los Alamos National Laboratory: Results of Four Years of Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.M. Gallaher; R.J. Koch

    2004-09-15

    In May 2000, the Cerro Grande fire burned about 7400 acres of mixed conifer forest on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and much of the 10,000 acres of mountainside draining onto LANL was severely burned. The resulting burned landscapes raised concerns of increased storm runoff and transport of contaminants by runoff in the canyons traversing LANL. The first storms after the fire produced runoff peaks that were more than 200 times greater than prefire levels. Total runoff volume for the year 2000 increased 50% over prefire years, despite a decline in total precipitation of 13% below normal and a general decrease in the number of monsoonal thunderstorms. The majority of runoff in 2000 occurred in the canyons at LANL south of Pueblo Canyon (70%), where the highest runoff volume occurred in Water Canyon and the peak discharge occurred in Pajarito Canyon. This report describes the observed effects of the Cerro Grande fire and related environmental impacts to watersheds at and near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the first four runoff seasons after the fire, from 2000 through 2003. Spatial and temporal trends in radiological and chemical constituents that were identified as being associated with the Cerro Grande fire and those that were identified as being associated with historic LANL discharges are evaluated with regard to impacts to the Rio Grande and area reservoirs downstream of LANL. The results of environmental sampling performed by LANL, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) after the Cerro Grande fire are included in the evaluation. Effects are described for storm runoff, baseflow, stream sediments, and area regional reservoir sediment.

  4. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites Remedial Action Program: radiological survey of the Bayo Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, D L; Stoker, A K; Ahlquist, A J [comps.

    1979-06-01

    A portion of Bayo Canyon, located in Los Alamos County in north-central New Mexico, was used between 1944 and 1961 as a site for experiments employing conventional high explosives in conjunction with research on nuclear weapons development. Radiochemistry operations conducted at the site resulted in the generation of liquid and solid radioactive wastes, which were disposed into subsurface pits and leaching fields. The site was decommissioned by 1963. The resurvey utilized information from a number of routine and special environmental surveillance studies as well as extensive new instrumental measurements, soil sampling, and radiochemical analyses. Results showed that residual surface contamination due to /sup 90/Sr averaged about 1.4 pCi/g or approximately 3 times the level attributable to worldwide fallout. Surface uranium averaged about 4.9 ..mu..g/g or about 1.5 times the amount naturally present in the volcanic-derived soils of the area. Subsurface contamination associated with the former waste disposal locations is largely confined within a total area of about 10,000 m/sup 2/ and down to depths of about 5 m. Of 378 subsurface samples, fewer than 12% exceeded 13 pCi/g of gross beta activity, which is comparable to the upper range of activities for uncontaminated local soils. Health physics interpretation of the data indicates that the present population of Los Alamos living on mesas adjacent to Bayo Canyon is not receiving any incremental radiation doses due to the residual contamination. Potential future land uses of Bayo Canyon include development of a residential area.

  5. Alterations in nitrogen biogeochemistry in Los Angeles, California (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Pataki, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    The biogeochemistry and ecology of the Los Angeles region have been heavily altered by humans. Irrigation and fertilization have changed the landscape dramatically, with concomitant changes in the regional N budget. Anthropogenic N additions to the region have resulted in increased losses of N. We studied two aspects of N cycling in Southern California: soil-atmosphere fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), a powerful greenhouse gas, and dissolved N losses to the coastal ocean in streams and urban runoff. Nitrous oxide fluxes from irrigated and fertilized lawns in the Los Angeles region are similar to results from agricultural fields in Southern California and elsewhere, indicating that urban landscapes may be a significant contributor to regional greenhouse gas budgets. Content of N-15 and O-18 in N2O from agricultural and urban land cover is highly variable, and isotope signatures are not useful indicators of urban versus agricultural N2O sources. We found that the isotopic signature of N2O was highly variable from soils, but very useful for distinguishing among sources of dissolved nitrate. Irrigation in urban areas has also increased the flux of fresh water to the coastal ocean, with concurrent increases in nutrient fluxes to coastal ecosystems. Wastewater and soil N are the major sources of N to Aliso Creek, an urban/suburban stream in the Los Angeles area, with atmospheric N only a small source during infrequent rain events. Inorganic fertilizers do not appear to be a large source of N to the stream. Concentrations of nitrate in this stream are much higher (~ 10 micromoles per liter) than streams in watersheds that are less impacted by humans. N-15 in nitrate in the stream increases along a longitudinal gradient downstream, indicating that denitrification along the stream channel and in riparian areas may be helping to reduce the total N loading to the coastal ocean, although this may also be associated with increases in N2O emissions. Irrigation with recycled

  6. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification Addition of Structures within Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11, Dome 375 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, July 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lechel, Robert A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-31

    The purpose of this letter is to notify the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) in November 2010. The modification adds structures to the container storage unit at Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, Pad 11. Permit Section 3.1(3) requires that changes to the location of a structure that does not manage hazardous waste shall be changed within the Permit as a Class 1 modification without prior approval in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 (40 CFR), {section}270.42(a)(1). Structures have been added within Dome 375 located at TA-54, Area G, Pad 11 that will be used in support of waste management operations within Dome 375 and the modular panel containment structure located within Dome 375, but will not be used as waste management structures. The Class 1 Permit Modification revises Figure 36 in Attachment N, Figures; and Figure G.12-1 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Descriptions of the structures have also been added to Section A.4.2.9 in Attachment A, TA - Unit Descriptions; and Section 2.0 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Full description of the permit modification and the necessary changes are included in Enclosure 1. The modification has been prepared in accordance with 40 CFR {section}270.42(a)(l). This package includes this letter and an enclosure containing a description of the permit modification, text edits of the Permit sections, and the revised figures (collectively LA-UR-12-22808). Accordingly, a signed certification page is also enclosed. Three hard copies and one electronic copy of this submittal will be delivered to the NMED-HWB.

  7. Review of the geological and structural setting near the site of the proposed Transuranic Waste Facility (TRUWF) Technical Area 52 (TA-52), Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Gardner, Jamie N.

    2007-10-01

    Because of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s proximal location to active geologic structures, assessment of seismic hazards, including the potential for seismic surface rupture, must occur before construction of any facilities housing nuclear or other hazardous materials. A transuranic waste facility (TRUWF) planned for construction at Technical Area 52 (TA-52) provides the impetus for this report. Although no single seismic hazards field investigation has focused specifically on TA-52, numerous studies at technical areas surrounding TA-52 have shown no significant, laterally continuous faults exhibiting activity in the last 10 ka within 3,000 ft of the proposed facility. A site-specific field study at the footprint of the proposed TRUWF would not yield further high-precision data on possible Holocene faulting at the site because post-Bandelier Tuff sediments are lacking and the shallowest subunit contacts of the Bandelier Tuff are gradational. Given the distal location of the proposed TRUWF to any mapped structures with demonstrable Holocene displacement, surface rupture potential appears minimal at TA-52.

  8. Analysis of Precipitation (Rain and Snow) Levels and Straight-line Wind Speeds in Support of the 10-year Natural Phenomena Hazards Review for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dewart, Jean Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Deola, Regina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-10

    This report provides site-specific return level analyses for rain, snow, and straight-line wind extreme events. These analyses are in support of the 10-year review plan for the assessment of meteorological natural phenomena hazards at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These analyses follow guidance from Department of Energy, DOE Standard, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities (DOE-STD-1020-2012), Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800, 2007) and ANSI/ ANS-2.3-2011, Estimating Tornado, Hurricane, and Extreme Straight-Line Wind Characteristics at Nuclear Facility Sites. LANL precipitation and snow level data have been collected since 1910, although not all years are complete. In this report the results from the more recent data (1990–2014) are compared to those of past analyses and a 2004 National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration report. Given the many differences in the data sets used in these different analyses, the lack of statistically significant differences in return level estimates increases confidence in the data and in the modeling and analysis approach.

  9. Floodplain Assessment for the Upper Cañon de Valle Watershed Enhancement Project in Technical Area 16 at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles Dean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Keller, David Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sartor, Karla A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-04

    This floodplain assessment was prepared in accordance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1022 Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements, which was promulgated to implement the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements under Executive Order 11988 Floodplain Management and Executive Order 11990 Wetlands Protection. According to 10 CFR 1022, a 100-year floodplain is defined as “the lowlands adjoining inland and coastal waters and relatively flat areas and flood prone areas of offshore islands.” In this action, DOE is proposing to control the run-on of storm water by slowing water velocity and managing sediments from the upper portions of the Cañon de Valle watershed on Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) property with a number of new watershed controls near and within the 100-year floodplain (hereafter floodplain). The proposed work will comply with requirements under the Settlement Agreement and Stipulated Final Compliance Order (Settlement Agreement) Number HWB-14-20.

  10. The comparative uptake and interaction of several radionuclides in the trophic levels surrounding the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) waste water ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, G.H. Jr.

    1989-08-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the uptake, distribution, and interaction of five activation products (Co-57, Be-7, Cs-134, Rb-83, and Mn-54) within the biotic and abiotic components surrounding the waste treatment lagoons of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The study attempted to ascertain where, and what specific interactions were taking place among the isotopes and the biotic/abiotic components. A statistical approach, utilizing Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA), was conducted testing the radioisotopic concentrations by (1) the trophic levels (TROPLVL) in each position sampled on the grid, (2) where sampled on the grid (TRAN), (3) where sampled with-in each grid line (PLOT), and (4) the side with which sampled (SIDE). This provided both the dependent and independent variables that would be tested. The Null Hypothesis (Ho) tested the difference in the mean values of the isotopes within/between each of the four independent variables. The Rb-83 statistic indicated an accumulation within the TRAN and PLOT variables within the sampled area. The Co-57 test statistic provided a value which indicated that accumulation of this isotope within TROPLVL was taking place. Mn-54 test values indicated that accumulation was also taking place at the higher trophic levels within the PLOT, TRAN, and SIDE positions. Cs-134 was found to accumulate to third level in this trophic level structure (TROPLVL-(vegetation)), and then decrease from there. The Be-7 component provided no variance from known compartmental transfers. 210 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Product and market study for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Building resources for technology commercialization: The SciBus Analytical, Inc. paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The study project was undertaken to investigate how entrepreneurial small businesses with technology licenses can develop product and market strategies sufficiently persuasive to attract resources and exploit commercialization opportunities. The study attempts to answer two primary questions: (1) What key business development strategies are likely to make technology transfers successful, and (2) How should the plan best be presented in order to attract resources (e.g., personnel, funding, channels of distribution)? In the opinion of the investigator, Calidex Corporation, if the business strategies later prove to be successful, then the plan model has relevance for any technology licensee attempting to accumulate resources and bridge from technology resident in government laboratories to the commercial marketplace. The study utilized SciBus Analytical, Inc. (SciBus), a Los Alamos National Laboratory CRADA participant, as the paradigm small business technology licensee. The investigator concluded that the optimum value of the study lay in the preparation of an actual business development plan for SciBus that might then have, hopefully, broader relevance and merit for other private sector technology transfer licensees working with various Government agencies.

  12. Chemical Concentrations in Field Mice from Open-Detonation Firing Sites TA-36 Minie and TA-39 Point 6 at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresquez, Philip R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Field mice (mostly Peromyscus spp.) were collected at two open-detonation (high explosive) firing sites - Minie at Technical Area (TA) 36 and Point 6 at TA-39 - at Los Alamos National Laboratory in August of 2010 and in February of 2011 for chemical analysis. Samples of whole body field mice from both sites were analyzed for target analyte list elements (mostly metals), dioxin/furans, polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, high explosives, and perchlorate. In addition, uranium isotopes were analyzed in a composite sample collected from TA-36 Minie. In general, all constituents, with the exception of lead at TA-39 Point 6, in whole body field mice samples collected from these two open-detonation firing sites were either not detected or they were detected below regional statistical reference levels (99% confidence level), biota dose screening levels, and/or soil ecological chemical screening levels. The amount of lead in field mice tissue collected from TA-39 Point 6 was higher than regional background, and some lead levels in the soil were higher than the ecological screening level for the field mouse; however, these levels are not expected to affect the viability of the populations over the site as a whole.

  13. Tuff Pile 1 -- A justification of the projection of material properties within a portion of Los Alamos Test Areas 1, 3, 4 and 7 -- Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    App, F.N.; Marusak, N.L.

    1997-06-01

    The Los Alamos underground nuclear test area which is located west of the Yucca fault and north of Nevada state coordinate N256000 m has been used for testing since 1964. The area encompasses parts of Areas 1, 3, 4 and 7. All of the 25 events conducted in the area have been successfully contained. As knowledge of the geology has improved with additional holes and geophysical surveys, it has become increasingly apparent that this is one of the least complex areas they have for testing outside of Area 3 alluvium. Particularly in the southern three quarters of the area, they found that as each new hole was drilled, the stratigraphy and physical properties encountered were as expected. They have never been surprised. This prompted them to formally evaluate a large portion of the area as a Tuff Pile, a term borrowed from the Area 3 Sandpile, and one that implies that physical properties in the area are sufficiently predictable that most measurements no longer need to be routinely made for containment evaluation. This report is the result of that evaluation.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory: Request for Information (RFI) – Call for Commercialization Partners on behalf of the Department of Energy’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) L’Innovator Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Laura Jeaneen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-19

    The purpose of the L’Innovator is to assemble unique, state-of-the-art IP bundles developed at the national labs that aggregate synergistic technologies in furtherance of the emerging hydrogen and fuel cell market. The first L’Innovator IP bundle consists of Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) Catalyst technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), combined with Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) technology developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  15. Preliminary risk assessment of the Mexican Spotted Owl under a spatially-weighted foraging regime at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Gonzales, G.J.; Bennett, K.D.; Pratt, L.E.

    1997-02-01

    The Record of Decision on the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory requires that the Department of Energy takes special precautions to protect the Mexican Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis lucida). In order to do so, risk to the owl presented by radiological and nonradiological contaminants must be estimated. A preliminary risk assessment on the Mexican Spotted Owl in two Ecological Exposure Units (EEUs) was performed using a modified Environmental Protection Agency Quotient method, the FORTRAN model ECORSK4, and a geographic information system. Estimated doses to the owl under a spatially-weighted foraging regime were compared against toxicological reference doses generating hazard indices (HIs) and hazard quotients (HQs) for three risk source types. The average HI was 0.20 for EEU-21 and 0.0015 for EEU-40. Under the risk parameter assumptions made, hazard quotient results indicated no unacceptable risk to the owl, including a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants that assumes a linear additive toxicity type. An HI of 1.0 was used as the evaluative criteria for determining the acceptability of risk. This value was exceeded (1.06) in only one of 200 simulated potential nest sites. Cesium-137, Ni, {sup 239}Pu, Al and {sup 234}U we`re among the constituents with the highest partial HQs. Improving model realism by weighting simulated owl foraging based on distance from potential nest sites decreased the estimated risk by 72% (0.5 HI units) for EEU-21 and by 97.6% (6.3E-02 HI units) for EEU-40. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, owl habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations in order to maintain risk from contaminants at acceptably low levels.

  16. Risk assessment of the retrieval of transuranic waste: Pads 1, 2, and 4, Technical Area-54, Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbert, K.A.; Lyon, B.F.; Hutchison, J.; Holmes, J.A.; Legg, J.L.; Simek, M.P.; Travis, C.C.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    The Risk Assessment for the Retrieval of Transuranic Waste is a comparative risk assessment of the potential adverse human health effects resulting from exposure to contaminants during retrieval and post-retrieval aboveground storage operations of post-1970 earthen-covered transuranic waste. Two alternatives are compared: (1) Immediate Retrieval and (2) Delayed Retrieval. Under the Immediate Retrieval Alternative, retrieval of the waste is assumed to begin immediately, Under the Delayed Retrieval Alternative, retrieval is delayed 10 years. The current risk assessment is on Pads 1, 2, and 4, at Technical Area-54, Area-G, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Risks are assessed independently for three scenarios: (1) incident-free retrieval operations, (2) incident-free storage operations, and (3) a drum failure analysis. The drum failure analysis evaluates container integrity under both alternatives and assesses the impacts of potential drum failures during retrieval operations. Risks associated with a series of drum failures are potentially severe for workers, off-site receptors, and general on-site employees if retrieval is delayed 10 years and administrative and engineering controls remain constant. Under the Delayed Retrieval Alternative, an average of 300 drums out of 16,647 are estimated to fail during retrieval operations due to general corrosion, while minimal drums are predicted to fail under the Immediate Retrieval Alternative. The results of the current study suggest that, based on risk, remediation of Pads 1, 2, and 4 at LANL should not be delayed. Although risks from incident-free operations in the Delayed Retrieval Alternative are low, risks due to corrosion and drum failures are potentially severe.

  17. Chemical surety material decontamination and decommissioning of Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemical Surety Material Laboratory area TA-3, building SM-29, room 4009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, T.E.; Smith, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    From 1982 through 1987, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed surety laboratory operations for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC). Room 4009 in building SM-29, TA-3, was used as the laboratory for work with the following chemical surety material (CSM) agents: sarin (GB), soman (GD), lewisite (L), and distilled mustard (HD) radio-labelled with H{sup 3} or C{sup 14}. The work was confined to three CSM-certified fume hoods, located in room 4009 (see diagram in Appendix C). The laboratory ceased all active operations during the late 1986 and early 1987 period. From 1987 until 1993 the laboratory was secured and the ventilation system continued to operate. During late 1992, the decision was made to utilize this laboratory space for other operations, thus a decision was made to dismantle and reconfigure this room. LANL sub-contracted Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) to draw upon the CSM experience of the technical staff from the Hazardous Materials Research Facility (HMRF) to assist in developing a decontamination and decommissioning plan. BMI was subcontracted to devise a CSM safety training course, and a sampling and air monitoring plan for CSM material to ensure personnel safety during all disassembly operations. LANL subcontracted Johnson Controls personnel to perform all disassembly operations. Beginning in early 1993 BMI personnel from the HMRF visited the laboratory to develop both the safety plan and the sample and air monitoring plan. Execution of that plan began in September 1993 and was completed in January 1994.

