WorldWideScience

Sample records for california directed research

  1. Directions for further research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minsaas, Atle; Psaraftis, Harilaos N.

    2015-01-01

    chapter of this book we discuss directions for further research in this area. We do so by taking stock of (1) related recommendations of project SuperGreen, and (2) related activities mainly in European research. Links between research and policy-making as two activities that should go hand in hand...

  2. California Tribal Nations Technical Water Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben, C; Coty, J

    2005-08-15

    This research focused on identifying the key technical water issues of federally recognized California Native American tribes, the context within which these water issues arise for the tribes, and an appropriate format for potentially opening further dialogue on water research issues between the tribes and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists. At LLNL, a Water Quality and Resource Management Issues Workshop held in January of 2003 resulted in multiple recommendations, one proposing a LLNL dialogue with California tribes to further inform LLNL's prioritization of water issues based on identified needs across national sectors. The focus of this aforementioned Water Quality and Resource Management Issues Workshop was to identify national and international priority water research issues with which LLNL may align their research efforts and contribute to resolving these needs. LLNL staff researched various sectors to delineate the key water issues associated with each. This preliminary water issue research included diverse entities such as international water agencies, federal and state agencies, industry, non-governmental agencies, and private organizations. The key (identified) water issues across these sectors were presented to workshop attendees and used during workshop debates and sessions. However, the key water issues of federally recognized Native American tribes remained less understood, resulting in a workshop proposal for additional research and LLNL potentially hosting a dialog with representatives of these tribes. Federally recognized Native American tribes have a unique government-to-government relationship with the United States (U.S.) government, in contrast to other sectors researched for the workshop. Within the U.S., the number of federally recognized tribes currently stands at 562 and, in addition to this large number of tribes, much diversity across these tribes exists. For the purposes of this preliminary research and report

  3. Offshoring research directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuijsen, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Outsourcing and offshoring provide companies with ways to achieve their business objectives better or more cost effectively or despite a shortage of specific resources. From a research point of view, outsourcing and offshoring have mostly been studied as something that large companies do, not small

  4. Antiemetic research: future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olver, Ian; Molassiotis, Alexander; Aapro, Matti

    2011-01-01

    the impact of nausea on work capacity. New antiemetic drugs may be targeted at different receptors, such as opioid, cannabinoid and peptide YY receptors. New research is needed into determining the extent of corticosteroid use. The emetic potential of a range of newer cytotoxics particularly when used...... and vomiting may combine algorithms based on observed prognostic factors relating to the patient and the anticancer therapy, the identification of the genes that code for receptors, and pharmacogenetic studies of the metabolism of drugs. Design issues for future trials include standardising the emetic stimulus...

  5. Major Directions in Creativity Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatena, Joe

    Reviewed are major directions in creativity research in the following areas: theories of creativity; definitions; instruments to measure creativity; nurturing creativity; the disabled, disturbed, and disadvantaged; cross cultural patterns; creative imagination imagery; and measuring creative imagination imagery. (LS)

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2001-02-27

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development for FY2000.

  7. The direct radiative forcing effects of aerosols on the climate in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hui

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is used to explore the influence of aerosol direct radiative effects on regional climate of California. Aerosol data is provided by the MOZART global chemistry transport model and includes sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust and sea salt. To investigate the sensitivity of aerosol radiative effects to different aerosol species and to the quantity of sulfate and dust, tests are conducted by using different combinations of aerosols and by resetting the quantity of sulfate and dust. The model results show that all the considered aerosols could have a cooling effect of one half to one degree in terms of temperature and that dust and sulfate are the most important aerosols. However, large uncertainties exist. The results suggest that the dust from MOZART is greatly overestimated over the simulation domain. The single scattering albedo (SSA) values of dust used in some global climate models are likely underestimated compared to recent studies on dust optical properties and could result in overestimating the corresponding cooling effects by approximately 0.1 degree. Large uncertainties exist in estimating the roles of different forcing factors which are causing the observed temperature change in the past century in California.

  8. Energy Efficient Community Development in California: Chula Vista Research Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gas Technology Institute

    2009-03-31

    In 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy joined the California Energy Commission in funding a project to begin to examine the technical, economic and institutional (policy and regulatory) aspects of energy-efficient community development. That research project was known as the Chula Vista Research Project for the host California community that co-sponsored the initiative. The researches proved that the strategic integration of the selected and economically viable buildings energy efficiency (EE) measures, photovoltaics (PV), distributed generation (DG), and district cooling can produce significant reductions in aggregate energy consumption, peak demand and emissions, compared to the developer/builder's proposed baseline approach. However, the central power plant emission reductions achieved through use of the EE-DG option would increase local air emissions. The electric and natural gas utility infrastructure impacts associated with the use of the EE and EE-PV options were deemed relatively insignificant while use of the EE-DG option would result in a significant reduction of necessary electric distribution facilities to serve a large-scale development project. The results of the Chula Vista project are detailed in three separate documents: (1) Energy-Efficient Community Development in California; Chula Vista Research Project report contains a detailed description of the research effort and findings. This includes the methodologies, and tools used and the analysis of the efficiency, economic and emissions impacts of alternative energy technology and community design options for two development sites. Research topics covered included: (a) Energy supply, demand, and control technologies and related strategies for structures; (b) Application of locally available renewable energy resources including solar thermal and PV technology and on-site power generation with heat recovery; (c) Integration of local energy resources into district energy systems and existing

  9. Laboratory directed research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle''; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  10. The California Health Policy Research Program - supporting policy making through evidence and responsive research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roby, Dylan H; Jacobs, Ken; Kertzner, Alex E; Kominski, Gerald F

    2014-08-01

    This article explores the creation, design, and execution of a university-based collaboration to provide responsive research and evidence to a group of diverse health care, labor, and consumer stakeholders through convening a funded series of deliberative meetings, research briefs, peer-reviewed journal articles, ad hoc data analyses, and policy analyses. Funded by the California Endowment, the California Health Policy Research Program was created by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education, and the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. The collaboration not only allowed new research and analyses to be used by stakeholders and policy makers in decision making but also allowed university researchers to receive input on the important health policy issues of the day. The guidance of stakeholders in the research and policy analysis process was vital in driving meaningful results during an important time in health policy making in California. The manuscript discusses lessons learned in building relationships with stakeholders; meeting research and analytic needs; engaging stakeholders and policy makers; building capacity for quick-turnaround data collection and analysis, dissemination and publication; and maintaining the collaboration.

  11. Directional Dependence in Developmental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Eye, Alexander; DeShon, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss and propose methods that may be of use to determine direction of dependence in non-normally distributed variables. First, it is shown that standard regression analysis is unable to distinguish between explanatory and response variables. Then, skewness and kurtosis are discussed as tools to assess deviation from…

  12. Geothermal direct-heat study: Imperial County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-05-01

    Potential applications of geothermal energy which would be compatible with the agricultural activities in the county were identified and a plan to attract potential users to the area was developed. The intent of the first effort was to identify general classifications of industries which could utilize geothermal heat in production processes. Two levels of analyses were utilized for this effort. Initially, activities relying on previously developed engineering and industrial concepts were investigated to determine capital costs, employment, and potential energy savings. Second, innovative concepts not yet fully developed were investigated to determine their potential applicability to the agricultural base of the county. These investigations indicated that the major potential applications of geothermal heat would involve industries related to food processing or other direct agriculture-related uses of raw materials produced or imported to the county. An implementation plan which can be utilized by the county to market direct heat applications was developed. A socioeconomics analysis examined the potential effects on the county from development of direct heat projects. The county's planning and permitting requirements for dirct heat projects were also examined.

  13. Mapping methane sources and emissions over California from direct airborne flux and VOC source tracer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, A.; Misztal, P. K.; Peischl, J.; Karl, T.; Jonsson, H. H.; Woods, R. K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the contributions of methane (CH4) emissions from anthropogenic sources in the Central Valley of California is important for validation of the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and subsequent AB32 law implementation. The state GHG inventory is largely based on activity data and emission factor based estimates. The 'bottom-up' emission factors for CH4 have large uncertainties and there is a lack of adequate 'top-down' measurements to characterize emission rates. Emissions from non-CO2 GHG sources display spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability, and are thus, often, poorly characterized. The Central Valley of California is an agricultural and industry intensive region with large concentration of dairies and livestock operations, active oil and gas fields and refining operations, as well as rice cultivation all of which are known CH4 sources. In order to gain a better perspective of the spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, airborne measurements were conducted aboard a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of low-altitude and mixed layer airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements alongside coincident VOC measurements. Transects during eight unique flights covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. We report direct quantification of CH4 fluxes using real-time airborne Eddy Covariance measurements. CH4 and CO2 were measured at 1-Hz data rate using an instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) along with specific VOCs (like isoprene, methanol, acetone etc.) measured at 10-Hz using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer - Eddy Covariance (PTRMS-EC) flux system. Spatially resolved eddy covariance

  14. New Directions in Socialization Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the reproduction of gender-related insufficiencies by the organizational assymetry of family structure, whereby children of both sexes are predominantly mother-reared; and current challenges to the traditional, logical positivist paradigm in socialization research by a paradigm more congruent with a concrete, historical, and relational…

  15. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  16. Trouble Brewing: The Disaster of California State Pensions. State Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    California has promised its public employees lavish pensions and retiree health benefits without setting aside nearly enough money to pay for those benefits. As a result, California already admits to a $75.5 billion shortfall in paying for these promises to public employees--$40.5 billion for the teachers' retirement plan (California State…

  17. Impact of California's Air Pollution Laws on Black Carbon and their Implications for Direct Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, R.; Feng, Y.; Russell, L. M.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-12-01

    We examine the temporal and the spatial trends in the concentrations of black carbon (BC) - recorded by the IMPROVE monitoring network for the past 20 years - in California. Annual average BC concentrations in California have decreased by about 50% from 0.46 μg m-3 in 1989 to 0.24 μgm-3 in 2008 compared to a corresponding reductions in diesel BC emissions (also about 50%) from a peak of 0.013 Tg Yr-1 in 1990 to 0.006 Tg Yr-1 by 2008. We attribute the observed negative trends to the deployment of diesel particulate filters. Our conclusion that the reduction in diesel emissions is the primary cause of the observed BC reduction is also substantiated by a significant decrease in the ratio of BC to non-BC aerosols. The absorption efficiency of aerosols at visible wavelengths - determined from the observed scattering coefficient and the observed BC - also decreased by about 50% leading to a model-inferred negative direct radiative forcing (a cooling effect) of -1.4 Wm-2 (±60%) over California. Figure 1 (a) Annual means of measured Black Carbon (left axis) and BC fossil fuel emissions (right axis) in California from 1985 to 2008. Error bars correspond to standard deviation between measurements at each station. Dashed lines indicate a linear fit. Aerosol measurements from the IMPROVE network, emission inventories from (1) CARB, (2) [Ito and Penner, 2005] (b) Annual means of BC measured in Southern (South of 35 N), Northern (North of 38 N), and Central California (c) Annual means of measured Sulfate, Nitrate, and OC from IMPROVE network.

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd C.

    2005-03-22

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Goals that are codified in DOE's September 2003 Strategic Plan, with a primary focus on Advancing Scientific Understanding. For that goal, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 LDRD projects support every one of the eight strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the goals of Investing in America's Energy Future (six of the fourteen strategies), Resolving the Environmental Legacy (four of the eight strategies), and Meeting National Security Challenges (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20 year Scientific Facilities Plan and the draft Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also

  19. Future directions in brain injury research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential future directions that are important for brain injury research, especially with regard to concussion. The avenues of proposed research are categorized according to current concepts of concussion, types of concussion, and a global schema for globally reducing the burden of concussion.

  20. An Emerging Strategy of "Direct" Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, Henry

    1979-01-01

    Discusses seven basic themes that underlie the author's "direct research" activities. These themes include reliance on research based on description and induction instead of prescription and deduction, and the measurement of many elements in real settings, supported by anecdote, instead of few variables in perceptual terms from a…

  1. 77 FR 46805 - Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program Policy Directives... Research Program Policy Directive AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Final policy directive... Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Policy Directive. The purpose of these amendments is to implement...

  2. Cloud Security: Issues and Research Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-18

    al. present two storage isolation schemes that enable cloud users with high security requirements to verify that their disk storage is isolated from...Proof of Isolation for Cloud Storage Zhan Wang, Kun Sun, Sushil Jajodia, and Jiwu Jing 6. Selective and Fine-Grained Access to Data in the Cloud ... Cloud Security: Issues and Research Directions We organized an invitational workshop at George Mason University on Cloud Security: Issues and Research

  3. Proceedings of the fourth conference on research in California's National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veirs, Stephen D.; Stohlgren, Thomas; Schonewald-Cox, Christine

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this proceedings were selected from the 63 presentations given at the Fourth Biennial Conference on Research in National Parks in California. The overall theme for this meeting was a recurring one: “The Integration of Research into National Park Service Resource Management Decisions.” The conference was held at the University of California, Davis, on 10-12 September 1991 and was sponsored by the National Park Service Cooperative Park Studies Unit and the Institute of Ecology at the University of California, Davis. This proceedings highlights a variety of research and resource management efforts to improve the stewardship of our most treasured landscapes. In the future, it will become increasingly more important for federal and state agencies, university scientists and students, and the public to cooperate fully to improve the quantity and quality of science and resource management programs in units of the National Park System. As many of the papers in this proceedings attest, we must look beyond the political boundaries of protected landscapes to incorporate entire ecosystems. Competing resource uses inside and outside parklands must be reexamined to weave a common thread of biological conservation. As scientists, our studies must bridge the gap from plots to landscapes and from landscapes to regions. Our studies must built on information from species and populations to ecosystems and the processes that influence them. The papers in this proceedings are modest but important contribution to those ideals. Each paper represents original research and has been peer-reviewed. Many agencies, institutions, and individuals contributed in the development of this product. In the planning stages, National Park Service Western Region scientists provided advice and assistance in structuring the conference format. University of California, Davis, graduate students, directed by Sharon Lynch, assisted with logistics at the meeting, and provided general assistance

  4. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2002-03-15

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY01.

  5. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2000-03-08

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY99.

  6. New directions for telemental health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Terry; Brennan, David M; Chumbler, Neale R; Kobb, Rita; Yellowlees, Peter

    2008-11-01

    Although telemental healthcare has been available for many years, is generally accepted as effective, and has steadily growing numbers of consumers and providers, more and better research in this area needs to be done in order to convince insurers, policymakers, and funding agencies that mental healthcare delivered from a distance is at least as good as that delivered face-to-face. Because there is a wide spectrum of potential mental health disorders that might be encountered, there are significant gaps in telemental health research that need to be addressed before payment for services or funding for large-scale studies of this application can be expected. This white paper will review the current state of telemental health research and will offer suggestions for future directions necessary for telemental research to take in order to firmly establish its effectiveness.

  7. Research on laser direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongzhong; Shi, Likai

    2003-03-01

    Laser direct deposition of metallic parts is a new manufacturing technology, which combines with computer-aided design, laser cladding and rapid prototyping. Fully dense metallic parts can be directly obtained through melting the coaxially fed powders with a high-power laser in a layer-by-layer manner. The process characteristics, system composition as well as some research and advancement on laser direct deposition are presented here. The microstructure and properties observation of laser direct formed 663 copper alloy, 316L stainless steel and Rene'95 nickel super alloy samples indicate that, the as-deposited microstructure is similar to rapidly solidified materials, with homogenous composition and free of defects. Under certain conditions, directionally solidified microstructure can be obtained. The as-formed mechanical properties are equal to or exceed those for casting and wrought annealed materials. At the same time, some sample parts with complicate shape are presented for technology demonstration. The formed parts show good surface quality and dimensional accuracy.

  8. Evaluation of the MIND Research Institute's Spatial-Temporal Math (ST Math) Program in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Staci; Rice, John; Nakamoto, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The MIND Research Institute contracted with the Evaluation Research Program at WestEd to conduct an independent assessment of mathematics outcomes in elementary school grades across California that were provided with the ST Math program. Spatial-Temporal (ST) Math is a game-based instructional software designed to boost K-5 and secondary-level…

  9. 1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

    2000-06-01

    This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  10. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    editor, Todd C Hansen

    2009-02-23

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Themes that are codified in DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan (DOE/CF-0010), with a primary focus on Scientific Discovery and Innovation. For that strategic theme, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 LDRD projects support each one of the three goals through multiple strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the four goals of Energy Security, the two goals of Environmental Responsibility, and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD program supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20-year Scientific Facilities Plan and the Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under

  11. Geysers advanced direct contact condenser research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, J.; Bahning, T.; Bharathan, D.

    1997-12-31

    The first geothermal application of the Advanced Direct Contact Condenser (ADCC) technology developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is now operational and is being tested at The Geysers Power Plant Unit 11. This major research effort is being supported through the combined efforts of NREL, The Department of Energy (DOE), and Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E). NREL and PG&E have entered into a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) for a project to improve the direct-contact condenser performance at The Geysers Power Plant. This project is the first geothermal adaptation of an advanced condenser design developed for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems. PG&E expects this technology to improve power plant performance and to help extend the life of the steam field by using steam more efficiently. In accordance with the CRADA, no money is transferred between the contracting parties. In this case the Department of Energy is funding NREL for their efforts in this project and PG&E is contributing funds in kind. Successful application of this technology at The Geysers will provide a basis for NREL to continue to develop this technology for other geothermal and fossil power plant systems.

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.

    1991-12-01

    Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new fundable'' R D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

  13. Neurosciences research in space - Future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzman, Frank M.; Wolfe, James W.

    1991-01-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the effects of long-duration space missions on the central nervous system, near-term research, to take place from 1990-1995, will be directed at investigating the acute effects of microgravity and the 'space adaptation syndrome'. These include experiments scheduled for the Spacelab Life Sciences 1 which is designed to evaluate changes in the visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive systems. An extensive series of experiments, collectively termed Microgravity Vestibular Investigations (MVI), is also planned for the IML-1 mission to be flown in 1992. The IML-2 mission will emphasize behavior and performance, biological rhythms, and further vestibular studies. Mid-term goals, projected to be achieved from 1995-2000, include the use of new technology such as magnetic recording techniques. Long-term goals are also discussed including studies dealing with neuronal plasticity and sensory substitution, augmentation, and robotic telepresence.

  14. Universal Digital Library-Future research directions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BALAKRISHNAN N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper starts with a description of the present status of the Digital Library of India Initiative. As part of this initiative large corpus of scanned text is available in many Indian languages and has stimulated a vast amount of research in Indian language technology briefly described in this paper. Other than the Digital Library of India Initiative which is part of the Million Books to the Web Project initiated by Prof Raj Reddy of Carnegie Mellon University, there are a few more initiatives in India towards taking the heritage of the country to the Web. This paper presents the future directions for the Digital Library of India Initiative both in terms of growing collection and the technical challenges in managing such large collection poses.

  15. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd

    2004-03-27

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. In FY03, Berkeley Lab was authorized by DOE to establish a funding ceiling for the LDRD program of $15.0 M, which equates to about 3.2% of Berkeley Lab's FY03 projected operating and capital equipment budgets. This funding level was provided to develop new scientific ideas and opportunities and allow the Berkeley Lab Director an opportunity to initiate new directions. Budget constraints limited available resources, however, so only $10.1 M was expended for operating and $0.6 M for capital equipment (2.4% of actual Berkeley Lab FY03 costs). In FY03, scientists submitted 168 proposals, requesting over $24.2 M in operating funding. Eighty-two projects were funded, with awards ranging from $45 K to $500 K. These projects are summarized in Table 1.

  16. California Energy Commission Public Interest EnergyResearch/Energy System Integration -- Transmission-Planning Research&Development Scoping Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard; Widergren, Steven

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this Public Interest Energy Research (PIER)scoping project is to identify options for public-interest research and development (R&D) to improve transmission-planning tools, techniques, and methods. The information presented was gathered through a review of current California utility, California Independent System Operator (ISO), and related western states electricity transmission-planning activities and emerging needs. This report presents the project teams findings organized under six topic areas and identifies 17 distinct R&D activities to improve transmission-planning in California and the West. The findings in this report are intended for use, along with other materials, by PIER staff, to facilitate discussions with stakeholders that will ultimately lead to development of a portfolio of transmission-planning R&D activities for the PIER program.

  17. Collaborative Problem-Solving Environments; Proceedings for the Workshop CPSEs for Scientific Research, San Diego, California, June 20 to July 1, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, George

    1999-01-11

    A workshop on collaborative problem-solving environments (CPSEs) was held June 29 through July 1, 1999, in San Diego, California. The workshop was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the High Performance Network Applications Team of the Large Scale Networking Working Group. The workshop brought together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government to identify, define, and discuss future directions in collaboration and problem-solving technologies in support of scientific research.

  18. Diversity Matters: New Directions for Institutional Research on Undergraduate Racial/Ethnic and Economic Diversity. SERU Project and Consortium Research Paper. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.8.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Gregg

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the new directions in institutional research on undergraduate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic diversity at the University of California, Berkeley. The use of SERU/UCUES and other web-based census surveys has made possible more detailed and extensive analysis of student diversity. Included is research on an expanded number of…

  19. Corrosion investigations, Tracy Red Bluff, California, and Boulder City, Nevada, ehv direct current tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backstrom, T.E.

    1965-01-01

    Evaluation of corrosion on buried metalwork, by the introduction of large direct currents into the ground, was studied during ehv dc transmission investigations in the Tracy-Red Bluff, California and the Boulder City, Nevada areas. Tests made on two types of electrodes showed that ehv dc ground return at test current levels would: (1) promote serious corrosion of buried metalwork within approximately 1/2-mile radius of the electrode with a ground mat electrode and mild corrosion with a deep-well electrode; (2) promote negligible-to-serious corrosion of buried pipelines within 1/2 to 3 mile radius of either a ground mat or deep-well electrode, depending on (a) distance of the pipelines from the electrode, (b) geometry of the two electrode-pipeline systems, and (c) horizontal extent of the pipelines; (3) impress negligible-to-mild corrosion of buried pipelines beyond a 3-mile radius of the electrode depending upon geometry of the electrode-pipeline system. Results show normal corrosion prevention techniques will be adequate to prevent corrosion of buried metalwork, if electrode is properly located. Use of ground return for only 8 to 24 hours per year on the ehv intertie, although with currents 2 to 3 times higher than test currents, will cause stray current damage of only a fraction of that expected with continuous operations.

  20. Comparison of Direct and Array-Derived Strain and Rotation at the Pinon Flat Observatory, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Jen; Vernon, Frank; Wassermann, Joachim; Gebauer, André; Schreiber, Ulrich; Carr Agnew, Duncan; Igel, Heiner

    2016-04-01

    To fully understand the wave motion of a deformable body, we need 12 components in total: 3 components of translation, 3 components of rotation, and 6 components of strain. Translation are routinely recorded in the seismology community. Strain measurements are rare and do not routinely enter the inversion procedures for structure and source from seismic observations. Single-component rotational ground motions have been measured just recently. In principle, strains and rotations can be derived from an array of seismic stations, under uniform strain assumption across the array. In a unique instrument setting at the PFO (Pinon Flat Observatory, California), a dense small-aperture seismic array is in the vicinity of a sensor measuring rotations around a vertical axis (ring laser) and three horizontal strain meters. This enables us to compare array derived strain/rotation with observations for 10/12 components of complete ground motion. We show the comparison results between array-derived ground motion and direct observation for tele-seismic events. Several possible errors like tilt couplings, array size, seismometer noise are discussed.

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Anderson, S.E.; Baldwin, G.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W.; Kirvel, R.D.; McElroy, L.A. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) funds projects that nurture and enrich the core competencies of the Laboratory. The scientific and technical output from the FY 1992 RD Program has been significant. Highlights include (1) Creating the first laser guide star to be coupled with adaptive optics, thus permitting ground-based telescopes to obtain the same resolution as smaller space-based instruments but with more light-gathering power. (2) Significantly improving the limit on the mass of the electron antineutrino so that neutrinos now become a useful tool in diagnosing supernovas and we disproved the existence of a 17-keV neutrino. (3) Developing a new class of organic aerogels that have robust mechanical properties and that have significantly lower thermal conductivity than inorganic aerogels. (4) Developing a new heavy-ion accelerator concept, which may enable us to design heavy-ion experimental systems and use a heavy-ion driver for inertial fusion. (5) Designing and demonstrating a high-power, diode-pumped, solid-state laser concept that will allow us to pursue a variety of research projects, including laser material processing. (6) Demonstrating that high-performance semiconductor arrays can be fabricated more efficiently, which will make this technology available to a broad range of applications such as inertial confinement fusion for civilian power. (7) Developing a new type of fiber channel switch and new fiber channel standards for use in local- and wide-area networks, which will allow scientists and engineers to transfer data at gigabit rates. (8) Developing the nation`s only numerical model for high-technology air filtration systems. Filter designs that use this model will provide safer and cleaner environments in work areas where contamination with particulate hazardous materials is possible.

  2. 75 FR 15756 - Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION RIN 3244-AF61 Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive AGENCY: U.S. Small... announces a final amendment to the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program Policy Directive (PD... the Policy Directive; Small Business Innovation Research Program To: The Directors, Small...

  3. Protocol, Engineering Research Center, University of California, Santa Barbara

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Raymond Klefstad * Juan Colmenares , Graduate Student Researcher • Shruti Gorappa, Graduate Student Researcher * Trevor Harmon, Graduate Student Researcher...Technology and Applications Symposium, Washington ,D.C., May - June 2000. K. Raman, Y. Zhang, M. Panahi, J. A. Colmenares and R. Klefstad, "RTZen...Systems, September 2005, Vienna, Austria. K. Raman, Y. Zhang, M. Panahi, J. A. Colmenares and R. Klefstad, "Patterns and tools for achieving

  4. Future Directions for Chinese Accounting Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Chen; Katherine Schipper

    2008-01-01

    <正>Introduction and Summary Capital-markets based accounting research in China has a relatively short history;the two principal stock exchanges in Shanghai and Shenzhen have operated for less than 20 years.Recent accounting research has tended to adopt techniques,research designs and even topics that were developed in North America and

  5. New Directions in Policy Borrowing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

    2016-01-01

    Research on policy borrowing is a well-established research area of comparative education. Over the past 20 years or so it gained prominence among globalization scholars. Of great interest is not so much the question of which reforms "travel" internationally, and which ones are homebound, but rather why traveling reforms resonate in a…

  6. Human-Robot Interaction Directed Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, Ernest V., II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2014-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces and command modalities affect the human's ability to perform tasks accurately, efficiently, and effectively when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. This DRP concentrates on three areas associated with interfaces and command modalities in HRI which are applicable to NASA robot systems: 1) Video Overlays, 2) Camera Views, and 3) Command Modalities. The first study focused on video overlays that investigated how Augmented Reality (AR) symbology can be added to the human-robot interface to improve teleoperation performance. Three types of AR symbology were explored in this study, command guidance (CG), situation guidance (SG), and both (SCG). CG symbology gives operators explicit instructions on what commands to input, whereas SG symbology gives operators implicit cues so that operators can infer the input commands. The combination of CG and SG provided operators with explicit and implicit cues allowing the operator to choose which symbology to utilize. The objective of the study was to understand how AR symbology affects the human operator's ability to align a robot arm to a target using a flight stick and the ability to allocate attention between the symbology and external views of the world. The study evaluated the effects type of symbology (CG and SG) has on operator tasks performance and attention allocation during teleoperation of a robot arm. The second study expanded on the first study by evaluating the effects of the type of

  7. Direct participation of electrical loads in the California independent system operator markets during the Summer of 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Khavkin, Mark; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2001-04-01

    California's restructured electricity markets opened on 1 April 1998. The former investor-owned utilities were functionally divided into generation, transmission, and distribution activities, all of their gas-fired generating capacity was divested, and the retail market was opened to competition. To ensure that small customers shared in the expected benefit of lower prices, the enabling legislation mandated a 10% rate cut for all customers, which was implemented in a simplistic way that fossilized 1996 tariff structures. Rising fuel and environmental compliance costs, together with a reduced ability to import electricity, numerous plant outages, and exercise of market power by generators drove up wholesale electricity prices steeply in 2000, while retail tariffs remained unchanged. One of the distribution/supply companies entered bankruptcy in April 2001, and another was insolvent. During this period, two sets of interruptible load programs were in place, longstanding ones organized as special tariffs by the distribution/supply companies and hastily established ones run directly by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO). The distribution/supply company programs were effective at reducing load during the summer of 2000, but because of the high frequency of outages required by a system on the brink of failure, customer response declined and many left the tariff. The CAISO programs failed to attract enough participation to make a significant difference to the California supply demand imbalance. The poor performance of direct load participation in California's markets reinforces the argument for accurate pricing of electricity as a stimulus to energy efficiency investment and as a constraint on market volatility.

  8. New Directions in Qualitative Research in Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative Research gains increasing popularity in the field of Psychology. With the renewed interest, there are, however, also some risks related to the overhomogenization and increasing standardization of qualitative methods. This special issue is dedicated to clarify some of the existing...... misconceptions of qualitative research and to discuss its potentials for the field of psychology in light of recent endeavors to overcome paradigmatic battles and a re-orientation to the specifities of psychology. The issue comprises a discussion from workshop on the future of qualitative research in psychology...

  9. New directions in qualitative research in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuth, Carolin

    2015-06-01

    Qualitative Research gains increasing popularity in the field of Psychology. With the renewed interest, there are, however, also some risks related to the overhomogenization and increasing standardization of qualitative methods. This special issue is dedicated to clarify some of the existing misconceptions of qualitative research and to discuss its potentials for the field of psychology in light of recent endeavors to overcome paradigmatic battles and a re-orientation to the specifities of psychology. The issue comprises a discussion from workshop on the future of qualitative research in psychology organized at Aalborg University, and several contributions that resulted from it.

  10. Learning Analytics: Challenges and Future Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatko Lukarov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, learning analytics (LA has attracted a great deal of attention in technology-enhanced learning (TEL research as practitioners, institutions, and researchers are increasingly seeing the potential that LA has to shape the future TEL landscape. Generally, LA deals with the development of methods that harness educational data sets to support the learning process. This paper provides a foundation for future research in LA. It provides a systematic overview on this emerging field and its key concepts through a reference model for LA based on four dimensions, namely data, environments, context (what?, stakeholders (who?, objectives (why?, and methods (how?. It further identifies various challenges and research opportunities in the area of LA in relation to each dimension.

  11. Sandia, California Tritium Research Laboratory transition and reutilization project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, T.B. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes a project within Sandia National Laboratory to convert the shut down Tritium Research Laboratory into a facility which could be reused within the laboratory complex. In the process of decommissioning and decontaminating the facility, the laboratory was able to save substantial financial resources by transferring much existing equipment to other DOE facilities, and then expeditiously implementing a decontamination program which has resulted in the building being converted into laboratory space for new lab programs. This project of facility reuse has been a significant financial benefit to the laboratory.

  12. Laboratory directed research and development fy1999 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R A

    2000-04-11

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was founded in 1952 and has been managed since its inception by the University of California (UC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Because of this long association with UC, the Laboratory has been able to recruit a world-class workforce, establish an atmosphere of intellectual freedom and innovation, and achieve recognition in relevant fields of knowledge as a scientific and technological leader. This environment and reputation are essential for sustained scientific and technical excellence. As a DOE national laboratory with about 7,000 employees, LLNL has an essential and compelling primary mission to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. The Laboratory receives funding from the DOE Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs, whose focus is stewardship of our nuclear weapons stockpile. Funding is also provided by the Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, many Department of Defense sponsors, other federal agencies, and the private sector. As a multidisciplinary laboratory, LLNL has applied its considerable skills in high-performance computing, advanced engineering, and the management of large research and development projects to become the science and technology leader in those areas of its mission responsibility. The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program was authorized by the U.S. Congress in 1984. The Program allows the Director of each DOE laboratory to fund advanced, creative, and innovative research and development (R&D) activities that will ensure scientific and technical vitality in the continually evolving mission areas at DOE and the Laboratory. In addition, the LDRD Program provides LLNL with the flexibility to nurture and enrich essential scientific and technical competencies, which attract the most qualified scientists and engineers. The LDRD Program

  13. Biology Education Research: Lessons and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Susan R.; Nielsen, Natalie R.; Schweingruber, Heidi A.

    2013-01-01

    Biologists have long been concerned about the quality of undergraduate biology education. Over time, however, biology faculty members have begun to study increasingly sophisticated questions about teaching and learning in the discipline. These scholars, often called biology education researchers, are part of a growing field of inquiry called…

  14. New directions in social comparison research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, BP; Mussweiler, T

    2001-01-01

    This article notices that social comparison theory has developed from being a focused theoretical statement on the use of others for self-evaluation into a lively and varied area of research encompassing many different paradigms, approaches and applications. A recent 'renaissance' in social comparis

  15. Restructuring of the Electricity Industry and Environmental Issues: A California Research Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward L. Vine

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the restructuring of the electricity industry in many states, public benefits funding has emerged as a primary mechanism for supporting social benefits such as energy efficiency and research and development (R&D. In California, a Public Interest Energy Research (PIER Program was established to �conduct public interest energy research that seeks to improve the quality of life for California�s citizens by providing environmentally sound, safe, reliable, and affordable energy services and products. PIER includes the full range of research, development, and demonstration activities that will advance science or technology not adequately provided by competitive and regulated markets.� The PIER Program is comprised of six PIER Program funding areas, including the Energy-Related Environmental Research. The overall mission of the Energy-Related Environmental Research is to �Develop cost-effective approaches to evaluating and resolving environmental effects of energy production, delivery, and use in California, and explore how new energy applications and products can solve environmental problems.� This paper describes the process used in developing these approaches and identifies a set of environmental issues that the State plans to evaluate.

  16. Medical Robots: Current Systems and Research Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Beasley, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    First used medically in 1985, robots now make an impact in laparoscopy, neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, emergency response, and various other medical disciplines. This paper provides a review of medical robot history and surveys the capabilities of current medical robot systems, primarily focusing on commercially available systems while covering a few prominent research projects. By examining robotic systems across time and disciplines, trends are discernible that imply future capabilities ...

  17. Restructuring of steelworks in direct research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The publication presents the most recent results of research conducted in metallurgical enterprises which build Polish metallurgical sector. Three main areas of restructuring were tested, that is repair restructuring, development restructuring and adaptation restructuring. For each type of restructuring there were certain strategies set for functioning of steelworks and their corresponding actions. The last stage of tests was the assessment of conducted restructuring activities in steelworks and reference to situation in metallurgy in perspective of following years.

  18. California Levee Risk, Now and in the Future:Identifying Research and Tool Development Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newmark, R L; Hanemann, M; Farber, D

    2006-11-28

    The Center for Catastrophic Risk Management (CCRM) and the California Center for Environmental Law and Policy (CCELP) at UC Berkeley and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) joined together to cosponsor a workshop to define research requirements to mitigate the hazards facing the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Levee system. The Workshop was intended to provide a forum to (1) Report assessments of current vulnerabilities facing the levees, such as structural failure, seismic loading, flooding, terrorism; (2) Consider longer term challenges such as climate change, sea level rise; and (3) Define research requirements to fill gaps in knowledge and reduce uncertainties in hazard assessments.

