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Sample records for california gama program

  1. California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project--shallow aquifer assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The California State Water Resources Control Board’s (SWRCB) GAMA Program is a comprehensive assessment of statewide groundwater quality in California. From 2004 to 2012, the GAMA Program’s Priority Basin Project focused on assessing groundwater resources used for public drinking-water supplies. More than 2,000 public-supply wells were sampled by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for this effort. Starting in 2012, the GAMA Priority Basin Project began an assessment of water resources in shallow aquifers in California. These shallow aquifers provide water for domestic and small community-supply wells, which are often drilled to shallower depths in the groundwater system than public-supply wells. Shallow aquifers are of interest because shallow groundwater may respond more quickly and be more susceptible to contamination from human activities at the land surface, than the deeper aquifers. The SWRCB’s GAMA Program was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 (Water Code sections 10780-10782.3): a public mandate to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking-water supplies, and to increase the availability of information about groundwater quality to the public. The U.S. Geological Survey is the technical lead of the Priority Basin Project. Stewardship of California’s groundwater resources is a responsibility shared between well owners, communities, and the State. Participants and collaborators in the GAMA Program include Regional Water Quality Control Boards, Department of Water Resources, Department of Public Health, local and regional groundwater management entities, county and local water agencies, community groups, and private citizens. Well-owner participation in the GAMA Program is entirely voluntary.

  2. Groundwater-quality data in the northern Coast Ranges study unit, 2009: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Dawson, Barbara J.; Shelton, Jennifer L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 633-square-mile Northern Coast Ranges (NOCO) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from June to November 2009, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program's Priority Basin Project (PBP) and the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NOCO study unit was the thirtieth study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP.

  3. California GAMA Program: Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Results for the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces of Northern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2005-01-20

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) project (under the GAMA Program) is to assess water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements

  4. Groundwater Quality Data in the Mojave Study Unit, 2008: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,500 square-mile Mojave (MOJO) study unit was investigated from February to April 2008, as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). MOJO was the 23rd of 37 study units to be sampled as part of the GAMA Priority Basin Project. The MOJO study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated ground water used for public water supplies within MOJO, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 59 wells in San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties. Fifty-two of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and seven were selected to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for a large number of organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds], constituents of special interest (perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]) naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, dissolved organic carbon [DOC], major and minor ions, silica, total dissolved solids [TDS], and trace elements), and radioactive constituents (gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity, radium isotopes, and radon-222). Naturally occurring isotopes (stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate, and activities of tritium and carbon-14), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled

  5. Groundwater Quality Data for the Northern Sacramento Valley, 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Peter A.; Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,180-square-mile Northern Sacramento Valley study unit (REDSAC) was investigated in October 2007 through January 2008 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw groundwater used for public water supplies within REDSAC and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 66 wells in Shasta and Tehama Counties. Forty-three of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and 23 were selected to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOC], pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial constituents. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate, stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen of water), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled ground water. In total, over 275 constituents and field water-quality indicators were investigated. Three types of quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, and sampmatrix spikes) were collected at approximately 8

  6. California GAMA program: ground-water quality data in the San Diego drainages hydrogeologic province, California, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Burton, Carmen A.

    2005-01-01

    Because of concerns over ground-water quality, the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has implemented the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. A primary objective of the program is to provide a current assessment of ground-water quality in areas where public supply wells are an important source of drinking water. The San Diego GAMA study unit was the first region of the state where an assessment of ground-water quality was implemented under the GAMA program. The San Diego GAMA study unit covers the entire San Diego Drainages hydrogeologic province, and is broken down into four distinct hydrogeologic study areas: the Temecula Valley study area, the Warner Valley study area, the Alluvial Basins study area, and the Hard Rock study area. A total of 58 ground-water samples were collected from public supply wells in the San Diego GAMA study unit: 19 wells were sampled in the Temecula Valley study area, 9 in the Warner Valley study area, 17 in the Alluvial Basins study area, and 13 in the Hard Rock study area. Over 350 chemical and microbial constituents and water-quality indicators were analyzed for in this study. However, only select wells were measured for all constituents and water-quality indicators. Results of analyses were calculated as detection frequencies by constituent classification and by individual constituents for the entire San Diego GAMA study unit and for the individual study areas. Additionally, concentrations of constituents that are routinely monitored were compared to maximum contaminant levels (MCL) and secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCL). Concentrations of constituents classified as 'unregulated chemicals for which monitoring is required' (UCMR) were compared to the 'detection level for the purposes of reporting' (DLR). Eighteen of the 88 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and gasoline oxygenates

  7. California GAMA Program: Sources and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in the Llagas Basin of Santa Clara County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; McNab, W; Esser, B; Hudson, G; Carle, S; Beller, H; Kane, S; Tompson, A B; Letain, T; Moore, K; Eaton, G; Leif, R; Moody-Bartel, C; Singleton, M

    2005-06-29

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate is the most pervasive and intractable contaminant in California groundwater and is the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the cities of Morgan Hill and Gilroy, CA, in the Llagas Subbasin of Santa Clara County, where high nitrate levels affect several hundred private domestic wells. The main objectives of the study are: (1) to identify the main source(s) of nitrate that issue a flux to the shallow regional aquifer (2) to determine whether denitrification plays a role in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin and (3) to assess the impact that a nitrate management plan implemented by the local water agency has had on the flux of nitrate to the regional aquifer. Analyses of 56 well water samples for major anions and cations, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, dissolved excess nitrogen, tritium and groundwater age, and trace organic compounds, show that synthetic fertilizer is the most likely source of nitrate in highly contaminated wells, and that denitrification is not a significant process in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin except in the area of recycled water application. In addition to identifying contaminant sources, these methods offer a deeper understanding of how the severity and extent of contamination are affected by hydrogeology and groundwater management practices. In the Llagas subbasin, the nitrate problem is amplified in the shallow aquifer because it is highly vulnerable with high vertical recharge rates and rapid lateral transport, but the deeper aquifers are relatively more protected by laterally extensive aquitards. Artificial recharge delivers low-nitrate water and provides a means of

  8. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Southern Sacramento Valley, California, 2005 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milby Dawson, Barbara J.; Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 2,100 square-mile Southern Sacramento Valley study unit (SSACV) was investigated from March to June 2005 as part of the Statewide Basin Assessment Project of Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. This study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within SSACV, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 83 wells in Placer, Sacramento, Solano, Sutter, and Yolo Counties. Sixty-seven of the wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area. Sixteen of the wells were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along ground-water flow paths. Four additional samples were collected at one of the wells to evaluate water-quality changes with depth. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of man-made organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and wastewater-indicator constituents), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, matrix spikes

  9. Groundwater-Quality Data in the South Coast Interior Basins Study Unit, 2008: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Ray, Mary C.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 653-square-mile South Coast Interior Basins (SCI) study unit was investigated from August to December 2008, as part of the Priority Basins Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basins Project was developed in response to Legislative mandates (Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act 1999-00 Fiscal Year; and, the Groundwater-Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 [Sections 10780-10782.3 of the California Water Code, Assembly Bill 599]) to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater used as public supply for municipalities in California, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). SCI was the 27th study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA Priority Basins Project. This study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated groundwater used for public water supplies within SCI, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 54 wells within the three study areas [Livermore, Gilroy, and Cuyama] of SCI in Alameda, Santa Clara, San Benito, Santa Barbara, Ventura, and Kern Counties. Thirty-five of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and 19 were selected to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides and pesticide degradates, polar pesticides and metabolites, and pharmaceutical compounds], constituents of special interest [perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)], naturally occurring inorganic constituents [trace elements, nutrients, major and minor ions, silica, total dissolved solids (TDS), and alkalinity

  10. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Southeast San Joaquin Valley, 2005-2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Carmen A.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 3,800 square-mile Southeast San Joaquin Valley study unit (SESJ) was investigated from October 2005 through February 2006 as part of the Priority Basin Assessment Project of Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The SESJ study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within SESJ, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 99 wells in Fresno, Tulare, and Kings Counties, 83 of which were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and 16 of which were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along ground-water flow paths or across alluvial fans (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, samples for matrix spikes) were collected at approximately 10 percent of the wells, and the results

  11. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Kern County Subbasin Study Unit, 2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Pimentel, Isabel; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 3,000 square-mile Kern County Subbasin study unit (KERN) was investigated from January to March, 2006, as part of the Priority Basin Assessment Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Kern County Subbasin study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw (untreated) ground-water quality within KERN, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 50 wells within the San Joaquin Valley portion of Kern County. Forty-seven of the wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide a statistical representation of the ground-water resources within the study unit. Three additional wells were sampled to aid in the evaluation of changes in water chemistry along regional ground-water flow paths. The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of man-made organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides, and pesticide degradates), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon) and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, and laboratory matrix spikes) were collected and analyzed at approximately 10 percent of

  12. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Coastal Los Angeles Basin Study Unit, 2006: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Land, Michael; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 860 square-mile Coastal Los Angeles Basin study unit (CLAB) was investigated from June to November of 2006 as part of the Statewide Basin Assessment Project of the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Coastal Los Angeles Basin study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within CLAB, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 69 wells in Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Fifty-five of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (?grid wells?). Fourteen additional wells were selected to evaluate changes in ground-water chemistry or to gain a greater understanding of the ground-water quality within a specific portion of the Coastal Los Angeles Basin study unit ('understanding wells'). Ground-water samples were analyzed for: a large number of synthetic organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gasoline oxygenates and their degradates, pesticides, polar pesticides, and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater-indicators]; constituents of special interest [perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), 1,4-dioxane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP)]; inorganic constituents that can occur naturally [nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements]; radioactive constituents [gross-alpha and gross-beta radiation, radium isotopes, and radon-222]; and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes [stable isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen, and activities of tritium and carbon-14

  13. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Santa Clara River Valley Study Unit, 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrella, Joseph; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 460-square-mile Santa Clara River Valley study unit (SCRV) was investigated from April to June 2007 as part of the statewide Priority Basin project of the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw ground water used for public water supplies within SCRV, and to facilitate a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Fifty-seven ground-water samples were collected from 53 wells in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties. Forty-two wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells). Eleven wells (understanding wells) were selected to further evaluate water chemistry in particular parts of the study area, and four depth-dependent ground-water samples were collected from one of the eleven understanding wells to help understand the relation between water chemistry and depth. The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOC], pesticides and pesticide degradates, potential wastewater-indicator compounds, and pharmaceutical compounds), a constituent of special interest (perchlorate), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial constituents. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-13, carbon-14 [abundance], stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water, stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate, chlorine-37, and bromine-81), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source

  14. Groundwater-Quality Data in the Antelope Valley Study Unit, 2008: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Stephen J.; Milby Dawson, Barbara J.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,600 square-mile Antelope Valley study unit (ANT) was investigated from January to April 2008 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw groundwater used for public water supplies within ANT, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 57 wells in Kern, Los Angeles, and San Bernardino Counties. Fifty-six of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized, grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and one additional well was selected to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding well). The groundwater samples were analyzed for a large number of organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], gasoline additives and degradates, pesticides and pesticide degradates, fumigants, and pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), and radioactive constituents (gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity, radium isotopes, and radon-222). Naturally occurring isotopes (strontium, tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled groundwater. In total, 239 constituents and water-quality indicators (field parameters) were investigated. Quality

  15. Ground-Water Quality Data in the San Francisco Bay Study Unit, 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Mary C.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 620-square-mile San Francisco Bay study unit (SFBAY) was investigated from April through June 2007 as part of the Priority Basin project of the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples in SFBAY were collected from 79 wells in San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Alameda, and Contra Costa Counties. Forty-three of the wells sampled were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells). Thirty-six wells were sampled to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOC], pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater-indicator compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, trace elements, chloride and bromide isotopes, and uranium and strontium isotopes), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-14 isotopes, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, boron, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases (noble gases were analyzed in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blank samples

  16. Groundwater-quality data for the Sierra Nevada study unit, 2008: Results from the California GAMA program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Munday, Cathy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 25,500-square-mile Sierra Nevada study unit was investigated in June through October 2008, as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Sierra Nevada study was designed to provide statistically robust assessments of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems in the study unit, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) are defined by the depth of the screened or open intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database of wells used for public and community drinking-water supplies. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. In the Sierra Nevada study unit, groundwater samples were collected from 84 wells (and springs) in Lassen, Plumas, Butte, Sierra, Yuba, Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, Amador, Alpine, Calaveras, Tuolumne, Madera, Mariposa, Fresno, Inyo, Tulare, and Kern Counties. The wells were selected on two overlapping networks by using a spatially-distributed, randomized, grid-based approach. The primary grid-well network consisted of 30 wells, one well per grid cell in the study unit, and was designed to provide statistical representation of groundwater quality throughout the entire study unit. The lithologic grid-well network is a secondary grid that consisted of the wells in the primary grid-well network plus 53 additional wells and was designed to provide statistical representation of groundwater quality in each of the four major lithologic units in the Sierra

  17. Groundwater-quality data in the Western San Joaquin Valley study unit, 2010 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Landon, Matthew K.; Shelton, Jennifer L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 2,170-square-mile Western San Joaquin Valley (WSJV) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from March to July 2010, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program's Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The WSJV study unit was the twenty-ninth study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA Western San Joaquin Valley study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined as parts of aquifers corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the WSJV study unit. Groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the quality in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the WSJV study unit, groundwater samples were collected from 58 wells in 2 study areas (Delta-Mendota subbasin and Westside subbasin) in Stanislaus, Merced, Madera, Fresno, and Kings Counties. Thirty-nine of the wells were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and 19 wells were selected to aid in the understanding of aquifer-system flow and related groundwater-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], low-level fumigants, and pesticides and pesticide degradates

  18. California GAMA Special Study: Nitrate Fate and Transport in the Salinas Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Jean E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Esser, Bradley K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hillegonds, Darren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holtz, Marianne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, Sarah K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Singleton, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Visser, Ate [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-05-13

    The Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is a comprehensive groundwater quality monitoring program managed by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). Under the GAMA program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory carries out special studies that address groundwater quality issues of statewide relevance. The study described here is one in a series of special studies that address the fate and transport of nitrate in basins where groundwater is the main source of water for both irrigation and public drinking water supply.

  19. Groundwater-quality data in the Klamath Mountains study unit, 2010: results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 8,806-square-mile Klamath Mountains (KLAM) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from October to December 2010, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The KLAM study unit was the thirty-third study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA Klamath Mountains study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated-groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined by the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the KLAM study unit. Groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the quality in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the KLAM study unit, groundwater samples were collected from sites in Del Norte, Siskiyou, Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, and Shasta Counties, California. Of the 39 sites sampled, 38 were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the primary aquifer system in the study unit (grid sites), and the remaining site was non-randomized (understanding site). The groundwater samples were analyzed for basic field parameters, organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs] and pesticides and pesticide degradates), inorganic constituents (trace elements, nutrients, major and minor ions, total dissolved solids [TDS]), radon-222, gross alpha and gross beta

  20. Groundwater-quality data in the Santa Barbara study unit, 2011: results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 48-square-mile Santa Barbara study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from January to February 2011, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Santa Barbara study unit was the thirty-fourth study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA Santa Barbara study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated-groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the Santa Barbara study unit. Groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the quality in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the Santa Barbara study unit located in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, groundwater samples were collected from 24 wells. Eighteen of the wells were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and six wells were selected to aid in evaluation of water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds); constituents of special interest (perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]); naturally occurring inorganic constituents (trace

  1. Groundwater-quality data in the Santa Cruz, San Gabriel, and Peninsular Ranges Hard Rock Aquifers study unit, 2011-2012: results from the California GAMA program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 2,400-square-mile Santa Cruz, San Gabriel, and Peninsular Ranges Hard Rock Aquifers (Hard Rock) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from March 2011 through March 2012, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Hard Rock study unit was the 35th study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP.

  2. Groundwater-quality data in the North San Francisco Bay Shallow Aquifer study unit, 2012: results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 1,850-square-mile North San Francisco Bay Shallow Aquifer (NSF-SA) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from April to August 2012, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NSF-SA study unit was the first study unit to be sampled as part of the second phase of the GAMA-PBP, which focuses on the shallow aquifer system.

  3. Groundwater-quality data in the Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau study unit, 2010-Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 39,000-square-kilometer Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau (CAMP) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from July through October 2010, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CAMP study unit is the thirty-second study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA PBP. The GAMA CAMP study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated-groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the open or screened intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the CAMP study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from the quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the CAMP study unit, groundwater samples were collected from 90 wells and springs in 6 study areas (Sacramento Valley Eastside, Honey Lake Valley, Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau Low Use Basins, Shasta Valley and Mount Shasta Volcanic Area, Quaternary Volcanic Areas, and Tertiary Volcanic Areas) in Butte, Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, Shasta, Siskiyou, and Tehama Counties. Wells and springs were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells). Groundwater samples were analyzed for field water-quality indicators, organic constituents, perchlorate, inorganic constituents

  4. Groundwater-quality data in seven GAMA study units: results from initial sampling, 2004-2005, and resampling, 2007-2008, of wells: California GAMA Program Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Robert; Belitz, Kenneth; Fram, Miranda S.

    2014-01-01

    The Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The GAMA-PBP began sampling, primarily public supply wells in May 2004. By the end of February 2006, seven (of what would eventually be 35) study units had been sampled over a wide area of the State. Selected wells in these first seven study units were resampled for water quality from August 2007 to November 2008 as part of an assessment of temporal trends in water quality by the GAMA-PBP. The initial sampling was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw groundwater used for public water supplies within the seven study units. In the 7 study units, 462 wells were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area. Wells selected this way are referred to as grid wells or status wells. Approximately 3 years after the initial sampling, 55 of these previously sampled status wells (approximately 10 percent in each study unit) were randomly selected for resampling. The seven resampled study units, the total number of status wells sampled for each study unit, and the number of these wells resampled for trends are as follows, in chronological order of sampling: San Diego Drainages (53 status wells, 7 trend wells), North San Francisco Bay (84, 10), Northern San Joaquin Basin (51, 5), Southern Sacramento Valley (67, 7), San Fernando–San Gabriel (35, 6), Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley Basins (91, 11), and Southeast San Joaquin Valley (83, 9). The groundwater samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides, and pesticide degradates), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N

  5. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Upper Santa Ana Watershed Study Unit, November 2006-March 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Robert; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 1,000-square-mile Upper Santa Ana Watershed study unit (USAW) was investigated from November 2006 through March 2007 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Upper Santa Ana Watershed study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within USAW, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 99 wells in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. Ninety of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells). Nine wells were selected to provide additional understanding of specific water-quality issues identified within the basin (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater-indicator compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], 1,4-dioxane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water) and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify sources and ages of the sampled ground water. Dissolved gases, and isotopes of nitrogen gas and of dissolved nitrate also were measured in order to investigate the sources and occurrence of

  6. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Owens and Indian Wells Valleys Study Unit, 2006: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Jill N.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 1,630 square-mile Owens and Indian Wells Valleys study unit (OWENS) was investigated in September-December 2006 as part of the Priority Basin Project of Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Owens and Indian Wells Valleys study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within OWENS study unit, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 74 wells in Inyo, Kern, Mono, and San Bernardino Counties. Fifty-three of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and 21 wells were selected to evaluate changes in water chemistry in areas of interest (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater- indicator compounds], constituents of special interest [perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and 1,2,3- trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP)], naturally occurring inorganic constituents [nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements], radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes [tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water], and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. This study evaluated the quality of raw ground water in the aquifer in the OWENS study unit and did not attempt to evaluate the quality of treated water

  7. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Northern Coast Ranges study unit, 2009: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 633-square-mile (1,639-square-kilometer) Northern Coast Ranges (NOCO) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The study unit is composed of two study areas (Interior Basins and Coastal Basins) and is located in northern California in Napa, Sonoma, Lake, Colusa, Mendocino, Glenn, Humboldt, and Del Norte Counties. The GAMA-PBP is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the USGS and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  8. Ground-Water Quality Data in the San Fernando-San Gabriel Study Unit, 2005 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Michael; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 460 square mile San Fernando-San Gabriel study unit (SFSG) was investigated between May and July 2005 as part of the Priority Basin Assessment Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The San Fernando-San Gabriel study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within SFSG, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 52 wells in Los Angeles County. Thirty-five of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and seventeen wells were selected to aid in the evaluation of specific water-quality issues or changes in water chemistry along a historic ground-water flow path (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides and pesticide degradates], constituents of special interest [perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), 1,2,3-trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP), and 1,4-dioxane], naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, samples for matrix spikes) were collected at approximately one-fifth (11 of 52) of the wells, and the results for these

  9. Groundwater-quality data in the Bear Valley and Selected Hard Rock Areas study unit, 2010: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 112-square-mile Bear Valley and Selected Hard Rock Areas (BEAR) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from April to August 2010, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The BEAR study unit was the thirty-first study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA Bear Valley and Selected Hard Rock Areas study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined as the zones corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the BEAR study unit. Groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the quality in the shallow or deep water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the BEAR study unit, groundwater samples were collected from two study areas (Bear Valley and Selected Hard Rock Areas) in San Bernardino County. Of the 38 sampling sites, 27 were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the primary aquifer system in the study unit (grid sites), and the remaining 11 sites were selected to aid in the understanding of the potential groundwater-quality issues associated with septic tank use and with ski areas in the study unit (understanding sites). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and

  10. Implementation of SQLite database support in program gama-local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Petras

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The program gama-local is a part of GNU Gama project and allows adjustment of local geodetic networks. Before realization of this project the program gama-local supported only XML as an input. I designed and implemented support for the SQLite database and thanks to this extension gama-local can read input data from the SQLite database. This article is focused on the specifics of the use of callback functions in C++ using the native SQLite C/C++ Application Programming Interface. The article provides solution to safe calling of callback functions written in C++. Callback functions are called from C library and C library itself is used by C++ program. Provided solution combines several programing techniques which are described in detail, so this article can serve as a cookbook even for beginner programmers.  This project was accomplished within my bachelor thesis.

  11. California GAMA Special Study: Analysis of Carbamazepine, Oxcarbazepine and Metabolites as Wastewater Tracers in Water Resource Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vu, A. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Esser, B. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-08-20

    The Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is a comprehensive groundwater quality monitoring program managed by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The GAMA Special Studies project provides analyses and interpretation of constituents of concern that allow assessment of current groundwater conditions. In addition, the Special Studies project develops analyses that will enhance the monitoring and assessment effort by focusing on specific constituents of concern and water quality parameters, such as disinfection byproducts (DBP), wastewater indicators, and redox conditions, as it relates to irrigation and groundwater management. This study developed a robust analytical method for the quantitation of CBZ, OXC, CBZ-E, CBZ-DiOH, and CBZ-10-OH in wastewater treatement plant (WWTP) effluent and in groundwater in the parts per trillion range.

  12. Geochemical conditions and the occurrence of selected trace elements in groundwater basins used for public drinking-water supply, Desert and Basin and Range hydrogeologic provinces, 2006-11: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The geochemical conditions, occurrence of selected trace elements, and processes controlling the occurrence of selected trace elements in groundwater were investigated in groundwater basins of the Desert and Basin and Range (DBR) hydrogeologic provinces in southeastern California as part of the Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA PBP is designed to provide an assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the aquifer systems that are used for public drinking-water supply. The GAMA PBP is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  13. Groundwater-quality data in the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit, 2008-2010--Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Wright, Michael T.; Beuttel, Brandon S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 12,103-square-mile Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts (CLUB) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from December 2008 to March 2010, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program's Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CLUB study unit was the twenty-eighth study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA CLUB study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer systems, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated-groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers) are defined as parts of aquifers corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the CLUB study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from the quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the CLUB study unit, groundwater samples were collected from 52 wells in 3 study areas (Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts) in San Bernardino, Riverside, Kern, San Diego, and Imperial Counties. Forty-nine of the wells were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and three wells were selected to aid in evaluation of water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile

  14. Groundwater-quality data for the Madera/Chowchilla–Kings shallow aquifer study unit, 2013–14: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Fram, Miranda S.

    2017-02-03

    Groundwater quality in the 2,390-square-mile Madera/Chowchilla–Kings Shallow Aquifer study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey from August 2013 to April 2014 as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program’s Priority Basin Project. The study was designed to provide a statistically unbiased, spatially distributed assessment of untreated groundwater quality in the shallow aquifer systems of the Madera, Chowchilla, and Kings subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley groundwater basin. The shallow aquifer system corresponds to the part of the aquifer system generally used by domestic wells and is shallower than the part of the aquifer system generally used by public-supply wells. This report presents the data collected for the study and a brief preliminary description of the results.Groundwater samples were collected from 77 wells and were analyzed for organic constituents, inorganic constituents, selected isotopic and age-dating tracers, and microbial indicators. Most of the wells sampled for this study were private domestic wells. Unlike groundwater from public-supply wells, the groundwater from private domestic wells is not regulated for quality in California and is rarely analyzed for water-quality constituents. To provide context for the sampling results, however, concentrations of constituents measured in the untreated groundwater were compared with regulatory and non-regulatory benchmarks established for drinking-water quality by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the State of California, and the U.S. Geological Survey.Of the 319 organic constituents assessed in this study (90 volatile organic compounds and 229 pesticides and pesticide degradates), 17 volatile organic compounds and 23 pesticides and pesticide degradates were detected in groundwater samples; concentrations of all but 2 were less than the respective benchmarks. The fumigants 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP

  15. Groundwater quality in the Western San Joaquin Valley study unit, 2010: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.

    2017-06-09

    Water quality in groundwater resources used for public drinking-water supply in the Western San Joaquin Valley (WSJV) was investigated by the USGS in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) as part of its Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project. The WSJV includes two study areas: the Delta–Mendota and Westside subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley groundwater basin. Study objectives for the WSJV study unit included two assessment types: (1) a status assessment yielding quantitative estimates of the current (2010) status of groundwater quality in the groundwater resources used for public drinking water, and (2) an evaluation of natural and anthropogenic factors that could be affecting the groundwater quality. The assessments characterized the quality of untreated groundwater, not the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water distributors.The status assessment was based on data collected from 43 wells sampled by the U.S. Geological Survey for the GAMA Priority Basin Project (USGS-GAMA) in 2010 and data compiled in the SWRCB Division of Drinking Water (SWRCB-DDW) database for 74 additional public-supply wells sampled for regulatory compliance purposes between 2007 and 2010. To provide context, concentrations of constituents measured in groundwater were compared to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and SWRCB-DDW regulatory and non-regulatory benchmarks for drinking-water quality. The status assessment used a spatially weighted, grid-based method to estimate the proportion of the groundwater resources used for public drinking water that has concentrations for particular constituents or class of constituents approaching or above benchmark concentrations. This method provides statistically unbiased results at the study-area scale within the WSJV study unit, and permits comparison of the two study areas to other areas assessed by the GAMA Priority Basin Project

  16. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, 2004: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 3,900-square-mile (mi2) San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter San Diego) study unit was investigated from May through July 2004 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southwestern California in the counties of San Diego, Riverside, and Orange. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA San Diego study was designed to provide a statistically robust assessment of untreated-groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 58 wells in 2004 and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as the primary aquifers) were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the San Diego study unit. The San Diego study unit consisted of four study areas: Temecula Valley (140 mi2), Warner Valley (34 mi2), Alluvial Basins (166 mi2), and Hard Rock (850 mi2). The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers. For example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination than groundwater in deep water-bearing zones. This study had two components: the status assessment and the understanding assessment. The first component of this study-the status assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource-was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to

  17. Updated study reporting levels (SRLs) for trace-element data collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Priority Basin Project, October 2009-March 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    evaluated for potential contamination bias by using the same approach developed by Olsen and others (2010). Some data collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program for the Southern California Coastal Drainages study unit were included to supplement the GAMA-PBP data. The detection frequency and upper threshold of potential contamination bias (BD-90/90) were determined from field-blank and equipment-blank data for each trace element. The BD-90/90 is the 90th percentile concentration of potential extrinsic contamination calculated by using the binomial probability distribution for greater than 90 percent confidence. Additionally, data from laboratory blanks and blind blanks analyzed by the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) during water years 2010 through 2013, and compiled by the USGS Branch of Quality Systems (BQS), were considered for each trace element. These results were compared to each constituent’s reporting level to determine whether an SRL was necessary to minimize the potential for detections in the groundwater samples, attributed principally to contamination bias. Results of the evaluation were used to set SRLs for trace-element data for about 1,135 samples of groundwater collected by the GAMA-PBP between October 2009 and March 2013. Ten trace elements analyzed (Sb, As, Be, B, Cd, Li, Se, Ag, Tl, and U) had blank results that did not necessitate establishing SRLs during this review or the review by Olsen and others (2010). Five trace elements analyzed (Al, Ba, Cr, Sr, and V) had blank results that necessitated establishing an SRL during the previous review but did not need an SRL starting October 2009. One trace element (Fe) had field and laboratory-blank results that necessitated keeping the previous SRL (6 micrograms per liter [μg/L]). Two trace elements (Ni and W) had quality-control results that warranted decreasing the previous SRL, and five trace elements (Cu, Pb, Mn, Mo, and Zn) had field, laboratory, or blind blank results

  18. Groundwater-quality data in the Tulare Shallow Aquifer Study Unit, 2014-2015: Results from the California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Johnson, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected groundwater samples from 95 domestic wells in Tulare and Kings Counties, California in 2014-2015. The wells were sampled for the Tulare Shallow Aquifer Study Unit of the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project’s assessment of the quality of groundwater resources used for domestic drinking water supply. Domestic wells commonly are screened at shallower depths than are public-supply wells. The Tulare Shallow Aquifer Study Unit includes the Kaweah, Tule, and Tulare Lake subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley groundwater basin and adjacent areas of the Sierra Nevada. The study unit was divided into equal area grid cells and one domestic well was sampled in each cell. Groundwater samples were analyzed for field water-quality parameters, volatile organic compounds, pesticides and pesticide degradates, nutrients, major ions and trace elements, gross alpha and gross beta particle activities, noble gases, tritium, carbon-14 in dissolved inorganic carbon, stable isotopic ratios of water and dissolved nitrate, and microbial indicators.These data support the following publication:Fram, M.S., 2017, Groundwater Quality in the Shallow Aquifers of the Tulare, Kaweah, and Tule Groundwater Basins and Adjacent Highlands areas, Southern San Joaquin Valley, California: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2017–3001, 4 p., http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/fs20173001.

  19. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Klamath Mountains study unit, 2010: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George Luther; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Klamath Mountains (KLAM) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in Del Norte, Humboldt, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, and Trinity Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was designed to provide a spatially unbiased, statistically robust assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer system. The assessment is based on water-quality data and explanatory factors for groundwater samples collected in 2010 by the USGS from 39 sites and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) water-quality database. The primary aquifer system was defined by the depth intervals of the wells listed in the CDPH water-quality database for the KLAM study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. This study included two types of assessments: (1) a status assessment, which characterized the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds, pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements, and (2) an understanding assessment, which evaluated the natural and human factors potentially affecting the groundwater quality. The assessments were intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the KLAM study unit, not the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentrations

  20. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the North San Francisco Bay Shallow Aquifer study unit, 2012; California GAMA Priority Basin Project (ver. 1.1, February 2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George L.

    2017-07-20

    Groundwater quality in the North San Francisco Bay Shallow Aquifer study unit (NSF-SA) was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is in Marin, Mendocino, Napa, Solano, and Sonoma Counties and included two physiographic study areas: the Valleys and Plains area and the surrounding Highlands area. The NSF-SA focused on groundwater resources used for domestic drinking water supply, which generally correspond to shallower parts of aquifer systems than that of groundwater resources used for public drinking water supply in the same area. The assessments characterized the quality of untreated groundwater, not the quality of drinking water.This study included three components: (1) a status assessment, which characterized the status of the quality of the groundwater resources used for domestic supply for 2012; (2) an understanding assessment, which evaluated the natural and human factors potentially affecting water quality in those resources; and (3) a comparison between the groundwater resources used for domestic supply and those used for public supply.The status assessment was based on data collected from 71 sites sampled by the U.S. Geological Survey for the GAMA Priority Basin Project in 2012. To provide context, concentrations of constituents measured in groundwater were compared to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and California State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water regulatory and non-regulatory benchmarks for drinking-water quality. The status assessment used a grid-based method to estimate the proportion of the groundwater resources that has concentrations of water-quality constituents approaching or above benchmark concentrations. This method provides statistically unbiased results at the study-area scale and permits comparisons to other GAMA Priority Basin Project study areas.In the NSF-SA study unit as a whole, inorganic

  1. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Madera, Chowchilla Study Unit, 2008: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Jurgens, Bryant C.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 860-square-mile Madera and Chowchilla Subbasins (Madera-Chowchilla study unit) of the San Joaquin Valley Basin was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in California's Central Valley region in parts of Madera, Merced, and Fresno Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Project was designed to provide statistically robust assessments of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems in California. The primary aquifer system within each study unit is defined by the depth of the perforated or open intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database of wells used for municipal and community drinking-water supply. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifer system; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. The assessments for the Madera-Chowchilla study unit were based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 35 wells during April-May 2008 and water-quality data reported in the CDPH database. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource, and (2) understanding, identification of natural factors and human activities affecting groundwater quality. The primary aquifer system is represented by the grid wells, of which 90 percent (%) had depths that ranged from about 200 to 800 feet (ft) below land surface and had depths to the top of perforations that ranged from about 140 to 400 ft below land surface. Relative-concentrations (sample concentrations divided by benchmark concentrations) were used for

  2. Groundwater-quality data in 12 GAMA study units: Results from the 2006–10 initial sampling period and the 2008–13 trend sampling period, California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.

    2017-03-09

    The Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board. From 2004 through 2012, the GAMA-PBP collected samples and assessed the quality of groundwater resources that supply public drinking water in 35 study units across the State. Selected sites in each study unit were sampled again approximately 3 years after initial sampling as part of an assessment of temporal trends in water quality by the GAMA-PBP. Twelve of the study units, initially sampled during 2006–11 (initial sampling period) and sampled a second time during 2008–13 (trend sampling period) to assess temporal trends, are the subject of this report.The initial sampling was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated groundwater used for public water supplies in the 12 study units. In these study units, 550 sampling sites were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized, grid-based method to provide spatially unbiased representation of the areas assessed (grid sites, also called “status sites”). After the initial sampling period, 76 of the previously sampled status sites (approximately 10 percent in each study unit) were randomly selected for trend sampling (“trend sites”). The 12 study units sampled both during the initial sampling and during the trend sampling period were distributed among 6 hydrogeologic provinces: Coastal (Northern and Southern), Transverse Ranges and Selected Peninsular Ranges, Klamath, Modoc Plateau and Cascades, and Sierra Nevada Hydrogeologic Provinces. For the purposes of this trend report, the six hydrogeologic provinces were grouped into two hydrogeologic regions based on location: Coastal and Mountain.The groundwater samples were analyzed for a number of synthetic organic

  3. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the central-eastside San Joaquin Basin, 2006: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Johnson, Tyler D.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,695-square-mile Central Eastside San Joaquin Basin (Central Eastside) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA Central Eastside study unit was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. During March through June 2006, samples were collected from 78 wells in Stanislaus and Merced Counties, 58 of which were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and 20 of which were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along groundwater-flow paths (understanding wells). Water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database also were used for the assessment.An assessment of the current status of the groundwater quality included collecting samples from wells for analysis of anthropogenic constituents such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring constituents such as major ions and trace elements. The assessment of status is intended to characterize the quality of untreated-groundwater resources within the primary aquifer system, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. The primary aquifer system (hereinafter, primary aquifer) is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the CDPH database for the Central Eastside study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallower or

  4. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Santa Clara River Valley, 2007-California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Carmen A.; Montrella, Joseph; Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 460-square-mile Santa Clara River Valley study unit was investigated from April through June 2007 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Santa Clara River Valley study unit contains eight groundwater basins located in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties and is within the Transverse and Selected Peninsular Ranges hydrogeologic province. The Santa Clara River Valley study unit was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer system. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2007 by the USGS from 42 wells on a spatially distributed grid, and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer system was defined as that part of the aquifer system corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the CDPH database for the Santa Clara River Valley study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may differ from that in shallow or deep water-bearing zones; for example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. Eleven additional wells were sampled by the USGS to improve understanding of factors affecting water quality.The status assessment of the quality of the groundwater used data from samples analyzed for anthropogenic constituents, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of untreated groundwater resources in the primary aquifers of the Santa Clara River Valley study unit

  5. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau study unit, 2010: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.; Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau study unit was investigated as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project. The study was designed to provide a statistically unbiased assessment of untreated groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system. The depth of the primary aquifer system for the Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau study unit was delineated by the depths of the screened or open intervals of wells in the State of California’s database of public-supply wells. Two types of assessments were made: a status assessment that described the current quality of the groundwater resource, and an understanding assessment that made evaluations of relations between groundwater quality and potential explanatory factors representing characteristics of the primary aquifer system. The assessments characterize the quality of untreated groundwater, not the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water distributors.

  6. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the North San Francisco Bay Shallow Aquifer study unit, 2012; California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George L.

    2017-07-20

    Groundwater quality in the North San Francisco Bay Shallow Aquifer study unit (NSF-SA) was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is in Marin, Mendocino, Napa, Solano, and Sonoma Counties and included two physiographic study areas: the Valleys and Plains area and the surrounding Highlands area. The NSF-SA focused on groundwater resources used for domestic drinking water supply, which generally correspond to shallower parts of aquifer systems than that of groundwater resources used for public drinking water supply in the same area. The assessments characterized the quality of untreated groundwater, not the quality of drinking water.This study included three components: (1) a status assessment, which characterized the status of the quality of the groundwater resources used for domestic supply for 2012; (2) an understanding assessment, which evaluated the natural and human factors potentially affecting water quality in those resources; and (3) a comparison between the groundwater resources used for domestic supply and those used for public supply.The status assessment was based on data collected from 71 sites sampled by the U.S. Geological Survey for the GAMA Priority Basin Project in 2012. To provide context, concentrations of constituents measured in groundwater were compared to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and California State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water regulatory and non-regulatory benchmarks for drinking-water quality. The status assessment used a grid-based method to estimate the proportion of the groundwater resources that has concentrations of water-quality constituents approaching or above benchmark concentrations. This method provides statistically unbiased results at the study-area scale and permits comparisons to other GAMA Priority Basin Project study areas.In the NSF-SA study unit as a whole, inorganic

  7. California GAMA Special Study. Development of a Capability for the Analysis of Krypton-85 in Groundwater Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Ate [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bibby, Richard K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, Jean E. [California State Univ. (CalState), Long Beach, CA (United States); Singleton, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Esser, Bradley K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A capability for the analysis of krypton-85 (85Kr) in groundwater samples was developed at LLNL. Samples are collected by extracting gas from 2000-4000 L of groundwater at the well, yielding approximately 0.2 cm3 STP krypton. Sample collection takes 1 to 4 hours. Krypton is purified in the laboratory using a combination of molecular sieve and activated charcoal traps, and transferred to a liquid scintillation vial. The 85Kr activity is measured by liquid scintillation on a Quantulus 1220 liquid scintillation counter from PerkinElmer. The detection limit for a typical 0.2 cm3Kr sample size is 11% of the present day activity in air, corresponding to the decay corrected activity in air in 1987. The typical measurement uncertainty is below 10% for recently recharged samples. Six groundwater samples were collected, purified and counted. 85Kr was not detected in any of the samples counted at LLNL. 85Kr was detected by the low level counting laboratory of Bern University in all samples between 1.5 and 6.6 decays per minute per cm3 krypton, corresponding to decay corrected activities in air between 1971 and 1985. The new capability is an excellent complement to tritium-helium, expanding the existing suite of age dating tools available to the GAMA program (35S, 3H/3He, 14C and radiogenic helium). 85Kr can replace 3H/3He in settings where 3H/3He ages are impossible to determine (for example where terrigenic helium overwhelms tritiogenic helium) and provides additional insight into travel time distributions in complex mixed groundwater systems.