  18. The Walls Come Tumbling Down: Decontamination and Demolition of 29 Manhattan Project and Cold War-Era Buildings and Structures at Los Alamos National Laboratory-12301

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaloupka, Allan B.; Finn, Kevin P.; Parsons, Duane A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    When the nation's top scientists and military leaders converged on Los Alamos, New Mexico in the 1943, to work on the Manhattan Project, the facilities they used to conduct their top-secret work were quickly constructed and located in the middle of what eventually became the Los Alamos town site. After one of these early facilities caught on fire, it seemed wise to build labs and production facilities farther away from the homes of the town's residents. They chose to build facilities on what was then known as Delta Prime (DP) Mesa and called it Technical Area 21, or TA-21. With wartime urgency, a number of buildings were built at TA-21, some in as little as a few months. Before long, DP Mesa was populated with several nondescript metal and cinder-block buildings, including what became, immediately following the war, the world's first plutonium production facility. TA-21 also housed labs that used hazardous chemicals and analyzed americium, tritium and plutonium. TA-21 was a bustling center of research and production for the next several decades. Additional buildings were built there in the 1960's, but by the 1990's many of them had reached the end of their service lives. Labs and offices were moved to newer, more modern buildings. When Los Alamos National Laboratory received $212 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in July 2009 for environmental cleanup projects, about $73 million of the funds were earmarked to decontaminate and demolish 21 of the old buildings at TA-21. Although some D and D of TA-21 buildings was performed in the 1990's, many of the facilities at DP Site remained relatively untouched for nearly three decades following their final operational use. In 2006, there were over three dozen buildings or structures on the mesa to be removed so that soil cleanup could be completed (and the land made available for transfer and reuse). The total footprint of buildings across the mesa was

  19. Los Alamos science, Number 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Nine authored articles are included covering: natural heat engine, photoconductivity, the Caribbean Basin, energy in Central America, peat, geothermal energy, and the MANIAC computer. Separate abstracts were prepared for the articles. (DLC)

  20. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Catfish and Carp Collected from the Rio Grande Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert J. Gonzales

    2008-05-12

    Concern has existed for years that the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a complex of nuclear weapons research and support facilities, has released polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the environment that may have reached adjacent bodies of water through canyons that connect them. In 1997, LANL's Ecology Group began measuring PCBs in fish in the Rio Grande upstream and downstream of ephemeral streams that cross LANL and later began sampling fish in Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs, which are situated on the Rio Chama and Rio Grande upstream and downstream of LANL, respectively. In 2002, we electroshocked channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and common carp (Carpiodes carpio) in the Rio Grande upstream and downstream of LANL and analyzed fillets for PCB congeners. We also sampled soils along the Rio Chama and Rio Grande drainages to discern whether a background atmospheric source of PCBs that could impact surface water adjacent to LANL might exist. Trace concentrations of PCBs measured in soil (mean = 4.7E-05 {micro}g/g-ww) appear to be from background global atmospheric sources, at least in part, because the bimodal distribution of low-chlorinated PCB congeners and mid-chlorinated PCB congeners in the soil samples is interpreted to be typical of volatilized PCB congeners that are found in the atmosphere and dust from global fallout. Upstream catfish (n = 5) contained statistically (P = 0.047) higher concentrations of total PCBs (mean = 2.80E-02 {micro}g/g-ww) than downstream catfish (n = 10) (mean = 1.50E-02 {micro}g/g-ww). Similarly, upstream carp (n = 4) contained higher concentrations of total PCBs (mean = 7.98E-02 {micro}g/g-ww) than downstream carp (n = 4) (3.07E-02 {micro}g/g-ww); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.42). The dominant PCB homologue in all fish samples was hexachlorobiphenyls. Total PCB concentrations in fish in 2002 are lower than 1997; however, differences in analytical methods and other uncertainties

  1. Concentrations of Radionuclides and Trace Elements in Environmantal Media arond te Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facilit at Los Alamos National Laboratory during 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.J.Gonzales; P.R. Fresquez; C.D.Hathcock; D.C. Keller

    2006-05-15

    The Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory requires that samples of biotic and abiotic media be collected after operations began to determine if there are any human health or environmental impacts. The DARHT facility is the Laboratory's principal explosive test facility. To this end, samples of soil and sediment, vegetation, bees, and birds were collected around the facility in 2005 and analyzed for concentrations of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Tl. Bird populations have also been monitored. Contaminant results, which represent up to six sample years since the start of operations, were compared with (1) baseline statistical reference levels (BSRLs) established over a four-year preoperational period before DARHT facility operations, (2) screening levels (SLs), and (3) regulatory standards. Most radionuclides and trace elements were below BSRLs and those few samples that contained radionuclides and trace elements above BSRLs were below SLs. Concentrations of radionuclides and nonradionuclides in biotic and abiotic media around the DARHT facility do not pose a significant human health hazard. The total number of birds captured and number of species represented were similar in 2003 and 2004, but both of these parameters increased substantially in 2005. Periodic interruption of the scope and schedule identified in the MAP generally should have no impact on meeting the intent of the MAP. The risk of not sampling one of the five media in any given year is that if a significant impact to contaminant levels were to occur there would exist a less complete understanding of the extent of the change to the baseline for these media and to the ecosystem as a whole. Since the MAP is a requirement that was established under the regulatory framework of

  2. Medium-Sized Mammals around a Radioactive Liquid Waste Lagoon at Los Alamos National Laboratory: Uptake of Contaminants and Evaluation of Radio-Frequency Identification Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie A. Hansen; Phil R. Fresquez; Rhonda J. Robinson; John D. Huchton; Teralene S. Foxx

    1999-11-01

    Use of a radioactive liquid waste lagoon by medium-sized mammals and levels of tritium, other selected radionuclides, and metals in biological tissues of the animals were documented at Technical Area 53 (TA-53) of Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1997 and 1998. Rock squirrel (Spermophilus variegates), raccoon (Procyon lotor), striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), and bobcat (Lynx rufus) were captured at TA-53 and at a control site on the Santa Fe National Forest. Captured animals were anesthetized and marked with radio-frequency identification (RFD) tags and/or ear tags. We collected urine and hair samples for tritium and metals (aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, and thallium) analyses, respectively. In addition, muscle and bone samples from two rock squirrels collected from each of TA-53, perimeter, and regional background sites were tested for tritium, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and total uranium. Animals at TA-53 were monitored entering and leaving the lagoon area using a RFID monitor to read identification numbers from the RFID tags of marked animals and a separate camera system to photograph all animals passing through the monitor. Cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus spp.), rock squirrel, and raccoon were the species most frequently photographed going through the RFID monitor. Less than half of all marked animals in the lagoon area were detected using the lagoon. Male and female rock squirrels from the lagoon area had significantly higher tritium concentrations compared to rock squirrels from the control area. Metals tested were not significantly higher in rock squirrels from TA-53, although there was a trend toward increased levels of lead in some individuals at TA-53. Muscle and bone samples from squirrels in the lagoon area appeared to have higher levels of tritium, total uranium, and {sup 137}Cs than samples collected from perimeter and

  3. Aldo Manuzio a Los Angeles. La collezione Ahmanson-Murphy all'University of California Los Angeles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Nuovo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispetto della sua recente fondazione, la collezione Ahmanson-Murphy della University of California Los Angeles è la più ricca di edizioni manuziane fuori dall’Europa, e una delle più vaste del mondo. L'articolo ricostruisce le fasi della sua formazione e catalogazione, inquadrandola nel contesto delle maggiori collezioni di libri antichi presenti a Los Angeles. Franklin D. Murphy (1916-1994, sesto Chancellor di UCLA, spicca come il vero motore di questa grande impresa culturale.

  4. A Kinesthetic Learning Approach to Earth Science for 3rd and 4th Grade Students on the Pajarito Plateau, Los Alamos, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershow, H. N.; Green, M.; Stocker, A.; Staires, D.

    2010-12-01

    Current efforts towards Earth Science literacy in New Mexico are guided by the New Mexico Science Benchmarks [1]. We are geoscience professionals in Los Alamos, NM who believe there is an important role for non-traditional educators utilizing innovative teaching methods. We propose to further Earth Science literacy for local 3rd and 4th grade students using a kinesthetic learning approach, with the goal of fostering an interactive relationship between the students and their geologic environment. We will be working in partnership with the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), which teaches the natural heritage of the Pajarito Plateau to 3rd and 4th grade students from the surrounding area, as well as the Family YMCA’s Adventure Programs Director. The Pajarito Plateau provides a remarkable geologic classroom because minimal structural features complicate the stratigraphy and dramatic volcanic and erosional processes are plainly on display and easily accessible. Our methodology consists of two approaches. First, we will build an interpretive display of the local geology at PEEC that will highlight prominent rock formations and geologic processes seen on a daily basis. It will include a simplified stratigraphic section with field specimens and a map linked to each specimen’s location to encourage further exploration. Second, we will develop and implement a kinesthetic curriculum for an exploratory field class. Active engagement with geologic phenomena will take place in many forms, such as a scavenger hunt for precipitated crystals in the vesicles of basalt flows and a search for progressively smaller rhyodacite clasts scattered along an actively eroding canyon. We believe students will be more receptive to origin explanations when they possess a piece of the story. Students will be provided with field books to make drawings of geologic features. This will encourage independent assessment of phenomena and introduce the skill of scientific observation. We

  5. Reconnaissance of geothermal resources of Los Angeles County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal waters produced from large oil fields are currently the most important geothermal resources in Los Angeles County. Otherwise, the County does not appear to have any large, near-surface geothermal resources. The oil fields produce thermal water because of both the moderate depths of production and normal to above-normal geothermal gradients. Gradients are about 3.0-3.5/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Ventura Basin and range from that up to about 5.5-6.0/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Los Angeles Basin. The hottest fields in the County are west of the Newport-Inglewood Structural Zone. The Los Angeles Basin has substantially more potential for uses of heat from oil fields than does the Ventura Basin because of its large fields and dense urban development. Produced fluid temperatures there range from ambient air to boiling, but most are in the 100-150/sup 0/F range. Daily water production ranges from only a few barrels at some fields to over a million barrels at Wilmington Oil Field; nearly all fields produce less than 50,000 barrels/day. Water salinity generally ranges from about 15,000-35,000 mg/liter NaCl. Fields with the most promise as sources of heat for outside applications are Wilmington, Torrance, Venice Beach, and Lawndale. The centralized treatment facilities are the most favorable sites for extraction of heat within the oil fields. Because of the poor water quality heat exchangers will likely be required rather than direct circulation of the field water to users. The best sites for applications are commercial-industrial areas and possibly institutional structures occupied by large numbers of people.

  6. Análisis de los flujos turísticos en el corredor Los Cabos, Baja California Sur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro López López

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The Los Cabos corridor is one of the most dynamic tourism spaces in Mexico. In, around and towards this corridor, intense flows of tourists, migrants, merchandises and information takes place. Diverse in their territorial Impact as they are, most of them act as a link between the southernmost tip of the Baja peninsula and the state of California, in the United States. This is provoking a dissociation of this region of Mexico in its relation with the rest of the country that, to a certain extent, leads to a loss of national sovereignty.

  7. Espacios del agua en el territorio urbanizado. Los Ángeles, California

    OpenAIRE

    González Vives, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Los Ángeles, en California, muestra de forma excepcional la hidrología de las grandes metrópolis en zonas de paisaje árido, basadas en grandes obras de ingeniería civil que concentran en la ciudad el agua de ámbitos geográficos muy extensos mediante aportes elevados de energía, al tiempo que canalizan la evacuación como residuo de los recursos locales. La desertización creciente derivada de este modelo sugiere la necesidad de alternativas de baja energía, basadas...

  8. Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirchner, Thomas B. [New Mexico State University; Breshears, David D. [University of Arizona; Field, Jason P. [University of Arizona

    2012-03-27

    The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant

  9. Introductory materials for committee members: 1) instructions for the Los Alamos National Laboratory fiscal year 2010 capability reviews 2) NPAC strategic capability planning 3) Summary self-assessment for the nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics an

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors.

  10. An Assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Los Angeles (California USA) Hospitals, Wildfires Highest Priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelaine, Sabrina A; Sato, Mizuki; Jin, Yufang; Godwin, Hilary

    2017-10-01

    Introduction Although many studies have delineated the variety and magnitude of impacts that climate change is likely to have on health, very little is known about how well hospitals are poised to respond to these impacts. Hypothesis/Problem The hypothesis is that most modern hospitals in urban areas in the United States need to augment their current disaster planning to include climate-related impacts. Using Los Angeles County (California USA) as a case study, historical data for emergency department (ED) visits and projections for extreme-heat events were used to determine how much climate change is likely to increase ED visits by mid-century for each hospital. In addition, historical data about the location of wildfires in Los Angeles County and projections for increased frequency of both wildfires and flooding related to sea-level rise were used to identify which area hospitals will have an increased risk of climate-related wildfires or flooding at mid-century. Only a small fraction of the total number of predicted ED visits at mid-century would likely to be due to climate change. By contrast, a significant portion of hospitals in Los Angeles County are in close proximity to very high fire hazard severity zones (VHFHSZs) and would be at greater risk to wildfire impacts as a result of climate change by mid-century. One hospital in Los Angeles County was anticipated to be at greater risk due to flooding by mid-century as a result of climate-related sea-level rise. This analysis suggests that several Los Angeles County hospitals should focus their climate-change-related planning on building resiliency to wildfires. Adelaine SA , Sato M , Jin Y , Godwin H . An assessment of climate change impacts on Los Angeles (California USA) hospitals, wildfires highest priority. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(5):556-562.

  11. Edificio de los Tribunales Municipales - Valle de San Gabriel, Los Ángeles - California (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1976-04-01

    Full Text Available The most outstanding feature of this construction are the columns of the main facades which are formed by big prefabricated concrete members and which cover the entire height of the four story structure. The Southern facade is protected from the direct sunlight by means of long prefabricated vertical elements. The building is crowned with a large crobel which is supported by the columns. The space of the four storeys is distributed in the following manner: courtrooms, judges chambers and jury assembly; facilities for the district attorney, the public defender and the marshal; rooms for the court reporters; waiting rooms for the witnesses and premises for the accused. The general planning is such that the court rooms separate the private sector from the public one, at the same time as they are connected with the judges chambers and jury assembly. The interior features have a sober elegance in keeping with the function of the building. The construction is completed by a large parking space and gardens. OEl rasgo más sobresaliente de esta construcción son las columnatas de las fachadas principales, formadas por grandes elementos prefabricados de hormigón que cubren las cuatro plantas de altura del edificio. En la fachada sur, el peristilo se completa con largos partesoles verticales, también prefabricados, que protegen de la luz solar directa. En la parte superior el edificio culmina en un amplio voladizo apoyado sobre las grandes columnas. En el interior de las cuatro plantas se han distribuido: salas para los tribunales; dependencias destinadas a los jueces y jurados; locales para el fiscal, el abogado y el jefe de policía; salas para periodistas; salas de espera para los testigos, e instalaciones para los acusados. La organización general es tal que las salas de las audiencias separan la zona pública de la privada, quedando, al mismo tiempo, enlazadas con las salas de los jueces y de los jurados correspondientes. En la decoraci

  12. Fault slip rates from three-dimensional models of the Los Angeles metropolitan area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Michele L.; Marshall, Scott T.

    2006-11-01

    We present results from the first mechanical model of active tectonics in the Los Angeles region to use non-planar, geologically representative fault surfaces compiled by the Southern California Earthquake Center Community Fault Model. The fault slip rates from our three-dimensional model match well the available geologic slip rates. Discrepancies in reverse slip along the Upper Elysian Park fault and strike-slip along the Raymond fault may reflect imprecise knowledge of local fault geometry. Discrepancy in the average dip slip rate along the Palos Verdes fault reveals variations in dip slip along that surface; model predictions at the location of the geological investigation have good match to geologic data. The validated model is used to estimate dip and strike slip rates for 26 active faults in the Los Angeles metropolitan region, many of which are otherwise unconstrained by geologic evidence.

  13. Anomuros (Anomura del arrecife de Cabo Pulmo - Los Frailes y alrededores, Golfo de California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Socorro García-Madrigal

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available El análisis de los fragmentos del coral Pocillopora elegans recolectados en siete campañas de muestreo durante 1988 y 1989 resultó en 57 ejemplares de anomuros, identificándose nueve especies de la familia Porcellanidae y una especie de Diogenidae, de los cuales tres especies son nuevos registros para el área. Para la zona había 22 especies de anomuros registradas; ahora hay 25 especies repartidas en cuatro familias. Porcellanidae contiene el mayor número de especies (15, seguida por Diogenidae (7, Hippidae (2 y Coenobitidae (1. Las especies más abundantes fueron Megalobrachium tuberculipes (20 ejemplares, Petrolisthes edwardsii (9 y P. hirtispinosus (7. Sólo Hippa pacifica (4% presenta distribución Indopacífica, el resto se distribuye en áreas más restringidas del Pacífico oriental tropical y subtropical. Cuatro especies son endémicas de la provincia cortesiana (16%. Las especies de anomuros de este arrecife y sus alrededores representan el 21% de todas las especies registradas para la región del golfo de California, costa occidental de Baja California Sur, áreas costeras de Nayarit, Sinaloa y zona económica exclusiva de estos estados.During 1988-1989 seven expeditions were made in the Cabo Pulmo-Los Frailes reef and fifty-seven anomurans were collected in fragments of Pocillopora elegans (nine species of Porcellanidae and one of Diogenidae. Twenty-two species were recorded previously for the study area and three are new records, all distributed in four families. The Porcellanidae had most species (15, followed by the Diogenidae (7, Hippidae (2 and the Coenobitidae (1. Most abundant were Megalobrachium tuberculipes (20 specimens, Petrolisthes edwardsii (nine specimens, and P. hirtispinosus (seven specimens. All species are recognized as members of the Eastern Tropical Pacific fauna, although Hippa pacifica is widespread in the Indopacific. Four species are restricted to the Cortez province (16%. Anomurans collected in these

  14. Risks for abuse against pregnant Hispanic women: Morelos, Mexico and Los Angeles County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Roberto; Peek-Asa, Corinne; García, Lorena; Ruiz, Agustín; Kraus, Jess F

    2003-11-01

    Although violence against women is gaining international attention as a prevention priority, little is known about how risks differ across countries. A comparative study of violence against pregnant Mexican women in Morelos, Mexico, and Latina women in Los Angeles County, California, United States. In 1998 and 1999, women in prenatal clinics were interviewed about psychological abuse and sexual and physical violence by their partner, during and the 1 year prior to the index pregnancy. The overall response rate for Morelos was 99%, with a sample size of 914; Los Angeles County had a response rate of 96.9%, with a sample size of 219. Women in Morelos reported a higher prevalence of violence compared to women in the California (14.8% v 11.9%, respectively). A partner aged child were more than 25 times more likely to be abused during pregnancy than women not reporting this type of abuse. The identification of factors associated with violence against women, especially as they differ by culture and ethnicity, will help clinicians to better identify victims and to design and implement culturally appropriate prevention programs.