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen (Ed.), Todd

    2007-03-08

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness.

  20. Medical Robots: Current Systems and Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A. Beasley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available First used medically in 1985, robots now make an impact in laparoscopy, neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, emergency response, and various other medical disciplines. This paper provides a review of medical robot history and surveys the capabilities of current medical robot systems, primarily focusing on commercially available systems while covering a few prominent research projects. By examining robotic systems across time and disciplines, trends are discernible that imply future capabilities of medical robots, for example, increased usage of intraoperative images, improved robot arm design, and haptic feedback to guide the surgeon.

  1. Cultural psychiatry: research strategies and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Ban, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews some key aspects of current research in cultural psychiatry and explores future prospects. The first section discusses the multiple meanings of culture in the contemporary world and their relevance for understanding mental health and illness. The next section considers methodological strategies for unpacking the concept of culture and studying the impact of cultural variables, processes and contexts. Multiple methods are needed to address the many different components or dimensions of cultural identity and experience that constitute local worlds, ways of life or systems of knowledge. Quantitative and observational methods of clinical epidemiology and experimental science as well as qualitative ethnographic methods are needed to capture crucial aspects of culture as systems of meaning and practice. Emerging issues in cultural psychiatric research include: cultural variations in illness experience and expression; the situated nature of cognition and emotion; cultural configurations of self and personhood; concepts of mental disorder and mental health literacy; and the prospect of ecosocial models of health and culturally based interventions. The conclusion considers the implications of the emerging perspectives from cultural neuroscience for psychiatric theory and practice.

  2. Leadership: current theories, research, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Bruce J; Walumbwa, Fred O; Weber, Todd J

    2009-01-01

    This review examines recent theoretical and empirical developments in the leadership literature, beginning with topics that are currently receiving attention in terms of research, theory, and practice. We begin by examining authentic leadership and its development, followed by work that takes a cognitive science approach. We then examine new-genre leadership theories, complexity leadership, and leadership that is shared, collective, or distributed. We examine the role of relationships through our review of leader member exchange and the emerging work on followership. Finally, we examine work that has been done on substitutes for leadership, servant leadership, spirituality and leadership, cross-cultural leadership, and e-leadership. This structure has the benefit of creating a future focus as well as providing an interesting way to examine the development of the field. Each section ends with an identification of issues to be addressed in the future, in addition to the overall integration of the literature we provide at the end of the article.

  3. Neurosciences research in space Future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzman, Frank M.; Wolfe, James W.

    Future research in the neurosciences can best be understood in the context of NASA's life sciences goals in the near term (1990-1995), mid term (1995-2000), and long term (2000 and beyond). Since NASA is planning short-duration Spacelab and International Microgravity Laboratory (IML) flights for many years to come, the acute effects of exposure to microgravity will continue to be of experimental and operational interest in the near term. To this end, major new areas of research will be devoted to ground-based studies of preflight adaptation trainers and their efficacy in preventing or reducing the incidence of space motion sickness. In addition, an extensive series of studies of the vestibular system will be conducted inflight on the IML-1 mission The IML-2 mission will emphasize behavior and performance, biological rhythms, and further vestibular studies. In the mid-term period, Spacelab missions will employ new technology such as magnetic recording techniques in order to evaluate changes in the processing of sensory and motor inputs at the brainstem and cortical level during exposure to microgravity. Two Space Life Sciences (SLS) missions planned for the mid to late 1990's, SLS-4 and SLS-5, will utilize an onboard centrifuge facility that will enable investigators to study the effects of partial gravity on sensory and motor function. In the long term (2000 and beyond), Space Station Freedom and long-duration missions will provide opportunities to explore new options in the neurosciences, such as sensory substitution and augmentation, through the use of physical sensors to provide three-dimensional tactile-visual, tactile-auditory and tactile-somatosensory inputs. The use of this technology will be extremely important in the area of robotic telepresence. Finally, Space Station Freedom and proposed LifeSat missions will provide neuroscientists the opportunity to study the effects of partial gravity and microgravity on neuronal plasticity.

  4. Wildland fire ash: future research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodí, Merche B.; Martins, Deborah A.; Cerdà, Artemi; Balfour, Victoria N.; Santin, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan H.; Pereira, Paulo; Mataix-Solera, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Ash is a key component of the forest fires affected land (Cerdà, 1998; Bodí et al., 2011; Pereira et al., 2013a). Ash controls the hydrological processes and determines the water repellency (Dlapa et al., 2012) and the infiltration rates (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008;). Moreover, ash is the key factor on runoff initiation and then on the soil erosion. Little is known about the impact of ash in different ecosystems, but during the last decade a substantial increase in the papers that show the role of ash in the Earth and Soil System were published (Bodí et al., 2012; Pereira et al., 2013b).. Ash is being found as the key component of the post-fire pedological, geomorphological and hydrological response after forest fires (Fernández et al., 2012; Martín et al., 2012; Bodí et al., 2013; Guénon et al., 2013; Pereira et al., 2013c). A recent State-of-the-Art review about wildland fire ash (Bodí et al., 2014) compiles the knowledge regarding the production, composition and eco-hydro-geomorphic effects of wildland fire ash. In the present paper we indicate the knowledge gaps detected and suggest topics that need more research effort concerning: i) data collection and analysis techniques: a) To develop standardized sampling techniques that allow cross comparison among sites and avoid inclusion of the underlying soil unless the burned surface soil forms part of the ash layer, b) To develop standardized methods to define and characterize ash, including its color, physical properties such as particle size distribution or density, proportion of pyrogenic C, chemical and biological reactivity and persistence in the environment, c) To validate, calibrate and test measurements collected through remote sensing with on-the-ground measurements. ii) ash production, deposition redistribution and fate: d) To untangle the significance of the effects of maximum temperature reached during combustion versus the duration of heating, e) To understand the production of ash by measuring its

  5. Current research directions definition of economic security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Falovych

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article features the topical issue of the established level of the enterprise's economic security. The objective of this article is to research, to base and to supplement the tendency for generalization of the categorical system in order to clarify the matter meaning of the enterprise's economic security. The systematized analyses of the matter meaning of the enterprise's economic security were done by domestic and foreign scientists-economists. The results of the study were expounded and also some vital approaches to the definition of the enterprise's economic security were presented and proved particularly: strategically, resource-functional, marketable, combined, deductive, systematic and criminal.Based on the analyzed content-conceptual interpretations and detailed characteristics of each approach to the definition of this meaning, there was proposed its own meaning of the interpretation of the enterprise's economic security. A systematic approach was adopted due to the matters concerning enterprise's economic security. As in this approach the vital economic interests of thee enterprise were stipulated, also gained the topicality in the current crisis economic conditions

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

  7. Acupuncture and Depth: Future Direction for Acupuncture Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The research on acupuncture has increased steadily over the years and regular review and revision of the direction of future acupuncture research are necessary. This paper aims to review and explore the significance of acupuncture depth in modern acupuncture research. Searches conducted in Science Direct and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases reflected a lack of focus on depth of acupuncture. We propose that the research trends of acupuncture should progress to the depth of insertion. It is suggested that future acupuncture research, especially randomized controlled trials (RCTs), should take into consideration the depth of insertion. Comparison between databases using different language of medium suggests the need for international collaboration of researchers from the same field. It is also crucial to inherit and innovate traditional medicine (TM) through modern technology. The use of bibliometric method is also suitable for development of TM research trends. Acupuncture and depth should be considered as one of the future directions of acupuncture research. PMID:25114707

  8. A Priority for California's Future: Science for Students. Analysis of Public Opinion Research. Strengthening Science Education in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for the Future of Teaching and Learning, 2010

    2010-01-01

    California's public schools have struggled since the passage of Proposition 13 in 1978, and today face enormous challenges to try to regain lost quality and standing as a national education leader. In light of the current economic crisis, competition for limited resources is fierce and the pressure is on to eliminate all but the basic "Three…

  9. Career Self-Efficacy: Exemplary Recent Research and Emerging Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Nancy E.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses what the author views as exemplary work illustrating important directions in research on the applications of Bandura's self-efficacy theory to career theory, assessment, and counseling. The author begins with research on measuring career self-efficacy, following which research testing the postulated behavioral consequences…

  10. Religious Practice and Microcredit: Literature Review and Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind ASHTA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Little work has been done in the conjunction of Microfinance and Religion. This paper explores the findings of the extant research. It then provides future research directions on a number of subjects within this broad area, available for researchers from a large number of fields: anthropology, theology, sociology, representations and systems of thought, development economics, finance, and business management.

  11. Research of Direct Digital Correlative-Interferometric Radio Direction Finder with Double Correlation-convolutional Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Tsyporenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this article the unsettled part of the general problem of the research of direct digital methods of correlative-interferometric direction-finding was solved. The purpose of the article is to optimize the direction-finding of the direct digital correlative-interferometric radio direction finder with double correlation-convolutional processing by its exactness. Fundamentals of researches. As a result of the conducted researches it was defined that the basic parameter of equalization of dispersion of error of estimation of direction on the source of radio radiation for the explored radio direction finder, which ought to be optimized, is the size of frequency converting change. Optimization. It was conducted the parametrical optimization of the direct digital correlative-interferometric radio direction finder with double correlation-convolutional processing by its exactness. As a result of the modelling the dependence of middle quadratic deflection of estimation of direction from the relation of signal/noise for the different possible values of circular frequency converting shift was obtained. Conclusions. The analytical calculations and the results of the modelling fully coincided, that confirmed the rightness of the researches and the authenticity of the results of optimization.

  12. California Breast Cancer Prevention Initiatives: Setting a research agenda for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, P; Kavanaugh-Lynch, M H E; Plumb, M; Yen, I H; Sarantis, H; Thomsen, C L; Campleman, S; Galpern, E; Dickenson, C; Woodruff, T J

    2015-07-01

    The environment is an underutilized pathway to breast cancer prevention. Current research approaches and funding streams related to breast cancer and the environment are unequal to the task at hand. We undertook the California Breast Cancer Prevention Initiatives, a four-year comprehensive effort to set a research agenda related to breast cancer, the environment, disparities and prevention. We identified 20 topics for Concept Proposals reflecting a life-course approach and the complex etiology of breast cancer; considering the environment as chemical, physical and socially constructed exposures that are experienced concurrently: at home, in the community and at work; and addressing how we should be modifying the world around us to promote a less carcinogenic environment. Redirecting breast cancer research toward prevention-oriented discovery could significantly reduce the incidence and associated disparities of the disease among future generations.

  13. Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Facility (Research Cell 22)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: RC22 is a continuous-flow, direct-connect supersonic-combustion research facility that is capable of simulating flight conditions from Mach 3.0 to Mach...

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R

    2001-05-24

    This Annual Report provides an overview of the FY2000 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents a summary of the results achieved by each project during the year.

  15. Laboratory directed research and development 2006 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westrich, Henry Roger

    2007-03-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2006. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 430 individual R&D projects in 17 categories.

  16. Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1995 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1996-03-01

    This document presents an overview of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Programs at Los Alamos. The nine technical disciplines in which research is described include materials, engineering and base technologies, plasma, fluids, and particle beams, chemistry, mathematics and computational science, atmic and molecular physics, geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics, and biosciences. Brief descriptions are provided in the above programs.

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-15 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Rekha Sukamar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all INL programs. This report includes summaries of all INL LDRD research activities supported during Fiscal Year (FY) 2015.

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-10 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dena Tomchak

    2011-03-01

    The FY 2010 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL -- it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  19. PRIORITY RESEARCH DIRECTIONS IN THE AREA OF QUALITATIVE METHODOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The basic directions of modern theoretical and practical research in the area of qualitative methodology in Russia are discussed in the article. The complexity of research is considered from three points of view: the development of methodology of qualitative analysis, qualitative methods, and verbal and nonverbal projective techniques. The authors present an integrative model of the qualitative analysis, the research on specificity of the use of discourse-analysis method and projective techni...

  20. Archaeological Investigations at Nelson Wash, Fort Irwin, California. Fort Irwin Archaeological Project Research Report Number 23. Volume 2. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    Lithic Use-Wear Research ., Archaeometry 26:49- * 61. Kowta, Makoto 1969 The Sayles Complex: A Late Millingstone Assemblage from Cajon Pass and the...8217Deposit Versus Abrasion’ Controversy. Journal of Archaeological Research 11:91-98. United States Army Environmental Hygiene Agency 1984 Water Quality...1981 Pleistocene High-Silica Rhyolites of the Coso Volcanic Field, Inyo County, California. Journal of Geophysical Research , Vol. 86, No. Bll: 10223

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development LDRD-FY-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dena Tomchak

    2012-03-01

    This report provides a summary of the research conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2011. This report demonstrates the types of cutting edge research the INL is performing to help ensure the nation's energy security. The research conducted under this program is aligned with our strategic direction, benefits the Department of Energy (DOE) and is in compliance with DOE order 413.2B. This report summarizes the diverse research and development portfolio with emphasis on the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) mission, encompassing both advanced nuclear science and technology and underlying technologies.

  2. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program: FY 2015 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SLAC,

    2016-04-04

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) encourage innovation, creativity, originality and quality to maintain the Laboratory’s research activities and staff at the forefront of science and technology. To further advance its scientific research capabilities, the Laboratory allocates a portion of its funds for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. With DOE guidance, the LDRD program enables SLAC scientists to make rapid and significant contributions that seed new strategies for solving important national science and technology problems. The LDRD program is conducted using existing research facilities.

  3. Final annual site environmental report, calendar year 1997, for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR), University of California at Davis, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) describes DOE activities for the Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) Project at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) site at UC Davis California. The report provides information about the Site and its environmental monitoring operation throughout calendar year 1997 for both radiological and non-radiological parameters. This report also describes activities conducted during 1997 in support of the Site environmental restoration efforts, and information about the impact of these activities on the public and the environment.

  4. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report compiles the annual reports of Laboratory Directed Research and Development projects supported by the Berkeley Lab. Projects are arranged under the following topical sections: (1) Accelerator and fusion research division; (2) Chemical sciences division; (3) Computing Sciences; (4) Earth sciences division; (5) Environmental energy technologies division; (6) life sciences division; (7) Materials sciences division; (8) Nuclear science division; (9) Physics division; (10) Structural biology division; and (11) Cross-divisional. A total of 66 projects are summarized.

  5. Direct and indirect evidence for earthquakes; an example from the Lake Tahoe Basin, California-Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, J. M.; Noble, P. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Schmauder, G. C.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution seismic CHIRP data can image direct evidence of earthquakes (i.e., offset strata) beneath lakes and the ocean. Nevertheless, direct evidence often is not imaged due to conditions such as gas in the sediments, or steep basement topography. In these cases, indirect evidence for earthquakes (i.e., debris flows) may provide insight into the paleoseismic record. The four sub-basins of the tectonically active Lake Tahoe Basin provide an ideal opportunity to image direct evidence for earthquake deformation and compare it to indirect earthquake proxies. We present results from high-resolution seismic CHIRP surveys in Emerald Bay, Fallen Leaf Lake, and Cascade Lake to constrain the recurrence interval on the West Tahoe Dollar Point Fault (WTDPF), which was previously identified as potentially the most hazardous fault in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Recently collected CHIRP profiles beneath Fallen Leaf Lake image slide deposits that appear synchronous with slides in other sub-basins. The temporal correlation of slides between multiple basins suggests triggering by events on the WTDPF. If correct, we postulate a recurrence interval for the WTDPF of ~3-4 k.y., indicating that the WTDPF is near its seismic recurrence cycle. In addition, CHIRP data beneath Cascade Lake image strands of the WTDPF that offset the lakefloor as much as ~7 m. The Cascade Lake data combined with onshore LiDAR allowed us to map the geometry of the WTDPF continuously across the southern Lake Tahoe Basin and yielded an improved geohazard assessment.

  6. Laboratory directed research and development program, FY 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1996 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The Berkeley Lab LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory`s forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for Berkeley Lab scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances the Laboratory`s core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. Areas eligible for support include: (1) Work in forefront areas of science and technology that enrich Laboratory research and development capability; (2) Advanced study of new hypotheses, new experiments, and innovative approaches to develop new concepts or knowledge; (3) Experiments directed toward proof of principle for initial hypothesis testing or verification; and (4) Conception and preliminary technical analysis to explore possible instrumentation, experimental facilities, or new devices.

  7. New Voices in the Workplace: Research Directions in Multicultural Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Marlene G.

    1991-01-01

    Develops a two-step framework (resistance to privileged discourse followed by harmonic discourse) for understanding multicultural communication in organizations based on the assumption of cultural difference. Suggests four directions for future research to create the data base that would allow development of a model of multicultural communication…

  8. Trend-Analysis and Research Direction in Construction Management Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper Kranker; Ussing, Lene Faber; Brunø, Thomas Ditlev

    2013-01-01

    Planning and scheduling, both in the form of pre-assembly construction as well as increase in cost and time are all themes that haven’t been studies in a trend-analysis, with the purpose of finding gaps and research directions in the literature. The aim of this paper is therefor to analyze...... of Construction Engineering and Management....

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is required to provide a program description and overview of its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) to the Department of Energy in accordance with DOE Order 413.2B dated April 19, 2006. This report fulfills that requirement.

  10. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none, none

    2012-04-27

    Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Themes that are codified in DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan (DOE/CF-0010), with a primary focus on Scientific Discovery and Innovation. For that strategic theme, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 LDRD projects support each one of the three goals through multiple strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the four goals of Energy Security, the two goals of Environmental Responsibility, and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). Going forward in FY 2012, the LDRD program also supports the Goals codified in the new DOE Strategic Plan of May, 2011. The LDRD program also supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20-year Scientific Facilities Plan and the Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under consideration and review by the Office of Science Program Offices, such as LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions. Brief summares of projects and accomplishments for the period for each division are included.

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2007-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2006. The associated FY 2006 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2007/2) provides financial data about the FY 2006 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process.

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-05-01

    This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, J P; Fox, K J

    2008-03-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary Laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2008 spending was $531.6 million. There are approximately 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. To be a premier scientific Laboratory, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research and renew its research agenda. The competition for LDRD funds stimulates Laboratory scientists to think in new and creative ways, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining research excellence and a means to address National needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. By fostering high-risk, exploratory research, the LDRD program helps

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, T. [ed.; Chartock, M.

    1999-02-05

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL or Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1998 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the supported projects and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The LBNL LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory's forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for LBNL scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances LBNL's core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. All projects are work in forefront areas of science and technology. Areas eligible for support include the following: Advanced study of hypotheses, concepts, or innovative approaches to scientific or technical problems; Experiments and analyses directed toward ''proof of principle'' or early determination of the utility of new scientific ideas, technical concepts, or devices; and Conception and preliminary technical analyses of experimental facilities or devices.

  15. Foresight scanning: future directions of clinical and pharmaceutical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Brian C

    2008-01-01

    Foresight Scanning: Future Directions of Clinical and Pharmaceutical Research. Brian C. Foster, Therapeutic Products Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada ABSTRACT The Canadian Society for Pharmaceutical Sciences Satellite Symposium on Foresight Scanning, May 26 and 27, 2008, Nordegg, Alberta, Canada, focussed on the future directions of clinical and pharmaceutical research. The symposium brought together a group of clinicians, regulatory scientists, researchers and students to examine where clinical, pharmaceutical, and regulatory science might be in 10 to 15 years. Industry, regulatory, analytical, and clinical perspectives were presented and discussed, as well as the impact of exogenous (indirect) and endogenous (direct) change drivers. Unconditional funding was provided by Bayer HealthCare; they had no input on the direction of the meeting or selection of speakers. It was envisioned that the more important endogenous drivers may not be new information or changes in technology, policy, regulation, or health care delivery, but amplification of long-term underlying trends by emergence of new technologies, convergence of existing technologies or new communication and collaboration vehicles such as Web 2.0.

  16. Patterns of Living in California's Migrant Labor Families. Research Monograph No. 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Glenn R.; And Others

    This report presents a study of the living patterns of California's migrant labor families, one part of a national study on the identification of life patterns among relatively disadvantaged families. Data were collected from 169 interviews with homemakers randomly selected from 12 state-owned migrant camps in California. The interviews consisted…

  17. Characterization of Lone Pine, California, tremolite asbestos and preparation of research material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Martin; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Crankshaw, Owen S; Doorn, Stacy S; Ennis, J. Todd; Harrison, Sara E

    2014-01-01

    Well-characterized amphibole asbestos mineral samples are required for use as analytical standards and in future research projects. Currently, the National Institute for Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material samples of asbestos are listed as ‘Discontinued’. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has a goal under the Asbestos Roadmap of locating and characterizing research materials for future use. Where an initial characterization analysis determines that a collected material is appropriate for use as a research material in terms of composition and asbestiform habit, sufficient amounts of the material will be collected to make it publicly available. An abandoned mine near Lone Pine, California, contains a vein of tremolite asbestos, which was the probable source of a reference material that has been available for the past 17 years from the Health and Safety Laboratory (HSL) in the UK. Newly collected fibrous vein material from this mine was analyzed at Research Triangle Institute (RTI International) with some additional analysis by the US Geological Survey’s Denver Microbeam Laboratory. The analysis at RTI International included: (i) polarized light microscopy (PLM) with a determination of principal optical properties; (ii) X-ray diffraction; (iii) transmission electron microscopy, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected-area electron diffraction; and (iv) spindle stage analysis using PLM to determine whether individual fibers and bundles of the samples were polycrystalline or single-crystal cleavage fragments. The overall findings of the study indicated that the material is tremolite asbestos with characteristics substantially similar to the earlier distributed HSL reference material. A larger quantity of material was prepared by sorting, acid-washing and mixing for sub-division into vials of ~10g each. These vials have been transferred from NIOSH to RTI International, from where they can be

  18. 1995 Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cauffman, D.P.; Shoaf, D.L.; Hill, D.A.; Denison, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) is a key component of the discretionary research conducted by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (Lockheed Idaho) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The threefold purpose and goal of the LDRD program is to maintain the scientific and technical vitality of the INEL, respond to and support new technical opportunities, and enhance the agility and flexibility of the national laboratory and Lockheed Idaho to address the current and future missions of the Department of Energy.

  19. Laboratory-directed research and development: FY 1996 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the FY 1996 goals and accomplishments of Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, and provides an index to the projects` principal investigators. Projects are grouped by their LDRD component: Individual Projects, Competency Development, and Program Development. Within each component, they are further divided into nine technical disciplines: (1) materials science, (2) engineering and base technologies, (3) plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (4) chemistry, (5) mathematics and computational sciences, (6) atomic and molecular physics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) biosciences.

  20. 1996 Laboratory directed research and development annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Lopez-Andreas, L.M.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comp.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1996. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 259 individual R&D projects in seventeen categories. The general areas of research include: engineered processes and materials; computational and information sciences; microelectronics and photonics; engineering sciences; pulsed power; advanced manufacturing technologies; biomedical engineering; energy and environmental science and technology; advanced information technologies; counterproliferation; advanced transportation; national security technology; electronics technologies; idea exploration and exploitation; production; and science at the interfaces - engineering with atoms.

  1. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W., editor

    2015-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  2. 2014 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W., editor

    2016-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    This report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the 1992 fiscal year. It describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The Divisions that report include: Accelerator and Fusion Research, Chemical Sciences, Earth Sciences, Energy and Environment, Engineering, Environment and Safety and Health, Information and Computing Sciences, Life Sciences, Materials Sciences, Nuclear Science, Physics and Structural Biology.

  4. US Army Research Laboratory Directed Energy Internship Program 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    describing the program and our team’s research topics was posted on ARL’s Internet site and linked from the DEPS site. We also published a free ad in...in the importance of training the future Department of Defense workforce and believe that the Directed Energy Visiting Scholars program provides...pipelining of multi-part designs. Finally, one of the last things that could be accomplished is making the schematic to CAD process easier. This is

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

    2009-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Developlnent at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. Accordingly, this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2008. BNL expended $12 million during Fiscal Year 2008 in support of 69 projects. The program has two categories, the annual Open Call LDRDs and Strategic LDRDs, which combine to meet the overall objectives of the LDRD Program. Proposals are solicited annually for review and approval concurrent with the next fiscal year, October 1. For the open call for proposals, an LDRD Selection Committee, comprised of the Associate Laboratory Directors (ALDs) for the Scientific Directorates, an equal number of scientists recommended by the Brookhaven Council, plus the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning, review the proposals submitted in response to the solicitation. The Open Can LDRD category emphasizes innovative research concepts

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, Fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. LDRD includes activities previously defined as ER&D, as well as other discretionary research and development activities not provided for in a DOE program.`` Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process technology; energy systems research. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. The projects are described in Section 2.0. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  7. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ASSESSMENT FOR FY 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19,2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13,2006. The goals and' objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman,L.; Fox, K.J.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2007 spending was $515 million. There are approximately 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which

  9. Air Pollution and Watershed Research in the Central Sierra Nevada of California: Nitrogen and Ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Hunsaker

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining healthy forests is the major objective for the Forest Service scientists and managers working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Air pollution, specifically ozone (O3 and nitrogenous (N air pollutants, may severely affect the health of forest ecosystems in the western U.S. Thus, the monitoring of air pollution concentration and deposition levels, as well as studies focused on understanding effects mechanisms, are essential for evaluation of risks associated with their presence. Such information is essential for development of proper management strategies for maintaining clean air, clean water, and healthy ecosystems on land managed by the Forest Service. We report on two years of research in the central Sierra Nevada of California, a semi-arid forest at elevations of 1100–2700 m. Information on O3 and N air pollutants is obtained from a network of 18 passive samplers. We relate the atmospheric N concentration to N concentrations in streams, shallow soil water, and bulk deposition collectors within the Kings River Experimental Watershed. This watershed also contains an intensive site that is part of a recent Forest Service effort to calculate critical loads for N, sulfur, and acidity to forest ecosystems. The passive sampler design allows for extensive spatial measurements while the watershed experiment provides intensive spatial data for future analysis of ecosystem processes.

  10. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, Davis, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), conducted November 16 through 20, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LEHR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation, and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the LEHR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the LEHR at UC Davis. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LEHR Survey. 75 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2001 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R

    2002-06-20

    Established by Congress in 1991, the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program provides the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories, like Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL or the Laboratory), with the flexibility to invest up to 6% of their budget in long-term, high-risk, and potentially high payoff research and development (R&D) activities to support the DOE/NNSA's national security missions. By funding innovative R&D, the LDRD Program at LLNL develops and extends the Laboratory's intellectual foundations and maintains its vitality as a premier research institution. As proof of the Program's success, many of the research thrusts that started many years ago under LDRD sponsorship are at the core of today's programs. The LDRD Program, which serves as a proving ground for innovative ideas, is the Laboratory's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. Basic and applied research activities funded by LDRD enhance the Laboratory's core strengths, driving its technical vitality to create new capabilities that enable LLNL to meet DOE/NNSA's national security missions. The Program also plays a key role in building a world-class multidisciplinary workforce by engaging the Laboratory's best researchers, recruiting its future scientists and engineers, and promoting collaborations with all sectors of the larger scientific community.

  12. Direct in situ measurement of Carbon Allocation to Mycorrhizal Fungi in a California Mixed-Conifer Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi represent a large allocation of C to ecosystems, based on indirect measurements (tree girdling) and glasshouse extrapolations. However, we have no direct measures carbon (C) sink, in part because technologies for studying belowground dynamics on time scales at which roots and microbes grow and die have not existed. We initiated new sensor and observation platforms belowground to characterize and quantify belowground dynamics in a California mixed-conifer ecosystem. For the first time, we directly observed growth and mortality of mycorrhizal fungi in situ. We measured soil CO2, T and θ at 5-min intervals into the soil profile. Using our automated minirhizotron (AMR) for hyphal dynamics and the Bartz minirhizotron for longer-term and spatial variation in roots and rhizomorphs, we measured root, rhizomorph, hyphal growth, and belowground phenology up to 4x daily. These data are coupled with sensors measuring eddy flux of water and CO2, sapflow for water fluxes and C fixation activity, and photographs for leaf phenology. Because our data were collected at short intervals, we can describe integrative C exchange using the DayCent model for NPP and measured NPP of rhizomorphs, and fungal hyphae. Here, we focused on an arbuscular mycorrhiza dominated meadow and an ectomycorrhizal pine/oak forest at the James Reserve, in southern California. By daily measuring hyphal growth and mortality, we constructed life-span estimates of mycorrhizal hyphae, and from these, C allocation estimates. In the meadow, the NPP was 141g/m2/y, with a productivity of fine root+internal AM fungi of 76.5g C/m2/y, and an estimated 10% of which is AM fungal C allocation (7.7 g/m2/y). Extramatrical AM hyphal peak standing crop was 10g/m2, with a lifespan of 46 days (with active hyphae persisting for ~240 days per year days). Thus, the annual AM fungal allocation was 7.7g C/m2/y internal and 52g/m2/y external, for a net allocation of 84g C/m2/y, or 60% of the estimated NPP. In the

  13. Investigation of seismicity and related effects at NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Computer Center, Edwards, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, R. D.; Crook, R., Jr.; Leeds, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    This report discusses a geological and seismological investigation of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility site at Edwards, California. Results are presented as seismic design criteria, with design values of the pertinent ground motion parameters, probability of recurrence, and recommended analogous time-history accelerograms with their corresponding spectra. The recommendations apply specifically to the Dryden site and should not be extrapolated to other sites with varying foundation and geologic conditions or different seismic environments.

  14. FY2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, W W; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

    2008-03-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) provides a summary of LDRD-funded projects for the fiscal year and consists of two parts: An introduction to the LDRD Program, the LDRD portfolio-management process, program statistics for the year, and highlights of accomplishments for the year. A summary of each project, submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY07, and a list of publications that resulted from the research in FY07. Summaries are organized in sections by research category (in alphabetical order). Within each research category, the projects are listed in order of their LDRD project category: Strategic Initiative (SI), Exploratory Research (ER), Laboratory-Wide Competition (LW), and Feasibility Study (FS). Within each project category, the individual project summaries appear in order of their project tracking code, a unique identifier that consists of three elements. The first is the fiscal year the project began, the second represents the project category, and the third identifies the serial number of the proposal for that fiscal year.

  15. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  16. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE's policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL's Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our core competencies.'' Currently, PNL's core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL's LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  17. New Directions in Research: Contemporary Qualitative Research Methodologies and Issues in Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Joseph; Steinkuehler, Constance A.; Black, Rebecca W.; Clinton, Katherine A.; Hinchman, Kathleen A.; Dillon, Deborah R.

    2005-01-01

    Scholars who are drawn to qualitative research methodologies represent a diverse group of disciplines and fields. They also represent themselves as researchers and the theoretical frameworks in which they work quite differently. Indeed, it was this diversity in representation that initially motivated us to propose a New Directions feature on…

  18. Laboratory directed research and development annual report. Fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. This report represents Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) LDRD report for FY 1994. During FY 1994, 161 LDRD projects were selected for support through PNL`s LDRD project selection process. Total funding allocated to these projects was $13.7 million. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our {open_quotes}core competencies.{close_quotes} Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy systems development. In this report, the individual summaries of LDRD projects (presented in Section 1.0) are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. Projects within the three core competency areas were approximately 91.4 % of total LDRD project funding at PNL in FY 1994. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. Funding allocated to each of these projects is typically $35K or less. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program, the management process used for the program, and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  19. Hypothesis-based research on the causes of sick building symptoms: A design for Phases 2 and 3 of the California Healthy Building Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, W.J.; Hodgson, A.T.; Daisey, J.M.; Faulkner, D. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Macher, J.M. (California Dept. of Health Services, Berkeley, CA (United States). Air and Industrial Hygiene Lab.); Mendell, M.J. (National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Industrywide Studies Branch)

    1992-07-01

    The California Healthy Building Study (CHBS) is a multidisciplinary research based in 12 office buildings within California. The overall goal the CHBS is to elucidate relationships between occurrences of office worker health symptoms and characteristics of the workers' buildings, ventilation systems, work spaces, jobs, and indoor environments. A Phase-1 study was completed during 1990. The California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), through its Exploratory Research Program, supported the design of research plans for two future phases of the CHBS. The intent of the CIEE-supported effort was to design research to be conducted in the Phase-1 buildings that capitalizes on the Phase-1 research findings and also on recently-published results of research from other institutions. This report describes the research plans developed with CIEE support and presents the rationale for these research plans.

  20. Hypothesis-based research on the causes of sick building symptoms: A design for Phases 2 and 3 of the California Healthy Building Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, W.J.; Hodgson, A.T.; Daisey, J.M.; Faulkner, D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Macher, J.M. [California Dept. of Health Services, Berkeley, CA (United States). Air and Industrial Hygiene Lab.; Mendell, M.J. [National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Industrywide Studies Branch

    1992-07-01

    The California Healthy Building Study (CHBS) is a multidisciplinary research based in 12 office buildings within California. The overall goal the CHBS is to elucidate relationships between occurrences of office worker health symptoms and characteristics of the workers` buildings, ventilation systems, work spaces, jobs, and indoor environments. A Phase-1 study was completed during 1990. The California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), through its Exploratory Research Program, supported the design of research plans for two future phases of the CHBS. The intent of the CIEE-supported effort was to design research to be conducted in the Phase-1 buildings that capitalizes on the Phase-1 research findings and also on recently-published results of research from other institutions. This report describes the research plans developed with CIEE support and presents the rationale for these research plans.

  1. Southern California Particle Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the Southern California Particle Center, center researchers will investigate the underlying mechanisms that produce the health effects associated with exposure to...

  2. 1997 Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comps.

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1997. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 218 individual R&D projects in eleven categories. Theses reports are grouped into the following areas: materials science and technology; computer sciences; electronics and photonics; phenomenological modeling and engineering simulation; manufacturing science and technology; life-cycle systems engineering; information systems; precision sensing and analysis; environmental sciences; risk and reliability; national grand challenges; focused technologies; and reserve.

  3. Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-03-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2004. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 352 individual R and D projects in 15 categories. The 15 categories are: (1) Advanced Concepts; (2) Advanced Manufacturing; (3) Biotechnology; (4) Chemical and Earth Sciences; (5) Computational and Information Sciences; (6) Differentiating Technologies; (7) Electronics and Photonics; (8) Emerging Threats; (9) Energy and Critical Infrastructures; (10) Engineering Sciences; (11) Grand Challenges; (12) Materials Science and Technology; (13) Nonproliferation and Materials Control; (14) Pulsed Power and High Energy Density Sciences; and (15) Corporate Objectives.

  4. Laboratory directed research and development: FY 1997 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1998-05-01

    This is the FY 1997 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic and molecular physics and plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1998 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Vigil; Kyle Wheeler

    1999-04-01

    This is the FY 1998 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principle investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman,L.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy Order 413.2(a) establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 413.2, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. DOE Order 413.2 requires that each laboratory submit an annual report on its LDRD activities to the cognizant Secretarial Officer through the appropriate Operations Office Manager. The report provided in this document represents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s LDRD report for FY 1997.