  8. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the South Coast Range-Coastal study unit, 2008: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Carmen A.; Land, Michael; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the South Coast Range–Coastal (SCRC) study unit was investigated from May through November 2008 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in the Southern Coast Range hydrologic province and includes parts of Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was designed to provide a statistically unbiased, spatially distributed assessment of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer system. The primary aquifer system is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the SCRC study unit. The assessments for the SCRC study unit were based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2008 by the USGS from 55 wells on a spatially distributed grid, and water-quality data from the CDPH database. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource, and (2) understanding, identification of the natural and human factors affecting groundwater quality. Water-quality and ancillary data were collected from an additional 15 wells for the understanding assessment. The assessments characterize untreated groundwater quality, not the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. The first component of this study, the status assessment of groundwater quality, used data from samples analyzed for anthropogenic constituents such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring inorganic constituents such as major ions and trace elements. Although the status assessment applies to untreated

  9. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the two southern San Joaquin Valley study units, 2005-2006 - California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Carmen A.; Shelton, Jennifer L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the southern San Joaquin Valley was investigated from October 2005 through March 2006 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. There are two study units located in the southern San Joaquin Valley: the Southeast San Joaquin Valley (SESJ) study unit and the Kern County Subbasin (KERN) study unit. The GAMA Priority Basin Project in the SESJ and KERN study units was designed to provide a statistically unbiased, spatially distributed assessment of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifers. The status assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2005 and 2006 by the USGS from 130 wells on a spatially distributed grid, and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. Data was collected from an additional 19 wells for the understanding assessment. The aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers) were defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the CDPH database for the SESJ and KERN study units. The status assessment of groundwater quality used data from samples analyzed for anthropogenic constituents such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring inorganic constituents such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of untreated groundwater resources within the primary aquifers in the SESJ and KERN study units, not the quality of drinking water delivered to consumers. Although the status assessment applies to untreated groundwater, Federal and California regulatory and non-regulatory water-quality benchmarks that apply to drinking water are used

  10. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Bear Valley and Lake Arrowhead Watershed Study Unit, 2010: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy; Burton, Carmen

    2017-06-20

    Groundwater quality in the 112-square-mile Bear Valley and Lake Arrowhead Watershed (BEAR) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit comprises two study areas (Bear Valley and Lake Arrowhead Watershed) in southern California in San Bernardino County. The GAMA-PBP is conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.The GAMA BEAR study was designed to provide a spatially balanced, robust assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater from the primary aquifer systems in the two study areas of the BEAR study unit. The assessment is based on water-quality collected by the USGS from 38 sites (27 grid and 11 understanding) during 2010 and on water-quality data from the SWRCB-Division of Drinking Water (DDW) database. The primary aquifer system is defined by springs and the perforation intervals of wells listed in the SWRCB-DDW water-quality database for the BEAR study unit.This study included two types of assessments: (1) a status assessment, which characterized the status of the quality of the groundwater resource as of 2010 by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds, pesticides, and naturally present inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements, and (2) an understanding assessment, which evaluated the natural and human factors potentially affecting the groundwater quality. The assessments were intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the BEAR study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers. Bear Valley study area and the Lake Arrowhead Watershed study area were also compared statistically on the basis of water-quality results and factors potentially affecting the groundwater quality.Relative concentrations (RCs

  11. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units, 2006-2007--California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The three study units are located in the Sierra Nevada region of California in parts of Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, Madera, Tulare, and Kern Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board, in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The project was designed to provide statistically robust assessments of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems used for drinking water. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) for each study unit are defined by the depth of the screened or open intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database of wells used for municipal and community drinking-water supply. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. The assessments for the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units were based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 132 wells in the three study units during 2006 and 2007 and water-quality data reported in the CDPH database. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource, and (2) understanding, identification of the natural and human factors affecting groundwater quality. The assessments characterize untreated groundwater quality, not the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentrations divided by benchmark concentrations) were used for evaluating groundwater quality for those

  12. Groundwater quality in the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Sierra Nevada Regional study unit constitutes one of the study units being evaluated.

  13. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Sierra Nevada Regional study unit, 2008: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Sierra Nevada Regional (SNR) study unit was investigated as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program Priority Basin Project. The study was designed to provide statistically unbiased assessments of the quality of untreated groundwater within the primary aquifer system of the Sierra Nevada. The primary aquifer system for the SNR study unit was delineated by the depth intervals over which wells in the State of California’s database of public drinking-water supply wells are open or screened. Two types of assessments were made: (1) a status assessment that described the current quality of the groundwater resource, and (2) an evaluation of relations between groundwater quality and potential explanatory factors that represent characteristics of the primary aquifer system. The assessments characterize untreated groundwater quality, rather than the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water distributors.

  14. Groundwater quality in the Bear Valley and Lake Arrowhead Watershed, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy; Burton, Carmen; Fram, Miranda S.

    2017-06-20

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Bear Valley and Lake Arrowhead Watershed study areas in southern California compose one of the study units being evaluated.

  15. Groundwater quality in the western San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.

    2017-06-09

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Western San Joaquin Valley is one of the study units being evaluated. 

  16. Status of groundwater quality in the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit, 2008-2010: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Mary C.; Hancock, Tracy Connell; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 963-square-mile Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southern California in San Bernardino, Riverside, San Diego, and Imperial Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer system. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 52 wells (49 grid wells and 3 understanding wells) and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health database. The primary aquifer system was defined by the depth intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database for the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. This study assesses the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit, not the

  17. Groundwater quality in the North San Francisco Bay shallow aquifer, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.

    2018-02-23

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The North San Francisco Bay Shallow Aquifer constitutes one of the study units being evaluated.

  18. A Comparative Study of Leadership Preparation Programs in Gama (Brazil) and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges-Gatewood, Mara Rubia Fonseca; McNeal, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the relationship, if any, between leadership preparation programs types and how well school administrators are prepared to set a widely shared vision, develop a school culture, effectively manage school operations and resources, collaborate with faculty and community members, act with integrity and…

  19. Bursts de raios gama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, J.

    2003-02-01

    Nos últimos anos, graças principalmente aos dados obtidos pelo Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory e pelo satélite ítalo-holandês BeppoSAX, grandes avanços foram obtidos no nosso conhecimento sobre os fascinantes e enigmáticos fenômenos conhecidos por "bursts"de raios gama. Neste trabalho é feita uma revisão sobre a fenomenologia desses misteriosos objetos e são apresentados os desenvolvimentos recentes nessa área palpitante da astrofísica moderna, ressaltando tanto os resultados observacionais obtidos até o momento quanto os modelos teóricos propostos para explixá-los.

  20. Evaluation of volatile organic compound (VOC) blank data and application of study reporting levels to groundwater data collected for the California GAMA Priority Basin Project, May 2004 through September 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were analyzed in quality-control samples collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project. From May 2004 through September 2010, a total of 2,026 groundwater samples, 211 field blanks, and 109 source-solution blanks were collected and analyzed for concentrations of 85 VOCs. Results from analyses of these field and source-solution blanks and of 2,411 laboratory instrument blanks during the same time period were used to assess the quality of data for the 2,026 groundwater samples. Eighteen VOCs were detected in field blanks or source-solution blanks: acetone, benzene, bromodichloromethane, 2-butanone, carbon disulfide, chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethene, dichloromethane, ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethene, styrene, tetrahydrofuran, toluene, trichloroethene, trichlorofluoromethane, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m- and p-xylenes, and o-xylene. The objective of the evaluation of the VOC-blank data was to determine if study reporting levels (SRLs) were needed for any of the VOCs detected in blanks to ensure the quality of the data from groundwater samples. An SRL is equivalent to a raised reporting level that is used in place of the reporting level used by the analyzing laboratory [long‑term method detection level (LT-MDL) or laboratory reporting level (LRL)] to reduce the probability of reporting false-positive detections. Evaluation of VOC-blank data was done in three stages: (1) identification of a set of representative quality‑control field blanks (QCFBs) to be used for calculation of SRLs and identification of VOCs amenable to the SRL approach, (2) evaluation of potential sources of contamination to blanks and groundwater samples by VOCs detected in field blanks, and (3) selection of appropriate SRLs from among four potential SRLs for VOCs detected in field blanks and application of those SRLs to the groundwater data. An important conclusion from this study is that to ensure the

  1. Groundwater quality in the Yuba River and Bear River Watersheds, Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.; Jasper, Monica; Taylor, Kimberly A.

    2017-09-27

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Program’s Priority Basin Project assesses the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking water supply and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. In the Yuba River and Bear River Watersheds of the Sierra Nevada, many rural households rely on private wells for their drinking water supplies. 

  2. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2010-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2013-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2014-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

  6. Microcomputer Use in Learning Disabilities Programs at California Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, Gilbert

    A study was conducted to gather information about the use of microcomputers within the learning disabilities (LD) programs in California community colleges. Surveys were sent to all 106 two-year colleges in the state, requesting information on the number of students enrolled in LD programs, the kind and number of computers used in the LD programs,…

  7. Research to Support California Greenhouse Gas Reduction Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croes, B. E.; Charrier-Klobas, J. G.; Chen, Y.; Duren, R. M.; Falk, M.; Franco, G.; Gallagher, G.; Huang, A.; Kuwayama, T.; Motallebi, N.; Vijayan, A.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    Since the passage of the California Global Warming Solutions Act in 2006, California state agencies have developed comprehensive programs to reduce both long-lived and short-lived climate pollutants. California is already close to achieving its goal of reducing greenhouse (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, about a 30% reduction from business as usual. In addition, California has developed strategies to reduce GHG emissions another 40% by 2030, which will put the State on a path to meeting its 2050 goal of an 80% reduction. To support these emission reduction goals, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the California Energy Commission have partnered with NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) program on a comprehensive research program to identify and quantify the various GHG emission source sectors in the state. These include California-specific emission studies and inventories for carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission sources; a Statewide GHG Monitoring Network for these pollutants integrated with the Los Angeles Megacities Carbon Project funded by several federal agencies; efforts to verify emission inventories using inversion modeling and other techniques; mobile measurement platforms and flux chambers to measure local and source-specific emissions; and a large-scale statewide methane survey using a tiered monitoring and measurement program, which will include satellite, airborne, and ground-level measurements of the various regions and source sectors in the State. In addition, there are parallel activities focused on black carbon (BC) and fluorinated gases (F-gases) by CARB. This presentation will provide an overview of results from inventory, monitoring, data analysis, and other research efforts on Statewide, regional, and local sources of GHG emissions in California.

  8. Groundwater quality in the shallow aquifers of the Madera–Chowchilla and Kings subbasins, San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.; Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2018-01-08

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Program’s Priority Basin Project assesses the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking-water supply and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Many households and small communities in the Madera– Chowchilla and Kings subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley rely on private domestic wells for their drinking-water supplies.

  9. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 2. Confirmation, Edwards AFB, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    to divert groundwater movement. IRP. Installation Restoration Program kg. Kilogram Lenticular. Having the shape of a lentil or double convex lense...California. Supervisor, Chemistry- Nutrition Laboratory. Responsible for operation of nutrient analysis facility for major food processing company. Developed...areas. Conducted lab- * oratory investigation of leachate composition and analysis of treatment techniques for application to leachates generated

  10. Tribal Energy Program for California Indian Tribes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-10

    A strategic plan is needed to catalyze clean energy in the more than 100 California Indian tribal communities with varying needs and energy resources. We propose to conduct a scoping study to identify tribal lands with clean energy potential, as well as communities with lack of grid-tied energy and communications access. The research focus would evaluate the energy mixture and alternatives available to these tribal communities, and evaluate greenhouse gas emissions associated with accessing fossil fuel used for heat and power. Understanding the baseline of energy consumption and emissions of communities is needed to evaluate improvements and advances from technology. Based on this study, we will develop a strategic plan that assesses solutions to address high energy fuel costs due to lack of electricity access and inform actions to improve economic opportunities for tribes. This could include technical support for tribes to access clean energy technologies and supporting collaboration for on-site demonstrations.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Monitoring Program annual report for 2011.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2011-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/California Environmental Monitoring Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/California Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2010 program report describes the activities undertaken during the previous year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/California.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2012-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

  13. Evaluation of the SB 1041 Reforms to California's CalWORKs Program: Background and Study Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoly, Lynn A.; Bozick, Robert; Davis, Lois M.; Kitmitto, Sami; Turk-Bicakci, Lori; Bos, Johannes M.; Holod, Aleksandra; Blankenship, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The California Budget Act of 2012, through a trailer bill known as Senate Bill (SB) 1041, contained significant reforms to the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program. CalWORKs is California's Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, a central component of the safety net that provides cash aid for…

  14. Determinants of children's participation in California's Medicaid and SCHIP programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincheloe, Jennifer; Frates, Janice; Brown, E Richard

    2007-04-01

    To develop a comprehensive predictive model of eligible children's enrollment in California's Medicaid (Medi-Cal [MC]) and State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP; Healthy Families [HF]) programs. 2001 California Health Interview Survey data, data on outstationed eligibility workers (OEWs), and administrative data from state agencies and local health insurance expansion programs for fiscal year 2000-2001. The study examined the effects of multiple family-level factors and contextual county-level factors on children's enrollment in Medicaid and SCHIP. Simple logistical regression analyses were conducted with sampling weights. Hierarchical logistic regressions were run to control for clustering. Participation in MC and HF programs is determined by a combination of family-level predisposing, perceived need, and enabling/disabling factors, and county-level enabling/disabling factors. The strongest predictors of MC enrollment were family-level immigration status, ethnicity, and income, and the presence of a county-level "expansion program"; and the county-level ratio of OEWs to eligible children. Important HF enrollment predictors included family-level ethnicity, age, number of hours a parent worked, and urban residence; and county-level population size and outreach and media expenditure. MC and HF outreach/enrollment efforts should target poorer and immigrant families (especially Latinos), older children, and children living in larger and urban counties. To reach uninsured eligible children, it is important to further simplify the application process and fund selected outreach efforts. Local health insurance expansion programs increase children's enrollment in MC.

  15. California Seafloor Mapping Program video and photograph portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Nadine E.; Cochrane, Guy R.

    2013-01-01

    This portal provides access to marine spatial data for the state of California. These data have been generated and compiled by the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), which has the goal of developing a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The approach of the CSMP is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of seafloor video, seafloor photography, swath sonar bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, high-resolution seismic-reflection profile, and bottom-sediment sampling data. This interactive map displays all CSMP video and imagery and published CSMP GIS spatial data layers. The data layers display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System Program Manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy Management and Fleet Services Environmental programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has several groups operating at Sandia

  17. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System Program Manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2011-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy Management and Fleet Services programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has several groups operating at Sandia National Laboratories

  18. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2012-03-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site first received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006 and recertification in 2009. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy and Water Resource Management and Fleet Services programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has

  19. Report of Study on Vocational Programs in Selected California Correctional Institutions for Male Felons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Ralph; And Others

    This study represents the combined efforts of three separate institutions (California Department of Education, the California Department of Corrections, and the California Advisory Council for Vocational Education and Technical Training) to obtain data for more responsible program planning. Research strategy was developed to elicit facilitating or…

  20. Accessibility benchmarks: interpretive programs and services in north central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura J. McLachlin; Emilyn A. Sheffield; Donald A. Penland; Charles W. Nelson

    1995-01-01

    The Heritage Corridors Project was a unique partnership between the California Department of Parks and Recreation, the California State University, and the Across California Conservancy. The purpose of the project was to develop a map of selected northern California outdoor recreation and heritage sites. Data about facility accessibility improvements (restrooms, clear...

  1. California state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-09

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of California. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  2. Desenvolvimento de sonda gama para cirurgia radioguiada

    OpenAIRE

    José Oliveira da Silva, Iran

    2008-01-01

    O uso de técnicas de cirurgia radioguiada tem crescido e tem se mostrado muito eficiente para as cirurgias de câncer. O procedimento inicia-se antes da cirurgia com a administração ao paciente de um radiotraçador, geralmente emissor gama, que tem grande afinidade pelas células tumorais. Durante a cirurgia, uma sonda detectora de radiação gama é usada para identificar as regiões em que houve maior concentração do material radioativo e, portanto, os locais de células tumorais. ...

  3. Distributing Earthquakes Among California's Faults: A Binary Integer Programming Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, E. L.; Parsons, T.

    2016-12-01

    Statement of the problem is simple: given regional seismicity specified by a Gutenber-Richter (G-R) relation, how are earthquakes distributed to match observed fault-slip rates? The objective is to determine the magnitude-frequency relation on individual faults. The California statewide G-R b-value and a-value are estimated from historical seismicity, with the a-value accounting for off-fault seismicity. UCERF3 consensus slip rates are used, based on geologic and geodetic data and include estimates of coupling coefficients. The binary integer programming (BIP) problem is set up such that each earthquake from a synthetic catalog spanning millennia can occur at any location along any fault. The decision vector, therefore, consists of binary variables, with values equal to one indicating the location of each earthquake that results in an optimal match of slip rates, in an L1-norm sense. Rupture area and slip associated with each earthquake are determined from a magnitude-area scaling relation. Uncertainty bounds on the UCERF3 slip rates provide explicit minimum and maximum constraints to the BIP model, with the former more important to feasibility of the problem. There is a maximum magnitude limit associated with each fault, based on fault length, providing an implicit constraint. Solution of integer programming problems with a large number of variables (>105 in this study) has been possible only since the late 1990s. In addition to the classic branch-and-bound technique used for these problems, several other algorithms have been recently developed, including pre-solving, sifting, cutting planes, heuristics, and parallelization. An optimal solution is obtained using a state-of-the-art BIP solver for M≥6 earthquakes and California's faults with slip-rates > 1 mm/yr. Preliminary results indicate a surprising diversity of on-fault magnitude-frequency relations throughout the state.

  4. California Energy Incentive Programs: An Annual Update on Key Energy Issues and Financial Opportunities for Federal Sites in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-12-01

    A spate of recently enacted energy legislation and associated program changes is providing numerous opportunities to help California federal energy managers cut costs and meet their renewables, energy efficiency and GHG emissions goals. In April 2011, Governor Jerry Brown approved the nation’s most ambitious renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which requires 33% of the state’s electricity to come from renewable energy sources by 2020. Policy changes that will support the RPS include expanded eligibility rules that fill previous gaps in incentives for certain sizes of on-site renewable energy systems. Program updates described in this document include: $200 million more in funding for California Solar Initiative rebates to commercial and industrial customers; an increase in the eligible system size for the Feed-In-Tariff (FIT) from 1.5MW to 3MW; and pending changes that may allow customer-side systems to sell tradable renewable energy credits (TRECs) to entities with RPS compliance obligations in California.

  5. Building the evaluation capacity of California's local tobacco control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiber, Jeanette; Cassady, Diana; Kipke, Robin; Kwon, Nicole; Satterlund, Travis

    2011-11-01

    Successful evaluation capacity building requires a dynamic balance between responding to local agency needs and ensuring that local staff have appropriate skills to conduct rigorous evaluations. In 2004, the California Tobacco Control Program established the Tobacco Control Evaluation Center (TCEC), based at a public research university, to provide evaluation technical assistance to approximately 100 local agencies implementing tobacco control programs. TCEC has been responsive to local needs, for instance, by answering 512 technical assistance requests in the first 5 years of operation and by tailoring training according to needs assessment results. About 50% of the technical assistance requests were for new data collection instruments (n = 255). TCEC has sought proactively to improve local evaluation skills, most recently in a data analysis and report writing skill building campaign that included a webinar, newsletter, and seven regional training meetings. Preliminary analysis suggests a 20% improvement in scores for the local final evaluation reports as a result of this campaign. It is concluded that evaluation technical assistance can be provided effectively by a university as long as the local context is kept in mind, and a balance of responsive and proactive technical assistance is provided.

  6. Climate Science Program at California State University, Northridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele Cox, H.; Klein, D.; Cadavid, A. C.; Foley, B.

    2012-12-01

    Due to its interdisciplinary nature, climate science poses wide-ranging challenges for science and mathematics students seeking careers in this field. There is a compelling need for universities to provide coherent programs in climate science in order to train future climate scientists. With funding from NASA Innovations in Climate Education (NICE), California State University, Northridge (CSUN), is creating the CSUN Climate Science Program. An interdisciplinary team of faculty members is working in collaboration with UCLA, Santa Monica College and NASA/JPL partners to create a new curriculum in climate science. The resulting sequence of climate science courses, or Pathway for studying the Mathematics of Climate Change (PMCC), is integrated into a Bachelor of Science degree program in the Applied Mathematical Sciences offered by the Mathematics Department at CSUN. The PMCC consists of courses offered by the departments of Mathematics, Physics, and Geography and is designed to prepare students for Ph.D. programs in technical fields relevant to global climate change and related careers. The students who choose to follow this program will be guided to enroll in the following sequence of courses for their 12 units of upper division electives: 1) A newly created course junior level course, Math 396CL, in applied mathematics which will introduce students to applications of vector calculus and differential equations to the study of thermodynamics and atmospheric dynamics. 2) An already existing course, Math 483, with new content on mathematical modeling specialized for this program; 3) An improved version of Phys 595CL on the mathematics and physics of climate change with emphasis on Radiative Transfer; 4) A choice of Geog 407 on Remote Sensing or Geog 416 on Climate Change with updated content to train the students in the analysis of satellite data obtained with the NASA Earth Observing System and instruction in the analysis of data obtained within a Geographical

  7. District Paid Insurance Programs in California School Districts 1977-78.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California School Boards Association, Sacramento.

    This publication presents 1977-78 data on employee insurance programs provided by 1,078 California school districts and county offices of education that responded to a statewide survey conducted by the California State Department of Education. Individual school districts are listed alphabetically within categories according to the type of district…

  8. Institutional Reports on Pacific Rim Programs. Submissions by the California Community Colleges, the California State University, and the University of California in Response to Assembly Concurrent Resolution 82 (1986). Commission Report 87-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    Reports from the California State University, the University of California, and the California community colleges consider their roles in the Pacific Rim region. The Pacific Rim includes all lands with at least a portion of their coastlines fronting on the Pacific Ocean. Of concern are: the need for changes in program offerings and exchange…

  9. 76 FR 62303 - California: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... and Mineral Processing Wastes; (7) Hazardous Soils Treatment Standards and Exclusions; (8... Compliance Date for Characteristic Slags; (11) Treatment Standards for Spent Potliners from Primary Aluminum... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 California: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories California Waste Management Program Annual Report April 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2011-04-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories California Waste Management Program Annual Report February 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2008-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  13. Luiz Gama: um abolicionista leitor de Renan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Fonseca Ferreira

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O hisoriador e filósofo Ernest Renan exerceu grande influência, hoje um tanto esquecida, sobre uma boa parte da elite intelectual brasileira engajada em reformas e movimentos que caracterizam a transição da Monarquia para a República. Dentre eles, destaca-se o abolicionista Luiz Gama, caso único de um ex-escravo autodidata que alcança projeção no cenário político e na República das Letras. Leitor precoce de Vida de Jesus, obra seminal do pensador francês, o advogado dos escravos é um dos primeiros a referir-se à obra que contou com inédita tradução brasileira, pouco depois de sua publicação na França. Por fim, observamos a apropriação das idéias renanianas por parte de personalidades diversas do ponto de vista social e racial, estabelecendo um paralelo entre Luiz Gama e Joaquim Nabuco.Historian and philosopher Ernest Renan exerts great influence - today somewhat forgotten - on a large part of the Brazilian intellectual elite that is engaged in reforms and movements which characterize the transition of a Monarchy to a Republic. Among these, abolitionist Luiz Gama stands out as the sole case of a former autodidact slave, who achieves a projection in the political scenario, and in the Republic of Letters. An early reader of Vida de Jesus, a seminal work of the French philosopher, the slaves’ attorney is one of the first to refer to the work, which counted with a first-hand, unprecedented Brazilian translation, shortly after its publication in France. Finally, we shall see the appropriation of Renanian ideas on the part of various personalities from the social and racial point of view, while establishing a parallel between Luiz Gama and Joaquim Nabuco.

  14. 75 FR 60398 - California: Proposed Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 California: Proposed Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... application for authorization for changes to its hazardous waste management program by November 1, 2010... waste management program. EPA continues to have independent enforcement authority under RCRA sections...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System rogram Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  16. The California Seafloor and Coastal Mapping Program – Providing science and geospatial data for California's State Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine; Dartnell, Peter; Hartwell, Stephen; Cochran, Susan; Watt, Janet

    2017-01-01

    The California Seafloor and Coastal Mapping Program (CSCMP) is a collaborative effort to develop comprehensive bathymetric, geologic, and habitat maps and data for California's State Waters. CSCMP began in 2007 when the California Ocean Protection Council (OPC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) allocated funding for high-resolution bathymetric mapping, largely to support the California Marine Life Protection Act and to update nautical charts. Collaboration and support from the U.S. Geological Survey and other partners has led to development and dissemination of one of the world's largest seafloor-mapping datasets. CSCMP provides essential science and data for ocean and coastal management, stimulates and enables research, and raises public education and awareness of coastal and ocean issues. Specific applications include:•Delineation and designation of marine protected areas•Characterization and modeling of benthic habitats and ecosystems•Updating nautical charts•Earthquake hazard assessments•Tsunami hazard assessments•Planning offshore infrastructure•Providing baselines for monitoring change•Input to models of sediment transport, coastal erosion, and coastal flooding•Regional sediment management•Understanding coastal aquifers•Providing geospatial data for emergency response

  17. Tobacco Use in California: An Evaluation of the Tobacco Control Program, 1989-1993. A Report to the California Department of Health Services

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, JP; Evans, N.; Farkas, AJ; Cavin, SW; Berry, C.; Kramer, M.; Kealey, S.; Rosenbrook, B; W. Choi; Kaplan, RM; University of California, San Diego; Cancer Prevention and Control Program

    1994-01-01

    TOBACCO USE IN CALIFORNIA DETAILED FINDINGS SUMMARIZED BY CHAPTER Chapter 4. ASSESSING PROGRESS TOWARD PROGRAM GOALS 1. Between 1990 and 1993, the proportion of California children and nonsmoking workers who were protected from ETS exposure increased substantially. 2. Cigarette consumption in California declined by an estimated 13.7% following the passage of Proposition 99 and the mandated increase in excise tax on cigarette products. This accelerated decline in consumption lasted approximate...

  18. Profile of the chemicals industry in California: Californiaindustries of the future program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) established the Industries of the Future (IOF) program to increase energy efficiency, reduce waste production and to improve competitiveness, currently focusing on nine sectors. The IOF is a partnership strategy involving industry, the research community and the government, working together to identify technology needs, promote industrial partnerships and implement joint measures with all partners involved. The State Industries of the Future (SIOF) program delivers the accomplishments of the national Industries of the Future strategy to the local level, to expand the technology opportunities to a larger number of partners and reach smaller businesses and manufacturers that were not initially involved in the IOF effort. The state programs bring together industry, academia, and state agencies to address the important issues confronting industry in the state. These public-private coalitions facilitate industry solutions locally and enhance economic development. California has started a State Industries of the Future effort, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy. The California Energy Commission (CEC) is leading the SIOF program in California, as part of many other programs to improve the energy efficiency and performance of industries in California. The California State IOF program aims to build a network of participants from industry, academia and government in four selected industrial sectors as a basis for the development of a strategic partnership for industrial energy efficient technology in the state. In California the IOF effort focuses petroleum refining, chemical processing, food processing and electronics. As part of this effort, the SIOF program will develop roadmaps for technology development for the selected sectors. On the basis of the roadmap, the program will develop successful projects with co-funding from state and federal government, and promote industry

  19. Effect of the California tobacco control program on personal health care expenditures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Lightwood

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Large state tobacco control programs have been shown to reduce smoking and would be expected to affect health care costs. We investigate the effect of California's large-scale tobacco control program on aggregate personal health care expenditures in the state.Cointegrating regressions were used to predict (1 the difference in per capita cigarette consumption between California and 38 control states as a function of the difference in cumulative expenditures of the California and control state tobacco control programs, and (2 the relationship between the difference in cigarette consumption and the difference in per capita personal health expenditures between the control states and California between 1980 and 2004. Between 1989 (when it started and 2004, the California program was associated with $86 billion (2004 US dollars (95% confidence interval [CI] $28 billion to $151 billion lower health care expenditures than would have been expected without the program. This reduction grew over time, reaching 7.3% (95% CI 2.7%-12.1% of total health care expenditures in 2004.A strong tobacco control program is not only associated with reduced smoking, but also with reductions in health care expenditures.

  20. Evaluation of the MIND Research Institute's Spatial-Temporal Math (ST Math) Program in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Staci; Rice, John; Nakamoto, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The MIND Research Institute contracted with the Evaluation Research Program at WestEd to conduct an independent assessment of mathematics outcomes in elementary school grades across California that were provided with the ST Math program. Spatial-Temporal (ST) Math is a game-based instructional software designed to boost K-5 and secondary-level…

  1. Multiple-Methods Needs Assessment of California 4-H Science Education Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worker, Steven M.; Schmitt-McQuitty, Lynn; Ambrose, Andrea; Brian, Kelley; Schoenfelder, Emily; Smith, Martin H.

    2017-01-01

    The California 4-H Science Leadership Team conducted a statewide assessment to evaluate the needs of county-based 4-H programs related to the key areas of the 4-H Science Initiative: program development and design, professional development, curricula, evaluation, partnerships, and fund development. The use of multiple qualitative data sources…

  2. Peer Assessment and Compliance Review (PACR) Innovative Strategies Report. California Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macro, Bronwen; Huang, Lee Ann

    2005-01-01

    This report focuses on the innovative strategies study component of the Peer Assessment and Compliance Review (PACR) project. California (Court Appointed Special Advocates) CASA programs have developed many innovative strategies to serve children in their communities. At each of the programs visited during the PACR project, the team identified at…

  3. Alimentos industrializados congelados gama III y IV

    OpenAIRE

    Tupone Reverter, Paula

    2012-01-01

    El presente estudio tiene como objetivo, indagar sobre el consumo, el grado de información y contenido de sodio, grasas saturadas y colesterol de los principales alimentos congelados Gama III y V consumidos por los encuestados. A partir de esto, se realiza una encuesta de frecuencia de consumo y preguntas varias a 250 personas de entre 30 a 60 años, que concurren a cuatro supermercados de la ciudad de Mar del Plata, para determinar el conocimiento por parte de los encuestados e...

  4. California Public Hospitals Improved Quality of Care Under Medicaid Waiver Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nederah

    2017-06-01

    California has 12 county-owned and operated hospital systems and 5 University of California hospitals designated as public hospitals. These organizations deliver the majority of inpatient care and a significant amount of outpatient care to Medicaid patients in the state. In 2010, California was the first state in the nation to implement a five-year Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) program under the Section §1115 Medicaid "Bridge to Reform" waiver to improve the capacity of these hospitals to deliver high quality and more efficient care. The California DSRIP was the first program in a continuing national initiative to reform the Medicaid delivery system while remaining budget neutral. An extensive evaluation revealed major advances in infrastructure development, delivery of health care, and patient outcomes during the program. The results highlight the importance of joint federal and state investments in bolstering the capacity of safety net providers to deliver high-quality care, and they emphasize the need for continued investment in the safety net. The California DSRIP was followed by a program called Public Hospital Redesign and Incentives in Medi-Cal (PRIME), which incentivizes improvements in expanded and new areas of care not addressed by DSRIP

  5. Prevalence and types of disease management programs in community pharmacies in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Anandi V; Okamoto, Mark P; Chang, Peter S

    2005-01-01

    To (1) evaluate the prevalence and types of disease management (DM) programs provided by independent and chain community pharmacies in the state of California, (2) examine the interest among community pharmacists in establishing programs, and (3) assess perceived barriers to developing a successful DM program in community pharmacy. An exploratory telephone survey was conducted from February 2003 to February 2004 to collect data from community (primarily independent and chainstore) pharmacies across California. The survey evaluated existence (or lack of) and types of DM programs in community pharmacies in California. Pharmacies that did not have a DM program were queried on their interest and decisionmaking authority in establishing new programs. Pharmacies that had existing DM programs were sent a follow-up survey to determine the details of the DM programs, including challenges in establishing DM programs, reimbursement issues, and program effectiveness. The sample comprised 1,875 pharmacies, 60 (3.2%) of which had existing DM programs. There were significantly more independent pharmacies (37) with DM programs than chain-store pharmacies (23), Ptype of DM program was diabetes, and the second most common type was asthma. Limited time, limited staff, and limited reimbursement were the 3 most commonly reported barriers to establishing new DM programs. About 20% of the sample that did not have a DM program reported interest in developing DM programs, and an equal percentage reported having the decision-making authority to start a program. There were no differences between independent and chain pharmacies on interest (P = 0.234); however, there were significantly more chain pharmacists that did not have the decision-making authority. Of the 18 of 60 pharmacies (30%) that had DM programs and responded to the follow-up survey, 9 respondents (50%) reported monitoring medications as part of their DM program. Fifteen of 18 (83%) perceived lack of reimbursement as a

  6. Sandia National Laboratories California Pollution Prevention Program Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Janet S.; Farren, Laurie J.

    2007-04-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Pollution Prevention Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Pollution Prevention Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2007-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2006 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories, California Pollution Prevention Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Janet S.; Farren, Laurie J.

    2010-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Pollution Prevention Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Pollution Prevention Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories, California Air Quality Program : annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Richard (ERM, Walnut Creek, CA); Gardizi, Leslee P.

    2007-05-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Air Quality Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Air Quality Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories, California Air Quality Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardizi, Leslee P.; Smith, Richard (ERM, Walnut Creek, CA)

    2009-06-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Air Quality Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Air Quality Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  11. Investments in the future of behavioral science: the University of California, San Francisco, Visiting Professors Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolcini, M Margaret; Grinstead Reznick, Olga A; Marín, Barbara V

    2009-04-01

    A need exists for the promotion of diversity in the scientific workforce to better address health disparities. In response to this need, funding agencies and institutions have developed programs to encourage ethnic-minority and early-career scientists to pursue research careers. We describe one such program, the University of California, San Francisco, Visiting Professors Program, which trains scientists to conduct HIV/AIDS-related research in communities of color. The program provides training and mentoring in navigating grant processes and developing strong research proposals and provides crucial networking opportunities. Although this program is focused on community-based HIV prevention, its principles and methods are widely applicable.

  12. County Clustering for the California 4-H Youth Development Program: Impacts and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Aarti; Dasher, Harry Steve; Young, Jane Chin

    2012-01-01

    In response to budgetary constraints, a new staffing structure, the Pilot Leadership Plan, was proposed for California's 4-H Youth Development Program. County clusters were formed, each led by a coordinator. The plan was piloted for 2 years to provide insight into how county clustering could support Extension staff to increase and enhance program…

  13. 77 FR 53199 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Advanced Clean Car Program; Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... AGENCY California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Advanced Clean Car Program; Request... control of emissions from new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle engines subject to this part. No state... crankcase emission standards) for the control of emissions from new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories, California Pollution Prevention Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Janet S.

    2011-04-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Pollution Prevention Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Pollution Prevention Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. Pollution Prevention supports the goals and objectives to increase the procurement and use of environmentally friendly products and materials and minimize the generation of waste (nonhazardous, hazardous, radiological, wastewater). Through participation on the Interdisciplinary Team P2 provides guidance for integration of environmentally friendly purchasing and waste minimization requirements into projects during the planning phase. Table 7 presents SNL's corporate objectives and targets that support the elements of the Pollution Prevention program.

  15. Techniques for Teaching Speaking Skill in Widya Gama Mahakam University

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arbain Arbain; Dedi Rahman Nur

    2017-01-01

    .... But in fact, speaking is often neglected in the classroom. The objective of this research is to investigate techniques in teaching speaking skill in second semester of primary school department of Widya Gama Mahakam University...

  16. Can private companies contribute to public programs' outreach efforts? Evidence from California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Mireille; Buchmueller, Thomas C

    2007-01-01

    We studied an innovative outreach effort in California, which trains and certifies community organizations to help complete Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) applications. In this paper we provide a detailed description of participating organizations, the populations they serve, and their success at turning submitted applications into enrollments. We found that insurance brokers and income tax preparers-for-profit groups that are not typically associated with outreach-make important contributions to Medicaid and SCHIP in California. Brokers, in particular, help serve a hard-to-reach population: those on the higher end of the income eligibility thresholds.

  17. Changing the health care system: a professional education program for Hispanic leaders in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, H P; DeVries, R A; Dickstein, D A

    2001-01-01

    This article reports characteristics and evaluation findings on a program aimed at promoting change in California's health care system by training minority managers and policy specialists. Between 1990 and 1992, 30 Hispanic college graduates enrolled in the University of Southern California's Hispanic Leadership Program. Funded in part by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, this program led to award of the Master of Health Administration degree and involved students in a series of community workshops. Evaluation took place via alumni surveys and focus groups. Although four individuals failed to complete the program, nearly all others entered careers potentially leading to positions of influence in health care delivery. Graduates indicated that they possessed most of the skills they considered necessary to help improve services to Hispanic people. All had taken concrete action toward this objective. Experience with the program has provided lessons valuable for conducting efforts of this kind, the principal one being that success requires substantial human and material resources. Long-term follow-up will be necessary to assess the program's ultimate impact on California's health care system.

  18. Extracurricular Physical Activity Programs in California Private Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, David; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Interscholastic, intramural, and club physical activity (PA) programs can be important contributors to student PA accrual at schools. Few studies have assessed factors related to the provision of these extracurricular PA programs, especially in private schools. Methods: We used a 16-item questionnaire to assess the associations and…

  19. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory/University of California lighting program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, S.

    1981-12-01

    The objective of the Lighting Program is to assist and work in concert with the lighting community (composed of manufacturers, designers, and users) to achieve a more efficient lighting economy. To implement its objectives, the Lighting Program has been divided into three major categories: technical engineering, buildings applications, and human impacts (impacts on health and vision). The technical program aims to undertake research and development projects that are both long-range and high-risk and which the lighting industry has little interest in pursuing on its own, but from which significant benefits could accrue to both the public and the industry. The building applications program studies the effects that introducing daylighting in commercial buildings has on lighting and cooling electrical energy requirements as well as on peak demand. This program also examines optimization strategies for integrating energy-efficient design, lighting hardware, daylighting, and overall building energy requirements. The impacts program examines relationships between the user and the physical lighting environment, in particular how new energy-efficient technologies relate to human productivity and health. These efforts are interdisciplinary, involving engineering, optometry, and medicine. The program facilities are described and the personnel in the program is identified.

  20. The College Readiness Program: A Program for Third World Students at the College of San Mateo, California. The Study of Collegiate Compensatory Programs for Minority Group Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopate, Carol

    This report describes the two and one-half year history of the College Readiness Program (CRP) at the College of San Mateo in California. The program aimed at increasing the number of Third World students in the College and insuring that, once admitted, these students would be given necessary financial, emotional and academic backing to succeed…

  1. Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Wikler, Greg; Chiu, Albert; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Hennage, Dan; Thomas, Chuck

    2007-12-18

    This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with well-designed incentives and DR programs such as Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP), Auto-DR is opening up the opportunity for many different types of buildings to effectively participate in DR programs. We present the results of Auto-DR implementation efforts by the three California investor-owned utilities for the Summer of 2007. The presentation emphasizes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) Auto-DR efforts, which represents the largest in the state. PG&E's goal was to recruit, install, test and operate 15 megawatts of Auto-DR system capability. We describe the unique delivery approaches, including optimizing the utility incentive structures designed to foster an Auto-DR service provider community. We also show how PG&E's Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP) options were called and executed under the automation platform. Finally, we show the results of the Auto-DR systems installed and operational during 2007, which surpassed PG&E's Auto-DR goals. Auto-DR is being implemented by a multi-disciplinary team including the California Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs), energy consultants, energy management control system vendors, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the California Energy Commission (CEC).

  2. Restructuring of the electricity industry and environmental issues: a California research program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, E L

    2001-08-02

    As part of the restructuring of the electricity industry in many states, public benefits funding has emerged as a primary mechanism for supporting social benefits such as energy efficiency and research and development (RD). In California, a Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program was established to "conduct public interest energy research that seeks to improve the quality of life for California"s citizens by providing environmentally sound, safe, reliable, and affordable energy services and products. PIER includes the full range of research, development, and demonstration activities that will advance science or technology not adequately provided by competitive and regulated markets." The PIER Program is comprised of six PIER Program funding areas, including the Energy-Related Environmental Research. The overall mission of the Energy-Related Environmental Research is to "Develop cost-effective approaches to evaluating and resolving environmental effects of energy production, delivery, and use in California, and explore how new energy applications and products can solve environmental problems." This paper describes the process used in developing these approaches and identifies a set of environmental issues that the State plans to evaluate.

  3. Low-income Renewable Energy Programs: Case Studies of State Policy in California and Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kaitlin

    Energy policies aimed at reducing the burden of monthly utility costs on low-income families have been established since the 1970s. Energy use impacts low-income families and organizations through housing specific costs, health and wellness, and opportunity costs. States have begun to run renewable energy installation programs aimed at reducing costs for low-income communities. This thesis examines two of these programs, the solar photovoltaic policies in California as part of the Single Family Affordable Solar Housing and Multi-family Affordable Solar Housing programs, and the Low-income Solar Housing program in Massachusetts. Lessons learned from reviewing these programs are that renewable energy programs are an effective strategy for reducing utility costs for low-income communities, but that the total effectiveness of the program is dependent on removing cost barriers, implementing energy efficiency improvements, and increasing consumer education through established community networks and relationships.

  4. A scoping study on energy-efficiency market transformation by California Utility DSM Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, J.; Prahl, R.; Schlegel, J.