  15. Desarrollo humano en el noroeste de México: un análisis comparativo de los estados de Sonora, Baja California y Baja California Sur, 1995-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Zamudio Sánchez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo aborda el desarrollo humano en Sonora, Baja California y Baja California Sur. Se estimaron los valores de cuatro índices: desarrollo humano con producto interno bruto, desarrollo humano con servicios, con género e inequidad; además de curvas de calidad estatal y municipal.Aunque los valores ubican a Baja California Sur en la mejor posición de los indicadores de desarrollo humano y después a Sonora; Baja California ocupa el mejor sitio en equidad en el país.

  16. Workshop on Probing Frontiers in Matter with Neutron Scattering, Wrap-up Session Chaired by John C. Browne on December 14, 1997, at Fuller Lodge, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezei, F.; Thompson, J.

    1998-12-01

    The Workshop on Probing Frontiers in Matter with Neutron Scattering consisted of a series of lectures and discussions about recent highlights in neutron scattering. In this report, we present the transcript of the concluding discussion session (wrap-up session) chaired by John C. Browne, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The workshop had covered a spectrum of topics ranging from high T{sub c} superconductivity to polymer science, from glasses to molecular biology, a broad review aimed at identifying trends and future needs in condensed matter research. The focus of the wrap-up session was to summarize the workshop participants' views on developments to come. Most of the highlights presented during the workshop were the result of experiments performed at the leading reactor-based neutron scattering facilities. However, recent advances with very high power accelerators open up opportunities to develop new approaches to spallation technique that could decisively advance neutron scattering research in areas for which reactor sources are today by far the best choice. The powerful combination of neutron scattering and increasingly accurate computer modeling emerged as another area of opportunity for research in the coming decades.

  17. Experience at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility with the use of alloy Inconel 718 as an enclosure for a beam degrader and as a proton beam entry window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.; Brown, R.D.; Cedillo, C.M.; Zimmerman, E.

    1994-09-01

    Operation of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) began in 1972 and continues at present. An injector delivers protons to a 0.8 kin long linear accelerator which produces a particle energy of 800 MeV; the protons are then transported to a variety of experimental areas. The proton beam is transported in a vacuum tube, controlled and bent by electromagnets. The highest intensity beam, at a maximum level of 1 mA, is delivered to the experimental area designated as Area A. At the end of the experimental area, the beam is transported through an interface between beamline vacuum and one atmosphere air pressure. This interface is made of metal and is generally referred to as a beam entry window. At LAMPF, after the beam has exited the vacuum tube, it becomes incident on a number of experiments or ``targets.`` These include capsules for radiation damage studies, a beam ``degrader`` for the long-term neutrino experiment, and as many nine targets in the Isotope Production (IP) stringer system used to produce medically significant isotopes. Following the IP system is a beam stop used for the purpose its name implies. The beam stop also contains a beam entry window, whose purpose is to separate the 250 psig water cooling environment from I atmosphere of air. The beam entry window, the beam degrader, and the beam stop window are made of alloy Inconel 718, have endured a lengthy irradiation service time at LAMPF, and are the subject of this report.

  18. Type A Accident Investigation Board report on the January 17, 1996, electrical accident with injury in Technical Area 21 Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    An electrical accident was investigated in which a crafts person received serious injuries as a result of coming into contact with a 13.2 kilovolt (kV) electrical cable in the basement of Building 209 in Technical Area 21 (TA-21-209) in the Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility (TSFF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In conducting its investigation, the Accident Investigation Board used various analytical techniques, including events and causal factor analysis, barrier analysis, change analysis, fault tree analysis, materials analysis, and root cause analysis. The board inspected the accident site, reviewed events surrounding the accident, conducted extensive interviews and document reviews, and performed causation analyses to determine the factors that contributed to the accident, including any management system deficiencies. Relevant management systems and factors that could have contributed to the accident were evaluated in accordance with the guiding principles of safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy in an October 1994 letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and subsequently to Congress.

  19. Inner Radiation Belt Representation of the Energetic Electron Environment: Model and Data Synthesis Using the Salammbo Radiation Belt Transport Code and Los Alamos Geosynchronous and GPS Energetic Particle Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, R. H. W.; Bourdarie, S.; Fennell, J.; Kanekal, S.; Cayton, T. E.

    2004-01-01

    The highly energetic electron environment in the inner magnetosphere (GEO inward) has received a lot of research attention in resent years, as the dynamics of relativistic electron acceleration and transport are not yet fully understood. These electrons can cause deep dielectric charging in any space hardware in the MEO to GEO region. We use a new and novel approach to obtain a global representation of the inner magnetospheric energetic electron environment, which can reproduce the absolute environment (flux) for any spacecraft orbit in that region to within a factor of 2 for the energy range of 100 KeV to 5 MeV electrons, for any levels of magnetospheric activity. We combine the extensive set of inner magnetospheric energetic electron observations available at Los Alamos with the physics based Salammbo transport code, using the data assimilation technique of "nudging". This in effect input in-situ data into the code and allows the diffusion mechanisms in the code to interpolate the data into regions and times of no data availability. We present here details of the methods used, both in the data assimilation process and in the necessary inter-calibration of the input data used. We will present sample runs of the model/data code and compare the results to test spacecraft data not used in the data assimilation process.

  20. Fault zone regulation, seismic hazard, and social vulnerability in Los Angeles, California: Hazard or urban amenity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toké, Nathan A.; Boone, Christopher G.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón

    2014-09-01

    Public perception and regulation of environmental hazards are important factors in the development and configuration of cities. Throughout California, probabilistic seismic hazard mapping and geologic investigations of active faults have spatially quantified earthquake hazard. In Los Angeles, these analyses have informed earthquake engineering, public awareness, the insurance industry, and the government regulation of developments near faults. Understanding the impact of natural hazards regulation on the social and built geography of cities is vital for informing future science and policy directions. We constructed a relative social vulnerability index classification for Los Angeles to examine the social condition within regions of significant seismic hazard, including areas regulated as Alquist-Priolo (AP) Act earthquake fault zones. Despite hazard disclosures, social vulnerability is lowest within AP regulatory zones and vulnerability increases with distance from them. Because the AP Act requires building setbacks from active faults, newer developments in these zones are bisected by parks. Parcel-level analysis demonstrates that homes adjacent to these fault zone parks are the most valuable in their neighborhoods. At a broad scale, a Landsat-based normalized difference vegetation index shows that greenness near AP zones is greater than the rest of the metropolitan area. In the parks-poor city of Los Angeles, fault zone regulation has contributed to the construction of park space within areas of earthquake hazard, thus transforming zones of natural hazard into amenities, attracting populations of relatively high social status, and demonstrating that the distribution of social vulnerability is sometimes more strongly tied to amenities than hazards.

  1. Chagas disease awareness among Latin American immigrants living in Los Angeles, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Daniel R; Traina, Mahmoud I; Hernandez, Salvador; Smer, Aiman M; Khamag, Haneen; Meymandi, Sheba K

    2014-11-01

    Approximately 300,000 persons have Chagas disease in the United States, although almost all persons acquired the disease in Latin America. We examined awareness of Chagas disease among Latin American immigrants living in Los Angeles, California. We surveyed 2,677 persons (age range = 18-60 years) in Los Angeles who resided in Latin America for at least six months. A total of 62% of the participants recalled seeing triatomines in Latin America, and 27% of the participants reported triatomine bites at least once per year while living abroad. A total of 86% of the participants had never heard of Chagas disease. Of persons who had heard of Chagas disease, 81% believed that it was not serious. More than 95% of those who had heard of Chagas disease would want to be tested and treated. Most Latin American immigrants living in Los Angeles recalled exposure to vectors of Chagas disease. However, they have little knowledge of this disease. Increasing awareness of Chagas disease is needed in this high-risk population. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. Chagas Disease Awareness among Latin American Immigrants Living in Los Angeles, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Daniel R.; Traina, Mahmoud I.; Hernandez, Salvador; Smer, Aiman M.; Khamag, Haneen; Meymandi, Sheba K.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 300,000 persons have Chagas disease in the United States, although almost all persons acquired the disease in Latin America. We examined awareness of Chagas disease among Latin American immigrants living in Los Angeles, California. We surveyed 2,677 persons (age range = 18–60 years) in Los Angeles who resided in Latin America for at least six months. A total of 62% of the participants recalled seeing triatomines in Latin America, and 27% of the participants reported triatomine bites at least once per year while living abroad. A total of 86% of the participants had never heard of Chagas disease. Of persons who had heard of Chagas disease, 81% believed that it was not serious. More than 95% of those who had heard of Chagas disease would want to be tested and treated. Most Latin American immigrants living in Los Angeles recalled exposure to vectors of Chagas disease. However, they have little knowledge of this disease. Increasing awareness of Chagas disease is needed in this high-risk population. PMID:25200261

  3. Shallow seismic imaging of folds above the Puente Hills blind-thrust fault, Los Angeles, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Thomas L.; Shaw, John H.; Dolan, James F.; Christofferson, Shari A.; Williams, Robert A.; Odum, Jack K.; Plesch, Andreas

    2002-05-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiles image discrete folds in the shallow subsurface (Puente Hills blind-thrust fault system, Los Angeles basin, California. The profiles demonstrate late Quaternary activity at the fault tip, precisely locate the axial surfaces of folds within the upper 100 m, and constrain the geometry and kinematics of recent folding. The Santa Fe Springs segment of the Puente Hills fault zone shows an upward-narrowing kink band with an active anticlinal axial surface, consistent with fault-bend folding above an active thrust ramp. The Coyote Hills segment shows an active synclinal axial surface that coincides with the base of a 9-m-high scarp, consistent with tip-line folding or the presence of a backthrust. The seismic profiles pinpoint targets for future geologic work to constrain slip rates and ages of past events on this important fault system.

  4. HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELL EDUCATION AT CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LOS ANGELES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blekhman, David

    2011-09-30

    California State University, Los Angeles, has partnered with the Department of Energy in addressing the workforce preparation and public education needs of the fuel cell industry and the US economy through a comprehensive set of curriculum development and training activities: * Developing and offering several courses in fuel cell technologies, hydrogen and alternative fuels production, alternative and renewable energy technologies as means of zero emissions hydrogen economy, and sustainable environment. * Establishing a zero emissions PEM fuel cell and hydrogen laboratory supporting curriculum and graduate students teaching and research experiences. * Providing engaging capstone projects for multi-disciplinary teams of senior undergraduate students. * Fostering partnerships with automotive OEMs and energy providers. * Organizing and participating in synergistic projects and activities that grow the program and assure its sustainability.

  5. Los bandidos y la identidad california en la segunda mitad del XIX: Tiburcio Vasquez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamar Prieto, Covadonga

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The bandit Tiburcio Vasquez developed his career at a time of political and social struggle for California and the Californios, given that they became part of the United States of America after 1848. This paper examines the bilingual interview that Vasquez gave the day before his death sentence, together with other documentary sources about him in English and Spanish. I use the conceptual frame of liminality in order to expose the tools used to folklorize the past of the Californios. I examine conceptualizations about Vasquez, and who defined them, and the conclude that the Californio bandits, and especially Vasquez, represent the partial dissolution of the Californio identity, under pressure from the new social and political framework imposed by the United States.El bandido Tiburcio Vasquez desarrolla su carrera en un momento de dificultad política y social para los californios, que desde 1848 pasan a formar parte de EEUU. Se examinan la entrevista bilingüe que Vasquez concede en la víspera de su ajusticiamiento, así como fuentes contemporáneas en inglés y en español sobre él. Desde el marco teórico de la liminalidad, se muestran las herramientas por las que se folcloriza el pasado californio, además de la conceptualización de Vasquez como bandido y quiénes originan esos juicios. Se concluye que los bandidos californios, y especialmente Vasquez, representan la disolución parcial de la identidad california, empujada por el marco social y político de EEUU.

  6. Antecedentes históricos de los indígenas de Baja California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bendímez Patterson

    1987-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio explica la forma como se han ido desenvolviendo los primeros pobladores de esta región, inicia en el periodo paleo-indígena, para después avanzar paulatinamente en el tiempo hasta llegar al problema actual que caracteriza a muchas de las comunidades indígenas de nuestro país. No obstante que la historia ha sido documentada por la sociedad dominante, sin contar con la versión de los actores nativos, y en lo que se refiere a estas sociedades, ésta es sumamente escueta. En la actualidad, la conciencia de muchos mexicanos no-indígenas está permeada con la concepción heredada desde la época colonial y continuamos marginándolos y considerándolos como un obstáculo para la modernización, al grado que, actualmente quedan menos de 1,000 indígenas en las comunidades de Baja California.

  7. Isotopic constraints on sources of methane in Los Angeles, California, USA (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Tyler, S. C.; Christensen, L.; Xu, X.; Pataki, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and an important contributor to global warming. Recent studies have suggested that methane emissions in large cities are underestimated with several models even indicating that substantial emissions attributed to cities are in part from regional and/or encroaching agricultural sources rather than from urban fossil fuel sources. We have found that stable isotopes (13-C and D) and radiocarbon (C-14) are excellent tracers of various sources of methane in Los Angeles, California. Measurements of the d13C and dD of methane from discrete sources show excellent separation between urban sources, such as vehicle emissions, power plants, oil refineries, landfills, and sewage treatment plants and agricultural sources like cows, biogas, and cattle feedlots. In addition, radiocarbon is an excellent tracer of modern versus fossil fuel contributions to methane emissions in the region. Preliminary measurements of background air in Los Angeles indicate that the major source of excess methane is vehicle emissions with most additional CH4 likely contributed from among other fossil fuel sources such as oil refining or power plants. We are currently confirming these results with broader field campaigns and additional measurements, including continuous measurements of atmospheric methane concentration using tunable laser spectroscopy. The combination of high-resolution tunable laser concentration measurements and precise isotope measurements using mass spectrometry is a very promising and powerful tool for methane source monitoring.

  8. Geologic map database of the El Mirage Lake area, San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David M.; Bedford, David R.

    2000-01-01

    This geologic map database for the El Mirage Lake area describes geologic materials for the dry lake, parts of the adjacent Shadow Mountains and Adobe Mountain, and much of the piedmont extending south from the lake upward toward the San Gabriel Mountains. This area lies within the western Mojave Desert of San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties, southeastern California. The area is traversed by a few paved highways that service the community of El Mirage, and by numerous dirt roads that lead to outlying properties. An off-highway vehicle area established by the Bureau of Land Management encompasses the dry lake and much of the land north and east of the lake. The physiography of the area consists of the dry lake, flanking mud and sand flats and alluvial piedmonts, and a few sharp craggy mountains. This digital geologic map database, intended for use at 1:24,000-scale, describes and portrays the rock units and surficial deposits of the El Mirage Lake area. The map database was prepared to aid in a water-resource assessment of the area by providing surface geologic information with which deepergroundwater-bearing units may be understood. The area mapped covers the Shadow Mountains SE and parts of the Shadow Mountains, Adobe Mountain, and El Mirage 7.5-minute quadrangles. The map includes detailed geology of surface and bedrock deposits, which represent a significant update from previous bedrock geologic maps by Dibblee (1960) and Troxel and Gunderson (1970), and the surficial geologic map of Ponti and Burke (1980); it incorporates a fringe of the detailed bedrock mapping in the Shadow Mountains by Martin (1992). The map data were assembled as a digital database using ARC/INFO to enable wider applications than traditional paper-product geologic maps and to provide for efficient meshing with other digital data bases prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey's Southern California Areal Mapping Project.

  9. Evaluating the Impact of Conservation Measures on Urban Water Fluxes in Los Angeles, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manago, K. F.; Hogue, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    California is experiencing one of the most severe droughts on record. In response, the State Water Resources Control Board adopted emergency regulations in May, implementing a mandatory 25% statewide reduction in potable urban water use. Prior to this, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power had implemented mandatory restrictions and a pricing increase in 2009 and 2010, respectively to encourage reduced consumption. Understanding where conservation measures are having the greatest impact and how it is affecting water fluxes throughout the basin is critical, especially when considering the push for increased reliance on local water resources. Los Angeles is selected as the study area due to its high degree of urbanization, while the Ballona Creek watershed is used for runoff analysis due to the lack of dams and wastewater treatment plants altering flow in the channel. Utilizing a combination of runoff gages, groundwater monitoring well data, consumption data, and hydrologic models, we aim to evaluate how hydrologic processes have been influenced by water conservation measures. The work focuses on how changes in outdoor water use have influenced discharge patterns and groundwater recharge since most of the water conservation efforts have been focused on decreasing landscape irrigation. Previous work has shown that outdoor irrigation rates have decreased after the implementation of conservation measures, causing a decrease in vegetation greenness across the city. Runoff has also significantly decreased, especially dry season discharge. Further work is also being conducted to evaluate changes to evapotranspiration, using a combination of NLDAS model results and CIMIS reference ET data, as well as groundwater and recharge, utilizing a Bayesian Hierarchical model to fill missing groundwater monitoring well data. Results provide improved understanding of response to, and impacts of, conservation measures which ultimately allow for better water resources management

  10. Toward a nitrous oxide budget for a global megacity: Los Angeles, California (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrous oxide is a powerful greenhouse gas (nearly 300 times as powerful as carbon dioxide) and one of the major anthropogenic ozone depleting chemicals in the atmosphere. The strong global warming potential makes it a good target for greenhouse gas emissions reductions. But although the major anthropogenic source of nitrous oxide globally is from fertilized agricultural soils, only a very few studies have attempted a regional nitrous oxide budget. Here we present a synthesis of several recent efforts to constrain nitrous oxide emissions from terrestrial soils, wastewater treatment plants, and the coastal ocean in the Los Angeles, California metro area, home to ~13 million residents. Landscaped soils such as lawns and athletic fields emit nitrous oxide at approximately the same rate as agricultural soils in the region, ~ 200 mg N m-2 yr-1. Wastewater recycling to conserve water resources in this arid region emits nitrous oxide at rates about 3 times higher than traditional carbon oxidation of wastewater, making water reclamation the dominant anthropogenic source in the region. However, we also estimated efflux of nitrous oxide from the coastal ocean using surface concentrations and estimates of wind-driven mixing, and we found that marine emissions may be up to 10 times higher than anthropogenic sources. We also measured stable isotopic composition (N-15 and O-18) of nitrous oxide from all of these sources, and we will present the implications of these and our emission rate data for top-down monitoring of regional nitrous oxide sources.