  8. Latino Immigrants, Acculturation, and Health: Promising New Directions in Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraído-Lanza, Ana F; Echeverría, Sandra E; Flórez, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of novel topics emerging in recent years in research on Latino immigrants, acculturation, and health. In the past ten years, the number of studies assessing new ways to conceptualize and understand how acculturation-related processes may influence health has grown. These new frameworks draw from integrative approaches testing new ground to acknowledge the fundamental role of context and policy. We classify the emerging body of evidence according to themes that we identify as promising directions--intrapersonal, interpersonal, social environmental, community, political, and global contexts, cross-cutting themes in life course and developmental approaches, and segmented assimilation--and discuss the challenges and opportunities each theme presents. This body of work, which considers acculturation in context, points to the emergence of a new wave of research that holds great promise in driving forward the study of Latino immigrants, acculturation, and health. We provide suggestions to further advance the ideologic and methodologic rigor of this new wave.

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Kelly O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-03-30

    A national laboratory must establish and maintain an environment in which creativity and innovation are encouraged and supported in order to fulfill its missions and remain viable in the long term. As such, multiprogram laboratories are given discretion to allocate a percentage of their operating budgets to support research and development projects that align to PNNL’s and DOE’s missions and support the missions of other federal agencies, including DHS, DOD, and others. DOE Order 413.2C sets forth DOE’s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) policy and guidelines for DOE multiprogram laboratories, and it authorizes the national laboratories to allocate up to 6 percent of their operating budgets to fund the program. LDRD is innovative research and development, selected by the Laboratory Director or his/her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory. The projects supported by LDRD funding all have demonstrable ties to DOE/DHS missions and may also be relevant to the missions of other federal agencies that sponsor work at the Laboratory. The program plays a key role in attracting the best and brightest scientific staff, which is needed to serve the highest priority DOE mission objectives. Individual project reports comprise the bulk of this LDRD report. The Laboratory focuses its LDRD research on scientific assets that often address more than one scientific discipline.

  10. Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-03-01

    Science historian James Burke is well known for his stories about how technological innovations are intertwined and embedded in the culture of the time, for example, how the steam engine led to safety matches, imitation diamonds, and the landing on the moon.1 A lesson commonly drawn from his stories is that the path of science and technology (S&T) is nonlinear and unpredictable. Viewed another way, the lesson is that the solution to one problem can lead to solutions to other problems that are not obviously linked in advance, i.e., there is a ripple effect. The motto for Sandia's approach to research and development (R&D) is 'Science with the mission in mind.' In our view, our missions contain the problems that inspire our R&D, and the resulting solutions almost always have multiple benefits. As discussed below, Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is structured to bring problems relevant to our missions to the attention of researchers. LDRD projects are then selected on the basis of their programmatic merit as well as their technical merit. Considerable effort is made to communicate between investment areas to create the ripple effect. In recent years, attention to the ripple effect and to the performance of the LDRD Program, in general, has increased. Inside Sandia, as it is the sole source of discretionary research funding, LDRD funding is recognized as being the most precious of research dollars. Hence, there is great interest in maximizing its impact, especially through the ripple effect. Outside Sandia, there is increased scrutiny of the program's performance to be sure that it is not a 'sandbox' in which researchers play without relevance to national security needs. Let us therefore address the performance of the LDRD Program in fiscal year 2003 and then show how it is designed to maximize impact.

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-01

    The FY 2009 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development. Established by Congress in 1991, LDRD proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, publications, national and international awards, and new hires from the universities and industry, which helps refresh the scientific and engineering workforce. The benefits of INL's LDRD research are many as shown in the tables below. Last year, 91 faculty members from various universities contributed to LDRD research, along with 7 post docs and 64 students. Of the total invention disclosures submitted in FY 2009, 7 are attributable to LDRD research. Sixty three refereed journal articles were accepted or published, and 93 invited presentations were attributable to LDRD research conducted in FY 2009. The LDRD Program is administered in accordance with requirements set in DOE Order 413.2B, accompanying contractor requirements, and other DOE and federal requirements invoked through the INL contract. The LDRD Program is implemented in accordance with the annual INL LDRD Program Plan, which is approved by the DOE, Nuclear Energy Program Secretarial Office. This plan outlines the method the laboratory uses to develop its research portfolio, including peer and management reviews, and the use of other INL management systems to ensure quality, financial, safety, security and environmental requirements and risks are

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

    2009-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Developlnent at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. Accordingly, this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2008. BNL expended $12 million during Fiscal Year 2008 in support of 69 projects. The program has two categories, the annual Open Call LDRDs and Strategic LDRDs, which combine to meet the overall objectives of the LDRD Program. Proposals are solicited annually for review and approval concurrent with the next fiscal year, October 1. For the open call for proposals, an LDRD Selection Committee, comprised of the Associate Laboratory Directors (ALDs) for the Scientific Directorates, an equal number of scientists recommended by the Brookhaven Council, plus the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning, review the proposals submitted in response to the solicitation. The Open Can LDRD category emphasizes innovative research concepts

  13. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2002-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 1 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology

  14. Science and cycling: current knowledge and future directions for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Greg; Davison, Richard; Jeukendrup, Asker; Passfield, Louis

    2003-09-01

    In this holistic review of cycling science, the objectives are: (1) to identify the various human and environmental factors that influence cycling power output and velocity; (2) to discuss, with the aid of a schematic model, the often complex interrelationships between these factors; and (3) to suggest future directions for research to help clarify how cycling performance can be optimized, given different race disciplines, environments and riders. Most successful cyclists, irrespective of the race discipline, have a high maximal aerobic power output measured from an incremental test, and an ability to work at relatively high power outputs for long periods. The relationship between these characteristics and inherent physiological factors such as muscle capilliarization and muscle fibre type is complicated by inter-individual differences in selecting cadence for different race conditions. More research is needed on high-class professional riders, since they probably represent the pinnacle of natural selection for, and physiological adaptation to, endurance exercise. Recent advances in mathematical modelling and bicycle-mounted strain gauges, which can measure power directly in races, are starting to help unravel the interrelationships between the various resistive forces on the bicycle (e.g. air and rolling resistance, gravity). Interventions on rider position to optimize aerodynamics should also consider the impact on power output of the rider. All-terrain bicycle (ATB) racing is a neglected discipline in terms of the characterization of power outputs in race conditions and the modelling of the effects of the different design of bicycle frame and components on the magnitude of resistive forces. A direct application of mathematical models of cycling velocity has been in identifying optimal pacing strategies for different race conditions. Such data should, nevertheless, be considered alongside physiological optimization of power output in a race. An even distribution

  15. Analysis of a viral metagenomic library from 200 m depth in Monterey Bay, California constructed by direct shotgun cloning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston Christina M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses have a profound influence on both the ecology and evolution of marine plankton, but the genetic diversity of viral assemblages, particularly those in deeper ocean waters, remains poorly described. Here we report on the construction and analysis of a viral metagenome prepared from below the euphotic zone in a temperate, eutrophic bay of coastal California. Methods We purified viruses from approximately one cubic meter of seawater collected from 200m depth in Monterey Bay, CA. DNA was extracted from the virus fraction, sheared, and cloned with no prior amplification into a plasmid vector and propagated in E. coli to produce the MBv200m library. Random clones were sequenced by the Sanger method. Sequences were assembled then compared to sequences in GenBank and to other viral metagenomic libraries using BLAST analyses. Results Only 26% of the 881 sequences remaining after assembly had significant (E ≤ 0.001 BLAST hits to sequences in the GenBank nr database, with most being matches to bacteria (15% and viruses (8%. When BLAST analysis included environmental sequences, 74% of sequences in the MBv200m library had a significant match. Most of these hits (70% were to microbial metagenome sequences and only 0.7% were to sequences from viral metagenomes. Of the 121 sequences with a significant hit to a known virus, 94% matched bacteriophages (Families Podo-, Sipho-, and Myoviridae and 6% matched viruses of eukaryotes in the Family Phycodnaviridae (5 sequences or the Mimivirus (2 sequences. The largest percentages of hits to viral genes of known function were to those involved in DNA modification (25% or structural genes (17%. Based on reciprocal BLAST analyses, the MBv200m library appeared to be most similar to viral metagenomes from two other bays and least similar to a viral metagenome from the Arctic Ocean. Conclusions Direct cloning of DNA from diverse marine viruses was feasible and resulted in a distribution of virus

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2008 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammeraad, J E; Jackson, K J; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

    2009-03-24

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Institutional Science and Technology Office at Lawrence Livermore, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the full spectrum of national security interests encompassed by the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration. The accomplishments described in this annual report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $91.5 million for fiscal year 2008 sponsored 176 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the brightest technical staff and for establishing collaborations with

  17. The next ten years in neonatology: new directions in research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilios Fanos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a prelude to proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology to be held in Cagliari, Italy from October 21st to 25th, 2014. These proceedings will be a significant milestone, highlighting the new frontiers of perinatal and neonatal research. Over the five days of this meeting, we aim to (1 examine the roots of the new directions in perinatal and neonatal research; (2 predict the trajectories of advancement in medical technologies, research, clinical care and teaching that will be the future of perinatology and neonatology. The discussion will be in four sections:back to the future: the placenta and perinatal programming;paradigm shift: the revolution of metabolomics in perinatalogy and neonatology;brave new world: the microbiome and microbiomics from perinatal to adult life;new inhabitants on the planet earth: adults who were born with extremely low birth weight. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  18. Laboratory directed research and development FY98 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R; Holzrichter, J

    1999-05-01

    In 1984, Congress and the Department of Energy (DOE) established the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program to enable the director of a national laboratory to foster and expedite innovative research and development (R and D) in mission areas. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) continually examines these mission areas through strategic planning and shapes the LDRD Program to meet its long-term vision. The goal of the LDRD Program is to spur development of new scientific and technical capabilities that enable LLNL to respond to the challenges within its evolving mission areas. In addition, the LDRD Program provides LLNL with the flexibility to nurture and enrich essential scientific and technical competencies and enables the Laboratory to attract the most qualified scientists and engineers. The FY98 LDRD portfolio described in this annual report has been carefully structured to continue the tradition of vigorously supporting DOE and LLNL strategic vision and evolving mission areas. The projects selected for LDRD funding undergo stringent review and selection processes, which emphasize strategic relevance and require technical peer reviews of proposals by external and internal experts. These FY98 projects emphasize the Laboratory's national security needs: stewardship of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, responsibility for the counter- and nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction, development of high-performance computing, and support of DOE environmental research and waste management programs.

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.

    1991-12-01

    Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new ``fundable`` R&D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

  20. Addressing transportation energy and environmental impacts: technical and policy research directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissenberger, S.; Pasternak, A.; Smith, J.R.; Wallman, H.

    1995-08-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is establishing a local chapter of the University of California Energy Institute (UCEI). In order to most effectively contribute to the Institute, LLNL sponsored a workshop on energy and environmental issues in transportation. This workshop took place in Livermore on August 10 and brought together researchers from throughout the UC systems in order to establish a joint LLNL-UC research program in transportation, with a focus on energy and environmental impacts.

  1. Cloud Computing – A market Perspective and Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol C. Adamuthe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Computational paradigm has been revolving round cloud computing and its offshoots for some time and till we see a breakout resulting in a breakthrough technology driven by advances in microelectronics and material technology. Till we experience a radically efficient technology for computation it is worth juxtaposing the virtues of cloud computing and market‟s longing for offering cost and quality arbitrage to the marketplace. Integration of cloud computing in enterprises has the potential to influence the way business gets carried out by them in the market place. Different reports show that demand for cloud computing products and processes is in an upward growth trajectory. This paper identified the characteristics, drivers and constraints of cloud computing which influence its adaptation and integration in enterprises. We are also examining India specific opportunities and threats of cloud computing tools and cloud driven practices in the context of fierce competition among enterprises to remain competitive in the marketplace by reducing software licensing fees, cost of capital to acquire digital systems and cost of maintenances. New directions in cloud computing are analyzed by using Gartner strategic technologies and trend in research publications. Paper focuses on exploring the research issues which are categorized into technical and business in nature for understanding the evolving fortunes of cloud computing. Number of papers published in IEEE is an indication of the popularity and relevance of the continued research initiatives happening in the area. It is also noticed that that very few researchers are attempting to understand the possibility of remodeling business processes leveraging the new found computational paradigm.

  2. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-05-26

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is conducting a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Fiscal year 2015 represents the first full year of LDRD at Fermilab and includes seven projects approved mid-year in FY14 and six projects approved in FY15. One of the seven original projects has been completed just after the beginning of FY15. The implementation of LDRD at Fermilab is captured in the approved Fermilab 2015 LDRD Annual Program Plan. In FY15, the LDRD program represents 0.64% of Laboratory funding. The scope of the LDRD program at Fermilab will be established over the next couple of years where a portfolio of about 20 on-going projects representing approximately between 1% and 1.5% of the Laboratory funding is anticipated. This Annual Report focuses on the status of the current projects and provides an overview of the current status of LDRD at Fermilab.

  3. Directions for Research and Development on Electronic Portfolios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Abrami

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This lead article for the special issue of the Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology explores directions for research and development on electronic portfolios, which are digital containers capable of storing visual and auditory content; software for which may also be designed to support a variety of pedagogical processes and assessment purposes. The paper is organized around several key questions: What are the types and characteristics of electronic portfolios? What are the outcomes and processes that electronic portfolios support for their creators? What are the contexts in which EPs are most effective and worthwhile? Who are electronic portfolio users/viewers and how do we provide appropriate professional development to encourage correct adoption and widespread and sustained use? What do we know and need to know about technical and administrative issues? What is evidence of electronic portfolio success? How do we move forward with funding and infrastructure?

  4. College Success and the Black Male. San Jose City College, San Jose, California. Research Report #128.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Percy; And Others

    In 1992, a study was conducted at San Jose City College (SJCC) and Evergreen Valley College (EVC), California, to examine the fourth semester persistence rates of black male students and to investigate the effect of SJCC athletic and athlete academic support programs on persistence. Study findings included the following: (1) new full-time (NFT)…

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development 1998 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pam Hughes; Sheila Bennett eds.

    1999-07-14

    The Laboratory's Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program encourages the advancement of science and the development of major new technical capabilities from which future research and development will grow. Through LDRD funding, Pacific Northwest continually replenishes its inventory of ideas that have the potential to address major national needs. The LDRD program has enabled the Laboratory to bring to bear its scientific and technical capabilities on all of DOE's missions, particularly in the arena of environmental problems. Many of the concepts related to environmental cleanup originally developed with LDRD funds are now receiving programmatic support from DOE, LDRD-funded work in atmospheric sciences is now being applied to DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. We also have used concepts initially explored through LDRD to develop several winning proposals in the Environmental Management Science Program. The success of our LDRD program is founded on good management practices that ensure funding is allocated and projects are conducted in compliance with DOE requirements. We thoroughly evaluate the LDRD proposals based on their scientific and technical merit, as well as their relevance to DOE's programmatic needs. After a proposal is funded, we assess progress annually using external peer reviews. This year, as in years past, the LDRD program has once again proven to be the major enabling vehicle for our staff to formulate new ideas, advance scientific capability, and develop potential applications for DOE's most significant challenges.

  6. Advances and Research Directions in Data-Warehousing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Mohania

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Information is one of the most valuable assets of an organisation and when used properly can assist in intelligent decision making that can significantly improve the functioning of an organisation. Data Warehousing is a recent technology that allows information to be easily and efficiently accessed for decision-making activities by collecting data from many operational, legacy and possibly heterogeneous data sources. On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP tools are well-suited for complex data analysis, such as multi-dimensional data analysis, and to assist in decision support activities while data mining tools take the process one step further and actively search the data for patterns and hidden knowledge in the data held in the warehouse. Many organisations are building, or are planning to develop, a data warehouse for their operational and decision support needs. In this paper, we present an overview of data warehousing, multi-dimensional databases, OLAP and data mining technology and discuss the directions of current research in the area. We also discuss recent developments in data warehouse modelling, view selection and maintenance, indexing schemes, parallel query processing and data mining issues. A number of technical issues for exploratory research are presented and possible solutions are also discussed.

  7. Investment horizon heterogeneity and wavelet: Overview and further research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Anindya; De, Anupam; Gunasekaran, Angappa; Dubey, Rameshwar

    2015-07-01

    Wavelet based multi-scale analysis of financial time series has attracted much attention, lately, from both the academia and practitioners from all around the world. The unceasing metamorphosis of the discipline of finance from its humble beginning as applied economics to the more sophisticated depiction as applied physics and applied psychology has revolutionized the way we perceive the market and its complexities. One such complexity is the presence of heterogeneous horizon agents in the market. In this context, we have performed a generous review of different aspects of horizon heterogeneity that has been successfully elucidated through the synergy between wavelet theory and finance. The evolution of wavelet has been succinctly delineated to bestow necessary information to the readers who are new to this field. The migration of wavelet into finance and its subsequent branching into different sub-divisions have been sketched. The pertinent literature on the impact of horizon heterogeneity on risk, asset pricing and inter-dependencies of the financial time series are explored. The significant contributions are collated and classified in accordance to their purpose and approach so that potential researcher and practitioners, interested in this subject, can be benefited. Future research possibilities in the direction of "agency cost mitigation" and "synergy between econophysics and behavioral finance in stock market forecasting" are also suggested in the paper.

  8. Destalking the Wily Tomato: A Case Study in Social Consequences in California Agricultural Research. Research Monograph No. 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, William H.; Barton, Amy

    The end of the bracero program after 1965 brought about a major change in the growing, harvesting, and processing of California tomatoes which dramatically influenced the structure of the harvesting labor force. In order to determine the social consequences of the transition from man to mechanized harvesting procedures, the following areas of…

  9. FY03 Engineering Technology Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minichino, C

    2004-03-05

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2003, and exemplifies Engineering's 50-year history of researching and developing the engineering technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.'' Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out through two programs, the LDRD program and the ''Tech Base'' program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge, or that require a significant level of research, or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice.'' Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2003, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology and nanotechnology for national security applications. Engineering's five Centers, in partnership with the Division Leaders and Department Heads, are responsible for guiding the science and technology investments for the Directorate. The Centers represent technology

  10. Munchausen by Internet: Current Research and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jacqui

    2012-01-01

    about their health in the online environment. We also suggest directions for future research. PMID:22914203

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-01

    The FY 2009 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development. Established by Congress in 1991, LDRD proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, publications, national and international awards, and new hires from the universities and industry, which helps refresh the scientific and engineering workforce. The benefits of INL's LDRD research are many as shown in the tables below. Last year, 91 faculty members from various universities contributed to LDRD research, along with 7 post docs and 64 students. Of the total invention disclosures submitted in FY 2009, 7 are attributable to LDRD research. Sixty three refereed journal articles were accepted or published, and 93 invited presentations were attributable to LDRD research conducted in FY 2009. The LDRD Program is administered in accordance with requirements set in DOE Order 413.2B, accompanying contractor requirements, and other DOE and federal requirements invoked through the INL contract. The LDRD Program is implemented in accordance with the annual INL LDRD Program Plan, which is approved by the DOE, Nuclear Energy Program Secretarial Office. This plan outlines the method the laboratory uses to develop its research portfolio, including peer and management reviews, and the use of other INL management systems to ensure quality, financial, safety, security and environmental requirements and risks are

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2008-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries for all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2007. The associated FY 2007 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching mission to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States and promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work for Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at http://www.ornl.gov/. LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2005 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2006-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2005 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2005 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2006/2) provides financial data about the FY 2005 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2004 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2005-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2004 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2004 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2005/2) provides financial data about the FY 2004 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the

  15. University of California Directed Research and Development (UCDRD) Activities for Fiscal Year 1997`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, J.

    1999-03-25

    Strong magnetic fields are a powerful tool for studying physical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor structures. The pulsed magnet facilities at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) have provided an unique opportunity to explore new correlated electronic phases of quantum Hall devices in ultra-high magnetic fields. We have performed both magneto-transport and photoluminescence experiments in the pulsed magnet for fields up to 50 T and temperatures down to 500 mK to study several types of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. The findings of our exploratory experiments are summarized.

  16. FY04 Engineering Technology Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, R M

    2005-01-27

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2004, and exemplifies Engineering's more than 50-year history of developing the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow''. Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out through two programs, the ''Tech Base'' program and the LDRD program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge. These require a significant level of research or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply technologies to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice''. Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2004, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology and nanotechnology for national security applications. Engineering's five Centers, in partnership with the Division Leaders and Department Heads, are responsible for guiding the long-term science and technology investments for the Directorate. The Centers represent technologies that have been identified as

  17. Artificial intelligence and design: Opportunities, research problems and directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarel, Saul

    1990-01-01

    that are of intrinsic concern to AI. We present examples of current AI work on specific design tasks, and discuss new directions of research, both as extensions of current work and in the context of new design tasks where domain knowledge is either intractable or incomplete. The domains discussed include Digital Circuit Design, Mechanical Design of Rotational Transmissions, Design of Computer Architectures, Marine Design, Aircraft Design, and Design of Chemical Processes and Materials. Work in these domains is significant on technical grounds, and it is also important for economic and policy reasons.

  18. Estimates of the Direct Effect of Seawater pH on the Survival Rate of Species Groups in the California Current Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, D. Shallin; McElhany, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) has the potential to restructure ecosystems due to variation in species sensitivity to the projected changes in ocean carbon chemistry. Ecological models can be forced with scenarios of OA to help scientists, managers, and other stakeholders understand how ecosystems might change. We present a novel methodology for developing estimates of species sensitivity to OA that are regionally specific, and applied the method to the California Current ecosystem. To do so, we built a database of all published literature on the sensitivity of temperate species to decreased pH. This database contains 393 papers on 285 species and 89 multi-species groups from temperate waters around the world. Research on urchins and oysters and on adult life stages dominates the literature. Almost a third of the temperate species studied to date occur in the California Current. However, most laboratory experiments use control pH conditions that are too high to represent average current chemistry conditions in the portion of the California Current water column where the majority of the species live. We developed estimates of sensitivity to OA for functional groups in the ecosystem, which can represent single species or taxonomically diverse groups of hundreds of species. We based these estimates on the amount of available evidence derived from published studies on species sensitivity, how well this evidence could inform species sensitivity in the California Current ecosystem, and the agreement of the available evidence for a species/species group. This approach is similar to that taken by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to characterize certainty when summarizing scientific findings. Most functional groups (26 of 34) responded negatively to OA conditions, but when uncertainty in sensitivity was considered, only 11 groups had relationships that were consistently negative. Thus, incorporating certainty about the sensitivity of species and functional groups to

  19. 2016 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab. LDRD is able to fund employee-initiated proposals that address the current strategic objectives and better position Fermilab for future mission needs. The request for such funds is made in consideration of the investment needs, affordability, and directives from DOE and Congress. Review procedures of the proposals will insure that those proposals which most address the strategic goals of the DOE and the Laboratory or which best position Fermilab for the future will be recommended to the Laboratory Director who has responsibility for approval. The execution of each approved project will be the responsibility of the Principal Investigator, PI, who will follow existing Laboratory guidelines to ensure compliance with safety, environmental, and quality assurance practices. A Laboratory Director-appointed LDRD Coordinator will work with Committees, Laboratory Management, other Fermilab Staff, and the PI’s to oversee the implementation of policies and procedures of LDRD and provide the management and execution of this Annual Program Plan. FY16 represents third fiscal year in which LDRD has existed at Fermilab. The number of preliminary proposals (117) submitted in response to the LDRD Call for Proposals indicates very strong interest of the program within the Fermilab community. The first two Calls have resulted in thirteen active LDRD projects – and it is expected that between five and seven new

  20. California Bioregions

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California regions developed by the Inter-agency Natural Areas Coordinating Committee (INACC) were digitized from a 1:1,200,000 California Department of Fish and...

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2011 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, W; Sketchley, J; Kotta, P

    2012-03-22

    A premier applied-science laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has earned the reputation as a leader in providing science and technology solutions to the most pressing national and global security problems. The LDRD Program, established by Congress at all DOE national laboratories in 1991, is LLNL's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. The LDRD internally directed research and development funding at LLNL enables high-risk, potentially high-payoff projects at the forefront of science and technology. The LDRD Program at Livermore serves to: (1) Support the Laboratory's missions, strategic plan, and foundational science; (2) Maintain the Laboratory's science and technology vitality; (3) Promote recruiting and retention; (4) Pursue collaborations; (5) Generate intellectual property; and (6) Strengthen the U.S. economy. Myriad LDRD projects over the years have made important contributions to every facet of the Laboratory's mission and strategic plan, including its commitment to nuclear, global, and energy and environmental security, as well as cutting-edge science and technology and engineering in high-energy-density matter, high-performance computing and simulation, materials and chemistry at the extremes, information systems, measurements and experimental science, and energy manipulation. A summary of each project was submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to DOE/NNSA and LLNL mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY11, and a list of publications that resulted from the research. The projects are: (1) Nuclear Threat Reduction; (2) Biosecurity; (3) High-Performance Computing and Simulation; (4) Intelligence; (5) Cybersecurity; (6) Energy Security; (7) Carbon Capture; (8) Material Properties, Theory, and Design; (9) Radiochemistry; (10) High

  2. New directions in research on local memory websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike de Kreek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available New directions in research on local memory websites Recent studies apply highly variable terminology in explaining the benefits of interventions using local memory websites. Our literature review systematizes this terminology into three, clearer levels of analysis that fit neatly into the empowerment framework: concepts on the micro level for individual benefits, on the meso level for group gains and on the macro level for community strengthening processes. On the macro level we distinguish three concepts: community memory, cultural citizenship and community capacity. With respect to all levels, the claims in the present literature tend to be based on offline data and seldom include an analysis of online participation. This one-sidedness is due to an emphasis on institutional interventions that often unintentionally prevent online participation. Nevertheless, the literature presents the accessible and online nature of local memory websites as a key driving force of empowerment, especially on the meso and macro levels. To enrich the body of knowledge, we propose research on the actual composition of the field of local memory websites and on more autonomous initiatives. Nieuwe richtingen in onderzoek naar buurtverhalenwebsites Recente studies gebruiken een sterk variërende terminologie voor het benoemen van de opbrengsten van interventies met buurtverhalenwebsites. Onze literatuurstudie ordent deze terminologie tot drie meer eenduidige analyseniveaus, die naadloos aansluiten op het empowerment model: concepten op microniveau voor individuele opbrengsten, op mesoniveau voor groepsvoordelen en op macroniveau voor versterking van de gemeenschap. Op het macroniveau onderscheiden we drie concepten: collectief geheugen, cultureel burgerschap en gemeenschapskracht. Met betrekking tot alle niveaus zijn de beweringen in de huidige literatuur voornamelijk gebaseerd op offline data en bevatten zelden een analyse van online participatie. Deze eenzijdigheid

  3. RESEARCH OF PROBLEMS ON REALIZING DIRECT ALGORITHM OF WAVELET TRANSFORM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Direct algorithm of wavelet transform (WT) is the numerical algorithm obtained from the integral formula of WT by directly digitization.Some problems on realizing the algorithm are studied.Some conclusions on the direct algorithm of discrete wavelet transform (DWT), such as discrete convolution operation formula of wavelet coefficients and wavelet components, sampling principle and technology to wavelets, deciding method for scale range of wavelets, measures to solve edge effect problem, etc, are obtained.The realization of direct algorithm of continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is also studied.The computing cost of direct algorithm and Mallat algorithm of DWT are still studied, and the computing formulae are obtained.These works are beneficial to deeply understand WT and Mallat algorithm.Examples in the end show that direct algorithm can also be applied widely.

  4. Wetlands Research Program. Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation Manual. Appendix C. Section 1. Region O - California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Palmerella’ . Fnicwn c~zpi !are L. W~itch grass A .P. dich otor’,i"’Iorum Michx. Fall panicum FAC.; I ccn.a Scribn Pacific panicum FACW riq-c’*?_U"L...ladyslipper FAG CypseZea hwnifusa Turpin Cypselea FACW Vanthonia californica Boland. California danthonia FACW D. intermedia Vasey Timber danthonia Darlingtonia...Trin.) Munro Annual hairgrass FACW DRA i. eZongata (Hook.) Munro Slender hairgrass Dichantheliwn czcuminatum (Swartz) Pacific panicum Gould & C. A

  5. Public Service Motivation Research : Achievements, Challenges, and Future Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perry, James L.; Vandenabeele, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    This article takes stock of public service motivation research to identify achievements, challenges, and an agenda for research to build on progress made since 1990. After enumerating achievements and challenges, the authors take stock of progress on extant proposals to strengthen research. In addit

  6. The Behavioral Economics of Education: New Directions for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Huriya

    2011-01-01

    Over the past several decades, researchers have used economics to understand a number of issues in education policy. This article argues that some education researchers have defined economics too narrowly, neglecting several areas of economics research that cut across disciplinary boundaries. One subdiscipline of economics that might be of use in…

  7. Research on spatial association rules mining in two-direction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Li-xia; WANG Zuo-cheng

    2007-01-01

    In data mining from transaction DB, the relationships between the attributes have been focused, but the relationships between the tuples have not been taken into account. In spatial database, there are relationships between the attributes and the tuples, and most of the associations occur between the tuples, such as adjacent, intersection, overlap and other topological relationships. So the tasks of spatial data association rules mining include mining the relationships between attributes of spatial objects, which are called as vertical direction DM, and the relationships between the tuples, which are called as horizontal direction DM. This paper analyzes the storage models of spatial data, uses for reference the technologies of data mining in transaction DB, defines the spatial data association rule, including vertical direction association rule, horizontal direction association rule and two-direction association rule, discusses the measurement of spatial association rule interestingness, and puts forward the work flows of spatial association rule data mining. During two-direction spatial association rules mining, an algorithm is proposed to get non-spatial itemsets. By virtue of spatial analysis, the spatial relations were transferred into non-spatial associations and the non-spatial itemsets were gotten. Based on the non-spatial itemsets, the Apriori algorithm or other algorithms could be used to get the frequent itemsets and then the spatial association rules come into being. Using spatial DB, the spatial association rules were gotten to validate the algorithm, and the test results show that this algorithm is efficient and can mine the interesting spatial rules.

  8. Mind, brain, and teaching: Some directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquinelli, Elena; Zalla, Tiziana; Gvodzic, Katarina; Potier-Watkins, Cassandra; Piazza, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In line with Kline's taxonomy, highlighting teaching as an array of behaviors with different cognitive underpinnings, we advocate the expansion of a specific line of research on mind, brain, and teaching. This research program is devoted to the understanding of the neurocognitive mechanisms and the evolutionary determinants of teaching skills, with the ultimate goal of helping teachers improve teaching quality.

  9. Communication in context. New directions in cancer communication research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Tates, K.

    2007-01-01

    Communication research is sometimes described as analyzing the black box of the doctor's healing power (Bensing, 2000; White, 1988), but, every now and then you get a flash which shows communication researchers analyzing this black box as if it was found in the bush after a plane crash: as an object

  10. Overview of the Hemostasis Research Program: Advances and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    advanced to treat such an injury in the field. The hypothesis was that a hemostatic material could be infused into a closed body cavity by a trocar ...Research Program of the US Army Medical Research and Material Command is to reduce the morbidity and mortality resulting from injuries on the

  11. The Research on School Marketing: Current Issues and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oplatka, Izhar; Hemsley-Brown, Jane

    2004-01-01

    This review provides a synthesis of the scholarship that has sought to expand the understanding of educational marketing practice in schools. The following research questions guided this review. What are the common themes and characteristics that emerge from research about marketing in schools? What remains underdeveloped in the characterization…

  12. Making an Impact: New Directions for Arts and Humanities Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelkorn, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The severity of the global economic crisis has put the spotlight firmly on measuring academic and research performance and productivity and assessing its contribution, value, impact and benefit. While, traditionally, research output and impact were measured by peer-publications and citations, there is increased emphasis on a "market-driven…

  13. Research on Humpback and Blue Whales off California, Oregon and Washington in 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    came from central California extending from Monterey Bay to Bodega Bay (Table 6, Figure 2). Identifications were obtained in Monterey Bay early in...11.0 87.8 ID 1 1 1 93 129 105 26-Jul N2 JAC Santa Barbara San Miguel 32 CA 8:10 18:08 10.0 109.3 Attach 3 CC CC 1 11 20 1 4-Aug N2 TEC Bodega Bay...Cordell- Bodega 53 CA 8:19 19:15 10.9 147.1 Foggy ID 2 4 1 2 3 1 5-Aug N2 TEC Half Moon Bay GF 53 CA 6:30 21:02 14.5 99.3 ID 55 107 73 20 31 19 9-Aug N2

  14. Qualitative psychotherapy research: the journey so far and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Heidi M

    2015-03-01

    This article documents the evolution of qualitative psychotherapy research over the past 3 decades. Clients' and therapists' accounts of their experiences in psychotherapy provide a window into the psychotherapy relationship and its mechanisms of change. A sizable body of literature has been generated that uses qualitative methods to collect and analyze these accounts and to shed light on the psychotherapy process. It notes changes in the field such as growing numbers of dissertations and publications using qualitative methods as well as a strengthening emphasis on qualitative research within graduate education and research funding bodies. Future recommendations include developing principles for practice from qualitative methods and conducting qualitative meta-analyses. Other recommendations include forming journal review policies that support the publication of qualitative research and that focus on coherence in adapting methods to meet research goals, in light of a study's characteristics and epistemological framework, rather than focusing on sets of procedures.

  15. Directions in implementation research methods for behavioral and social science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Molly; Supplee, Lauren H

    2012-10-01

    There is a growing interest, by researchers, policymakers, and practitioners, in evidence-based policy and practice. As a result, more dollars are being invested in program evaluation in order to establish "what works," and in some cases, funding is specifically tied to those programs found to be effective. However, reproducing positive effects found in research requires more than simply adopting an evidence-based program. Implementation research can provide guidance on which components of an intervention matter most for program impacts and how implementation components can best be implemented. However, while the body of rigorous research on effective practices continues to grow, research on implementation lags behind. To address these issues, the Administration for Children and Families and federal partners convened a roundtable meeting entitled, Improving Implementation Research Methods for Behavioral and Social Science, in the fall of 2010. This special section of the Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research includes papers from the roundtable and highlights the role implementation science can play in shedding light on the difficult task of taking evidence-based practices to scale.

  16. The 2010 California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, T. B.; Andrews, A. E.; Angevine, W. M.; Bates, T. S.; Brock, C. A.; Cairns, B.; Cohen, R. C.; Cooper, O. R.; Gouw, J. A.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Ferrare, R. A.; Fischer, M. L.; Flagan, R. C.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hair, J. W.; Hardesty, R. M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Langford, A. O.; McCauley, E.; McKeen, S. A.; Molina, L. T.; Nenes, A.; Oltmans, S. J.; Parrish, D. D.; Pederson, J. R.; Pierce, R. B.; Prather, K.; Quinn, P. K.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Senff, C. J.; Sorooshian, A.; Stutz, J.; Surratt, J. D.; Trainer, M.; Volkamer, R.; Williams, E. J.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2013-06-01

    The California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field study was conducted throughout California in May, June, and July of 2010. The study was organized to address issues simultaneously relevant to atmospheric pollution and climate change, including (1) emission inventory assessment, (2) atmospheric transport and dispersion, (3) atmospheric chemical processing, and (4) cloud-aerosol interactions and aerosol radiative effects. Measurements from networks of ground sites, a research ship, tall towers, balloon-borne ozonesondes, multiple aircraft, and satellites provided in situ and remotely sensed data on trace pollutant and greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol chemical composition and microphysical properties, cloud microphysics, and meteorological parameters. This overview report provides operational information for the variety of sites, platforms, and measurements, their joint deployment strategy, and summarizes findings that have resulted from the collaborative analyses of the CalNex field study. Climate-relevant findings from CalNex include that leakage from natural gas infrastructure may account for the excess of observed methane over emission estimates in Los Angeles. Air-quality relevant findings include the following: mobile fleet VOC significantly declines, and NOx emissions continue to have an impact on ozone in the Los Angeles basin; the relative contributions of diesel and gasoline emission to secondary organic aerosol are not fully understood; and nighttime NO3 chemistry contributes significantly to secondary organic aerosol mass in the San Joaquin Valley. Findings simultaneously relevant to climate and air quality include the following: marine vessel emissions changes due to fuel sulfur and speed controls result in a net warming effect but have substantial positive impacts on local air quality.