    1996-07-01

    Market transformation has emerged as a central policy objective for future publicly-funded energy-efficiency programs in California. California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) Decision 95-12-063 calls for public funding to shift to activities designed to transform the energy-efficiency market. The CPUC envisions that funding {open_quotes}would only be needed for specific and limited periods of time to cause the market to be transformed{close_quotes}. At the same time, the CPUC also acknowledges that {open_quotes}there are many definitions of market transformation{close_quotes} ... and does {open_quotes}not attempt to refine those definitions today{close_quotes}. We argue that a definition of market transformation is essential. The literature is now replete with definitions, and an operational definition is needed for the CPUC to decide on which programs should be supported with public funds. The CPUC decision initially indicated a preference for programs that do not provide financial assistance 4-efficiency programs that rely on financial assistance to customers. However, energy customers have traditionally accounted for a substantial portion of California utility`s DSM programs, so the CPUC`s direction to use ratepayer funds to support programs that will transform the market raises critical questions about how to analyze what has happened in order to plan effectively for the future: Which utility energy-efficiency programs, including those that provide financial assistance to customers, have had market transforming effects? To what extent do current regulatory rules and practices encourage or discourage utilities from running programs that are designed to transform the market? Should the rules and programs be modified, and, if so, how, to promote market transformation?

  5. SETI Programs at the University of California, Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, E. J.; Siemion, A. V. P.; Werthimer, D.; Korff, J. V.; Gautham, A.; Cobb, J.; Lebofsky, M.; Dexter, M.; MacMahon, D.; Wright, S.

    2014-03-01

    I describe recent SETI efforts by the University of California, Berkeley SETI Research center and efforts to be undertaken in the near future. In addition to our well known SETI@home (Korpela 2011) and Astropulse (Von Korff et al. 2013) public participation SETI survey projects, we have performed several targeted obsevations of different object classes. These include 1) Observations between 1.1 and 1.9 GHz of planetary systems idenfied by Kepler as containing earthlike planets in or near the habitable zones. (Siemion et al. 2013) 2) Wide-band Arecibo observations of 112 sky locations where the Astropulse project has identified strong µs duration dispersed radio pulses. 3) Observations of Kepler identified planetary systems at times when two planets would appear to be in conjuction when viewed from Earth. We plan a future campaign to simultaneously observe known planetary systems at radio, optical and IR wavelengths. We have also continued to advance our instrumentation. We are currently building the sixth generation of our SERENDIP (Siemion et al. 2011, Korpela et al. 2011) series of SETI instrumentation for installation at both Arecibo and GBT. SERENDIP VI will utilize an FPGA based polyphase filter bank course spectrometer feeding 8 or more GPU based compute nodes. The Arecibo version of this spectrometer will be capable of providing thresholded 1Hz resolution spectra of all seven beams of the 320 MHz bandwidth Arecibo L-band Feed Array in dual polarization. A separate front end will be available to allow up to 2.2 GHz of bandwidth in dual polarization from single pixel receivers. The Green Bank version of this spectrometer will utilize the single pixel front end. We are invesitating the possibility of simultaneous back end stages operating on the same or minimal processed data, for example, we could support simulataneous detection of fast extragalactic radio bursts (Thornton et al. 2013) by adding additional compute nodes. We are also developing new instruments

  6. Resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California. Report of the second year, 1979 to 1980 of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for reservoir assessment and confirmation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngs, L.G.; Bacon, C.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Higgins, C.T.; Majmundar, H.H.; Taylor, G.C.

    1980-11-10

    Statewide assessment studies included updating and completing the USGS GEOTHERM File for California and compiling all data needed for a California Geothermal Resources Map. Site specific assessment studies included a program to assess the geothermal resource at Calistoga, Napa County, California. The Calistoga effort was comprised of a series of studies involving different disciplines, including geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and geophysical studies.

  7. CalPro: a spreadsheet program for the management of California mixed-conifer stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingjing Liang; Joseph Buongiorno; Robert A. Monserud

    2004-01-01

    CalPro is an add-in program developed to work with Microsoft Excel to simulate the growth and management of uneven-aged mixed-conifer stands in California. Its built-in growth model was calibrated from 177 uneven-aged plots on industry and other private lands. Stands are described by the number of trees per acre in each of nineteen 2-inch diameter classes in...

  8. Clean Water Act Section 319 Nonpoint Source Pollution Control Projects Grants, US EPA Region 9, 2008, California Nonpoint Source Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The California Nonpoint Source (NPS) Program allocates about $4.5 million of CWA Section 319 funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency annually to...

  9. Framework for a ground-water quality monitoring and assessment program for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belitz, Kenneth; Dubrovsky, Neil M.; Burow, Karen; Jurgens, Bryant C.; John, Tyler

    2003-01-01

    The State of California uses more ground water than any other State in the Nation. With a population of over 30 million people, an agricultural economy based on intensive irrigation, large urban industrial areas, and naturally elevated concentrations of some trace elements, there is a wide range of contaminant sources that have the potential to contaminate ground water and limit its beneficial uses. In response to the many-and different-potential sources of ground-water contamination, the State of California has evolved an extensive set of rules and programs to protect ground-water quality, and agencies to implement the rules and programs. These programs have in common a focus on compliance with regulations governing chemical use and (or) ground-water quality. Although appropriate for, and successful at, their specific missions, these programs do not at present provide a comprehensive view of ground-water quality in the State of California. In October 2001, The California Assembly passed a bill, AB 599, establishing the Ground-Water- Quality Monitoring Act of 2001.' The goal of AB 599 is to improve Statewide comprehensive ground-water monitoring and increase availability of information about ground-water quality to the public. AB 599 requires the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), in collaboration with an interagency task force (ITF) and a public advisory committee (PAC), to develop a plan for a comprehensive ground-water monitoring program. AB 599 specifies that the comprehensive program should be capable of assessing each ground-water basin in the State through direct and other statistically reliable sampling approaches, and that the program should integrate existing monitoring programs and design new program elements, as necessary. AB 599 also stresses the importance of prioritizing ground-water basins that provide drinking water. The United States Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the SWRCB, and in coordination with the ITF and PAC, has

  10. Admission Policies and Attrition Rates in California Community College Nursing Programs. Background and Summary of Findings and Recommendations of the California Postsecondary Education Commission. Commission Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seago, Jean Ann; Spetz, Joanne

    Most analyses of California's nursing shortage find that too few nurses are being educated to meet future demand. Coffman and Spetz (1999) estimate that state nursing programs need to educate an additional 3,600 students per year between 2000 and 2010, and 5,000 more per year between 2010 and 2020 to maintain an adequate nursing force. Unless the…

  11. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/California recycling programs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrons, Ralph Jordan; Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2007-07-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management Department between May 2006 and March 2007, to evaluate the current site-wide recycling program for potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the program. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM Pollution Prevention (P2) staff worked with the SNL/CA P2 Staff to arrive at these options.

  12. Groundwater quality in the Owens Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Owens Valley is one of the study areas being evaluated. The Owens study area is approximately 1,030 square miles (2,668 square kilometers) and includes the Owens Valley groundwater basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). Owens Valley has a semiarid to arid climate, with average annual rainfall of about 6 inches (15 centimeters). The study area has internal drainage, with runoff primarily from the Sierra Nevada draining east to the Owens River, which flows south to Owens Lake dry lakebed at the southern end of the valley. Beginning in the early 1900s, the City of Los Angeles began diverting the flow of the Owens River to the Los Angeles Aqueduct, resulting in the evaporation of Owens Lake and the formation of the current Owens Lake dry lakebed. Land use in the study area is approximately 94 percent (%) natural, 5% agricultural, and 1% urban. The primary natural land cover is shrubland. The largest urban area is the city of Bishop (2010 population of 4,000). Groundwater in this basin is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay derived from surrounding mountains. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the Sierra Nevada, and by direct infiltration of irrigation. The primary sources of discharge are pumping wells, evapotranspiration, and underflow to the Owens Lake dry lakebed. The primary aquifers in Owens Valley are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database

  13. The California Tobacco Control Program: A Decade of Progress, Results from the California Tobacco Survey, 1990-1999

    OpenAIRE

    Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of California, San Diego

    2001-01-01

    Executive Summary: During the 1990s in California, smoking behavior and attiudes about smoking have changed, as measured from the California Tobacco Surveys (CTS) and other data sources. Some of the most important findings from the CTS are highlighted below. For a more complete summary, see the Key Findings from each chapter of this report, which appear both in this Executive Summary and at the end of each chapter. Throughout this report, results are given with the margin of error...

  14. The California Tobacco Control Program: A decade of progress, Results from the California Tobacco Survey, 1990-1999

    OpenAIRE

    Cancer Prevention and Control Program; University of California, San Diego

    2000-01-01

    Executive Summary and Key Findings EXECUTIVE SUMMARY During the 1990s in California, smoking behavior and attitudes about smoking have changed, as measured from the California Tobacco Surveys (CTS) and other data sources. Some of the most important findings from the CTS are highlighted below. For a more complete summary, see the Key Findings from each chapter of this report, which appear both in this Executive Summary and at the end of each chapter. Throughout this report, results are given w...

  15. Kakawin Sutasoma and Kakawin N?gara Krt?gama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick van der Meij

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Kate O’Brien, Sutasoma: The ancient tale of a Buddha-Prince from 14th century Java by the poet Mpu Tantular. Mpu Tantular, Kakawin Sutasoma. Cok Sawitri, Sutasoma. I Ketut Riana, Kakawin D??a Warnnana uthawi N?gara Krt?gama: Masa keemasan Majapahit.

  16. A multi-institutional medical educational collaborative: advocacy training in California pediatric residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Lisa J; Wu, Susan; Lewis, Gena; Graff, Nancy; Javier, Joyce R; Park, Joseph S R; Johnson, Christine L; Woods, Steven D; Patel, Mona; Wong, Daphne; Blaschke, Gregory S; Lerner, Marc; Kuo, Anda K

    2013-03-01

    Educational collaboratives offer a promising approach to disseminate educational resources and provide faculty development to advance residents' training, especially in areas of novel curricular content; however, their impact has not been clearly described. Advocacy training is a recently mandated requirement of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education that many programs struggle to meet.The authors describe the formation (in 2007) and impact (from 2008 to 2010) of 13 California pediatric residency programs working in an educational collaboration ("the Collaborative") to improve advocacy training. The Collaborative defined an overarching mission, assessed the needs of the programs, and mapped their strengths. The infrastructure required to build the collaboration among programs included a social networking site, frequent conference calls, and face-to-face semiannual meetings. An evaluation of the Collaborative's activities showed that programs demonstrated increased uptake of curricular components and an increase in advocacy activities. The themes extracted from semistructured interviews of lead faculty at each program revealed that the Collaborative (1) reduced faculty isolation, increased motivation, and strengthened faculty academic development, (2) enhanced identification of curricular areas of weakness and provided curricular development from new resources, (3) helped to address barriers of limited resident time and program resources, and (4) sustained the Collaborative's impact even after formal funding of the program had ceased through curricular enhancement, the need for further resources, and a shared desire to expand the collaborative network.

  17. Restructuring of the Electricity Industry and Environmental Issues: A California Research Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward L. Vine

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the restructuring of the electricity industry in many states, public benefits funding has emerged as a primary mechanism for supporting social benefits such as energy efficiency and research and development (R&D. In California, a Public Interest Energy Research (PIER Program was established to �conduct public interest energy research that seeks to improve the quality of life for California�s citizens by providing environmentally sound, safe, reliable, and affordable energy services and products. PIER includes the full range of research, development, and demonstration activities that will advance science or technology not adequately provided by competitive and regulated markets.� The PIER Program is comprised of six PIER Program funding areas, including the Energy-Related Environmental Research. The overall mission of the Energy-Related Environmental Research is to �Develop cost-effective approaches to evaluating and resolving environmental effects of energy production, delivery, and use in California, and explore how new energy applications and products can solve environmental problems.� This paper describes the process used in developing these approaches and identifies a set of environmental issues that the State plans to evaluate.

  18. Framing Social Justice Leadership in a University-Based Preparation Program: The University of California's Principal Leadership Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Tina; Cooper, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Scholars are increasingly considering how theoretical concepts about social justice might permeate leadership preparation programs' design. Yet the degree to which these concepts actually anchor these programs is unclear. This article addresses this gap by analyzing how the University of California's Principal Leadership Institute bridges theory…

  19. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, annual report FY97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are oil fields administered by the DOE in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California. Four federally endangered animal species and one federally threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), blunt-nosed leopard lizard (Gambelia silus), giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), Tipton kangaroo rat (Dipodomys nitratoides), and Hoover`s wooly-star (Eriastrum hooveri). All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. The DOE/NPRC is obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The primary objective of the Endangered Species and Cultural Resources Program is to provide NPRC with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the ESA, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress, results, and accomplishments of the program during fiscal year 1997 (FY97).

  20. Factors Influencing California Dental Hygienists' Involvement in School-Based Oral Health Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Katherine V; Essex, Gwen; Rowe, Dorothy J

    2016-08-01

    To assess the influence of community oral health experiences during entry-level dental hygiene education on participation in community oral health events after graduation and the facilitators and barriers experienced by dental hygienists in participating in these programs. A 27-item survey, consisting of items related to community oral health experiences during and after entry-level education, was distributed by the California Dental Hygienists' Association to all dental hygienists whose email addresses were in their database. Frequencies of participants' responses to each survey item were calculated. Chi-square analysis was performed to identify significant relationships among variables. Response rate was 8%, with 513 out of the 6,248 contacted having responded. Additionally, 95% of the respondents had participated, as entry-level students, in community oral health experiences such as school-based oral health educational programs. Respondents agreed that participation in these programs was valuable to their professional development and encouraged them to participate after graduation; both these variables were related (pconflict with work (61%), family time commitment (52%), and no knowledge of existing programs (24%). Dental hygienists' involvement in school-based oral health programs is enhanced by their community experiences as a dental hygiene student. Barriers and facilitators need to be addressed to increase the number of programs and participants so that more children can benefit. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  1. Review of current Southern California edison load management programs and proposal for a new market-driven, mass-market, demand-response program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    Utility load management programs, including direct load control and interruptible load programs, constitute a large installed base of controllable loads that are employed by utilities as system reliability resources. In response to energy supply shortfalls expected during the summer of 2001, the California Public Utilities Commission in spring 2001 authorized new utility load management programs as well as revisions to existing programs. This report provides an independent review of the designs of these new programs for a large utility (Southern California Edison) and suggests possible improvements to enhance the price responsiveness of the customer actions influenced by these programs. The report also proposes a new program to elicit a mass-market demand response to utility price signals.

  2. Eclipse program QF-106 aircraft taxies at airport in Mojave, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    View of QF-106 airplane for the Eclipse project taxiing on the runway at Mojave Airport, California. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  3. Eclipse program F-106 aircraft takeoff from airport in Mojave, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Shot of QF-106 aircraft taking off from Mojave Airport, California. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  4. XML in Projects GNU Gama and 3DGI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolar, Jan; Soucek, Petr; Cepek, Ales

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents our practical experiences with XML in geodetic and geographical applications. The main concepts and ideas of XML are introduced in an example of a simple web based information system, which exploits the XHTML language. The article further describes how XML is used in GNU Gama...... for structuring data for a geodetic network adjustment. In another application of XML, it is demonstrated how XML can be used for a unified description of data from leveling registration units. Finally, the use of XML for modelling 3D geographical features within the 3DGI project is presented and a relation...... of the project to GML and X3D is argued. The paper also aims at presenting our future plans with XML in our projects - namely the GNU Gama project, and the 3DGI project....

  5. Família de distribuições gama tipo III generalizada

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Neto, Adélio Henrique da

    2016-01-01

    Na última década, diversos autores têm investigado novas famílias de distribuições de probabilidade com o intuito de obter modelos mais flexíveis para o ajuste a conjunto de dados. Neste trabalho, introduzimos pela primeira vez uma nova família de distribuições referida como a Gama tipo III Generalizada, que é uma generalização da família Gama tipo III (Torabi e Montazeri [6]). Estudamos duas distribuições particulares desta família: a Gama tipo III Burr III Generalizada (GIIIBIIIG) e a Gama ...

  6. The California Linkages Program: Doorway to Housing Support for Child Welfare-Involved Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrade, Amy; Simon, James David; Fabella, Danna; Castillo, Lolita; Mejia, Cesar; Shuster, David

    2017-09-01

    Housing instability can complicate parents' efforts to provide for their children. Child welfare service agencies have had difficulty adequately serving parents' housing needs due to limited and constrained funding streams. This article integrates the voices of four important stakeholders to illuminate how an innovative model of service system coordination called Linkages addresses housing needs for child welfare-involved parents eligible for public assistance. Facilitated by Linkages, these parents can receive supportive housing services through programs affiliated with the California public assistance program CalWORKs. Personal narratives reflecting the diverse perspectives of stakeholders in the Linkages collaboration-the statewide program director, a child welfare services coordinator, a CalWORKs caseworker, and a parent program participant-shed light on how the collaboration assists parents in attaining case plan goals, and highlights some of the factors facilitating and hindering effective collaboration between the agencies involved. Stakeholders emphasized the value of flexible service approaches, the intensity of the efforts required, the role of advocacy, and the importance of a shared vision between agencies working together to provide housing supports. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  7. The effect of the California tobacco control program on smoking prevalence, cigarette consumption, and healthcare costs: 1989-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightwood, James; Glantz, Stanton A

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that tobacco control funding in California has reduced per capita cigarette consumption and per capita healthcare expenditures. This paper refines our earlier model by estimating the effect of California tobacco control funding on current smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption per smoker and the effect of prevalence and consumption on per capita healthcare expenditures. The results are used to calculate new estimates of the effect of the California Tobacco Program. Using state-specific aggregate data, current smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption per smoker are modeled as functions of cumulative California and control states' per capita tobacco control funding, cigarette price, and per capita income. Per capita healthcare expenditures are modeled as a function of prevalence of current smoking, cigarette consumption per smoker, and per capita income. One additional dollar of cumulative per capita tobacco control funding is associated with reduction in current smoking prevalence of 0.0497 (SE.00347) percentage points and current smoker cigarette consumption of 1.39 (SE.132) packs per smoker per year. Reductions of one percentage point in current smoking prevalence and one pack smoked per smoker are associated with $35.4 (SE $9.85) and $3.14 (SE.786) reductions in per capita healthcare expenditure, respectively (2010 dollars), using the National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) measure of healthcare spending. Between FY 1989 and 2008 the California Tobacco Program cost $2.4 billion and led to cumulative NIPA healthcare expenditure savings of $134 (SE $30.5) billion.

  8. Postpartum care and contraception provided to women with gestational and preconception diabetes in California's Medicaid program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Braughton, Monica Y; Riedel, Julie Cross; Cohen, Susannah; Logan, Julia; Howell, Mike; Thiel de Bocanegra, Heike

    2017-12-01

    To compare rates of postpartum care and contraception provided to women with gestational or preconception diabetes mellitus to women with no known diabetes mellitus. A retrospective cohort study of 199,860 women aged 15-44 years who were continuously enrolled in California's Medicaid program, Medi-Cal, from 43 days prior to 99 days after delivering in 2012. Claims for postpartum clinic visits and contraceptive supplies were compared for 11,494 mothers with preconception diabetes, 17,970 mothers with gestational diabetes, and 170,396 mothers without diabetes. Multivariable logistic regression was used to control for maternal age, race/ethnicity, primary language, residence in a primary care shortage area, state-funded healthcare program and Cesarean delivery, when examining the effects of diabetes on postpartum care and contraception. Although postpartum clinic visits were more common with diabetes (55% preconception, 55% gestational, 48% no diabetes, p=contraception than women without diabetes (preconception diabetes, aOR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.31-1.47; gestational diabetes, aOR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.14-1.27). However, among women without permanent contraception, less than half received any reversible contraception within 99 days of delivery (44% preconception, 43% gestational, 43% no diabetes) and less effective, barrier contraceptives were more commonly provided to women with preconception diabetes than women without diabetes (aOR: 1.24, 95% CI:1.16-1.33). Low-income Californian women with pregnancies complicated by diabetes do not consistently receive postpartum care or contraception that may prevent complication of future pregnancies. Efforts are needed to improve rates of provision of postpartum care and high quality contraceptive services to low income women in California, particularly following pregnancies complicated by diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cost-benefit analysis for biological control programs that target insects pests of eucalypts in urban landscapes of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.D. Paine; J.G. Millar; L.M. Hanks; J. Gould; Q. Wang; K. Daane; D.L. Dahlsten; E.G. McPherson

    2015-01-01

    As well as being planted for wind breaks, landscape trees, and fuel wood, eucalypts are also widely used as urban street trees in California. They now are besieged by exotic insect herbivores of four different feeding guilds. The objective of the current analysis was to determine the return on investment from biological control programs that have targeted these pests....

  10. Developmental Math Programs in California Community College: An Analysis of Math Boot Camp at Cosumnes River College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Torence J.

    2017-01-01

    The California Community College system, as an open access institution, is tasked with helping students who possess math skills far below college-level complete math course requirements for obtaining an associate degree or transfer to a university. Colleges have created various developmental math programs to achieve this mission; this paper…

  11. Making Sense of the Nursing Education Crises in California: A Program Planning Study Prospectus. Report 09-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    In the absence of continuous legislative and institutional intervention, the demand for services provided by vocational and registered nurses in California over the next ten years will greatly outpace the supply of nurses anticipated to flow from postsecondary degree programs. Nursing education and supply issues can be better understood and…

  12. Design of a Model Management Information System (MIS) for California's Regional Occupational Centers and Programs. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, James C.; And Others

    The management information system (MIS) development project for California's Regional Occupational Centers and Programs (ROC/Ps) was conducted in 3 phases over a 12-month period. Phase I involved a literature review and field study to match MIS design features and development strategy with existing conditions in ROC/Ps. A decision support system…

  13. The Cal-Bridge Program: Increasing the Gender and Ethnic Diversity of Astrophysics Students in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Rudolph, Alexander L.

    2016-06-01

    The mission of the Cal-Bridge program is to increase the number of underrepresented minority and women students completing a bachelor’s degree and entering a PhD program in astronomy, physics, or closely-related fields. The program has created a network of faculty at diverse higher education institutions, including 5 University of California (UC) campuses, 9 California State Universities (CSUs), and 10 community colleges in southern California, dedicated to this goal. Students selected for the program are know as “Cal-Bridge Scholars” and they are given a wide variety of support: (1) scholarships in their junior/senior years at CSU and their first year of graduate school at a UC, (2) intensive mentoring by a pair of CSU and UC faculty members, (3) tutoring, when needed, (4) professional development workshops, (5) exposure to research opportunities at various universities, and (6) membership in a growing cohort of like-minded students. We report on the structure of our program, lessons learned with our current 12 Cal-Bridge scholars, and the results of our first two years of operation. Funding for this program is provided by NSF-SSTEM Grant #1356133.

  14. A KiDS weak lensing analysis of assembly bias in GAMA galaxy groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dvornik, Andrej; Cacciato, Marcello; Kuijken, Konrad; Viola, Massimo; Hoekstra, Henk; Nakajima, Reiko; van Uitert, Edo; Brouwer, Margot; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Fenech Conti, Ian; Farrow, Daniel J.; Herbonnet, Ricardo; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hopkins, Andrew. M.; McFarland, John; Norberg, Peder; Schneider, Peter; Sifón, Cristóbal; Valentijn, Edwin; Wang, Lingyu

    2017-01-01

    We investigate possible signatures of halo assembly bias for spectroscopically selected galaxy groups from the GAMA survey using weak lensing measurements from the spatially overlapping regions of the deeper, high-imaging-quality photometric KiDS survey. We use GAMA groups with an apparent richness

  15. The California HIV/AIDS Research Program: History, Impact, and HIV Cure Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb Stanga, Lisa; Mujeeb, Anwer; Packel, Laura; Martz, Tyler; Lemp, George

    2017-08-29

    This Special Issue of AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses features results from the HIV Cure Initiative, funded by the California HIV/AIDS Research Program (CHRP). As a publicly-funded grant maker, CHRP has served for more than three decades as a unique resource for innovative researchers in California whose work seeks to address all aspects of the HIV epidemic and the communities affected by it. Early initiatives at CHRP pioneered what would become enduring cornerstones of HIV science: isolation of the virus; efficacy and toxicities of the first HIV treatments; the emergence of drug resistance; the first biospecimen banks for HIV-related research; the first community-based laboratory service for HIV diagnostic serology; and the first population-based longitudinal cohort study of persons living with HIV - The Gay Men's Health Study. More recently, CHRP-funded conceptual studies of zinc finger nuclease-mediated disruption of CCR5 genomic sequences and the safety of solid organ transplantation for HIV-positive patients have progressed from brilliant ideas to clinical realities, and CHRP is currently funding the first multisite trial of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis for transgender persons in the U.S. The present article outlines the founding of CHRP, our current grantmaking process, and our impact on HIV research over time. In 2013, CHRP launched a new initiative aimed at moving the then nascent area of HIV cure science forward: the CHRP HIV Cure Initiative provided over $1.4 million to multiple basic biomedical research projects, and their results are presented in this Special Issue.

  16. Groundwater quality in the Indian Wells Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Indian Wells Valley is one of the study areas being evaluated. The Indian Wells study area is approximately 600 square miles (1,554 square kilometers) and includes the Indian Wells Valley groundwater basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). Indian Wells Valley has an arid climate and is part of the Mojave Desert. Average annual rainfall is about 6 inches (15 centimeters). The study area has internal drainage, with runoff from the surrounding mountains draining towards dry lake beds in the lower parts of the valley. Land use in the study area is approximately 97.0 percent (%) natural, 0.4% agricultural, and 2.6% urban. The primary natural land cover is shrubland. The largest urban area is the city of Ridgecrest (2010 population of 28,000). Groundwater in this basin is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay derived from the Sierra Nevada to the west and from the other surrounding mountains. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the Sierra Nevada and to the west and from the other surrounding mountains. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the Sierra Nevada and direct infiltration from irrigation and septic systems. The primary sources of discharge are pumping wells and evapotranspiration near the dry lakebeds. The primary aquifers in the Indian Wells study area are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells in

  17. Groundwater quality in the Colorado River basins, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Four groundwater basins along the Colorado River make up one of the study areas being evaluated. The Colorado River study area is approximately 884 square miles (2,290 square kilometers) and includes the Needles, Palo Verde Mesa, Palo Verde Valley, and Yuma groundwater basins (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). The Colorado River study area has an arid climate and is part of the Sonoran Desert. Average annual rainfall is about 3 inches (8 centimeters). Land use in the study area is approximately 47 percent (%) natural (mostly shrubland), 47% agricultural, and 6% urban. The primary crops are pasture and hay. The largest urban area is the city of Blythe (2010 population of 21,000). Groundwater in these basins is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay deposited by the Colorado River or derived from surrounding mountains. The primary aquifers in the Colorado River study area are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells in the Colorado River basins are completed to depths between 230 and 460 feet (70 to 140 meters), consist of solid casing from the land surface to a depth of 130 of 390 feet (39 to 119 meters), and are screened or perforated below the solid casing. The main source of recharge to the groundwater systems in the Needles, Palo Verde Mesa, and Palo Verde Valley basins is the Colorado River; in the Yuma basin, the main source of recharge is from

  18. Endangered Species Program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Chevron USA. Production Company (CPDN). Four federally-listed endangered animal species and one federally-threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, giant kangaroo rat, Tipton kangaroo rat, and Hoover`s wooly-star. All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, which declares that it is ``...the policy of Congress that all Federal departments and agencies shall seek to conserve endangered species and threatened species and shall utilize their authorities in furtherance of the purposes of the Act.`` DOE is also obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The major objective of the EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. Endangered Species Program on NPRC is to provide DOE with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the Endangered Species Act. The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress and results of the Endangered Species Program made during fiscal year 1993.

  19. Inflation in Hospital Charges. Implications for the California Workers' Compensation Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wynn, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    .... RAND was asked to provide an assessment of the potential vulnerabilities that excessive charge inflation poses for the California workers' compensation system, Wynn testified that the largest risks...

  20. Identification from the Natural Response of Vasco Da Gama Bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunha, A.; Caetano, E.; Brincker, Rune

    2004-01-01

    Subspace Identification (SSI) methods. The modal estimates obtained using these alternative approaches are compared, taking also into account the estimates previously obtained with the conventional Peak Picking technique from the free vibration test of the bridge, performed at the end of construction.......This paper describes the reanalysis of the ambient vibration data of Vasco da Gama cable-stayed bridge with the purpose of testing the efficiency and accuracy of two recent and promising identification methods in a large application: the Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) and the Stochastic...

  1. The Effect of the California Tobacco Control Program on Smoking Prevalence, Cigarette Consumption, and Healthcare Costs: 1989–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightwood, James; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown that tobacco control funding in California has reduced per capita cigarette consumption and per capita healthcare expenditures. This paper refines our earlier model by estimating the effect of California tobacco control funding on current smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption per smoker and the effect of prevalence and consumption on per capita healthcare expenditures. The results are used to calculate new estimates of the effect of the California Tobacco Program. Methodology/Principal Findings Using state-specific aggregate data, current smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption per smoker are modeled as functions of cumulative California and control states' per capita tobacco control funding, cigarette price, and per capita income. Per capita healthcare expenditures are modeled as a function of prevalence of current smoking, cigarette consumption per smoker, and per capita income. One additional dollar of cumulative per capita tobacco control funding is associated with reduction in current smoking prevalence of 0.0497 (SE.00347) percentage points and current smoker cigarette consumption of 1.39 (SE.132) packs per smoker per year. Reductions of one percentage point in current smoking prevalence and one pack smoked per smoker are associated with $35.4 (SE $9.85) and $3.14 (SE.786) reductions in per capita healthcare expenditure, respectively (2010 dollars), using the National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) measure of healthcare spending. Conclusions/Significance Between FY 1989 and 2008 the California Tobacco Program cost $2.4 billion and led to cumulative NIPA healthcare expenditure savings of $134 (SE $30.5) billion. PMID:23418411

  2. Installation Restoration Program Stage 2-1 Remedial Investigation. Beale Air Force Base, Marysville, California. Volume 1. Text and Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-29

    ABSTRACT ( Coen n mIvvrsg of new y &V AW n by blad anfbw) As part of the ongoing Installation Restoration Program at Beale Air Force Base, California, 24...detected at the same depths at 0.005 (be- low LOQ), 0.014, 0.006, and 0.21 mg/kg. 1,1,2 trichloro- ethane was detected at 0.009 mg/kg at 48 feet (42

  3. Effect of Brief Behavioral Intervention Program in Managing Stress in Medical Students from Two Southern California Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Bughi, Stephanie A.; Sumcad, Jennifer; Bughi, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The study aims to assess 1) the prevalence of stress among a group of third and fourth year medical students (MS) from two Southern California universities and 2) the effect of a brief behavioral intervention program (BBIP) on stress management among the students instructed on stress intervention techniques. The stress level was determined by using the General Well Being Scale (GWBS), a self-report questionnaire designed by the National Center for Health Statistics.1 The stress testing was do...

  4. The impact in the early years of the Oportunidades program by type of poverty in Mexico and Baja California, 2002–2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Bracamontes Nevárez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a limited impact of the Oportunidades program in reducing poverty in Mexico and Baja California during the study period (2002–2006, which is due to insufficient resources and the exclusion of poor households. In the country the three types of poverty had a modest reduction and in Baja California capabilities poverty declined slightly, but the food and heritage poverty increased despite the program.

  5. Water Quality of "Tritium-Dead" Drinking Water Wells in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, A.; Moran, J. E.; Singleton, M. J.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Belitz, K.; Fram, M. S.; Esser, B. K.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding ambient levels of regulated constituents with predominantly natural sources, such as arsenic and uranium, or with both natural and anthropogenic sources, such as nitrate, salinity and perchlorate, is important for attributing source, assessing susceptibility, and for groundwater basin management. For California, the large database of tritium-helium, noble gas and stable isotope measurements acquired at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the State of California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program provides a unique opportunity to assess pre-development groundwater quality. GAMA is administered by the State Water Resources Control Board with USGS and LLNL as technical leads. These data were acquired for the GAMA California Aquifer Susceptibility and Priority Basin projects (http://www.swrcb.ca.gov/gama/; Belitz, 2003, USGS WRIR 03-4166). Groundwater pumped from long-screened wells will have a mixed distribution of travel times since recharge. Model calculations of mixing between tritium-dead recharge water and younger recharge water assuming simple binary, exponential or dispersive age distributions show that, given the historical levels of tritium in precipitation in the pacific coastal region, a threshold of less than 1 pCi/L of tritium is required to ensure that less than 25% of the pumped groundwater recharged after 1950. The low detection limit is necessary because water recharged between 1980 and 1995 contains only 3-4 pCi/L of tritium at present. The use of groundwater for irrigation in agricultural areas can result in recent recharge of tritium-dead water and complicates the identification of pre-development groundwater. Additional parameters including radiogenic helium, stable isotopes, and recharge temperature were studied to confirm the absence of a modern component. Initial results show that pre-development groundwater reflects the various hydrogeochemical settings found in California

  6. 75 FR 8056 - California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; California New Nonroad Compression...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... AGENCY California State Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; California New Nonroad Compression... conditions justifying California's need for its own nonroad vehicle and engine emissions control program... 3030, 3033 (January 16, 2009); ``California State Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Pollution Control...

  7. Initial results of the California Testing and Inspection Program for solar equipment (TIPSE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    The California Energy Commission has accredited seven independent test laboratories to test solar collectors. Data for 65 collector models are tabulated. Terms used in the table are defined and ways to interpret the results are discussed. (MHR)

  8. Installation Restoration Program Records Search for McClellan Air Force Base, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    were also observed at a number of locations on Magpie Creek. In regard to birds, game species such as pheasant, mourning dove, and California quail...of locations on Magpie Creek. In regard to birds, game species such as pheasant, mourning dove, and California quail are common on the site, though... Farewell -to-spring Clarkia purpurea Clarkia Clarkia unguiculata Willow herb Epilobium paniculatum Yellow water weed Jussiaea californica Water primrose

  9. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California: Annual report FY95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    In FY95, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 674 preactivity surveys covering approximately 211 hectares (521 acres) were conducted in FY95. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY95, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was completed, and the results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In FY95, reclamation success was monitored on 50 sites reclaimed in 1985. An investigation of factors influencing the distribution and abundance of kit foxes at NPRC was initiated in FY94. Factors being examined include habitat disturbance, topography, grazing, coyote abundance, lagomorph abundance, and shrub density. This investigation continued in FY95 and a manuscript on this topic will be completed in FY96. Also, Eg and G/EM completed collection of field data to evaluate the effects of a well blow-out on plant and animal populations. A final report will be prepared in FY96. Finally, EG and G/EM completed a life table analysis on San Joaquin kit foxes at NPRC.

  10. Final Scientific / Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layman Energy Associates, Inc.

    2006-08-15

    With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and interpretation of remote sensing imagery such as aerial and satellite photographs; acquisition, quality control and interpretation of gravity data; and acquisition, quality control and interpretation of resistivity data using state of the art magnetotelluric (MT) methods. The results of this exploratory program have allowed LEA to develop a structural and hydrologic interpretation of the Truckhaven geothermal resource which can be used to guide subsequent exploratory drilling and resource development. Of primary significance, is the identification of an 8 kilometer-long, WNW-trending zone of low resistivity associated with geothermal activity in nearby wells. The long axis of this low resistivity zone is inferred to mark a zone of faulting which likely provides the primary control on the distribution of geothermal resources in the Truckhaven area. Abundant cross-faults cutting the main WNW-trending zone in its western half may indicate elevated fracture permeability in this region, possibly associated with thermal upwelling and higher resource temperatures. Regional groundwater flow is inferred to push thermal fluids from west to east along the trend of the main low resistivity zone, with resource temperatures likely declining from west to east away from the inferred upwelling zone. Resistivity mapping and well data have also shown that within the WNW-trending low resistivity zone, the thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary section above granite basement ranges from 1,900–2,600 meters. Well data indicates the lower part of this

  11. Effect of the Healthy Schools Program on prevalence of overweight and obesity in California schools, 2006-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kristine A; Cotterman, Carolyn; Crawford, Pat; Stevelos, JoAnn; Archibald, Abbie

    2015-05-21

    The Alliance for a Healthier Generation's Healthy Schools Program (HSP) is a national evidence-based obesity-prevention initiative aimed at providing the schools in greatest need with onsite training and technical assistance (TTA) and consultation with national experts (HSP national advisors) to create sustainable healthy change in schools' nutrition and physical activity environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of HSP on the prevalence of overweight and obesity in California schools, from HSP's inception in 2006 through 2012. We used statewide body mass index (BMI) data collected annually from 5th-, 7th-, and 9th-grade students to determine whether enrolling in the HSP's onsite intervention reduced the prevalence of overweight and obesity in intervention schools (n = 281) versus propensity-score matched control schools (n = 709) and whether increasing exposure to the program (TTA and contact with HSP national advisors) was associated with reductions in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Analyses showed no difference between HSP schools and control schools in overweight or obesity prevalence. However, program exposure varied widely among participating schools, and each additional contact with TTA or HSP national advisors was associated with a 0.3% decline in overweight and obesity prevalence (P schools in reducing obesity. Although participation in HSP alone was not sufficient to improve weight status in California schools, there was a clear dose-response relationship to the program. HSP serves as an effective model for addressing childhood obesity among engaged schools.

  12. Racial and ethnic disparities in postpartum care and contraception in California's Medicaid program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel de Bocanegra, Heike; Braughton, Monica; Bradsberry, Mary; Howell, Mike; Logan, Julia; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla

    2017-07-01

    Considerable racial and ethnic disparities have been identified in maternal and infant health in the United States, and access to postpartum care likely contributes to these disparities. Contraception is an important component of postpartum care that helps women and their families achieve optimal interpregnancy intervals and avoid rapid repeat pregnancies and preterm births. National quality measurements to assess postpartum contraception are being developed and piloted. To assess racial/ethnic variation in receipt of postpartum care and contraception among low-income women in California. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 199,860 Californian women aged 15-44 with a Medicaid-funded delivery in 2012. We examined racial/ethnic variation of postpartum care and contraception using multivariable logistic regression to control for maternal age, language, cesarean delivery, Medicaid program, and residence in a primary care shortage area (PCSA). Only one-half of mothers attended a postpartum visit (49.4%) or received contraception (47.5%). Compared with white women, black women attended postpartum visits less often (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.76), were less likely to receive any contraception (aOR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.78-0.89) and were less likely to receive highly effective contraception (aOR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.58-0.71). Women with Spanish as their primary language were more likely to get any contraception (aOR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.11-1.19) but had significantly lower odds of receiving a highly effective method (aOR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.90-0.99) compared with women with English as their primary language. Similarly, women in PCSAs had a greater odds of getting any contraception (aOR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.03-1.09), but 24% lower odds of getting highly effective contraception than women not living in PCSAs (aOR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.73-0.79). Significant racial/ethnic disparities exist among low-income Californian mothers' likelihood of attending

  13. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Pala, California, Roundtable Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-03-23

    The Pala, California, DOE Tribal Roundtable convened at 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 23, at the Pala Resort. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy). Tracey LeBeau, Director of the DOE Office of Indian Energy and Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director-Policy of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, attended. Tribal leaders and representatives from five tribal communities also attended. There were thirteen participants. The meeting was facilitated by Debra Drecksel, Senior Program Manager, Senior Facilitator, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). She was assisted by Lindsey Sexton, Program Associate, U.S. Institute.   

  14. Public Education for Household Mitigation and Preparedness for Earthquakes in California: The Research Base and Program Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileti, D. S.

    2007-05-01

    This presentation summarizes the findings from previous research in the social sciences regarding the factors and processes that enhance the effectivenss of public education efforts for household mitigation and preparedness actions for earthquakes. The conclusions from this research base include that the most effective efforts are those that are designed as an ongoing process with multiple channels and types of public communications. Second, an anticipated survey to measure household mitigation and preparedness actions in the State of California is sumarized. This survey will measure actual household mitigation and preparedness actions taken, knowledge, perceived risk, and other factors that previous research suggests impact these actions and perceptions; each of these factors are reviewed. The presentation then illustrates how knowledge from previous research will be blended with the information obtained from the planned survey in order to desgin a state-of-the-art public education campaign in California that maximizes household mitigation and preparedness for earthquakes and mega-earthquakes. Among other things, this requires that government agencies, NGOs, and provate sector organizations cooperate to coordinate their efforts to maximize program effectivenss. Finally, how this program might be evaluated to inform program refinements over time is discussed.

  15. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 2. Confirmation McClellan AFB, California. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    Professors Citizens Advisory Ccimittee - 208 Planning, Southern California Association of Governments Environmental Management Institute, University of...U.S. Geological Survey to identify groundwater and surface water resources of Pierce o183# ES SNGINENING - CIENCE Robert E. Brogden (Continued) County...Performed engineering study of nonstructural and ecologically sound methods of runoff reduction and flood control. Identified management practices which

  16. Summary of the Script and Program Review of Sesame Street by the Chicano Study Center, University of California in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Television Workshop, New York, NY.