  11. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 91-395-2244, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Los Angeles, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.E.; Miller, A.

    1992-08-01

    In response to a request from an employee of the Veterans Administration Medical Center (SIC-8062), Los Angeles, California, an investigation was undertaken of exposures to chemicals in the laboratory department, excessive heat and humidity in the kitchen area of the dietetics department, and carbon-monoxide (630080) exposures inside the building. In three of five personal breathing zone samples taken in the histopathology laboratory, formaldehyde (50000) was detected at concentrations up to 0.17 part per million (ppm) and it was also present in all four of the area air samples at concentrations up to 1.1ppm. The predominant symptoms associated with work in the laboratory included occasional headaches and nose/throat irritation. Mild episodes of dermal irritation and rash were also reported. All carbon-monoxide levels were less than 5ppm. In the kitchens, relative humidity levels were below the recommended range. Temperatures were above the range of temperatures recommended for a medium level of work. The authors conclude that a potential carcinogenic risk existed for workers in laboratories which use formaldehyde. The authors recommend specific measures to lower the risk of formaldehyde exposures in the laboratory.

  12. Development of Multi-Disciplinary Finite Element Method Analysis Courses at California State University, Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, John; Wu, Chivey

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) Partnership Awards Grant to California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA) has two primary goals that help to achieve NASA objectives. The overall objectives of the NASA Partnership Awards are to create opportunities for joint University NASA/Government sponsored research and related activities. One of the goals of the grant is to have university faculty researchers participate and contribute to the development of NASA technology that supports NASA goals for research and development (R&D) in Aeronautics and Astronautics. The other goal is technology transfer in the other direction, where NASA developed technology is made available to the general public and more specifically, targeted to industries that can profit from utilization of government developed technology. This years NASA Dryden Partnership Awards grant to CSULA entitled, "Computer Simulation of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering Systems", has two major tasks that satisfy overall NASA objectives. The first task conducts basic and applied research that contributes to technology development at the Dryden Flight Research Center. The second part of the grant provides for dissemination of NASA developed technology, by using the teaching environment created in the CSULA classroom. The second task and how this is accomplished is the topic of this paper. The NASA STARS (Structural Analysis Routines) computer simulation program is used at the Dryden center to support flight testing of high-performance experimental aircraft and to conduct research and development of new and advanced Aerospace technology.

  13. Climatic consequences of adopting drought tolerant vegetation over Los Angeles as a response to California drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban-Weiss, G. A.; Vahmani, P.

    2016-12-01

    During 2012-2014, drought in California resulted in policies to reduce water consumption. One measure pursued was replacing lawns with landscapes that minimize water consumption, such as drought tolerant vegetation. If implemented at broad scale, this strategy would result in reductions in irrigation, and changes in land surface characteristics. In this study, we employ a modified regional climate model to assess the climatic consequences of adopting drought tolerant vegetation over the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Transforming lawns to drought tolerant vegetation resulted in daytime warming of up to 1.9°C, largely due to decreases in irrigation that shifted surface energy partitioning toward higher sensible and lower latent heat flux. During nighttime, however, adopting drought tolerant vegetation caused mean cooling of about 3°C, due to changes in soil thermodynamic properties and heat exchange dynamics between the surface and ground. Our results show that nocturnal cooling effects, which are larger in magnitude and of great importance for public health during heat events, could counterbalance the daytime warming attributed to the studied water conservation strategy. A more aggressive implementation, assuming all urban vegetation was replaced with drought tolerant vegetation, resulted in an average daytime cooling of 0.2°C, largely due to weakened sea-breeze patterns, highlighting the important role of land surface roughness in this coastal megacity.

  14. Los Alamos Science, Fall 1983 No. 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, N G [ed.

    1983-10-01

    Topics covered in this issue include: cellular automata, gene expression, gen-bank and its promise for molecular genetics, and frontiers of supercomputing. Abstracts have been prepared for the individual items. (GHT)

  15. LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-02

    The principle goals of this project is to increase flux and improve resolution for neutron energies above 1 keV for nuclear physics experiments; and preserve current strong performance at thermal energies for material science.

  16. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinman, William Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Steiner, Robert Ernest [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lamont, Stephen Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Nuclear forensics assists in responding to any event where nuclear material is found outside of regulatory control; a response plan is presented and a nuclear forensics program is undergoing further development so that smugglers are sufficiently deterred.

  17. Dr Smith goes to Los Alamos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nuclear weapons and terrorism. Nuclear weapons were first developed during World War II in the United States under a top-secret program called the Manhat- tan Project. These weapons were developed because of the fear that Nazi Germany was developing such weapons, but after. Germany's surrender, they were used ...

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory Perchlorate Issues.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjeresen, Denny; Rae, Steve; Beers, Bob; Saladen, Mike; Barr, Alice; Pope, Alicia; Dziewinski, Lacek; Scott, Jim; Holcomb, Robert; Hollis, Diana; Leslie Dale,; Williams, Laurie; Strietelmeier, Betty; Carlson, Bryan; Alexander, Rick; Worland, Pete; Hanson, Steve; Stine, Jim; Hiskey, Mike; Archuleta, Jose; Kinkead, Scott; Sherrard, Ann; Longmire, Pat; Witkowski, Marc; Gard, Marvin

    2003-08-04

    This document reviews the chemical structure of the perchlorate anion and the uses of perchlorates, related health issues, applicable drinking water regulations, water supply system monitoring, current laboratory perchlorate use, management of perchlorate compound risks, potential perchlorate sites and sources, the search for a lower perchlorate detection limit, and treatment of perchlorate contamination.

  19. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Michelle; Brady, Doug

    2008-07-01

    Each year, LANL produces an Environmental Surveillance Report (ESR) in compliance with a Department of Energy (DOE) order. The ESR aims to summarize the environmental impacts of the Laboratory, the efforts to minimize these impacts, and LANL’s compliance with environmental regulations. This Summary Report presents the methods and results of environmental monitoring done in 2007 in a form that is more understandable and inviting to the public. Though other DOE sites have done Summary Reports in the past, this is LANL’s first for the ESR, and the authors were privileged to write this report from the perspective of students.

  20. Los Alamos County Blocks, Total Population (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The once-a-decade decennial census was conducted in April 2010 by the U.S. Census Bureau. This count of every resident in the United States was mandated by Article...

  1. Los Alamos County 2010 Census Blocks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  2. Los Alamos County Current Area Landmark

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  3. Los Alamos County Current Point Landmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  4. Los Alamos County 2010 Census Edges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  5. Los Alamos County 2010 Census Tracts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  6. Los Alamos County 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — TIGER, TIGER/Line, and Census TIGER are registered trademarks of the Bureau of the Census. The Redistricting Census 2000 TIGER/Line files are an extract of selected...

  7. Los Alamos County 2010 Census Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  8. Flies from L.A., The Sequel: A further twelve new species of Megaselia (Diptera: Phoridae) from the BioSCAN Project in Los Angeles (California, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartop, Emily A; Brown, Brian V; Disney, R Henry L

    2016-01-01

    Presented are continued results from the BioSCAN Project, an urban biodiversity study sampling primarily from private backyards in Los Angeles, California (USA). Presented are continued results from the BioSCAN Project, an urban biodiversity study sampling primarily from private backyards in Los Angeles, California (USA). Twelve new species of Megaselia (Diptera: Phoridae) are described: M. baileyae, M. friedrichae, M. gonzalezorum, M. joanneae, M. losangelensis, M. phyllissunae, M. pongsaiae, M. shatesae, M. stoakesi, M. studentorum, M. voluntariorum, M. wongae.

  9. Potential for post-closure radionuclide redistribution due to biotic intrusion: aboveground biomass, litter production rates, and the distribution of root mass with depth at material disposal area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Sean B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Christensen, Candace [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jennings, Terry L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jaros, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wykoff, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crowell, Kelly J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [URS

    2008-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) is disposed of at LANL's Technical Area (T A) 54, Material Disposal Area (MDA) G. The ability of MDA G to safely contain radioactive waste during current and post-closure operations is evaluated as part of the facility's ongoing performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA). Due to the potential for uptake and incorporation of radio nuclides into aboveground plant material, the PA and CA project that plant roots penetrating into buried waste may lead to releases of radionuclides into the accessible environment. The potential amount ofcontamination deposited on the ground surface due to plant intrusion into buried waste is a function of the quantity of litter generated by plants, as well as radionuclide concentrations within the litter. Radionuclide concentrations in plant litter is dependent on the distribution of root mass with depth and the efficiency with which radionuclides are extracted from contaminated soils by the plant's roots. In order to reduce uncertainties associated with the PA and CA for MDA G, surveys are being conducted to assess aboveground biomass, plant litter production rates, and root mass with depth for the four prominent vegetation types (grasses, forbs, shrubs and trees). The collection of aboveground biomass for grasses and forbs began in 2007. Additional sampling was conducted in October 2008 to measure root mass with depth and to collect additional aboveground biomass data for the types of grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees that may become established at MDA G after the facility undergoes final closure, Biomass data will be used to estimate the future potential mass of contaminated plant litter fall, which could act as a latent conduit for radionuclide transport from the closed disposal area. Data collected are expected to reduce uncertainties associated with the PA and CA for MDA G and ultimately aid in the assessment and

  10. TURISMO MÉDICO EN LOS ALGODONES, BAJA CALIFORNIA, MÉXICO: EXPLORACIÓN DEL CAPITAL HUMANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Guadalupe Zermeño-Flores

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available El presente documento es una exploración del capital humano (CH de los profesionistas de salud respecto a la capacitación y el desarrollo de conocimientos, habilidades y actitudes en la prestación de servicios médicos al paciente-turista de Vicente Guerrero, mejor conocido como Los Algodones (LAL en el Estado de Baja California. Éste se distingue por ofrecer a los visitantes que llegan principalmente del norte de Estados Unidos y Canadá durante la temporada de invierno servicios de salud, especialmente en el campo de la higiene dental y la optometría, así como venta de medicamentos A esto se agregan las estrategias de competitividad en la frontera de Baja California (México y California (Estados Unidos. El presente artículo es tanto un estudio cuantitativo como cualitativo, que comprende tres etapas. La primera etapa consistió en la revisión de literatura del turismo médico (TM y sus implicaciones para el capital humano. La segunda etapa fue la consulta de datos básicos de la entidad, que se sometió al análisis estadístico de los profesionistas instalados oficialmente en las empresas que operan en el TM. La tercera etapa se enfocó en la realización de entrevistas a profundidad a profesionistas de la salud de alto prestigio en la sociedad de Los Algodones.

  11. Hydrocarbon emissions from twelve urban shade trees of the Los Angeles, California, Air Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corchnoy, Stephanie B.; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger

    The large-scale planting of shade trees in urban areas to counteract heat-island effects and to minimize energy use is currently being discussed. Among the costs to be considered in a cost/benefit analysis of such a program is the potential for additional reactive organic compounds in the atmosphere due to emissions from these trees. In this program, 15 species of potential shade trees for the Los Angeles Air Basin were studied and emission rates were determined for 11 of these trees, with one further tree (Crape myrtle) exhibiting no detectable emissions. The emission rates normalized to dry leaf weight and corrected to 30°C were (in μg g -1 h -1), ranked from lowest to highest emission rate: Crape myrtle, none detected; Camphor, 0.03; Aleppo pine, 0.15; Deodar cedar, 0.29; Italian Stone pine, 0.42; Monterey pine, 0.90; Brazilian pepper, 1.3; Canary Island pine, 1.7; Ginkgo, 3.0; California pepper, 3.7; Liquidambar, 37; Carrotwood, 49. In addition to the emission rates per unit biomass, the biomass per tree must be factored into any assessment of the relative merits of the various trees, since some trees have higher biomass constants than others. The present data shows that there are large differences in emission rates among different tree species and this should be factored into decision-making as to which shade trees to plant. Based solely on the presently determined emission rates, the Crape myrtle and Camphor tree are good choices for large-scale planting, while the Carrotwood tree and Liquidambar are poor choices due to their high isoprene emission rates.

  12. Application of three fault growth criteria to the Puente Hills thrust system, Los Angeles, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Erik L.; Cooke, Michele L.

    2005-10-01

    Three-dimensional mechanical models are used to evaluate the performance of different fault growth criteria in predicting successive growth of three échelon thrust faults similar to the segments of the Puente Hills thrust system of the Los Angeles basin, California. Four sequential Boundary Element Method models explore the growth of successive échelon faults within the system by simulating snapshots of deformation at different stages of development. These models use three criteria, (1) energy release rate, (2) strain energy density, and (3) Navier-Coulomb stress, to characterize the lateral growth of the fault system. We simulate the growth of an échelon thrust fault system to evaluate the suitability of each of these criteria for assessing fault growth. Each of these three factors predicts a portion of the incipient fault geometry (i.e. location or orientation); however, each provides different information. In each model, energy release rate along the westernmost (leading) tip of the Puente Hills thrust drops with growth of the next neighboring fault; this result supports the overall lateral development of successive échelon segments. Within each model, regions of high strain energy density and Navier-Coulomb stress envelope at least a portion of the next fault to develop, although the strain energy density has stronger correlation than Navier-Coulomb stress to the location of incipient faulting. In each model, one of the two predicted planes of maximum Navier-Coulomb stress ahead of the leading fault tip matches the strike but not the dip of the incipient fault plane recreating part of the fault orientation. The incipient fault dip is best predicted by the orientation of the strain energy density envelopes around the leading fault tip. Furthermore, the energy release rate and pattern of strain energy density can be used to characterize potential soft linkage (overlap) or hard linkage (connection) of échelon faults within the system.

  13. Third-World Hodgkin's disease at Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, E; Hufford, S; Lukes, R; Bernstein-Singer, M; Sobel, G; Gill, P; Pinter-Brown, L; Rarick, M; Rosen, P; Brynes, R

    1988-08-01

    The reported experience with Hodgkin's disease (HD) in the United States has come primarily from large referral centers that attract a predominantly white population of high socioeconomic status (SES). The majority of these patients had the nodular sclerosis (NS) histologic subtype and asymptomatic stage I/II disease. We have reviewed the records of 178 patients with HD seen within the past 17 years at Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center (LAC/USC), which is a nonreferral, government-operated facility. Our patient population was found to be heterogeneous, with 38% white, 22% black, and 36% Hispanic. Systemic "B" symptoms were noted in 62% of patients at diagnosis, and 63% had advanced disease (stage III or IV). NS pathologic subtype was present in only 52% of the group. Comparison between the races revealed: (1) Hispanics had a higher incidence of lymphocyte depleted subtype and less NS than whites (P less than .06); (2) whites had equal distribution between stages I/II and III/IV; (3) blacks and Hispanics presented more frequently with stage III/IV (P = .10); and (4) extranodal involvement occurred most often in bone in whites, and was equally distributed between liver, lung, and bone in blacks and Hispanics. We conclude that the lower SES, mixed racial population seen at our institution more closely resembles the reports of HD in Third-World countries and is characterized by advanced symptomatic disease. Further, the clinical pathologic characteristics of HD in the United States may vary significantly, depending upon the precise ethnic and socioeconomic status of the patients being served.

  14. Mechanical Analysis of Fault Interaction in the Puente Hills Region, Los Angeles Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, W. A.; Cooke, M.

    2002-12-01

    A three-dimensional model of the Puente Hills thrust system (PHT) and the Whittier fault has been constructed using published cross sections, surface trace maps [Shaw (1999); Shaw and Suppe (1996); Wright (1991)] and products of the Southern California Earthquake Center. This study utilizes boundary element method models to validate the proposed fault geometry of the Puente Hills region via investigating fault interaction. The interaction between PHT and Whittier faults is evaluated within an elastic half-space under horizontal contraction and evidenced by slip rates on faults, strain energy density (SED), and Navier-Coulomb stress (NC) throughout the host rock. Modeled slip rates are compared to paleoseismic estimates to validate the proposed fault configuration while maps of SED and NC highlight regions of high strain in the host rock and likely faulting. Subsequently, the sensitivity of SED and NC distribution to changes in fault geometry illuminate the nature of fault interaction within this complex system of interacting faults. We explore interaction of faults within the PHT region using two sets of models. The first examines slip rates and SED and NC distribution within a local model of the PHT region while the second set incorporates the PHT faults within the context of the Los Angeles basin. Both sets explore the response of the fault system to systematic addition of faults. Adding faults within regions of high SED and NC does not influence slip on neighboring faults; however the addition of fault surfaces in regions of low/moderate SED and NC reduces slip along adjacent faults. The sensitivity of fault slip rates to direction of remote contraction in the Los Angeles Basin is examined with contraction directions of 036, 017, and 006.5 [Bawden (2001), Argus (1999), and Feigl (1993)]. Furthermore, variations on intersection geometry between the PHT and Whittier fault are explored. Portions of the PHT and Whittier faults show reasonable match to available

  15. 76 FR 80875 - Los Padres National Forest: California; Environmental Impact Statement for the Removal of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... federally listed arroyo toad, California red-legged frog, and steelhead trout. The purpose of this project...), California red-legged frog (F-T), southwestern pond turtle (R5-S), two-striped garter snake (R5-S) and... on National Forest System land. Tamarisk is a nonnative invasive tree-shrub that can grow in dense...

  16. 77 FR 9200 - Los Padres National Forest: California; Environmental Impact Statement for the Removal of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... federally listed arroyo toad, California red-legged frog, and steelhead trout. The purpose of this project... as arroyo toad (F-E), California red-legged frog (F-T), southwestern pond turtle (R5-S), two-striped... prevent its further spread on National Forest System land. Tamarisk is a nonnative invasive tree-shrub...