  17. Experimental High Energy Physics Research: Direct Detection of Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherell, Michael S.

    2014-10-02

    The grant supported research on an experimental search for evidence of dark matter interactions with normal matter. The PI carried out the research as a member of the LUX and LZ collaborations. The LUX research team collected a first data set with the LUX experiment, a large liquid xenon detector installed in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). The first results were published in Physical Review Letters on March 4, 2014. The journal Nature named the LUX result a scientific highlight of the year for 2013. In addition, the LZ collaboration submitted the full proposal for the Lux Zeplin experiment, which has since been approved by DOE-HEP as a second-generation dark matter experiment. Witherell is the Level 2 manager for the Outer Detector System on the LUX-Zeplin experiment.

  18. Laboratory directed research development annual report. Fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This document comprises Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s report for Fiscal Year 1996 on research and development programs. The document contains 161 project summaries in 16 areas of research and development. The 16 areas of research and development reported on are: atmospheric sciences, biotechnology, chemical instrumentation and analysis, computer and information science, ecological science, electronics and sensors, health protection and dosimetry, hydrological and geologic sciences, marine sciences, materials science and engineering, molecular science, process science and engineering, risk and safety analysis, socio-technical systems analysis, statistics and applied mathematics, and thermal and energy systems. In addition, this report provides an overview of the research and development program, program management, program funding, and Fiscal Year 1997 projects.

  19. Research and development conference: California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    CIEE's first Research and Development Conference will introduce you to some of the results achieved to date through CIEE-sponsored multiyear research performed in three programs: building energy efficiency, air quality impacts of energy efficiency, and end-use resource planning. Results from scoping studies, Director's discretionary research, and exploratory research will also be featured.

  20. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (36th, Anaheim, California, 2013). Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    For the thirty-sixth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Anaheim, California. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  1. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (36th, Anaheim, California, 2013). Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    For the thirty-sixth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Anaheim, California. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  2. Research on Microwave Heating-Direct Steelmaking in Electric Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jin; LIU Liu; ZENG Jia-qing; REN Rui-gang; LIU Jin-ying

    2005-01-01

    Self-fluxing iron ore concentrates containing coal have good microwave absorbability.With the voluminal heating property of microwave,the concentrates can be reduced uniformly and swiftly.The metallized semi-product can be directly charged into electric furnace for making clean steel.The total consumed energy of overall route is about 20.98 GJ.

  3. Evaluating Direct Marketing Campaigns: recent findings and future research topics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J-J. Jonker (Jedid-Jah); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); N. Piersma (Nanda)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis paper contains a survey of the recent literature on the evaluation of direct marketing campaigns. We give an outline of the various stages included in such a campaign. Next, we review the statistical methods most frequently used and we review the general findings from using these me

  4. Evaluating Direct Marketing Campaigns: recent findings and future research topics

    OpenAIRE

    Jonker, Jedid-Jah; Franses, Philip Hans; Piersma, Nanda

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis paper contains a survey of the recent literature on the evaluation of direct marketing campaigns. We give an outline of the various stages included in such a campaign. Next, we review the statistical methods most frequently used and we review the general findings from using these methods.

  5. Geosciences Student Recruitment Strategies at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB): Earth System Science/Community-Research Based Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambos, E. L.; Behl, R.; Whitney, D.; Rodrigue, C.; Wechsler, S.; Holk, G.; Lee, C.; Francis, R. D.; Larson, D.

    2005-12-01

    Collaborations among geoscience-oriented departments at California State University, Long Beach (Geological Sciences, as well as portions of the Geography and Anthropology departments and a new, fast-growing Environmental Sciences and Policy (ES&P) program) are characterized by attention to three important elements: (1) community-based partnerships and research, (2) outreach and continuity within educational pipeline transitions from high school, to community college, to university, and, (3) sharing of resources and expertise. Three specific collaborations, (1) creation of the ES&P, (2) the NSF-funded Geoscience Diversity Enhancement Program (GDEP), and, (3) the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research on Materials, Environment, and Societies (IIRMES), are powerful illustrations of how these collaborations can work to foster geoscience student recruitment and academic development, particularly at urban, highly diverse institutions with limited resources. Through a combination of student surveys, focus groups, and institutional research supported by the GDEP program, we know (e.g., Whitney et al., 2005) that non-Caucasian students often express less affinity for the geosciences as a focus of study than Caucasians. Early exposure to positive field and laboratory experiences, better understanding of geoscience career possibilities, and better advising at high school and college levels are all excellent strategies for heightening student interest and recruitment in the geosciences, yet appear to be lacking for many of the students in the greater Long Beach, California area. GDEP, ES&P, and IIRMES all challenge these lacunae by emphasizing hands-on learning, research on relevant community-based problems, and one-on-one or small group research, advising and mentoring. Our current challenge is to help our high-school and community-college colleagues adopt their own model of these active-learning strategies, thereby priming the pump and patching the pipe(line) for student

  6. Future Research Directions in Asthma. An NHLBI Working Group Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Bruce D; Noel, Patricia J; Freemer, Michelle M; Cloutier, Michelle M; Georas, Steve N; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ober, Carole; Woodruff, Prescott G; Barnes, Kathleen C; Bender, Bruce G; Camargo, Carlos A; Chupp, Geoff L; Denlinger, Loren C; Fahy, John V; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Gaston, Ben M; Hartert, Tina V; Kolls, Jay K; Lynch, Susan V; Moore, Wendy C; Morgan, Wayne J; Nadeau, Kari C; Ownby, Dennis R; Solway, Julian; Szefler, Stanley J; Wenzel, Sally E; Wright, Rosalind J; Smith, Robert A; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease without cure. Our understanding of asthma onset, pathobiology, classification, and management has evolved substantially over the past decade; however, significant asthma-related morbidity and excess healthcare use and costs persist. To address this important clinical condition, the NHLBI convened a group of extramural investigators for an Asthma Research Strategic Planning workshop on September 18-19, 2014, to accelerate discoveries and their translation to patients. The workshop focused on (1) in utero and early-life origins of asthma, (2) the use of phenotypes and endotypes to classify disease, (3) defining disease modification, (4) disease management, and (5) implementation research. This report summarizes the workshop and produces recommendations to guide future research in asthma.

  7. The Development Direction of Research on Chinese Technological Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hanxi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical study of Chinese technological innovation assumes the perspective of prototype structure of scientific being, and consists of four directions of investigations: ontological study of innovation cognition, behavior study of innovation cognition, subjects of innovation cognition, and subjective material foundation of innovation cognition. The study aims to obtain technological innovation capacity through construction of an external technological innovation system. However, an external system would necessarily result in redundancy of systems and decreased operability. For the purpose of environmental friendliness and resource conservation, it is vital for our technological innovation to ignite the intrinsic innovation vitality of the system. Therefore the endogenous mechanism of innovation is the scientific direction to take for the theoretical study of technological innovation.

  8. Direct dark matter searches and the CDEX research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Henry T.; Yue, Qian; Kang, Kejun

    2016-07-01

    We sketch the landscape which gives rise to the missing energy density problem and highlight the direct experimental searches of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) dark matter. An overview of the China Jinping underground laboratory as well as the China dark matter experiment (CDEX) dark matter program based on germanium detectors with sub-keV sensitivities is presented. The achieved results, status as well as the R&D and technology acquisition efforts towards a ton-scale experiment are reported.

  9. The Annual Department of Defense Procurement Research Symposium (5th), held 17-19 Nov 76, Monterey, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-01

    for both Chapman College, Orange , California, and California State University at San Bernardino. Mr. Templeman has 14 years of procurement experience...Xerox . 906 SLi.y .457 Dairy products 60-70 Soaps. etc. 60-70 Borden 1.023 Procter & Gamble 1.612 National Oairy 948 Colgate 531 Carnation * 456 .-Lee...percent increase in the salaries of the policemen of Orange , California to every three percent decline in rape, robbery, burglary and auto theft (6

  10. Future Directions for NCI’s Surveillance Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the early 1970s, NCI’s SEER program has been an invaluable resource for statistics on cancer in the United States. For the past several years, SEER researchers have been working toward a much broader and comprehensive goal for providing cancer stati

  11. Women in Management: Leadership Theories, Research Results, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Linda L.

    This review of the literature about women in management advocates the pursuit of research on women executives as unique components in the organizational setting, with the warning that careful and unremitting attention be paid to the selection of theoretical perspectives. It examines trait and role theory, and discusses such factors as…

  12. Help for the Reading Teacher: New Directions in Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, William D., Ed.

    This book is designed to be a bridge between teachers and research in such topics as the cloze procedure, readability formulas, miscue analysis, reading strategies, informal reading inventories, and concepts and reading in the content areas. "Children's Behavior While Reading" by H. Robinson serves as a bridge between Huey's early beginning and…

  13. Focus on environmental justice: new directions in international research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Jayajit

    2017-03-01

    More than three decades since the emergence of the environmental justice (EJ) movement in the U.S., environmental injustices continue to unfold across the world to include new narratives of air and water pollution, as well as new forms of injustices associated with climate change, energy use, natural disasters, urban greenspaces, and public policies that adversely affect socially disadvantaged communities and future generations. This focus issue of Environmental Research Letters provides an interdisciplinary forum for conceptual, methodological, and empirical scholarship on EJ activism, research, and policy that highlights the continuing salience of an EJ perspective to understanding nature-society linkages. The 16 letters published in this focus issue address a variety of environmental issues and social injustices in multiple countries across the world, and advance EJ research by: (1) demonstrating how environmental injustice emerges through particular policies and political processes; (2) exploring environmental injustices associated with industrialization and industrial pollution; and (3) documenting unjust exposure to various environmental hazards in specific urban landscapes. As the discourse of EJ continues to evolve both topically and geographically, we hope that this focus issue will help establish research agendas for the next generation of EJ scholarship on distributive, procedural, participatory, and other forms of injustices, as well as their interrelationships.

  14. Trends and Directions in Family Research in the 1980s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardo, Felix M.

    1990-01-01

    Introduces special journal issue devoted to a review of research on marriage and the family over the past decade. Provides overview of marital issues, feminism, parent-child relationships, day care, divorce, remarriage, stepfamilies, adolescence, later life families, religion, Blacks, Hispanics, adolescent childbearing, health, employment,…

  15. Symposium--Accentuating the Positive: Directions in Pronunciation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derwing, Tracey M.; Munro, Murray J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few decades perspectives on second language (L2) pronunciation have evolved from pessimistic appraisals of the capabilities of L2 learners and doubts about the value of instruction to a view of pronunciation teaching as an effective and important part of language pedagogy. Earlier research on the teaching of pronunciation dwelt…

  16. Research Directions Suggested by the A.C.L.U.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triandis, Harry C.

    1975-01-01

    Translates questions submitted by Alan Reitman, Associate Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union which the practitioners of civil liberties would like behavioral scientists to answer into researchable topics. Reviews some of the literature relevant to each, and suggests the kinds of studies needed to provide some answers.…

  17. Supply chain management models, applications, and research directions

    CERN Document Server

    Pardalos, Panos; Romeijn, H

    2005-01-01

    This work brings together some of the most up to date research in the application of operations research and mathematical modeling te- niques to problems arising in supply chain management and e-Commerce. While research in the broad area of supply chain management enc- passes a wide range of topics and methodologies, we believe this book provides a good snapshot of current quantitative modeling approaches, issues, and trends within the field. Each chapter is a self-contained study of a timely and relevant research problem in supply chain mana- ment. The individual works place a heavy emphasis on the application of modeling techniques to real world management problems. In many instances, the actual results from applying these techniques in practice are highlighted. In addition, each chapter provides important mana- rial insights that apply to general supply chain management practice. The book is divided into three parts. The first part contains ch- ters that address the new and rapidly growing role of the inte...

  18. Direction and Policies Needed to Support Hybrid Electric Car Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridwan Arief Subekti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The rising number of vehicles over the years has driven the increase of air pollution and fuel consumption. One of the solutions to overcome this problem is using hybrid electric car because it is environmentally friendly and efficient in fuel consumption. LIPI has conducted electric car research since 1997, but there were so many problems in its development that electric car can not be developed into a national industry scale. Therefore, it is important to conduct a study that maps the problems and finds the solutions to prevent the same failure of electric car commercialization process from happening to hybrid electric car . This study was done by collecting and analyzing the primary and secondary data through interviews, discussing electric hybrid car with stakeholders, and examining earlier study results and regulations. Based on this study, several policies to support sustainability research of hybrid electric car were proposed. Some recommendations were the making of national roadmap and regulation for the usage of hybrid electric car on the road. For policy makers at LIPI, a research focus, research coordination, and pre-commercialization program were recommended.

  19. Research on Direct Torque Control System Based on Induction Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康劲松; 陶生桂; 毛明平

    2003-01-01

    The mathematic model of direct torque control (DTC) was deduced. Two simulating models based on the MATLAB & SIMULINK were established. The emphasis is focused on study of the performance difference of the DTC system with stator flux hexagon and circle trajectories. The simulation waveforms of flux, torque and current characters with two flux trajectories were given. Experiments were carried out in an AC drive system based on induction motor and two-level inverter. A dual-CPU structure was used and the communication with two CPUs was obtained by a dual-port RAM in this system.

  20. Bulgarian Megaliths - Present State and Future Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsonev, L. V.; Kolev, D. Z.

    A first attempt is made to provide a global picture of the megaliths in Thrace (South East Europe); also the problems related to their dating are explicated. The location and the conventional (indirect) dating of the menhirs and dolmens mainly in Bulgaria, but partially also in Greece and Turkey are summarized. The necessity of direct dating - preferably by luminescence means - is discussed. International collaboration is proposed for creating a full and precise picture of the Thracian megaliths within the chronological framework of the pan-European (Mediterranean) megalithic region.

  1. Climate strength: a new direction for climate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Benjamin; Salvaggio, Amy Nicole; Subirats, Montse

    2002-04-01

    Climate strength was conceptualized within D. Chan's (1998) discussion of compositional models and the concept of culture strength from the organizational culture literature. Climate strength was operationalized in terms of within-group variability in climate perceptions-the less within-group variability, the stronger the climate. The authors studied climate strength in the context of research linking employee service climate perceptions to customer satisfaction. The hypothesis was tested that climate strength moderates the relationship between employee perceptions of service climate and customer satisfaction experiences. Partial support for the hypothesis was reported in both a concurrent and predictive (3-year) test across 118 branches of a bank. In the predictive study only the interaction of climate and climate strength predicted customer satisfaction. Implications for future research on climate and climate strength are discussed.

  2. FY 1999 Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PJ Hughes

    2000-06-13

    A short synopsis of each project is given covering the following main areas of research and development: Atmospheric sciences; Biotechnology; Chemical and instrumentation analysis; Computer and information science; Design and manufacture engineering; Ecological science; Electronics and sensors; Experimental technology; Health protection and dosimetry; Hydrologic and geologic science; Marine sciences; Materials science; Nuclear science and engineering; Process science and engineering; Sociotechnical systems analysis; Statistics and applied mathematics; and Thermal and energy systems.

  3. Ubiquitous Wireless Computing: Current Research Progress, Challenging, and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Elyas, Palantei

    2014-01-01

    - The aggressive research activities and generous studies focusing on the ubiquitous mobile computing carried-out during the last two decades have gained very tremendous outcomes to apply in broad areas of modern society lives. In the near future, the computing technology application is highly possible to emerge as the dominant method to connect any objects to the global ICT infrastructure, the internet. This talk mainly discusses several R&D achievements performed during the last five yea...

  4. The microball and Gammasphere: Research highlights and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, M.; Sarantites, D.G.; LaFosse, D.R.; Lerma, F. [Washington Univ., Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Microball, a compact, 4{pi} charged-particle detector array, has been used in conjunction with Gammasphere for numerous physics experiments, and more are planned in the near future. A summary of this research program is presented, and the device and its capabilities are described. An example of its use in the study of the population and entry state excitation energy distributions of normal and superdeformed bands in {sup 82}Sr is presented.

  5. Directions in biomedical research: a plea for ideological pluralism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, P Colm; Agutter, Paul S

    2003-08-01

    Feinstein [A.R. Feinstein, Am. J. Med. 107 (1999) 461] complained that 'basic medical science' has overwhelmed 'pathophysiological medical science' during the past half century, and 'destroyed the bridge between bedside and bench'. We agree that a 'drastic reorientation' will be necessary to correct the overemphasis and imbalance. Re-examining the roots of his problem, we believe that a plea to restore a balance between the 'status' (esteem) of 'large research' and 'small research' in medical science brings back into question the decision of academic physiologists to invoke the framework of Physics in/of 1847 [P.F. Cranefield, J. Hist. Med. Allied Sci. 12 (1957) 407] (together with an absolutist 'Prime Mover'/Metaphysic which Einstein would delete from Physics in 1905). The current 'imbalance' arose when that Cartesian 'Prime Mover' was NOT deleted from the Biological frame. Feinstein felt that the 'privileged status' (esteem) in which fund-giving bodies hold 'Small' researches compared to 'Large' should be cancelled. Once Biology replaces its Cartesian absolutism with a relativist framework, redress will follow naturally when living-material has regained the status of cause as well as effect. Descartes' 'Great Watchmaker' is a Dead God in Biology: a non-metaphysical Biological Perspective would restore balance between 'large' and 'small' investigations. ('Pluralism' implies that no scientific perspective would be second-rate in a relativist framework.)

  6. Problems, Prescriptions and Potential in Actionable Climate Change Science - A Case Study from California Coastal Marsh Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, G. M.; Ambrose, R. F.; Thorne, K.; Takekawa, J.; Brown, L. N.; Fejtek, S.; Gold, M.; Rosencranz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Frustrations regarding the provision of actionable science extend to both producers and consumers. Scientists decry the lack of application of their research in shaping policy and practices while decision makers bemoan the lack of applicability of scientific research to the specific problems at hand or its narrow focus relative to the plethora of engineering, economic and social considerations that they must also consider. Incorporating climate change adds additional complexity due to uncertainties in estimating many facets of future climate, the inherent variability of climate and the decadal scales over which significant changes will develop. Recently a set of guidelines for successful science-policy interaction was derived from the analysis of transboundary water management. These are; 1 recognizing that science is a crucial but bounded input into the decision-making processes, 2 early establishment of conditions for collaboration and shared commitment among participants, 3 understanding that science-policy interactions are enhanced through greater collaboration and social or group-learning processes, 4 accepting that the collaborative production of knowledge is essential to build legitimate decision-making processes, and 5 engaging boundary organizations and informal networks as well as formal stakeholders. Here we present as a case study research on California coastal marshes, climate change and sea-level that is being conducted by university and USGS scientists under the auspices of the Southwest Climate Science Center. We also present research needs identified by a seperate analysis of best practices for coastal marsh restoration in the face of climate change that was conducted in extensive consultation with planners and managers. The initial communication, scientific research and outreach-dissemination of the marsh scientfic study are outlined and compared to best practices needs identified by planners and the science-policy guidelines outlined above

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of fiscal year 1993. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. The program advances the Laboratory`s core competencies, foundations, scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. Reports are given from the following divisions: Accelerator and Fusion Research, Chemical Sciences, Earth Sciences, Energy and Environment, Engineering, Environment -- Health and Safety, Information and Computing Sciences, Life Sciences, Materials Sciences, Nuclear Science, Physics, and Structural Biology. (GHH)

  8. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

  9. Health psychology in primary care: recent research and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thielke S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Thielke1, Alexander Thompson2, Richard Stuart31Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Puget Sound VA Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Over the last decade, research about health psychology in primary care has reiterated its contributions to mental and physical health promotion, and its role in addressing gaps in mental health service delivery. Recent meta-analyses have generated mixed results about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of health psychology interventions. There have been few studies of health psychology interventions in real-world treatment settings. Several key challenges exist: determining the degree of penetration of health psychology into primary care settings; clarifying the specific roles of health psychologists in integrated care; resolving reimbursement issues; and adapting to the increased prescription of psychotropic medications. Identifying and exploring these issues can help health psychologists and primary care providers to develop the most effective ways of applying psychological principles in primary care settings. In a changing health care landscape, health psychologists must continue to articulate the theories and techniques of health psychology and integrated care, to put their beliefs into practice, and to measure the outcomes of their work.Keywords: health psychology, primary care, integrated care, collaborative care, referral, colocation

  10. The international migration of dentists: directions for research and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Madhan; Brennan, David Simon; Spencer, A John; Short, Stephanie Doris

    2016-08-01

    In 2010, the World Health Organization Global Code of Practice for International Recruitment of Health Personnel (the WHO Code) was adopted by the 193 Member States of the WHO. The WHO Code is a tool for global diplomacy, providing a policy framework to address the challenges involved in managing dentist migration, as well as improving the retention of dental personnel in source countries. The WHO Code recognizes the importance of migrant dentist data to support migration polices; minimum data on the inflows, outflows and stock of dentists are vital. Data on reasons for dentist migration, job satisfaction, cultural adaptation issues, geographic distribution and practice patterns in the destination country are important for any policy analysis on dentist migration. Key challenges in the implementation of the WHO Code include the necessity to coordinate with multiple stakeholders and the lack of integrated data on dentist migration and the lack of shared understanding of the interrelatedness of workforce migration, needs and planning. The profession of dentistry also requires coordination with a number of private and nongovernmental organizations. Many migrant dentist source countries, in African and the South-Asian WHO Regions, are in the early stages of building capacity in dentist migration data collection and research systems. Due to these shortcomings, it is prudent that developed countries take the initiative to pursue further research into the migration issue and respond to this global challenge.

  11. Supply chain risk management: review, classification and future research directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to be more efficient, firms have adopted strategies such as outsourcing, global partnerships and lean practices. Although such strategies have tremendous abilities to improve the efficiencies but simultaneously they make the firms vulnerable to market uncertainties, dependencies and disruptions. Moreover, natural calamities and manmade crises have also put negative impact on strategic, operational and tactical performance of supply chains. These factors have triggered the interest of academia and industry to consider the risk issues as prime concerns. To capture the more fine-grained elements of diversified risk issues related to the supply chain we employ a multi-layered top town taxonomy to classify and codify the literature and put forward the probable dimensions for future research. We further study the pool of SCRM literature focusing on coordination, decision making and sector-wise SCRM implementation issues and derive relevant propositions.

  12. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2014 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, H. A. [Nevada Test Site/National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)

    2015-04-22

    The reports contained herein are for project activities that occurred from October 2013 through September 2014. Project life cycle is indicated under the title as well as the original proposal number (in the following format: site abbreviation--ID #--originating fiscal year; e.g., STL-03-14). Each of the reports describes in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our principal investigators. As SDRD, by definition, invests in “high-risk” and hopefully “high-payoff” research, the element of uncertainty is inherent. While many of our efforts are “successful” and result in positive outcomes or technology utilization, some fall short of expectations, but cannot be construed as “failure” in the negative sense. The latter is a natural and valid part of the process of advanced research and often leads to unforeseen new pathways to future discovery. Regardless, either result advances our knowledge base and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or avoid costly and unwarranted paths for future challenges. In summary, the SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation that returns multifold to our customers, to national security, and to the general public. The program is a vibrant R&D innovation engine, benefited by its discretionary pedigree, enhanced mission spectrum, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum taxpayer benefit. The 25 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security. Further SDRD performance metrics can be found in the appendix at the end of this report.

  13. Directions for nuclear research in the transplutonium elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Chasman, R.R.; Friedman, A.M.; Ahmad, I.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the heavy nuclides has played a vital role in our understanding of the alpha decay process, nuclear fission, nuclear binding energies and the limits of nuclear stability. This study has led to the understanding of novel shape degrees of freedom, such as the very large quadrupole deformations associated with the fission isomer process, and the very recently discovered octupole deformation. The existence of these unique phenomena in the heavy element region is not accidental. Fission isomerism is due to the delicate balance between nuclear forces holding the nucleus together and Coulomb forces causing nuclear fission. Octupole deformation arises from the increasing strength of matrix elements with increasing oscillator shell. Both illustrate the unique features of the heavy element region. Fission studies have given us information about large collective aspects in nuclei and the importance that nuclear structural effects can play in altering these macro properties. A new class of atomic studies has become possible with the availability of heavy elements. With these isotopes, we are now able to produce electric fields of such magnitude that it becomes possible to spontaneously create positron-electron pairs in the vacuum. We have organized this presentation into three major sections: nuclear structure, fission studies and atomic studies of supercritical systems. In each we will try to emphasize the new directions which can benefit from the continued availability of isotopes supplied by the Trans-plutonium Production Program. 117 references. (WHK)

  14. OPERATIONAL RESEARCHES OF TRACK GAUGE AND POSITIONS IN THE TERMS OF SWITCH LATERAL DIRECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Rybkin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of operational research of lateral direction of switches of type P65 mark 1/11-1/9 on reinforced concrete bars on the track gauge and the direction in plan are presented in the article. The characteristic parts of the lateral direction in terms of the influence of geometrical position on the interaction with rolling stock are determined.

  15. 2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goli, Sasank [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Olsen, Daniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McKane, Aimee [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Piette, Mary Ann [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This report describes the work of the Industrial Demand Response (DR) Team of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) from 2008-2010, in the context of its mandate to conduct and disseminate research that broadens the knowledge base of DR strategies, with a focus on the Industrial-Agricultural-Water (IAW) sector. Through research and case studies of industrial sectors and entities, the DRRC-IAW Team continued to assimilate knowledge on the feasibility of industrial DR strategies with an emphasis on technical and economic evaluation and worked to encourage implementation of these strategies.

  16. Current trends and future directions in flower development research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutt, Charlie P; Vandenbussche, Michiel

    2014-11-01

    Flowers, the reproductive structures of the approximately 400 000 extant species of flowering plants, exist in a tremendous range of forms and sizes, mainly due to developmental differences involving the number, arrangement, size and form of the floral organs of which they consist. However, this tremendous diversity is underpinned by a surprisingly robust basic floral structure in which a central group of carpels forms on an axis of determinate growth, almost invariably surrounded by two successive zones containing stamens and perianth organs, respectively. Over the last 25 years, remarkable progress has been achieved in describing the molecular mechanisms that control almost all aspects of flower development, from the phase change that initiates flowering to the final production of fruits and seeds. However, this work has been performed almost exclusively in a small number of eudicot model species, chief among which is Arabidopsis thaliana. Studies of flower development must now be extended to a much wider phylogenetic range of flowering plants and, indeed, to their closest living relatives, the gymnosperms. Studies of further, more wide-ranging models should provide insights that, for various reasons, cannot be obtained by studying the major existing models alone. The use of further models should also help to explain how the first flowering plants evolved from an unknown, although presumably gymnosperm-like ancestor, and rapidly diversified to become the largest major plant group and to dominate the terrestrial flora. The benefits for society of a thorough understanding of flower development are self-evident, as human life depends to a large extent on flowering plants and on the fruits and seeds they produce. In this preface to the Special Issue, we introduce eleven articles on flower development, representing work in both established and further models, including gymnosperms. We also present some of our own views on current trends and future directions of the

  17. Analysis of High Spatial, Temporal, and Directional Resolution Recordings of Biological Sounds in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    map. To the northwest of the array deployment area is Santa Catalina Island . The array number is listed next to each push-pin location. The data...very shallow- water shelf just offshore in Fig. 1. A few conclusions from the analysis of this chorus are: • The spatial distribution of the...received levels and the directionality of the received sounds indicate the primary region of chorusing occurs in the very shallow water region just offshore

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

  19. Research progresses and future directions on pool boiling heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the previous work carried on pool boiling heat transfer during heating of various liquids and commodities categorized as refrigerants and dielectric fluids, pure liquids, nanofluids, hydrocarbons and additive mixtures, as well as natural and synthetic colloidal solutions. Nucleate pool boiling is an efficient and effective method of boiling because high heat fluxes are possible with moderate temperature differences. It is characterized by the growth of bubbles on a heated surface. It occurs during boiling of liquids for excess temperature ranging from 5 to 30 °C in various processes related to high vaporization of liquid for specific purposes like sugarcane juice heating for jaggery making, milk heating for khoa making, steam generation, cooling of electronic equipments, refrigeration and etcetera. In this review paper, pool boiling method during heating of liquids for specific purpose is depicted. It is inferred that enhancement in pool boiling heat transfer is a challenging and complex task. Also, recent research and use of various correlations for natural convection pool boiling is reviewed.

  20. Congressionally Directed Project for Passive NOx Removal Catalysts Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, William

    2014-08-29

    The Recipient proposes to produce new scientific and technical knowledge and tools to enable the discovery and deployment of highly effective materials for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from lean combustion exhaust. A second goal is to demonstrate a closely coupled experimental and computational approach to heterogeneous catalysis research. These goals will be met through the completion of four primary technical objectives: First, an in-depth kinetic analysis will be performed on two prominent classes of NOx SCR catalysts, Fe- and Cu-exchanged beta and ZSM-5 zeolites, over a wide range of catalyst formulation and under identical, high conversion conditions as a function of gas phase composition. Second, the nanoscale structure and adsorption chemistry of these high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) catalysts will be determined using in situ and operando spectroscopy under the same reaction conditions. Third, first-principles molecular simulations will be used to model the metal-zeolite active sites, their adsorption chemistry, and key steps in catalytic function. Fourth, this information will be integrated into chemically detailed mechanistic and kinetic descriptions and models of the operation of these well- defined NOx SCR catalysts under practically relevant reaction conditions. The new knowledge and models that derive from this work will be published in the scientific literature.

  1. Alcohol and NMDA Receptor: Current research and future direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman eChandrasekar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The brain is one of the major targets of alcohol actions. Most of the excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system is mediated by NMDA receptors. However, one of the most devastating effects of alcohol leads to brain shrinkage, loss of nerve cells at specific regions through a mechanism involving excitotoxicity, oxidative stress. Earlier studies have indicated that chronic exposure to ethanol both in vivo and in vitro, increases NR1 and NR2B gene expression and their polypeptide levels. The effect of alcohol and molecular changes on the regulatory process, which modulates NMDAR functions including factors altering transcription, translation, post-translational modifications and protein expression, as well as those influencing their interactions with different regulatory proteins (downstream effectors are incessantly increasing at the cellular level. Further, I discuss the various genetically altered mice approaches that have been used to study NMDA receptor subunits and their functional implication. In a recent countable review, epigenetic dimension (i.e., histone modification-induced chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation, in the process of alcohol related neuroadapation is one of the key molecular mechanisms in alcohol mediated NMDAR alteration. Here, I provide a recount on what has already been achieved, current trends and how the future research/studies of the NMDA receptor might lead to even greater engagement with many possible new insights into the neurobiology and treatment of alcoholism.

  2. Alcohol and NMDA receptor: current research and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, Raman

    2013-01-01

    The brain is one of the major targets of alcohol actions. Most of the excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system is mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. However, one of the most devastating effects of alcohol leads to brain shrinkage, loss of nerve cells at specific regions through a mechanism involving excitotoxicity, oxidative stress. Earlier studies have indicated that chronic exposure to ethanol both in vivo and in vitro, increases NR1 and NR2B gene expression and their polypeptide levels. The effect of alcohol and molecular changes on the regulatory process, which modulates NMDAR functions including factors altering transcription, translation, post-translational modifications, and protein expression, as well as those influencing their interactions with different regulatory proteins (downstream effectors) are incessantly increasing at the cellular level. Further, I discuss the various genetically altered mice approaches that have been used to study NMDA receptor subunits and their functional implication. In a recent countable review, epigenetic dimension (i.e., histone modification-induced chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation, in the process of alcohol related neuroadaptation) is one of the key molecular mechanisms in alcohol mediated NMDAR alteration. Here, I provide a recount on what has already been achieved, current trends and how the future research/studies of the NMDA receptor might lead to even greater engagement with many possible new insights into the neurobiology and treatment of alcoholism.

  3. Congressionally Directed Project for Passive NOx Removal Catalysts Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2014-12-29

    The Recipient proposes to produce new scientific and technical knowledge and tools to enable the discovery and deployment of highly effective materials for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from lean combustion exhaust. A second goal is to demonstrate a closely coupled experimental and computational approach to heterogeneous catalysis research. These goals will be met through the completion of four primary technical objectives: First, an in-depth kinetic analysis will be performed on two prominent classes of NOx SCR catalysts, Fe- and Cu-exchanged beta and ZSM-5 zeolites, over a wide range of catalyst formulation and under identical, high conversion conditions as a function of gas phase composition. Second, the nanoscale structure and adsorption chemistry of these high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) catalysts will be determined using in situ and operando spectroscopy under the same reaction conditions. Third, first-principles molecular simulations will be used to model the metal-zeolite active sites, their adsorption chemistry, and key steps in catalytic function. Fourth, this information will be integrated into chemically detailed mechanistic and kinetic descriptions and models of the operation of these well- defined NOx SCR catalysts under practically relevant reaction conditions. The new knowledge and models that derive from this work will be published in the scientific literature.

  4. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2012 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    2013-04-01

    The reports included in this report are for project activities that occurred from October 2011 through September 2012. These reports describe in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our talented and enthusiastic principal investigators (PIs). Many of the reports describe R&D efforts that were “successful” in their pursuits and resulted in a positive outcome or technology realization. As we’ve stated before, and continue to stress, in some cases the result is a “negative” finding, for instance a technology is currently impractical or out of reach. This can often be viewed erroneously as a “failure,” but is actually a valid outcome in the pursuit of high-risk research, which often leads to unforeseen new paths of discovery. Either result advances our knowledge and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or likewise avoid costly paths not appropriate for the challenges presented. The SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation and development that returns multifold to the NNSS mission. Overall the program is a strong R&D innovation engine, benefited by an enhanced mission, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum benefit. The 23 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security.