    The Sesame Street research staff summarizes comments on the fourth season of the program by the Chicano Study Center of the University of California at Los Angeles. Included are reviews of Sesame Street scripts and programs containing Spanish content; sex role observations; examples of modeling behavior; and comments on segments which challenge…

  17. Maximizing the Impact of Digital Media Campaigns to Promote Smoking Cessation: A Case Study of the California Tobacco Control Program and the California Smokers' Helpline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn Ok; Momin, Behnoosh; Hansen, Heather; Duke, Jennifer; Harms, Kristin; McCartney, Amanda; Neri, Antonio; Kahende, Jennifer; Zhang, Lei; Stewart, Sherri L

    2014-01-01

    Digital media are often used to encourage smoking cessation by increasing quitline call volume through direct promotion to smokers or indirect promotion to smoker proxies. The documentation of a program's experiences utilizing digital media is necessary to develop both the knowledge base and a set of best practices. This case study highlights the use of digital media in a proxy-targeted campaign to promote the California Smokers' Helpline to health care professionals from October 2009 to September 2012. We describe the iterative development of the campaign's digital media activities and report campaign summaries of web metrics (website visits, webinar registrations, downloads of online materials, online orders for promotional materials) and media buy (gross impressions) tracking data. The campaign generated more than 2.7 million gross impressions from digital media sources over 3 years. Online orders for promotional materials increased almost 40% over the course of the campaign. A clearly defined campaign strategy ensured that there was a systematic approach in developing and implementing campaign activities and ensuring that lessons learned from previous years were incorporated. Discussion includes lessons learned and recommendations for future improvements reported by campaign staff to inform similar efforts using digital media.

  18. THE STUDENTS PERCEPTION ABOUT THE COMPETITIVENESS OF THE ACADEMIC TUTORING PROGRAM AT THE AUTONOMOUS UNIVERSITY OF BAJA CALIFORNIA LA PERCEPCION DE LOS ALUMNOS SOBRE LA COMPETITIVIDAD DEL PROGRAMA DE TUTORIAS ACADEMICAS EN LA UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE BAJA CALIFORNIA

    OpenAIRE

    Leonel Rosiles Lopez; Cruz Elda Macias Teran; Santiago Perez Alcala; Julio Cesar Leon Prieto

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of academic tutoring as a way to keep students informed properly, avoid lagging student dropouts, and increase terminal efficiency. The research was conducted at the Faculty of Administrative Sciences (FCA) of the Autonomous University of Baja California (UABC), Mexico. From a quantitative perspective we analyzed competitiveness of the mentoring program. The purpose of this study is to determine if the student knows the mentoring program, whether from his view, ...

  19. APLICACIÓN DE LA TECNICA DE IV GAMA PARA LA ELABORACIÓN DE ENSALADAS EVALUATION OF IV GAMA TECHNIQUE TO PREPARE VEGETABLE SALADS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Auris Damely García Méndez

    2008-01-01

    ... “Mediterránea y Cheff”. La metodología permitió seleccionar y evaluar la técnica de IV Gama, así como las buenas prácticas de manufactura para extender la vida comercial de las ensaladas y garantizar la seguridad alimentaria para la...

  20. Wetlands Research Program. Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation Manual. Appendix C. Section 1. Region O - California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    hastata L. Blue verbena V. scabra Vahi Verbena Verbesina enceLicides (Cay.) Golden crownbeard Benth. & Hook. Veronica americana (Raf.) Schweinitz...Rv ~d b .Scouler valerian R~ on$. Sitka valerian ’_ Gray California falsehellebore OBL rayt~sL Fringed falsehellebore Borren.L.Tall verbena FACW. 35...rN wv*, *. 7 7 _7 Indicator ’’ Scientific Name Common Name Status V. hracteata Lag. & Rodr. Prostrate verbena V. brasiZiensi8 Veil. Brasilian verbena V

  1. Program planner's guide to geothermal development in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, W.W.S.; Chambers, D.M.; Elliott, J.F.; Whittier, J.P.; Schnoor, J.J.; Blachman, S.

    1980-09-30

    The resource base, status of geothermal development activities, and the state's energy flow are summarized. The present and projected geothermal share of the energy market is discussed. The public and private sector initiatives supporting geothermal development in California are described. These include legislation to provide economic incentives, streamline regulation, and provide planning assistance to local communities. Private sector investment, research, and development activities are also described. The appendices provide a ready reference of financial incentives. (MHR)

  2. Effect of the Healthy Schools Program on Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in California Schools, 2006–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterman, Carolyn; Crawford, Pat; Stevelos, JoAnn; Archibald, Abbie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program (HSP) is a national evidence-based obesity-prevention initiative aimed at providing the schools in greatest need with onsite training and technical assistance (TTA) and consultation with national experts (HSP national advisors) to create sustainable healthy change in schools’ nutrition and physical activity environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of HSP on the prevalence of overweight and obesity in California schools, from HSP’s inception in 2006 through 2012. Methods We used statewide body mass index (BMI) data collected annually from 5th-, 7th-, and 9th-grade students to determine whether enrolling in the HSP’s onsite intervention reduced the prevalence of overweight and obesity in intervention schools (n = 281) versus propensity-score matched control schools (n = 709) and whether increasing exposure to the program (TTA and contact with HSP national advisors) was associated with reductions in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Results Analyses showed no difference between HSP schools and control schools in overweight or obesity prevalence. However, program exposure varied widely among participating schools, and each additional contact with TTA or HSP national advisors was associated with a 0.3% decline in overweight and obesity prevalence (P schools in reducing obesity. Although participation in HSP alone was not sufficient to improve weight status in California schools, there was a clear dose–response relationship to the program. HSP serves as an effective model for addressing childhood obesity among engaged schools. PMID:25996984

  3. California community water systems inventory dataset, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This data set contains information about all Community Water Systems in California. Data are derived from California Office of Drinking Water (ODW) Water Quality...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories California Pollution Prevention Program Annual Report February 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Janet S.; Farren, Laurie J.

    2008-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Pollution Prevention Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Pollution Prevention Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report for Calendar Year 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2006-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 Update program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories, California pollution prevention annual program report for calendar year 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farren, Laurie J. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-07-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Pollution Prevention Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the ''SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual''. The 2005 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Pollution Prevention Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  7. Implementation of a food insecurity screening and referral program in student-run free clinics in San Diego, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny Smith

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Food insecurity is associated with many poor health outcomes yet is not routinely addressed in clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to implement a food insecurity screening and referral program in Student-run Free Clinics (SRFC and to document the prevalence of food insecurity screening in this low-income patient population. All patients seen in three SRFC sites affiliated with one institution in San Diego, California were screened for food insecurity using the 6-item United States Department of Agriculture (USDA Food Security Survey between January and July 2015 and referred to appropriate resources. The percentage of patients who were food insecure was calculated. The screening rate was 92.5% (430/463 patients, 74.0% (318/430 were food insecure, including 30.7% (132/430 with very low food security. A food insecurity registry and referral tracking system revealed that by January 2016, 201 participants were receiving monthly boxes of food onsite, 66 used an off-site food pantry, and 64 were enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP. It is possible to implement a food insecurity screening and referral program into SRFCs. The prevalence of food insecurity in this population was remarkably high yet remained largely unknown until this program was implemented. Other health care settings, particularly those with underserved patient populations, should consider implementing food insecurity screening and referral programs.

  8. Deactivation of the SR-71 Program at Beale Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    240 Annual 80 - - 1 hcur 188 470 - Annual 41 - 100 1 houar 11 23,000 40,000 8 hOUZ 8 10,000 10,000 s02 1 hour 26 655 - 3 hor 24 - 1,300 24 hour 21 131...addition, Mr. Robert Holland of California Depart- ment of Fish and Game (CDFG) was contacted to determine if there were any records of State-listed plants...Assessment: Beale Air Force Base Robert Woodson, Beale AFB Engineering Group John Thomson, Beale AFB Engineering Group Tracy Kissler, Beale AFB Engineering

  9. Groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    More than 40 percent of California's drinking water is from groundwater. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter referred to as San Diego) is one of the study units being evaluated. The San Diego study unit is approximately 3,900 square miles and consists of the Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, and 12 other alluvial basins (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). The study unit also consists of all areas outside defined groundwater basins that are within 3 kilometers of a public-supply well. The study unit was separated, based primarily on hydrogeologic settings, into four study areas: Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, Alluvial Basins, and Hard Rock (Wright and others, 2005). The sampling density for the Hard Rock study area, which consists of areas outside of groundwater basins, was much lower than for the other study areas. Consequently, aquifer proportions for the Hard Rock study area are not used to calculate the aquifer proportions shown by the pie charts. An assessment of groundwater quality for the Hard Rock study area can be found in Wright and Belitz, 2011. The temperatures in the coastal part of the study unit are mild with dry summers, moist winters, and an average annual rainfall of about 10 inches. The temperatures in the mountainous eastern part of the study unit are cooler than in the coastal part, with an annual precipitation of about 45 inches that occurs mostly in the winter. The primary aquifers consist of Quaternary-age alluvium and weathered bedrock in the Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, and Alluvial Basins study areas, whereas in the Hard Rock study area the primary aquifers consist mainly of fractured and

  10. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): Optimal Tiling of Dense Surveys with a Multi-Object Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, A.; Driver, S. P.; Norberg, P.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Peacock, J. A.; Cameron, E.; Croom, S. M.; Doyle, I. F.; Frenk, C. S.; Hill, D. T.; Jones, D. H.; van Kampen, E.; Kelvin, L. S.; Kuijken, K.; Nichol, R. C.; Parkinson, H. R.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Sharp, R. G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Thomas, D.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2010-03-01

    A heuristic greedy algorithm is developed for efficiently tiling spatially dense redshift surveys. In its first application to the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) redshift survey we find it rapidly improves the spatial uniformity of our data, and naturally corrects for any spatial bias introduced by the 2dF multi-object spectrograph. We make conservative predictions for the final state of the GAMA redshift survey after our final allocation of time, and can be confident that even if worse than typical weather affects our observations, all of our main survey requirements will be met.

  11. Joint environmental assessment 1997--2001 of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Top Virus Control Program for Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The DOE, Naval Petroleum reserves in California (NPRC), proposes to sign an Amendment to the Cooperative Agreement and Supplement with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to extend the term of the Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) in California. This program involves Malathion spraying on NPRC lands to control the beet leafhopper, over a five year period from 1997 through 2001. It is expected that approximately 330 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 (NPR-1) and approximately 9,603 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 2 (NPR-2) will be treated with Malathion annually by CDFA during the course of this program. The actual acreage subject to treatment can vary from year to year. Pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, the potential impacts of the proposed action were analyzed in a Joint Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1011) with the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) acting as lead agency, in consultation with the CDFA, and the DOE acting as a cooperating agency. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the conduct of the Curly Top Virus Control Program in California is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is consequently issuing a FONSI.

  12. California GAMA Special Study: Importance of River Water Recharge to Selected Groundwater Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Ate [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, Jean E. [California State Univ. East Bay (CalState), Hayward, CA (United States); Singleton, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Esser, Bradley K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-21

    River recharge represents 63%, 86% and 46% of modern groundwater in the Mojave Desert, Owens Valley, and San Joaquin Valley, respectively. In pre-modern groundwater, river recharge represents a lower fraction: 36%, 46%, and 24% respectively. The importance of river water recharge in the San Joaquin valley has nearly doubled and is likely the result of a total increase of recharge of 40%, caused by river water irrigation return flows. This emphasizes the importance of recharge of river water via irrigation for renewal of groundwater resources. Mountain front recharge and local precipitation contribute to recharge of desert groundwater basins in part as the result of geological features focusing scarce precipitation promoting infiltration. River water recharges groundwater systems under lower temperatures and with larger water table fluctuations than local precipitation recharge. Surface storage is limited in time and volume, as evidenced by cold river recharge temperatures resulting from fast recharge, compared to the large capacity for subsurface storage. Groundwater banking of seasonal surface water flows therefore appears to be a natural and promising method for increasing the resilience of water supply systems. The distinct isotopic and noble gas signatures of river water recharge, compared to local precipitation recharge, reflecting the source and mechanism of recharge, are valuable constraints for numerical flow models.

  13. California Colleges and Universities 2008: A Guide to California's Degree-Granting Institutions and Degree, Certificate, and Credential Programs. Commission Report 08-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Californians can earn college degrees or certificates or get job-related training at a variety of institutions both public and private, throughout the state. This guide is divided into three parts designed for locating information about higher education in a number of ways. Part I lists California's degree-granting colleges and universities in…

  14. The impact of STEM enrichment programs on California's high school Latino/a seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrotzki, Gretchen

    This study seeks to determine if Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) enrichment programs, such as summer camp programs, after-school programs, or STEM-based high schools motivate Latino high school graduates to enter into STEM bachelor programs in college as compared to those students enrolled in non-STEM enrichment programs. A mixed-methods approach consisting of pre- and post- surveys and focus group interviews were used to determine students' level of interest in STEM, confidence in their ability to do well in STEM subjects, consideration to pursue advanced courses in STEM, and consideration to pursue a job in STEM. An average change (Post-Pre) across survey questions was calculated for each student. This provided an overall change across all variables and allowed for one variable called "Total Interest" to be derived.

  15. Comparison of Sea Floor Character in Two Areas Mapped by the California Seafloor and Coastal Mapping Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, G. R.

    2016-02-01

    Since the California Seafloor and Coastal Mapping Program (CSCMP) began in 2008 multibeam echo sounder (MBES) data have been acquired in all mainland State Waters (shoreline to 3 nautical miles). As of this writing a suite of map products derived from the data has been published for 22 of the network of 83 CSCMP map blocks along the mainland coast. These publications provide the first opportunity to contrast physical habitats in different areas; here we compare the seafloor character in a set of 6 blocks along the mainland coast of the Santa Barbara Channel (Hueneme Canyon to Refugio Beach), with that of a similarly sized subset of blocks along the more energetic coast of Northern California (Salt Point to Drakes Bay). Seafloor character, one of the products being produced for the CSCMP, is a raster with a small number of substrate classes (soft-flat, hard-flat, and hard-rugose) designed for inclusion in multi-variant analysis of fisheries data that include visual observations of substrate type. Seafloor character is derived with bottom-video supervised maximum likelihood classification of MBES backscatter intensity data and vector ruggedness derived from the MBES bathymetry data. Typically areas of fine-grained sand and mud with infauna occupy the soft-flat areas, hard-flat areas are a mix of low-relief coarse sediment and flat bedrock pavement with sparse epifauna, and hard-rugose areas are highly valued rocky reef habitat with a diverse assemblage of epifauna. In the Northern California area waters less than 100 m deep the percentage of hard-rugose habitat is 8% of the seafloor whereas in the Santa Barbara area it is 0.2%. In both areas Marine Protected Areas contain a higher percentage of hard-rugose habitat than is found in the larger surrounding region. The scarcity of hard-rugose habitat in the Santa Barbara area increases the value of protected habitat in the Channel Islands bounding the channel as well as artificial habitat created by offshore oil rigs.

  16. Ahmed Shoukry“, Gama] A El-Kadyl and Fathi M Diabz

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bionomics of ticks collected from Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. 1. Biology of Hyalomma schulzei (Olenev) (Acari: Ixodidae) under laboratory conditions. Ahmed Shoukry“, Gama] A El-Kadyl and Fathi M Diabz. 1. Faculty of Agriculture, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt. 2. Research Institute of Medical Entomology, Cairo, Egypt.

  17. Endangered species and cultural resources program Naval petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    In FY96, Enterprise Advisory Services, Inc. (EASI) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on federal properties. Population monitoring activities were conducted for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. Kit fox abundance and distribution was assessed by live-trapping over a 329-km{sup 2} area. Kit fox reproduction and mortality were assessed by radiocollaring and monitoring 22 adults and two pups. Reproductive success and litter size were determined through live-trapping and den observations. Rates and sources of kit fox mortality were assessed by recovering dead radiocollared kit foxes and conducting necropsies to determine cause of death. Abundance of coyotes and bobcats, which compete with kit foxes, was determined by conducting scent station surveys. Kit fox diet was assessed through analysis of fecal samples collected from live-trapped foxes. Abundance of potential prey for kit foxes was determined by conducting transect surveys for lagornorphs and live-trapping small mammals.

  18. NWHL final report 1984 [ to ] 1985 lead poisoning monitoring program Modoc National Wildlife Refuge California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Twelve carcasses were submitted for necropsy from Modoc National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) during the 1984-85 Lead Poisoning Monitoring Program; one Canada goose was...

  19. National Marine Sanctuary Polygons, California, 2009, NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Marine Sanctuary Program manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of Thesee sanctuaries are...

  20. Embracing Comprehensive Mental Health and Social Services Programs to Serve Children Under California's Mental Health Services Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, Katharan D; Snowden, Lonnie R

    2017-03-01

    Authorized under California's Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) of 2004, full service partnership (FSP) programs address social welfare and other human service needs of seriously mentally ill adults and children who are especially socially and economically vulnerable or who are untreated or insufficiently treated. Because FSP enrollment should reflect greater individual and community distress, we investigated whether counties' enrollment of children into FSPs came from mental health system caseloads with higher crisis use, assessed trauma and substance abuse problems; and from counties which had more foster care placement, more child poverty, lower median household incomes and more unemployment. We addressed these questions in 36 counties over 34 quarters after MHSA's onset. Results indicated greater FSP enrollment for children was associated with higher county unemployment and foster care placement rates and with mental health systems which had increasing children's crisis rates over the study period. These findings suggest that underservice and community adversity prompt officials to adopt and make greater use of children's FSP programming, in keeping with MHSA's intensions.

  1. Malabar Reading Program for Mexican-American Children, Los Angeles, California. Elementary Program in Compensatory Education, 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    This program attempted to raise the reading levels of Mexican-American children (prekindergarten through grade three) through individualized instruction, self-instruction, curriculum change, parent participation, and cultural activities. It was assumed that children would become capable of self-regulating learning behavior only when they had…

  2. California Bioregions

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California regions developed by the Inter-agency Natural Areas Coordinating Committee (INACC) were digitized from a 1:1,200,000 California Department of Fish and...

  3. Research and development conference: California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    CIEE's first Research and Development Conference will introduce you to some of the results achieved to date through CIEE-sponsored multiyear research performed in three programs: building energy efficiency, air quality impacts of energy efficiency, and end-use resource planning. Results from scoping studies, Director's discretionary research, and exploratory research will also be featured.

  4. Biological assessment: water hyacinth control program for the Sacramento/ San Joaquin River Delta of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    A detailed Biological Assessment was developed for the proposed Areawide Water Hyacinth Control Program to outline the procedures that will be used to control this invasive aquatic plant in the Sacramento/ San Joaquin River Delta, and to help determine if this action is expected to threaten endanger...

  5. Framing a Program Designed to Train New Chemistry/Physics Teachers for California Outlying Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodily, Gerald P., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines for a new high school chemistry and physics teacher training program. Eleven participants were interviewed who attended daylong workshops, every other Saturday, for 10 months. The instructors used Modeling Instruction pedagogy and curriculum. All the instructors had high school teaching…

  6. Elk-effects vegetation monitoring program for Tomales Point Elk Range, Point Reyes National Seashore, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachern, Kathryn; Semenoff-Irving, Marcia; van der Leeden, Pamela

    2000-01-01

    The monitoring program for elk effects on Tomales Point vegetation is designed to provide information on how tule elk grazing affects plant communities and rare species. The basic objective of the program is to show whether the elk are driving the vegetation into an unacceptable state by their grazing. The expectation is that as elk numbers increase, grazing pressure will increase too, resulting in unacceptable levels of any or all of the following: low vegetation ground cover, poor nutritional quality for the elk, undesirable increases in weedy species, unacceptable loss of native plant biodiversity, population declines in rare plants, population declines in plants used for food and nectar by the endangered silverspot butterfly, and increased erosion.The monitoring program has 3 basic components designed to provide complementary information on different aspects of the elk-vegetation system. Long-term plant community monitoring along permanent transects will show how plant species composition and cover are changing since cattle removal in 1979, and it will show whether any of he undesirable traits listed above are developing in the vegetation. However, monitoring these transects alone will not tell us what the effects of continued grazing by elk are apart from changes the vegetation would be undergoing anyway. In order to tease apart the elk effects from change that is happening because of cattle removal, elk exclosures are needed. By sampling inside and outside exclosures, we will be able to see how elk are modifying the rates and directions of change in the vegetation that would be happening in their absence. In a sense, the exclosures serve as a “check” on elk effects. They will allow us to interpret how much of the change is due to elk and how much can be attributed to other processes such as natural succession or weather patterns. This information will allow us to analyze whether changing elk management will have a desirable effect on the vegetation

  7. Temperature, salinity, radioisotopes, sediments, and other data from Phase II Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Monitoring Program in the Santa Maria Basin, California from 21 Oct 1986 to 08 Mar 1987 (NODC Accession 8900198)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are part of the data collected for the California Phase II OCS Monitoring Program of the Santa Maria Basin by Dr. Hyland from Battelle Ocean Science and...

  8. (University of California, Davis) annual report for radioimmunotherapy program, Year 4, (1986)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-28

    The goal of this program is to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach to delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. These basic questions refer to the choice of antibody fragments related to their biokinetics, the variation of the biokinetics with variations in the radiochemistry of labeling and the radionuclide used to label, the radionuclide radiation dosimetry, and the feasibility calculated from quantitative imaging in patients and implementation of a proven kinetic model. To approach these problems this program has five discrete, but interrelated aims. Radionuclide choices for effective therapy for solid tumors and bone marrow infiltrating tumor cells; The development of radiochemistry to optimize tumor uptake and increase non-target tissue clearance of the radiopharmaceuticals; Further development and documentation of the peri-fusion system for screening antibodies for human tumor uptake, normal tissue cross-reactivity, and tissue stability of new antibody radiometal linkages; Quantitation in vivo of pharmacokinetics and radiation dosimetry for radioiodinated and radiometal chelate-labeled antibodies and fragments; and Verification of dosimetry predictions and therapy feasibility in patients using selected I-131 and Cu-67 radioimmunopharmaceuticals.

  9. A KiDS weak lensing analysis of assembly bias in GAMA galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvornik, Andrej; Cacciato, Marcello; Kuijken, Konrad; Viola, Massimo; Hoekstra, Henk; Nakajima, Reiko; van Uitert, Edo; Brouwer, Margot; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Fenech Conti, Ian; Farrow, Daniel J.; Herbonnet, Ricardo; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hopkins, Andrew M.; McFarland, John; Norberg, Peder; Schneider, Peter; Sifón, Cristóbal; Valentijn, Edwin; Wang, Lingyu

    2017-07-01

    We investigate possible signatures of halo assembly bias for spectroscopically selected galaxy groups from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey using weak lensing measurements from the spatially overlapping regions of the deeper, high-imaging-quality photometric Kilo-Degree Survey. We use GAMA groups with an apparent richness larger than 4 to identify samples with comparable mean host halo masses but with a different radial distribution of satellite galaxies, which is a proxy for the formation time of the haloes. We measure the weak lensing signal for groups with a steeper than average and with a shallower than average satellite distribution and find no sign of halo assembly bias, with the bias ratio of 0.85^{+0.37}_{-0.25}, which is consistent with the Λ cold dark matter prediction. Our galaxy groups have typical masses of 1013 M⊙ h-1, naturally complementing previous studies of halo assembly bias on galaxy cluster scales.

  10. Estudo do efeito do uso de colimador na sonda gama utilizada em cirurgia radioguiada

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Iran José Oliveira da; Khoury,Helen Jamil; Lemos,Márcia Rosana Leite de; Almeida Filho,Paulo José de; Guimarães,Maria Inês Calil Cury

    2006-01-01

    OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste trabalho consiste em estudar a influência da resolução espacial da sonda gama Europrobe que é utilizada em cirurgia radioguiada. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Na técnica de cirurgia radioguiada, após a injeção de um radiotraçador no tumor primário, é utilizada uma sonda detectora de radiação gama a fim de determinar a localização do linfonodo sentinela. Para simular a região dos pontos de injeção do radiotraçador e o linfonodo sentinela, duas fontes de Tc-99m, com 20,42 MBq ...

  11. Effect of a Smoking Cessation Program on Sexual Function Recovery Following Robotic Prostatectomy at Kaiser Permanente Southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavy, Seena; Kilday, Patrick S; Slezak, Jeff M; Abdelsayed, George A; Harrison, Teresa N; Jacobsen, Steven J; Chien, Gary W

    2017-01-01

    The association between cigarette smoking and erectile dysfunction has been well established. Studies demonstrate improvements in erectile rigidity and tumescence as a result of smoking cessation. Radical prostatectomy is also associated with worsening of erectile function secondary to damage to the neurovascular bundles. To our knowledge, no previous studies have examined the relationship between smoking cessation after prostate cancer diagnosis and its effect on sexual function following robotic prostatectomy. We sought to demonstrate the utility of a smoking cessation program among patients with prostate cancer who planned to undergo robotic prostatectomy at Kaiser Permanente Southern California. All patients who underwent robotic prostatectomy between March 2011 and April 2013 with known smoking status were included, and were followed-up through November 2014. All smokers were offered the smoking cessation program, which included wellness coaching, tobacco cessation classes, and pharmacotherapy. Patients completed the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-26 (EPIC-26) health-related quality-of-life (HR-QOL) survey at baseline and postoperatively at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. There were 2 groups based on smoking status: Continued smoking vs quitting group. Patient's age, Charlson Comorbidity Score, body mass index, educational level, median household income, family history of prostate cancer, race/ethnicity, language, nerve-sparing status, and preoperative/postoperative clinicopathology and EPIC-26 HR-QOL scores were examined. A linear regression model was used to predict sexual function recovery. A total of 139 patients identified as smokers underwent the smoking cessation program and completed the EPIC-26 surveys. Fifty-six patients quit smoking, whereas 83 remained smokers at last follow-up. All demographics and clinicopathology were matched between the 2 cohorts. Smoking cessation, along with bilateral nerve-sparing status, were the only 2 modifiable

  12. New Program for New Faculty Mentoring at California State University, Chico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, R.; McCarthy, K.; Phillips, C.; Silliman, K.; Fosen, C.; Thomas, M.

    2015-12-01

    CSU, Chico is a comprehensive university with high expectations for both teaching (4 courses per semester) and scholarly work. In an attempt to introduce faculty to their new positions, a two-day New Faculty Orientation has been offered for the last two decades. In AY 2014-15, in an attempt to improve the first year experience for new faculty, the Office of Faculty Affairs established and assessed a New Faculty Mentoring program. Eight college-based mentors were selected based on recommendations by College Deans who suggested successful teachers and scholars who could provide the social and leadership skills to effectively guide others. Based on a needs-assessment survey new faculty completed during orientation, mentors met with their new faculty cohort at least monthly to discuss campus resources, host workshops and provide other support in areas of time management, work-life balance, teaching pedagogies, discipline-specific internal and external funding resources, student support resources, and the preparation of Review/Retention documents. Mentors were paid a small stipend for their work and met twice each semester to discuss readings on mentoring best practices, their mentoring activities with new faculty and to compare the needs of their mentees. Survey results from 28 of 37 new faculty respondents indicate they valued Review/Retention workshops, mentor reviews of teaching and the opportunity to visit mentor classrooms for examples of good teaching practices. Social events helped establish cohorts, although some mentees indicated that some cohorts were too large. An unforeseen outcome was recognition that mid-year hires need to also be included in new faculty cohort groups. Moving forward, mentors will continue to work with their original mentees for a 2nd year. A new group of mentors will be identified for faculty starting in fall 2015 who will work with smaller first-year faculty cohorts and will coordinate with the first generation mentors for peer support.

  13. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): active galactic nuclei in pairs of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Yjan A.; Owers, Matt S.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Croom, Scott M.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Baldry, Ivan K.; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Cluver, Michelle E.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Davies, Luke J. M.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Gunawardhana, Madusha L. P.; Loveday, Jonathan; Taylor, Edward N.; Wang, Lingyu

    2017-03-01

    There exist conflicting observations on whether or not the environment of broad- and narrow-line active galatic nuclei (AGN) differ and this consequently questions the validity of the AGN unification model. The high spectroscopic completeness of the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey makes it ideal for a comprehensive analysis of the close environment of galaxies. To exploit this, and conduct a comparative analysis of the environment of broad- and narrow-line AGN within GAMA, we use a double-Gaussian emission line fitting method to model the more complex line profiles associated with broad-line AGN. We select 209 type 1 (I.e. unobscured), 464 type 1.5-1.9 (partially obscured), and 281 type 2 (obscured) AGN within the GAMA II data base. Comparing the fractions of these with neighbouring galaxies out to a pair separation of 350 kpc h-1 and Δz except at separations less than 20 kpc h-1 where our observations suggest an excess of type 2 AGN in close pairs. We analyse the properties of the galaxies neighbouring our AGN and find no significant differences in colour or the star formation activity of these galaxies. Further to this, we find that Σ5 is also consistent between broad- and narrow-line AGN. We conclude that the observations presented here are consistent with AGN unification.

  14. Evaluation of respiratory protection programs and practices in California hospitals during the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Stella; Materna, Barbara; Goldmacher, Suzi; Zipprich, Jennifer; D'Alessandro, Maryann; Novak, Debra; Harrison, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Emergence of the novel 2009 influenza A H1N1 virus in California led to an evaluation of hospital respiratory protection programs (RPPs) and practices by the California Department of Public Health during the 2009-2010 influenza season. Onsite evaluation of 16 hospitals consisted of interviews with managers and health care workers about RPPs and practices, review of written RPPs, and limited observations of personnel using respirators. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. All hospitals had implemented policies requiring the minimum use of N95 filtering facepiece respirators when working with patients with H1N1 virus infection; 95.5% of health care workers (n = 199) reported they would wear at least this level of protection when in close contact with a patient with confirmed or suspected H1N1 virus infection. However, evaluation of written RPPs indicated deficiencies in required areas, most commonly in recordkeeping, designation of a program administrator, program evaluation, employee training, and fit testing procedures. Health care workers were aware of respiratory protection required when providing care for patients with confirmed or suspected H1N1 virus infection. Hospitals should improve written RPPs, fully implement written procedures, and conduct periodic program evaluation to ensure effectiveness of respirator use for health care worker protection. Increased accessibility of resources tailored for hospital respirator program administrators may be helpful. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Examining Lead Exposures in California through State-Issued Health Alerts for Food Contamination and an Exposure-Based Candy Testing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Margaret A; Nelson, Kali; Sanford, Eric; Clarity, Cassidy; Emmons-Bell, Sophia; Gorukanti, Anuhandra; Kennelly, Patrick

    2017-10-26

    In California, the annual number of children under age 6 y of age with blood lead levels (BLL) ≥10μg/dL is estimated at over 1,000 cases, and up to 10,000 cases when BLL between 4.5 and 9.5 μg/dL are included. State-issued health alerts for food contamination provide one strategy for tracking sources of food-related lead exposures. As well, California passed legislation in 2006 for the Food and Drug Branch (FDB) of the state health department to test and identify lead in candy. This report presents health alert data from California over a 14-y period, compares data before and after the candy testing program began, and examines country of origin, ZIP code data, and time from candy testing to release of health alerts for lead-contaminated candies for 2011-2012. After 2007, health alerts issued for lead in candy and food increased significantly. Analysis of candy-testing data indicated that multiple counties and ZIP codes were affected. Seventeen candies with high lead concentrations were identified, resulting in rapid dissemination (lead exposures from state-based food and candy testing programs provides an opportunity to identify and immediately act to remove nonpaint sources of lead affecting children. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP2582.

  16. Multiproxy record of the last interglacial (MIS 5e) off central and northern California, U.S.A., from Ocean Drilling Program sites 1018 and 1020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, Richard Z.; Dowsett, H.J.; Barron, J.A.; Heusser, L.; Ravelo, A.C.; Mix, A.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and climatic conditions during the last interglacial (about 125,000 years ago) along the Central and Northern California coastal region are interpreted from study of marine cores recovered by the Ocean Drilling Program at sites 1018 and 1020. Marine microfossil and pollen assemblages, oxygen isotopes in benthic foraminifers, physical properties, and calcium carbonate contents of cored sediments are proxies indicating strong links between the marine and terrestrial environments during marine isotope stage 5 (MIS 5). At the beginning of the last interglacial (MIS 5e), reduction in global ice volume, increase in surface temperature, and warming of air temperature along the Central and Northern California coast were synchronous within the resolution of our sampling record.

  17. Nitrate Contamination of Deep Aquifers in the Salinas Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J. E.; Esser, B. K.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Holtz, M.; Roberts, S. K.; Singleton, M. J.; Visser, A.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Belitz, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Salinas Valley, known as 'the salad bowl of the world', has been an agricultural center for more than 100 years. Irrigated row crops such as lettuce and strawberries dominate both land use and water use. Groundwater is the exclusive supply for both irrigation and drinking water. Some irrigation wells and most public water supply wells in the Salinas Valley are constructed to draw water from deep portions of the aquifer system, where contamination by nitrate is less likely than in the shallow portions of the aquifer system. However, a number of wells with top perforations greater than 75 m deep, screened below confining or semi-confining units, have nitrate concentrations greater than the Maximum Contaminant Limit (MCL) of 45 mg/L as NO3-. This study uses nitrate concentrations from several hundred irrigation, drinking water, and monitoring wells (Monterey County Water Resources Agency, 1997), along with tritium-helium groundwater ages acquired at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory through the State of California Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program (reported in Kulongoski et al., 2007 and in Moran et al., in press), to identify nitrate 'hot spots' in the deep aquifer and to examine possible modes of nitrate transport to the deep aquifer. In addition, observed apparent groundwater ages are compared with the results of transport simulations that use particle tracking and a stochastic-geostatistical framework to incorporate aquifer heterogeneity to determine the distribution of travel times from the water table to each well (Fogg et al., 1999). The combined evidence from nitrate, tritium, tritiogenic 3He, and radiogenic 4He concentrations, reveals complex recharge and flow to the capture zone of the deep drinking water wells. Widespread groundwater pumping for irrigation accelerates vertical groundwater flow such that high nitrate groundwater reaches some deep drinking water wells. Deeper portions of the wells often draw in water that recharged

  18. Medical Care Provided Under California's Workers' Compensation Program: Effects of the Reforms and Additional Opportunities to Improve the Quality and Efficiency of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Barbara O; Timbie, Justin W; Sorbero, Melony E

    2011-01-01

    -containment expenses be reported by category of cost; compile information on the types of medical services that are subject to UR denials and expedited hearings; and expand ongoing monitoring of system performance. Finally, to increase administrative efficiency, California should use an external medical review organization to review medical-necessity determinations, and it should explore best practices of other WC programs and health programs in carrying out medical cost-containment activities.

  19. California Colleges and Universities, 2010: A Guide to California's Degree-Granting Institutions and Degree, Certificate, and Credential Programs. Commission Report 10-19

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Californians can earn college degrees or certificates or get job-related training at a variety of institutions both public and private, throughout the state. The variety of institutions, programs, degrees and other educational choices is wide. This Guide will help individuals identify options that suit their needs. This guide is divided into three…

  20. California Agribusiness Representatives' Perceptions of the North American Free Trade Agreement with Implications for Globalizing Academic Programs in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, M.

    1997-01-01

    A majority of 56 California agribusiness representatives surveyed were optimistic about the short-term impact of the North American Free Trade Act on agriculture. They remained concerned about trade barriers with Mexico, where little business was being conducted as yet. (SK)

  1. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 2. Confirmation/Quantification. Stage 1 Report for Beale AFB, Marysville, California. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-29

    an a cura (c’ of _j.I feet above mean sea level (MSL) by a California-licensed land surwesor. Lateral location was determined to an accuracy of +1...infectious characteristics may cause or significantly contribute to an increase in mortality or an increase in serious, irreversible, or incapacitating

  2. Updated Dosing Instructions for Immune Globulin (Human) GamaSTAN S/D for Hepatitis A Virus Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Noele P

    2017-09-15

    GamaSTAN S/D (Grifols Therapeutics, Inc., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina) is a sterile, preservative-free solution of immune globulin (IG) for intramuscular administration and is used for prophylaxis against disease caused by infection with hepatitis A, measles, varicella, and rubella viruses (1). GamaSTAN S/D is the only IG product approved by the Food and Drug Administration for hepatitis A virus (HAV) prophylaxis. In July 2017, GamaSTAN S/D prescribing information was updated with changes to the dosing instructions for hepatitis A preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis indications. These changes were made because of concerns about decreased HAV immunoglobulin G antibody (anti-HAV IgG) potency, likely resulting from decreasing prevalence of previous HAV infection among plasma donors, leading to declining anti-HAV antibody levels in donor plasma (2). No changes in dosing instructions were made for measles, varicella, or rubella preexposure or postexposure prophylaxis.

  3. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): halo formation times and halo assembly bias on the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojeiro, Rita; Eardley, Elizabeth; Peacock, John A.; Norberg, Peder; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Driver, Simon P.; Henriques, Bruno; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kafle, Prajwal R.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Thomas, Peter; Tonini, Chiara; Wild, Vivienne

    2017-09-01

    We present evidence for halo assembly bias as a function of geometric environment (GE). By classifying Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) galaxy groups as residing in voids, sheets, filaments or knots using a tidal tensor method, we find that low-mass haloes that reside in knots are older than haloes of the same mass that reside in voids. This result provides direct support to theories that link strong halo tidal interactions with halo assembly times. The trend with GE is reversed at large halo mass, with haloes in knots being younger than haloes of the same mass in voids. We find a clear signal of halo downsizing - more massive haloes host galaxies that assembled their stars earlier. This overall trend holds independently of GE. We support our analysis with an in-depth exploration of the L-Galaxies semi-analytic model, used here to correlate several galaxy properties with three different definitions of halo formation time. We find a complex relationship between halo formation time and galaxy properties, with significant scatter. We confirm that stellar mass to halo mass ratio, specific star formation rate (SFR) and mass-weighed age are reasonable proxies of halo formation time, especially at low halo masses. Instantaneous SFR is a poor indicator at all halo masses. Using the same semi-analytic model, we create mock spectral observations using complex star formation and chemical enrichment histories, which approximately mimic GAMA's typical signal-to-noise ratio and wavelength range. We use these mocks to assert how well potential proxies of halo formation time may be recovered from GAMA-like spectroscopic data.

  4. AFSC/NMML/CCEP: Natality rates of California sea lions at San Miguel Island, California during 1987-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem Program (AFSC/NOAA) initiated a long-term marking program of California sea lions (Zalophus...

  5. Reunión de consenso para recomendaciones sobre la gama de productos Restylane Skinboosters ®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Anido

    Full Text Available Con motivo del 10º aniversario de Restylane Skinboosters® se llevó a cabo una reunión de consenso entre un grupo de médicos españoles con el objetivo de aumentar el estándar de seguridad, mejorar y dar coherencia a los tratamientos, favorecer la buena praxis, posibilitar mejores resultados y aumentar la seguridad con esta gama de productos. Se realizó una revisión exhaustiva de los estudios clínicos publicados que demuestran cómo Restylane Skinboosters® mejora la calidad de la piel, disminuyendo la rugosidad, aumentando la firmeza e hidratación a largo plazo y reduciendo las cicatrices de acné, así como estimulando la creación de colágeno tipo I. Por último, los participantes pusieron en común su experiencia clínica para realizar un resumen de las indicaciones y los protocolos más empleados con esta gama de tratamientos.

  6. Modified method for bronchial suture by Ramirez Gama compared to separate stitches suture: experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Mayer de Moura

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To experimentally compare two classic techniques described for manual suture of the bronchial stump. METHODS: We used organs of pigs, with isolated trachea and lungs, preserved by refrigeration. We dissected 30 bronchi, which were divided into three groups of ten bronchi each, of 3mm, 5mm, and 7mm, respectively. In each, we performed the suture with simple, separated, extramucosal stitches in five other bronchi, and the technique proposed by Ramirez and modified by Santos et al in the other five. Once the sutures were finished, the anastomoses were tested using compressed air ventilation, applying an endotracheal pressure of 20mmHg. RESULTS: the Ramirez Gama suture was more effective in the bronchi of 3, 5 and 7 mm, and there was no air leak even after subjecting them to a tracheal pressure of 20mmHg. The simple interrupted sutures were less effective, with extravasation in six of the 15 tested bronchi, especially in the angles of the sutures. These figures were not significant (p = 0.08. CONCLUSION: manual sutures of the bronchial stumps were more effective when the modified Ramirez Gama suture was used in the caliber bronchi arms when tested with increased endotracheal pressure.