  17. Dinámica de los componentes demográficos en Baja California, durante el periodo 1985-1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Estrella Valenzuela

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se identifican los rangos predominantes en la dinámica de los componentes demográficos del estado de Baja California y sus municipios, durante el período 1985-1990. Para ello, se utilizan y combinan datos de estadísticas vitales, censales y de las Encuestas Demográficas de Baja California de 1986 y 1990. A partir del análisis de la mortalidad y la fecundidad, se logra determinar una tendencia de estabilidad en el componente natural de la dinámica demográfica del estado, con variaciones marginales a nivel municipal. En el rubro de crecimiento social, sin embargo, se observa un notable y claro incremento en la movilidad de la población que se sustenta en dos componentes: un incremento en la tasa de emigración desde el estado en su conjunto y una más elevada y consistente tendencia al incremento en las tasas de inmigración hacia Baja California, que revierte la tendencia decreciente del peso del crecimiento social en la entidad

  18. INMIGRACIÓN Y PROPIEDAD DE LA VIVIENDA: LOS CASOS DE CALIFORNIA Y ESPAÑA, 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián LÓPEZ COLÁS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años California y España, dos contextos donde predomina la tenencia de la vivienda en propiedad, han recibido un gran volumen de inmigrantes y han experimentado una burbuja inmobiliaria que ha acabado por desinflarse. El objetivo de este artículo es analizar la propiedad de la vivienda de los extranjeros en ambos contextos entre 2001 y 2006, considerándola como un indicador de integración de los inmigrantes en las sociedades de acogida. Otros objetivos, derivados del anterior, son determinar la influencia de la nacionalidad en la propiedad de la vivienda y analizar cómo influyen los factores sociodemográficos para que nacionales y extranjeros vivan en propiedad. La modelización de las variables sociodemográficas muestra que entre 2001 y 2006 la propensión a vivir en propiedad de los extranjeros es inferior a la de los nacionales y, lo que es más importante, que el sistema residencial español les exige más esfuerzo que el californiano para vivir en propiedad.

  19. Hepatitis A: the burden among Latino children in California La hepatitis A: impacto entre los niños latinos californianos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Hayes-Bautista

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of Hepatitis A within subpopulations of southern California counties. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Age and race/ethnic-specific hepatitis A rates were derived from the California Department of Health Services Surveillance and Statistics Section for 1996-2001 and from demographic data of the California Department of Finance. RESULTS: 2.3 million Latino children (aged 0-14 years in five southern California counties had a rate of 31.1 cases per 100 000, five times higher than the non-Hispanic white rate. CONCLUSIONS: The CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends routine vaccination for children with "very high" rates of hepatitis A. The annual prevalence of hepatitis A in California, especially in southern California, met the CDC's "very high" definition, therefore Latino children in these counties should be considered for routine childhood hepatitis A vaccination. As health has no borders, this issue should be addressed by the public health services of both, the United States' and Mexico's public health services.OBJETIVO: Determinar la tasa de prevalencia de la hepatitis A entre ciertos grupos de población de los condados del sur de California. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se calcularon las tasas de hepatitis A por edad y raza/etnia utilizando los datos de los archivos del Centro de Servicios de Salud y Vigilancia de California, y los denominadores demográficos del ciclo 1996-2001 de la Sección de Estadísticas del Departamento de Finanzas de California. RESULTADOS: Los 2.3 millones de niños latinos (de 0 a 14 años de cinco condados del sur de California presentaron una tasa de 31.1 casos por cada 100 000 niños, lo que muestra que es cinco veces más alta que la tasa anglosajona. CONCLUSIONES: El Comité Consejero de Prácticas de Inmunización del CDC recomienda vacunar rutinariamente a los niños con índices "muy altos" de hepatitis A. La frecuencia anual de hepatitis A, especialmente en el sur de

  20. Las políticas estatales de California como mecanismos de exclusión del sistema de salud: el caso de los migrantes mexicanos

    OpenAIRE

    Palacios Espinosa, María del Rocío

    2005-01-01

    En los últimos años se ha dado un incremento sumamente significativo en la migración de mexicanos hacia los Estados Unidos y en específico hacia el estado de California. La creciente población mexicana en California resalta la importancia en el manejo de cuestiones como programas de seguridad social, derechos humanos y salud. El derecho a la salud es establecido por diversas instancias internacionales como la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos, la Convención I...

  1. Evaluación medicosocial de los ancianos de dos consultorios pertenecientes al Policlínico "California"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regla Ledia González Sánchez

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó la evaluación medicosocial de los ancianos de los Consultorios 29.1 y 29.2 del Policlínico "California", municipio San Miguel del Padrón, en 1996. Se aplicó una encuesta en todos los pacientes a los familiares, si el estado mental del anciano no lo permitía. Se encontró una mayor prevalencia del estado mental normal y el requerimiento de atención médica periódica frecuente, y fueron capaces de conocer sus medicamentos y tomarlos sin ayuda, los encuestados, en su mayoría, eran capaces de realizar actividades dentro y fuera de la casa, se encontraban parcialmente integrados a la comunidad, cubrían sus necesidades básicas y la mayoría convivía con familiaresThe medicosocial evaluation of the elderly from the family physician’s offices 29.1 and 29.2 of the "California" Polyclinic, municipality of San Miguel del Padrón, was made in 1996. All the patients or their relatives were surveyed when the mental health of the former was not good. A higher prevalence of the normal mental status was found. The requirement of periodical medical attention was frequent. Most of the patients lived with their relatives, were partially integrated to community, and were able to take their medicines without any help, to carry out activities inside and outside the house, and to meet their basic needs

  2. Desarrollo, identidad cultural y turismo en los oasis de Baja California Sur, México

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexandra Sauvage; Alba E. Gámez

    2013-01-01

    .... These rural communities are located in one of the largest oasis in the arid Baja California peninsula and face the risks of cultural commodification from the growth of the real estate and tourism sectors...

  3. Efecto de los vientos Santa Ana en las propiedades bio-ópticas frente a Baja California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A partir de las propiedades bio-ópticas, los coeficientes de absorción por partículas, detritos y fitoplancton (ap, adT, aφ se evaluó el efecto de los vientos Santa Ana en el océano frente a Baja California ocurridos durante octubre de 1999. Los vientos medidos en la estación meteorológica frente a la Bahía de Todos Santos y los determinados a partir de información de satélite indicaron tres eventos Santa Ana, caracterizados por baja humedad relativa, alta temperatura del aire y vientos con dirección predominante del este-noreste. Los valores del coeficiente de absorción de detritos (adT fueron hasta diez veces mayores en las muestras superficiales de octubre, con relación a las de enero, abril y agosto de 1999. Los altos valores de adT se debieron al material inorgánico aero-transportado por los vientos tierra-mar ocurridos del 9 al 11 y del 17 al 20 de octubre. Los coeficientes de absorción de las particulas (ap y el fitoplancton (aφ en la zona eufótica fueron mayores en abril, como resultado de la abundancia del fitoplancton. Los valores de ap, aφ y Kd para la zona eufótica fueron ajustados a una función de potencia con la clorofila como variable independiente, con una variancia explicada de 37%, 72% y 16%, respectivamente. Cuando se excluyeron del ajuste los valores de adT medidos en la superficie durante octubre, la clorofila explicó 82% de la variabilidad en los coeficientes de absorción (ap y aφ y 87% en Kd. A partir de la ecuación que relaciona la reflectancia de la radiancia espectral ascendente (Rrs con la clorofila, se determinó que ~80% de la variabilidad en la clorofila superficial es explicada por la razón de reflectancia Rrs(443/Rrs(555 medida en la zona de estudio. Las estimaciones regionales de clorofila a partir de información bioóptica obtenida en la columna de agua no fueron afectadas fuertemente por el polvo aero-transportado durante los vientos Santa Ana ocurridos en octubre de 1999.

  4. Desarrollo, identidad cultural y turismo en los oasis de Baja California Sur, México

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexandra Sauvage; Alba E. Gámez

    2013-01-01

    .... Ese proceso permite advertir los riesgos de la patrimonialización y comodificación culturales de una ruralidad presionada por el crecimiento de los sectores de bienes raíces y turismo. Proponemos aquí...

  5. Migración Oaxaqueña a los Campos Agrícolas de California: Un Diálogo

    OpenAIRE

    Zabin, Carol

    1992-01-01

    Esta publicación recoge los temas más importantes de la reunión en el mes de febrero de 1990 de más de cincuenta académicos, defensores de los trabajadores del campo, organizadores de sindicatos, y líderes de asociaciones populares de migrantes mixtecos. Ellos participaron en una reunión de trabajo para discutir la situación de los trabajadores agrícolas mixtecos en California, y conocer los esfuerzos que los líderes mixtecos están haciendo para mejorar sus condiciones de vida y trabajo. La ...

  6. ¿Por qué son mejores los organismos de agua de Baja California que los de Sonora? Instituciones locales y desempeño de los organismos públicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Pineda Pablos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El desempeño de los principales organismos operadores de agua para uso urbano de Baja California, a juzgar por los indicadores de gestión, es superior al de los de Sonora. El objetivo de este artículo es compararlos, y reflexionar sobre las variables explicativas de dicha diferencia. Los dos estados tienen características geográficas y demográficas similares: son fronterizos, su clima es semidesértico y su población comparte la misma cultura y comportamientos. El estudio indaga las causas, y revisa las reglas institucionales que pueden explicar el desempeño diferenciado: la instancia gubernamental responsable del servicio, la duración de los directores, la tarifa, facturación y cobranza, así como la alternancia de partido político en el gobierno local y aquél del cual han emanado los gobiernos responsables del servicio. El estudio concluye que las instituciones importan, y que sus reglas han hecho la diferencia en el desempeño de los organismos de agua de ambas entidades.

  7. Los trabajadores agrícolas mexicanos en los campos de California: migración, empleo y formación de clase en una agricultura intensiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Adrián Hernández Romero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta una aproximación antropológica al proceso de formación de clase, motivado por el asentamiento y estabilización de la fuerza de trabajo migrante mexicana empleada en la agricultura de California. A partir de observación directa de las dinámicas productivas de una mercancía ilustrativa, las uvas para mesa, se describen las pautas de participación laboral en un contexto de capitalismo agrícola avanzado para explorar las formas de proletarización vinculadas al uso de mano de obra externa, analizando tanto los factores que propician proletarización como las condiciones que impiden que el empleo agrícola se iguale a otros sectores de la economía.

  8. Valoración socioambiental de los recursos naturales: el caso de los recursos minerales en la parte central de Baja California Sur, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. Beltrán Morales

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Se seleccionaron 15 localidades ubicadas en el radio de influencia de dos depósitos evaluados de fosfato, esto con la finalidad de aplicar el método de valoración contingente del recurso y su medio ambiente: el depósito de Tembabichi en el margen del Golfo de California y el depósito de Santo Domingo en la costa del Pacífico en Baja California Sur, México. Se encontró una disposición media a pagar por los habitantes del área de estudio de $29.77 pesos mensuales para colaborar con el medio ambiente de su región. Hipotéticamente se daría una valoración contingente en el total del área de estudio de $227 859.58 pesos mensuales, es decir, $2 734 314.9 pesos anuales. Es una cantidad considerable de recursos para contribuir a mejoras en el medio ambiente por comunidades rurales con signos de marginación socioeconómica.

  9. Características biopsicosociales de los ancianos de 2 Consultorios del Policlínico California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regla Ledia González Sánchez

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza un estudio descriptivo de las características biopsicosociales de la población anciana de 2 Consultorios del Policlínico "California", San Miguel del Padrón, en 1995. Se aplica el test de Hasegawa para determinar el estado mental de 166 ancianos, de los cuales resultaron aptos 154. Se revisan sus historias clínicas. Se halla un predominio del sexo femenino y son los grupos de edades de 60 a 69 y de 70 a 79 años, los más frecuentes. Se señala que la osteoartrosis es la enfermedad de mayor prevalencia. Se observa que la mayoría se sentían satisfechos con su vida, aunque un número importante se encontraba deprimido; Se aprecia que ocupa una función activa en la familia y con relaciones interpersonales e intergeneracionales adecuadasA descriptive study of the biopsychosocial characteristics of the aging population of two family physicians'offices of the "California" Polyclinic, in San Miguel del Padrón, was conducted in 1995. The Hasegawa's test was applied to determine the mental status of 166 elderly patients, 154 of whom were apt. Their medical histories were reviewed and it was found a predominance of the female sex and that the age groups 60-69 and 70-79 were the most frequent. It was observed that most of them felt satisfied with their lives, although a considerable amount of them were depressed, and that they played an active role in the family and had adequate interpersonal and intergenerational relations

  10. Hate Behavior and Hate Crimes: What Motivates People To Hate? How Can We Prevent Hate Crimes in Our Schools and Communities? A Town Hall Meeting, Simon Wiesenthal Center, Los Angeles, December 7, 1999 & California State Capitol, February 1, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento.

    The LegiSchool Project of California State University, Sacramento, and the California State Legislature planned two town hall meetings focusing on hate crime for the winter of 1999-2000, one in Los Angeles and one in Sacramento to provide forums in which California's high school students, educators, and legislators can engage in face-to-face…

  11. 1994 Northern Goshawk inventory on portions of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinton, D.T.; Kennedy, P.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) (hereafter referred to as goshawk) are large forest dwelling hawks. They are the largest species of the Accipiter genus which also includes sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus) and the Cooper`s hawk (A. cooperii). Goshawks are holarctic in distribution and nest in coniferous, deciduous, and mixed species forests. In the southwest they primarily nest in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), mixed species, and spruce-fir forests. Goshawks may be declining in population and reproduction in the southwestern United States. In 1982 the USDA-Forest Service listed the goshawk as a {open_quotes}sensitive species{close_quotes} and in 1992 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the goshawk as a {open_quotes}Category 2 species{close_quotes} in accordance with the Endangered Species Act. Reasons for the possible decline in goshawk populations include timber harvesting resulting in the loss of nesting habitat, toxic chemicals, and the effects of drought, fire, and disease. Thus, there is a need to determine their population status and assess impacts of management activities in potential goshawk habitat. Goshawk inventory was conducted during the 1993 nesting season with no adult goshawk responses detected within the LANL survey area. As noted by Sinton and Kennedy, these results may be interpreted in several ways: (1) no goshawk territory(ies) occur in the inventoried area; (2) goshawk territory(ies) exist but have failed prior to the survey and thus were not detected; or (3) territory(ies) exist and were successful but the goshawks did not respond to tapes or their responses were undetected by the observer. For those reasons, a goshawk inventory was conducted in 1994. This report summarizes the results of this inventory.

  12. Cangrejos braquiuros (Brachyura del arrecife de Cabo Pulmo-Los Frailes y alrededores, Golfo de California, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Socorro García-Madrigal

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available El análisis de los fragmentos del coral Pocillopora elegans recolectados en siete campañas de muestreo durante 1988 y 1989 resultó en 281 ejemplares de braquiuros, identificándose 30 especies de ocho familias, de las cuales 22 especies son nuevos registros para el área. Había 39 especies de braquiuros registradas; ahora hay 61 especies de braquiuros, repartidas en 16 familias. Majidae contiene el mayor número de especies (23, seguida por Panopeidae (9 y Xanthidae (6. Las especies más abundantes fueron Trapezia ferruginea (71 ejemplares, Theleophrys cristulipes (39 y Microcassiope xantusii xantusii (29. Todas las especies se agruparon en cuatro grupos zoogeográficos: indopacífico (8.5%, anfiamericano (5.1%, Pacífico oriental (76.3% y endémico del Pacífico mexicano (10.1%. Las especies de braquiuros de este arrecife (con sólo 0.004% de la superficie de la región representan el 21% de todas las especies registradas para la región del golfo de California, costa occidental de Baja California Sur, áreas costeras de Nayarit y Sinaloa y zona económica exclusiva de estos estados.Fragments of the coral Pocillopora elegans collected in 1988 and 1989 produced 281 specimens of brachyurans. There were 30 species and subspecies in eight families, and 22 are new records for the Cabo Pulmo-Los Frailes reef. Including earlier records, there are now 61 species and subspecies (19 families from the area. Majidae had the largest number of species (23, followed by Panopeidae (9, and Xanthidae (6. Most abundant were Trapezia ferruginea (71 specimens, Theleophrys cristulipes (39 and Microcassiope xantusii xantusii (29. The species were sorted out in four zoogeographic groups: Indopacific (8.5%, Amphiamerican (5.1%, Eastern Pacific (76.3%, and Mexican Pacific endemics (10.1%. The reef represents only 0.004% of the Gulf area but harbors 21% of all species recorded from the gulf of California, western coast of Baja California Sur and exclusive economic

  13. Alcohol Availability and Neighborhood Characteristics in Los Angeles, California and Southern Louisiana

    OpenAIRE

    Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Cohen, Deborah A.; Farley, Thomas A.; Scribner, Richard; Beighley, Christopher; Schonlau, Matthias; Robinson, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the associations between alcohol availability types and community characteristics in randomly selected census tracts in Southern California and Southeastern Louisiana. Outlet shelf space and price by beverage type was collected from all off-sale alcohol outlets in 189 census tracts by trained research personnel. Three aspects of alcohol availability at the census tract level were considered—outlets per roadway mile, shelf space, and least price by be...

  14. Los matices regionales de la división de poderes: Baja California y Coahuila en perspectiva comparada

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Carmina Gutiérrez Cuéllar; Alejandro Monsiváis Carrillo

    2011-01-01

    El propósito de este artículo es analizar las políticas de la división de poderes en Baja California y Coahuila, para ello se presenta un índice de equilibrio entre poderes estatales, que permite observar su grado de concentración o dispersión, promovido por el diseño constitucional. También se exploran las condiciones políticas de las interacciones entre los poderes públicos en dichos estados. Se mostrará que, tanto en el diseño constitucional como en la operación fáctica de la política exis...

  15. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Coastal Los Angeles Basin Study Unit, 2006: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Land, Michael; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 860 square-mile Coastal Los Angeles Basin study unit (CLAB) was investigated from June to November of 2006 as part of the Statewide Basin Assessment Project of the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Coastal Los Angeles Basin study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within CLAB, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 69 wells in Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Fifty-five of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (?grid wells?). Fourteen additional wells were selected to evaluate changes in ground-water chemistry or to gain a greater understanding of the ground-water quality within a specific portion of the Coastal Los Angeles Basin study unit ('understanding wells'). Ground-water samples were analyzed for: a large number of synthetic organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gasoline oxygenates and their degradates, pesticides, polar pesticides, and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater-indicators]; constituents of special interest [perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), 1,4-dioxane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP)]; inorganic constituents that can occur naturally [nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements]; radioactive constituents [gross-alpha and gross-beta radiation, radium isotopes, and radon-222]; and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes [stable isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen, and activities of tritium and carbon-14

  16. Summary of the Script and Program Review of Sesame Street by the Chicano Study Center, University of California in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Television Workshop, New York, NY.