  5. Research Review: Teens as Authors of Web Culture [and] The State of Arts Education in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Susannah, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    In this Research Review, the authors first look at a recent study of online content creation by teens in America conducted by the Pew Internet & American Life Project ("Teens as Authors of Web Culture," Review by Keidra Chaney). The study both confirms and challenges some common beliefs about teens and technology, and raises…

  6. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California National Primate Research Center (1992-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, J Rachel; Canfield, Don R; Lane, Jennifer F; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Ardeshir, Amir; Allen, A Mark; Tarara, Ross P

    2016-04-01

    Necropsy records and associated clinical histories from the rhesus macaque colony at the California National Primate Research Center were reviewed to identify mortality related to cardiac abnormalities involving left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Over a 21-y period, 162 cases (female, 90; male, 72) of idiopathic LVH were identified. Macaques presented to necropsy with prominent concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle associated with striking reduction of the ventricular lumen. Among all LVH cases, 74 macaques (female, 39; male, 35), mostly young adults, presented for spontaneous (sudden) death; more than 50% of these 74 cases were associated with a recent history of sedation or intraspecific aggression. The risk of sudden death in the 6- to 9-y-old age group was significantly higher in male macaques. Subtle histologic cardiac lesions included karyomegaly and increased cardiac myocyte diameter. Pedigree analyses based on rhesus macaque LVH probands suggested a strong genetic predisposition for the condition. In humans, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, associated with diverse clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic disease to sudden death. Although the overall risk of disease complications such as sudden death, end-stage heart failure, and stroke is low (1% to 2%) in patients with HCM, the absolute risk can vary dramatically. Prima facie comparison of HCM and LVH suggest that further study may allow the development of spontaneously occurring LVH in rhesus macaques as a useful model of HCM, to better understand the pathogenesis of this remarkably heterogeneous disease.

  7. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California National Primate Research Center (1992–2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, J Rachel; Canfield, Don R; Lane, Jennifer F; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Ardeshir, Amir; Allen, A Mark; Tarara, Ross P

    2016-01-01

    Necropsy records and associated clinical histories from the rhesus macaque colony at the California National Primate Research Center were reviewed to identify mortality related to cardiac abnormalities involving left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Over a 21-y period, 162 cases (female, 90; male, 72) of idiopathic LVH were identified. Macaques presented to necropsy with prominent concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle associated with striking reduction of the ventricular lumen. Among all LVH cases, 74 macaques (female, 39; male, 35), mostly young adults, presented for spontaneous (sudden) death; more than 50% of these 74 cases were associated with a recent history of sedation or intraspecific aggression. The risk of sudden death in the 6- to 9-y-old age group was significantly higher in male macaques. Subtle histologic cardiac lesions included karyomegaly and increased cardiac myocyte diameter. Pedigree analyses based on rhesus macaque LVH probands suggested a strong genetic predisposition for the condition. In humans, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, associated with diverse clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic disease to sudden death. Although the overall risk of disease complications such as sudden death, end-stage heart failure, and stroke is low (1% to 2%) in patients with HCM, the absolute risk can vary dramatically. Prima facie comparison of HCM and LVH suggest that further study may allow the development of spontaneously occurring LVH in rhesus macaques as a useful model of HCM, to better understand the pathogenesis of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. PMID:27053572

  8. Southern California Earthquake Center--Virtual Display of Objects (SCEC-VDO): An Earthquake Research and Education Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, S.; Maechling, P.; Jordan, T.

    2006-12-01

    Interns in the program Southern California Earthquake Center/Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (SCEC/UseIT, an NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates Site) have designed, engineered, and distributed SCEC-VDO (Virtual Display of Objects), an interactive software used by earthquake scientists and educators to integrate and visualize global and regional, georeferenced datasets. SCEC-VDO is written in Java/Java3D with an extensible, scalable architecture. An increasing number of SCEC-VDO datasets are obtained on the fly through web services and connections to remote databases; and user sessions may be saved in xml-encoded files. Currently users may display time-varying sequences of earthquake hypocenters and focal mechanisms, several 3-dimensional fault and rupture models, satellite imagery - optionally draped over digital elevation models - and cultural datasets including political boundaries. The ability to juxtapose and interactively explore these data and their temporal and spatial relationships has been particularly important to SCEC scientists who are evaluating fault and deformation models, or who must quickly evaluate the menace of evolving earthquake sequences. Additionally, SCEC-VDO users can annotate the display, plus script and render animated movies with adjustable compression levels. SCEC-VDO movies are excellent communication tools and have been featured in scientific presentations, classrooms, press conferences, and television reports.

  9. Nature and Significance of Igneous Rocks Cored in the State 2-14 Research Borehole: Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Charles T.; Elders, Wilfred A.

    1988-11-01

    The State 2-14 research borehole of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project penetrated 3.22 km of Pleistocene to Recent sedimentary rocks in the Salton Sea geothermal system, located in the Salton Trough of southern California and northern Baja California, Mexico. In addition, three intervals of igneous rocks were recovered; a silicic tuff and two sills of altered diabase. The chemical composition of the silicic tuff at 1704 m depth suggests that it is correlative with the Durmid Hill tuff, cropping out 25 km NW of the geothermal system. In turn, both of these tuffs may be deposits of the Bishop Tuff, erupted from the Long Valley caldera of central California at 0.7 Ma. The diabases are similar to basaltic xenoliths found in the nearby Salton Buttes rhyolite domes. These diabase are interpreted as hypabyssal intrusions resulting from magmatism due to rifting of the Salton Trough as part of the East Pacific Rise/Gulf of California transtensional system. The sills apparently intruded an already developed geo-thermal system and were in turn altered by it.

  10. Internet accessibility and usage among urban adolescents in Southern California: implications for web-based health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Unger, Jennifer B; Palmer, Paula H; Gallaher, Peggy; Chou, Chih-Ping; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Sussman, Steve; Johnson, C Anderson

    2005-10-01

    The World Wide Web (WWW) poses a distinct capability to offer interventions tailored to the individual's characteristics. To fine tune the tailoring process, studies are needed to explore how Internet accessibility and usage are related to demographic, psychosocial, behavioral, and other health related characteristics. This study was based on a cross-sectional survey conducted on 2373 7th grade students of various ethnic groups in Southern California. Measures of Internet use included Internet use at school or at home, Email use, chat-room use, and Internet favoring. Logistic regressions were conducted to assess the associations between Internet uses with selected demographic, psychosocial, behavioral variables and self-reported health statuses. The proportion of students who could access the Internet at school or home was 90% and 40%, separately. Nearly all (99%) of the respondents could access the Internet either at school or at home. Higher SES and Asian ethnicity were associated with higher internet use. Among those who could access the Internet and after adjusting for the selected demographic and psychosocial variables, depression was positively related with chat-room use and using the Internet longer than 1 hour per day at home, and hostility was positively related with Internet favoring (All ORs = 1.2 for +1 STD, p Internet use (ORs for +1 STD ranged from 1.2 to 2.0, all p Internet use. Substance use was positively related to email use, chat-room use, and at home Internet use (OR for "used" vs. "not used" ranged from 1.2 to 4.0, p Internet use at home but lower levels of Internet use at school. More physical activity was related to more email use (OR = 1.3 for +1 STD), chat room use (OR = 1.2 for +1 STD), and at school ever Internet use (OR = 1.2 for +1 STD, all p Internet use-related measures. In this ethnically diverse sample of Southern California 7(th) grade students, 99% could access the Internet at school and/or at home. This suggests that the Internet

  11. The California Integrated Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, M.; Given, D.; Hauksson, E.; Neuhauser, D.; Oppenheimer, D.; Shakal, A.

    2007-05-01

    The mission of the California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) is to operate a reliable, modern system to monitor earthquakes throughout the state; to generate and distribute information in real-time for emergency response, for the benefit of public safety, and for loss mitigation; and to collect and archive data for seismological and earthquake engineering research. To meet these needs, the CISN operates data processing and archiving centers, as well as more than 3000 seismic stations. Furthermore, the CISN is actively developing and enhancing its infrastructure, including its automated processing and archival systems. The CISN integrates seismic and strong motion networks operated by the University of California Berkeley (UCB), the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) offices in Menlo Park and Pasadena, as well as the USGS National Strong Motion Program (NSMP), and the California Geological Survey (CGS). The CISN operates two earthquake management centers (the NCEMC and SCEMC) where statewide, real-time earthquake monitoring takes place, and an engineering data center (EDC) for processing strong motion data and making it available in near real-time to the engineering community. These centers employ redundant hardware to minimize disruptions to the earthquake detection and processing systems. At the same time, dual feeds of data from a subset of broadband and strong motion stations are telemetered in real- time directly to both the NCEMC and the SCEMC to ensure the availability of statewide data in the event of a catastrophic failure at one of these two centers. The CISN uses a backbone T1 ring (with automatic backup over the internet) to interconnect the centers and the California Office of Emergency Services. The T1 ring enables real-time exchange of selected waveforms, derived ground motion data, phase arrivals, earthquake parameters, and ShakeMaps. With the goal of operating similar and redundant

  12. Ferroelectric Thin Films III, Symposium Held in San Francisco, California on April 13 - 16, 1993. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Volume 310

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-16

    ritietal I ic A llo\\ V. -i Bakel - J.D,) Whitteiiluerger. R. D aroiufa -N. H. Yoo. 199.1. ISBN: I 55899- 183 2 V oflnie 289*--- I lo and NIicrosti-ructnic...ni VOLUME 310 Ferroelectric Thin Films EDITORS Edward R. Myers Bruce A . Tuttle Seshu B. Desu Poul K. Larsen MATERIALS RESEARCH SOCIETY SYMPOSIUM...Edward R. Myers $ National Semiconductor Corporation Santa Clara, California, U.S.A. Bruce A . Tuttle I Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New

  13. The California Central Coast Research Partnership: Building Relationships, Partnerships and Paradigms for University-Industry Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    thermal analysis of LED arrays for automotive headlamps . Chen et al. [10] presented a package design of high-power LEDs. However, no research has been...Issue 5, Oct 2007, pp. 191-196. [9] S. Jang and M. Shin, "Thermal Analysis of LED Arrays for Automotive Headlamp with a Novel Cooling System", IEEE... materials and devices, data acquisition, imaging technologies, autonomous vehicles and robots, alternative energy sources and energy efficiency

  14. Research on no Dig Directional Drilling Pipeline Laying Technique——The reseach on directional drilling tool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuLi; ZhangGuozheng; MaWeiguo; TangShizhong; LiYiliang; GeXindong; GuZhen

    2004-01-01

    The directional crossing drilling works were applied in the West-East gas pipeline(WEGTP) project.The main researehs on the directional crossing drilling include:(1)to analyze the forces applied on the drilling tool and the failure mechanism in onler to obtain the proper configuration of the drilling tool and solve the failure prevention;(2)to analyze the existing mud,to propose a viable mud composition;(3)in respect of mud mixing and environmental protection,to develop a quick evcloning mud hydration and recycling device;(4)to develop a interface picture software for direction controlling measured parameter to improve directional drilling accuracy;(5)tp develop an electronic search software incorporating large amounl of construction specifications and mud compositions,used for construction.In this paper the first one of the above mentioned points is introduced,including existing problems with directional drilling,optimization of the drilling tool,analysis of drill collar fracture failure,research on stress scattering structure of drilling tool thread and thread sticking prevention measures.etc.

  15. Evidence of sub Kilometer-scale Variability in Stress Directions near Active Faults: An Example from the Newport-Inglewood Fault, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, P.; Stock, J. M.; Smith, D.

    2015-12-01

    The active Newport-Inglewood Fault (NIF) zone is a series of right-lateral, left-stepping en echelon segments and associated anticlines that produced the 1933 Long Beach Mw 6.4 earthquake. Seismic hazard estimates, dynamic earthquake rupture models, and earthquake simulations for Southern California rely on information on the stress field obtained from the Community Stress Model (CSM), though the latter still lacks observational constraints. This study provides much needed observational constraints on in-situ stress, which are useful for validating the CSM. Our results highlight the possibility of variations in stress directions near active faults at length-scales less than 1 km. We determined the orientation of stress-induced compressive failures or borehole breakouts, which are reliable indicators of the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress (SH) in over 40 wellbores in the Los Angeles basin near the NIF. The compressional jogs along the fault have long been drilled for oil in this major metropolitan area, and so provide the dataset of oriented caliper logs. This allowed us to investigate the variation of SH direction in three oil fields. In the Inglewood oil field, a dense dataset of 24 wells in ~2 km2, SH varies from N9°E to N32°E over a depth range of 1-3 km and within 400 m of the fault in the western fault block, with more variability occurring in wells father away. At depths below 2 km, SH takes on a more northerly orientation. In contrast, SH is oriented E-W in the eastern fault block, based on constraints from two wells. In the Wilmington oil field located between the Thums-Huntington Beach Fault and the NIF, data from 11 deviated wells yields a pattern of elongation directions, which differs from the more complex pattern obtained for the Huntington Beach wells located ~12 km to the southeast. The short-length-scale variations in SH direction are attributed to the proximity to faults or fault segmentation, and indicate the likely complexity that

  16. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program. Final Project Report. California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sathaye, Jayant [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-12-01

    This report on the California Energy Balance version 2 (CALEB v2) database documents the latest update and improvements to CALEB version 1 (CALEB v1) and provides a complete picture of how energy is supplied and consumed in the State of California. The CALEB research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) performed the research and analysis described in this report. CALEB manages highly disaggregated data on energy supply, transformation, and end-use consumption for about 40 different energy commodities, from 1990 to 2008. This report describes in detail California's energy use from supply through end-use consumption as well as the data sources used. The report also analyzes trends in energy demand for the "Manufacturing" and "Building" sectors. Decomposition analysis of energy consumption combined with measures of the activity driving that consumption quantifies the effects of factors that shape energy consumption trends. The study finds that a decrease in energy intensity has had a very significant impact on reducing energy demand over the past 20 years. The largest impact can be observed in the industry sector where energy demand would have had increased by 358 trillion British thermal units (TBtu) if subsectoral energy intensities had remained at 1997 levels. Instead, energy demand actually decreased by 70 TBtu. In the "Building" sector, combined results from the "Service" and "Residential" subsectors suggest that energy demand would have increased by 264 TBtu (121 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 143 TBtu in the "Residential" sector) during the same period, 1997 to 2008. However, energy demand increased at a lesser rate, by only 162 TBtu (92 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 70 TBtu in the "Residential" sector). These energy intensity reductions can be indicative of energyefficiency improvements during the past 10 years. The research presented in this report provides a basis for developing an energy-efficiency performance index to measure

  17. Advancing user experience research to facilitate and enable patient-centered research: current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Philip R O

    2013-01-01

    Human-computer interaction and related areas of user experience (UX) research, such as human factors, workflow evaluation, and data visualization, are thus essential to presenting data in ways that can further the analysis of complex data sets such as those used in patient-centered research. However, a review of available data on the state of UX research as it relates to patient-centered research demonstrates a significant underinvestment and consequently a large gap in knowledge generation. In response, this report explores trends in funding and research productivity focused on UX and patient-centered research and then presents a set of recommendations to advance innovation at this important intersection point. Ultimately, the aim is to catalyze a community-wide dialogue concerning future directions for research and innovation in UX as it applies to patient-centered research.

  18. Sub-scale Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Facility (Research Cell 18)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: RC18 is a continuous-flow, direct-connect, supersonic-combustion research facility that is capable of simulating flight conditions from Mach 3.0 to Mach...

  19. Scientific Merit Review of Directed Research Tasks Within the NASA Human Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.

    2010-01-01

    The Human Research Program is instrumental in developing and delivering research findings, health countermeasures, and human systems technologies for spacecraft. :HRP is subdivided into 6 research entities, or Elements. Each Element is charged with providing the Program with knowledge and capabilities to conduct research to address the human health and performance risks as well as advance the readiness levels of technology and countermeasures. Project: An Element may be further subdivided into Projects, which are defined as an integrated set of tasks undertaken to deliver a product or set of products

  20. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  1. State University of New York Research Foundation: Controls over Direct Costs. Report 93-S-64.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    An evaluation was done of the State University of New York (SUNY) Research Foundation's controls over direct expenditures for research and sponsored activities. The Foundation is a private, non-profit educational corporation established to expand the educational mission of SUNY through fund raising, administration of gifts and grants, and…

  2. The First Big Wave of Astronomy Education Research Dissertations and Some Directions for Future Research Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2008-01-01

    The past several years have presented the astronomy education research community with a host of foundational research dissertations in the teaching and learning of astronomy. These PhD candidates have been studying the impact of instructional innovations on student learning and systematically validating astronomy learning assessment instruments,…

  3. The Research on Interface between Lithuanian Direct Investment Abroad and Foreign Trade Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anžela Kozlova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The scientific research results related to foreign trade and direct investment abroad (DIA are discussed in the article. The relation of the direct investment abroad and foreign trade is still under the discussion as there is no clear answer whether foreign trade is supplemented or replaced by the direct investment abroad. Since 1997 the flows of the direct investment abroad increased greately in Lithuania. Consequently, it is important to define the link between the DIA and foreign trade considering each country separately. Direct investment abroad and trade links in Lithuania in 1997–2014 are analyzed in the article. The research analysis involves Lithuanian direct investments in the developed countries except some countries, such as Belorus, Russia and Ukraine. It is defined that there is a positive bilateral link between Lithuanian direct investment abroad and foreign trade. It is also observed the impact of general development of Lithuanian direct investment abroad (considering certain countries on the countries economy itself – imports can exceed exports. Engle-Granger causality test is applied in the research paper for the purpose of defining the impact of the DIA on the import and export range.

  4. Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, Revised December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1993-12-01

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is a discretionary research and development tool critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the laboratory. It is also a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, within the overall mission of the Department of Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes research which was funded by this program during fiscal year 1993. The research fell in a number of broad technical and scientific categories: new directions for energy technologies; global change; radiation therapies and imaging; genetic studies; new directions for the development and utilization of BNL facilities; miscellaneous projects. Two million dollars in funding supported 28 projects which were spread throughout all BNL scientific departments.

  5. Former University of California Chancellors Urge New Funding Models for UC. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.15.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Studies in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In this era of massive budget cuts, the survival of the University of California as a great institution of learning has become the subject of increasingly urgent debate. Twenty-two of the twenty-nine living former UC chancellors met in San Francisco on June 26-28, 2011 to discuss the current threats facing the University and all of California…

  6. The Effects of a Changing Financial Context on the University of California. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.16.05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissler, Gerald R.; Switkes, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    California's loss of capital gains and stock options revenue during the recent economic downturn was one of the worst in the nation, and the resulting fiscal crisis led to reductions in State appropriations to the University of 15% over the past four years, while enrollments grew by 19%. This article examines the effects of this reduction in State…

  7. Career and Technical Education (CTE) Transfer Research Project: Improving Transfer Pathways for California Community College Students in CTE Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandjeff, Kelley; Schiorring, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Despite the current economic downturn, workforce projections indicate that California will experience shortages in its supply of baccalaureate-trained workers in the decades to come, particularly engineers, accountants, nurses, teachers and law enforcement professionals. Students often start their journey toward these occupations in community…

  8. Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

  9. China-Related Research in Auditing: A Review and Directions for Future Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan A. Simunic; Xi Wu

    2009-01-01

    <正>1.Introduction Academic research concerning independent audits of financial statements,including the economic incentives and relations surrounding audit contracts and audit processes,is relatively new.Prior to the mid-1970’s,auditing was viewed as a purely practical activity,governed by technical rules largely set by the profession itself.But of course,auditing is

  10. Frequency Properties Research of Elevator Drive System with Direct Torque Control-Pulse with Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Koval

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article problems of frequency properties research for electric drive system with direct torque control and pulse width modulator are described. The mathematical description of elevator is present. Simplified mathematical description of direct torque control - pulse width modulator electric drive system is shown. Transfer functions for torque and speed loops are determined. Logarithmic frequency characteristics are computed. Damping properties of elevator drive system are estimated.

  11. Neuroscience-related research in Ghana: a systematic evaluation of direction and capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quansah, Emmanuel; Karikari, Thomas K

    2016-02-01

    Neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases account for considerable healthcare, economic and social burdens in Ghana. In order to effectively address these burdens, appropriately-trained scientists who conduct high-impact neuroscience research will be needed. Additionally, research directions should be aligned with national research priorities. However, to provide information about current neuroscience research productivity and direction, the existing capacity and focus need to be identified. This would allow opportunities for collaborative research and training to be properly explored and developmental interventions to be better targeted. In this study, we sought to evaluate the existing capacity and direction of neuroscience-related research in Ghana. To do this, we examined publications reporting research investigations authored by scientists affiliated with Ghanaian institutions in specific areas of neuroscience over the last two decades (1995-2015). 127 articles that met our inclusion criteria were systematically evaluated in terms of research foci, annual publication trends and author affiliations. The most actively-researched areas identified include neurocognitive impairments in non-nervous system disorders, depression and suicide, epilepsy and seizures, neurological impact of substance misuse, and neurological disorders. These studies were mostly hospital and community-based surveys. About 60% of these articles were published in the last seven years, suggesting a recent increase in research productivity. However, data on experimental and clinical research outcomes were particularly lacking. We suggest that future investigations should focus on the following specific areas where information was lacking: large-scale disease epidemiology, effectiveness of diagnostic platforms and therapeutic treatments, and the genetic, genomic and molecular bases of diseases.

  12. Research on the direct liquefaction of peat at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). [Peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P.; Solantausta, Y.

    1985-01-01

    At the Laboratory of Fuel Processing and Lubrication Technology, VTT, a process for the high-pressure liquefaction of peat into motor fuels is being developed. Because the different process steps are strongly interrelated, the production chain has to be optimized as a whole. The optimization is based on the results of both experimential investigations and techno-economic studies. To this date the research has concentrated on a process concept, where dry peat (10% moisture) is fed to the reactor as a slurry with recycle oil from the process. Promising results have been obtained in both experiments and economic evaluations of the process. Research on liquefaction via flash pyrolysis has also been initiated. In addition the Laboratory has participated in an International Energy Agency (IEA) co-operative project where several biomass liquefaction processes were examined.

  13. The neurobiology of psychopathy: recent developments and new directions in research and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Psychopathic individuals account for substantial predatory and impulsive violence. To the present, the principal intervention used to decrease the harm inflicted by psychopaths has been confinement. Nevertheless, most confined psychopathic persons return to the community. Recent advances in the understanding of the neurobiology of psychopathy hold promise for new research directions and more effective treatments. In this article, we will explore recent advances in genetics, electrophysiology, brain imaging, and psychopharmacology, as well as, in brief, their implications for new directions in research and treatment.

  14. Wireless Sensor Network Security Enhancement Using Directional Antennas: State of the Art and Research Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel-Ioan Curiac

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Being often deployed in remote or hostile environments, wireless sensor networks are vulnerable to various types of security attacks. A possible solution to reduce the security risks is to use directional antennas instead of omnidirectional ones or in conjunction with them. Due to their increased complexity, higher costs and larger sizes, directional antennas are not traditionally used in wireless sensor networks, but recent technology trends may support this method. This paper surveys existing state of the art approaches in the field, offering a broad perspective of the future use of directional antennas in mitigating security risks, together with new challenges and open research issues.

  15. Wireless Sensor Network Security Enhancement Using Directional Antennas: State of the Art and Research Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiac, Daniel-Ioan

    2016-04-07

    Being often deployed in remote or hostile environments, wireless sensor networks are vulnerable to various types of security attacks. A possible solution to reduce the security risks is to use directional antennas instead of omnidirectional ones or in conjunction with them. Due to their increased complexity, higher costs and larger sizes, directional antennas are not traditionally used in wireless sensor networks, but recent technology trends may support this method. This paper surveys existing state of the art approaches in the field, offering a broad perspective of the future use of directional antennas in mitigating security risks, together with new challenges and open research issues.

  16. 1997 Annual report. Technological Research Direction; Informe Anual 1997. Direccion de Investigacion Tecnologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This document describes the results for one year of work. Here is presented the goals of the Technological Research Direction of the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico, which is promoting and developing the production of high technologies in the nuclear sciences and related disciplines as well as to generate the technologies, products, quality insume for academic organizations, health, industrial and commercial that are required. (Author)

  17. The Research Results of the Individual Competences Influence on Direct Sales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Sypniewska

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the influence of individual competences on the effects of sales consultants efforts working at few well-known cosmetic companies specializing in direct sales multi-level marketing. The research proves dependence between individual competences and the level of effects. The competences profile derived from the analyses, characteristic for each study group, stresses the benefits and practical implications of this research.

  18. Stepping Into and Out of the Void: Funding Dynamics of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in California, Sweden, and South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinryb, Noomi; Bubela, Tania

    2016-02-01

    Nonprofit organizations and philanthropists stepped into a funding void caused by controversies over public funding of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research. Based on interviews of 83 representatives of 53 funders, we examine the motivations and accountability structures of public agencies, corporations, fundraising dependent nonprofit organizations and philanthropic organizations that funded hESC research in three jurisdictions: California, Sweden, and South Korea. While non-traditional forms of funding are essential in the early stages of research advancement, they are unreliable for the long timeframes necessary to advance cell therapies. Such funding sources may enter the field based on high expectations, but may exit just as rapidly based on disappointing rates of progress.

  19. New directions in evidence-based policy research: a critical analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Kathryn; Lorenc, Theo; Innvær, Simon

    2014-07-14

    Despite 40 years of research into evidence-based policy (EBP) and a continued drive from both policymakers and researchers to increase research uptake in policy, barriers to the use of evidence are persistently identified in the literature. However, it is not clear what explains this persistence - whether they represent real factors, or if they are artefacts of approaches used to study EBP. Based on an updated review, this paper analyses this literature to explain persistent barriers and facilitators. We critically describe the literature in terms of its theoretical underpinnings, definitions of 'evidence', methods, and underlying assumptions of research in the field, and aim to illuminate the EBP discourse by comparison with approaches from other fields. Much of the research in this area is theoretically naive, focusing primarily on the uptake of research evidence as opposed to evidence defined more broadly, and privileging academics' research priorities over those of policymakers. Little empirical data analysing the processes or impact of evidence use in policy is available to inform researchers or decision-makers. EBP research often assumes that policymakers do not use evidence and that more evidence - meaning research evidence - use would benefit policymakers and populations. We argue that these assumptions are unsupported, biasing much of EBP research. The agenda of 'getting evidence into policy' has side-lined the empirical description and analysis of how research and policy actually interact in vivo. Rather than asking how research evidence can be made more influential, academics should aim to understand what influences and constitutes policy, and produce more critically and theoretically informed studies of decision-making. We question the main assumptions made by EBP researchers, explore the implications of doing so, and propose new directions for EBP research, and health policy.

  20. The Direction and Autonomy of Interdisciplinary Study and Research Paths in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of didactic infrastructures to direct Study and Research Paths (SRP) in teacher education within the context of interdisciplinary inquiry. The disciplines of school mathematics and school biology, and their didactics, are made to interconnect through the investigation of a generating question concerning the illness…

  1. Future Directions in Etiologic, Prevention, and Treatment Research for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; South, Kelsey; Shaw, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances have occurred regarding the understanding of etiologic processes that give rise to eating disorders and the design and evaluation of efficacious prevention programs and treatment interventions. Herein we offer suggestions regarding potentially fruitful directions for future research in these areas. We suggest it would be…

  2. How Multilingual African Contexts Are Pushing Educational Research and Practice in New Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Carol

    2010-01-01

    A strong case can be made for developing more flexible and relevant multilingual strategies for teaching and learning within the field of bilingual education. This paper aims to demonstrate how current linguistic and educational practices in countries like Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique and Ethiopia suggest new directions for research and practice. A…

  3. Forms and terminology of Direct Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Palle

    It is apparent that some confusion exits both among researchers and political actors about the various forms of direct democracy. Various institutions such as IRI and IDEA, various countries such as Switzerland and California, and various authors such as Pier Vincenzo Uleri and David Altman present...

  4. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2013. The associated FY 2013 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2014/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  5. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2009 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2009. The associated FY 2009 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2010/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  6. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-03-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2008. The associated FY 2008 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  7. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2011 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2011. The associated FY 2011 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2012/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  8. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2010. The associated FY 2010 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2011/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  9. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2012 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2012. The associated FY 2012 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2012/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  10. Kriging direct and indirect estimates of sulfate deposition: A comparison. Forest Service research paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reams, G.A.; Huso, M.M.P.; Vong, R.J.; McCollum, J.M.

    1997-08-01

    Due to logistical and cost constraints, acidic deposition is rarely measured at forest research or sampling locations. A crucial first step to assessing the effects of acid rain on forests is an accurate estimate of acidic deposition at forest sample sites. The authors examine two methods (direct and indirect) for estimating sulfate deposition at atmospherically unmonitored forest sites. The direct method only uses directly measured deposition data, while the indirect method additionally incorporates precipitation measurements from a spatially denser network of monitoring sites. Sulfate deposition values were estimated by point kriging using both the direct and indirect methods. By using the supplemental data from the precipitation monitoring network, estimates of sulfate deposition improved substantially, particularly at sites that are relatively isolated to the acid deposition monitoring network. Cross-validated procedures indicate that by using the indirect method, a reduction of approximately 20 to 25 percent in the predicted error sum of squares occurred.

  11. RESEARCH ON THEORETIC EVIDENCE AND REALIZATION OF DIRECTLY-MEAN EMD METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Youming; Qin Shuren; Tang Baoping

    2004-01-01

    Emprical mode decomposition(EMD) is a method and principle of decomposing signal dealing with Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) in signal analysis, while directly-mean EMD is an improved EMD method presented by N.E.Huang, the inventor of HHT, which is aimed at solving the problems of EMD principle. Although the directly-mean EMD method is very remarkable with its advantages and N. E. Huang has given a method to realize it, he did not find the theoretic evidence of the method so that the feasibility of the idea and correctness of realizing the directly-mean EMD method is still indeterminate. For this a deep research on the forming process of complex signal is made and the involved stationary point principle and asymptotic stationary point principle are demonstrated, thus some theoretic evidences and the correct realizing way of directly-mean EMD method is firstly presented. Some simulation examples for demonstrating the idea presented are given.

  12. Research on Social Networking Sites and Social Support from 2004 to 2015: A Narrative Review and Directions for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jingbo; Martinez, Lourdes; Holmstrom, Amanda; Chung, Minwoong; Cox, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a narrative review of scholarship on social support through social networking sites (SNSs) published from 2004 to 2015. By searching keywords related to social support and SNSs in major databases for social sciences, we identified and content analyzed directly relevant articles (N = 88). The article summarizes the prevalence of theory usage; the function of theory usage (e.g., testing a theory, developing a theory); major theories referenced; and methodologies, including research designs, measurement, and the roles of social support and SNS examined in this literature. It also reports four themes identified across the studies, indicating the trends in the current research. Based on the review, the article presents a discussion about study sites, conceptualization of social support, theoretical coherence, the role of social networks, and the dynamic relationships between SNS use and social support, which points out potential avenues for shaping a future research agenda.

  13. Future Directions in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Research. An NHLBI Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Timothy S.; Tager, Andrew M.; Borok, Zea; Moore, Bethany B.; Schwartz, David A.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Bitterman, Peter; Blackburn, Michael R.; Bradford, William; Brown, Kevin K.; Chapman, Harold A.; Collard, Harold R.; Cosgrove, Gregory P.; Deterding, Robin; Doyle, Ramona; Flaherty, Kevin R.; Garcia, Christine Kim; Hagood, James S.; Henke, Craig A.; Herzog, Erica; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Horowitz, Jeffrey C.; King, Talmadge E.; Loyd, James E.; Lawson, William E.; Marsh, Clay B.; Noble, Paul W.; Noth, Imre; Sheppard, Dean; Olsson, Julie; Ortiz, Luis A.; O’Riordan, Thomas G.; Oury, Tim D.; Raghu, Ganesh; Roman, Jesse; Sime, Patricia J.; Sisson, Thomas H.; Tschumperlin, Daniel; Violette, Shelia M.; Weaver, Timothy E.; Wells, Rebecca G.; White, Eric S.; Kaminski, Naftali; Martinez, Fernando J.; Wynn, Thomas A.; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2014-01-01

    The median survival of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) continues to be approximately 3 years from the time of diagnosis, underscoring the lack of effective medical therapies for this disease. In the United States alone, approximately 40,000 patients die of this disease annually. In November 2012, the NHLBI held a workshop aimed at coordinating research efforts and accelerating the development of IPF therapies. Basic, translational, and clinical researchers gathered with representatives from the NHLBI, patient advocacy groups, pharmaceutical companies, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to review the current state of IPF research and identify priority areas, opportunities for collaborations, and directions for future research. The workshop was organized into groups that were tasked with assessing and making recommendations to promote progress in one of the following six critical areas of research: (1) biology of alveolar epithelial injury and aberrant repair; (2) role of extracellular matrix; (3) preclinical modeling; (4) role of inflammation and immunity; (5) genetic, epigenetic, and environmental determinants; (6) translation of discoveries into diagnostics and therapeutics. The workshop recommendations provide a basis for directing future research and strategic planning by scientific, professional, and patient communities and the NHLBI. PMID:24160862

  14. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX, K.J.

    2006-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2006.

  15. Mentoring Through Research as a Catalyst for the Success of Under-represented Minority Students in the Geosciences at California State University Northridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsaglia, K. M.; Pedone, V.; Simila, G. W.; Yule, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    The Catalyst Program of the Department of Geological Sciences at California State University Northridge has been developed by four faculty members who were the recipients of a three-year award (2002-2005) from the National Science Foundation. The goal of the program is to increase minority participation and success in the geosciences. The program seeks to enrich the educational experience by introducing students at all levels to research in the geosciences and to decrease obstacles that affect academic success. Both these goals are largely achieved by the formation of integrated high school, undergraduate, and graduate research groups, which also provide fulfilling and successful peer mentorship. The Catalyst Program provides significant financial support to participants to allow them to focus their time on their education. New participants first complete a specially designed course that introduces them to peer-mentoring, collaborative learning, and geological research. Students of all experience levels then become members of research teams, which deepens academic and research skills as well as peer-mentor relationships. The program was highly successful in its inaugural year. To date, undergraduates and graduate students in the program coauthored six abstracts at professional meetings and one conference paper. High-school students gained first hand experience of a college course and geologic research. Perhaps the most important impacts of the program are the close camaraderie that has developed and the increased ability of the Catalyst students to plan and execute research with greater confidence and self-esteem.

  16. Research and Development of Information on Geothermal Direct Heat Application Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hederman, William F., Jr.; Cohen, Laura A.

    1981-10-01

    This is the first annual report of ICF's geothermal R&D project for the Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office. The overall objective of this project is to compile, analyze, and report on data from geothermal direct heat application projects. Ultimately, this research should convey the information developed through DOE's and Program Opportunity Notice (PON) activities as well as through other pioneering geothermal direct heat application projects to audiences which can use the early results in new, independent initiatives. A key audience is potential geothermal investors.

  17. The research on direct-drive wave energy conversion system and performance optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhongxian; YU Haitao; HU Minqiang

    2014-01-01

    A direct-drive wave energy conversion system based on a three-phase permanent magnet tubular linear generator (PMTLG) and a heaving buoy is proposed to convert wave energy into electrical energy. Sufficient experimental methods are adopted to compare the computer simulations, the validity of which is verified by the experiment results from a wave tank laboratory. In the experiment, the motion curves of heaving buoy are with small fluctuations, mainly caused by the PMTLG’s detent force. For the reduction of these small fluctuations and a maximum operational efficiency of the direct-drive wave energy conversion system, the PMTLG’s detent force minimization technique and the heaving buoy optimization will be discussed. It is discovered that the operational efficiency of the direct-drive wave energy conversion system increases dra-matically after optimization. The experiment and optimization results will provide useful reference for the future research on ocean wave energy conversion system.