  7. Pewarisan Ketahanan Melon (Cucumis melo L. Kultivar Melodi Gama 3 terhadap Kyuri green mottle mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Setiadi Daryono

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Melon (Cucumis melo L. belongs to Cucurbitaceae. Melon has high potential to be developed as main horticultural product in Indonesia. Melon is one of important foreign exchange and is the fifth biggest horticulture commodity in Indonesia. One of the problems in melon farming is mosaic disease caused by Kyuri green mottle mosaic virus (KGMMV. KGMMV infection reduces the quality and the amount of melon production. Melon farmers suffered a significant financial loss. Melodi Gama 3 (MG3 is a high yielding melon cultivar from the Genetics Laboratory, Faculty of Biology, Universitas Gadjah Mada. The use of genetically resistant melon cultivar has beneficial outcome for agriculture sector. The aim of this research was to study the resistance’s inherintance to KGMMV in MG3 melon cultivar. Two cultivars of MG3, MG3|5and MG3|8, were cultivated in the greenhouse. MAI, Glamour, Ladika, and Action melon cultivars were used as references. Resistance of KGMMV was analyzed by symptom observation and serological detection using Double Antibody Sandwich Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (DAS-ELISA. DAS-ELISA result analyzed further to establish resistance category. Description to melon cultivar phenotype variation was done. The result of this research indicates that MG3 melon cultivar is tolerant to KGMMV. The decrease of MG3 optical density was directly related with the lowering of KGMMV symptoms. The character of tolerance to KGMMV was inherited from Melodi Gama 1 (MG1 cultivar.   INTISARI   Melon (Cucumis melo L. merupakan tanaman buah yang tergolong dalam familia Cucurbitaceae. Tanaman melon berpotensi untuk dikembangkan sebagai produk unggulan hortikultura di Indonesia. Tanaman melon juga merupakan salah satu penghasil devisa penting Indonesia dan menempati urutan ke-5 dari kelompok hortikultura. Salah satu kendala yang sering dihadapi oleh petani melon adalah penyakit mosaik yang disebabkan oleh Kyuri green mottle mosaic virus (KGMMV. Infeksi KGMMV pada

  8. USGS Northern California Shoreline Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has generated a comprehensive data clearinghouse of digital vector shorelines and shoreline...

  9. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  10. APLICACIÓN DE LA TECNICA DE IV GAMA PARA LA ELABORACIÓN DE ENSALADAS EVALUATION OF IV GAMA TECHNIQUE TO PREPARE VEGETABLE SALADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auris Damely García Méndez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de la aplicación de la técnica de IV Gama en la elaboración de ensaladas listas para el consumo fresco, esta dirigido al control del deterioro en lechuga americana (Lactuca sativa, zanahoria (Daucus carota L., radicchio (Cichorium intybus L. y escarola (Cichorium endivia L., destinadas a preparar ensaladas tipo “Mediterránea y Cheff”. La metodología permitió seleccionar y evaluar la técnica de IV Gama, así como las buenas prácticas de manufactura para extender la vida comercial de las ensaladas y garantizar la seguridad alimentaria para la población potencialmente consumidora. La aplicación combinada de soluciones de cloruro de calcio al 1%, acido cítrico a 0,1% y oxido de magnesio al 0,5% contribuyo a mantener la calidad de las ensaladas por un período de 16 días bajo refrigeración a 5 + 1 °C y 95 + 5% HR. En conclusión las técnicas ensayadas, posibilitaron extender el valor comercial de estos productos.The purpose of applying the fresh-cut technique in preparing vegetable salads ready for fresh consumption, was aimed to control the damage American lettuce (Lactuca sativa; carrot (Daucus carota L; Radicchio (Cichorium intybus L and endive (Cichorium endivia L.“ Mediterranean and Cheff” style salads were prepared for evaluation. The methodology allowed selecting and evaluating fresh-cut technique as well as good manufacturing practices, to extend the commercial life, and guarantee alimentary food safety to people. Use of 1% calcium chloride; 0.1% citric acid and 0.5% magnesium oxide solutions; allowed to maintain the quality of the salads for a period of 16 up to days, under refrigeration at 5± 1ºC and 95 ± 5 % RH. Finally the assays techniques let to extend the commercial value of these vegetables.

  11. An integrated study of earth resources in the State of California based on Skylab and supporting aircraft data. [environmental monitoring, tectonics, ecology, and forest management in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, R. N. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    Skylab data has been used: (1) as an aid to resource management in Northern California; (2) to assess and monitor change in the Southern California environment; and (3) for resource inventory and analysis of The California Desert Program.

  12. Proceedings of the 1994 DOE/NREL Hydrogen Program Review, April 18--21, 1994, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The US Department of Energy has conducted programs of research and development in hydrogen and related technologies since 1975. The current program, conducted in accordance with the DOE Hydrogen Program Plan FY 1993--FY 1997 published in June 1992, establishes program priorities and guidance for allocating funding. The core program, currently under the Office of Energy Management, supports projects in the areas of hydrogen production, storage, and systems research. At an annual program review, each research project is evaluated by a panel of technical experts for technical quality, progress, and programmatic benefit. This Proceedings of the April 1994 Hydrogen Program Review compiles all research projects supported by the Hydrogen Program during FY 1994. For those people interested in the status of hydrogen technologies, we hope that the Proceedings will serve as a useful technical reference. Individual reports are processed separately.

  13. Diversity and Structure of the Gama Gallery Forest in Central Brazil in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Tramontina Araujo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the diversity and structure of the tree community of the Gama gallery forest, in the Federal District, in 2009. A total of 151 permanent plots of 10×20 m were allocated continually along ten lines perpendicular to the watercourse. All individuals with diameter at breast height (DBH equal or greater than 10 cm were tagged and measured. In total, 114 species in 52 families and 96 genera were identified. The density was 643 ind.ha-1, the basal area was 31.52 m2.ha-1 and 13 species were frequently at least in 25% of the plots. The Shannon index was 3.91 nats.ind-1 and the Pielou index was 82%, expressing the good conservation condition and the high diversity of the vegetation. The diameter distribution curve showed an "inverted J" pattern.

  14. Uporaba gama zračenja u ispitivanju mehaničkih svojstava polimernih materijala

    OpenAIRE

    F. Greškovič; Varga, J.; Dulebová, Ľ.

    2012-01-01

    U članku je riječ o području primjene zračenja u poprečnom povezivanju polimera, što slijedi nakon injekcijskog prešanja. Glavni je cilj prezentiranog članka istražiti utjecaj doze zračenja na mehanička svojstva materijala: PP ispunjen s 15 % mineralnog punjenja – milovke. Mehanička svojstva – otpornost na vlak i otpornost na udar po Charpyju bila su ispitivana u ovisnosti o apsorbiranoj dozi gama zraka u raznim uvjetima te su bila uspoređivana s uzorcima koji nisu bili izloženi zračenju. Rad...

  15. Polpa de camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia submetida à radiação gama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available O fruto amazônico camu-camu, Myrciaria dubia, possui elevado teor de vitamina C, antocianinas, carotenóides e compostos fenólicos, fatores que fazem com este fruto venham se posicionando na preferência dos consumidores de frutas exóticas. A radiação ionizante tem sido utilizada para aumentar a vida útil dos produtos, além de preservar qualidades intrínsecas e nutricionais. Desta forma, o objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a radiação gama como método alternativo na conservação da polpa de camu-camu. As amostras de polpa do fruto foram submetidas às doses 0 (controle, 2, 4, e 6 kGy. Em seguida, foram armazenadas a 6 ºC e à temperatura ambiente (26 ºC, e avaliadas quanto a cor, pH, acidez titulável, teores de sólidos solúveis, vitamina C, compostos fenólicos e antocianinas nos períodos 1 e 15 dias de armazenamento. Os atributos pH, teor de sólidos solúveis, compostos fenólicos e acidez total, não foram afetados pela irradiação e pela temperatura de armazenamento nos dois períodos analisados. A vitamina C também não se alterou com a irradiação, porém o armazenamento refrigerado manteve os teores mais constantes. A cor foi o atributo mais afetado pela irradiação e pelo armazenamento à temperatura ambiente. Portanto, a radiação gama não se mostrou eficaz no armazenamento da polpa desta fruta em nenhuma das temperaturas propostas.

  16. Effects of Stigma and Discrimination Reduction Trainings Conducted Under the California Mental Health Services Authority: An Evaluation of Disability Rights California and Mental Health America of California Trainings

    OpenAIRE

    Cerully, Jennifer L.; Collins, Rebecca L.; Wong, Eunice C.; Roth, Elizabeth; Marks, Joyce; Yu, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Describes the methods and results of a RAND evaluation of stigma and discrimination reduction trainings delivered by two program partners, Disability Rights California and Mental Health America of California.

  17. Pilot Implementation of the Improving Children's Health through Farming, Food, and Fitness Program in Select California Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneman, Karrie; Junge, Sharon K.; Schneider, Connie; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this pilot project was to evaluate the effect of the Improving Children's Health through Farming, Food, and Fitness Program (CHF3) on the dietary knowledge and habits of participating children. Methods: The CHF3 program aims to 1) establish salad bars and integrate nutrition messages into cafeteria activities; 2) develop…

  18. Nitrate isotopic composition and ancillary variables (land use, redox, excess N2, age, water isotopics) in California groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Nathan; Moran, Jean; Visser, Ate; Singleton, Michael; Esser, Bradley

    2017-04-01

    Nitrate is a critical water quality issue in California, the United States and the world. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has compiled a large, unique database of California groundwater nitrate isotopic compositions (δ15N-NO3 and δ18O-NO3), acquired largely through more than a decade of coordination with the State of California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program. The water samples are predominantly from shallow aquifers accessed by domestic and monitoring wells. The database of >1,300 nitrate isotopic compositions includes a number of important ancillary parameters: DO, ORP and DOC (measured for 18% of samples); excess air and dissolved N2 (24%); water isotopic composition (δ18O-H2O and δD-H2O) (43%); and tritium/3He groundwater age (27%). Methods used at LLNL include sample preparation by the denitrifier method (for δ15N-NO3 and δ18O-NO3) and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry with (δ15N-NO3 and δ18O-NO3 and δ18O-H2O and δD-H2O), Noble Gas Mass Spectrometry (NGMS; for excess air and groundwater age), and Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry (MIMS; for major dissolved gases and excess N2). Redox indicators (DO, ORP and DOC) in conjunction with excess N2, groundwater age, and nitrate isotopic composition are used to assess the presence or absence, and potentially the rate of, saturated-zone denitrification. Comparison of δ18O-NO3 to δ18O-H2O isotopic composition is used to distinguish synthetic nitrate from nitrification of reduced forms of nitrogen as a source of groundwater nitrate. Groundwater age is used to discern timing and temporal trends in groundwater nitrate isotopic composition. The relationship of nitrate isotopic composition to ancillary parameters (redox, excess N2, water isotopic composition and groundwater age) is explored, along with its relationship to well location, screened interval, and land use, with a focus on the extent of saturated-zone denitrification and the significance of synthetic nitrate as

  19. Post remedial action survey report for Building 003, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California, October 1981; April 1982. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous Federally-funded projects involving the use of radioactive materials. One such project was the System for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Building 003 on the Santa Susana site was used in conjunction with the SNAP Program and contained a highly shielded area designed for remote manipulation of radioactive materials. Such facilities are commonly referred to as hot caves. During the SNAP Program, fuel burnup samples were analyzed and irradiation experiments were evaluated in the Building 003 hot cave. Use of the hot cave facility ended when the SNAP Program was terminated in 1973. Subsequently, the Building 003 facilities were declared excess and were decontaminaed and decommissioned during the first half of calendar year 1975. At that time, the building was given a preliminary release. In 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of Building 003 was conducted at the request of the Department of Energy. Significant levels of residual contamination were found in various parts of the building. Consequently, additional decontamination was conducted by Rockwell International. A final post-remedial-action survey was conducted during April 1982, and those areas in Building 003 that had been found contaminated in 1981 were now found to be free of detectable radioactive contamination. Sludge samples taken from the sewer sump showed elevated levels of enriched uranium contaminant. Hence, all sewer lines within Building 003 were removed. This permitted unconditional release of the building for unrestricted use. However, the sewer lines exterior to the building, which remain in place, must be considered potentially contaminated and, therefore, subject to restricted use.

  20. The Significance of Harm Reduction as a Social and Health Care Intervention for Injecting Drug Users: An Exploratory Study of a Needle Exchange Program in Fresno, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Kris; Harris, Debra; Zweifler, John A; Lasher, Marc; Mortimer, Roger B; Hughes, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Infectious disease remains a significant social and health concern in the United States. Preventing more people from contracting HIV/AIDS or Hepatitis C (HCV), requires a complex understanding of the interconnection between the biomedical and social dimensions of infectious disease. Opiate addiction in the US has skyrocketed in recent years. Preventing more cases of HIV/AIDS and HCV will require dealing with the social determinants of health. Needle exchange programs (NEPs) are based on a harm reduction approach that seeks to minimize the risk of infection and damage to the user and community. This article presents an exploratory small-scale quantitative study of the injection drug using habits of a group of injection drug users (IDUs) at a needle exchange program in Fresno, California. Respondents reported significant decreases in high risk IDU behaviors, including sharing of needles and to a lesser extent re-using of needles. They also reported frequent use of clean paraphernalia. Greater collaboration between social and health outreach professionals at NEPs could provide important frontline assistance to people excluded from mainstream office-based services and enhance efforts to reduce HIV/AIDS or HCV infection.

  1. Esterilização de soros e vacinas por radiação gama de cobalto

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalvo Guidolin; Alcino Corrêa; Regina Maria Barreto Cicarelli; Eloi Previde; Josefina Farina Morais; Hisako Gondo Higashi

    1988-01-01

    Os soros antitetânico, antidiftérico e antibotrópico-crotálico e, ainda, a vacina diftérica-pertussis-tetânica foram submetidos a diferentes intensidades de radiação gama, com os seguintes intuitos: verificação da resistência das atividades específicas destes produtos à ação dos raios gama; avaliação das possibilidades de utilização deste tipo de energia radiante para a esterilização de alguns soros hiperimunes heterólogos e vacinas, mais comumente utilizados em saúde pública. Os resultados o...

  2. California community water systems quarterly indicators dataset, 1999-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This data set contains quarterly measures of arsenic and nitrates in public drinking water supplies. Data are derived from California Office of Drinking Water (ODW)...

  3. California community water systems annual indicators dataset, 1999-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This data set contains annual measures of arsenic and nitrates in public drinking water supplies. Data are derived from California Office of Drinking Water (ODW)...

  4. Williamson Act - The California Land Conservation Act of 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The California Land Conservation Act of 1965 - commonly referred to as the Williamson Act - is the State's primary program for the conservation of private land in...

  5. California State Waters Map Series--Hueneme Canyon Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  6. California State Waters Map Series--Drakes Bay Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  7. Challenges in the Implementation of Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review in a California Community College District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the manner in which a community college district planned to implement a systematic outcomes-based assessment program review process in order to have results inform institutional, district, and state policy discussions. Data derived from this grounded theory study indicated that there was not a shared…

  8. An Investigation of First-Year Teacher Induction Programs in Jesuit Secondary Schools within the California Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Justin

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, researchers have made considerable contributions to the field of new teacher induction. More specifically, they have demonstrated that an effective induction program can increase teacher effectiveness and decrease teacher attrition (Ingersoll & Smith 2004; Ingersoll & Strong 2011; Villar & Strong 2007). Yet, little…

  9. California Institute of Technology: Caltech Energy Conservation Investment Program. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The Caltech Energy Conservation Investment Program (CECIP) was initiated in 2009. It manages $8 million within an existing fund in the school's endowment, which had been created to finance capital projects. Any member of the Caltech community may submit a project proposal, and projects are considered for approval as long as they have at least a 15…

  10. Final Environmental Assessment: Falcon 9 and Falcon 9 Heavy Launch Vehicle Programs from Space Launch Complex 4 East at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    dominant native species at this site are coyote brush (Baccharis pilularis), California sagebrush ( Artemisia californica), mock heather (Ericameria...Force Base: Population size, reproductive success, and management. Unpublished Report. Point Reyes Bird Observatory. Stinson Beach, California. 29 pp...observed. Startle responses are rare and reproductive success does not seem to be affected by launch activities, even near SLC-2 where Delta II

  11. Effect of the Healthy Schools Program on Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in California Schools, 2006?2012

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Kristine A.; Cotterman, Carolyn; Crawford, Pat; Stevelos, JoAnn; Archibald, Abbie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Alliance for a Healthier Generation?s Healthy Schools Program (HSP) is a national evidence-based obesity-prevention initiative aimed at providing the schools in greatest need with onsite training and technical assistance (TTA) and consultation with national experts (HSP national advisors) to create sustainable healthy change in schools? nutrition and physical activity environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of HSP on the prevalence of overweight a...

  12. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): probing the merger histories of massive galaxies via stellar populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreras, I.; Hopkins, A. M.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Sansom, A. E.; Owers, M. S.; Driver, S.; Davies, L.; Robotham, A.; Taylor, E. N.; Konstantopoulos, I.; Brough, S.; Norberg, P.; Croom, S.; Loveday, J.; Wang, L.; Bremer, M.

    2017-06-01

    The merging history of galaxies can be traced with studies of dynamically close pairs. These consist of a massive primary galaxy and a less massive secondary (or satellite) galaxy. The study of the stellar populations of secondary (lower mass) galaxies in close pairs provides a way to understand galaxy growth by mergers. Here we focus on systems involving at least one massive galaxy - with stellar mass above 1011M⊙ in the highly complete Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. Our working sample comprises 2692 satellite galaxy spectra (0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.3). These spectra are combined into high S/N stacks, and binned according to both an 'internal' parameter, the stellar mass of the satellite galaxy (i.e. the secondary), and an 'external' parameter, selecting either the mass of the primary in the pair, or the mass of the corresponding dark matter halo. We find significant variations in the age of the populations with respect to environment. At fixed mass, satellites around the most massive galaxies are older and possibly more metal-rich, with age differences ˜1-2 Gyr within the subset of lower mass satellites (˜1010 M⊙). These variations are similar when stacking with respect to the halo mass of the group where the pair is embedded. The population trends in the lower mass satellites are consistent with the old stellar ages found in the outer regions of massive galaxies.

  13. California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

    2010-04-14

    This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This study provides two new pieces of evidence that the Ripon Farm Services Plant is the source of elevated nitrate in Ripon City Well 12. (1) Chemical mass balance calculations using nitrate concentration, nitrate isotopic composition, and initial tritium activity all indicate that that the source water for elevated nitrate to Ripon City Well 12 is a very small component of the water produced by City Well 12 and thus must have extremely high nitrate concentration. The high source water nitrate concentration ({approx}1500 mg/L as nitrate) required by these mass balance calculations precludes common sources of nitrate such as irrigated agriculture, dairy wastewater, and septic discharge. Shallow groundwater under the Ripon Farm Services RFS plant does contain extremely high concentrations of nitrate (>1700 mg/L as nitrate). (2) Nitrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of nitrate indicate that the additional anthropogenic nitrate source to Ripon City Well 12 is significantly enriched in {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, an isotopic signature consistent with synthetic nitrate fertilizer, and not with human or animal wastewater discharge (i.e. dairy operations, septic system discharge, or municipal wastewater discharge), or with organic fertilizer. Monitoring wells on and near the RFS plant also have high {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, and the plant has handled and stored synthetic nitrate fertilizer that will have this isotopic signature. The results described here highlight the complexity of attributing nitrate found in long screened, high capacity wells to specific sources. In this case, the presence of a very high concentration source near the well site combined with sampling using multiple isotopic tracer techniques and specialized depth-specific techniques allowed fingerprinting of the source in the mixed-age samples drawn from the production well.

  14. Occurrence and concentrations of pharmaceutical compounds in groundwater used for public drinking-water supply in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fram, Miranda S., E-mail: mfram@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center, 6000 J Street, Placer Hall, Sacramento, CA 95819-6129 (United States); Belitz, Kenneth, E-mail: kbelitz@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center, 4165 Spruance Road, Suite 200, San Diego, CA 95101-0812 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Pharmaceutical compounds were detected at low concentrations in 2.3% of 1231 samples of groundwater (median depth to top of screened interval in wells = 61 m) used for public drinking-water supply in California. Samples were collected statewide for the California State Water Resources Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. Of 14 pharmaceutical compounds analyzed, 7 were detected at concentrations greater than or equal to method detection limits: acetaminophen (used as an analgesic, detection frequency 0.32%, maximum concentration 1.89 {mu}g/L), caffeine (stimulant, 0.24%, 0.29 {mu}g/L), carbamazepine (mood stabilizer, 1.5%, 0.42 {mu}g/L), codeine (opioid analgesic, 0.16%, 0.214 {mu}g/L), p-xanthine (caffeine metabolite, 0.08%, 0.12 {mu}g/L), sulfamethoxazole (antibiotic, 0.41%, 0.17 {mu}g/L), and trimethoprim (antibiotic, 0.08%, 0.018 {mu}g/L). Detection frequencies of pesticides (33%), volatile organic compounds not including trihalomethanes (23%), and trihalomethanes (28%) in the same 1231 samples were significantly higher. Median detected concentration of pharmaceutical compounds was similar to those of volatile organic compounds, and higher than that of pesticides. Pharmaceutical compounds were detected in 3.3% of the 855 samples containing modern groundwater (tritium activity > 0.2 TU). Pharmaceutical detections were significantly positively correlated with detections of urban-use herbicides and insecticides, detections of volatile organic compounds, and percentage of urban land use around wells. Groundwater from the Los Angeles metropolitan area had higher detection frequencies of pharmaceuticals and other anthropogenic compounds than groundwater from other areas of State with similar proportions of urban land use. The higher detection frequencies may reflect that groundwater flow systems in Los Angeles area basins are dominated by engineered recharge and intensive groundwater pumping. - Highlights: {yields

  15. A qualidade de água como indicador de uso e ocupação do solo: bacia do Gama - Distrito Federal The water quality as an indicator of land use and occupation: Gama basin-DF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Amorim Moura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The spread of Brasília isn't accompanied by correct support of land occupation, situation that is reflected in water quality. Under the optics of land use and occupation, working with multivariate statistics as main tool, water physical and chemical quality of Gama Catchment were assessed. During two years samples were collected and analyzed for 24 parameters. The statistical analysis showed the influence of civil buildings, agricultural activities and the best statistical parameters to a quickly assessment: nitrate, ammonia, suspended solids and aluminium.

  16. Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) for coastal California, 1995-2002-era land cover change analysis (NODC Accession 0038579)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the 1995-era and 2002-era classifications of Coastal California and can be used to analyze change. This data set utilized 87 full or partial...

  17. The supplemental instruction program: Student perceptions of the learning environment and impact on student academic achievement in college science at California State University, San Marcos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizer, Suzanne Elizabeth

    Higher education in science has been criticized and calls to increase student learning and persistence to degree has been recognized as a national problem by the Department of Education, the National Science Foundation, the National Research Council, and the National Academy of Sciences. One mode of academic assistance that may directly address this issue is the implementation of Supplemental Instruction (SI) in science courses. SI is a specific model of academic assistance designed to help students in historically difficult science classes master course content, thus increasing their academic achievement and retention. This study assessed the SI program at California State University, San Marcos, in supported science courses. Specifically, academic achievement based on final course grades were compared between SI participating and nonparticipating students, multiple affective factors were measured at the beginning and end of the semester, and students' perceptions of the classroom and SI session learning environments recorded. Overall, students who attended five or more SI sessions achieved higher final course grades. Students who chose to participate in SI had higher initial levels of responsibility and anxiety. Additionally, SI participants experienced a reduction in anxiety over the semester whereas nonparticipants experienced an increase in anxiety from beginning to the end of the semester. The learning environment of SI embodies higher levels of constructivist principles of active learning such as cooperation, cohesiveness, innovation, and personalization---with one exception for the physics course, which is a based on problem-based learning. Structural equation modeling of variables indicates that high self-efficacy at the end of the semester is directly related to high final course grades; this is mediated by cohesion in the classroom and the cooperation evidenced in SI sessions. These findings are elaborated by student descriptions of what happened in SI

  18. Comparison of adherence to chlamydia screening guidelines among Title X providers and non-Title X providers in the California Family Planning, Access, Care, and Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Joan M; de Bocanegra, Heike Thiel; Hulett, Denis; Park, Hye-Youn; Darney, Philip

    2012-08-01

    Annual chlamydia screening is recommended for adolescent and young adult females and targeted screening is recommended for women ≥26 years based on risk. Although screening levels have increased over time, adherence to these guidelines varies, with high levels of adherence among Title X family planning providers. However, previous studies of provider variation in screening rates have not adjusted for differences in clinic and client population characteristics. Administrative claims from the California Family Planning, Access, Care, and Treatment (Family PACT) program were used to (1) examine clinic and client sociodemographic characteristics by provider group-Title X-funded public sector, non-Title X public sector, and private sector providers, and (2) estimate age-specific screening and differences in rates by provider group during 2009. Among 833 providers, Title X providers were more likely than non-Title X public sector providers and private sector providers to serve a higher client volume, a higher proportion of clients aged ≤25 years, and a higher proportion of African American clients. Non-Title X public providers were more likely to be located in rural areas, compared with Title X grantees and private sector providers. Title X providers had the largest absolute difference in screening rates for young females vs. older females (10.9%). Unadjusted screening rates for young clients were lower among non-Title X public sector providers (54%) compared with private sector and Title X providers (64% each). After controlling for provider group, urban location, client volume, and percent African American, private sector providers had higher screening rates than Title X and non-Title X public providers. Screening rates for females were higher among private providers compared with Title X and non-Title X public providers. However, only Title X providers were more likely to adhere to screening guidelines through high screening rates for young females and low

  19. California Political Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a series of district layers pertaining to California'spolitical districts, that are derived from the California State Senateand State Assembly information....

  20. Documentation of a groundwater flow model (SJRRPGW) for the San Joaquin River Restoration Program study area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traum, Jonathan A.; Phillips, Steven P.; Bennett, George Luther; Zamora, Celia; Metzger, Loren F.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the potential effects of restoration flows on existing drainage problems, anticipated as a result of the San Joaquin River Restoration Program (SJRRP), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), developed a groundwater flow model (SJRRPGW) of the SJRRP study area that is within 5 miles of the San Joaquin River and adjacent bypass system from Friant Dam to the Merced River. The primary goal of the SJRRP is to reestablish the natural ecology of the river to a degree that restores salmon and other fish populations. Increased flows in the river, particularly during the spring salmon run, are a key component of the restoration effort. A potential consequence of these increased river flows is the exacerbation of existing irrigation drainage problems along a section of the river between Mendota and the confluence with the Merced River. Historically, this reach typically was underlain by a water table within 10 feet of the land surface, thus requiring careful irrigation management and (or) artificial drainage to maintain crop health. The SJRRPGW is designed to meet the short-term needs of the SJRRP; future versions of the model may incorporate potential enhancements, several of which are identified in this report. The SJRRPGW was constructed using the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW and was built on the framework of the USGS Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) within which the SJRRPGW model domain is embedded. The Farm Process (FMP2) was used to simulate the supply and demand components of irrigated agriculture. The Streamflow-Routing Package (SFR2) was used to simulate the streams and bypasses and their interaction with the aquifer system. The 1,300-square mile study area was subdivided into 0.25-mile by 0.25-mile cells. The sediment texture of the aquifer system, which was used to distribute hydraulic properties by model cell, was refined from that used in the CVHM to better represent

  1. The nature of massive transition galaxies in CANDELS, GAMA and cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Viraj; Brennan, Ryan; Somerville, Rachel S.; Choi, Ena; Barro, Guillermo; Wuyts, Stijn; Taylor, Edward N.; Behroozi, Peter; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Faber, Sandra M.; Primack, Joel; Koo, David C.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Kocevski, Dale; Bell, Eric F.; Dekel, Avishai; Fang, Jerome J.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lu, Yu; Mantha, Kameswara; Mobasher, Bahram; Newman, Jeffrey; Pacifici, Camilla; Papovich, Casey; van der Wel, Arjen; Yesuf, Hassen M.

    2017-12-01

    We explore observational and theoretical constraints on how galaxies might transition between the `star-forming main sequence' (SFMS) and varying `degrees of quiescence' out to z = 3. Our analysis is focused on galaxies with stellar mass M* > 1010 M⊙, and is enabled by GAMA and CANDELS observations, a semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation, and a cosmological hydrodynamical `zoom in' simulation with momentum-driven AGN feedback. In both the observations and the SAM, transition galaxies tend to have intermediate Sérsic indices, half-light radii, and surface stellar mass densities compared to star-forming and quiescent galaxies out to z = 3. We place an observational upper limit on the average population transition time-scale as a function of redshift, finding that the average high-redshift galaxy is on a `fast track' for quenching whereas the average low-redshift galaxy is on a `slow track' for quenching. We qualitatively identify four physical origin scenarios for transition galaxies in the SAM: oscillations on the SFMS, slow quenching, fast quenching, and rejuvenation. Quenching time-scales in both the SAM and the hydrodynamical simulation are not fast enough to reproduce the quiescent population that we observe at z ˜ 3. In the SAM, we do not find a clear-cut morphological dependence of quenching time-scales, but we do predict that the mean stellar ages, cold gas fractions, SMBH (supermassive black hole) masses and halo masses of transition galaxies tend to be intermediate relative to those of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at z < 3.

  2. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): Exploring the WISE Web in G12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Cluver, M. E.; Magoulas, C.; Bilicki, M.; Alpaslan, M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Croom, S.; Driver, S.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Loveday, J.; Norberg, P.; Peacock, J. A.; Popescu, C. C.; Sadler, E. M.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wang, L.

    2017-02-01

    We present an analysis of the mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) sources seen within the equatorial GAMA G12 field, located in the North Galactic Cap. Our motivation is to study and characterize the behavior of WISE source populations in anticipation of the deep multiwavelength surveys that will define the next decade, with the principal science goal of mapping the 3D large-scale structures and determining the global physical attributes of the host galaxies. In combination with cosmological redshifts, we identify galaxies from their WISE W1 (3.4 μm) resolved emission, and we also perform a star-galaxy separation using apparent magnitude, colors, and statistical modeling of star counts. The resulting galaxy catalog has ≃590,000 sources in 60 deg2, reaching a W1 5σ depth of 31 μJy. At the faint end, where redshifts are not available, we employ a luminosity function analysis to show that approximately 27% of all WISE extragalactic sources to a limit of 17.5 mag (31 μJy) are at high redshift, z> 1. The spatial distribution is investigated using two-point correlation functions and a 3D source density characterization at 5 Mpc and 20 Mpc scales. For angular distributions, we find that brighter and more massive sources are strongly clustered relative to fainter sources with lower mass; likewise, based on WISE colors, spheroidal galaxies have the strongest clustering, while late-type disk galaxies have the lowest clustering amplitudes. In three dimensions, we find a number of distinct groupings, often bridged by filaments and superstructures. Using special visualization tools, we map these structures, exploring how clustering may play a role with stellar mass and galaxy type.

  3. Gravity Data for California and Southern Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity data (88,514 records) were compiled largely from a state-wide regional gravity study program organized by the California Division of Mines and Geology in...

  4. California Energy Systems for the 21st Century 2016 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Randwyk, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Boutelle, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McClelland, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Weed, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-25

    The California Energy Systems for the 21st Century (CES-21) Program is a public-private collaborative research and development program between the California Joint Utilities1 and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of this annual report is to provide the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC or Commission) with a summary of the 2016 progress of the CES-21 Program.

  5. California Endangered Species Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Los Angeles.

    This document was developed in response to California Senate Bill No. 885, "The Endangered Species Education Project," that called for a statewide program in which schools adopt a local endangered species, research past and current efforts to preserve the species' habitat, develop and implement an action plan to educate the community…

  6. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Golden, Nadine E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Greene, H. Gary; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Watt, Janet Tilden; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Manson, Michael W.; Endris, Charles A.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Sliter, Ray W.; Lowe, Erik N.; Chinn, John L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 200 m) subsurface geology.

  7. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Salt Point, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Golden, Nadine E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Greene, H. Gary; Cochrane, Guy R.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Manson, Michael W.; Endris, Charles A.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Watt, Janet T.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Sliter, Ray W.; Lowe, Erik N.; Chinn, John L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology.

  8. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Pacifica, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Brian D.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Bretz, Carrie K.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Sliter, Ray W.; Ross, Stephanie L.; Golden, Nadine E.; Watt, Janet Tilden; Chinn, John L.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Manson, Michael W.; Endris, Charles A.; Cochran, Susan A.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. 

  9. California State Waters Map Series: Drakes Bay and vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Janet T.; Dartnell, Peter; Golden, Nadine E.; Greene, H. Gary; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Manson, Michael W.; Endris, Charles A.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Sliter, Ray W.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Lowe, Erik N.; Chinn, John L.; Watt, Janet T.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology.

  10. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Refugio Beach, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Conrad, James E.; Greene, H. Gary; Seitz, Gordon G.; Endris, Charles A.; Sliter, Ray W.; Wong, Florence L.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; East, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology.

  11. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of San Francisco, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Endris, Charles A.; Manson, Michael W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Watt, Janet Tilden; Ross, Stephanie L.; Bruns, Terry R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology.

  12. Implementación del núcleo de un microcontrolador compatible con los PIC de la gama media en FPGA de Altera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Escartín

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES-TRAD X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} En este trabajo se describe, el diseño del núcleo de un procesador compatible con el juego de instrucciones de microcontroladores PIC de la gama media. La estructura utilizada posee un pipeline de dos etapas. Se utiliza el lenguaje de descripción de hardware VHDL con dispositivos programables de las familias Cyclone de Altera. La metodología de diseño empleada es un proceso recurrente que se inicia con la definición de la arquitectura a nivel de bloques funcionales del sistema a diseñar, se realiza la modelación estructural y la implementación de cada bloque. Finalizando con la simulación funcional y temporal. Todo este proceso tiene como objetivo lograr un dispositivo con la mayor velocidad posible en su funcionamiento y sintetizarlo con el  menor número de celdas.

  13. Citotoxicidade de tubos de PVC esterilizados em óxido de etileno após exposição à radiação gama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Queiroz de Souza

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Materiais esterilizados em raios gama, ao serem re-esterilizados em óxido de etileno (EO, formam substâncias tóxicas? Esta questão norteou o objetivo deste estudo, que foi investigar o potencial efeito citotóxico do PVC esterilizado em radiação gama e re-esterilizado em EO pelo método da difusão em ágar em culturas celulares. Nove tubos de PVC foram submetidos à esterilização em radiação gama e re-esterilizados em EO. Os tubos foram divididos em um total de 81 unidades de análise, que foram testadas de forma a representar as superfícies internas, externas e massa de cada tubo. Concluiu-se que os materiais de PVC esterilizados em Radiação Gama e consecutivamente re-esterilizados em EO não são citotóxicos.

  14. Citotoxicidade de tubos de PVC esterilizados em óxido de etileno após exposição à radiação gama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Queiroz de Souza

    Full Text Available Materiais esterilizados em raios gama, ao serem re-esterilizados em óxido de etileno (EO, formam substâncias tóxicas? Esta questão norteou o objetivo deste estudo, que foi investigar o potencial efeito citotóxico do PVC esterilizado em radiação gama e re-esterilizado em EO pelo método da difusão em ágar em culturas celulares. Nove tubos de PVC foram submetidos à esterilização em radiação gama e re-esterilizados em EO. Os tubos foram divididos em um total de 81 unidades de análise, que foram testadas de forma a representar as superfícies internas, externas e massa de cada tubo. Concluiu-se que os materiais de PVC esterilizados em Radiação Gama e consecutivamente re-esterilizados em EO não são citotóxicos.

  15. Citotoxicidade de tubos de PVC esterilizados em óxido de etileno após exposição à radiação gama

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rafael Queiroz de Souza; Kazuko Uchikawa Graziano; Tamiko Ichikawa Ikeda; Cláudia Regina Gonçalves; Áurea Silveira Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Materiais esterilizados em raios gama, ao serem re-esterilizados em óxido de etileno (EO), formam substâncias tóxicas? Esta questão norteou o objetivo deste estudo, que foi investigar o potencial efeito...

  16. The stellar-to-halo mass relation of GAMA galaxies from 100 deg2 of KiDS weak lensing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uitert, Edo; Cacciato, Marcello; Hoekstra, Henk; Brouwer, Margot; Sifón, Cristóbal; Viola, Massimo; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, M. J. I.; Choi, Ami; Driver, Simon P.; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Joachimi, Benjamin; Kuijken, Konrad; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; Mc Farland, J.; Miller, Lance; Nakajima, Reiko; Peacock, John; Radovich, Mario; Robotham, A. S. G.; Schneider, Peter; Sikkema, Gert; Taylor, Edward N.; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    2016-01-01

    We study the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies in the range 9.7 10(M*/h- 2 M⊙) ) ) 2 of KiDS data to study the lensing signal around galaxies for which spectroscopic redshifts and stellar masses were determined by GAMA. We show that lensing alone results in poor constraints on the

  17. Radiação gama e atmosfera modificada passiva na qualidade de goiabas 'Pedro Sato'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André José de Campos

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da irradiação gama associada à atmosfera modificada passiva na qualidade pós-colheita de goiabas 'Pedro Sato', verificando suas características físico-químicas. Foram utilizadas goiabas provenientes da região de Vista Alegre do Alto-SP,Brasil. Após a colheita, as goiabas foram imediatamente transportadas ao Laboratório de Frutas e Hortaliças, pertencente ao Departamento de Gestão e Tecnologia Agroindustrial, da Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas - UNESP - Câmpus de Botucatu-SP, onde foram armazenadas a 10ºC e 90-95%UR, em câmara frigorífica, por 28 dias. Os tratamentos foram: controle 1 (sem embalagem e sem irradiação; controle 2 (embalagem de poliestireno (PS + polietileno de baixa densidade (PEBD e sem irradiação; tratamento 1 (PS+PEBD e 0,2kGy; tratamento 2 (PS+PEBD e 0,6kGy, e tratamento 3 (PS+PEBD e 1,0kGy. As análises realizadas foram: firmeza, sólidos solúveis (SS, acidez titulável (AT e índice de maturação. Foi utilizado o delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com esquema fatorial 5 x 5 (tratamento x tempo. Concluiu-se que as altas doses de irradiação promoveram efeito negativo nas características físico-químicas da goiaba 'Pedro Sato', e que apenas a menor dose utilizada (0,2kGy associada à atmosfera modificada conservou frutos com maior qualidade e aceitabilidade, indicado por maiores índice de maturação e teor de sólidos solúveis obtidos.

  18. H-ATLAS/GAMA: magnification bias tomography. Astrophysical constraints above ~1 arcmin

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Nuevo, J.; Lapi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Danese, L.; de Zotti, G.; Negrello, M.; Bourne, N.; Cooray, A.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Ivison, R. J.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.

    2017-10-01

    An unambiguous manifestation of the magnification bias is the cross-correlation between two source samples with non-overlapping redshift distributions. In this work we measure and study the cross-correlation signal between a foreground sample of GAMA galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.2

  19. Beginning Teachers' Perceptions of the California Teaching Performance Assessment (TPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Conni; Ayala, Carlos Cuauhtémoc; Railsback, Gary; Freking, Frederick W.; McKenna, Corey; Lausch, David

    2016-01-01

    The teaching performance assessment (TPA) seeks to measure the knowledge, skills, and competencies of teachers during the credential phase of their training. The TPA was introduced in California in 2004 with programs piloting it and then became mandatory for candidates enrolling in preliminary programs in 2008. Although California has multiple…

  20. California sea lion and northern fur seal censuses conducted at Channel Islands, California by Alaska Fisheries Science Center from 1969-07-31 to 2015-08-08 (NCEI Accession 0145165)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem Program (AFSC/NOAA) initiated and maintains census programs for California sea lions (Zalophus...

  1. Cultural Resource Test Sampling Program for a Proposed Flood Control Project in the Lower San Luis Rey River Drainage, Oceanside, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    SCIENTIFIC NAME COMMON NAME ENVIRONMENT Donax gouldii california Bean Clam Open Beach Aequipecten sp. Pecten Mud Flats Chione spp. . californiensis Banded...gross and 57.1 percent of the total) at W-1838 is evidence of resource procurement along the open beach environment. Donax occurred in large amounts...cursory analysis of their cosmological tales, shamanism, world- view, and numerous specialized religious ceremonies reveals a deep-rooted, well- conceived

  2. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program. Final Project Report. California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sathaye, Jayant [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-12-01

    This report on the California Energy Balance version 2 (CALEB v2) database documents the latest update and improvements to CALEB version 1 (CALEB v1) and provides a complete picture of how energy is supplied and consumed in the State of California. The CALEB research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) performed the research and analysis described in this report. CALEB manages highly disaggregated data on energy supply, transformation, and end-use consumption for about 40 different energy commodities, from 1990 to 2008. This report describes in detail California's energy use from supply through end-use consumption as well as the data sources used. The report also analyzes trends in energy demand for the "Manufacturing" and "Building" sectors. Decomposition analysis of energy consumption combined with measures of the activity driving that consumption quantifies the effects of factors that shape energy consumption trends. The study finds that a decrease in energy intensity has had a very significant impact on reducing energy demand over the past 20 years. The largest impact can be observed in the industry sector where energy demand would have had increased by 358 trillion British thermal units (TBtu) if subsectoral energy intensities had remained at 1997 levels. Instead, energy demand actually decreased by 70 TBtu. In the "Building" sector, combined results from the "Service" and "Residential" subsectors suggest that energy demand would have increased by 264 TBtu (121 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 143 TBtu in the "Residential" sector) during the same period, 1997 to 2008. However, energy demand increased at a lesser rate, by only 162 TBtu (92 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 70 TBtu in the "Residential" sector). These energy intensity reductions can be indicative of energyefficiency improvements during the past 10 years. The research presented in this report provides a basis for developing an energy-efficiency performance index to measure

  3. Benefits from flywheel energy storage for area regulation in California - demonstration results : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

    2009-10-01

    This report documents a high-level analysis of the benefit and cost for flywheel energy storage used to provide area regulation for the electricity supply and transmission system in California. Area regulation is an 'ancillary service' needed for a reliable and stable regional electricity grid. The analysis was based on results from a demonstration, in California, of flywheel energy storage developed by Beacon Power Corporation (the system's manufacturer). Demonstrated was flywheel storage systems ability to provide 'rapid-response' regulation. Flywheel storage output can be varied much more rapidly than the output from conventional regulation sources, making flywheels more attractive than conventional regulation resources. The performance of the flywheel storage system demonstrated was generally consistent with requirements for a possible new class of regulation resources - 'rapid-response' energy-storage-based regulation - in California. In short, it was demonstrated that Beacon Power Corporation's flywheel system follows a rapidly changing control signal (the ACE, which changes every four seconds). Based on the results and on expected plant cost and performance, the Beacon Power flywheel storage system has a good chance of being a financially viable regulation resource. Results indicate a benefit/cost ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 using what may be somewhat conservative assumptions. A benefit/cost ratio of one indicates that, based on the financial assumptions used, the investment's financial returns just meet the investors target.