    The Sesame Street research staff summarizes comments on the fourth season of the program by the Chicano Study Center of the University of California at Los Angeles. Included are reviews of Sesame Street scripts and programs containing Spanish content; sex role observations; examples of modeling behavior; and comments on segments which challenge…

  17. Isotopic measurements of atmospheric methane in Los Angeles, California, USA: Influence of “fugitive” fossil fuel emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, Amy; Tyler, Stanley C.; Pataki, Diane E.; Xu, Xiaomei; Christensen, Lance E.

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that CH4 emissions in Los Angeles and other large cities may be underestimated. We utilized stable isotopes (13C and D) and radiocarbon (14C) to investigate sources of CH4 in Los Angeles, California. First, we made measurements of δ13C and δD of various CH4 sources in urban areas. Fossil fuel CH4 sources (oil refineries, power plants, traffic, and oil drilling fields) had δ13C values between -45 and -30‰ and dD values between -275 and -100‰, whereas biological CH4 (cows, biofuels, landfills, sewage treatment plants, and cattle feedlots) had δ13C values between -65 and -45‰ and δD values between -350 and -275‰. We made high-altitude observations of CH4 concentration using continuous tunable laser spectroscopy measurements combined with isotope analyses (13C, 14C, and D) of discrete samples to constrain urban CH4 sources. Our data indicate that the dominant source of CH4 in Los Angeles has a δ13C value of approximately -41.5‰ and a δD value between -229 and -208‰. Δ14C of CH4 in urban air samples ranged from +262 to +344‰ (127.1 to 134.9 pMC), depleted with respect to average global background CH4. We conclude that the major source of CH4 in Los Angeles is leakage of fossil fuels, such as from geologic formations, natural gas pipelines, oil refining, and/or power plants. More research is needed to constrain fluxes of CH4 from natural gas distribution and refining, as this flux may increase with greater reliance on natural gas and biogas for energy needs.

  18. Desarrollo, identidad cultural y turismo en los oasis de Baja California Sur, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Sauvage

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an analysis of the integration of San Miguel and San José de Comondú to the process of economic globalization lived in Baja California Sur, in northwest Mexico. These rural communities are located in one of the largest oasis in the arid Baja California peninsula and face the risks of cultural commodification from the growth of the real estate and tourism sectors. In a context of diffuse integration to new markets and a weak local community involvement in the initiatives to foster economic growth, without a cultural policy that involves comundeños in defining their own heritage and the benefits of its use, the goal of local development attached to the recent public policies is questionable. We propose that a cultural policy should form the backbone of the development programmes now being elaborated, so as to articulate regional development needs with cultural heritage conservation, seeking to avoid the simple commodification of local traditions and recognizing the role of the local community in (redefining their cultural values.

  19. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Buckweed Fire Perimeter, Agua Dulce Quadrangle, Los Angeles County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  20. Developing a Luminescence Chronology for Fan-terrace Sediments, Los Cabos, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, E. J.; Brown, N. D.; Antinao, J.; Huenupi, E. C.; Baker, S. E.; McDonald, E.

    2012-12-01

    Extensive depositional units forming large terrace units within alluvial fans close to the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico, record sedimentation under a very different climatic regime from the present. Dating these sediments presents significant challenges; they contain very sparse organic material suitable for radiocarbon dating; their upper surfaces are heavily bioturbated, in some places eroded and in other locations show signs of continued deposition even after incision and base level fall, rendering them difficult to date using TCN (terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide) methods. Locations that have experienced significant regional tectonic influences associated with rapid erosion (e.g. Transverse Ranges, California, Southern Alps, New Zealand, Himalaya and Tibet) are typically not well-suited for quartz OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) application owing to low signal sensitivity. For this reason, our efforts to develop a chronology for the sandy sediments that characterize these contexts have focussed on IRSL dating of K-feldspar, using newly developed post-infrared IRSL (infra-red stimulated luminescence) approaches. We explore the relative advantages of different techniques, and methods to assess both the degree of incomplete zeroing and signal fading. In particular, we explore how novel single grain IRSL measurements of K-feldspar can be applied to these and similar high energy deposits on timescales ranging from the last 100,000 years to a few decades. Based on our chronology coupled with detailed sedimentological and soil stratigraphy investigations, we are able to exploit these deposits as valuable archives of past environmental and climatic change.

  1. Velázquez en el Purgatorio: los días y los trabajos de un científico en California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabéu Albert, Salvador

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available While the Creole scientist, Velázquez de León, was pursuing the projects of a visitor from Malaga, José de Gálvez, he absented himself from the University of Mexico and spent two years in the distant peninsula of California. The study of this little-known episode in his life shows us the diversity and complexity of social relations in one of the most remote places in the colony. Velázquez failed in his attempts to improve local mining and in his efforts as right-hand man to the visitor, but he wrote several very interesting descriptions and helped to measure the Transit of Venus from his residence in Santa Ana. His fondness for cards, parties and women will help to show the human side of a figure who is too often typecast in laboratories, chapels and respectable learned institutions.

    Siguiendo los proyectos del visitador malagueño José de Gálvez, el científico criollo Velázquez de León se ausentó de la Universidad de México y pasó dos años en la lejana península de California. El estudio de este episodio poco conocido de su vida nos revela la diversidad y complejidad de las relaciones sociales en uno de los lugares más remotos de la colonia. Velázquez fracasó en sus intentos por mejorar la minería local y en sus medidas como lugarteniente del visitador, pero escribió varias descripciones de gran interés y ayudó a medir el Paso de Venus desde su residencia de Santa Ana. Su afición a las cartas, a las fiestas y a las mujeres servirá para humanizar una figura demasiado encasillada en laboratorios, oratorios y respetables instituciones ilustradas.

  2. After the Resistance: The Alamo Today

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-09-23

    Byron Breedlove reads his essay After the Resistance: The Alamo Today about the Alamo and emerging disease resistance.  Created: 9/23/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/20/2014.

  3. Analysis of Pool Distribution Operations at the Los Angeles, California, Regional Freight Consolidation Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    comparison with direct shipment to the customer . This study covers the period January through September 1990. Pooling refers to the movement of freight from a...shipments for short distance hauls to the customer . This study is the third such analysis of the cost effectiveness of pooling operations at the Los Angeles

  4. AUV Mapping and ROV Exploration of Los Frailes Submarine Canyon, Cabo Pulmo National Marine Park, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troni, G.; Caress, D. W.; Graves, D.; Thomas, H. J.; Thompson, D.; Barry, J. P.; Aburto-Oropeza, O.; Johnson, A. F.; Lundsten, L.

    2015-12-01

    Los Frailes submarine canyon is located at the south boundary of the Cabo Pulmo National Marine Park on the southeast tip of the Baja California Peninsula. During the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) 2015 Gulf of California expedition we used an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to map this canyon from 50 m to 450 m depths, and then explored the canyon with a small remotely operated vehicle (ROV). This three day R/V Rachel Carson cruise was a collaboration with the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Centro para la Biodiversidad Marina y la Conservación in La Paz. The MBARI AUV D. Allan B. collected high resolution bathymetry, sidescan, and subbottom profiles of Los Frailes submarine canyon and part of the north Cabo Pulmo deep reef. In order to safely generate a 1-m lateral resolution multibeam bathymetry map in the nearshore high relief terrain, the mapping operations consisted of an initial short survey following the 100-m isobath followed by a series of short, incremental AUV missions located on the deep edge of the new AUV bathymetry. The MBARI Mini-ROV was used to explore the submarine canyon within the detailed map created by the MBARI AUV. The Mini-ROV is a 1.2-m-long, 350 kg, 1,500-m-depth-rated ROV designed and constructed by MBARI. It is controlled by six 600-watt thrusters and is equipped with a high-definition video camera and navigation sensors. This small ROV carries less accurate, lower cost navigation sensors than larger vehicles. We implemented new algorithms to localize combining Doppler velocity log sensor data and low-cost MEMS-based inertial sensor data with sporadic ultra-short baseline position measurements to provide a high accuracy position estimation. The navigation performance allowed us to colocate the ROV video imagery with the 1-m resolution bathymetric map of the submarine canyon. Upper Los Frailes Canyon is rugged and, aside from small sand pockets along

  5. Security Pacific National Bank - Los Ángeles - California (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin, Albert C.

    1976-04-01

    Full Text Available This building, situated in a 17,000 m2 block in Los Angeles, consists of a 55 storeyed tower, in the lower part of which are the offices and the parkingplace with room for 2,500 cars. The complex has a total surface of 260,000 m2. The sides of the square ground plan of the tower make a 45° angle with the adjoining streets whereby the orientation in relation to the sun provides better possibilities for the use of solar energy. Within this complex much attention has been paid to the pedestrians in the form of futuristic innovations such as, for example: moving ramps and above-street pedestrian walkways which provide access to the other buildings. On the rooftop a heliport has been constructed.Este edificio, situado en una manzana de 17.000 m2 en la ciudad de Los Angeles, está constituido por una alta torre de 55 plantas levantada sobre una base en la que se encuentran la zona de oficinas y el aparcamiento. El conjunto posee una superficie de más de 260.000 m2. La planta de la torre, de forma cuadrada, tiene sus lados dispuestos según un ángulo de 45° respecto a las calles adyacentes, con lo que, al mejorar la orientación, se logra un mayor control solar y un gran ahorro de energía. En el interior se han tenido muy en cuenta los sistemas de circulación peatonal, mediante innovaciones de tipo futurista tales como: pasillos mecánicos rodantes, una plataforma móvil elevada y pasos elevados que conectan con los edificios vecinos. En la coronación del edificio se ha dispuesto un helipuerto, y en la base, un aparcamiento de 2.500 plazas de capacidad.

  6. Earthquake hazards of active blind-thrust faults under the central Los Angeles basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, John H.; Suppe, John

    1996-04-01

    We document several blind-thrust faults under the Los Angeles basin that, if active and seismogenic, are capable of generating large earthquakes (M = 6.3 to 7.3). Pliocene to Quaternary growth folds imaged in seismic reflection profiles record the existence, size, and slip rates of these blind faults. The growth structures have shapes characteristic of fault-bend folds above blind thrusts, as demonstrated by balanced kinematic models, geologic cross sections, and axial-surface maps. We interpret the Compton-Los Alamitos trend as a growth fold above the Compton ramp, which extends along strike from west Los Angeles to at least the Santa Ana River. The Compton thrust is part of a larger fault system, including a decollement and ramps beneath the Elysian Park and Palos Verdes trends. The Cienegas and Coyote Hills growth folds overlie additional blind thrusts in the Elysian Park trend that are not closely linked to the Compton ramp. Analysis of folded Pliocene to Quaternary strata yields slip rates of 1.4 ± 0.4 mm/yr on the Compton thrust and 1.7 ± 0.4 mm/yr on a ramp beneath the Elysian Park trend. Assuming that slip is released in large earthquakes, we estimate magnitudes of 6.3 to 6.8 for earthquakes on individual ramp segments based on geometric segment sizes derived from axial surface maps. Multiple-segment ruptures could yield larger earthquakes (M = 6.9 to 7.3). Relations among magnitude, coseismic displacement, and slip rate yield an average recurrence interval of 380 years for single-segment earthquakes and a range of 400 to 1300 years for multiple-segment events. If these newly documented blind thrust faults are active, they will contribute substantially to the seismic hazards in Los Angeles because of their locations directly beneath the metropolitan area.

  7. Installation Restoration Program. Phase I: Records Search. Los Angeles Air Force Station, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    logistic , transportation, aad medical support for all organizations and personnel assigned or attached to the installation. The Space Division is...developed area of Los Angeles dominated by aerospaci industries. A residential housing development is situated immediately south of Area A. Due to...Corp. On April 1, 1961, reorganization of the Air Force resulted in the formation of three new commands--the AFSC, Air Force Logistics Command, and

  8. Centro de Investigación de IBM - Los Gatos - California – (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellmuth, George

    1978-12-01

    Full Text Available This complex, located in a large hill-surrounded property, occupied by some 300 scientits, dedicates over 7,800 m2 of built-up area to offices, workshops and laboratories, kith the corresponding dining facilities. Individual offices are grouped around a central common —use core housing workshops and laboratories—. The open office concept used is outstanding, closely linking the working areas with the surounding nature. The blending of architecture and landscape is further achieved by the formal beauty of the complex, generating the required relaxed.

    Este complejo, situado en una extensa parcela rodeada de colinas, ocupado por unos 300 científicos, emplea más de 7.800 m2 de construcción en oficinas, talleres y laboratorios, con los correspondientes servicios de comedor. Las oficinas individuales se agrupan en torno a un espacio central destinado a los locales comunes —talleres y laboratorios—. Destaca el concepto desarrollado de oficina abierta, que pone en estrecha relación a los locales de trabajo con la naturaleza circundante. La unidad entra arquitectura y paisaje se completa con la belleza formal del conjunto, del que emanan las indispensables condiciones de tranquilidad y sosiego tan necesarias para la labor de investigación.

  9. Is crime associated with over-the-counter pharmacy syringe sales? Findings from Los Angeles, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopka, Thomas J; Geraghty, Estella M; Azari, Rahman; Gold, Ellen B; DeRiemer, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    More than 50,000 new HIV infections occur annually in the United States. Injection drug users represent twelve percent of incident HIV infections each year. Pharmacy sales of over-the-counter (OTC) syringes have helped prevent HIV transmission among injection drug users in many states throughout the United States. However, concerns exist among some law enforcement officials, policymakers, pharmacists, and community members about potential links between OTC syringe sales and crime. We used a geographic information system and novel spatial and longitudinal analyses to determine whether implementation of pharmacy-based OTC syringe sales were associated with reported crime between January 2006 and December 2008 in Los Angeles Police Department Reporting Districts. We assessed reported crime pre- and post-OTC syringe sales initiation as well as longitudinal associations between crime and OTC syringe-selling pharmacies. By December 2008, 9.3% (94/1010) of Los Angeles Police Department Reporting Districts had at least one OTC syringe-selling pharmacy. Overall reported crime counts and reported crime rates decreased between 2006 and 2008 in all 1010 Reporting Districts. Using generalized estimating equations and adjusting for potential confounders, reported crime rates were negatively associated with OTC syringe sales (adjusted rate ratio: 0.89; 95% confidence interval: 0.81, 0.99). Our findings demonstrate that OTC pharmacy syringe sales were not associated with increases in reported crime in local communities in Los Angeles during 2006-2008. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Perros ferales en la isla de Cedros, Baja California, México: una posible amenaza para los pinnípedos Feral dogs at Isla de Cedros, Baja California, Mexico: a possible threat for pinnipeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Concepción García-Aguilar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available La presencia de perros ferales (Canis lupus familiaris en la isla de Cedros, Baja California, México, fue documentada hace más de 15 años. En el verano de 2009 e invierno 2009/2010, se realizaron 2 campañas de muestreo en la costa noreste de la isla para evaluar los hábitos alimentarios de los perros en las cercanías de las zonas de reproducción y descanso del lobo marino de California (Zalophus californianus y del elefante marino del norte (Mirounga angustirostris. Los mamíferos constituyeron el grupo consumido más importante en la alimentación de los perros (85.4%. Los resultados de este estudio muestran que en la costa noreste de la isla de Cedros los perros se alimentan de pinnípedos: el elefante marino fue la especie que más se consumió, con el mayor porcentaje en ambas temporadas (43.3% en verano y 51.9% en invierno; el lobo marino, fue la segunda durante el verano (23.3%, aunque su porcentaje disminuyó en el invierno (5.8%. Además del potencial impacto que el consumo por los perros pueda tener sobre las poblaciones de los pinnípedos, una amenaza adicional es la posible transmisión de los patógenos caninos, con serias consecuencias epizoóticas.The presence of feral dogs (Canis lupus familiaris in Isla de Cedros, Baja California, Mexico, has been documented for over 15 years. In the summer of2009 and the winter of 2009/2010, 2 sampling surveys were conducted in the northeast coastal portion of the island to assess the diet of feral dogs in the vicinity of hauled out California sea lions (Zalophus californianus and northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris. Mammals were the most important prey group in the diet of dogs (85.4%. Our results show that in the northeast coast of Isla de Cedros, feral dogs feed on pinnipeds: the elephant seal was the most important prey in both seasons (43.3% in summer and 51.9% in winter, followed by the sea lion as the second most important prey during the summer (23.3%, while its

  11. Nuevo edificio de la Lincoln Savings, en Los Angeles, California, (U.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deasy & Boiling, Arquitectos

    1968-03-01

    Full Text Available The building has eight floor levels devoted to the main functions of the bank, a ninth storey houses various services, and a car park is located in the basement. The ground floor is highly diaphanous and is occupied by those departments that are more intimately related with the outside public. The second floor is devoted to banking and credit operations. There is a museum on the seventh floor, and a dining hall on the eighth, as well as a cafeteria and a social zone for the staff. The remaining floor space has been let for offices to a number of commercial firms. The structure and external aspect are outstanding because of their originality.El edificio consta de ocho plantas en servicio; una novena, que alberga los equipos mecánicos; y un sótano, destinado a aparcamiento. La planta baja, que goza de una gran diafanidad, aloja los servicios que exigen un contacto más frecuente con el público; en la segunda, las secciones en las que se desarrollan las operaciones de crédito y bancarias; en la planta séptima, el museo; y en la octava, el comedor, la cafetería y zona social para empleados. Las restantes plantas han sido alquiladas para oficinas de diversas firmas y empresas comerciales. Son de destacar, la estructura y el tratamiento de fachadas, de indudable gracia y originalidad.

  12. Shear wave splitting observations and implications on stress regimes in the Los Angeles basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Gang

    1996-06-01

    A systematic analysis of three-component seismograms recorded at 15 stations from earthquakes occurring at depths of 5 to 18 km beneath the Los Angeles basin and adjacent areas during the period between 1988 and 1994 shows 20 to 160 ms shear wave splitting. Shallow events exhibit little splitting, while deeper events show progressively greater splitting with depth. The preferred polarization direction of the fast shear wave is nearly N-S, consistent with the direction of the regional maximum horizontal compressive stress but independent of the azimuth between the event and station. We interpret that the shear wave splitting is caused by fluid-filled crustal microcracks and macrofractures aligned in the N-S direction. The shear wave splitting observations of 2.8 to 7.8 ms/km can be explained in terms of an anisotropic crust containing vertical cracks with the apparent crack density of 0.023-0.08. On a regional basis, the crack density may vary from station to station, but we find that the apparent crack density in the strike-slip region of the Newport-Inglewood fault and the Whittier fault is higher than in the reverse-thrusting Santa Monica Mountains and Palos Verdes Hills. No systematic change of shear wave splitting in the Los Angeles basin is found in this study.