  18. Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors:the Basic Design and New Research Directions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The basic design principles and parameters of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIP) are reviewed.Furthermore new research directions,devices and applications suited for QWIPs are discussed.These include monolithic integration of QWIPs with GaAs based electronic and optoelectronic devices,high frequency and high speed QWIPs and applications,multicolor and multispectral detectors,and p-type QWIPs.

  19. DIRECTIONS OF RESEARCH OF POSITION OF WOMAN IN REGIONAL COMMUNITY OF THE REPUBLIC NORTHERN OSSETIAALANYA

    OpenAIRE

    T. I. Barsukova; B. M. Taysayeva

    2015-01-01

    Results of the analysis of possible directions of studying of position of woman in regional community of the Republic Northern Ossetia-Alania are given in article. The purpose of article consists in definition of a circle of problems which research will allow to characterize the economic status of Ossetian woman through identification of level of her labor loading, gender inequality concerning employment of women in the labor sphere, female unemployment in its comparison with man's, financial...

  20. Incentive Pass-through for Residential Solar Systems in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, C. G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Wiser, Ryan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rai, Varun [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The deployment of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems has grown rapidly over the last decade, partly because of various government incentives. In the United States, among the largest and longest-running incentives have been those established in California. Building on past research, this report addresses the still-unanswered question: to what degree have the direct PV incentives in California been passed through from installers to consumers? This report helps address this question by carefully examining the residential PV market in California (excluding a certain class of third-party-owned PV systems) and applying both a structural-modeling approach and a reduced-form regression analysis to estimate the incentive pass-through rate. The results suggest an average pass-through rate of direct incentives of nearly 100%, though with regional differences among California counties. While these results could have multiple explanations, they suggest a relatively competitive market and well-functioning subsidy program. Further analysis is required to determine whether similar results broadly apply to other states, to other customer segments, to all third-party-owned PV systems, or to all forms of financial incentives for solar (considering not only direct state subsidies, but also utility electric bill savings and federal tax incentives).

  1. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science program report, Weapons Resarch and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, L.

    1997-03-01

    This report is the annual progress report for the Chemistry Materials Science Program: Weapons Research and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development. Twenty-one projects are described separately by their principal investigators.

  2. Workshop on Direct Contact Heat Transfer at the Solar Energy Research Institute

    CERN Document Server

    Boehm, R

    1988-01-01

    to increase the use of direct contact processes, the National Science Foundation sup­ ported a workshop on direct contact heat transfer at the Solar Energy Research Insti­ tute in the summer of 1985. We served as organizers for this workshop, which em­ phasized an area of thermal engineering that, in our opinion, has great promise for the future, but has not yet reached the point of wide-spread commercial application. Hence, a summary of the state of knowledge at this point is timely. The workshop had a dual objective: 1. To summarize the current state of knowledge in such a form that industrial practi­ tioners can make use of the available information. 2. To indicate the research and development needed to advance the state-of-the-art, indicating not only what kind of research is needed, but also the industrial poten­ tial that could be realized if the information to be obtained through the proposed research activities were available.

  3. Attachment among older adults: current issues and directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J M; Cafferty, T P

    2001-09-01

    Although John Bowlby conceptualized attachment theory as applicable across the life span, researchers have been relatively slow to examine attachment phenomena specifically among older adults. The present article reviews the extant research applying attachment theory to older populations; preliminary findings suggest that attachment issues hold particular relevance for older adults, given the increased potential for separation, loss and vulnerability associated with aging. Although many of the studies reviewed are somewhat limited methodologically, the overall pattern of results suggests that attachment patterns are associated with a variety of outcomes in later life (such as adaptation to chronic illness and caregiver burden among family members, reactions to the death of a loved one, and general well-being) in a theoretically consistent manner. The implications of and questions raised by current findings are reviewed, and directions for future research are discussed.

  4. Constructed wetlands, 1991-2011: a review of research development, current trends, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Wei; Ji, Guodong

    2012-12-15

    This study explores a bibliometric approach to quantitatively evaluate global scientific constructed wetlands research, and statistically assess current trends, and future directions using the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) database from 1991 to 2011. Articles referencing constructed wetlands were analyzed by accessing the following: publication language, output characteristics, publication performance by country and institution, author keywords, title words, and KeyWords Plus. Synthetically analyzing three keyword types, we concluded that the dominant constructed wetlands research hotspots from 1991 to 2011 included water, nutrients, plants, and flow. These four hotspots remained the most dominant research areas throughout our study period, and are predicted to remain the top research emphases in the near future. "Soil" also exhibited a notable increase since 2005, and is likely to become another notable area of research interest in the future. "Phytoremediation" and "horizontal" were not identified in 1991-1995, but exhibited marked increases from 136th (0.5%) and 169th (0.7%) in 1996-2000, to 9th (3.8%) and 11th (4.3%) in 2006-2011, respectively. Therefore, given the heightened attention during the last 15 years, these topics are likely to become a primary research focus in upcoming years.

  5. Atolls, Islands, and Archipelagos: The California OER Council and the New Landscape for Open Education in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Francis Hanley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available California’s three public higher education systems (University of California, California State University, the California Community College System enroll nearly 3 million undergraduate students and employ almost 100 thousand faculty. In 2012, the California State Legislature directed the three systems to create an online library of open educational resources to encourage the use of free or affordable textbooks and other materials throughout California’s public higher education system. Composed of faculty representatives from each of the three systems, the California Open Educational Resources Council (CAOERC was formed and charged in January, 2014, with collecting, peer-reviewing, helping to curate, publicizing, and cultivating the adoption of these open educational resources. As we end the first phase of this massive effort, our paper will: 1 outline what we’ve learned about scale and collaboration among California’s three distinct higher education systems; 2 present the results of CAOERC’s ongoing research (via surveys and focus groups about open textbook use and adoption; 3 briefly discuss issues of OER sustainability in the context of cooperation among state, university, and non-profit sectors.

  6. Direct and enhanced disclosure of researcher financial conflicts of interest: the role of trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spece, Roy G

    2013-01-01

    In earlier writing, I recommended direct disclosure of major researcher financial conflicts of interest in per capita funding arrangements--the practice of providing researchers with a fixed sum for each subject recruited and enrolled in a study. This Article adds a recommendation for enhanced direct disclosure. The enhancement in the disclosure is a summary of why per capita and excess payments are being discussed and further includes whether the sponsors of the research and the researchers have claimed that there are no excess payments. The reason per capita payments are being discussed is because of the risk--with special caution when sponsors and researchers are not willing to claim that there are no excess payments--of introducing bias into researchers' decisions regarding study design, implementation, and interpretation, as well as concerning whom to enroll or keep in studies. Researchers' claims that there are no excess payments do not vitiate the risk of such payments. Nevertheless, a special admonition when sponsors and researchers do not claim the absence of excess payments would hopefully encourage them to eschew excess payments. My recommendations are required by the rights to bodily integrity and autonomy embedded in informed consent. Several arguments have been made against my recommendations, many of which relate to supposed effects on trust. My rights-based recommendations should not be rejected because of objections based on propositions that (1) are conceptually unclear because of a failure to unbundle different kinds and degrees of trust and (2) have not been empirically proven even where concepts are clarified. In some instances, the required strong empirical confirmation cannot be made because of practical or ethical restraints, including the fact that some of the necessary studies would require invasion of the right to informed consent. Finally, I suggest and partially apply an organizational method to generate empirical questions and guidance

  7. Sources of methane and nitrous oxide in California's Central Valley estimated through direct airborne flux and positive matrix factorization source apportionment of groundbased and regional tall tower measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Abhinav

    Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are two major greenhouse gases that contribute significantly to the increase in anthropogenic radiative-forcing causing perturbations to the earth's climate system. In a watershed moment in the state's history of environmental leadership and commitment, California, in 2006, opted for sharp reductions in their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and adopted a long-term approach to address climate change that includes regulation of emissions from individual emitters and source categories. There are large CH4 and N2O emissions sources in the state, predominantly in the agricultural and waste management sector. While these two gases account for Transects) study. Next, a one-year continuous field campaign (WGC 2012-13, June 2012 - August 2013) was conducted at the Walnut Grove tall tower near the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta in the Central Valley. Through analysis of these field measurements, this dissertation presents the apportionment of observed CH4 and N2O concentration enhancements into major source categories along with direct emissions estimates from airborne observations. We perform high-precision measurements of greenhouse gases using gas analyzers based on absorption spectroscopy, and other source marker volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using state of the art VOC measurement systems (e.g. proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry). We combine these measurements with a statistical source apportionment technique called positive matrix factorization (PMF) to evaluate and investigate the major local sources of CH4 and N2O during CalNex and Walnut Grove campaigns. In the CABERNET study, we combine measurements with an airborne approach to a well-established micrometeorological technique (eddy-covariance method) to derive CH4 fluxes over different source regions in the Central Valley. In the CalNex experiments, we demonstrate that dairy and livestock remains the largest source sector of non-CO2 greenhouse gases in the San

  8. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development: FY 2006 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2007-08-01

    The Nevada Test Site–Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed its fifth successful year of research and development activities in FY 2006. Forty new projects were selected for funding this year, and ten FY 2005 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $6 million, for an average per-project cost of $120 thousand. Beginning in May, 2006 programmatic burden rates were applied to SDRD project costs. An external audit conducted in September 2006 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: the filing of 27 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2006 projects; programmatic adoption of four FY 2005 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2006 projects; and the successful completion of 50 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

  9. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration. FY2005 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Will [comp.

    2006-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

  10. Research on the Child Development Project: Current Status and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistich, Victor; Solomon, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Reports on the current status of the Child Development Project (San Ramon, California). States that major concerns focus upon validity of measures and criterion validity. Notes that there are indications that the program is being implemented and children's attitudes are being affected. Predicts additional teacher questionnaire measures and the…

  11. 34 CFR 97.405 - Research involving greater than minimal risk but presenting the prospect of direct benefit to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... presenting the prospect of direct benefit to the individual subjects. 97.405 Section 97.405 Education Office... the prospect of direct benefit to the individual subjects. ED conducts or funds research in which the... holds out the prospect of direct benefit for the individual subject, or by a monitoring procedure...

  12. 34 CFR 97.406 - Research involving greater than minimal risk and no prospect of direct benefit to individual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... prospect of direct benefit to individual subjects, but likely to yield generalizable knowledge about the... § 97.406 Research involving greater than minimal risk and no prospect of direct benefit to individual... an intervention or procedure that does not hold out the prospect of direct benefit for the...

  13. LDRD 2014 Annual Report: Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, Diane [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is required to provide a program description and overview of its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) to the Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with DOE Order 413.2B dated April 19, 2006. This report provides a detailed look at the scientific and technical activities for each of the LDRD projects funded by BNL in FY 2014, as required. In FY 2014, the BNL LDRD Program funded 40 projects, 8 of which were new starts, at a total cost of $9.6M.

  14. Tom Ten Have's contributions to causal inference and biostatistics: review and future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Dylan S; Joffe, Marshall M; Lynch, Kevin G; Roy, Jason A; Russell Localio, A

    2014-09-10

    Tom Ten Have made many contributions to causal inference and biostatistics before his untimely death. This paper reviews Tom's contributions and discusses potential related future research directions. We focus on Tom's contributions to longitudinal/repeated measures categorical data analysis and particularly his contributions to causal inference. Tom's work on causal inference was primarily in the areas of estimating the effect of receiving treatment in randomized trials with nonadherence and mediation analysis. A related area to mediation analysis he was working on at the time of his death was posttreatment effect modification with applications to designing adaptive treatment strategies.

  15. Pollutant transport among California regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angevine, Wayne M.; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart; Holloway, John S.; Lerner, Brian M.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guha, Abhinav; Andrews, Arlyn; Nowak, John B.; Evan, Stephanie; Fischer, Marc L.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Bon, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Several regions within California have significant air quality issues. Transport of pollutants emitted in one region to another region may add to the impact of local emissions. In this work, Lagrangian particle dispersion model simulations show the amounts of tracers that are transported within and among four regions, Southern California, the San Francisco Bay Area, the Central Valley, and the rest of the state. The simulations cover May and June of 2010, the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change experiment period. Tracers of automobile emissions and one type of agricultural emission are used. Tracer mixing ratios are compared to airborne and ground-based measurements. The age of tracers in each location is also presented. Vertical profiles and diurnal cycles help to clarify the transport process. As is well known, Southern California emissions are transported to the east and affect the desert areas, and Bay Area automobile emissions are an important source of pollutants in the San Joaquin Valley. A novel result is that the Southern California Bight is filled with a mixture of well-aged carbon monoxide tracer from Southern California and the Bay Area. Air over the Bight is also affected by the agricultural emissions represented by the agricultural tracer, dominantly from the Central Valley where its sources are largest. There is no indication of transport from Southern California to the Central Valley. Emissions from the Central Valley do make their way to Southern California, as shown by the agricultural tracer, but automobile emissions from the Valley are insignificant in Southern California.

  16. Issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulics research and development in nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, P., E-mail: pradip.saha@ge.com [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Aksan, N. [GRNSPG Group, University of Pisa (Italy); Andersen, J. [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Yan, J. [Westinghouse Electric Co., Columbia, SC (United States); Simoneau, J.P. [AREVA, Lyon (France); Leung, L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Bertrand, F. [CEA, DEN, DER, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Aoto, K.; Kamide, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    The paper archives the proceedings of an expert panel discussion on the issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulic research and development in nuclear power reactors held at the NURETH-14 conference in Toronto, Canada, in September 2011. Thermal-hydraulic issues related to both operating and advanced reactors are presented. Advances in thermal-hydraulics have significantly improved the performance of operating reactors. Further thermal-hydraulics research and development is continuing in both experimental and computational areas for operating reactors, reactors under construction or ready for near-term deployment, and advanced Generation-IV reactors. As the computing power increases, the fine-scale multi-physics computational models, coupled with the systems analysis code, are expected to provide answers to many challenging problems in both operating and advanced reactor designs.

  17. MAINTENANCE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH – PART 2: A REVIEW OF MODELS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Oke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: In recent years, the research scope of maintenance performance has been greatly expanded due to the pressure on maintenance organizations to deliver fruitful results in the current competitive business environment. In part 1 of this paper, treatment methods and maintenance performance models have been explored. In this concluding paper (part 2, the review further investigates maintenance performance models. The paper offers directions on future research in the area of maintenance performance.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: As gevolg van die ondervinding van verbruikers in die jongste tyd word organisasies wat instandhouding pleeg, genoop om deel te neem aan kontemporêre navorsing, wat belofte op verbeterde vertoning inhou. Die eerste gedeelte van hierdie artikel behandel metodes en modelle wat gebruik word. Die tweede gedeelte gaan dan voort om modelle van instandhoudingsvertoning te ondersoek. Die aangebode stof word ten slotte aangevul met raadgewing oor moontlike toekomstige navorsing.

  18. Defining interdisciplinarity and indentifying Research directions in Jani Christou’s Strychnine lady

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Yerosimou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jani Christou was a major Greek composer, whose unusual, yet promising career was brought to an end after his untimely death in 1970 at the age of 44. His challenging and speculative output has intrigued generation of young music scholars; however, J. Christou’s work remains imperfectly and only patchily known and understood, especially outside Greece. This is partly because of the interdisciplinary nature of his late works which reduces the possibility of potential researchers who will academically establish J. Christou’s distinguished output. The aim of the present paper is to present and analyse parts of Strychnine Lady, a work composed in 1967 in order to propose research directions in an effort to confirm J. Christou’s posthumous reputation.

  19. Direct teaching and incidental learning of vocabulary: a further cycle of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Al-Homoud

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The current research compares two conditions of L2 vocabulary learning, i.e. explicit teaching and incidental learning. Forty-five female participants, majoring in English at Alimam Mohammad Ibn-Saud Islamic University, Saudi Arabia, took part in this research. They were divided into two groups: read plus (RP and read only (RO. Three levels of vocabulary knowledge (form recall, meaning recall, and meaning recognition were assessed. The results showed that both conditions cater for vocabulary learning, however the RP group had significantly outperformed their RO counterparts. Moreover, the results showed that vocabulary learning in this study followed the general tendency starting from a receptive level to a productive level. Finally, the results of the current study confirmed what Sonbul and Schmitt (2010 have arrived at. Key words: vocabulary knowledge, vocabulary learning, explicit (direct teaching, incidental learning, attrition, retention.

  20. NNSA Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program 2008 Symposium--Focus on Energy Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotta, P R; Sketchley, J A

    2008-08-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program was authorized by Congress in 1991 to fund leading-edge research and development central to the national laboratories core missions. LDRD anticipates and engages in projects on the forefront of science and engineering at the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, and has a long history of addressing pressing national security needs at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories. LDRD has been a scientific success story, where projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published and cited in peer-reviewed journals, mainstream media coverage, and patents granted. The LDRD Program is also a powerful means to attract and retain top researchers from around the world, to foster collaborations with other prominent scientific and technological institutions, and to leverage some of the world's most technologically advanced assets. This enables the LDRD Program to invest in high-risk and potentially high-payoff research that creates innovative technical solutions for some of our nation's most difficult challenges. Worldwide energy demand is growing at an alarming rate, as developing nations continue to expand their industrial and economic base on the back of limited global resources. The resulting international conflicts and environmental consequences pose serious challenges not only to this nation, but to the international community as well. The NNSA and its national security laboratories have been increasingly called upon to devote their scientific and technological capabilities to help address issues that are not limited solely to the historic nuclear weapons core mission, but are more expansive and encompass a spectrum of national security missions, including energy security. This year's symposium highlights some of the exciting areas of research in alternative fuels and technology, nuclear power, carbon

  1. Nevada National Security Site: Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Howard A. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States). Site-Directed Research and Development Program

    2016-04-01

    This report presents results of multiple research projects, new and ongoing, funded under the Site-Directed Research and Development Program for the Nevada National Security Site during federal fiscal year 2015. The Site's legacy capabilities in remote sensing combined with new paradigms for emergency response and consequence management help drive the need to develop advanced aerial sensor platforms. Likewise, dynamic materials science is a critical area of scientific research for which basic physics issues are still unresolved. New methods of characterizing materials in extreme states are vitally needed, and these efforts are paving the way with new knowledge. Projects selected in FY 2015 for the Exploratory Research portfolio exhibit a strong balance of NNSS mission relevance. Geoscience, seismology, and techniques for detecting underground nuclear events are still essential focus areas. Many of the project reports in the second major section of this annual report are ongoing continuations in multi-year lifecycles. Diagnostic techniques for stockpile and nuclear security science figured prominently as well, with a few key efforts coming to fruition, such as phase transition detection. In other areas, modeling efforts toward better understanding plasma focus physics has also started to pay dividends for major program needs.

  2. California Political Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a series of district layers pertaining to California'spolitical districts, that are derived from the California State Senateand State Assembly information....

  3. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2000-12-31

    The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and I exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, ,projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2000. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2000 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2001. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2000 was $6 million. The.actual allocation totaled $5.5 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer

  4. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DOE - DECEMBER 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2001-12-01

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' March 5, 1997, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 4 13.2. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas

  5. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2003-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 41 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology

  6. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2004-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology

  7. Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

    1982-06-01

    This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

  8. Laboratory directed research and development: Annual report to the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, Brookhaven must continuously foster the development of new ideas and technologies, promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develop new fundable R and D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments are described in this report. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Searing, J.M.

    1997-12-01

    New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  10. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-02-25

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  12. Annual Research in Nursing Education Conference Proceedings and Abstracts (5th, San Francisco, California, January 14-16, 1987).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National League for Nursing, New York, NY.

    These proceedings include approximately 100 abstracts of papers dealing with the following aspects of research in nursing education: clinical judgment, faculty roles and expectations, learning, clinical experience, ethics and moral development, implications for the nursing curriculum of clinical nursing knowledge research, professional…

  13. EngageUC: Developing an Efficient and Ethical Approach to Biobanking Research at the University of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Sarah B; Koenig, Barbara A; Brown, Arleen; Hult, Jen R; Boyd, Elizabeth A; Dry, Sarah; Dohan, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Biorepositories, or biobanks, provide researchers with access to biological samples and associated data in support of translational research. Efficient operation and ethical stewardship of biobanks involves coordinated efforts among multiple stakeholders including researchers who manage and use the repository, institutional officials charged with its oversight, and patients and volunteers who contribute samples and data. As advancements in translational research increasingly involve more data derived from larger numbers of diverse samples, the size and governance challenges facing biorepositories have grown. We describe an approach to developing efficient and ethical biobank governance that includes all major stakeholders. This model provides a pathway for addressing the technical and ethical challenges that must be resolved to ensure biorepositories continue to support translational research.

  14. Does California's Master Plan Still Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdman, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    For nearly 50 years, California's higher education system has been shaped by the tripartite division of the vaunted Master Plan. The 1960 document's bold vision of access and quality safeguarded a system of selective research universities (the University of California) and provided baccalaureate education through less-selective campuses (the…

  15. Final report for the protocol extensions for ATM Security Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarman, T.D.; Pierson, L.G.; Brenkosh, J.P. [and others

    1996-03-01

    This is the summary report for the Protocol Extensions for Asynchronous Transfer Mode project, funded under Sandia`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. During this one-year effort, techniques were examined for integrating security enhancements within standard ATM protocols, and mechanisms were developed to validate these techniques and to provide a basic set of ATM security assurances. Based on our experience during this project, recommendations were presented to the ATM Forum (a world-wide consortium of ATM product developers, service providers, and users) to assist with the development of security-related enhancements to their ATM specifications. As a result of this project, Sandia has taken a leading role in the formation of the ATM Forum`s Security Working Group, and has gained valuable alliances and leading-edge experience with emerging ATM security technologies and protocols.

  16. Complex PTSD: research directions for nosology/assessment, treatment, and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian D. Ford

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD in children and adolescents extends beyond the core PTSD symptoms to dysregulation in three psychobiological domains: (1 emotion processing, (2 self-organization (including bodily integrity, and (3 relational functioning. CPTSD research directions for the next decade and beyond are identified in three areas: (1 diagnostic classification (establishing the empirical integrity of CPTSD as a distinct form of psychopathology and psychometric assessment [validation and refinement of measures of childhood polyvictimization and developmental trauma disorder (DTD], (2 rigorous evaluation and refinement of interventions (and algorithms for their delivery developed or adapted for CPTSD and DTD, and (3 the epidemiology of CPTSD and DTD, and their public health and safety impact, across the lifespan and intergenerationally, for populations, nations, and cultures.

  17. Aggression in Tephritidae Flies: Where, When, Why? Future Directions for Research in Integrated Pest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni

    2014-12-30

    True fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) include over 4000 species, many of which constitute enormous threats to fruit and vegetable production worldwide. A number of Tephritidae are lekking species, forming aggregations in which males fight to defend a small territory where they court females and mate. Male-male contests also occur in non-lekking species, characterized by resource defense polygyny. Tephritidae females display agonistic behavior to maintain single oviposition sites and reduce larval competition for food. Here, how, where, when and why aggressive interactions occur in Tephritidae flies is reviewed. A number of neglected issues deserving further research are highlighted, with a special focus on diel periodicity of aggression, cues evoking aggressive behavior, the role of previous experience on fighting success and the evolution of behavioral lateralization of aggressive displays. In the final section, future directions to exploit this knowledge in Integrated Pest Management, with particular emphasis on enhancement of Sterile Insect Technique and interspecific competitive displacement in the field are suggested.

  18. Final report for the Integrated and Robust Security Infrastructure (IRSI) laboratory directed research and development project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, R.L.; Hamilton, V.A.; Istrail, G.G.; Espinoza, J.; Murphy, M.D.

    1997-11-01

    This report describes the results of a Sandia-funded laboratory-directed research and development project titled {open_quotes}Integrated and Robust Security Infrastructure{close_quotes} (IRSI). IRSI was to provide a broad range of commercial-grade security services to any software application. IRSI has two primary goals: application transparency and manageable public key infrastructure. IRSI must provide its security services to any application without the need to modify the application to invoke the security services. Public key mechanisms are well suited for a network with many end users and systems. There are many issues that make it difficult to deploy and manage a public key infrastructure. IRSI addressed some of these issues to create a more manageable public key infrastructure.

  19. California Institute for Energy Efficiency: 1993 Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    In 1988, a statewide partnership of California`s six largest electric and gas utilities, the California Public Utilities Commission, the California Energy Commission, the University of California, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) led to the creation of the California Institute for energy Efficiency. CIEE was specifically established to respond to California`s energy and environmental needs by developing new, energy-efficient technologies for buildings, industry, and transportation using the scientific and technological capabilities of the state`s universities, colleges, and university-affiliated laboratories. This 1993 Annual Report highlights the accomplishments of CIEE`s research and development program, which includes 11 major multiyear projects in the fields of Building Energy Efficiency and Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency as well as 21 ongoing exploratory projects. This report contains research highlights from seven of these programs.

  20. Theoretical research relating to excitation spectrum of furan. Application of integral direct coupled cluster linear response (direct CCLR) method; Furan no reiki supekutoru ni kansuru ronriteki kenkyu. Integral-direct Coupled Cluster Linear Response (direct CCLR) ho no tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigemitsu, Yasuhiro. [Nagasaki Industrial Technology Center, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    heoretical researches relating to excitation spectrum of furan have been carried out for many years, and they reveal the problems that should be solved in order to predict highly reliable excitation energy. In general, it is difficult to uniformly obtain highly reliable calculation results for all excitation states since different excitation states show different electronic correlative effects. Means for obtaining the electron states in ground state and excited state and calculating the energy difference thereof is the mainstream of the theoretical calculation of the excitation energy. CASSCF/CASPT 2 developed by Roos et al. is a typical method excellent in quantitative description. Recently, the comparison between direct CCLR and CASSCF/CASPT 2 as examples for calculating the excitation spectrum of furan was carried out by using the same ground function. For Rydberg excitation, CC3, CAS, CASPT 2 show good agreement with each other. (NEDO)

  1. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  2. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  3. California Geothermal Forum: A Path to Increasing Geothermal Development in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Katherine R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The genesis of this report was a 2016 forum in Sacramento, California, titled 'California Geothermal Forum: A Path to Increasing Geothermal Development in California.' The forum was held at the California Energy Commission's (CEC) headquarters in Sacramento, California with the primary goal being to advance the dialogues for the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) and CEC technical research and development (R&D) focuses for future consideration. The forum convened a diverse group of stakeholders from government, industry, and research to lay out pathways for new geothermal development in California while remaining consistent with critical Federal and State conservation planning efforts, particularly at the Salton Sea.

  4. The Challenge: Latinos in a Changing California. The Report of the University of California SCR 43 Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Univ., Riverside. Consortium on Mexico and the United States.

    This document presents a report from a task force composed of scholars, professionals, and community leaders to the State of California and the University of California (UC) addressing issues affecting Latinos in California. The following major recommendations are discussed: (1) continuing research must be undertaken concerning dynamic changes and…

  5. A Prototype System for Using Multiple Radios in Directional MANET (Mobile Ad Hoc Network): A NISE Funded Applied Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Technical Document 3276 September 2013 A Prototype System for using Multiple Radios in Directional MANET (Mobile Ad Hoc Network) A...point, it is difficult to employ directional antennas in a mobile ad hoc network ( MANET ) as most current radio and wireless networking protocols were...September 2013 Final A Prototype System for Using Multiple Radios in Directional MANET (Mobile Ad Hoc Network) A NISE funded Applied Research

  6. Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of the Director

    2010-04-09

    I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In

  7. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development, FY 2007 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2008-02-20

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2007. Twenty-nine new projects were selected for funding this year, and eight projects started in FY 2006 were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.67 million, for an average per-project cost of $153 thousand. An external audit conducted in September 2007 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: programmatic adoption of 8 SDRD-developed technologies; the filing of 9 invention disclosures for innovation evolving from SDRD projects; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD Symposium that was broadly attended by Nevada Test Site (NTS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), LDRD, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2007 projects; and the successful completion of 37 R&D projects, as presented in this report. In response to a company-wide call, authors throughout the NTS complex submitted 182 proposals for FY 2007 SDRD projects. The SDRD program has seen a dramatic increase in the yearly total of submitted proposals--from 69 in FY 2002 to 182 this year--while the number of projects funded has actually decreased from a program high of 57 in FY 2004. The overall effect of this trend has helped ensure an increasingly competitive program that benefited from a broader set of innovative ideas, making project selection both challenging and rewarding. Proposals were evaluated for technical merit, including such factors as innovation, probability of success, potential benefit, and mission applicability. Authors and reviewers benefited from the use of a shortfalls list entitled the 'NTS Technology Needs Assessment' that was compiled from NTS, National Weapons Laboratory

  8. Strengthening LLNL Missions through Laboratory Directed Research and Development in High Performance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    High performance computing (HPC) has been a defining strength of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) since its founding. Livermore scientists have designed and used some of the world’s most powerful computers to drive breakthroughs in nearly every mission area. Today, the Laboratory is recognized as a world leader in the application of HPC to complex science, technology, and engineering challenges. Most importantly, HPC has been integral to the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Stockpile Stewardship Program—designed to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of our nuclear deterrent without nuclear testing. A critical factor behind Lawrence Livermore’s preeminence in HPC is the ongoing investments made by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program in cutting-edge concepts to enable efficient utilization of these powerful machines. Congress established the LDRD Program in 1991 to maintain the technical vitality of the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories. Since then, LDRD has been, and continues to be, an essential tool for exploring anticipated needs that lie beyond the planning horizon of our programs and for attracting the next generation of talented visionaries. Through LDRD, Livermore researchers can examine future challenges, propose and explore innovative solutions, and deliver creative approaches to support our missions. The present scientific and technical strengths of the Laboratory are, in large part, a product of past LDRD investments in HPC. Here, we provide seven examples of LDRD projects from the past decade that have played a critical role in building LLNL’s HPC, computer science, mathematics, and data science research capabilities, and describe how they have impacted LLNL’s mission.

  9. A 60-year journey of mycorrhizal research in China:Past,present and future directions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The significance of mycorrhizas(fungal roots in 90% of land plants) in plant nutrient acquisition and growth,element biogeo-chemical cycling and maintaining of terrestrial ecosystem structures has been globally established for more than 120 years.Great progress in mycorrhizal research in the past 60 years(1950-2009,1981-2009 in particular) has also been made across China,particularly in the mainland,Hong Kong and Taiwan.For instance,a total of 20 new and ~120 records of arbuscular mycorrhizal(AM) fungal species,30 new and ~800 records of ectomycorrhizal(EM) fungal species,a dozen of new and ~100 records of orchid mycorrhizal(OM) fungal species have been isolated by morphological observation and/or molecular identification in China since the 1950s.Great accomplishment has also been made in the following area,including fungal species richness and genetic structure,relationships between species composition and plant taxa,effects of mycorrhizal fungi on plant nutrient uptake and growth,resistances to pathogens and interactions with other soil microorganisms,potential of mycorrhizal fungi in phytoremediation and/or land reclamation,alterations of enzymatic activities in mycorrhizal plants,and elevated CO2 and O3 on root colonization and species diversity.Unfortunately,the international community cannot easily appreciate almost all Chinese mycorrhizal studies since the vast majority of them have been published in Chinese and/or in China-based journals.The aim of this review is to make a comprehensive exposure of the past and present China’s major mycorrhizal research to the whole world,and then to suggest potential directions for the enhancement of future mycorrhizal research within and/or between the Chinese and international mycorrhizal community.

  10. BEopt-CA (Ex) -- A Tool for Optimal Integration of EE/DR/ES+PV in Existing California Homes. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-429

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Craig [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-29

    Opportunities for combining energy efficiency, demand response, and energy storage with PV are often missed, because the required knowledge and expertise for these different technologies exist in separate organizations or individuals. Furthermore, there is a lack of quantitative tools to optimize energy efficiency, demand response and energy storage with PV, especially for existing buildings. Our goal is to develop a modeling tool, BEopt-CA (Ex), with capabilities to facilitate identification and implementation of a balanced integration of energy efficiency (EE), demand response (DR), and energy storage (ES) with photovoltaics (PV) within the residential retrofit market. To achieve this goal, we will adapt and extend an existing tool -- BEopt -- that is designed to identify optimal combinations of efficiency and PV in new home designs. In addition, we will develop multifamily residential modeling capabilities for use in California, to facilitate integration of distributed solar power into the grid in order to maximize its value to California ratepayers. The project is follow-on research that leverages previous California Solar Initiative RD&D investment in the BEopt software. BEopt facilitates finding the least cost combination of energy efficiency and renewables to support integrated DSM (iDSM) and Zero Net Energy (ZNE) in California residential buildings. However, BEopt is currently focused on modeling single-family houses and does not include satisfactory capabilities for modeling multifamily homes. The project brings BEopt's existing modeling and optimization capabilities to multifamily buildings, including duplexes, triplexes, townhouses, flats, and low-rise apartment buildings.

  11. RESEARCH DIRECTIONS AND THE MOST RELEVANT ACHIEVEMENTS OF CHEMISTRY RESEARCHERS IN THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA FOR THE PERIOD OF 2004-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel F. Vlad

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The first International Conference organized by the Chemical Society of Moldova has taken place in the early October 2003. Following are the most important research directions, objectives and realizations, achieved by different institutions involved in chemical research during the period of 2004-2007, presented in a very concise form.

  12. Back to the Future: Directions for Research in Teaching and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Pam; McDonald, Morva

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine two distinct but closely related fields, research on teaching and research on teacher education. Despite its roots in research on teaching, research in teacher education has developed in isolation both from mainstream research on teaching and from research on higher education and professional education. A…

  13. Herbivory in global climate change research: direct effects of rising temperature on insect herbivores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bale, J.S.; Masters, G.J.; Hodkinson, I.D.; Awmack, C.; Bezemer, T.M.; Brown, V.K.; Butterfield, J.; Buse, A.; Coulson, J.C.; Farrar, J.; Good, J.E.G.; Harrington, R.; Hartley, S.; Jones, T.H.; Lindroth, R.L.; Press, M.C.; Symrnioudis, I.; Watt, A.D.; Whittaker, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    This review examines the direct effects of climate change on insect herbivores. Temperature is identified as the dominant abiotic factor directly affecting herbivorous insects. There is little evidence of any direct effects Of CO2 or UVB. Direct impacts of precipitation have been largely neglected i

  14. 45 CFR 46.406 - Research involving greater than minimal risk and no prospect of direct benefit to individual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... no prospect of direct benefit to individual subjects, but likely to yield generalizable knowledge... Involved as Subjects in Research § 46.406 Research involving greater than minimal risk and no prospect of... to children is presented by an intervention or procedure that does not hold out the prospect...

  15. Physical profile data collected by the research vessel, Point Sur, near the coast of California, during February and June 1992 (NODC Accession 9400106)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical profile data were collected using CTD casts in the Coastal Waters of California from R/V POINT SUR. Data were collected from 09 February 1992 to 16 June...