  4. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Aptos Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  5. California State Waters Map Series--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  6. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Half Moon Bay Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  7. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Ventura Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  8. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Bolinas Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  9. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Refugio Beach Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  10. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Scott Creek Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  11. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of San Francisco Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  12. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of San Gregorio Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  13. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Fort Ross Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  14. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Santa Barbara Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  15. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Point Reyes Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  16. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Tomales Point Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  17. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Bodega Head Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  18. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Carpinteria Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  19. California State Waters Map Series--Santa Barbara Channel Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  20. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Pigeon Point Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  1. California State Waters Map Series--Salt Point to Drakes Bay Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  2. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Salt Point Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  3. California State Waters Map Series--Bolinas to Pescadero Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  4. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Coal Oil Point Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  5. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Pacifica Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  6. AFSC/NMML/CCEP: Food habits of California sea lions in Washington, 1986 - 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — From 1986 to 1999, The National Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem Program (AFSC/NOAA) collected fecal samples and stomachs of male California...

  7. California Annual Pesticide Use Summary Data by County, Township, and Section, 1991-2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — The California Pesticide Use Report data contains very detailed information across space and time. It is summarized by the following categories: 1) Individual...

  8. Heat-related deaths among California residents, May-September, 2000-2009.

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains counts, rates, and confidence intervals of heat-related deaths among California residents for the years 2000-2009. These data are stratified by...

  9. Teale California shoreline

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California Spatial Information System (CaSIL) is a project designed to improve access to geo-spatial and geo-spatial related data information throughout the state of...

  10. Mediterranean California, Chapter 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.E. Fenn; E.B. Allen; L.H. Geiser

    2011-01-01

    The Mediterranean California ecoregion (CEC 1997; Fig 2.2) encompasses the greater Central Valley, Sierra foothills, and central coast ranges of California south to Mexico and is bounded by the Pacific Ocean, Sierra Nevada Mountains and Mojave Desert.

  11. California Condor Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These Data identify (in general) the areas where critical habitat for the California Condor occur. Critical habitat for the species consists of the following 10...

  12. Gamma Radioactivity Of The January 2013 Rainfall In Ostrava / Gama Radioaktivita Deště V Lednu 2013 V Ostravě

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa Petr

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Při analýze gama radioaktivity 8 mm silné vrstvy ledu, která se vytvořila při dešťových srážkách v areálu VŠB-Technické univerzity Ostrava 21.1.2013, bylo detekováno gama záření z izotopu 40K. Rovněž bylo pozorováno kosmogenní 7Be vznikající především v tříštivých reakcích galaktického kosmického záření s atmosférickým dusíkem a kyslíkem a také 226Ra, 235U and 137Cs.

  13. Radiação gama e nitrito de sódio na composição química e textura de mortadelas

    OpenAIRE

    Monalisa Pereira Dutra; Eduardo Mendes Ramos; Carolina Naves Aroeira; Alcinéia de Lemos Souza Ramos; Mauricio Henriques Louzada Silva; José Luís Contado; Marcio Tadeu Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Um delineamento composto central rotacional (DCCR) foi conduzido para estudar os efeitos simultâneos da adição de nitrito (43,6; 150; 256,4; e 300 ppm) e de doses de radiação gama (2,9; 10; 17,1; e 20 kGy) nos atributos de textura e parâmetros físico-químicos de mortadelas. O pH, composição química e adesividade das mortadelas não foram afetados por nenhuma das variáveis estudadas, enquanto a dureza e a mastigabilidade foram influenciados pela aplicação da radiação gama. Modelos de regressão ...

  14. Caracterização da dose letal mínima por irradiação gama para Penicillium citrinum Characterization of minimum lethal dosis of gama irradiation to Penicillium citrinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Norberg

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available O uso das radiações ionizantes na destruição de microrganismos responsáveis pela deterioração de alimentos ou causadores de infecções ou toxinfecções alimentares, constituiu-se aplicação da energia nuclear, para fins verdadeiramente pacíficos. Penicillium citrinum é um fungo produtor de micotoxinas, responsáveis por intoxicações em humanos e animais que se utilizam de alimentos contaminados. Há escassez de informações sobre a resistência do P. citrinum à irradiação gama; assim esta pesquisa objetivou determinar a dose letal por irradiação gama para esse microrganismo. Foram irradiadas 76 suspensões, contendo aproximadamente 100.000 esporos por mililitro, com doses entre 0,2 e 2,2 KGy (KiloGray, sendo os sobreviventes re-irradiados com doses até 3,0 KGy. O fungo foi totalmente destruído com dose de 2,2 KGy. P. citrinum descendentes dos sobreviventes de 2,0 KGy, quando re-irradiados também foram totalmente destruídos com dose de 2,2 KGy. Observou-se um aumento da resistência às doses mais baixas em relação ao fungo não irradiadoThe use of nuclear power through radiation for the destruction of microrganisms which cause food decay, and toxicosis, is specifically for peaceful purposes. Penicillium citrinum is a fungus which produce mycotoxins responsible for intoxication in humans and animals as a result of eating contaminated food. There is little informations on the resistance of P. citrinum to radiation. The objective of this research is to determine the lethal dose of gama radiation for these microrganisms. Seventy six suspensions containing approximately 100,000 spores/ml received a dose of radiation between 0.2 and 2.2 KGy (KiloGray, being one sample still alive re-irradiated with doses up to 3.0 KGy. The fungus were totally destroyed with a 2.2 KGy. Seventy six suspensions containing approximately 100,000 spores/ml received a dose of radiation between 0.2 and 2.2 KGy, being one sample still alive re

  15. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the Margins-Geoprisms Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum, Rupturing Continental Lithosphere Part II: Introducing Euler Poles Using Baja-North America Relative Plate Motion Across the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, J. P.; Bennett, S. E. K.; Cashman, S. M.; Dorsey, R. J.; Goodliffe, A. M.; Lamb, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes. The NSF-GeoPRISMS Mini-lesson Project, funded by NSF-TUES, is designed to integrate the significant findings from the MARGINS program into open-source college-level curriculum. The Gulf of California (GOC) served as the focus site for the Rupturing Continental Lithosphere (RCL) initiative, which addressed several scientific questions: What forces drive rift initiation, localization, propagation and evolution? How does deformation vary in time and space, and why? How does crust evolve, physically and chemically, as rifting proceeds to sea-floor spreading? What is the role of sedimentation and magmatism in continental extension? We developed two weeks of curriculum, including lectures, labs, and in-class activities that can be used as a whole or individually. This component of the curriculum introduces students to the Euler pole description of relative plate motion (RPM) by examining the tectonic interactions of the Baja California microplate and North American plate. The plate boundary varies in rift obliquity along strike, from highly oblique and strike-slip dominated in the south to slightly less oblique and with a larger extensional component in the north. This Google Earth-based exercise provides students with a visualization of RPM using small circle contours of the local direction and magnitude of Baja-North America movement on a spherical Earth. Students use RPM to calculate the fault slip rates on transform, normal, and oblique-slip faults and examine how the varying faulting styles combine to accommodate RPM. MARGINS results are integrated via comparison of rift obliquity with the structural style of rift-related faults around the GOC. We find this exercise to fit naturally into courses about plate tectonics, geophysics, and especially structural geology, given the similarity between Euler pole rotations and stereonet-based rotations of structural data.

  16. Radiação gama na conservação de caqui 'Giombo', destanizado e frigoarmazenado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Lopes Vieites

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O caqui apresenta uma safra curta, sendo necessário estender seu período de comercialização utilizando técnicas adequadas de armazenamento. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o uso da radiação gama na qualidade pós-colheita de caquis 'Giombo' destanizados. Frutos colhidos meio-maduros e com aproximadamente 50 % da coloração verde, foram destanizados, acondicionados em bandejas de poliestireno expandido (EPS, revestidas por filme plástico de polietileno de baixa densidade (PEBD e submetidos à radiação gama (60Co. Os frutos foram armazenados durante 35 dias, sob refrigeração (0±0,5 ºC e 85 ± 0,5% UR. Os tratamentos realizados foram: T1 - 0,0 kGy; T2 - 0,3 kGy; T3 - 0,6 kGy; T4 - 0,9 kGy; T5 - 1,2 kGy. As análises realizadas a cada 7 dias foram: perda de massa, atividade respiratória, teores de sólidos solúveis (SS, ácido ascórbico, acidez titulável (AT e relação SS/AT. Os frutos submetidos à dose de 0,6 kGy apresentaram o menor percentual de perda de massa e produção de CO2 ao longo do período experimental. Os teores de SS e AT permaneceram estáveis e sem diferenças devido às doses de irradiação aplicadas. Os tratamentos com 0,3 KGy e 0,6 KGy foram os mais eficazes na manutenção da firmeza nos caquis. Nos teores de ácido ascórbico, observou-se redução ao longo do período experimental, sendo os menores valores apresentados para a maior dose de irradiação (1,2 KGy.

  17. Radiação gama na conservação do suco natural de laranja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iemma Juliana

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho estudou o efeito da radiação gama na população microbiológica, teor de sólidos solúveis, acidez titulável, pH and conteúdo de vitamina C do suco natural de laranja. A atividade microbiana pode causar a deterioração do suco de laranja. A irradiação é um processo de conservação de alimentos através da eliminação dos microrganismos, porém pode afetar algumas características do produto. O delineamento experimental foi em esquema fatorial 4x5 referentes ao controle mais 3 doses de radiação (2,0; 4,0 and 6.0 kGy e 5 períodos de armazenamento (1, 7, 14, 21 e 28 dias com 2 repetições. As amostras de suco natural foram extraídas de laranjas da variedade "Pêra", irradiadas a uma taxa de dose de 2,0 kGy por hora (cobalto-60, e em seguida foram armazenadas sob refrigeração (5 ± 3ºC. Os resultados mostraram pequenas variações no teor de sólidos solúveis, acidez titulável e pH, em relação aos tratamentos testados. A razão sólidos solúveis/acidez titulável foi determinada e também mostrou pequena variação em todos os tratamentos. Com o aumento da dose de radiação e o prolongamento do período de armazenamento houve redução no conteúdo de vitamina C do suco. A radiação gama se mostrou eficaz na redução da população microbiana do suco de laranja.

  18. Mentoring the next generation of HIV prevention researchers: a model mentoring program at the University of California San Francisco and Gladstone Institute of Immunology and Virology Center for AIDS research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, James; Des Jarlais, Christine D; Dobkin, Loren; Barrs, Sarah French; Greenblatt, Ruth M

    2008-03-01

    Mentoring is critical to develop and nurture early career investigators, helping them to succeed in building networks of colleagues, and is especially important for investigators focused on HIV research. We piloted a multidiscipline mentoring program targeting postdoctoral scholars and early career faculty concentrating on HIV/AIDS research. The pilot mentoring program was conducted at the Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) at the University of California San Francisco and the Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology. Mentees were self-referred postdoctoral scholars and early career faculty. Mentors were drawn from the senior faculty. Early career mentees were matched with senior investigators for individual meetings, a monthly workshop on topics directed by the mentees, and single-day mentoring seminars. More than 30 mentees and 20 mentors have participated in the pilot project. Most mentees reported that the 1-on-1 mentoring was a satisfying experience. The most highly valued activities were those that facilitated networking among mentees, networking between mentors and mentees, and workshops that focused on grant applications and first academic appointments and promotions. A multidisciplinary mentoring program for postdoctoral scholars and early career faculty focused on HIV/AIDS research is valuable. Umbrella organizations, such as the CFAR, are well suited to create and provide highly valued mentoring experiences.

  19. A Suggested Journalism Curriculum for California Junior Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margosian, Arthur

    The purpose of this study was to develop a suggested journalism curriculum for California junior colleges, based upon the functions and content of journalism programs as they should be, as perceived by a representative group of junior college instructrs and editors of daily and weekly newspapers in California. Data were collected from…

  20. The Opportunity Illusion: Subsidized Housing and Failing Schools in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Deirdre

    2009-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program has funded the bulk of subsidized development nationwide, enabling the construction of over 100,000 units targeted to lower income households in California alone (California Tax Credit Allocation Committee 2009c). Yet, by not encouraging the siting of projects in racially…

  1. 77 FR 36287 - Proposed Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan for the California Tiger Salamander, Calaveras...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan for the California Tiger... listed animal, the threatened Central California Distinct Population Segment of the California tiger salamander (tiger salamander). The applicant would implement a conservation program to minimize and mitigate...

  2. Water use in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Justin; Sneed, Michelle; Rogers, Laurel Lynn; Metzger, Loren F.; Rewis, Diane; House, Sally F.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the USGS National Water Use Compilation, the California Water Science Center works in cooperation with local, State, and Federal agencies as well as academic and private organizations to collect and report total water withdrawals for California. The 2010 California water use data are aggregated here, in this website, for the first time. The California Water Science Center released these data ahead of the online USGS National Water Use Compilation circular report, in response to increased interest associated with current drought conditions. The national report is expected to be released late in 2014. The data on this website represents the most current California water use data available in the USGS National Water Use Compilation. It contains a section on water use in California for 2010. Water-use estimates are compiled by withdrawal source type, use category, and county. Withdrawal source types include groundwater, both fresh and saline,

  3. Eficiência do uso de água em domicílios residenciais na cidade do Gama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Paiva Scardua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo foi analisar os sistemas de descargas sanitárias e de chuveiros utilizados nos domicílios da cidade do Gama/DF. Foram selecionados 0,7% dos domicílios urbanos, distribuídos aleatoriamente, e aplicados questionários a fim de se avaliar o perfil socioeconômico e os sistemas de descarga e chuveiros utilizados. O consumo médio de água observado foi de 208,87 l/hab.dia, sendo que, 9,87% do consumo se deve ao uso de descarga sanitária, e 48,84%, ao uso do chuveiro, totalizando 58,72% do consumo de água das residências analisadas. Com a utilização de descargas e chuveiros mais eficientes a redução do consumo seria de 12,73% e 47,07%, respectivamente, e a redução total seria de 41,29% do consumo total de água. Mais de 86% dos entrevistados se mostraram interessados em trocar ou adaptar os sistemas avaliados para sistemas mais eficientes

  4. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of San Gregorio, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Watt, Janet T.; Golden, Nadine E.; Endris, Charles A.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Bretz, Carrie K.; Manson, Michael W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Ross, Stephanie L.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Chin, John L.; Cochran, Susan A.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California's State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of San Gregorio map area is located in northern California, on the Pacific coast of the San Francisco Peninsula about 50 kilometers south of the Golden Gate. The map area lies offshore of the Santa Cruz Mountains, part of the northwest-trending Coast Ranges that run roughly parallel to the San Andreas Fault Zone. The Santa Cruz Mountains lie between the San Andreas Fault Zone and the San Gregorio Fault system. The nearest significant onshore cultural centers in the map area are San Gregorio and Pescadero, both unincorporated communities with populations well under 1,000. Both communities are situated inland of state beaches that share their names. No harbor facilities are within the Offshore of San Gregorio map area. The hilly coastal area is virtually undeveloped grazing land for sheep and cattle. The coastal geomorphology is controlled by late Pleistocene and Holocene slip in the San Gregorio Fault system. A westward bend in the San Andreas Fault Zone, southeast of the map area, coupled with right-lateral movement along the San Gregorio Fault system have caused regional folding and uplift. The coastal area consists of high coastal bluffs and vertical sea cliffs. Coastal promontories in

  5. Southern California Particle Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the Southern California Particle Center, center researchers will investigate the underlying mechanisms that produce the health effects associated with exposure to...

  6. A Study of the Awareness Level of Electric Vehicle Technology in California Community College Automotive Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyzer, James

    California automotive technician programs were surveyed regarding their awareness of the impact that mandates of the Clean Air Act would have on their automotive technology programs. A questionnaire was sent to 100 California community colleges with an automotive technology program; 49 usable questionnaires were returned. A possible byproduct of…

  7. Caracterização e avaliação de três grupos de arroz-de-sequeiro de diferentes procedências por meio da sensitividade à radiação gama Characterization and evaluation of three groups of rice upland of different origins through gamma-ray sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Roberto Franco Rodrigues

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available A caracterização e avaliação de variedades de arroz auxiliam na seleção dos parentais e na ampliação da base genética dos programas de melhoramento. Este trabalho teve como objetivo caracterizar e avaliar três grupos de arroz-de-sequeiro (Oryza sativa L. de diferentes procedências por meio da sensitividade à radiação gama. Sementes de 84 variedades procedentes do Japão, Filipinas e Brasil foram submetidas a v��rias dosagens de radiação gama e semeadas em caixas de madeira no delineamento em blocos completos ao acaso com três repetições. O experimento foi instalado em casa de vegetação, em 1991, no Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA, da Universidade de São Paulo (USP. Mediu-se a sensitividade por meio dos efeitos fisiológicos produzidos na geração M1; determinaram-se as porcentagens de emergência, a sobrevivência e a altura das plântulas. Os resultados mostraram diferenças significativas de sensitividade à radiação gama entre grupos em todos os caracteres avaliados.The characterization and evaluation of varieties of rice aid in the parents selection and in the increase of the genetic base of breeding programs. The present work was carried out to characterize and to evaluate three groups of rice upland (Oryza sativa L. of different origins through gamma-ray sensitivity. Seeds of 84 varieties collected from Japan, Philippines and Brazil, were submitted to various doses of gamma-radiation and sown in wooden boxes. The experiment was conducted in 1991 at greenhouse according to randomized complete block design with three replications. Physiological effects caused by radiation in the M1 generation, such as seed emergency, seedling height and survival rate, were determined and evaluated. The results showed significant differences of sensitivity to the radiation among three groups for all traits evaluated.

  8. Heat-related inpatient hospitalizations and emergency room visits among California residents, May-September, 2000-2010.

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains case counts, rates, and confidence intervals of heat-related inpatient hospitalizations and ED visits among California residents for the years...

  9. The California Integrated Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, M.; Given, D.; Hauksson, E.; Neuhauser, D.; Oppenheimer, D.; Shakal, A.

    2007-05-01

    The mission of the California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) is to operate a reliable, modern system to monitor earthquakes throughout the state; to generate and distribute information in real-time for emergency response, for the benefit of public safety, and for loss mitigation; and to collect and archive data for seismological and earthquake engineering research. To meet these needs, the CISN operates data processing and archiving centers, as well as more than 3000 seismic stations. Furthermore, the CISN is actively developing and enhancing its infrastructure, including its automated processing and archival systems. The CISN integrates seismic and strong motion networks operated by the University of California Berkeley (UCB), the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) offices in Menlo Park and Pasadena, as well as the USGS National Strong Motion Program (NSMP), and the California Geological Survey (CGS). The CISN operates two earthquake management centers (the NCEMC and SCEMC) where statewide, real-time earthquake monitoring takes place, and an engineering data center (EDC) for processing strong motion data and making it available in near real-time to the engineering community. These centers employ redundant hardware to minimize disruptions to the earthquake detection and processing systems. At the same time, dual feeds of data from a subset of broadband and strong motion stations are telemetered in real- time directly to both the NCEMC and the SCEMC to ensure the availability of statewide data in the event of a catastrophic failure at one of these two centers. The CISN uses a backbone T1 ring (with automatic backup over the internet) to interconnect the centers and the California Office of Emergency Services. The T1 ring enables real-time exchange of selected waveforms, derived ground motion data, phase arrivals, earthquake parameters, and ShakeMaps. With the goal of operating similar and redundant

  10. Special Education Finance in California. Technical Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Laura; Warren, Paul; Murphy, Patrick; Ugo, Iwunze; Pathak, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the technical appendices that accompany the full report, "Special Education Finance in California." The appendices include: (1) Problems with AB 602 and Other State Funding Programs for Special Education; (2) Additional Figures for Analysis of Distribution of Students with Disabilities; (3) Using Supplemental and…

  11. California Digital Library in Twitter-Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Joan

    2010-01-01

    In October 2009, California Digital Library (CDL), where the author serves as manager of strategic and project planning, jumped into the world of social networking by joining Twitter. From Twitter, the CDL staff publish the content of their monthly newsletter, "CDLINFO News," and also additional content created by CDL programs and…

  12. Tectonic deformation in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    Our objectives were to use modem geodetic data, especially those derived from space techniques like Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to infer crustal deformation in southern California and relate it to plate tectonics and earthquake hazard. To do this, we needed to collect some original data, write computer programs to determine positions of survey markers from geodetic observables, interpret time dependent positions in terms of velocity and earthquake caused episodic displacements, and construct a model to explain these velocities and displacements in terms of fault slip and plate movements.

  13. Spain: Europe's California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilvert, Calvin

    1994-01-01

    Contends that, as Spain integrates into the European Economic Community, it is considered to be Europe's California. Asserts that making regional comparisons between California and Spain can be an effective teaching method. Provides comparisons in such areas as agriculture and tourism. (CFR)

  14. California-Baja California border master plan - plan maestro fronterizo California-Baja California : executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Crossborder travel at the six land ports of entry (POEs) in the California-Baja California region has grown : significantly over the years. The San Diego County-Tijuana/Tecate region is home to the San Ysidro- : Puerta Mxico, the Otay Mesa-Mesa de ...

  15. California-Baja California border master plan - plan maestro fronterizo California-Baja California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Crossborder travel at the six land ports of entry (POEs) in the California-Baja California region has grown : significantly over the years. The San Diego County-Tijuana/Tecate region is home to the San Ysidro- : Puerta Mxico, the Otay Mesa-Mesa de ...

  16. California's Reference Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    Social and economic issues affecting the vitality of public libraries in California are discussed. A 1993 study by the California State Library identified diminishing reference skills and reference collections, reduced funding which impacted staffing, increased demand, technology change, and language/culture issues as contributing factors to…

  17. The Suicide Prevention, Depression Awareness, and Clinical Engagement Program for Faculty and Residents at the University of California, Davis Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Jessica; Carson, John G; Chang, Celia H; Kirshnit, Carol; Link, Daniel P; Navarra, Leslie; Scher, Lorin M; Sciolla, Andres F; Uppington, Jeffrey; Yellowlees, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The authors replicated a program developed by UC San Diego, identified medical staff at risk for depression and suicide using a confidential online survey, and studied aspects of that program for 1 year. The authors used a 35-item, online assessment of stress and depression depression developed and licensed by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention that aims to identify and suicide risk and facilitate access to mental health services. During 2013/2014, all 1864 UC Davis residents/fellows and faculty physicians received an invitation to take the survey and 158 responded (8% response rate). Most respondents were classified at either moderate (86 [59%]) or high risk for depression or suicide (54 [37%]). Seventeen individuals (11%) were referred for further evaluation or mental health treatment. Ten respondents consented to participate in the follow-up portion of the program. Five of the six who completed follow-up surveys reported symptom improvement and indicated the program should continue. This program has led to continued funding and a plan to repeat the Wellness Survey annually. Medical staff will be regularly reminded of its existence through educational interventions, as the institutional and professional culture gradually changes to promptly recognize and seek help for physicians' psychological distress.

  18. Self-reported use of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits to purchase soda in a public health center population: Los Angeles County, California, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragan, Noel; Gase, Lauren; Butler, Rebecca; Smith, Lisa; Simon, Paul; Kuo, Tony

    2015-01-01

    To better inform local program planning for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health used self-reported data from a public health center population to examine the prevalence of benefits used to purchase soda. We performed statistical analyses, including multivariable regression modeling, using data from a local health and nutrition examination survey. The survey response rate was 69% (n=1,503). More than one-third of survey participants reported receiving, or living in a household where someone receives, nutrition assistance benefits. When asked, 33% (n=170) reported using these benefits to purchase soda "sometimes" and 18% (n=91) reported "often" or "always," suggesting that the use of program benefits to purchase soda was not uncommon in this subpopulation. These findings have meaningful policy and planning implications, as they contribute to ongoing dialogue about strategies for optimizing nutrition among SNAP recipients.

  19. Navy Program Guide 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    search more than 40,000 square miles of ocean a day in long dwell orbits . From the sea, we will continue to deploy the MQ-8 Fire Scout surveillance...Signal Sunnyvale, California AT&T Solutions Vienna, Virginia EDO Corporation San Jose, California General Dynamics San Jose, California L-3...program has a projected IOC in 2015. Developers HSMST: Silver Ships Theodore, Alabama GQM-163A: Orbital Sciences Chandler, Arizona MSST

  20. Southern California Coastal Processes Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    A report describing the program which is to restore and enhance a degraded wetland on the San Diego coast. Program is to be included in the local...42 DESCRIPTION " Describes the occurrence of cobbles and boulders of glaucophane schist and rock grains in sedimentary rocks in Southern California...San Juan Creek and Trabuco Creek, Facility Nos. LO and L02, Aggradation/ Degradation Study CITATION : Orange County Environmental Management Agency

  1. Data Analysis and Data-Driven Decision-Making Strategies Implemented by Elementary Teachers in Selected Exited Program Improvement Safe Harbor Schools in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to investigate and describe how elementary teachers in exited Program Improvement-Safe Harbor schools acquire student achievement data through assessments, the strategies and reflections utilized to make sense of the data to improve student achievement, ensure curriculum and instructional goals are aligned,…

  2. The Development of a Comprehensive First-Year Experience Program for the University of Southern California: Using an Innovation Gap Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studdert, Thomas Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Using an innovation adaptation of the gap analysis approach of Richard Clark and Fred Estes, the collegiate First-Year Experience (FYE) consisting of comprehensive and intentional curricular and co-curricular initiatives was examined. Conceptualization and operationalization of the goal for a FYE program was based on 3 student development theories…

  3. Parâmetros comportamentais e neurotóxicos de gama-decanolactona em modelos experimentais de epilepsia, estresse oxidativo e genotoxicidade

    OpenAIRE

    Pricila Fernandes Pflüger

    2016-01-01

    Gama-decanolactona (GD) é um composto monoterpeno com estrutura semelhante às lactonas naturais, que estão presentes em diferentes espécies e são usadas como terapia farmacológica na região amazônica. GD mostrou um efeito anticonvulsivo em ambos os modelos de pentilenotetrazol (PTZ) agudo e crônico e atua como um antagonista de glutamato não-competitivo. Considerando estudos anteriores sobre atividades biológicas de GD, o presente estudo teve como objetivo explorar o seu perfil anticonvulsiva...

  4. "Companheiros de infortúnio": a educação de "surdos-mudos" e o repetidor Flausino da Gama

    OpenAIRE

    CÁSSIA GECIAUSKAS SOFIATO; LUCIA HELENA REILY

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present the educational trajectory of Flausino José da Costa Gama, who was a student at the Imperial Institute for Deaf-Mutes of Rio de Janeiro in the nineteenth-century. Besides having been an exemplary student and lesson repeater, according to records of the times, he distinguished himself by creating the first sign language to date in Brazil, i.e. the Iconography of Signs of Deaf-Mutes of 1875. Using bibliographic and documentary research, we present the pedagog...

  5. Compatibilidades e incompatibilidades entre radiação gama e óxido de etileno como métodos sucessivos de esterilização

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Queiroz de Souza; Kazuko Uchikawa Graziano

    2010-01-01

    A dúvida sobre a questão da re-esterilização de artigos confeccionados com cloreto de polivinila (PVC), esterilizados em radiação gama (RG) e posteriormente em óxido de etileno (EO) persiste até os dias atuais. Por meio da revisão integrativa da literatura, este artigo analisou estudos que evidenciaram compatibilidades e incompatibilidades entre os processos de esterilização com RG e EO quando utilizados como métodos sucessivos de esterilização. Foram analisados 7 estudos. Constatou-se que há...

  6. An Analysis of Impediments to the Productivity Enhancing Capital Investment Programs at the Naval Air Station, Alameda and the Naval Air Rework Facility, Alameda, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    review of manangement control theory is also incorporated. Impediments to productivity at NAS Alameda is the subject of Chapter IV. Each phase of the...requested but not funded under OPN. Managers may honestly fail to see the need for change from present budget strategy. Another impediment is the...industrial fund - revenues rather than direct appropriated funds. The effec- tive date for the change was 1 October 1982. The program . established to

  7. Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for the California Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate Project and its associated Marine Mammal Research Program. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-01

    presented at the January 6, 1995 public hearing in Santa Cruz, CA. These comments contributed to the evolution of the research program that makes up...frequency sounds, and crustacean/ cephalopod auditory capabilities/potential impacts. Response: There is a fairly well-defined OMZ in the oceanic water...habitat and predicted activity locations within the oceanic water column. Commercially-taken species of fish, crustaceans and cephalopods would be

  8. Serum levels of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gama in infants with and without dengue Níveis séricos de interleucina-6, fator de necrose tumoral-alfa e interferon-gama em crianças menores de um ano com e sem dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Nelly Restrepo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the serum levels of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, in children under 1 year of age with and without dengue. Sera were collected from a total of 41 children living in the Department of Antioquia, Colombia (27 patients with dengue and 14 controls. The results showed higher cytokine levels in children with dengue than without dengue, with statistically significant differences for IL-6 and IFN-gamma. No statistically significant differences were found between clinical forms, although IL-6 and IFN-gamma levels were higher in dengue fever cases than in dengue hemorrhagic fever cases. On the other hand, TNF-alpha levels were higher in dengue hemorrhagic fever than in dengue fever. The levels of IL-6 and TNF-alpha were higher in secondary infection than in primary infection, although IFN-gamma levels were higher in primary infection. These results suggest that IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma are involved in dengue infection independently of the clinical form.Este estudo comparou os níveis séricos de IL-6, TNF-alfa e IFN-gama, em crianças menores de um ano com e sem dengue. Os soros foram coletados de um total de 41 crianças residentes no Departamento de Antioquia, Colômbia (27 pacientes com dengue e 14 controles. Os resultados mostraram níveis de citoquinas mais elevadas em crianças com dengue do que naquelas sem dengue, com diferenças estatisticamente significativas para IL-6 and IFN-gama. Não houve diferenças estatisticamente significativas entre formas clínicas, embora os níveis de IL-6 e IFN-gama estivessem mais elevados nos casos de febre do dengue que nos casos de febre hemorrágica do dengue. Por outro lado, os níveis de TNF-alfa estavam mais elevados na febre hemorrágica do dengue que na febre do dengue. Os níveis de IL-6 and TNF-alfa estavam mais elevados em infecções secundárias que em infecções primarias, embora os níveis de IFN-gama estivessem mais elevados em infecções primárias. Estes resultados

  9. California Immigrants Today

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelius, Wayne A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will focus on the Mexico-origin component of the California immigrant population. Drawing on the results of field studies conducted throughout California and in west-central Mexico during the last ten years,the paper will describe how the profile of Mexican migration to California has changed since the 197Os, suggest explanations for these changes, and discuss their implications for public policy. Effects of the long-running economic crisis in Mexico and of the 1986 U.S. immigra-ti...

  10. Installation-restoration program (IRP) Stage 7, remedial investigation/feasibility study comprehensive CERCLA work plan for McClellan AFB/EM, McClellan AFB, California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    In 1979, officials at McClellan Air Force Base (AFB) in California began to suspect that past waste disposal practices may be contaminating the ground water in the area. At least four areas of potential ground water contamination needing further investigation. A comprehensive program was developed to maintain drinking water quality and to remediate the contamination. Through the operation and maintenance of aircraft, McClellan AFB has been engaged in operations that involve the use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials including: industrial solvents, caustic cleaners, electroplating chemicals, heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), low-level radioactive wastes, and a variety of fuel oils and lubricants. Hazardous substances have percolated into aquifers. Ground water testing identified the presence of volatile organic compounds in on- and off-base wells. Surface water drainage includes several creeks within the area watersheds. These creeks receive contaminants and toxic hazards from on base drainage and then in turn merge with several tributaries, and exit to the west.

  11. California State Waters Map Series Data Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Nadine E.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California's State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps and associated data layers through the collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. CSMP has divided coastal California into 110 map blocks (fig. 1), each to be published individually as USGS Scientific Investigations Maps (SIMs) at a scale of 1:24,000. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. This CSMP data catalog contains much of the data used to prepare the SIMs in the California State Waters Map Series. Other data that were used to prepare the maps were compiled from previously published sources (for example, onshore geology) and, thus, are not included herein.

  12. California Rare Endemics and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, M.

    2010-12-01

    California is known for its wide variety of endemic flora, from its annuals such as the Eschscholzia californica (California poppy) to the perennials like the Arctostaphylos pallida (Alameda manzanita), which happens to be a rare species. Each species plays an important role in the biodiversity of California, yet there are species that are threatened, not only by human interaction and urbanization, but by climate change. Species that we seldom see are now on the verge of becoming eradicated; rare endemics similar to Arctostaphylos pallida are now facing a new challenge that may severely impair their survival. The climate has changed significantly over the twentieth century and it has affected the distribution of rare endemics in California, both geographically as well as within their climatic and edaphic niches. Lilaeopsis masonii is just one rare endemic, however it serves as a representative of the other 23 species that were studied. Using Maxent, a climate-modeling program, it was viable to construct two climate envelopes of the masonii species: the early century envelope (1930-1959) and the later century envelope (1990-2009). When these two climate envelopes were compared, it became clear that the later century climate envelope had contracted radically, reshaping the climate niche of all rare endemics in California due to an increase in temperature. It is possible to conclude that the future of rare endemics hangs in the balance, where one degree higher in temperature is enough to topple the scale.

  13. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the Margins-Geoprisms Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum, Rupturing Continental Lithosphere Part I: Introducing Seismic Interpretation and Isostasy Principles Using Gulf of California Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, M. A.; Cashman, S. M.; Dorsey, R. J.; Bennett, S. E. K.; Loveless, J. P.; Goodliffe, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes. The NSF-GeoPRISMS Mini-lesson Project, funded by NSF-TUES, is designed to integrate the significant findings from the MARGINS program into open-source college-level curriculum. The Gulf of California (GOC) served as the focus site for the Rupturing Continental Lithosphere initiative, which addressed several scientific questions: What forces drive rift initiation, localization, propagation and evolution? How does deformation vary in time and space, and why? How does crust evolve, physically and chemically, as rifting proceeds to sea-floor spreading? What is the role of sedimentation and magmatism in continental extension? We developed two weeks of curriculum designed for an upper-division structural geology, tectonics or geophysics course. The curriculum includes lectures, labs, and in-class activities that can be used as a whole or individually. The first set of materials introduces the RCL initiative to students and has them analyze the bathymetry and oblique-rifting geometry of the GOC in an exercise using GeoMapApp. The second set of materials has two goals: (1) introduce students to fundamental concepts of interpreting seismic reflection data via lectures and in-class interpretation of strata, basement, and faults from recent GOC seismic data, and (2) encourage students to discover the structural geometry and rift evolution, including the east-to-west progression of faulting and transition from detachment to high-angle faulting in the northern GOC, and changes in deformation style from north to south. In the third set of materials, students investigate isostatic affects of sediment fill in GOC oblique rift basins. This activity consists of a problem set, introduced in a lecture, where students integrate their findings from the previous bathymetry- and seismic-interpretation exercises.

  14. Regional systems development for geothermal energy resources: Pacific region (California and Hawaii). Task 2: Regional program monitoring and progress evaluation, topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-19

    All the objectives of the regional program monitoring and progress evaluation have been met through personal contacts and the review of data. They are as follows: to determine the existing status of power plant projects and future plans; to identify major problem areas for each project (technical, financial, regulatory) that are affecting progress; and to analyze the data and to develop recommendations directed toward resolving problems. The results have been presented in a tabular summary format that is accompanied by explanatory text covering 25 projects.

  15. California Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a result of the California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: a collaboration between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center and Marine Conservation...

  16. University of Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The focus of the University of Southern California (USC) Children''s Environmental Health Center is to develop a better understanding of how host susceptibility and...

  17. California Data Exchange Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to make July &28;Water Smart Month.&29; &28;Conserving ... Remote sensors today indicate that statewide, snowpack water content is 54 percent of ... California ranked first, along with Texas, on ...

  18. Coastal California Digital Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital ortho-imagery dataset is a survey of coastal California. The project area consists of approximately 3774 square miles. The project design of the digital...

  19. Kelp distribution off California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set delineates kelp beds (Nereocystis leutkeana and Macrocystis spp.) along the Pacific Coast of California. Multiple years of kelp mapping data for the...

  20. California Harpoon Fishery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vessel logbook and landings data from harpoon vessels that fish within 200 miles of the California coast, from 1974 to present. The harpoon...

  1. Earthquakes in Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — There have been many earthquake occurrences in Southern California. This set of slides shows earthquake damage from the following events: Imperial Valley, 1979,...

  2. California Watershed Hydrologic Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset is intended to be used as a tool for water-resource management and planning activities, particularly for site-specific and localized studies requiring a...

  3. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the G02 field, Herschel-ATLAS target selection and Data Release 3 arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Baldry, I.K.; Brown, M.J.I.; Robotham, A.S.G.; Driver, S.P.; Dunne, L.; Alpaslan, M.; Brough, S.; Cluver, M.E.; Eardley, E.; Farrow, D.J.; Heymans, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Hopkins, A.M.; Kelvin, L.S.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A.J.; Norberg, P.; Owers, M.S.; Taylor, E.N.; Wright, A.H.; Bamford, S.P.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bourne, N.; Bremer, M.N.; Colless, M.; Conselice, C.J.; Croom, S.M.; Davies, L.J.M.; Foster, C.; Grootes, M.W.; Holwerda, B.W.; Jones, D.H.; Kafle, P.R.; Kuijken, K.; Lara-Lopez, M.A.; Lopez-Sanchez, A.R.; Meyer, M.J.; Phillipps, S.; Sutherland, W.J.; van Kampen, E.; Wilkins, S.M.

    We describe data release 3 (DR3) of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA survey is a spectroscopic redshift and multi-wavelength photometric survey in three equatorial regions each of 60.0 deg^2 (G09, G12, G15), and two southern regions of 55.7 deg^2 (G02) and 50.6 deg^2 (G23). DR3 consists of: the first release of data covering the G02 region and of data on H-ATLAS sources in the equatorial regions; and updates to data on sources released in DR2. DR3 includes 154809 sources with secure redshifts across four regions. A subset of the G02 region is 95.5% redshift complete to r<19.8 over an area of 19.5 deg^2, with 20086 galaxy redshifts, that overlaps substantially with the XXL survey (X-ray) and VIPERS (redshift survey). In the equatorial regions, the main survey has even higher completeness (98.5%), and spectra for about 75% of H-ATLAS filler targets were also obtained. This filler sample extends spectroscopic redshifts, for probable optical counterparts to H-ATLAS sub-mm sources, to 0.8 ma...

  4. Esterilização de soros e vacinas por radiação gama de cobalto Sterilization of sera and vaccines by cobalt gamma radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalvo Guidolin

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available Os soros antitetânico, antidiftérico e antibotrópico-crotálico e, ainda, a vacina diftérica-pertussis-tetânica foram submetidos a diferentes intensidades de radiação gama, com os seguintes intuitos: verificação da resistência das atividades específicas destes produtos à ação dos raios gama; avaliação das possibilidades de utilização deste tipo de energia radiante para a esterilização de alguns soros hiperimunes heterólogos e vacinas, mais comumente utilizados em saúde pública. Os resultados obtidos, segundo os parâmetros empregados, mostraram a possibilidade de esterilização sem alterações das atividades específicas, de ordem biológica ou química, dos produtos experimentados.Diphteria, tetanus, anti-snake venom sera and Diphteria-Pertussis-Tetanus vaccine were submited to different intensities of gamma radiation, in order to: verify the resistance of their specific activities to the action of gamma rays; evaluate the possibility of using this type of energy to sterilize some heterogenous hyperimmune sera and vaccines commonly utilized in Public Health. The results, according to the range employed, show the possibility of sterilizing the products tested, without any alteration to specific biological and chemical properties.