  13. Alcohol availability and neighborhood characteristics in Los Angeles, California and southern Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluthenthal, Ricky N; Cohen, Deborah A; Farley, Thomas A; Scribner, Richard; Beighley, Christopher; Schonlau, Matthias; Robinson, Paul L

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the associations between alcohol availability types and community characteristics in randomly selected census tracts in Southern California and Southeastern Louisiana. Outlet shelf space and price by beverage type was collected from all off-sale alcohol outlets in 189 census tracts by trained research personnel. Three aspects of alcohol availability at the census tract level were considered--outlets per roadway mile, shelf space, and least price by beverage type. Using multivariate analyses, we examined the associations between census tract socioeconomic and demographic characteristics and alcohol availability types. Fifteen measures of alcohol availability were calculated-total shelf space and shelf space by beverage types (beer, malt liquor, and distilled spirits); outlets per roadway mile, per tract, and per capita; and least price by beverage type (including wine). In multivariate analyses controlling for state, male unemployment rate was inversely associated with total shelf space (p = 0.03) and distilled spirit shelf space (p = 0.05). Malt liquor shelf space was inversely associated with percent White (p = 0.02). Outlets per roadway mile was positively associated with household poverty (p < 0.0001), whereas percent African American was inversely associated with outlets per roadway mile (p = 0.03). Beverage-specific least prices were not associated with any socioeconomic or demographic community characteristics. Alcohol availability types, but not least price, were associated with some community characteristics. More research exploring how alcohol availability types vary by community and their relationship to alcohol-related harms should be conducted.

  14. Stable isotopic indicators of nitrous oxide and methane sources in Los Angeles, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Pataki, D.; Tyler, S.; Trumbore, S.

    2008-12-01

    As urbanization increasingly encroaches upon agricultural landscapes, there are greater potential sources of greenhouse gases and other atmospheric contaminants. Measurements of the isotopic composition of trace gases have the potential to distinguish between pollutant sources and quantify the proportional contribution of agricultural activities to the total atmospheric pool. In this study, we are measuring the isotopic composition of greenhouse gases N2O and CH4 emitted from cropland, animal feeding operations, and urban activities in the South Coast Air Basin in southern California. The ultimate goal of our project is to utilize atmospheric measurements of the isotopic composition of N2O and CH4 combined with studies of source signatures to determine the proportional contributions of cropland, animal operations, and urban sources of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Measurements of the δ13C of methane show excellent separation between urban sources, such as vehicle emissions, power plants, oil refineries, landfills, and sewage treatment plants and agricultural sources like cows, biogas, and cattle feedlots. For nitrous oxide, soil N2O sources showed good separation from wastewater treatment facilities using δ15N and δ18O. Within soil N2O sources, the isotopic composition of N2O from cropland soils was similar to N2O emissions from urban turfgrass. These data indicate that nitrification may be as important a source of N2O as denitrification in urban soils. We are also measuring N2O fluxes from soils and from sewage treatment processes, and preliminary data indicate that urban N2O fluxes are higher than initially assumed by managers and regulatory agencies.

  15. Using Comprehensive Science-based Disaster Scenarios to Support Seismic Safety Policy: A Case Study in Los Angeles, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L.

    2014-12-01

    In 2014, the USGS entered a technical assistance agreement with the City of Los Angeles to apply the results of the 2008 ShakeOut Scenario of a M7.8 earthquake on the southern San Andreas fault to develop a comprehensive plan to increase the seismic resilience of the City. The results of this project are to be submitted to the Mayor of Los Angeles at the Great ShakeOut on October 16, 2014. The ShakeOut scenario detailed how the expected cascade of failures in a big earthquake could lead to significant delays in disaster recovery that could create financial losses that greatly exceed the direct losses in the event. The goal of the seismic resilience plan is to: protect the lives of residents during earthquakes improve the capacity of the City to respond to the earthquake prepare the City to recover quickly after the earthquake so as to protect the economy of the City and all of southern California To accomplish these goals, the project addresses three areas of seismic vulnerability that were identified in the original ShakeOut Scenario: Pre-1980 buildings that present an unacceptable risk to the lives of residents, including "non-ductile reinforced concrete," and "soft-first-story" buildings Water system infrastructure (including impact on firefighting capability) Communications infrastructure The critical science needed to support policy decisions is to understand the probable consequences to the regional long-term economy caused by decisions to undertake (or not) different levels of mitigation. The arguments against mitigation are the immediate financial costs, so a better understanding of the eventual benefit is required. However, the direct savings rarely justify the mitigation costs, so the arguments in favor of mitigation are driven by the potential for cascading failures and the potential to trigger the type of long term reduction in population and economic activity that has occurred in New Orleans since Hurricane Katrina.

  16. Water resources and geology of the Los Coyotes Indian Reservation and vicinity, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballog, A.P.; Moyle, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    The water resources of the Los Coyotes Indian Reservation, San Diego County, Calif., are sufficient to supply the limited domestic and stock-water needs of the present residents of the reservation. Surface-water runoff is derived from direct precipitation on the area and from intermittent spring flow. Groundwater occurs in the alluvial deposits and in the consolidated rocks where they are highly fractured or deeply weathered. The best potential for groundwater development on the reservation is in the small alluvial basins in the San Ysidro and San Ignacio areas. Most water on the reservation is good to excellent in chemical quality for domestic, stock, and irrigation use. Water from two wells (and one spring), however, exceeds the primary drinking-water standard for nitrate plus nitrate. (USGS)

  17. Evapotranspiration of urban landscapes in Los Angeles, California at the municipal scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, E.; Manago, K. F.; Hogue, T. S.; Pataki, D. E.

    2017-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET), an essential process in biosphere-atmosphere interactions, is highly uncertain in cities that maintain cultivated and irrigated landscapes. We estimated ET of irrigated landscapes in Los Angeles by combining empirical models of turfgrass ET and tree transpiration derived from in situ measurements with previously developed remotely sensed estimates of vegetation cover and ground-based vegetation surveys. We modeled irrigated landscapes as a two-component system comprised of trees and turfgrass to assess annual and spatial patterns of ET. Annual ET from vegetated landscapes (ETveg) was 1110 ± 53 mm/yr and ET from the whole city (vegetated and nonvegetated areas, ETland) was three times smaller, reflecting the fractional vegetation cover. With the exception of May and June, monthly ETland was significantly higher than predicted by the North American Land Data Assimilation System. ETveg was close to potential ET, indicating abundant irrigation inputs. Monthly averaged ETveg varied from 1.5 ± 0.1 mm/d (December) to 4.3 ± 0.2 mm/d (June). Turfgrass was responsible for ˜70% of ETveg. For trees, angiosperm species (71% of all trees) contributed over 90% to total tree transpiration, while coniferous and palm species made very small contributions. ETland was linearly correlated with median household income across the city, confirming the importance of social factors in determining spatial distribution of urban vegetation. These estimates have important implications for constraining the municipal water budget of Los Angeles and improving regional-scale hydrologic models, as well as for developing water-saving practices. The methodology used in this study is also transferable to other semiarid regions for quantification of urban landscape ET.

  18. Los matices regionales de la división de poderes: Baja California y Coahuila en perspectiva comparada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Carmina Gutiérrez Cuéllar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este artículo es analizar las políticas de la división de poderes en Baja California y Coahuila, para ello se presenta un índice de equilibrio entre poderes estatales, que permite observar su grado de concentración o dispersión, promovido por el diseño constitucional. También se exploran las condiciones políticas de las interacciones entre los poderes públicos en dichos estados. Se mostrará que, tanto en el diseño constitucional como en la operación fáctica de la política existen diferencias importantes en ambos casos. A partir de la evidencia recabada, se discutirán las implicaciones del funcionamiento de la división de poderes a escala subnacional, en el federalismo y en las estructuras locales de poder en México.

  19. Climatic consequences of adopting drought-tolerant vegetation over Los Angeles as a response to California drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahmani, P.; Ban-Weiss, G.

    2016-08-01

    During 2012-2014, drought in California resulted in policies to reduce water consumption. One measure pursued was replacing lawns with landscapes that minimize water consumption, such as drought-tolerant vegetation. If implemented at broad scale, this strategy would result in reductions in irrigation and changes in land surface characteristics. In this study, we employ a modified regional climate model to assess the climatic consequences of adopting drought-tolerant vegetation over the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Transforming lawns to drought-tolerant vegetation resulted in daytime warming of up to 1.9°C, largely due to decreases in irrigation that shifted surface energy partitioning toward higher sensible and lower latent heat flux. During nighttime, however, adopting drought-tolerant vegetation caused mean cooling of 3.2°C, due to changes in soil thermodynamic properties and heat exchange dynamics between the surface and subsurface. Our results show that nocturnal cooling effects, which are larger in magnitude and of great importance for public health during heat events, could counterbalance the daytime warming attributed to the studied water conservation strategy. A more aggressive implementation, assuming all urban vegetation was replaced with drought-tolerant vegetation, resulted in an average daytime cooling of 0.2°C, largely due to strengthened sea breeze patterns, highlighting the important role of land surface roughness in this coastal megacity.

  20. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and damage in Los Gatos, California, from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Aftershock records of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake are used to calculate site response in the frequency band of 0.5-10 Hz at 24 locations in Los Gatos, California, on the edge of the Santa Clara Valley. Two different methods are used: spectral ratios relative to a reference site on rock and a source/site spectral inversion method. These two methods complement each other and give consistent results. Site amplification factors are compared with surficial geology, thickness of alluvium, shallow shear-wave velocity measurements, and ground deformation and structural damage resulting from the Loma Prieta earthquake. Higher values of site amplification are seen on Quaternary alluvium compared with older Miocene and Cretaceous units of Monterey and Franciscan Formation. However, other more detailed correlations with surficial geology are not evident. A complex pattern of alluvial sediment thickness, caused by crosscutting thrust faults, is interpreted as contributing to the variability in site response and the presence of spectral resonance peaks between 2 and 7 Hz at some sites. Within the range of our field measurements, there is a correlation between lower average shear-wave velocity of the top 30 m and 50% higher values of site amplification. An area of residential homes thrown from their foundations correlates with high site response. This damage may also have been aggravated by local ground deformation. Severe damage to commercial buildings in the business district, however, is attributed to poor masonry construction.

  1. The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) in waters of the Lower Ballona Creek Watershed, Los Angeles County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawecki, Stephanie; Kuleck, Gary; Dorsey, John H; Leary, Christopher; Lum, Michelle

    2017-06-01

    Screening for the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) was done at the Ballona Creek and Wetlands, an urban-impacted wetland system in Los Angeles, California. The goals were (1) to assess the overall prevalence of ARB, and (2) compare differences in ARB abundance and the types of antibiotic resistance (AR) among the following sample types: lagoon water from Del Rey Lagoon, urban runoff from Ballona Creek, and water from the Ballona Wetlands (tidal water flooding in from the adjacent estuary, and ebbing out from the salt marsh). Antibiotic resistance distributions were analyzed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to develop the cumulative frequency of bacteria having resistance of up to eight antibiotics. Distributions from the environmental water samples were compared to unchlorinated secondary effluent from the Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant that was used as comparator samples likely to have an abundance of ARB. As expected, densities of total and ARB were highest in secondary effluent, followed by urban runoff. Samples of water flooding into the wetlands showed similar results to urban runoff; however, a reduction in densities of total and ARB occurred in water ebbing out of the wetlands. During preliminary work to identify ARB species, several bacterial species of relevance to human illness (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus hirae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aeromonas veronii, Enterobacter cancerogenus, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, and Staphylococcus intermedius) were isolated from sampled waters. If wetlands are a sink for ARB, construction and restoration of wetlands can help in the mediation of this human and environmental health concern.

  2. Blooms of Pseudo-nitzschia and Domoic Acid in the San Pedro Channel and Los Angeles Harbor Areas of the Southern California Bight, 2003–2004

    OpenAIRE

    Schnetzer, Astrid; Miller, Peter E.; Schaffner, Rebecca; Stauffer, Beth; Jones, Burton H.; Weisberg, Stephen B.; DiGiacomo, Paul M.; Berelson, William M.; David A. Caron

    2007-01-01

    Abundances of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and concentrations of particulate domoic acid (DA) were determined in the Southern California Bight (SCB) along the coasts of Los Angeles and Orange Counties during spring and summer of 2003 and 2004. At least 1500 km2 were affected by a toxic event in May/June of 2003 when some of the highest particulate DA concentrations reported for US coastal waters were measured inside the Los Angeles harbor (12.7 μg DA L−1). Particulate DA levels were an order of magn...

  3. Continuity of slip rates over various time scales on the Puente Hills Blind-thrust Fault, Los Angeles, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Kristian J.; Shaw, John H.; Leon, Lorraine A.; Dolan, James F.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Barrera, Wendy; Rhodes, Edward J.; Murari, Madhav K.; Owen, Lewis A.

    2014-05-01

    Our study seeks to assess the history of slip on the Los Angeles segment of the Puente Hills blind-thrust fault system (PHT) from its inception through the Holocene by integrating a suite of geological and geophysical datasets. The PHT presents one of the largest seismic hazards in the United States, given its location beneath downtown Los Angeles. It is also well suited to slip rate studies, as fold scarps formed by slip on the PHT at depth have been continually buried by flood deposits from the Los Angeles and San Gabriel Rivers, preserving a record of uplift in the form of growth stratigraphy. We determined uplift from the growth stratigraphy by measuring the difference in sediment thickness across the folded layers. At our study site above the western segment of the PHT, the fold structure was imaged by industry seismic reflection data and a pair of high-resolution (100 to 700 m depth) seismic reflection profiles acquired by the authors for this study using weight drop and small vibrator sources. The industry and high-resolution profiles were stacked, migrated and depth converted using a velocity model based on the stacking velocities and the Southern California Earthquake Center Community Velocity Model. The shallowest layers of growth stratigraphy were geometrically constrained by lithological correlations across a series of cone penetration tests and continuously cored boreholes. Age control was provided by radiocarbon dating, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating, and sequence-stratigraphic boundaries. Radiocarbon dating was used to constrain individual earthquake event ages in the borehole transect. Using a novel coring procedure, light-protected samples for quartz OSL and feldspar IRSL dating were acquired from a 171-m-deep borehole that we drilled within the growth fold. These samples provided age constraints on growth strata that were tied to prominent seismic reflections and were combined with

  4. SPATIOTEMPORAL PATTERNS AND SOCIOECONOMIC DIMENSIONS OF SHARED ACCOMMODATIONS: THE CASE OF AIRBNB IN LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sarkar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, disruptive innovation by peer-to-peer platforms in a variety of industries, notably transportation and hospitality have altered the way individuals consume everyday essential services. With growth in sharing economy platforms such as Uber for ridesharing and Airbnb for short-term accommodations, interest in examining spatiotemporal patterns of participation in the sharing economy by suppliers and consumers is increasing. This research is motivated by key questions: who are the sharing economy workers, where are they located, and does their location influence their participation in the sharing economy? This paper is the first systematic effort to analyze spatiotemporal patterns of participation by hosts in the shared accommodation-based economy. Using three different kinds of shared accommodations listed in a 3-year period in the popular short-term accommodation platform, Airbnb, we examine spatiotemporal dimensions of host participation in a major U.S. market, Los Angeles CA. The paper also develops a conceptual model by positing associations of demographic, socioeconomic, occupational, and social capital attributes of hosts, along with their attitudes toward trust and greener consumption with hosts’ participation in a shared accommodation market. Results confirm host participation to be influenced by young dependency ratio, the potential of supplemental income, as well as the sustainability potential of collaborative consumption, along with finance, insurance, and real estate occupation, but not so much by trust for our overall study area. These results add new insights to limited prior knowledge about the sharing economy worker and have policy implications.

  5. Loss estimates for a Puente Hills blind-thrust earthquake in Los Angeles, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, E.H.; Seligson, H.A.; Gupta, N.; Gupta, V.; Jordan, T.H.; Campbell, K.W.

    2005-01-01

    Based on OpenSHA and HAZUS-MH, we present loss estimates for an earthquake rupture on the recently identified Puente Hills blind-thrust fault beneath Los Angeles. Given a range of possible magnitudes and ground motion models, and presuming a full fault rupture, we estimate the total economic loss to be between $82 and $252 billion. This range is not only considerably higher than a previous estimate of $69 billion, but also implies the event would be the costliest disaster in U.S. history. The analysis has also provided the following predictions: 3,000-18,000 fatalities, 142,000-735,000 displaced households, 42,000-211,000 in need of short-term public shelter, and 30,000-99,000 tons of debris generated. Finally, we show that the choice of ground motion model can be more influential than the earthquake magnitude, and that reducing this epistemic uncertainty (e.g., via model improvement and/or rejection) could reduce the uncertainty of the loss estimates by up to a factor of two. We note that a full Puente Hills fault rupture is a rare event (once every ???3,000 years), and that other seismic sources pose significant risk as well. ?? 2005, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  6. Is More Necessarily Better? Leadership and Organizational Development of Migrant Hometown Associations in Los Angeles, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Escala Rabadán

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Las asociaciones de paisanos en Estados Unidos son grupos de migrantes voluntarios basados en un sentimiento compartido de pertenencia a una región en un país de origen distinto. Sus actividades han llamado cada vez más la atención de instancias gubernamentales y de actores sociales y políticos. Estos actores han favorecido la formación de más de estos grupos, junto con una creciente demanda sobre ellos para que expandan sus compromisos cívicos. Sin embargo, esta estrategia no conduce necesariamente a ello, e incluso podría disminuir la capacidad organizativa de las asociaciones. A partir de un programa piloto basado en la formación de capacidades con asociaciones de migrantes latinos en Los Ángeles, aquí argumentamos que se requiere una estrategia distinta para que las HTAS amplíen su capacidad organizativa.