  16. Donor human milk for preterm infants: current evidence and research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslanoglu, Sertac; Corpeleijn, Willemijn; Moro, Guido; Braegger, Christian; Campoy, Cristina; Colomb, Virginie; Decsi, Tamas; Domellöf, Magnus; Fewtrell, Mary; Hojsak, Iva; Mihatsch, Walter; Mølgaard, Christian; Shamir, Raanan; Turck, Dominique; van Goudoever, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    The Committee on Nutrition of the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition aims to document the existing evidence of the benefits and common concerns deriving from the use of donor human milk (DHM) in preterm infants. The comment also outlines gaps in knowledge and gives recommendations for practice and suggestions for future research directions. Protection against necrotizing enterocolitis is the major clinical benefit deriving from the use of DHM when compared with formula. Limited data also suggest unfortified DHM to be associated with improved feeding tolerance and with reduced cardiovascular risk factors during adolescence. Presence of a human milk bank (HMB) does not decrease breast-feeding rates at discharge, but decreases the use of formula during the first weeks of life. This commentary emphasizes that fresh own mother's milk (OMM) is the first choice in preterm infant feeding and strong efforts should be made to promote lactation. When OMM is not available, DHM is the recommended alternative. When neither OMM nor DHM is available, preterm formula should be used. DHM should be provided from an established HMB, which follows specific safety guidelines. Storage and processing of human milk reduces some biological components, which may diminish its health benefits. From a nutritional point of view, DHM, like HM, does not meet the requirements of preterm infants, necessitating a specific fortification regimen to optimize growth. Future research should focus on the improvement of milk processing in HMB, particularly of heat treatment; on the optimization of HM fortification; and on further evaluation of the potential clinical benefits of processed and fortified DHM.

  17. Identified research directions for using manufacturing knowledge earlier in the product lifecycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Thomas D; Hartman, Nathan W; Rosche, Phil; Fischer, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Design for Manufacturing (DFM), especially the use of manufacturing knowledge to support design decisions, has received attention in the academic domain. However, industry practice has not been studied enough to provide solutions that are mature for industry. The current state of the art for DFM is often rule-based functionality within Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems that enforce specific design requirements. That rule-based functionality may or may not dynamically affect geometry definition. And, if rule-based functionality exists in the CAD system, it is typically a customization on a case-by-case basis. Manufacturing knowledge is a phrase with vast meanings, which may include knowledge on the effects of material properties decisions, machine and process capabilities, or understanding the unintended consequences of design decisions on manufacturing. One of the DFM questions to answer is how can manufacturing knowledge, depending on its definition, be used earlier in the product lifecycle to enable a more collaborative development environment? This paper will discuss the results of a workshop on manufacturing knowledge that highlights several research questions needing more study. This paper proposes recommendations for investigating the relationship of manufacturing knowledge with shape, behavior, and context characteristics of product to produce a better understanding of what knowledge is most important. In addition, the proposal includes recommendations for investigating the system-level barriers to reusing manufacturing knowledge and how model-based manufacturing may ease the burden of knowledge sharing. Lastly, the proposal addresses the direction of future research for holistic solutions of using manufacturing knowledge earlier in the product lifecycle.

  18. Ecoregions of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Glenn E.; Omernik, James M.; Smith, David W.; Cook, Terry D.; Tallyn, Ed; Moseley, Kendra; Johnson, Colleen B.

    2016-02-23

    Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. By recognizing the spatial differences in the capacities and potentials of ecosystems, ecoregions stratify the environment by its probable response to disturbance (Bryce and others, 1999). These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across Federal agencies, State agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources in the same geographical areas (Omernik and others, 2000).The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions are hierarchical and can be identified through the analysis of the spatial patterns and the composition of biotic and abiotic phenomena that affect or reflect differences in ecosystem quality and integrity (Wiken, 1986; Omernik, 1987, 1995). These phenomena include geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another regardless of the hierarchical level. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels of ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997, map revised 2006). At level III, the continental United States contains 105 ecoregions and the conterminous United States has 85 ecoregions (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2013). Level IV, depicted here for California, is a further refinement of level III ecoregions. Explanations of the methods used to define these ecoregions are given in Omernik (1995), Omernik and others

  19. Nevada National Security Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2011 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2012-04-25

    This fiscal year 2011 annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development program, the 10th anniversary edition, recognizes a full decade of innovative R&D accomplishments in support of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Last year the NNSS itself was renamed to reflect a diversifying mission, and our R&D program has contributed significantly to shape emerging missions that will continue to evolve. New initiatives in stockpile stewardship science, nonproliferation, and treaty verification and monitoring have had substantial successes in FY 2011, and many more accomplishments are expected. SDRD is the cornerstone on which many of these initiatives rest. Historically supporting our main focus areas, SDRD is also building a solid foundation for new, and non-traditional, emerging national security missions. The program continues its charter to advance science and technology for a broad base of agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and many others.

  20. PLASMA OXYTOCIN CONCENTRATION AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS: A REVIEW OF CURRENT EVIDENCE AND DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Suena H; Backes, Katherine A; Schuette, Stephanie A

    2016-04-01

    There is substantial recent interest in the role of oxytocin in social and affiliative behaviors-animal models of depression have suggested a link between oxytocin and mood. We reviewed literature to date for evidence of a potential relationship between peripheral oxytocin concentration and depressive symptoms in humans. Pubmed(®) and PsychINFO(®) were searched for biomedical and social sciences literature from 1960 to May 19, 2015 for empirical articles in English involving human subjects focused on the relationship between peripheral oxytocin concentration and depressive symptoms, excluding articles on the oxytocin receptor gene, or involving exogenous (i.e. intranasal) administration of oxytocin. Eight studies meeting criteria were identified and formally reviewed. Studies of pregnant women suggested an inverse relationship between oxytocin level and depressive symptom severity. Findings in nonpregnant women were broadly consistent with the role of oxytocin release in response to stress supported by animal studies. The relationship between oxytocin and depression in men appeared to be in the opposite direction, possibly reflecting the influence of gonadal hormones on oxytocinergic functioning found in other mammalian species. Overall, small sample sizes, heterogeneity in study designs, and other methodological limitations may account for inconsistent findings. Future research utilizing reliable oxytocin measurement protocols including measurements across time, larger sample sizes, and sample homogeneity with respect to multiple possible confounders (age, gender, race and ethnicity, ovarian status among women, and psychosocial context) are needed to elucidate the role of oxytocin in the pathogenesis of depression, and could guide the design of novel pharmacologic agents.

  1. Does organisational culture influence prescribing in care homes for older people? A new direction for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Carmel M; Lapane, Kate; Watson, Margaret C; Davies, Huw T O

    2007-01-01

    Prescribing in care homes for older people has been the focus of much research and debate because of inappropriate drug choice and poor monitoring practices. In the US, this has led to the implementation of punitive and adversarial regulation that has sought to improve the quality of prescribing in this healthcare setting. This approach is unique to the US and has not been replicated elsewhere. The literature has revealed that there are limitations as to how much can be achieved with regulation that is externally imposed (an 'external factor'). Other influences, which may be categorised as 'internal factors' operating within the care home (e.g. patient, physician and care-home characteristics), also affect prescribing. However, these internal and external factors do not appear to affect prescribing uniformly, and poor prescribing practices in care homes continue to be observed. One intangible factor that has received little attention in this area of healthcare is that of organisational culture. This factor has been linked to quality and performance within other health organisations. Consideration of organisational culture within care-home settings may help to understand what drives prescribing decisions in this particularly vulnerable patient group and thus provide new directions for future strategies to promote quality care.

  2. Virtual reality and the CAVE: Taxonomy, interaction challenges and research directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhanna A. Muhanna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the main goals of virtual reality is to provide immersive environments that take participants away from the real life into a virtual one. Many investigators have been interested in bringing new technologies, devices, and applications to facilitate this goal. Few, however, have focused on the specific human–computer interaction aspects of such environments. In this article we present our literature review of virtual reality and the Cave Automated Virtual Environment (CAVE. In particular, the article begins by providing a brief overview of the evolution of virtual reality. In addition, key elements of a virtual reality system are presented along with a proposed taxonomy that categorizes such systems from the perspective of technologies used and the mental immersion level found in these systems. Moreover, a detailed overview of the CAVE is presented in terms of its characteristics, uses, and mainly, the interaction styles inside it. Insights of the interaction challenges and research directions of investigating interaction with virtual reality systems in general and the CAVE in particular are thoroughly discussed as well.

  3. The SCAR Standing Committee on Antarctic Data Management - new directions in access to Antarctic research data

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, T.

    2009-04-01

    The SCAR Standing Committee on Antarctic Data Management (SC-ADM) was established by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP), to assist in the fulfillment of the data management obligations imposed by the Antarctic Treaty (section III.1.c): "Scientific observations and results from Antarctica shall be exchanged and made freely available." SC-ADM comprises representatives of the National Antarctic Data Centres or national points of contact. Currently 31 nations around the world are represented in SC-ADM. So far, SC-ADM has been focussing on the coordination of the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD), the internationally accessible, web-based, searchable record of Antarctic and Southern Ocean data set descriptions. The AMD is directly integrated into the international Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) to help further merge Antarctic science into global science. The AMD is a resource for scientists to advertise the data they have collected and to search for data they may need. Currently, SC-ADM is in a transition phase, moving forward to provide data access. Existing systems and web services technology will be used as much as possible, to increase efficiency and prevent 're-inventing the wheel' This poster will give an overview of this process, the current status and the expected results.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-12-23

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

  5. Plant Virus–Insect Vector Interactions: Current and Potential Future Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf G. Dietzgen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition and transmission by an insect vector is central to the infection cycle of the majority of plant pathogenic viruses. Plant viruses can interact with their insect host in a variety of ways including both non-persistent and circulative transmission; in some cases, the latter involves virus replication in cells of the insect host. Replicating viruses can also elicit both innate and specific defense responses in the insect host. A consistent feature is that the interaction of the virus with its insect host/vector requires specific molecular interactions between virus and host, commonly via proteins. Understanding the interactions between plant viruses and their insect host can underpin approaches to protect plants from infection by interfering with virus uptake and transmission. Here, we provide a perspective focused on identifying novel approaches and research directions to facilitate control of plant viruses by better understanding and targeting virus–insect molecular interactions. We also draw parallels with molecular interactions in insect vectors of animal viruses, and consider technical advances for their control that may be more broadly applicable to plant virus vectors.

  6. Plant Virus-Insect Vector Interactions: Current and Potential Future Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzgen, Ralf G; Mann, Krin S; Johnson, Karyn N

    2016-11-09

    Acquisition and transmission by an insect vector is central to the infection cycle of the majority of plant pathogenic viruses. Plant viruses can interact with their insect host in a variety of ways including both non-persistent and circulative transmission; in some cases, the latter involves virus replication in cells of the insect host. Replicating viruses can also elicit both innate and specific defense responses in the insect host. A consistent feature is that the interaction of the virus with its insect host/vector requires specific molecular interactions between virus and host, commonly via proteins. Understanding the interactions between plant viruses and their insect host can underpin approaches to protect plants from infection by interfering with virus uptake and transmission. Here, we provide a perspective focused on identifying novel approaches and research directions to facilitate control of plant viruses by better understanding and targeting virus-insect molecular interactions. We also draw parallels with molecular interactions in insect vectors of animal viruses, and consider technical advances for their control that may be more broadly applicable to plant virus vectors.

  7. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2011-04-04

    This annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program represents the highly significant R&D accomplishments conducted during fiscal year 2010. This year was noteworthy historically, as the Nevada Test Site was renamed to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This change not only recognizes how the site's mission has evolved, but also heralds a future of new challenges and opportunities for the NNSS. In many ways, since its inception in 2002, the SDRD program has helped shape that evolving mission. As we approach 2012, SDRD will also mark a milestone, having completed its first full decade of innovative R&D in support of the site and national security. The program continues to fund advanced science and technology development across traditional Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear security areas such as stockpile stewardship and non-proliferation while also supporting Department of Homeland Security (DHS) needs, and specialized work for government agencies like the Department of Defense (DoD) and others. The NNSS will also contribute technologies in the areas of treaty verification and monitoring, two areas of increasing importance to national security. Keyed to the NNSS's broadened scope, the SDRD program will continue to anticipate and advance R&D projects that will help the NNSS meet forthcoming challenges.

  8. Research on Continuous Injection Direct Rolling Process for PMMA Optical Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HaiXiong Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Continuous injection direct rolling (CIDR combined intermittent injection and rolling process is a new technology for molding optical polymer plates with microstructured patterns; research on forming PMMA optical plates is an aspect of it in this paper. The equipment of CIDR process consists of plastic injection module, precision rolling module, and automatic coiling module. Based on the establishing mathematical CIDR models, numerical analysis was used to explode the distribution of velocity, temperature, and pressure in injection-rolling zone. The simulation results show that it is feasible to control the temperature, velocity, and injection-rolling force, so it can form polymer plate under certain process condition. CIDR experiment equipment has been designed and produced. PMMA optical plate was obtained by CIDR experiments, longitudinal thickness difference is 0.005 mm/200 mm, horizontal thickness difference is 0.02/200 mm, transmittance is 86.3%, Haze is 0.61%, and the difference is little compared with optical glasses. So it can be confirmed that CIDR process is practical to produce PMMA optical plates.

  9. GEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF PALAEOTSUNAMIS IN THE SAMOAN ISLANDS: INTERIM REPORT AND RESEARCH DIRECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Davies

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The September 29, 2009 Samoa Tsunami provided the opportunity to sample the sediments deposited in the Samoan Islands landscape by the tsunami. Analysing the characteristics of the sediment deposits using an established suite of diagnostic criteria, and assessing how they differ from cyclone deposits enables the identification and dating of similar events in the geologic record. This helps to better understand the long-term frequency and likely magnitude of these events. Here we report on a pilot palaeotsunami field-sampling investigation carried out in 2010 at selected sites on Upolu and Savaii Islands in the Independent State of Samoa, and on Ta’u Island in American Samoa. We present empirical stratigraphic data for the investigated sites, and we demonstrate the existence of high energy marine inundation deposits at some of these sites which were laid down by past tsunamis and/or cyclones. We review and discuss the analytical outcomes, as well as summarise the overarching directions of this research. We propose that there is a need for this study to continue and for such studies to be carried out in other islands in the Pacific. By doing this, we can build on the sparse palaeotsunami database in the region, thereby helping to improve our understanding of the long-term frequency, impact distribution, and likely magnitude of these events. Further, we can start assessing their likely sources and the long-term risk these hazards pose to coastal cities and communities in the Pacific.

  10. Aggression in Tephritidae Flies: Where, When, Why? Future Directions for Research in Integrated Pest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Benelli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available True fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae include over 4000 species, many of which constitute enormous threats to fruit and vegetable production worldwide. A number of Tephritidae are lekking species, forming aggregations in which males fight to defend a small territory where they court females and mate. Male-male contests also occur in non-lekking species, characterized by resource defense polygyny. Tephritidae females display agonistic behavior to maintain single oviposition sites and reduce larval competition for food. Here, how, where, when and why aggressive interactions occur in Tephritidae flies is reviewed. A number of neglected issues deserving further research are highlighted, with a special focus on diel periodicity of aggression, cues evoking aggressive behavior, the role of previous experience on fighting success and the evolution of behavioral lateralization of aggressive displays. In the final section, future directions to exploit this knowledge in Integrated Pest Management, with particular emphasis on enhancement of Sterile Insect Technique and interspecific competitive displacement in the field are suggested.

  11. Stem cell technology for tendon regeneration: current status, challenges, and future research directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lui PP

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pauline Po Yee Lui Headquarter, Hospital Authority, Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China Abstract: Tendon injuries are a common cause of physical disability. They present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgeons because injured tendons respond poorly to current treatments without tissue regeneration and the time required for rehabilitation is long. New treatment options are required. Stem cell-based therapies offer great potential to promote tendon regeneration due to their high proliferative, synthetic, and immunomodulatory activities as well as their potential to differentiate to the target cell types and undergo genetic modification. In this review, I first recapped the challenges of tendon repair by reviewing the anatomy of tendon. Next, I discussed the advantages and limitations of using different types of stem cells compared to terminally differentiated cells for tendon tissue engineering. The safety and efficacy of application of stem cells and their modified counterparts for tendon tissue engineering were then summarized after a systematic literature search in PubMed. The challenges and future research directions to enhance, optimize, and standardize stem cell-based therapies for augmenting tendon repair were then discussed. Keywords: stem cells, tendon repair, tendon tissue engineering, tendon injuries

  12. Transmission routes of African swine fever virus to domestic pigs: current knowledge and future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinat, Claire; Gogin, Andrey; Blome, Sandra; Keil, Guenther; Pollin, Reiko; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Dixon, Linda

    2016-03-12

    African swine fever (ASF) is a major threat to the pig industry in Europe. Since 2007, ASF outbreaks have been ongoing in the Caucasus, Eastern Europe and the Baltic countries, causing severe economic losses for many pig farmers and pork producers. In addition, the number of ASF cases in wild boar populations has dramatically increased over the past few years. Evidence supports direct contact with infectious domestic pigs and wild boars, and consumption of contaminated feed, as the main transmission routes of ASF virus (ASFV) to domestic pigs. However, significant knowledge gaps highlight the urgent need for research to investigate the dynamics of indirect transmission via the environment, the minimal infective doses for contaminated feed ingestion, the probability of effective contacts between infectious wild boars and domestic pigs, the potential for recovered animals to become carriers and a reservoir for transmission, the potential virus persistence within wild boar populations and the influence of human behaviour for the spread of ASFV. This will provide an improved scientific basis to optimise current interventions and develop new tools and strategies to reduce the risk of ASFV transmission to domestic pigs.

  13. Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1991 program activities: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle``; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  14. Social networks and future direction for obesity research: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soohyun; Redeker, Nancy; Whittemore, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant efforts to decrease obesity rates, the prevalence of obesity continues to increase in the United States. Obesity risk behaviors including physical inactivity, unhealthy eating, and sleep deprivation are intertwined during daily life and are difficult to improve in the current social environment. Studies show that social networks-the thick webs of social relations and interactions-influence various health outcomes, such as HIV risk behaviors, alcohol consumption, smoking, depression, and cardiovascular mortality; however, there is limited information on the influences of social networks on obesity and obesity risk behaviors. Given the complexities of the biobehavioral pathology of obesity and the lack of clear evidence of effectiveness and sustainability of existing interventions that are usually focused on an individual approach, targeting change in an individual's health behaviors or attitude may not take sociocontextual factors into account; there is a pressing need for a new perspective on this problem. In this review, we evaluate the literature on social networks as a potential approach for obesity prevention and treatment (i.e., how social networks affect various health outcomes), present two major social network data analyses (i.e., egocentric and sociometric analysis), and discuss implications and the future direction for obesity research using social networks.

  15. Nanotechnology Research Directions for Societal Needs in 2020 Retrospective and Outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Roco, Mihail C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2011-01-01

    This volume presents a comprehensive perspective on the global scientific, technological, and societal impact of nanotechnology since 2000, and explores the opportunities and research directions in the next decade to 2020.  The vision for the future of nanotechnology presented here draws on scientific insights from U.S. experts in the field, examinations of lessons learned, and international perspectives shared by participants from 35 countries in a series of high-level workshops organized by Mike Roco of the National Science Foundation (NSF), along with a team of American co-hosts that includes Chad Mirkin, Mark Hersam, Evelyn Hu, and several other eminent U.S. scientists.  The study performed in support of the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) aims to redefine the R&D goals for nanoscale science and engineering integration and to establish nanotechnology as a general-purpose technology in the next decade. It intends to provide decision makers in academia, industry, and government with a n...

  16. Marine Invertebrate assemblages in southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a point file of invertebrate site clusters calculated from benthic trawls completed by the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP). Data...

  17. Nearshore marine fish assemblages in southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish benthic trawls were completed by the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP). Data from 425 fisheries independent trawls ranging from 2-215...

  18. The Future Arrives First in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Richard C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the challenges confronted by the University of California in financing higher education and research programs, and equalizing the opportunity for a college education for all students. Predicts that many challenges are on the horizon for all universities. (CCM)

  19. Improvements in the use of aquatic herbicides and establishment of future research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getsinger, K.D.; Netherland, M.D.; Grue, C.E.; Koschnick, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    priorities for future research directions in chemical management of submersed plants. The priorities we identified include: (A) improving methods for evaluating non-target impacts of herbicides with an emphasis on threatened and endangered species, or species of special concern; (B) improving herbicide performance in flowing-water environments, including irrigation canals; (C) screening and developing new herbicides to supplement fluridone for large-scale or whole-lake management approaches; (D) screening and developing new organic algaecides to supplement the use of copper-based compounds; (E) developing risk assessment tools to educate the public on the risks of invasive species and chemical management options; (F) increasing cooperative research with ecologists and fisheries scientists to evaluate the long-term impacts of invasive species introductions and herbicide programs on native plant assemblages, water quality, and fish populations; and (G) improving the integration of chemical control technology with other aquatic plant management disciplines. While circumstances may dictate setting new priorities or dropping current ones, the list we have generated represents our vision of the needs that will require the greatest focus over the next several years.

  20. Bringing Students out of the Classroom and into Research Projects: An Undergraduate Team Research (UTR) Program at the University of Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, I. V.; Quirk, M.; Culbert, K. N.; Whitesides, A. S.; Sun, H.; Black, C. J.; Cao, W.; Zhang, T.; Paterson, S. R.; Memeti, V.; Anderson, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    In 2006, USC Earth Sciences professors Paterson and Anderson created the Undergraduate Team Research (UTR) program, a year-long, multidisciplinary, learner-centered, student research experience. This program is open to all USC undergraduate students, but has also involved a few outstanding undergraduate students from other universities. Since its inception the 47 participants have been a diverse group: 53% women, ~17% minorities, and 43% non-Earth Science majors. To date, 15 abstracts written by UTR participants have been presented at national GSA and AGU meetings and several research papers for publication are in preparation. 12 presentations have been produced at University-sponsored research symposia and culminated in a number of senior theses. The central component of this program is a field-based research experience which involves several weeks of geologic mapping in various locations around the world. During the summer expedition, participants organize themselves into 3-4 person mapping teams consisting of a mix of undergraduate geology majors, non-majors, and mentors (professors and graduate students). At the end of each day, student researchers (with limited mentoring) work together to draft a geologic map while discussing their findings, formulating hypotheses about possible geologic histories, and planning research goals and organizing mapping teams for the next day. Throughout the following academic year, the student researchers continue to work in teams to digitize their geologic map, decide which analyses need to be done, and prepare collected rock samples for various structural, geochemical, and geochronologic studies. Most student researchers agree that they learned more in a few weeks than they often did in an entire semester course. What aspects of the UTR program elicit these high-yield results, even for non-majors that can be applied to other learning environments? We speculate that three critical elements are important: (1) The most notable is

  1. Climate Change Effects on Annual Average Concentrations of Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeman, M.; Mahmud, A.

    2008-12-01

    California has one of the worst particulate air pollution problems in the nation with some estimates predicting more than 5000 premature deaths each year attributed to air pollution. Climate change will modify weather patterns in California with unknown consequences for PM2.5. Previous down-scaling exercises carried out for the entire United States have typically not resolved the details associated with California's mountain-valley topography and mixture of urban-rural emissions characteristics. Detailed studies carried out for California have identified strong effects acting in opposite directions on PM2.5 concentrations making the net prediction for climate effects on PM2.5 somewhat uncertain. More research is needed to reduce this uncertainty so that we can truly understand climate impacts on PM2.5 and public health. The objective of this research is to predict climate change effects on annual average concentrations of particulate matter (PM2.5) in California with sufficient resolution to capture the details of California's air basins. Business-as-usual scenarios generated by the Parallel Climate Model (PCM) will be down-scaled to 4km meteorology using the Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model. The CIT/UCD source-oriented photochemical air quality model will be employed to predict PM2.5 concentrations throughout the entire state of California. The modeled annual average total and speciated PM2.5 concentrations for the future (2047-2049) and the present-day (2004-2006) periods will be compared to determine climate change effects. The results from this study will improve our understanding of global climate change effects on PM2.5 concentrations in California.

  2. Acquisition Research: Creating Synergy for Informed Change. Proceedings of the Annual Acquisition Research Symposium (5th) Held in Monterey, California on 14-15 May 2008. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-23

    2006). The study of reform agendas and recommendations is an exercise in organizational evolution. Just as Darwin noted the beaks of the finches...maintenance) are carried out in South Australia. Minor war vessels are mostly home-ported and supported in Darwin and Cairns. The home-porting of...UNCLASSIFIED Acquisition Logistics Robotic Systems Joint Project Office PM UA MG Cartwright Funding Direction And Oversight OSD JGRE Mr. Melita Col Braden

  3. An Analysis of Sport Event Tourism Research: Trends, Issues and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas Michele TURCO

    2008-01-01

    Sport tourism as an academic discipline and research focus has evolved considerably in the past two decades. Textbooks, academic conferences, undergraduate and graduate degree programmes, and a scientific journal, Journal of Sport and Tourism, now exist. This article examines the current body of research devoted to event-based sport tourism and identifies patterns of sport tourist behaviors, research issues, and future areas for research. Research focus areas covered include event economic im...

  4. Directional backlight liquid crystal autostereoscopic display: technical challenges, research progress, and prospect (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hang; Li, Kunyang; Zhou, Yangui; Liang, Haowen; Wang, Jiahui; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-09-01

    Recent upsurge on virtual and augmented realities (VR and AR) has re-ignited the interest to the immerse display technology. The VR/AR technology based on stereoscopic display is believed in its early stage as glasses-free, or autostereoscopic display, will be ultimately adopted for the viewing convenience, visual comfort and for the multi-viewer purposes. On the other hand, autostereoscopic display has not yet received positive market response for the past years neither with stereoscopic displays using shutter or polarized glasses. We shall present the analysis on the real-world applications, rigid user demand, the drawbacks to the existing barrier- and lenticular lens-based LCD autostereoscopy. We shall emphasize the emerging autostereoscopic display, and notably on directional backlight LCD technology using a hybrid spatial- and temporal-control scenario. We report the numerical simulation of a display system using Monte-Carlo ray-tracing method with the human retina as the real image receiver. The system performance is optimized using newly developed figure of merit for system design. The reduced crosstalk in an autostereoscopic system, the enhanced display quality, including the high resolution received by the retina, the display homogeneity without Moiré- and defect-pattern, will be highlighted. Recent research progress including a novel scheme for diffraction-free backlight illumination, the expanded viewing zone for autostereoscopic display, and the novel Fresnel lens array to achieve a near perfect display in 2D/3D mode will be introduced. The experimental demonstration will be presented to the autostereoscopic display with the highest resolution, low crosstalk, Moiré- and defect- pattern free.

  5. NASA space communications R and D (Research and Development): Issues, derived benefits, and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Space communication is making immense strides since ECHO was launched in 1962. It was a simple passive reflector of signals that demonstrated the concept. Today, satellites incorporating transponders, sophisticated high-gain antennas, and stabilization systems provide voice, video, and data communications to millions of people nationally and worldwide. Applications of emerging technology, typified by NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1992, will use newer portions of the frequency spectrum (the Ka-band at 30/20 GHz), along with antennas and signal-processing that could open yet new markets and services. Government programs, directly or indirectly, are responsible for many space communications accomplishments. They are sponsored and funded in part by NASA and the U.S. Department of Defense since the early 1950s. The industry is growing rapidly and is achieving international preeminence under joint private and government sponsorship. Now, however, the U.S. space communications industry - satellite manufacturers and users, launch services providers, and communications services companies - are being forced to adapt to a different environment. International competition is growing, and terrestrial technologies such as fiber optics are claiming markets until recently dominated by satellites. At the same time, advancing technology is opening up opportunities for new applications and new markets in space exploration, for defense, and for commercial applications of several types. Space communications research, development, and applications (RD and A) programs need to adjust to these realities, be better coordinated and more efficient, and be more closely attuned to commercial markets. The programs must take advantage of RD and A results in other agencies - and in other nations.

  6. Ground-water characterization field activities for 1995--1996 Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, University of California, Davis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liikala, T.L.; Lanigan, D.C.; Last, G.V. [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report documents ground-water characterization field activities completed from August to December 1995 and in January 1996 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) in Davis, California. The ground water at LEHR is one of several operable units under investigation by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this work was to further characterize the hydrogeology beneath the LEHR site, with the primary focus on ground water. The objectives were to estimate hydraulic properties for the two uppermost saturated hydrogeologic units (i.e., HSU-1 and HSU-2), and to determine distributions of contaminants of concern in these units. Activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives include well installation, geophysical logging, well development, ground-water sampling, slug testing, Westbay ground-water monitoring system installation, continuous water-level monitoring, Hydropunch installation, and surveying. Ground-water samples were collected from 61 Hydropunch locations. Analytical results from these locations and the wells indicate high chloroform concentrations trending from west/southwest to east/northeast in the lower portion of HSU-1 and in the upper and middle portions of HSU-2. The chloroform appears to originate near Landfill 2. Tritium was not found above the MCL in any of the well or Hydropunch samples. Hexavalent chromium was found at four locations with concentrations above the MCL in HSU-1 and at one location in HSU-2. One well in HSU-1 had a total chromium concentration above the MCL. Nitrate-nitrogen above the MCL was found at several Hydropunch locations in both HSU-1 and HSU-2.

  7. Army Research Office and Air Force Office of Scientific Research; 1998 Contractors’ Meeting in Chemical Propulsion Held in Long Beach, California on 29 June-1 July 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    estimate that the thermophoretic diffusivity of soot aggregates in atmospheric pressure flames is not very different from the/ ree -molecule kinetic...90095-1597 (310)825-5653 FAX:206-4830 ark@seas.ucla.edu Dr Laurence R Keefe Nielsen Engineering and Research, Inc. 510 Clyde Avenue Mountain

  8. Dick Crane's California Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrow, Charles H.

    2011-03-01

    Horace Richard Crane (1907-2007) was born and educated in California. His childhood was full of activities that helped him become an outstanding experimental physicist. As a graduate student at the California Institute of Technology (1930-1934), he had the good fortune to work with Charles C. Lauritsen (1892-1968) just as he introduced accelerator-based nuclear physics to Caltech. They shared the euphoric excitement of opening up a new field with simple, ingenious apparatus and experiments. This work prepared Crane for his career at the University of Michigan (1935-1973) where in the 1950s, after making the first measurement of the electron's magnetic moment, he devised the g-2 technique and made the first measurement of the anomaly in the electron's magnetic moment. A man of direct, almost laconic style, he made lasting contributions to the exposition of physics to the general public and to its teaching in high schools, community colleges, four-year colleges, and universities. I tell how he became a physicist and describe some of his early achievements.

  9. California Condor Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These Data identify (in general) the areas where critical habitat for the California Condor occur. Critical habitat for the species consists of the following 10...

  10. Automatic identification of fault zone head waves and direct P waves and its application in the Parkfield section of the San Andreas Fault, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zefeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    Fault zone head waves (FZHWs) are observed along major strike-slip faults and can provide high-resolution imaging of fault interface properties at seismogenic depth. In this paper, we present a new method to automatically detect FZHWs and pick direct P waves secondary arrivals (DWSAs). The algorithm identifies FZHWs by computing the amplitude ratios between the potential FZHWs and DSWAs. The polarities, polarizations and characteristic periods of FZHWs and DSWAs are then used to refine the picks or evaluate the pick quality. We apply the method to the Parkfield section of the San Andreas Fault where FZHWs have been identified before by manual picks. We compare results from automatically and manually picked arrivals and find general agreement between them. The obtained velocity contrast at Parkfield is generally 5-10 per cent near Middle Mountain while it decreases below 5 per cent near Gold Hill. We also find many FZHWs recorded by the stations within 1 km of the background seismicity (i.e. the Southwest Fracture Zone) that have not been reported before. These FZHWs could be generated within a relatively wide low velocity zone sandwiched between the fast Salinian block on the southwest side and the slow Franciscan Mélange on the northeast side. Station FROB on the southwest (fast) side also recorded a small portion of weak precursory signals before sharp P waves. However, the polarities of weak signals are consistent with the right-lateral strike-slip mechanisms, suggesting that they are unlikely genuine FZHW signals.

  11. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  12. Index and Bulk Parameters for Frequency-Direction Spectra Measured at CERC Field Research Facility, September 1991 to August 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Index and Bulk Parameters for Frequency- Direction Spectra Measured at CERC Field Research Facility, September 1991 to August 1992 Accion For by...Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000 Under Civil Works Research Work Unit 32484 M US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways...that affect coastal engineering pro- jects. This effort was authorized by Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps o.’ Engi- neers (HQUSACE), under Civil Works

  13. Research in Online and Blended Learning in the Business Disciplines: Key Findings and Possible Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbaugh, J. B.; Godfrey, Michael R.; Johnson, Marianne; Pollack, Birgit Leisen; Niendorf, Bruce; Wresch, William

    2009-01-01

    In this literature review, we examine and assess the state of research of online and blended learning in the business disciplines with the intent of assessing the state of the field and identifying opportunities for meaningful future research. We review research from business disciplines such as Accounting, Economics, Finance, Information Systems…

  14. 监督学习的发展动态%Current Directions in Supervised Learning Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋艳凰; 周海芳; 杨学军

    2003-01-01

    Supervised learning is very important in machine learning area. It has been making great progress in manydirections. This article summarizes three of these directions ,which are the hot problems in supervised learning field.These three directions are (a) improving classification accuracy by learning ensembles of classifiers, (b) methods forscaling up supervised learning algorithm, (c) extracting understandable rules from classifiers.

  15. Self-Directed Learning and Schooling: Identifying Pertinent Theories and Illustrative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skager, Rodney

    1979-01-01

    Six theoretical positions on human learning are identified as relevant to the development of self-direction: modeling; reinforcement; curiosity motivation; competency motivation; attribution theory and personal causation; and humanism. Four approaches to educational practice associated with self-direction are identified: experimental learning;…

  16. Self Directed Support and People with Learning Disabilities: A Review of the Published Research Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkes, Mary Anne; Brown, Michael; Horsburgh, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    A systematic literature review was undertaken to determine the evidence base underpinning the strategy of Self Directed Support and whether evidence demonstrates that this policy is accessible to everyone with a learning disability. It also sought to identify whether there were any barriers to Self Directed Support for people with severe or…

  17. Knowledge Mobilization in Canadian Educational Research: Identifying Current Developments and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snezana Ratkovic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this special issue of Brock Education: Journal for Educational Research and Practice, we build on the knowledge mobilization (KMb discourses initiated by the Ontario Ministry of Education (MOE, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC, Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research (KNAER, Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE, and School District-University Research Exchange (SURE network. We feature five journal articles and a book review addressing the three main KMb questions: How to assess KMb efforts across educational systems?  To what extent do educators use research to inform their praxis? How to make KMb work?

  18. Chemistry and Materials Science Weapons-Supporting Research and Laboratory-Directed Research and Development. Second half progress report, FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research are surface research, uranium research, physics and processing of metals, energetic materials. Group study areas included strength of Al and Al-Mg/alumina bonds, advanced synchrotron radiation study of materials, and theory, modeling, and computation. Individual projects were life prediction for composites and thermoelectric materials with exceptional figures of merit. The laboratory-directed R and D include director`s initiatives (aerogel-based electronic devices, molecular levels of energetic materials), individual projects, and transactinium institute studies. An author index is provided.

  19. Laboratory directed research and development final report: Intelligent tools for on-machine acceptance of precision machined components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, N.G.; Harwell, L.D.; Hazelton, A.

    1997-02-01

    On-Machine Acceptance (OMA) is an agile manufacturing concept being developed for machine tools at SNL. The concept behind OMA is the integration of product design, fabrication, and qualification processes by using the machining center as a fabrication and inspection tool. This report documents the final results of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development effort to qualify OMA.