  5. The Perception of Fifth Semester Students in Learning Listening Strategies at Widya Gama Mahakam Samarinda University in Academic Year 2016/2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maimunah Rani Fitri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The listening skills is viewed as an important skill to master, because from listening we can understand what are people saying, we can get the meaning of every words that speaker talk about, and it is important in process of listening comprehension. The Objective of this research is to find out the perception of fifth semester students of Widya Gama Mahakam Samarinda University in learning listening comprehension. In this research the main theories from Gay (2006 and from (Howitt & Cramer, 2009. The researcher uses Descriptive Quantitative research. The subject of this study was the fifth semester students of English Department at Widya Gama Mahakam Samarinda University. The researcher uses a questionnaire as an instrument to collect the data, and then representing the data in analysis and concluding the result of analysis. The result of questionnaire showed that students perception toward the strategies in learning listening were 12 students or 171% very often used Social strategies, 15 students or 171% often used Affective and Compensation strategies.

  6. 78 FR 54147 - Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, California; Decreased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... industry plans to shift its marketing programs to the State marketing program, the California Date... / Tuesday, September 3, 2013 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 987 Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, California...

  7. Análisis del mercado kosher, diseño del packaging, creación de nueva gama kosher en bodega Peces-Barba y desarrollo del plan de marketing MIX

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Diaz, Blanca Paloma

    2017-01-01

    Análisis del mercado Kosher para desarrollar una nueva gama de producto de la bodega toledana Peces - Barba. Además se ha desarrollado un plan de marketing donde se detalla el precio, la promoción, el producto y la distribución del mismo. Grado en Publicidad y Relaciones Públicas

  8. AFSC/NMML/CCEP: Northern fur seal demography at San Miguel Island, California, 1974 - 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem Program (AFSC/NOAA) initiated a long-term marking program of northern fur seals (Callorhinus...

  9. U.S. EPA Proposes to Add California Mine Site to Superfunds National Priorities List

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to add eight hazardous waste sites to the Superfund program's National Priorities List (NPL), including California's Argonaut Mine. Superfund is the federal program that investiga

  10. Joint Services Electronics Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-30

    Compound Semiconductors." 4 ......... I-*. Univesity of California. Berkeley Electronics Research Laboratory Joint Services Electronics Program August 15...reduction techniques [SCH-66,MCG- 73,HAM-75], for essentially i educing the proportionality constant. A significant portion of the probabilistic literature

  11. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2009 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  12. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2007 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  13. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2005 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  14. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2008 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  15. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2004 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  16. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2010 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  17. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2006 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  18. Retrofit California Overview and Final Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choy, Howard; Rosales, Ana

    2014-03-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (also called upgrades) are widely recognized as a critical component to achieving energy savings in the building sector to help lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To date, however, upgrades have accounted for only a small percentage of aggregate energy savings in building stock, both in California and nationally. Although the measures and technologies to retrofit a building to become energy efficient are readily deployed, establishing this model as a standard practice remains elusive. Retrofit California sought to develop and test new program models to increase participation in the energy upgrade market in California. The Program encompassed 24 pilot projects, conducted between 2010 and mid-2013 and funded through a $30 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The broad scope of the Program can be seen in the involvement of the following regionally based Grant Partners: Los Angeles County (as prime grantee); Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), consisting of: o StopWaste.org for Alameda County o Regional Climate Protection Authority (RCPA) for Sonoma County o SF Environment for the City and County of San Francisco o City of San Jose; California Center for Sustainable Energy (CCSE) for the San Diego region; Sacramento Municipal Utilities District (SMUD). Within these jurisdictions, nine different types of pilots were tested with the common goal of identifying, informing, and educating the people most likely to undertake energy upgrades (both homeowners and contractors), and to provide them with incentives and resources to facilitate the process. Despite its limited duration, Retrofit California undoubtedly succeeded in increasing awareness and education among home and property owners, as well as contractors, realtors, and community leaders. However, program results indicate that a longer timeframe will be needed to

  19. Private Schools, California, 2009, California Department of Education

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — California law (California Education Code Section 33190) requires private schools offering or conducting a full-time elementary or secondary level day school for...

  20. Tsunami Preparedness in California (videos)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filmed and edited by: Loeffler, Kurt; Gesell, Justine

    2010-01-01

    Tsunamis are a constant threat to the coasts of our world. Although tsunamis are infrequent along the West coast of the United States, it is possible and necessary to prepare for potential tsunami hazards to minimize loss of life and property. Community awareness programs are important, as they strive to create an informed society by providing education and training. These videos about tsunami preparedness in California distinguish between a local tsunami and a distant event and focus on the specific needs of each region. They offer guidelines for correct tsunami response and community preparedness from local emergency managers, first-responders, and leading experts on tsunami hazards and warnings, who have been working on ways of making the tsunami affected regions safer for the people and communities on a long-term basis. These videos were produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California Emergency Management Agency (CalEMA) and Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E).

  1. Birth defects data for 8 California counties by county, maternal age, maternal race/ethnicity, and infant gender for the years 2000-2006.

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains counts, rates, and confidence intervals of 12 selected birth defects among live births during 2000-2006 within eight California counties:...

  2. Food habits of California sea lions in Washington state, 1986-02-26 to 1999-10-18 (NCEI Accession 0145637)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — From 1986 to 1999, The National Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem Program (AFSC/NOAA) collected fecal samples and stomachs of male California...

  3. Childhood lead poisoning data for California by county, age, and blood lead level for the years 2007-2009; and age of housing data for 2000.

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains counts and percentages of blood lead levels among children tested for lead poisoning during 2007-2009 within California . The data are...

  4. The Story of California = La Historia de California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Nick

    "The Story of California" is a history and geography of the state of California, intended for classroom use by limited-English-proficient, native Spanish-speaking students in California's urban middle schools. The book is designed with the left page in English and the right page in Spanish to facilitate student transition into…

  5. The tobacco industry, state politics, and tobacco education in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begay, M E; Traynor, M; Glantz, S A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Proposition 99 added 25 cents to the California state cigarette tax and mandated that 20% of the new revenues be spent on tobacco education and prevention programs. This paper examines the implementation of these programs and the tobacco industry's response to Proposition 99. METHODS. Political expenditure data for twelve tobacco firms and associations were gathered from California's Fair Political Practices Commission and secretary of state's Political Reform Division. Tobacco education expenditure data were collected from Governor's Budgets and the Department of Finance. RESULTS. Since Proposition 99 passed, tobacco industry political expenditures in California have risen 10-fold, from $790,050 in the 1985-1986 election to $7,615,091 in the 1991-1992 election. The tobacco industry is contributing more heavily to the California legislature than to Congress. A statistical analysis of data on campaign contributions indicates that California legislators' policy-making is influenced by campaign contributions from the tobacco industry. Since fiscal year 1989-1990, the state has ignored the voters' mandate and spent only 14.7% of the new revenues to tobacco education. Medical care programs received more money than permitted by the voters. CONCLUSIONS. The tobacco industry has become politically active in California following the passage of Proposition 99. One result may be that the state has underfunded tobacco education by $174.7 million through the 1993-1994 fiscal year. The estimated redirection of funds to medical care would essentially eliminate the tobacco education campaign by the year 2000. PMID:8362994

  6. Ecoregion sections of California deserts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The dataset delineates ecological sections within California deserts. These deserts occupy the southeastern portion of California and include two ecoregional...

  7. 40 CFR 81.405 - California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false California. 81.405 Section 81.405 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF...-58 USDA-FS Yolla-Bolly-Middle-Eel Wild 109,091 88-577 USDA-FS Yosemite NP 759,172 58-49 USDI-NPS 1 26...

  8. Solar: California, not dreaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2006-03-15

    The California Solar Initiative (CSI) was approved by the California Public Utilities Commission (PUC) in January 2006. The CSI is the largest solar programme of this kind ever in the USA and provides for $3.2 billion in incentives for solar projects between 2007 and 2017. The PUC will oversee a $2.5 billion programme to provide funding for solar installations on commercial and existing residential buildings, while the California Energy Commission (CEC) will manage a separate $350 million fund targeted at new residential building. Existing solar programmes operated by the PUC and CEC will be consolidated into the CSI. The CEC programme will use already allocated funding, but the PUC programme will be funded through revenues collected from customers of the main gas and electric utilities in California. Funds will be distributed via rebates to householders or companies that install solar. As well as solar photovoltaics (PV), rebates will also go to solar thermal power (concentrating solar power) and solar heating and cooling. CSI funding can be used in combination with existing federal tax credits. The aim is a gradual increase from installation of 40 MW of PV in 2005 to 100 MW by 2009. The CSI is also expected to create favourable market conditions for PV manufacturers in California and to encourage investment in production of solar-grade silicon in or near California. Objections from the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) appear to have been overcome but a number of other potential snags remain. CSI is expected to be replicated in other US states.

  9. Observações das explosões cósmicas de raios gama GRB021004 e GRB021211 com o satélite HETE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, J.; Ricker, G.; Hurley, K.; Lamb, D.; Grew, G.; et al.

    2003-08-01

    O High Energy Transient Explorer (HETE) é o primeiro satélite inteiramente dedicado ao estudo das explosões cósmicas de raios gama (ECRGs). Lançado em 9 de outubro de 2000, o HETE possui instrumentação capaz de observar as ECRGs desde o UV até raios gama e localizá-las com precisão de ~ 1-10 minutos de arco. As localizações das ECRGs detectadas são disseminadas rapidamente (em alguns segundos) pela Internet através de uma rede de estações de recepção ao longo do equador. A participação brasileira nesse projeto se dá através da montagem e operação de uma estação de recepção em Natal, RN, e da participação na equipe científica da missão. Neste trabalho são apresentados resultados da observação pelo HETE de duas ECRGs: GRB 021004 e GRB 021211. A GRB021004 foi detectada em raios gama pelo HETE em 4 de outubro de 2002 e localizada em raios-X em apenas 48 s, quando a emissão de raios gama ainda estava se processando. A explosão, relativamente brilhante e longa, durou aproximadamente 100 s. Um transiente óptico de magnitude 15 foi detectado no local da explosão nove minutos após o evento, e observações realizadas após 7 horas determinaram um desvio para o vermelho de absorção de 1,6. O GRB021004 foi o burst mais bem observado até o momento e suas observações em vários comprimentos de onda têm sido fundamentais para o aprimoramento dos modelos de ECRGs. O GRB21211, um burst brilhante e rico em raios-X, foi detectado em 11 de dezembro de 2002 e localizado em raios-X em 22 s após o início do evento. A duração do burst foi de 2,3 s em altas energias (85 a 400 keV) e de 8,5 s em baixas energias (2 a 10 keV). Caso essa explosão não tivesse sido rapidamente localizada pelo HETE, ela teria sido classificada como "opticamente escura", já que o transiente óptico decaiu rapidamente de R < 14 a R»19 dentro dos primeiros 20 minutos e já estava mais fraco do que R»23 depois de 24 horas da ocorrência do burst. Ser

  10. Efeito da radiação gama do 60Co na conservação e qualidade de pimenta in natura e em polpa

    OpenAIRE

    Regina Célia Rodrigues Miranda Milagres

    2014-01-01

    Pimentas do gênero Capsicum estão entre as especiarias mais consumidas e valorizadas na culinária mundial como temperos. São altamente susceptíveis a deterioração pós-colheita, assim, o emprego da irradiação pode contribuir para conservação deste fruto que apresentam expressivo valor nutricional, econômico e social. Foram avaliados os efeitos da radiação gama do 60Co no aumento da vida útil e na conservação da qualidade de pimenta Dedo-de-MoçaCapsicumbaccatumvar. pendulum in natura e em polpa...

  11. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the absence of stellar mass segregation in galaxy groups and consistent predictions from GALFORM and EAGLE simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, P. R.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Lagos, C. del P.; Davies, L. J.; Moffett, A. J.; Driver, S. P.; Andrews, S. K.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Cortese, L.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Finnegan, R.; Hopkins, A. M.; Loveday, J.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the contentious issue of the presence, or lack thereof, of satellites mass segregation in galaxy groups using the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, the GALFORM semi-analytic, and the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation catalogues of galaxy groups. We select groups with halo mass 12 ≤ log (Mhalo/h-1 M⊙) EAGLE data allows us to probe much fainter luminosities (r-band magnitude of 22) as well as investigate the three-dimensional spatial distribution with intrinsic halo properties, beyond what the current observational data can offer. In both cases we find that the fainter EAGLE data show a very mild spatial mass segregation at z ≤ 0.22, which is again not apparent at higher redshift. Interestingly, our results are in contrast to some earlier findings using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We investigate the source of the disagreement and suggest that subtle differences between the group-finding algorithms could be the root cause.

  12. Medida da difusão de fluídos em sólidos amorfos por atenuação de raios gama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Tannous

    1979-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents theoretical and experimental procedure used in the study of fluid diffusion in amorphous solids by gamma ray atenuation. It is also presented a brief experimental study of water difussion in concrete, qualitatively comparing with a theoretical and experimental study of water diffusion in Cerrado soil. No presente trabalho discute-se o formalismo teórico e o procedimento experimental para o estudo do movimento de fluídos em sólidos amorfos por atenuação de raios gama. Apresenta-se também um breve estudo experimental da difusão de água em concreto, comparando-se qualitativamente com estudo teórico e experimental da difusão de água em solo do tipo Cerrado.

  13. Identifying the location and population served by domestic wells in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler D. Johnson

    2015-03-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: Aggregating the results indicates that three hydrogeologic provinces contain nearly 80% of all domestic wells and also have the highest density of domestic well users: Central Valley (31.6%, Sierra Nevada (31.5%, and Northern Coast Ranges (16.6%. Results were also aggregated into groundwater basins and highland areas, collectively called Groundwater Units (GUs. Twenty-eight of the 938 GUs contain more than 50% of the total population served by domestic wells, 70 GUs contain more than 75%, and 150 GUs contain 90%. The 28 GUs are mostly located in the eastern and southern San Joaquin Valley (11, the Sacramento Valley (7, and the western foothills of the Sierra Nevada province (5. Using the information presented in this research along with other information about domestic-well use, the US Geological Survey has begun sampling high-use GUs for the Shallow Aquifer Assessment component of the Groundwater Ambient Assessment (GAMA program.

  14. Radiação gama na conservação pós-colheita da nectarina (Prunus persica var. Nucipersica frigoconservada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Leandro Camargo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho foi desenvolvido no laboratório de Frutas e Hortaliças do Departamento de Gestão e Tecnologia Agroindustrial da Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas - UNESP - Câmpus de Botucatu, tendo como objetivo principal a caracterização do comportamento da radiação gama, na conservação pós-colheita da nectarina cv. "Sunred". Os frutos foram colhidos no início do estádio de maturação, selecionados, limpos, pré-resfriados (4masculineC por 12 horas e submetidos a diferentes doses de radiação gama, constituindo assim os tratamentos: 1 0,0 kGy, 2 - 0,2 kGy, 3 - 0,4 kGy, 4 - 0,6 kGy, 5 - 0,8 kGy, sendo após armazenados em câmara fria com temperaturas de 0masculineC e 90-95% de UR, por 28 dias. As análises foram realizadas a cada sete dias, determinando-se o aspecto visual dos frutos, a perda de massa fresca, a firmeza de polpa, a acidez total titulável (ATT, os sólidos solúveis totais (STT e a razão STT/ATT. Após 28 dias de armazenamento, verificou-se que os frutos submetidos à dose de 0,4 kGy apresentaram o melhor aspecto visual, as menores perdas de massa fresca, e a maior firmeza de polpa, não ocorrendo, entretanto, variações significativas nos teores de acidez total titulável, sólidos solúveis totais e nos valores da razão SST/ATT.

  15. Caracterização agronômica de mutantes de bananeira obtidos por meio da radiação gama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Perito Amorim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A bananeira é uma das fruteiras de maior importância econômica, explorada quase exclusivamente por pequenos produtores. Constitui-se em fonte contínua de alimento e renda. Embora o Brasil figure como um dos maiores produtores de banana, a bananicultura nacional enfrenta sérios problemas nas fases de produção e pós-colheita, que limitam sua inserção no mercado internacional. Um dos fatores que levam a grandes perdas na produção é o tombamento resultante da altura elevada da planta das principais cultivares comerciais. Uma estratégia para a solução deste problema é a redução do porte por indução de mutação. O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar mutantes de banana tipo Prata (cv´s Pacovan e Preciosa irradiadas, durante dois ciclos de produção, visando à seleção de plantas com porte baixo e boas características agronômicas. Plantas in vitro das duas cultivares foram irradiadas com raios gamas nas doses de 20 Gy ('Pacovan' - 200 mudas e 30 Gy ('Preciosa' - 200 mudas, subcultivadas por quatro vezes e posteriormente avaliadas em campo durante dois ciclos de produção. Foram selecionados quatro mutantes de cada cultivar com altura inferior à média de altura das testemunhas, após dois ciclos de avaliação. Observou-se que em alguns desses mutantes houve maior precocidade e maior massa do cacho quando comparados com as testemunhas. Pelos resultados, é possível selecionar plantas mutantes com características agronômicas superiores, tanto para a 'Pacovan' quanto para a 'Preciosa', submetidas à radiação gama.

  16. California's Perfect Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, David

    2010-01-01

    The United States today faces an economic crisis worse than any since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Nowhere is it sharper than in the nation's schools. Last year, California saw a perfect storm of protest in virtually every part of its education system. K-12 teachers built coalitions with parents and students to fight for their jobs and their…

  17. Women of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Harry

    This publication points out the achievements of women who contributed to the development and history of California from the 16th century, when the Spanish Conquistadores moved westward into the San Francisco Bay area, to the gold rush of 1848, and during the following period when women helped stabilize society on the rugged frontier. Women not…

  18. Peyotism in California

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Omer C

    1986-01-01

    The future of Peyotism in California is very uncertain even for the Indian peyotists east of Sierra Nevada. Cause for worry for the future of the Native American Church is the possibility that the supply of peyote may disappear from the "peyote gardens" in Texas.

  19. Higher Education in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Policy Institute of California, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Higher education enhances Californians' lives and contributes to the state's economic growth. But population and education trends suggest that California is facing a large shortfall of college graduates. Addressing this short­fall will require strong gains for groups that have been historically under­represented in higher education. Substantial…

  20. California's Future: Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Hans

    2015-01-01

    California's higher education system is not keeping up with the changing economy. Projections suggest that the state's economy will continue to need more highly educated workers. In 2025, if current trends persist, 41 percent of jobs will require at least a bachelor's degree and 36 percent will require some college education short of a bachelor's…

  1. NREL + Southern California Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdahl, Sonja E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-09

    NREL and Southern California Gas Company are evaluating a new 'power-to-gas' approach - one that produces methane through a biological pathway and uses the expansive natural gas infrastructure to store it. This approach has the potential to change how the power industry approaches renewable generation and energy storage.

  2. FELLOWS ADDRESS California Dreaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van Kees

    2017-01-01

    California was the first jurisdiction to mandate a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. This target was subsequently endorsed by the G8 in 2009 and the European Commission in 2014, and is the guiding principle of the 2015 Paris Agreement. To achieve these

  3. The environmental sustainability of a pilot plant for the manufacture of biodiesel from frying oil: a case study: Universidade de Brasilia UNB/FGA, Gama, DF, Brazil; A sustentabilidade ambiental de uma planta piloto para fabricacao de biodiesel a partir de oleo de fritura: estudo de caso: Universidade de Brasilia UnB/FGA, Gama, DF, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Glecia Virgolino da; Falla, Pilar Hidalgo; Ginoris, Yovanka Perez; Oliveira, Alessandro Borges de S.; Alves, Marcos Antonio de S. [Universidade de Brasilia (FGA/UnB), Gama, DF (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Whereas the efforts of the Brazilian government and its researchers to explore new renewable energy alternatives such as biofuels, and considering the existing methodologies for the production of biodiesel, including the processes of washing out, which consumes a large amount of water treated, University of Brasilia/FGA/Gama installs in about July 2010 a pilot plant for biodiesel production. The pilot plant will use feedstock used frying oil collected in homes, restaurants and coffee shop in the region, preventing this oil remains released to sewage in natura. Thus, this project aims to develop academic research and the improvement of the community in the city of Gama / DF. This study aimed to carry out preliminary studies of the methodology and water to be used in biodiesel production in order to confirm the reduction of fuel costs the University to contribute to reducing the release of oils into the sewer and use of distillers for water will wash the biodiesel, reducing the energy consumption of the plant. (author)

  4. Overview of California's Efforts to Understand and Reduce Methane Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croes, B. E.; Chen, Y.; Duren, R. M.; Falk, M.; Franco, G.; Herner, J.; Ingram, W.; Kuwayama, T.; McCarthy, R.; Scheehle, E.; Vijayan, A.

    2016-12-01

    Methane is an important short-lived climate pollutant (SLCP) and also has significant health implications as a tropospheric ozone precursor. As part of a comprehensive effort to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions overall by 40% from 1990 levels by 2030, California has proposed an SLCP Strategy that includes a 40% reduction of methane emissions from 2013 levels by 2030, with goals to reduce oil and gas related emissions and capture methane emissions from dairy operations and organic waste. A recent analysis of satellite data found a large methane "hot spot" over the Central Valley in California, likely the second largest over the entire U.S. In light of this finding, the California legislature passed Assembly Bill 1496 in 2015, which requires the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to undertake measurements to understand the sources of methane hot spots, evaluate life-cycle emissions from natural gas imported into California, and update relevant policies and programs. There is growing evidence in the recent scientific literature suggesting that a small fraction of methane sources within a category emit disproportionately higher emissions than their counterparts, usually referred to as "super emitters". As such, controlling these sources may provide a lower cost opportunity for methane reductions needed to meet near- and long-term climate goals. In order to achieve a comprehensive understanding of sources contributing to "hot spots", CARB, the California Energy Commission, and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are implementing a large-scale statewide methane survey using a tiered monitoring and measurement program, which will include airborne and ground-level measurements of the various regions and source sectors in the State. This presentation will discuss research and program implementation efforts to evaluate and mitigate methane super emitters and hot spots. These efforts are expected to improve our understanding of methane emission source distributions

  5. The role of technology transfer and emerging technologies in California`s economic recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Moody, J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Graduate School of Public Policy

    1994-02-01

    This report was prepared as part of a study supported by the California Trade and Commerce Agency (TCA), Defense Conversion/Base Closure Planning Program. It is one of several reports supporting the TCA`s efforts to develop a State Plan to address the economic impact of defense downsizing and base closures in California. The report focuses on: Examining existing federal technology transfer efforts -- the organizations involved, the funding mechanisms that are available, the processes by which technology transfer takes place -- and how they can help the state deal with the economic impact of base closures and defense downsizing. Evaluating the role of technology transfer in helping California develop a strong, technology-based economy capable of competing in an increasingly competitive world marketplace. Identifying ``critical technologies,`` and determining which of these technologies are likely to have the most impact on the economic future of the state and the nation. Reviewing current and proposed California technology transfer programs/initiatives and examining the role the state should play in supporting these efforts.

  6. Triennial changes in groundwater quality in aquifers used for public supply in California: Utility as indicators of temporal trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Robert; Landon, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    From 2004 to 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey collected samples from 1686 wells across the State of California as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Priority Basin Project (PBP). From 2007 to 2013, 224 of these wells were resampled to assess temporal trends in water quality. The samples were analyzed for 216 water-quality constituents, including inorganic and organic compounds as well as isotopic tracers. The resampled wells were grouped into five hydrogeologic zones. A nonparametric hypothesis test was used to test the differences between initial sampling and resampling results to evaluate possible step trends in water-quality, statewide, and within each hydrogeologic zone. The hypothesis tests were performed on the 79 constituents that were detected in more than 5 % of the samples collected during either sampling period in at least one hydrogeologic zone. Step trends were detected for 17 constituents. Increasing trends were detected for alkalinity, aluminum, beryllium, boron, lithium, orthophosphate, perchlorate, sodium, and specific conductance. Decreasing trends were detected for atrazine, cobalt, dissolved oxygen, lead, nickel, pH, simazine, and tritium. Tritium was expected to decrease due to decreasing values in precipitation, and the detection of decreases indicates that the method is capable of resolving temporal trends.

  7. Gama de hospedeiros e reação de genótipos de tomateiro a Pseudomonas cichorii Host range and genotypes reaction to Pseudomonas cichorii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeu Antônio Fernandes da Silva Júnior

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Em 2005, foi constatada em dois campos comerciais de tomate no Estado de São Paulo, a ocorrência da queima bacteriana, causada por Pseudomonas cichorii. Em vista disso, foram desenvolvidos estudos visando a determinação da gama de hospedeiros de isolados de Pseudomonas cichorii (IBSBF 2309 e IBSBF 2323, obtidos de tomateiro, provenientes de campos comerciais localizados nos municípios de Bragança Paulista e Mogi Guaçú, SP. Plantas de abobrinha, alface, beldroega, berinjela, beterraba, cenoura, couvebrócolo, datura, fumo, girassol, jiló, melão, pepino, petúnia, pimentão, rabanete, repolho, rúcula, salsa e tomateiro foram inoculadas por pulverização, separadamente, com os dois isolados de P. cichorii de tomateiro e um isolado de girassol (GIR-1. Os isolados IBSBF 2309 e IBSBF 2323 foram patogênicos à beldroega, datura, girassol, pimentão e tomate; GIR-1 foi patogênico apenas à beldroega, datura e girassol, não sendo patogênico ao pimentão e ao tomateiro. No Brasil não se conhecem fontes de resistência dentro do gênero Lycopersicon ou a reação de cultivares de tomateiros a esta bactéria. Vinte e oito genótipos de tomateiro provenientes do Banco de Germoplasma da empresa Sakata Seed Sudamerica Ltda., foram avaliados quanto a reação aos isolados IBSBF 2309 e IBSBF 2323 de P. cichorii, pelo método de inoculação nas folhas. Os maiores níveis de resistência foram observados em AF 11768, AF 2521, AF 11766, AF 11772, AF 229, AF 5719-1 e AF 8162. O genótipo AF 5719-1, que possui o gene Pto, que confere resistência a P. syringae pv. tomato, apresentou um bom nível de resistência a P. cichorii. A identificação de genótipos que apresentem bons níveis de resistência a este patógeno é importante para utilização em programas de melhoramento genético do tomateiro, visando a incorporação de genes de resistência a P. cichorii.The occurrence of the bacterial blight, caused by Pseudomonas cichorii, was observed

  8. Standardized measures of critical thinking. Experience with the California Critical Thinking Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppa, C J

    1997-01-01

    Standardized measures of student critical thinking are an attractive option for nursing educators under pressure to demonstrate student higher order thinking skills. One program's experience using the California Critical Thinking Skills Test and the California Critical Thinking Dispositions Inventory illustrates some of the problems of using standardized test and potential solutions.

  9. 40 CFR 80.375 - What requirements apply to California gasoline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline? 80.375 Section 80.375 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Exemptions § 80.375 What requirements apply to California gasoline? (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart California gasoline...

  10. Forest health monitoring in California, Oregon, and Washington: results and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard T. Busing

    2000-01-01

    From 1992 to 1997, standardized plots were established at about 500 sites in California, Oregon, and Washington as part of the national Forest Health Monitoring program. In California, 197 plots were established from 1992 to 1995; in Oregon and Washington, a total of 304 plots were established in 1997. Summarization of baseline data by state reveals similarities and...

  11. Library Education in California: Issues and Opportunities. A Report of the Council of Library Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gordon W.

    This report examines the problem of diminishing opportunities for professional library education in California. The first section examines topics related to the supply of and demand for librarians and library education programs, including U.S. and California demographics on librarianship and library education, librarianship and the information…

  12. Abre La Boca: A Component of the California Plan for the Education of Migrant Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Carol

    A 1969 summer program under the Region III Migrant Education Project in Merced County, California, brought dental services to migrant children in the northern San Joaquin Valley. The goal was to screen and test as many children of migratory agricultural workers as possible in a set span of time. The University of California School of Dentistry was…

  13. Effectiveness of "On Our Way to English" as a Program for Development of Reading and Oral Proficiency by Elementary English Learners: A Report of Randomized Experiments in a California and a Texas School District. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Denis; Jaciw, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The authors were asked to find out whether "On Our Way to English" ("OWE"), a supplementary, text-based product to help elementary school students learn to read and speak English was more effective in a California and a Texas school district than the materials the districts already had in place. They conducted an experiment…

  14. Testing transferability of willingness to pay for forest fire prevention among three states of California, Florida and Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    John B. Loomis; Hung Trong Le; Armando Gonzalez-Caban

    2005-01-01

    The equivalency of willingness to pay between the states of California, Florida and Montana is tested. Residents in California, Florida and Montana have an average willingness to pay of $417, $305, and $382 for prescribed burning program, and $403, $230, and $208 for mechanical fire fuel reduction program, respectively. Due to wide confidence intervals, household WTP...

  15. Biomonitoring in California Firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Leslie; McNeel, Sandra; Voss, Robert; Wang, Miaomiao; Gajek, Ryszard; Park, June-Soo; Harwani, Suhash; Barley, Frank; She, Jianwen; Das, Rupali

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess California firefighters' blood concentrations of selected chemicals and compare with a representative US population. Methods: We report laboratory methods and analytic results for cadmium, lead, mercury, and manganese in whole blood and 12 serum perfluorinated chemicals in a sample of 101 Southern California firefighters. Results: Firefighters' blood metal concentrations were all similar to or lower than the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) values, except for six participants whose mercury concentrations (range: 9.79 to 13.42 μg/L) were close to or higher than the NHANES reporting threshold of 10 μg/L. Perfluorodecanoic acid concentrations were elevated compared with NHANES and other firefighter studies. Conclusions: Perfluorodecanoic acid concentrations were three times higher in this firefighter group than in NHANES adult males. Firefighters may have unidentified sources of occupational exposure to perfluorinated chemicals. PMID:25563545

  16. SUGARLOAF ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Robert E.; Campbell, Harry W.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical investigations and a survey of mines, quarries, and prospects the Sugarloaf Roadless Area, California, has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or energy resources. Units of carbonate rock and graphitic schist have demonstrated resources of magnesian marble and graphite. Sand, gravel, and construction stone other than carbonate rock are present in the roadless area, but similar or better quality materials are abundant and more accessible outside the area.

  17. Fresh cut cassava subjected to gamma radiationMandioca minimamente processada submetida a radiação gama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gonçalves Lozano

    2012-04-01

    procura produtos de fácil preparo. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar a qualidade de mandioca minimamente processada submetida radiação gama. No processamento mínimo foram utilizadas raízes de mandioca (IAC- 567-70 e, após o preparo foram acondicionadas em embalagens de poliestireno expandido e revestidas por filme plástico de polietileno de baixa densidade (PEBD sendo irradiadas nas doses 0,0 (controle, 0,5; 1,0; 1,5; 2,0 KGy. Foi obtido ainda outro tratamento cujas, raízes foram acondicionadas em embalagem de nylon+ polietileno com aplicação de vácuo. As raízes acondicionadas de todos os tratamentos foram armazenadas sob refrigeração (5 ± 1 ºC e avaliações realizadas aos 0, 3, 6, 9 e 12 dias. As análises realizadas foram: acidez titulável, pH, firmeza, coloração, atividade da enzima polifenoloxidase, tempo de cocção e porcentagem de hidratação das raízes. As avaliações seguiram apenas até o 9º dia de armazenamento, pois após este período as raízes já apresentavam alterações fisiológicas e microbiológicas detectadas visualmente. Para acidez titulável, as raízes embaladas a vácuo obtiveram os menores valores, seguido do controle acondicionado em bandejas. Para os demais tratamentos observou-se aumento dos valores de acidez, tendo este comportamento influenciado nos valores de pH. Para os demais parâmetros avaliados não ocorreu diferença significativa entre tratamentos, mas foram observadas alterações com o armazenamento. A firmeza diminuiu com o armazenamento. Os valores de luminosidade e componente de cor amarela diminuíram com o armazenamento e os valores de cor b* (verde aumentaram. A atividade da enzima polifenoloxidase foi máxima no dia de elaboração do produto e diminuiu com o armazenamento. O tempo de cozimento e porcentagem de hidratação diminuíram com o armazenamento das raízes.

  18. Resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California. Report of the second year, 1979-1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngs, L.G.; Bacon, C.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Higgins, C.T.; Majmundar, H.H.; Taylor, G.C.

    1980-11-10

    Phase I studies included updating and completing the USGS GEOTHERM file for California and compiling all data needed for a California Geothermal Resources Map. Phase II studies included a program to assess the geothermal resource at Calistoga, Napa County, California. The Calistoga effort was comprised of a series of studies involving different disciplines, including geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and geophysical studies.

  19. Review of a Proposal to Establish a School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside. Commission Report 08-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Pursuant to Education Code 66903, the California Postsecondary Education Commission is charged with reviewing proposals for new academic and vocational programs at California's public colleges and universities and with making recommendations to the Legislature and the Governor. The Commission finds that the University of California's proposal to…

  20. Advanced Planning for Tsunamis in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K.; Wilson, R. I.; Larkin, D.; Reade, S.; Carnathan, D.; Davis, M.; Nicolini, T.; Johnson, L.; Boldt, E.; Tardy, A.

    2013-12-01

    The California Tsunami Program is comprised of the California Governor's Office of Emergency Services (CalOES) and the California Geological Survey (CGS) and funded through the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The program works closely with the 20 coastal counties in California, as well as academic, and industry experts to improve tsunami preparedness and mitigation in shoreline communities. Inundation maps depicting 'worst case' inundation modeled from plausible sources around the Pacific were released in 2009 and have provided a foundation for public evacuation and emergency response planning in California. Experience during recent tsunamis impacting the state (Japan 2011, Chile 2010, Samoa 2009) has brought to light the desire by emergency managers and decision makers for even more detailed information ahead of future tsunamis. A solution to provide enhanced information has been development of 'playbooks' to plan for a variety of expected tsunami scenarios. Elevation 'playbook' lines can be useful for partial tsunami evacuations when enough information about forecast amplitude and arrival times is available to coastal communities and there is sufficient time to make more educated decisions about who to evacuate for a given scenario or actual event. NOAA-issued Tsunami Alert Bulletins received in advance of a distant event will contain an expected wave height (a number) for each given section of coast. Provision of four elevation lines for possible inundation enables planning for different evacuation scenarios based on the above number potentially alleviating the need for an 'all or nothing' decision with regard to evacuation. Additionally an analytical tool called FASTER is being developed to integrate storm, tides, modeling errors, and local tsunami run-up potential with the forecasted tsunami amplitudes in real-time when a tsunami Alert is sent out. Both of these products will help

  1. Predicted pH at the domestic and public supply drinking water depths, Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosecrans, Celia Z.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Gronberg, Jo Ann M.

    2017-03-08

    This scientific investigations map is a product of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) project modeling and mapping team. The prediction grids depicted in this map are of continuous pH and are intended to provide an understanding of groundwater-quality conditions at the domestic and public supply drinking water zones in the groundwater of the Central Valley of California. The chemical quality of groundwater and the fate of many contaminants is often influenced by pH in all aquifers. These grids are of interest to water-resource managers, water-quality researchers, and groundwater modelers concerned with the occurrence of natural and anthropogenic contaminants related to pH. In this work, the median well depth categorized as domestic supply was 30 meters below land surface, and the median well depth categorized as public supply is 100 meters below land surface. Prediction grids were created using prediction modeling methods, specifically boosted regression trees (BRT) with a Gaussian error distribution within a statistical learning framework within the computing framework of R (http://www.r-project.org/). The statistical learning framework seeks to maximize the predictive performance of machine learning methods through model tuning by cross validation. The response variable was measured pH from 1,337 wells and was compiled from two sources: USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) database (all data are publicly available from the USGS: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ca/nwis/nwis) and the California State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water (SWRCB-DDW) database (water quality data are publicly available from the SWRCB: http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/gama/geotracker_gama.shtml). Only wells with measured pH and well depth data were selected, and for wells with multiple records, only the most recent sample in the period 1993–2014 was used. A total of 1,003 wells (training dataset) were used to train the BRT

  2. Subsidence of the Laguna Salada Basin, northeastern Baja California, Mexico, inferred from Milankovitch climatic changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, Juan; Martin-Barajas, Arturo [Departamento de Geologia, CICESE, Ensenada Baja California (Mexico); Herguera, Juan Carlos [Division de Oceanologia, CICESE, Ensenada Baja California (Mexico)

    2005-01-15

    Laguna Salada in northern Baja California, Mexico, is an active half-graben product of the trans-tensional tectonics of the Gulf of California. It is sensitive to changes in sediment supply from the Colorado River basin. We present a time series analysis of the upper 980 m of a gamma-ray log from a borehole drilled near the Laguna Salada fault. The power spectrum of the gammaray log resembles the spectrum of {delta}{sup 1}8{omicron} Pleistocene isotopic variations from ice cores and from the deep ocean, known to be strongly controlled by Milankovitch cycles. We correlate {delta}{sup 1}8{omicron} stages with silty and sandy intervals in the log. Downcore ages for the last 780 ky are constrained within {approx}10 kyr. We derive a simple time vs. depth calibration relation for the basin over this time interval. Estimated sedimentation rates at the drill site appear to be constant with a value of {approx}1.6 mm/yr. We propose that this subsidence rate is produced by the Laguna Salada fault. [Spanish] La cuenca de Laguna Salada en el norte de Baja California, Mexico, es un semigraben activo producto de la tectonica ranstensional del Golfo de California. Esta cuenca endorreica es sensible a cambios en sedimentacion por variaciones en el aporte e sedimentos de fuentes cercanas y distales transportados por arroyos de las sierras adyacentes y por el Rio Colorado. Esta cuenca es un sitio excepcional para explorar el uso de cambios climaticos ciclicos como herramienta de datacion y estimar tasas de sedimentacion y subsidencia en el area. Para demostrar esto se presenta un analisis de series de tiempo de un registro de rayos de gama de un pozo geotermico exploratorio perforado adyacente a la falla de Laguna Salada, la cual limita el margen oriental de la cuenca. Los resultados del analisis indican que el espectro de los primeros 980 m del registro de rayos gama tiene una alta coherencia con el espectro de registros isotopicos paleoclimaticos de {delta}{sup 1}8{omicron} del

  3. Ecoregions of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Glenn E.; Omernik, James M.; Smith, David W.; Cook, Terry D.; Tallyn, Ed; Moseley, Kendra; Johnson, Colleen B.

    2016-02-23

    Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. By recognizing the spatial differences in the capacities and potentials of ecosystems, ecoregions stratify the environment by its probable response to disturbance (Bryce and others, 1999). These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across Federal agencies, State agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources in the same geographical areas (Omernik and others, 2000).The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions are hierarchical and can be identified through the analysis of the spatial patterns and the composition of biotic and abiotic phenomena that affect or reflect differences in ecosystem quality and integrity (Wiken, 1986; Omernik, 1987, 1995). These phenomena include geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another regardless of the hierarchical level. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels of ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997, map revised 2006). At level III, the continental United States contains 105 ecoregions and the conterminous United States has 85 ecoregions (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2013). Level IV, depicted here for California, is a further refinement of level III ecoregions. Explanations of the methods used to define these ecoregions are given in Omernik (1995), Omernik and others

  4. Qualidade fisiológica de sementes de arroz submetidas à radiação gama Physiological quality rice seed submitted to gamma radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Lúcia da Cruz Miranda

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos da radiação gama (Co60 na qualidade fisiológica de sementes de arroz. O estudo foi realizado em três ensaios. No primeiro ensaio, sementes de arroz foram irradiadas com doses de 0; 1; 2,5 e 5Gy e, para o segundo e o terceiro ensaio, as sementes foram submetidas a envelhecimento acelerado, antes da irradiação. No segundo ensaio, as sementes foram dividas em úmidas e secas após envelhecimento acelerado e, então, foram irradiadas nas doses 0; 1; 2,5 e 5Gy. No terceiro ensaio, as sementes foram secas após o envelhecimento acelerado e irradiadas com doses de 0, 10, 25 e 50Gy. Para avaliação dos efeitos fisiológicos da radiação gama, foram realizados teste de germinação - TG, índice de velocidade de germinação - IVG e crescimento de plantas (comprimento de parte aérea e sistema radicular e massa seca total, em todos os ensaios. Foram determinadas as atividades enzimáticas da fosfatase ácida e alfa amilase nas sementes secas, no segundo ensaio. Os resultados obtidos nos ensaios indicam que as doses de radiação gama estudadas não afetam a qualidade fisiológica das sementes de arroz.The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of the gamma radiation (Co60 on the physiological quality of rice seeds. The research was carried out through three tests; in the first test rice seeds were irradiated at dosages of 0; 1; 2.5 and 5Gy, while for the second and third tests the seeds were subjected to accelerated aging before being irradiated. For the second test the seeds were divided into wet and dry and both groups subjected to accelerated aging previous to irradiation at dosages of 0; 1; 2.5 and 5Gy. For the third test the seeds were dried after being subjected to accelerated aging, and then irradiated at dosages of 0, 10, 25 and 50Gy. To assess the physiological effects of the gamma radiation, all seeds were tested for germination and their germination speed index recorded

  5. Database for potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Melissa N.; Ramsey, David W.; Miller, C. Dan

    2011-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the past 10,000 yr. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Sooner or later, volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health and safety of the State's citizens as well as on its economy. This report describes the nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property. It includes hazard-zonation maps that show areas relatively likely to be affected by future eruptions in California. This digital release contains information from maps of potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in the state of California, published as Plate 1 in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1847. The main component of this digital release is a spatial database prepared using geographic information systems (GIS) applications. This release also contains links to files to view or print the map plate, main report text, and accompanying hazard tables from Bulletin 1847. It should be noted that much has been learned about the ages of eruptive events in the State of California since the publication of Bulletin 1847 in 1989. For the most up to date information on the status of California volcanoes, please refer to the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website.