  7. Spatiotemporal Patterns and Socioeconomic Dimensions of Shared Accommodations: the Case of Airbnb in LOS Angeles, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, A.; Koohikamali, M.; Pick, J. B.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, disruptive innovation by peer-to-peer platforms in a variety of industries, notably transportation and hospitality have altered the way individuals consume everyday essential services. With growth in sharing economy platforms such as Uber for ridesharing and Airbnb for short-term accommodations, interest in examining spatiotemporal patterns of participation in the sharing economy by suppliers and consumers is increasing. This research is motivated by key questions: who are the sharing economy workers, where are they located, and does their location influence their participation in the sharing economy? This paper is the first systematic effort to analyze spatiotemporal patterns of participation by hosts in the shared accommodation-based economy. Using three different kinds of shared accommodations listed in a 3-year period in the popular short-term accommodation platform, Airbnb, we examine spatiotemporal dimensions of host participation in a major U.S. market, Los Angeles CA. The paper also develops a conceptual model by positing associations of demographic, socioeconomic, occupational, and social capital attributes of hosts, along with their attitudes toward trust and greener consumption with hosts' participation in a shared accommodation market. Results confirm host participation to be influenced by young dependency ratio, the potential of supplemental income, as well as the sustainability potential of collaborative consumption, along with finance, insurance, and real estate occupation, but not so much by trust for our overall study area. These results add new insights to limited prior knowledge about the sharing economy worker and have policy implications.

  8. A Potential Paleotsunami Shell-Hash layer from the Los Penasquitos Marsh, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, B. P.; Cordova, J.; Kirby, M. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Bonuso, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Los Penasquitos Marsh is one of a series of coastal wetlands between San Diego and Orange County that formed within stream valleys that were flooded and filled with sediment during early Holocene sea-level rise. In order to test the hypothesis that these wetlands contain a record of prehistoric tsunamis, 21 reconnaissance gouge cores between 48 and 321 cm in length were collected and described in the field. Nearly all of the cores contained a single peaty layer in the top 20-40 cm, underlain by interbedded fine-medium gray sand and mud. The stratigraphy in the cores is generally consistent with the complete infilling of a lagoon behind a baymouth bar during the mid-late Holocene. Five of the cores, ranging from 1.0-1.4 km inland from the present beach, intersect a distinctive 0.5 - 12.0 cm-thick shell-hash layer at a depth of between 233 and 280 cm beneath the modern surface. Based on this discovery, we collected a 285 cm long 5-cm diameter core using a Livingstone Piston corer. In this core the 10 cm-thick shell hash layer consists of angular fragments up to 1 cm of broken shells in a coarse sandy matrix that include the following genera: Mitrella, Venus, Spirotropis, Pecten, and Nassarius. This assemblage suggests a quiet water, marine source - from the lagoon and/or offshore. The core was also analyzed for loss on ignition (LOI) at both 550° and 950°C and magnetic susceptibility (ms). The LOI550 data are unremarkable throughout the core, and the LOI950 data show an expected spike within the shell-hash layer. The ms data show very low values for the lagoonal muds and sands, but a pronounced spike within the shell hash layer. We hypothesize that the anomalously high ms value for the shell hash layer indicates a substantial component from an offshore source, where heavier magnetic minerals may have accumulated seaward of the baymouth bar. If correct, this layer may represent a large-wave event, either a storm or tsunami. Three C-14 dates (uncorrected for the

  9. Aseptic meningitis outbreak associated with echovirus 30 among high school football players--Los Angeles County, California, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, Curtis; Civen, Rachel; Keough, Kathleen; Ngo, Van; Marutani, Amy; Schwartz, Benjamin

    2015-01-02

    On August 4, 2014, the Acute Communicable Disease Control Program of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health received a report of three aseptic meningitis cases among football players at a county high school. An investigation was conducted to determine the extent of the outbreak, identify potential exposures, and recommend control measures. An outbreak-associated aseptic meningitis case was defined as an illness of any team or family member with onset during July 28-August 11 with 1) cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and negative bacterial culture or 2) an emergency department visit with headache, fever, and stiff neck. Ten cases were identified; nine in males, and one in a female; patient ages ranged from 13 to 17 years. All the patients sought care at an emergency department, and five were hospitalized, resulting in 12 total hospital days. All 10 patients have recovered. Eight patients were football players, and two were siblings of football players. The most affected subgroup was the junior varsity football team, with seven cases out of 57 players (attack rate = 12.3%); the relative risk for aseptic meningitis was higher among players who were linemen than among those who were not linemen (relative risk = 5.4 [p = 0.03]). Of the 10 patients, eight tested positive by polymerase chain reaction for enterovirus, and two were not tested. Echovirus testing was performed at the California Viral and Rickettsial Disease Laboratory. Of the eight specimens testing positive for enterovirus, seven tested positive for echovirus 30, and one specimen could not be typed because of insufficient quantity.

  10. Physicochemical and toxicological profiles of particulate matter in Los Angeles during the October 2007 southern California wildfires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vishal; Polidori, Andrea; Schauer, James J; Shafer, Martin M; Cassee, Flemming R; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2009-02-01

    To characterize the impact of the October 2007 wildfires on the air quality of Los Angeles, integrated ambient particulate matter (PM) samples were collected near the University of Southern California between October 24 and November 14, 2007. Samples were analyzed for different chemical species (i.e.,water-soluble organic carbon, water-soluble elements, and several organic compounds), and the redox activity of PM was evaluated using two different assays: the dithiothreitol (DTT) and macrophage reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays. Tracers of biomass burning such as potassium and levoglucosan were elevated by 2-fold during the fire period (October 24-28), compared to the postfire period (November 1-14). Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) concentrations were also higher during the fire event (170 and 78 microg/mg of PM, during fire and postfire, respectively). While the DTT activity (on a per PM mass basis) increased for samples collected during the fire event (0.024 nmol DTT/min x microg on October 24) compared to the postfire samples (0.005 nmol DTT/min x microg on November 14), the ROS activity appears to be unaffected by the wildfires, probably because these two assays are driven by different PM species. While the DTT assay reflected the redox potential of polar organic compounds, which are abundant in wood-smoke, the ROS assay was mainly influenced by transition metals (e.g., Fe, Cu, Cr, Zn, Ni, and V), emitted mostly by vehicular traffic and other combustion sources, but not by the wildfires.

  11. Observation of elevated air pollutant concentrations in a residential neighborhood of Los Angeles California using a mobile platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shishan; Paulson, Suzanne E.; Fruin, Scott; Kozawa, Kathleen; Mara, Steve; Winer, Arthur M.

    2012-05-01

    We observed elevated air pollutant concentrations, especially of ultrafine particles (UFP), black carbon (BC) and NO, across the residential neighborhood of the Boyle Heights Community (BH) of Los Angeles, California. Using an electric vehicle mobile platform equipped with fast response instruments, real-time air pollutant concentrations were measured in BH in spring and summer of 2008. Pollutant concentrations varied significantly in the two seasons, on different days, and by time of day, with an overall average UFP concentration in the residential areas of ∼33 000 cm-3. The averaged UFP, BC, and NO concentrations measured on Soto St, a major surface street in BH, were 57 000 cm-3, 5.1 μg m-3, and 67 ppb, respectively. Concentrations of UFP across the residential areas in BH were nearly uniform spatially, in contrast to other areas in the greater metropolitan area of Los Angeles where UFP concentrations exhibit strong gradients downwind of roadways. We attribute this “UFP cloud” to high traffic volumes, including heavy duty diesel trucks on the freeways which surround and traverse BH, and substantial numbers of high-emitting vehicles (HEVs) on the surface streets traversing BH. Additionally, the high density of stop signs and lights and short block lengths, requiring frequent accelerations of vehicles, may contribute. The data also support a role for photochemical production of UFP in the afternoon. UFP concentration peaks (5 s average) of up to 9 million particles cm-3 were also observed immediately behind HEVs when they accelerated from stop lights in the BH neighborhood and areas immediately adjacent. Although encounters with HEV during mornings accounted for only about 6% and 17% of time spent monitoring residential areas and major surface streets, HEV contributed to about 28% and 53% of total ultrafine particles measured on the route, respectively. The observation of elevated pollutant concentrations across the Boyle Heights community highlights

  12. Holocene to Pliocene tectonic evolution of the region offshore of the Los Angeles urban corridor, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.; Gardner, James V.; Sliter, Ray W.

    2004-02-01

    Quaternary tectonism in the coastal belt of the Los Angeles urban corridor is diverse. In this paper we report the results of studies of multibeam bathymetry and a network of seismic reflection profiles that have been aimed at deciphering the diverse tectonism and at evaluating the relevance of published explanations of the region's tectonic history. Rapid uplift, subsidence in basins, folds and thrusts, extensional faulting, and strike-slip faulting have all been active at one place or another throughout the Quaternary Period. The tectonic strain is reflected in the modern physiography at all scales. Los Angeles (LA) Basin has filled from a deep submarine basin to its present condition with sediment impounded behind a large sill formed behind uplifts near the present shoreline. Newport trough to the south-southeast of LA Basin also accumulated a large volume of sediment, but remained at midbathyal depths throughout the Period. There is little or no evidence of Quaternary extensional tectonism in either basin although as much as 6 km of subsidence, which mainly occurred by sagging, has been recorded in places since the middle Miocene. The uplifts include folded and thrust faulted terranes in the Palos Verdes Hills and the shelves of Santa Monica and San Pedro Bays. The uplifted areas have been shortened in a southwest-northeast direction by 10% or slightly more, and some folds are reflected in the bathymetry. Two large adjacent midbathyal basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, show strong evidence of subsidence and slight west-northwest extension (10%) during the same time folding was taking place in the uplifts. The tectonic boundaries between uplifts and basins are folded, normal faulted, reverse-faulted, and strike-slip faulted depending on location. The rapid Quaternary uplift and subsidence, along with the filling of LA Basin, have produced a reversal in the regional physiography. In the early Pliocene, LA Basin was a submarine deep, Palos Verdes and the shelves

  13. Report: Visit To California State University: Los Angeles And Dominquez Hills Campuses: 1-7 August 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Ehlers

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the California State University’s (CSU’s Chancellor, Professor CB Reed, the CSU is America’s largest senior system of higher education with 350 000 students on 22 campuses, situated throughout California. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  14. California Conference on High Blood Pressure Control in the Spanish-Speaking Community (Los Angeles, California, April 1-2, 1978). Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. High Blood Pressure Information Center.

    As part of the National High Blood Pressure Education Program effort, the conference explored the implications and impact of the prevalence of hypertension in Spanish-speaking populations in California. Approximately 150 experts in health fields, representing all levels of government, public and private health care providers, consumers, and health…

  15. Inmigración y propiedad de la vivienda: los casos de California y España, 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián LÓPEZ COLÁS

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años California y España, dos contextos donde predomina la tenencia de la vivienda en propiedad, han recibido un gran volumen de inmigrantes y han experimentado una burbuja inmobiliaria que ha acabado por desinflarse. El objetivo de este artículo es analizar la propiedad de la vivienda de los extranjeros en ambos contextos entre 2001 y 2006, considerándola como un indicador de integración de los inmigrantes en las sociedades de acogida. Otros objetivos, derivados del anterior, son determinar la influencia de la nacionalidad en la propiedad de la vivienda y analizar cómo influyen los factores sociodemográficos para que nacionales y extranjeros vivan en propiedad. La modelización de las variables sociodemográficas muestra que entre 2001 y 2006 la propensión a vivir en propiedad de los extranjeros es inferior a la de los nacionales y, lo que es más importante, que el sistema residencial español les exige más esfuerzo que el californiano para vivir en propiedad.

  16. Ecología trófica del pez Arothron meleagris (Tetraodontiformes: Tetraodontidae en el arrecife de Los Frailes, Baja California Sur, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xchel G Moreno

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Con la finalidad de determinar los hábitos alimenticios del tamboril de oro Arothron meleagris, así como sus posibles variaciones de alimentación por talla y sexo, se realizaron muestreos mensuales de noviembre 2004 a octubre 2005, en el arrecife de Los Frailes, Baja California Sur, México. Se capturaron un total de 101 ejemplares, en los cuales todos los estómagos contenían alimento. Se aplicó el índice de importancia relativa (IIR para determinar los principales categorías alimenticias (ítems, los cuales fueron: Echinometra vanbrunti (26.25 %, Porifera (12.63 %, Pocillopora spp. (11.84%, Bryozoa (5.37 % y Porites spp. (4.83 %. El índice de Levin indica baja amplitud del nicho trófico (Bi= 0.12 por lo que se le puede considerar como un depredador especialista con marcadas preferencias hacia algunos tipos alimentarios. El índice de Morisita-Horn indicó que existe un traslape alto entre las dietas por sexo (hembras y machos o = 0.78, temporadas (cálida y fría o = 0.95 y entre tallas (chica y mediana o = 0.94, chica y grande o = 0.74, mediana y grande o = 0.83.

  17. Geohydrology, Geochemistry, and Ground-Water Simulation-Optimization of the Central and West Coast Basins, Los Angeles County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Eric G.; Land, Michael; Crawford, Steven M.; Johnson, Tyler D.; Everett, Rhett; Kulshan, Trayle V.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Halford, Keith L.; Johnson, Theodore A.; Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy

    2003-01-01

    Historical ground-water development of the Central and West Coast Basins in Los Angeles County, California through the first half of the 20th century caused large water-level declines and induced seawater intrusion. Because of this, the basins were adjudicated and numerous ground-water management activities were implemented, including increased water spreading, construction of injection barriers, increased delivery of imported water, and increased use of reclaimed water. In order to improve the scientific basis for these water management activities, an extensive data collection program was undertaken, geohydrological and geochemical analyses were conducted, and ground-water flow simulation and optimization models were developed. In this project, extensive hydraulic, geologic, and chemical data were collected from new multiple-well monitoring sites. On the basis of these data and data compiled and collected from existing wells, the regional geohydrologic framework was characterized. For the purposes of modeling, the three-dimensional aquifer system was divided into four aquifer systems?the Recent, Lakewood, Upper San Pedro, and Lower San Pedro aquifer systems. Most pumpage in the two basins is from the Upper San Pedro aquifer system. Assessment of the three-dimensional geochemical data provides insight into the sources of recharge and the movement and age of ground water in the study area. Major-ion data indicate the chemical character of water containing less than 500 mg/L dissolved solids generally grades from calcium-bicarbonate/sulfate to sodium bicarbonate. Sodium-chloride water, high in dissolved solids, is present in wells near the coast. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen provide information on sources of recharge to the basin, including imported water and water originating in the San Fernando Valley, San Gabriel Valley, and the coastal plain and surrounding hills. Tritium and carbon-14 data provide information on relative ground-water ages. Water with

  18. The University of California and the mobilization of science for national defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, R.W.

    1992-03-01

    The discovery of fission gave new urgency to the mobilization of science in World War II. In particular, its potential for an explosive release of subatomic energy gave pause to the scientists who organized the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) and its successor, the Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD). These organizations were responsible for placing the scientific talent of the nation in the service of national defense, for at that time the vast majority of scientists were employed in private industry and private and public academic institutions. One of the largest academic institutions to be mobilized was the University of California, which provided the research and development for the electromagnetic method of uranium isotope separation for the first atomic bomb, and operated a new laboratory for the design of nuclear weapons at Los Alamos. The mobilization of the University of California had far-reaching consequences. The University has operated Los Alamos for almost 50 years, and Livermore ever since it was recreated as a second weapons laboratory in 1952. In what follows, I hope to indicate how the partnership between the government and the University was created, and how this affected national security decision-making in the war and post-war eras.

  19. High temperature annealing of fission tracks in fluorapatite, Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Nancy D.; Crowley, Kevin D.; McCulloh, Thane H.; Reaves, Chris M.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Annealing of fission tracks is a kinetic process dependent primarily on temperature and to a laser extent on time. Several kinetic models of apatite annealing have been proposed. The predictive capabilities of these models for long-term geologic annealing have been limited to qualitative or semiquantitative at best, because of uncertainties associated with (1) the extrapolation of laboratory observations to geologic conditions, (2) the thermal histories of field samples, and (3) to some extent, the effect of apatite composition on reported annealing temperatures. Thermal history in the Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California, is constrained by an exceptionally well known burial history and present-day temperature gradient. Sediment burial histories are continuous and tightly constrained from about 9 Ma to present, with an important tie at 3.4 Ma. No surface erosion and virtually no uplift were recorded during or since deposition of these sediments, so the burial history is simple and uniquely defined. Temperature gradient (???40??C km-1) is well established from oil-field operations. Fission-track data from the Santa Fe Springs area should thus provide one critical field test of kinetic annealing models for apatite. Fission-track analysis has been performed on apatites from sandstones of Pliocene to Miocene age from a deep drill hole at Santa Fe Springs. Apatite composition, determined by electron microprobe, is fluorapatite [average composition (F1.78Cl0.01OH0.21)] with very low chlorine content [less than Durango apatite; sample means range from 0.0 to 0.04 Cl atoms, calculated on the basis of 26(O, F, Cl, OH)], suggesting that the apatite is not unusually resistant to annealing. Fission tracks are preserved in these apatites at exceptionally high present-day temperatures. Track loss is not complete until temperatures reach the extreme of 167-178??C (at 3795-4090 m depth). The temperature-time annealing relationships indicated by the new data

  20. Immigration and homeownership: the cases of California and Spain, Inmigración y propiedad de la vivienda: los casos de California y España, 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda YÉPEZ MARTÍNEZ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the evolution of foreign homeownership in Spain between 2001 and 2006, seen as an indicator of integration of migrants in host countries. Other goals, derived from the former, are to determine the influence of nationality in the homeownership and to quantify the likelihood of foreigners to live under this form of tenure. Having modelled the socio-demographic variables between the years 2001 and 2006, the results show a lower propensity of foreign born people to live through ownership than nationals and, what is most important, that the Spanish residential system demands more efforts for foreigners so as to live in property than the Californian system.En los últimos años California y España, dos contextos donde predomina la tenencia de la vivienda en propiedad, han recibido un gran volumen de inmigrantes y han experimentado una burbuja inmobiliaria que ha acabado por desinflarse. El objetivo de este artículo es analizar la propiedad de la vivienda de los extranjeros en ambos contextos entre 2001 y 2006, considerándola como un indicador de integración de los inmigrantes en las sociedades de acogida. Otros objetivos, derivados del anterior, son determinar la influencia de la nacionalidad en la propiedad de la vivienda y analizar cómo influyen los factores sociodemográficos para que nacionales y extranjeros vivan en propiedad. La modelización de las variables sociodemográficas muestra que entre 2001 y 2006 la propensión a vivir en propiedad de los extranjeros es inferior a la de los nacionales y, lo que es más importante, que el sistema residencial español les exige más esfuerzo que el californiano para vivir en propiedad.