  6. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Ventura map area lies within the Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the Ventura Basin, in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges, and the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. The city of Ventura is the major cultural center in the map area. The Ventura River cuts through Ventura, draining the Santa Ynez Mountains and the coastal hills north of Ventura. Northwest of Ventura, the coastal zone is a narrow strip containing highway and railway transportation corridors and a few small residential clusters. Rincon Island, an island constructed for oil and gas production, lies offshore of Punta Gorda. Southeast of Ventura, the coastal zone consists of the mouth and broad, alluvial plains of the Santa Clara River

  7. Unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning hospitalization and emergency department counts and rates by county, year, and fire-relatedness among California residents,2000-2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains case counts, rates, and confidence intervals of unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning (CO) inpatient hospitalizations and emergency...

  8. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Watt, Janet T.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Sliter, Ray W.; Maier, Katherine L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-08-18

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath bathymetry data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Offshore of Monterey map area in central California is located on the Pacific Coast, about 120 km south of San Francisco. Incorporated cities in the map area include Seaside, Monterey, Marina, Pacific Grove, Carmel-by-the-Sea, and Sand City. The local economy receives significant resources from tourism, as well as from the Federal Government. Tourist attractions include the Monterey Bay Aquarium, Cannery Row, Fisherman’s Wharf, and the many golf courses near Pebble Beach, and the area serves as a gateway to the spectacular scenery and outdoor activities along the Big Sur coast to the south. Federal facilities include the Army’s Defense Language Institute, the Naval Postgraduate School, and the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (operated by the Navy). In 1994, Fort Ord army base, located between Seaside and Marina, was closed; much of former army base land now makes up the Fort Ord National Monument, managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as part of the National Landscape Conservation System. In addition, part of the old Fort Ord is now occupied by California State University, Monterey Bay.The offshore part of the map area lies entirely within the Monterey Bay National

  9. Effectiveness of the California State Ban on the Sale of Caulerpa Species in Aquarium Retail Stores in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Stephanie; Smith, Jayson R.; Zaleski, Susan F.; Murray, Steven N.

    2012-07-01

    The invasion of the aquarium strain of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia and subsequent alteration of community structure in the Mediterranean Sea raised awareness of the potential for non-native seaweeds to impact coastal communities. An introduction of C. taxifolia in southern California in 2000, presumably from the release of aquarium specimens, cost ~7 million for eradication efforts. Besides C. taxifolia, other Caulerpa species being sold for aquarium use also may have the potential to invade southern Californian and U.S. waters. Surveys of the availability of Caulerpa species in southern California aquarium retail stores in 2000-2001 revealed that 26 of 50 stores sold at least one Caulerpa species (52 %) with seven stores selling C. taxifolia. In late 2001, California imposed a ban on the importation, sale, or possession of nine Caulerpa species; the City of San Diego expanded these regulations to include the entire genus. To determine the effectiveness of the California ban, we resurveyed Caulerpa availability at 43 of the 50 previously sampled retail stores in southern California in ~2006, ~4 years following the ban. Of the 43 stores, 23 sold Caulerpa (53 %) with four stores selling C. taxifolia. A χ2 test of frequency of availability before and after the California ban suggests that the ban has not been effective and that the aquarium trade continues to represent a potential vector for distributing Caulerpa specimens, including C. taxifolia. This study underscores the need for increased enforcement and outreach programs to increase awareness among the aquarium industry and aquarium hobbyists.

  10. Effectiveness of the California state ban on the sale of Caulerpa species in aquarium retail stores in southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Stephanie; Smith, Jayson R; Zaleski, Susan F; Murray, Steven N

    2012-07-01

    The invasion of the aquarium strain of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia and subsequent alteration of community structure in the Mediterranean Sea raised awareness of the potential for non-native seaweeds to impact coastal communities. An introduction of C. taxifolia in southern California in 2000, presumably from the release of aquarium specimens, cost ~$7 million for eradication efforts. Besides C. taxifolia, other Caulerpa species being sold for aquarium use also may have the potential to invade southern Californian and U.S. waters. Surveys of the availability of Caulerpa species in southern California aquarium retail stores in 2000-2001 revealed that 26 of 50 stores sold at least one Caulerpa species (52 %) with seven stores selling C. taxifolia. In late 2001, California imposed a ban on the importation, sale, or possession of nine Caulerpa species; the City of San Diego expanded these regulations to include the entire genus. To determine the effectiveness of the California ban, we resurveyed Caulerpa availability at 43 of the 50 previously sampled retail stores in southern California in ~2006, ~4 years following the ban. Of the 43 stores, 23 sold Caulerpa (53 %) with four stores selling C. taxifolia. A χ(2) test of frequency of availability before and after the California ban suggests that the ban has not been effective and that the aquarium trade continues to represent a potential vector for distributing Caulerpa specimens, including C. taxifolia. This study underscores the need for increased enforcement and outreach programs to increase awareness among the aquarium industry and aquarium hobbyists.

  11. Payoffs for California College Students and Taxpayers from Investing in Student Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwood, J Scott; Stein, Bradley D; Briscombe, Brian; Sontag-Padilla, Lisa; Woodbridge, Michelle W; May, Elizabeth; Seelam, Rachana; Burnam, M Audrey

    2016-05-09

    Reports results of a survey to assess the impact of CalMHSA's investments in mental health programs at California public colleges and estimates the return on investment in terms of student use of treatment, graduation rates, and lifetime earnings.

  12. AFSC/NMML/CCEP: Food Habits of Pinnipeds at San Miguel Island, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem Program (AFSC/NOAA) collects fecal samples to examine the diet of pinnipeds, including...

  13. 77 FR 73320 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; South Coast Air Quality Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... Quality Management District (SCAQMD or District) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP... Air Quality Management District regarding specific implementation of parts of the Prevention of Significant Deterioration program. (i) Incorporation by reference. (A) South Coast Air Quality Management...

  14. Radioactive deposits in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, George W.; Lovering, Tom G.

    1954-01-01

    Reconnaissance examination by Government geologists of many areas, mine properties, and prospects in California during the period between 1948 and 1953 has confirmed the presence of radioactive materials in place at more than 40 localities. Abnormal radioactivity at these localities is due to concentrations of primary and secondary uranium minerals, to radon gas, radium (?), and to thorium minerals. Of the known occurrences only three were thought to contain uranium oxide (uranitite or pitchblende), 4 contained uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals, 12 contained secondary uranium minerals, such as autunite, carnotite, and torbernite, one contained radon gas, 7 contained thorium minerals, and, at the remaining 16 localities, the source of the anomalous radiation was not positively determined. The occurrences in which uranium oxide has been tentatively identified include the Rathgeb mine (Calaveras County), the Yerih group of claims (San Bernardino County), and the Rainbow claim (Madera County). Occurrences of secondary uranium minerals are largely confined to the arid desert regions of south-eastern California including deposits in San Bernardino, Kern, Inyo, and Imperial Counties. Uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals have been reported from pegmatite and granitic rock in southeastern and eastern California. Thorium minerals have been found in vein deposits in eastern San Bernardino County and from pegmatites and granitic rocks in various parts of southeastern California; placer concentrations of thorium minerals are known from nearly all areas in the State that are underlain, in part, by plutonic crystalline rocks. The primary uranium minerals occur principally as minute accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, or with base-metal sulfide minerals in veins. Thorium minerals also occur as accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, in placer deposits derived from such rock, and, at Mountain Pass, in veins

  15. California Tiger Salamander Range - CWHR [ds588

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  16. Herpetofauna Surveys, Northern California - 2010 [ds694

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — We recorded all incidental herpetofauna encountered during visual encounter and dipnet surveys in northern California. Surveys took place from April 2, 2010 to...

  17. California Fish Passage Assessment Database [ds69

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Passage Assessment Database shapefile contains locations of known and potential barriers to salmonid migration in California streams with additional information...

  18. Economic and Workforce Development Program Annual Report, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The California Community Colleges, through the Economic and Workforce Development Program (EWD), continue to propel the California economy forward by providing students with skills to earn well-paying jobs. At the same time, EWD helps provide California companies with the talent they need to compete on a global scale. This annual report for…

  19. Tax Rates and Tax Evasion: Evidence from California Amnesty Data

    OpenAIRE

    Crane, Steven E.; Nourzad, Farrokh

    1990-01-01

    Examines the effect of marginal tax rates on income tax evasion using data from the California Tax Amnesty Program. Finds that evaders respond to higher tax rates by increasing their evasion activity and that individuals with higher levels of income tend to evade more.

  20. School Board Training: Its Effect on Southern California Governance Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the impact the California School Boards Association's (CSBA) Masters in Governance (MIG) training program has on effective school board governance practice. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between effective school boards and a commitment to seek and attend school board training. This…

  1. The California Critical Thinking Skills Test and Business School Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bycio, Peter; Allen, Joyce S.

    2009-01-01

    An intent of many business programs is to enhance the critical thinking capabilities of their students. Since AACSB accreditation requires evidence that business schools fulfill their goals, our students were required to take the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST). As expected, the CCTST was significantly related to SAT performance…

  2. California's forest resources: Forest Inventory and Analysis, 2001–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn A. Christensen; Karen L. Waddell; Sharon M. Stanton; Olaf Kuegler

    2016-01-01

    This report highlights key findings from the most recent (2001–2010) data collected by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program across all forest land in California, updating previously published findings from data collected from 2001 through 2005 (Christensen et al. 2008). We summarize and interpret basic resource information such as forest area, ownership, volume,...

  3. Conservation issues: California chaparral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Richard W.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2016-01-01

    California chaparral, a sclerophyllous shrub-dominated plant community shaped by a Mediterranean-type climate and infrequent, high-intensity fire, is one of the most biodiverse and threatened habitats on Earth. Distinct forms of chaparral, distinguished by differing species composition, geography, and edaphic characteristics, can cover thousands of hectares with dense vegetation or be restricted to smaller communities identified by the presence of endemic species. To maintain the biodiversity of chaparral, protective land management actions will be required to mitigate the loss due to the impacts of human population growth, development, climate change, and increased fire frequencies.

  4. California's Future: K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Laura; Gao, Niu; Warren, Paul

    2015-01-01

    California educates more than six million children in its K-12 public schools. More than half of these children are economically disadvantaged, and almost a quarter are not native English speakers (compared to less than one in ten nationwide). California is working to address these challenges, in part by adopting a new, simplified school finance…

  5. Female Superintendent Longevity in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfing, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate, through narrative inquiry (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000), the leadership evolution of five female superintendents in California with longevity of 5 or more years in their current school district positions. The research question addressed was, "How do California female superintendents evolve to…

  6. Galaxy-galaxy lensing in EAGLE: comparison with data from 180 deg2 of the KiDS and GAMA surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velliscig, Marco; Cacciato, Marcello; Hoekstra, Henk; Schaye, Joop; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Loveday, Jon; Norberg, Peder; Sifón, Cristóbal; Schneider, Peter; van Uitert, Edo; Viola, Massimo; Brough, Sarah; Erben, Thomas; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kuijken, Konrad

    2017-11-01

    We present predictions for the galaxy-galaxy lensing (GGL) profile from the EAGLE hydrodynamical cosmological simulation at redshift z = 0.18, in the spatial range 0.02 EAGLE predictions are in broad agreement with the observed profiles for both central and satellite galaxies, although the signal is underestimated at R ≈ 0.5-2 h- 1 Mpc for the highest stellar mass bins. When central and satellite galaxies are considered simultaneously, agreement is found only when the selection function of lens galaxies is taken into account in detail. Specifically, in the case of GAMA galaxies, it is crucial to account for the variation of the fraction of satellite galaxies in bins of stellar mass induced by the flux-limited nature of the survey. We report the inferred stellar-to-halo mass relation and we find good agreement with recent published results. We note how the precision of the GGL profiles in the simulation holds the potential to constrain fine-grained aspects of the galaxy-dark matter connection.

  7. Caracterización molecular de la cadena gama común y Jak3 en un individuo afectado con inmunodeficiencia severa combinada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Javier Patiño Grajales

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available

    La Inmunodeficiencia Severa Combinada (IDSC es una enfermedad
    de origen genético, que se puede heredar de forma autosómica
    recesiva o ligada al cromosoma X. La IDSC se caracteriza por un
    defecto en el número y la diferenciación de los linfocitos T y NK. Los
    individuos afectados desarrollan diarrea crónica, infecciones persistentes y severas como neumonía, septicemia e infecciones fúngicas.
    Estos pacientes presentan retardo en el crecimiento y pueden morir a
    temprana edad si no se realiza una terapia de corrección genética o un
    trasplante de células hematopoyéticas. Las mutaciones responsables
    de la IDSC comprometen principalmente el gen de la cadena gama
    común (γc y la proteína Jak3 que son proteínas fundamentales en la
    transducción de señales de los receptores para varias citoquinas esenciales en la diferenciación y activación de células del sistema inmune, las cuales incluyen IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9 e IL-15 (1,2.

     

     

  8. Copulation by California condors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, S.R.; Borneman, J.C.

    1972-01-01

    Koford (Res. Rept. No. 3, Natl. Audubon Soc., 1953) observed sexual display among California Condors (Gymnogyps californianus) on more than 30 occasions, yet only once did he see what he thought was copulation. Some of the displays he watched were quite intricate, with considerable posturing and "male" aggression, but no such activity preceded this copulation. The birds sat several feet apart for over 1 hour, then one climbed onto the other's back, staying there 1/2 minute and flapping gently at the apparent moment of coition. Afterward they sat quietly 1/2 hour before flying away. This led Koford to state (p. 79) that "possibly in Gymnogyps copulation is not immediately preceded by display." We have records of 8 California Condor copulations, 5 of which are similar to that described above. The three other occasions began similarly, with the birds sitting quietly, but then the "male" displayed briefly before the "female" with wings half spread and head drooping forward. This elicited no apparent response, but the male immediately walked behind and mounted the female. The apparent moment of coition was accompanied by gentle wing flapping in all instances.

  9. Information resources in state regulatory agencies-a California perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiZio, S.M. [California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Various state regulatory agencies have expressed a need for networking with information gatherers/researchers to produce a concise compilation of primary information so that the basis for regulatory standards can be scientifically referenced. California has instituted several programs to retrieve primary information, generate primary information through research, and generate unique regulatory standards by integrating the primary literature and the products of research. This paper describes these programs.

  10. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Conrad, James E.; Cochran, Susan A.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Santa Barbara map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and geodetic studies indicate that the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. Uplift rates (as much as 2.2 mm/yr) that are based on studies of onland marine terraces provide further evidence of significant shortening. The city of Santa Barbara, the main coastal population center in the map area, is part of a contiguous urban area that extends from Carpinteria to Goleta. This urban area was developed on the coalescing alluvial surfaces, uplifted marine terraces, and low hills that lie south of the east-west-trending Santa Ynez Mountains. Several beaches line the actively

  11. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Greene, H. Gary; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Wong, Florence L.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Carpinteria map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. The small city of Carpinteria is the most significant onshore cultural center in the map area; the smaller town of Summerland lies west of Carpinteria. These communities rest on a relatively flat coastal piedmont that is surrounded on the north, east, and west by hilly relief on the flanks of the Santa Ynez Mountains. El Estero, a salt marsh on the coast west of Carpinteria, is an ecologically important coastal estuary. Southeast of Carpinteria, the coastal zone is narrow strip containing highway and railway transportation corridors

  12. Curriculum Development in Remote Sensing at California State University, Monterery, Seaside, California 93955

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Ravi; Geol, P.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA-Ames Research Center and the California State University, Monterey Bay, California (CSUMB), have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to develop and provide cooperative programs between the Ecosystem Science and Technology Branch of NASA (ECOSAT) and the University (CSUMB). The agreement is to carry out educational, research, and technology goals in ecological and environmental sciences and related disciplines, with particular emphasis on changing environmental and climatic conditions occurring worldwide due to the anthropogenic causes affecting the balance within ecological systems and the health and well-being of humans. The preparation of the Curriculum for Remote Sensing at CSUMB was undertaken at the request of the Center as a result of the above agreement.

  13. Hardwood rangeland landowners in California from 1985 to 2004: production, ecosystem services, and permanence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn Huntsinger; Martin Johnson; Monica Stafford; Jeremy S. Fried

    2010-01-01

    A longitudinal study of California hardwood rangelands shows significant change in landowner characteristics and goals. Results of three studies spanning 1985 to 2004 were used to develop and evaluate a multiagency research and extension program known as the Integrated Hardwood Range Management Program. Program-sponsored education and research aimed at encouraging...

  14. Educators Exchange: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, William B.

    The Educators Exchange Program (EEP) was established under a training and educational exchange agreement reached by California's San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) and the republic of Mexico. In the program, the District provided a 4-week technological training program to faculty at Centros de Capacitacion Tecnologica Industrial…

  15. Letting the Sun Shine on Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation of Photovoltaic Cost Trends in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Cappers, P.; Margolis, R.

    2006-01-01

    This report provides a comprehensive analysis of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) cost trends in California, which is by far the largest PV market in the United States. The findings of this work may help stakeholders to understand important trends in the California PV market, and policymakers to design more effective solar incentive programs--a particularly important objective given the recent announcement from the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to establish an 11-year, $3.2 billion incentive program for customer-sited solar. The study statistically analyzes the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems funded by the state's two largest solar rebate programs, overseen by the California Energy Commission (CEC) [operating since 1998] and the CPUC [operating since 2001].

  16. Public Schools, California, 2009, California Department of Education

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This set of data represents the most current public schools in the State of California as of June, 2009. Information about each public school includes: school name,...

  17. Case Study of the California Cement Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

    2005-05-01

    California is the largest cement producing state in theU.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cementproduction and cement industry employment. The cement industry inCalifornia consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy,annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of wastematerials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paperfocused on providing background information, an assessment ofenergy-efficiency opportunities and barriers, and program recommendationsthat can be used by program planners to better target products to thecement industry. The primary approach to this case study involvedwalk-through surveys of customer facilities and in depth interviews withcustomer decision makers and subsequent analysis of collected data. Inaddition, a basic review of the cement production process was developed,and summary cement industry energy and economic data were collected, andanalyzed. The analysis of secondary data provides background informationon the cement industry and identification of potential energy-efficiencyopportunities. The interviews provide some understanding of the customerperspective about implementation of energy-efficiencyprojects.

  18. Selling green power in California: Product, industry, and market trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R.H.; Pickle, S.J.

    1998-05-01

    As one of the first US stages to open its doors to retail electric competition, California offers an important opportunity to assess the effectiveness of green power marketing as a mechanism for supporting renewable energy. This report is an interim assessment of key green power product, industry, and market trends in California. The report identifies and analyzes: the potential size of the green power market in California; the companies participating in the green power market; the green power products being offered and their prices; the impact of the green market on renewable generators and the environment; and the influence of several public policies and non-governmental programs on the market for green power. Data used in this paper have been collected, in large part, from surveys and interviews with green power marketers that took place between December 1997 and April 1998. There remain legitimate concerns over the viability of green power marketing to support significant quantities of renewable energy and provide large environmental gains, and it is far too early to assess the overall strength of customer demand for renewable energy. A critical finding of this report is that, because of the high cost of acquiring and servicing residential customers and the low utility default service price, green power marketing affords new energy service providers one of the only viable entrees to California`s residential marketplace.

  19. Commercializing solar for industry in California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudelson, J.

    1980-10-01

    The State of California has begun a commercialization program for increasing the rate of solar applications in industry. The components of this program include low-interest loans, tax credits, revenue bonds and educational efforts. Many California industries appear to be likely candidates for solar systems, but as yet only a few companies have elected to install them. The various barriers to solar use by industry are primarily perceptual and financial. The emphasis of the state program for commercialization is turning increasingly towards educational seminars for industry groups and development of creative financial tools and arrangements. There are a few remaining legislative changes at state and federal levels, primarily involving leasing and tax laws which, if enacted, would overcome all of the remaining financial barriers to widespread adoption of solar applications by industry.

  20. California low-temperature geothermal resources update: 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngs, L.G.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy -- Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) recently sponsored the Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program to bring the inventory of the nation`s low- and moderate-temperature geothermal resources up to date and to encourage development of the resources. The Oregon Institute of Technology, Geo-Heat Center (OIT/GHC) and the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI) established subcontracts and coordinated the project with the state resource teams from the western states that participated in the program. The California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology (DMG) entered into contract numbered 1092--023(R) with the OIT/GHC to provide the California data for the program. This report is submitted in fulfillment of that contract.

  1. Análise sérica das enzimas aspartato aminotransferase, alanina aminotransferase e gama glutamiltranspeptidase de coelhos adultos tratados com extrato bruto de própolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Ribeiro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Diversos trabalhos têm atribuído a própolis inúmeras propriedades farmacológicas, dentre elas podemos citar, como exemplo, efeitos antibacteriano, antiviral, antiinflamatório, regenerador do tecido cartilaginoso, inibidor da formação de radicais livres e redutor de níveis sangüíneo de glicose e triacilglicerol. Alguns efeitos colaterais são atribuídos à própolis principalmente em doses elevadas. Muitos efeitos tóxicos da própolis são atribuídos ao álcool etílico presente no extrato.Dentre alguns efeitos tóxicos citados em literatura como realmente da própolis temos a dermatite e o aumento da uréia sangüínea. O presente estudo teve como objetivo investigar se o extrato bruto de própolis ocasiona algum efeito adverso nos níveis séricos de alanina aminotransferase, aspartato aminotransferase e gama – glutamiltranspeptidase de coelhos saudáveis. O experimento teve 30 dias de duração, sendo as dosagens dos constituintes do sangue (alanina aminotransferase, aspartato aminotransferase e gama – glutamiltranspeptidase realizadas a 0, 15 e 30 dias. Os resultados indicaram que, de o extrato bruto de própolis na forma testadea, não ocasionou alteração relevante nos níveis séricos das enzimas marcadoras de metabolismo hepático. Palavras-chave: Própolis, alanina aminotransferase, aspartato aminotransferase, gama glutamiltranpeptidase, toxicologia.

  2. NEXRAD Rainfall Data: Eureka, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 (WSR-88D) measurements were used to support AMSR-E rainfall validation efforts in Eureka, California,...

  3. California from drought to deluge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.-Y. Simon; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Becker, Emily; Gillies, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The dramatic switch from extreme drought to severe flooding in California, and the accompanying flip from atmospheric ridge to trough in the northeastern Pacific, exemplifies the pathways to an intensified water cycle under a warming climate.

  4. Flight tracks, Northern California TRACON

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the records of all the flights in the Northern California TRACON. The data was provided by the aircraft noise abatement office...

  5. Chukar Range - California [ds570

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This layer was created from regional biologist input on paper maps. All paper maps were collected and sent to a single Research Analyst to digitize. Some liberties...

  6. Ecological zones of California deserts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The dataset delineates ecological zones within California deserts. We derived ecological zones by reclassifying LANDFIRE vegetation biophysical setting types, plus...

  7. DS796 California Groundwater Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The California Groundwater Units dataset classifies and delineates the State into one of three groundwater based polygon units: (1) those areas defined as alluvial...

  8. Contours--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Aptos map area, California. The vector data file is...

  9. Contours--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  10. Invertebrate diversity in southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This shapefile displays mean invertebrate diversity within 5 minute grid cells. The Shannon Index of diversity was calculated from Southern California Coastal Water...

  11. Habitat--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  12. 77 FR 73459 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Notice of Waiver of Clean Air Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... AGENCY California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Notice of Waiver of Clean Air Act..., challenging the need for CARB's own motor vehicle pollution control program based on lack of compelling and... Administrator shall waive preemption for California to enforce new motor vehicle emissions standards and...

  13. California Gnatcatcher Observations - 2004-2009 [ds457

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — In southern California, the coastal California gnatcatcher (CAGN) has become both the flagship species and an umbrella species identified with conservation, where...

  14. Estudo do efeito da radiação gama sobre algumas propriedades físico- mecânicas de madeiras usadas em patrimônios artísticos e culturais brasileiros

    OpenAIRE

    Lúcio Cesar Severiano

    2010-01-01

    A madeira é considerada um compósito natural de extrema complexidade, constituído basicamente por celulose, lignina, hemicelulose (polioses) e extrativos. Sua composição favorece ataques biológicos de diferentes espécies. Neste contexto, inúmeras técnicas vêm sendo estudadas e aplicadas para desinfestar e descontaminar obras de arte e bens culturais móveis elaborados em madeira e que sofreram ataques por fungos, bactérias ou insetos. A irradiação com raios gama, emitidos por isótopos instávei...

  15. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 21, Number 1. January-February 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Turner, Debra, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment…

  16. El mercado mediático de la belleza. Estudio de la estructura de ingresos en revistas femeninas de alta gama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Pérez Serrano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available El sector de la comunicación no es ajeno a la crisis y sus correlatos. La bajada de la inversión publicitaria está teniendo consecuencias drásticas que se manifiestan, por ejemplo, en un reajuste en su estructura de ingresos. Además de esta crisis “coyuntural” –aunque larga-, hay otra que afecta significativamente a las empresas periodísticas: la reducción paulatina de lectores de medios impresos. En este estudio se parcela esta tipología de empresas de comunicación, centrándonos en aquellas que tienen como output las revistas. Y, para que el universo se reduzca aún más, abordaremos aquellas que se califican como “de alta gama”, que por su exclusiva idiosincrasia se sitúan ante el contexto económico imperante de una forma distinta.  De ellas, se analizará su estructura económica, en concreto, los ingresos provenientes de la publicidad, aunque de manera tangencial, se estudiará su precio de venta al número y su tirada. Con una metodología sustentada en el análisis cualitativo, con transposición cuantitativa, pretendemos conocer la cuantía de ingresos que perciben tres de estas arquetípicas revistas en un mes a través de la publicidad que muestra el prototipo de belleza actual. Para llegar a corroborar –o no- la siguiente hipótesis: “las revistas de alta gama, como medios de comunicación impresos no diarios, son un vehículo de la expresión de la belleza y, a través de ella, se consiguen ingresos sustanciales”.

  17. "Companheiros de infortúnio": a educação de "surdos-mudos" e o repetidor Flausino da Gama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CÁSSIA GECIAUSKAS SOFIATO

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tiene como objetivo presentar la trayectoria educacional de Flausino José da Costa Gama, alumno del Imperial Instituto de los Sordos-Mudos de Rio de Janeiro en el siglo XIX. Flausino, más allá de tener sido alumno y "repetidor" ejemplar, según registros de la época, ha se destacado también por la creación de la primera producción de lengua de señales que se conoce en Brasil: la Iconographia dos Signaes dos Surdos-Mudos en 1875. Por medio de una investigación bibliográfica y documental, presentamos la propuesta pedagógica del Imperial Instituto de los Sordos-Mudos y sus objetivos educacionales cuando el Dr. Tobias Leite era director y mostramos el recorrido educacional de Flausino, trayendo antes su biografía y su desarrollo a partir del ingreso en la institución referida. Además, destacamos el contexto en lo cual se dio la creación del primer trabajo brasileño de lengua de señales, producido en litografía, formada por 20 estampas que presentan 382 señales, y también el alfabeto manual. Con este estudio, pretendemos mostrar a la comunidad académica quien fue Flausino, un sordo que tuvo un recorrido diferenciado y que contribuyó de manera relevante para la origen de la lengua de señales brasileña

  18. BTSA Program Directors' Perceptions on the Relationship between Components of Mentor Assessment and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricich, Patricia Sheehan

    2014-01-01

    California's Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment program (BTSA) is a high stakes induction program; a new teacher's completion of a BTSA induction program leads to the California clear credential. The cornerstone of the BTSA induction program is the mentor, also known as a support provider. Mentors provide a variety of services to new…

  19. Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in California Agricultural Irrigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Daniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Aghajanzadeh, Arian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McKane, Aimee [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Pumping water for agricultural irrigation represents a significant share of California’s annual electricity use and peak demand. It also represents a large source of potential flexibility, as farms possess a form of storage in their wetted soil. By carefully modifying their irrigation schedules, growers can participate in demand response without adverse effects on their crops. This report describes the potential for participation in demand response and automated demand response by agricultural irrigators in California, as well as barriers to widespread participation. The report first describes the magnitude, timing, location, purpose, and manner of energy use in California. Typical on-­farm controls are discussed, as well as common impediments to participation in demand response and automated demand response programs. Case studies of demand response programs in California and across the country are reviewed, and their results along with overall California demand estimates are used to estimate statewide demand response potential. Finally, recommendations are made for future research that can enhance the understanding of demand response potential in this industry.

  20. Down syndrome, paternal age and education: comparison of California and the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzurova, Dagmara; Pikhart, Hynek

    2005-06-17

    The association between maternal age and risk of Down syndrome has been repeatedly shown in various populations. However, the effect of paternal age and education of parents has not been frequently studied. Comparative studies on Down syndrome are also rare. This study evaluates the epidemiological characteristics of Down syndrome in two culturally and socially contrasting population settings, in California and the Czech Republic. The observed live birth prevalence of Down syndrome was studied among all newborns in the California counties monitored by California Birth Defects Monitoring Program from 1996 to 1997, and in the whole Czech Republic from 1994 to 1998. Logistic regression was used to analyze the data. A total of 516,745 (California) and 475,834 (the Czech Republic) infants were included in the analysis. Among them, 593 and 251, respectively, had Down syndrome. The mean maternal age of children with Down syndrome was 32.1 years in California and 26.9 years in the Czech Republic. Children born to older mothers were at greater risk of Down syndrome in both populations. The association with paternal age was mostly explained by adjusting for maternal age, but remained significant in the Czech Republic. The association between maternal education and Down syndrome was much stronger in California than in the Czech Republic but parental age influences higher occurrence of Down syndrome both in California and in the Czech Republic. The educational gradient in California might reflect selective impact of prenatal diagnosis, elective termination, and acceptance of prenatal diagnostic measures in Californian population.

  1. Northern fur seal demography studies at San Miguel Island, California conducted from 1975-10-07 to 2014-09-26 (NCEI Accession 0141240)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem Program (AFSC/NOAA) initiated a long-term marking program of northern fur seals (Callorhinus...

  2. en Baja California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmyra Ybañez Zepeda

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the future, the population of 60 years old or older will increase in absolute and relative numbers at a very rapid pace in Mexico. Using data from Censo general de población y vivienda 2000, Encuesta sobre migración en la frontera norte de México and Consejo Nacional de Población (Conapo, the purpose of this article is twofold: first of all, to analyze the aging process in the municipalities of Tijuana and Mexicali, located in the state of Baja California, which has a very low proportion of the eldest; and second of all, to examine the role of migration in this process. Tijuana has a younger population which is aging slowly due to a very intense immigration of young workers and potential parents. Mexicali, on the other hand, has a high percentage of a native population that is aging unrelentingly, and it also has a lower flow of immigrants who are older, and includes a high concentration of persons who had previously resided in the United States.

  3. Economic and Workforce Development Program Annual Report, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2014

    2014-01-01

    California's community colleges continue to play a crucial role in the state's economy by providing students with the skills and knowledge to succeed and by advancing the economic growth and global competitiveness of California and its regional economies through the Economic and Workforce Development Program (EWD). The EWD program invests in the…

  4. Cal-Adapt: California's Climate Data Resource and Interactive Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N.; Mukhtyar, S.; Wilhelm, S.; Galey, B.; Lehmer, E.

    2016-12-01

    Cal-Adapt is a web-based application that provides an interactive toolkit and information clearinghouse to help agencies, communities, local planners, resource managers, and the public understand climate change risks and impacts at the local level. The website offers interactive, visually compelling, and useful data visualization tools that show how climate change might affect California using downscaled continental climate data. Cal-Adapt is supporting California's Fourth Climate Change Assessment through providing access to the wealth of modeled and observed data and adaption-related information produced by California's scientific community. The site has been developed by UC Berkeley's Geospatial Innovation Facility (GIF) in collaboration with the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Research Program. The Cal-Adapt website allows decision makers, scientists and residents of California to turn research results and climate projections into effective adaptation decisions and policies. Since its release to the public in June 2011, Cal-Adapt has been visited by more than 94,000 unique visitors from over 180 countries, all 50 U.S. states, and 689 California localities. We will present several key visualizations that have been employed by Cal-Adapt's users to support their efforts to understand local impacts of climate change, indicate the breadth of data available, and delineate specific use cases. Recently, CEC and GIF have been developing and releasing Cal-Adapt 2.0, which includes updates and enhancements that are increasing its ease of use, information value, visualization tools, and data accessibility. We showcase how Cal-Adapt is evolving in response to feedback from a variety of sources to present finer-resolution downscaled data, and offer an open API that allows other organization to access Cal-Adapt climate data and build domain specific visualization and planning tools. Through a combination of locally relevant information, visualization tools, and access to

  5. Estimation of methane emission from California natural gas industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jeff; Hicks, Travis C; Drake, Brian; Chan, Tat Fu

    2015-07-01

    Energy generation and consumption are the main contributors to greenhouse gases emissions in California. Natural gas is one of the primary sources of energy in California. A study was recently conducted to develop current, reliable, and California-specific source emission factors (EFs) that could be used to establish a more accurate methane emission inventory for the California natural gas industry. Twenty-five natural gas facilities were surveyed; the surveyed equipment included wellheads (172), separators (131), dehydrators (17), piping segments (145), compressors (66), pneumatic devices (374), metering and regulating (M&R) stations (19), hatches (34), pumps (2), and customer meters (12). In total, 92,157 components were screened, including flanges (10,101), manual valves (10,765), open-ended lines (384), pressure relief valves (358), regulators (930), seals (146), threaded connections (57,061), and welded connections (12,274). Screening values (SVs) were measured using portable monitoring instruments, and Hi-Flow samplers were then used to quantify fugitive emission rates. For a given SV range, the measured leak rates might span several orders of magnitude. The correlation equations between the leak rates and SVs were derived. All the component leakage rate histograms appeared to have the same trend, with the majority of leakage ratesGas Research Institute (EPA/GRI) study. Twenty-five natural gas facilities in California were surveyed to develop current, reliable, and California-specific source emission factors (EFs) for the natural gas industry. Screening values were measured by using portable monitoring instruments, and Hi-Flow samplers were then used to quantify fugitive emission rates. The component-level average EFs derived in this study are often smaller than the corresponding ones in the 1996 EPA/GRI study. The smaller EF values from this study might be partially attributable to the employment of the leak detection and repair program by most, if not all

  6. Manufacturing the electric vehicle: a window of technological opportunity for Southern California

    OpenAIRE

    C O Quandt

    1995-01-01

    The California Air Resources Board has mandated that by 1998 2% of new vehicles sold in California must be zero emission, effectively, electric vehicles. This requirement is largely responsible for the electric vehicle development programs run by almost every global automobile manufacturer that does business in the United States. At present, no single electric vehicle technology, from battery type, to propulsion system, to vehicle design, represents a standard for a protoelectric vehicle indu...

  7. Summary of Pacific harbor seal, Phoca vitulina richardsi, surveys in California, 1982 to 1995

    OpenAIRE

    Fluharty, Marilyn J.

    1999-01-01

    The California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG) initiated an annual Pacific harbor seal, Phoca vitulina richardsi, census along the California coast in 1981 as part of an assessment program conducted cooperatively with National Marine Fisheries Service. Surveys were conducted during the harbor seal molting season and census data were used as an index of abundance to detect changes in population abundance or distribution. Because not all harbor seals are hauled-out at the time of the s...

  8. Implementation and adaptation of the Re-Engineered Discharge (RED) in five California hospitals: a qualitative research study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S E Mitchell; G M Weigel; V Laurens; J Martin; B W Jack

    2017-01-01

    .... The goal of this study was to identify and characterize contextual factors influencing how five California hospitals adapted and implemented RED and the subsequent impact on RED program sustainability...

  9. California's forest resources. Preliminary assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This Preliminary Assessment was prepared in response to the California Forest Resources Assessment and Policy Act of 1977 (FRAPA). This Act was passed to improve the information base upon which State resource administrators formulate forest policy. The Act provides for this report and a full assessment by 1987 and at five year intervals thereafter. Information is presented under the following chapter titles: introduction to the forest resources assessment program; the forest area: a general description; classifications of the forest lands; the watersheds; forest lands and the air resource; fish and wildlife resources; the forested rangelands; the wilderness; forest lands as a recreation resource; the timber resource; wood energy; forest lands and the mineral, fossil fuels, and geothermal energy resources; mathematically modeling California's forest lands; vegetation mapping using remote sensing technology; important forest resources legislation; and, State and cooperative State/Federal forestry programs. Twelve indexes, a bibliography, and glossary are included. (JGB)

  10. Student Services and Special Programs: A Report on Program Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Skillman, Thelma; And Others

    Student services and special programs within the California Community Colleges (CCC) are designed to enhance student equity, access, retention, persistence toward goal completion, and successful educational outcomes. The special programs and services within the CCC which serve targeted and diverse student populations are Extended Opportunity…

  11. Wind speed forecasting in the central California wind resource area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, E.F. [Wind Economics & Technology, Inc., Martinez, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A wind speed forecasting program was implemented in the summer seasons of 1985 - 87 in the Central California Wind Resource Area (WRA). The forecasting program is designed to use either meteorological observations from the WRA and local upper air observations or upper air observations alone to predict the daily average windspeed at two locations. Forecasts are made each morning at 6 AM and are valid for a 24 hour period. Ease of use is a hallmark of the program as the daily forecast can be made using data entered into a programmable HP calculator. The forecasting program was the first step in a process to examine whether the electrical energy output of an entire wind power generation facility or defined subsections of the same facility could be predicted up to 24 hours in advance. Analysis of the results of the summer season program using standard forecast verification techniques show the program has skill over persistence and climatology.

  12. COAMFTE accreditation and California MFT licensing exam success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Benjamin E; Kunker, Shelly A; Brown, Stephen W; Saiki, Dustin Y

    2011-10-01

    Professional accreditation of graduate programs in marital and family therapy (MFT) is intended to ensure the strength of the education students receive. However, there is great difficulty in assessing the real-world impact of accreditation on students. Only one measure is applied consistently to graduates of all MFT programs, regardless of accreditation status: licensure examinations. Within California, COAMFTE-accredited, regionally (WASC) accredited, and state-approved programs all may offer degrees qualifying for licensure. Exam data from 2004, 2005, and 2006 (n = 5,646 examinees on the Written Clinical Vignette exam and n = 3,408 first-time examinees on the Standard Written Exam) were reviewed to determine the differences in exam success among graduates of programs at varying levels of accreditation. Students from COAMFTE-accredited programs were more successful on both California exams than were students from other WASC-accredited or state-approved universities. There were no significant differences between (non-COAMFTE) WASC-accredited universities and state-approved programs. Differences could be related to selection effects, if COAMFTE programs initially accept students of higher quality. Implications for therapist education and training are discussed. © 2011 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  13. Teale California Office of Emergency Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California Spatial Information System (CaSIL) is a project designed to improve access to geo-spatial and geo-spatial related data information throughout the state of...

  14. California Least Tern Breeding Survey 1992 Season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1992, approximately 2,106 pairs of the endangered California Least Tern (Sterna antillarum browni) nested at 38 sites along the coast of California, from the San...

  15. California Geological Survey Geologic Map Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — All the individual maps from the Geologic Atlas of California and the Regional Geologic map series have been georeferenced for display in a GIS (and viewable online...

  16. Teale Urband and rural areas of California

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California Spatial Information System (CaSIL) is a project designed to improve access to geo-spatial and geo-spatial related data information throughout the state of...

  17. Missing Linkages in California's Landscape [ds420

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The critical need for conserving landscape linkages first came to the forefront of conservation thinking in California in November 2000, when a statewide interagency...

  18. Libraries in California: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/california.html Libraries in California To use the sharing features on ... page, please enable JavaScript. Alameda Alameda Hospital Medical Library 2070 Clinton Avenue Alameda, CA 94501 510-522- ...

  19. California Least Tern Breeding Survey 1996 Season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1996, 3330-3392 pairs of the endangered California least tern (Sterna antillarum browni) nested at 35 sites along the coast of California. This 29% increase in...

  20. California Least Tern Breeding Survey 1994 Season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1994, a minimum of approximately 2,792 pairs of the endangered California least tern (Sterna antillarum browni) nested at 36 sites along the coast of California....