  20. Progress in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gipe, P.

    1990-01-01

    Though the wind energy continues to take it on the chin in the rough and tumble of California's celebrity politics, several indicators are pointing toward a modest revival. First several new reports laud wind energy at good sites as now competitive with conventional sources. Second, utility subsidiaries are signaling their approval by cautiously venturing into the technology. Also, technological refinements and reorganizations continue while a demand for new generating capacity may be developing in the state. Three new reports all paint a picture of wind energy finally coming of age. The California Energy Commission's most recent Energy Technology Status report says that wind-generated electricity is competitive with coal, oil, gas, and most other technologies. Similarly, a staff report found that after tallying the economic, social, and environmental costs, wind was one of the least cost sources of new generation. Most recently the Electric Power Research Institute's Journal reported the wind energy, at about 8 cents/k Wh, is equivalent to generation from conventional sources.

  1. Management research in India: Current state and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Khatri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Concerned over the lack of high quality, context specific management research in India, and the predilection of Indian researchers to follow Western models of research and publication blindly, the authors take stock of Indian management research in this round table discussion and debate some of the relevant issues. Urging Indian researchers to strive for the levels of rigour of the Western models, they make a case for confident indigenous scholarship to suit the development and educational requirements of the country, following context-relevant constructs and methodologies in research and developing curricula, materials and modes of dissemination independently. These ideas were also explored at the second Indian Academy of Management Conference held at IIM Bangalore in December 2011.

  2. Overcoming gaps to advance global health equity: a symposium on new directions for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenk, Julio; Chen, Lincoln

    2011-02-22

    The 20th anniversary of the groundbreaking report of the Commission on Health Research for Development inspired a Symposium to assess progress made in strengthening essential national health research capacity in developing countries and in global research partnerships. Significant aspects of the health gains achieved in the 20th century can be attributed to the advancement and translation of knowledge, and knowledge continues to occupy center stage amidst growing complexity that characterizes the global health field. The way forward will entail a reinvigoration of research-generated knowledge as a crucial ingredient for global cooperation and global health advances. To do this we will need to overcome daunting gaps, including the divides between domestic and global health, among the disciplines of research (biomedical, clinical, epidemiological, health systems), between clinical and public health approaches, public and private investments, and between knowledge gained and action implemented. Overcoming systematically these obstacles can accelerate progress towards research for equity in health and development.

  3. Overcoming gaps to advance global health equity: a symposium on new directions for research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Lincoln

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 20th anniversary of the groundbreaking report of the Commission on Health Research for Development inspired a Symposium to assess progress made in strengthening essential national health research capacity in developing countries and in global research partnerships. Significant aspects of the health gains achieved in the 20th century can be attributed to the advancement and translation of knowledge, and knowledge continues to occupy center stage amidst growing complexity that characterizes the global health field. The way forward will entail a reinvigoration of research-generated knowledge as a crucial ingredient for global cooperation and global health advances. To do this we will need to overcome daunting gaps, including the divides between domestic and global health, among the disciplines of research (biomedical, clinical, epidemiological, health systems, between clinical and public health approaches, public and private investments, and between knowledge gained and action implemented. Overcoming systematically these obstacles can accelerate progress towards research for equity in health and development.

  4. UTILITY OF MECHANISTIC MODELS FOR DIRECTING ADVANCED SEPARATIONS RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES: Electrochemically Modulated Separation Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwantes, Jon M.

    2009-06-01

    The objective for this work was to demonstrate the utility of mechanistic computer models designed to simulate actinide behavior for use in efficiently and effectively directing advanced laboratory R&D activities associated with developing advanced separations methods.

  5. Profile of the chemicals industry in California: Californiaindustries of the future program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) established the Industries of the Future (IOF) program to increase energy efficiency, reduce waste production and to improve competitiveness, currently focusing on nine sectors. The IOF is a partnership strategy involving industry, the research community and the government, working together to identify technology needs, promote industrial partnerships and implement joint measures with all partners involved. The State Industries of the Future (SIOF) program delivers the accomplishments of the national Industries of the Future strategy to the local level, to expand the technology opportunities to a larger number of partners and reach smaller businesses and manufacturers that were not initially involved in the IOF effort. The state programs bring together industry, academia, and state agencies to address the important issues confronting industry in the state. These public-private coalitions facilitate industry solutions locally and enhance economic development. California has started a State Industries of the Future effort, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy. The California Energy Commission (CEC) is leading the SIOF program in California, as part of many other programs to improve the energy efficiency and performance of industries in California. The California State IOF program aims to build a network of participants from industry, academia and government in four selected industrial sectors as a basis for the development of a strategic partnership for industrial energy efficient technology in the state. In California the IOF effort focuses petroleum refining, chemical processing, food processing and electronics. As part of this effort, the SIOF program will develop roadmaps for technology development for the selected sectors. On the basis of the roadmap, the program will develop successful projects with co-funding from state and federal government, and promote industry

  6. Defining future directions for endometriosis research: workshop report from the 2011 World Congress of Endometriosis In Montpellier, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Peter A W; D'Hooghe, Thomas M; Fazleabas, Asgerally; Giudice, Linda C; Montgomery, Grant W; Petraglia, Felice; Taylor, Robert N

    2013-05-01

    Endometriosis, defined as estrogen-dependent lesions containing endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterus, is a chronic and often painful gynecological condition that affects 6% to 10% of reproductive age women. Endometriosis has estimated annual costs of US $12 419 per woman (approximately €9579), comprising one-third of the direct health care costs with two-thirds attributed to loss of productivity. Decreased quality of life is the most important predictor of direct health care and total costs. It has been estimated that there is a mean delay of 6.7 years between onset of symptoms and a surgical diagnosis of endometriosis, and each affected woman loses on average 10.8 hours of work weekly, mainly owing to reduced effectiveness while working. To encourage and facilitate research into this debilitating disease, a consensus workshop to define future directions for endometriosis research was held as part of the 11th World Congress on Endometriosis in September 2011 in Montpellier, France. The objective of this workshop was to review and update the endometriosis research priorities consensus statement developed following the 10th World Congress on Endometriosis in 2008.(1) A total of 56 recommendations for research have been developed, grouped under 6 subheadings: (1) diagnosis, (2) classification and prognosis, (3) clinical trials, treatment, and outcomes, (4) epidemiology, (5) pathophysiology, and (6) research policy. By producing this consensus international research priorities statement, it is the hope of the workshop participants that researchers will be encouraged to develop new interdisciplinary research proposals that will attract increased funding support for work on endometriosis.

  7. Direct-Drive Inertial Fusion Research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Bahr, R.E.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Donaldson, W.R.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Keck, R.L.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Lund, L.D.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Marshall, F.J.; Morse, S.F.B.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Thorp, K.A.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2010-04-16

    This paper reviews the status of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). LLE's goal is to demonstrate direct-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by 2014. Baseline "all-DT" NIF direct-drive ignition target designs have been developed that have a predicted gain of 45 (1-D) at a NIF drive energy of ~1.6 MJ. Significantly higher gains are calculated for targets that include a DT-wicked foam ablator. This paper also reviews the results of both warm fuel and initial cryogenic-fuel spherical target implosion experiments carried out on the OMEGA UV laser. The results of these experiments and design calculations increase confidence that the NIF direct-drive ICF ignition goal will be achieved.

  8. The portability of computer-related educational resources : summary and directions for further research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Diana, Italo; Collis, Betty A.

    1990-01-01

    In this Special Issue of the Journal of Research on Computing in Education, the portability of computer-related educational resources has been examined by a number of researchers and practitioners, reflecting various backgrounds, cultures, and experiences. A first iteration of a general model of fac

  9. Developmental Pathways to Conduct Disorder: Implications for Future Directions in Research, Assessment, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Research has indicated that there are several common pathways through which children and adolescents develop conduct disorder, each with different risk factors and each with different underlying developmental mechanisms leading to the child's aggressive and antisocial behavior. The current article briefly summarizes research on these pathways,…

  10. Evolving research directions in Surface Ocean-Lower Atmosphere (SOLAS) science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, Cliff S.; Breviere, Emilie; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Garcon, Veronique; Guieu, Cecile; Kieber, David J.; Kontradowitz, Stefan; Paulmier, Aurelien; Quinn, Patricia K.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Stefels, Jacqueline; von Glasow, Roland

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on critical issues in ocean-atmosphere exchange that will be addressed by new research strategies developed by the international Surface Ocean-Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS) research community. Eastern boundary upwelling systems are important sites for CO2 and trace gas emission

  11. Manufactured but not imported: new directions for research in shared decision making support and skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, A.; Evans, R.W.; Elwyn, G.

    2003-01-01

    Significant conceptual work on shared decision making has taken place but there are still significant challenges in achieving it in routine clinical practice. This paper outlines what research has identified to date that may promote shared decision making, and the further research that is required t

  12. Evolutionary algorithms and other metaheuristics in water resources: Current status, research challenges and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, H.R.; Kapelan, Z.; Kasprzyk, J.; Kollat, J.; Matott, L.S.; Cunha, M.C.; Dandy, G.C.; Gibbs, M.S.; Keedwell, E.; Marchi, A.; Ostfeld, A.; Savic, D.; Solomatine, D.P.; Vrugt, J.A.; Zecchin, A.C.; Minsker, B.S.; Barbour, E.J.; Kuczera, G.; Pasha, F.; Castelletti, A.; Giuliani, M.; Reed, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    The development and application of evolutionary algorithms (EAs) and other metaheuristics for the optimisation of water resources systems has been an active research field for over two decades. Research to date has emphasized algorithmic improvements and individual applications in specific areas (e.

  13. A Review of Research on Metacognition in Science Education: Current and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Anat; Barzilai, Sarit

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to map the current state of research in the field of metacognition in science education, to identify key trends, and to discern areas and questions for future research. We conducted a systematic analysis of 178 studies published in peer-reviewed journals in the years 2000-2012 and indexed in the ERIC database. The…

  14. Advances and Future Directions for Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research: Recommendations From the 2015 Strategic Planning Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mustafa; Henske, Elizabeth P; Manning, Brendan D; Ess, Kevin C; Bissler, John J; Klann, Eric; Kwiatkowski, David J; Roberds, Steven L; Silva, Alcino J; Hillaire-Clarke, Coryse St; Young, Lisa R; Zervas, Mark; Mamounas, Laura A

    2016-07-01

    On March 10 to March 12, 2015, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance sponsored a workshop in Bethesda, Maryland, to assess progress and new opportunities for research in tuberous sclerosis complex with the goal of updating the 2003 Research Plan for Tuberous Sclerosis (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/about_ninds/plans/tscler_research_plan.htm). In addition to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance, participants in the strategic planning effort and workshop included representatives from six other Institutes of the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program, and a broad cross-section of basic scientists and clinicians with expertise in tuberous sclerosis complex along with representatives from the pharmaceutical industry. Here we summarize the outcomes from the extensive premeeting deliberations and final workshop recommendations, including (1) progress in the field since publication of the initial 2003 research plan for tuberous sclerosis complex, (2) the key gaps, needs, and challenges that hinder progress in tuberous sclerosis complex research, and (3) a new set of research priorities along with specific recommendations for addressing the major challenges in each priority area. The new research plan is organized around both short-term and long-term goals with the expectation that progress toward specific objectives can be achieved within a five to ten year time frame.

  15. Conceptual Metaphor and the Study of Conceptual Change: Research Synthesis and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Tamer G.

    2015-01-01

    Many of the goals of research on conceptual metaphor in science education overlap with the goals of research on conceptual change. The relevance of a conceptual metaphor perspective to the study of conceptual change has already been discussed. However, a substantial body of literature on conceptual metaphor in science education has now emerged.…

  16. A Phenomenological Approach to Experiences with Technology: Current State, Promise, and Future Directions for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilesiz, Sebnem

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I conceptualize experiences with technology as an object of study for educational technology research and propose phenomenology as a highly suitable method for studying this construct. I begin by reviewing existing research focusing on the construct of experiences with technology and the approaches utilized for its study. To augment…

  17. Le discours oral en elaboration: Directions de recherche (Oral Discourse in Process: Research in Progress).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, Francis M.

    Research is in progress on oral interactive discourse, that is, discourse produced by several participants working in collaboration. The intent of the research is to investigate how the discourse is organized at several different levels of structure (acts, sequences of acts, interactive structure, propositional content, and formal realizations).…

  18. The influence of economic crisis on directions of estructuring of marketing in research institutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena Elżbieta Maślanka

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available On the eve of the third millennium the Polish economy is more and more subject to worldwide trends of globalization, which in a special way influences the scope and intensiveness of changes implemented in Research Institutes. It is accompanied by another more and more intensively transferred internationally and generally observed economic crisis, whose negative impulses cause the economic growth to slow down. The key determinant of the development of Research Institutes in the modern global economy is a skill to react on changes and a necessity to take restructuring actions within this range of marketing. Problems of a progressive global economic crisis and the influence of this process on restructuring of marketing in Research Institutes is an important research problem, requiring a deep and thorough analysis and research in this scope, hence this paper deals with all these important issues.

  19. Data standards in clinical research: gaps, overlaps, challenges and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richesson, Rachel L; Krischer, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Current efforts to define and implement health data standards are driven by issues related to the quality, cost and continuity of care, patient safety concerns, and desires to speed clinical research findings to the bedside. The President's goal for national adoption of electronic medical records in the next decade, coupled with the current emphasis on translational research, underscore the urgent need for data standards in clinical research. This paper reviews the motivations and requirements for standardized clinical research data, and the current state of standards development and adoption--including gaps and overlaps--in relevant areas. Unresolved issues and informatics challenges related to the adoption of clinical research data and terminology standards are mentioned, as are the collaborations and activities the authors perceive as most likely to address them.

  20. A cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural study of directives in discussions and conclusions of research articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Jalilifar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study provided cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary analyses of the distribution of directives in discussion and conclusion sections of English and Persian research articles (RAs in disciplines of physics, chemistry, counseling, and sociology, representing hard and soft sciences, respectively. To that aim, 80 RAs from both English and Persian journals between 2000 and 2012 were selected. The RAs were textually analyzed to determine the distribution of directives. Findings revealed a significant difference between Persian hard and soft science RAs in the employment of directives, with soft science writers employing directives more frequently in discussion and conclusion sections in comparison with hard science writers. However, no significant difference was found in the distribution of directives across discussion and conclusion sections of English soft and hard RAs. Moreover, findings did not show a significant difference across Persian and English RAs. Overall, results suggest that Persian and English academic writers tend to follow a similar generic and discursive trend in the employment of directives in their discussion and conclusion sections pointing to the universal nature of directives as persuasive strategies employed by academic writers in canonical branches of science. The findings of the present study might raise learners' awareness of the conventions and lexico-grammatical features of academic writing in Persian and/or English RAs.

  1. Progress in research on cold crucible directional solidification of titanium based alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ruirun

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold crucible directional solidification (CCDS is a newly developed technique, which combines the advantages of the cold crucible and continuous melting. It can be applied to directionally solidify reactive, high purity and refractory materials. This paper describes the principle of CCDS and its characteristics; development of the measurement and numerical calculation of the magnetic field, flow field and temperature field in CCDS; and the CCDS of Ti based alloys. The paper also reviews original data obtained by some scholars, including the present authors, reported in separate publications in recent years. In Ti based alloys, Ti6Al4V, TiAl alloys and high Nb-containing TiAl alloys, have been directionally solidified in different cold crucibles. The crosssections of the cold crucibles include round, near rectangular and square with different sizes. Tensile testing results show that the elongation of directionally solidified Ti6Al4V can be improved to 12.7% from as cast 5.4%. The strength and the elongation of the directionally solidified Ti47Al2Cr2Nb and Ti44Al6Nb1.0Cr2.0V are 650 MPa/3% and 602.5 MPa/1.20%, respectively. The ingots after CCDS can be used to prepare turbine or engine blades, and are candidates to replace Ni super-alloy at temperatures of 700 to 900 °C.

  2. Progress in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion research at the laboratory for laser energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, J.; Skupsky, S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Y.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Keck, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Marciante, J.; Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; Maximov, A.V.; McKenty, P.W.; Morse, S.F.B.; Myatt, J.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D. [Rochester Univ., Lab. for Laser Energetics, NY (United States); McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Betti, S.R.; Goncharov, V.N. [Rochester Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Physics and Astronomy, NY (United States); Fletcher, A.; Freeman, C.; Padalino, S. [SUNY Geneseo, Geneseo, NY (United States); Frenje, J.A.; Li, C.K.; Petrasso, R.D.; Seguin, F.H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kilkenny, J.D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is expected to demonstrate high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the next decade and is a leading candidate for inertial fusion energy production. The demonstration of high areal densities in hydro-dynamically scaled cryogenic DT or D{sub 2} implosions with neutron yields that are a significant fraction of the 'clean' 1-D predictions will validate the ignition-equivalent direct-drive target performance on the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). This paper highlights the recent experimental and theoretical progress leading toward achieving this validation in the next few years. The NIF will initially be configured for X-ray drive and with no beams placed at the target equator to provide a symmetric irradiation of a direct-drive capsule. LLE is developing the 'polar-direct-drive' (PDD) approach that directs beams toward the target equator. Initial 2-dimensional simulations have shown ignition. A unique 'Saturn-like' plastic ring around the equator refracts the laser light incident near the equator toward the target, improving the drive uniformity. LLE is currently constructing the multibeam, 2.6-kJ/beam, peta-watt laser system OMEGA-EP (Extended Performance). Integrated fast-ignition experiments, combining the OMEGA-EP and OMEGA Laser Systems, will begin in 2008. (authors)

  3. Dynamics of self-directed learning in M.Sc. nursing students: A qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FATEMEH SHIRAZI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Working in the complex and ever changing healthcare settings forces the nurses and nursing students to be equipped with lifelong learning skills. One of the lifelong learning skills is self-directed learning. This study aimed to explore the M.Sc. nursing students’ self-directed learning activities. Methods: A qualitative design using conventional content analysis approach was used in this study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve Iranian M.Sc. nursing students who were selected using purposive sampling. Results: Data analysis indicated that the M.Sc. nursing students performed different activities in their self-directed learning. These activities were categorized into four main themes and ten subthemes. The main themes were “sensory perceptions”, “knowledge construction”, “problem-centered orientation”, and “interaction with others”. Conclusion: According to the findings, the M.Sc. nursing students performed different intellectual and experiential self-directed activities for promoting their learning. Besides, the students’ perseverance and inquisitiveness played an important role in their self-directed learning in the challenging clinical environments.

  4. Dynamics of self-directed learning in M.Sc. nursing students: A qualitative research

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHIRAZI, FATEMEH; SHARIF, FARKHONDEH; MOLAZEM, ZAHRA; ALBORZI, MAHBOOBEH

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Working in the complex and ever changing healthcare settings forces the nurses and nursing students to be equipped with lifelong learning skills. One of the lifelong learning skills is self-directed learning. This study aimed to explore the M.Sc. nursing students’ self-directed learning activities. Methods: A qualitative design using conventional content analysis approach was used in this study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve Iranian M.Sc. nursing students who were selected using purposive sampling. Results: Data analysis indicated that the M.Sc. nursing students performed different activities in their self-directed learning. These activities were categorized into four main themes and ten subthemes. The main themes were “sensory perceptions”, “knowledge construction”, “problem-centered orientation”, and “interaction with others”. Conclusion: According to the findings, the M.Sc. nursing students performed different intellectual and experiential self-directed activities for promoting their learning. Besides, the students’ perseverance and inquisitiveness played an important role in their self-directed learning in the challenging clinical environments. PMID:28124019

  5. "Direct DICOM Slice Landmarking" A Novel Research Technique to Quantify Skeletal Changes in Orthognathic Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Almukhtar

    Full Text Available The limitations of the current methods of quantifying the surgical movements of facial bones inspired this study. The aim of this study was the assessment of the accuracy and reproducibility of directly landmarking of 3D DICOM images (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine to quantify the changes in the jaw bones following surgery. The study was carried out on plastic skull to simulate the surgical movements of the jaw bones. Cone beam CT scans were taken at 3mm, 6mm, and 9mm maxillary advancement; together with a 2mm, 4mm, 6mm and 8mm "down graft" which in total generated 12 different positions of the maxilla for the analysis. The movements of the maxilla were calculated using two methods, the standard approach where distances between surface landmarks on the jaw bones were measured and the novel approach where measurements were taken directly from the internal structures of the corresponding 3D DICOME slices. A one sample t-test showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the two methods of measurements for the y and z directions, however, the x direction showed a significant difference. The mean difference between the two absolute measurements were 0.34±0.20mm, 0.22±0.16mm, 0.18±0.13mm in the y, z and x directions respectively. In conclusion, the direct landmarking of 3D DICOM image slices is a reliable, reproducible and informative method for assessment of the 3D skeletal changes. The method has a clear clinical application which includes the analysis of the jaw movements "orthognathic surgery" for the correction of facial deformities.

  6. Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, first half FY 1992. Weapons-Supporting Research and Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This report contains sections on: Fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals; interfaces, adhesion, and bonding; energetic materials; plutonium research; synchrotron radiation-based materials science; atomistic approach to the interaction of surfaces with the environment: actinide studies; properties of carbon fibers; buried layer formation using ion implantation; active coherent control of chemical reaction dynamics; inorganic and organic aerogels; synthesis and characterization of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels; structural transformation and precursor phenomena in advanced materials; magnetic ultrathin films, surfaces, and overlayers; ductile-phase toughening of refractory-metal intermetallics; particle-solid interactions; electronic structure evolution of metal clusters; and nanoscale lithography induced chemically or physically by modified scanned probe microscopy.

  7. Future directions in communication research: individual health behaviors and the influence of family communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiocchi-Wagner, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous fields continue to advance research toward various areas of health prevention, communication researchers have yet to examine fully the link between communication and health improvement. This is particularly true of those studying the intersections of family and health communication--unfortunate, given that family members serve as primary socialization agents in health attitudes and behaviors. Using the example of obesity-related health behaviors, the following essay advances the argument that continued research aimed at understanding the intersection of health and families' communicative influence may help to illuminate the nature, causes, and redress to health issues that are correlated with individual health practices. This is accomplished by (a) reviewing contributions and limitations of pioneering studies in (family) health literature and (b) offering three key research areas for health communication exploration that will move scholars toward communication-based solutions (e.g., family-level communication health interventions).

  8. New directions for QA in basic research: The Fermilab/DOE-CH experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1989-09-01

    This paper addresses the underlying problems involved in developing institution-wide QA programs at DOE funded basic research facilities, and suggests concrete ways in which QA professionals and basic researchers can find common ground in describing and analyzing those activities to the satisfaction of both communities. The paper is designed to be a springboard into workshop discussions which can define a path for developing institution-wide QA programs based on the experience gained with DOE-CH and Fermilab.

  9. Over 20 Years of Business Systems Research -Contributions, Gaps, and Future Directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakhtiar Rana, Mohammad

    international business/management researches. This led me to synthesize the contributions of this stream. The review of BS literature from 1992 to 2013 makes an account of its contributions and gaps, brings them to light for international management (IM) studies to show how IM can benefit from this stream......, while gaps found in BS studies present a thirst that future studies of BS can contribute to advance this field of research....

  10. Research on stored product protection in Australia: a review of past, present and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Since its beginning, research into the protection of stored grain in Australia has been driven by market access, in particular, the need to provide insect free grain to overseas customers. Research began in 1917 when a bumper harvest coincided with disruption of shipping due the First World War and resulted in the unprecedented accumulation of wheat stocks, which were subject to catastrophic attack by ‘weevil plagues’. Initial experiments were of insect life cycles and reproductive rate. This...

  11. Everyday technologies for Alzheimer's disease care: Research findings, directions, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Maria C; Dishman, Eric; Plowman, Tim

    2009-11-01

    The Everyday Technologies for Alzheimer's Care initiative was launched by the Alzheimer's Association and Intel Corporation in 2003 to identify and fund promising research in the use of technology-especially information and communication technologies-for monitoring, diagnosing, and treating Alzheimer's disease. At the last two progress meetings, scientific leaders of the two partners, together with aging health technology academic scientists, met to review the most recent research and discuss how current and developing technologies can address growing needs in Alzheimer care.

  12. Researching direct action against carbon emissions: a digital ethnography of climate agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Pearse

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Global warming poses very directly the question of human agency. In this video ethnography of climate agency we explore dimensions of subjectivity in climate activism. Through a longitudinal study we track activist strategising as a reflexive process of creating climate agency. Activist reflection is presented as a balance between involvement and detachment, and analysed drawing on videoed interviews and on our own participation in organisations and events. Visual artefacts are deployed to deepen insights into the interview process, and into the contexts for climate action. In terms of the analysis, there are three themes. First we look at trajectories – how people come to identify with the climate movement and engage in its direct action wing. Second, we explore the hopes and fears of climate activists in the face of profound challenges. Third, we address political antidotes, and the role of direct action in precipitating large-scale systemic change. Across these themes there is much diversity and debate: what unifies is a common engagement in the broad field of direct climate action. This visual documentation helps us reflect on the conflicts and possibilities that thereby arise in contexts of climate activist praxis.

  13. Is Project Based Learning More Effective than Direct Instruction in School Science Classrooms? An Analysis of the Empirical Research Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dann, Clifford

    An increasingly loud call by parents, school administrators, teachers, and even business leaders for "authentic learning", emphasizing both group-work and problem solving, has led to growing enthusiasm for inquiry-based learning over the past decade. Although "inquiry" can be defined in many ways, a curriculum called "project-based learning" has recently emerged as the inquiry practice-of-choice with roots in the educational constructivism that emerged in the mid-twentieth century. Often, project-based learning is framed as an alternative instructional strategy to direct instruction for maximizing student content knowledge. This study investigates the empirical evidence for such a comparison while also evaluating the overall quality of the available studies in the light of accepted standards for educational research. Specifically, this thesis investigates what the body of quantitative research says about the efficacy of project-based learning vs. direct instruction when considering student acquisition of content knowledge in science classrooms. Further, existing limitations of the research pertaining to project based learning and secondary school education are explored. The thesis concludes with a discussion of where and how we should focus our empirical efforts in the future. The research revealed that the available empirical research contains flaws in both design and instrumentation. In particular, randomization is poor amongst all the studies considered. The empirical evidence indicates that project-based learning curricula improved student content knowledge but that, while the results were statistically significant, increases in raw test scores were marginal.

  14. Expanding Geothermal Resource Utilization through Directed Research, Education, and Public Outreach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Wendy [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2015-06-29

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE or the Center) was established at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) in May 2000 to promote research and utilization of geothermal resources. The Center received funding through this grant to promote increased geothermal development in the Great Basin, with most of the funding used for peerreviewed research. Funding to the Center and work under the contract were initiated in March 2002, with supplemental funding in subsequent years. The Center monitored the research projects that were competitively awarded in a series of proposal calls between 2002 and 2007. Peer-reviewed research promoted identification and utilization of geothermal resources in Nevada. Projects used geology, geochemistry, geophysics, remote sensing, and the synthesis of multi-disciplinary information to produce new models of geothermal systems in the Western U.S. and worldwide. Funds were also used to support graduate student research and training. Part of the grant was used to support public outreach activities, including webpages, online maps and data resources, and informational workshops for stakeholders.

  15. Taking stock of project value creation: A structured literature review with future directions for research and practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Markus; Svejvig, Per

    2016-01-01

    by adopting the project value creation perspective on literature relating to benefits, value, performance, and success in projects. Our review includes 111 contributions analyzed through both an inductive and deductive approach. We find that relevant literature dates back to the early 1980s, and the still...... developing value-centric view has been the subject of many publications in recent years. We contribute to research on project value creation through four directions for future research: rejuvenating value management through combining value, benefits, and costs; supplementing value creation with value capture......; applying a holistic approach to project, portfolio, and strategic management; and theorizing by applying independent models and frameworks....

  16. Nest guarding by female Agassiz's desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) at a wind-energy facility near Palm Springs, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Mickey; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Ennen, Joshua R.; Wilcox, Ethan

    2013-01-01

    We observed behavior consistent with nest-guarding in Agassiz's desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) at two nests in a large wind-energy-generation facility near Palm Springs, California, locally known as the Mesa Wind Farm. As researchers approached the nests, female desert tortoises moved to the entrance of their burrows and positioned themselves sideways, directly over their nests. One female stretched her limbs outward and wedged herself into the burrow (her plastron directly above the nest). Guarding of nests is rarely observed in Agassiz's desert tortoise but can occur as a result of attempted predation on eggs by Gila monsters (Heloderma suspectum) or in direct response to the perceived threat posed by researchers. This is the first report of nest-guarding for G. agassizii in the Sonoran Desert ecosystem of California.

  17. Profile of the chemicals industry in California: Californiaindustries of the future program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) established the Industries of the Future (IOF) program to increase energy efficiency, reduce waste production and to improve competitiveness, currently focusing on nine sectors. The IOF is a partnership strategy involving industry, the research community and the government, working together to identify technology needs, promote industrial partnerships and implement joint measures with all partners involved. The State Industries of the Future (SIOF) program delivers the accomplishments of the national Industries of the Future strategy to the local level, to expand the technology opportunities to a larger number of partners and reach smaller businesses and manufacturers that were not initially involved in the IOF effort. The state programs bring together industry, academia, and state agencies to address the important issues confronting industry in the state. These public-private coalitions facilitate industry solutions locally and enhance economic development. California has started a State Industries of the Future effort, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy. The California Energy Commission (CEC) is leading the SIOF program in California, as part of many other programs to improve the energy efficiency and performance of industries in California. The California State IOF program aims to build a network of participants from industry, academia and government in four selected industrial sectors as a basis for the development of a strategic partnership for industrial energy efficient technology in the state. In California the IOF effort focuses petroleum refining, chemical processing, food processing and electronics. As part of this effort, the SIOF program will develop roadmaps for technology development for the selected sectors. On the basis of the roadmap, the program will develop successful projects with co-funding from state and federal government, and promote industry

  18. Forests under climate change and air pollution: Gaps in understanding and future directions for research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matyssek, R.; Wieser, G.; Calfapietra, C.

    2012-01-01

    Forests in Europe face significant changes in climate, which in interaction with air quality changes, may significantly affect forest productivity, stand composition and carbon sequestration in both vegetation and soils. Identified knowledge gaps and research needs include: (i) interaction between...... for synthesis. This position paper highlights the above focuses, including the global dimension of air pollution as part of climate change and the need for knowledge transfer to enable reliable risk assessment. A new type of research site in forest ecosystems (“supersites”) will be conducive to addressing...... changes in air quality (trace gas concentrations), climate and other site factors on forest ecosystem response, (ii) significance of biotic processes in system response, (iii) tools for mechanistic and diagnostic understanding and upscaling, and (iv) the need for unifying modelling and empirical research...

  19. Standardization and future directions in pattern identification research: International brainstorming session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jeeyoun; Park, Bongki; Lee, Ju Ah; You, Sooseong; Alraek, Terje; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Birch, Stephen; Kim, Tae-Hun; Xu, Hao; Zaslawski, Chris; Kang, Byoung-Kab; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2016-09-01

    An international brainstorming session on standardizing pattern identification (PI) was held at the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine on October 1, 2013 in Daejeon, South Korea. This brainstorming session was convened to gather insights from international traditional East Asian medicine specialists regarding PI standardization. With eight presentations and discussion sessions, the meeting allowed participants to discuss research methods and diagnostic systems used in traditional medicine for PI. One speaker presented a talk titled "The diagnostic criteria for blood stasis syndrome: implications for standardization of PI". Four speakers presented on future strategies and objective measurement tools that could be used in PI research. Later, participants shared information and methodology for accurate diagnosis and PI. They also discussed the necessity for standardizing PI and methods for international collaborations in pattern research.

  20. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert Calderon; Reina Calderon

    2004-01-27

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  1. Scoping Review of Research on the Effectiveness of Food-Safety Education Interventions Directed at Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramalingam, Bhairavi; Young, Ian; Pham, Mai T; Waddell, Lisa; Greig, Judy; Mascarenhas, Mariola; Papadopoulos, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Improper food handling by consumers at home is a major cause of foodborne illness. Therefore, effective education strategies are essential to change consumers' food safety attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this scoping review was to identify and characterize primary literature examining the effectiveness of consumer food-safety education interventions. Ten bibliographic databases were searched using a comprehensive search strategy. Citations were identified; two reviewers screened them for relevance and characterized relevant articles. To ensure results would be applicable to end users, stakeholders were engaged to provide input on the review scope, methods, and results. We identified 246 relevant articles, of which 150 were quantitative, 66 qualitative, and 30 mixed-method research studies. Most studies (64.2%) were published in the United States, using an uncontrolled before-and-after study design (31.3%), and investigated the effectiveness of community-based training sessions and workshops (52.0%). Research gaps were found in the number of randomized controlled studies conducted, academic- and school-based courses and curricula investigated, and interventions targeting high-risk populations (e.g., pregnant women, those who are immunocompromised) and using new media channels (e.g., social media). Key opportunities to enhance the utility of future primary research investigating consumer food-safety interventions include the following: using studies based on behavior-change theories and formative research; engaging the target population in the research; using validated instruments to measures outcomes; and reporting intervention characteristics and outcomes completely. Results of this review can be used to prioritize future primary research and decision-making in this area.

  2. Research on measurement of total luminous flux of single LED in direct comparison method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Biyong; Lai, Lei; Yin, Dejin; Cheng, Weihai; Lin, Fangsheng

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on traceability work on total luminous flux of single LED based on the direct camparison method applied for quantity transfer of incandescent lamps. During the test different color groups of LEDs have been chosen as standard to measure total luminous flux of sample LEDs. The test is accomplished in the current integrating sphere measurement system under specific conditions according to LED characteristics. As results obtained from the experiment, the uncertainties are also evaluated.

  3. Critical Criminological Understandings of Adult Pornography and Woman Abuse: New Progressive Directions in Research and Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter DeKeseredy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a small, but growing, social scientific literature on the racist and violent nature of contemporary adult pornography. However, considerably more empirical and theoretical work needs to be done to advance a critical criminological understanding of how such hurtful sexual media contribute to various forms of woman abuse in intimate relationships. The main objective of this article is to briefly review the relevant literature and to suggest a few new progressive empirical and theoretical directions.

  4. Future directions in research on consumer-provider communication and adherence to cancer prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMatteo, M Robin

    2003-05-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine emerging issues in consumer-provider communication and patient adherence to cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, and coping with survivorship. Many factors that have been shown to affect adherence can be supported or hindered by provider-patient communication, including the provider-patient relationship, patients' beliefs, social and cultural norms, family and social support, mood, and behavioral management. Six research questions are posed, and substantive and methodological recommendations are offered for empirical research on the measurement and achievement of patient adherence.

  5. Phenomenological and evidence based research in ego state therapy: recognized and unrecognized successes and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Joan H; Frederick, Claire

    2013-07-01

    The status of research in ego state therapy is examined against the backdrop of 20th and 21st century developments in the philosophy of science and the emerging recognition of the subjective as a vital element in all science. Attention is paid to the phenomenological method because until recently phenomenological studies have been the basis for the standards of care and training in ego state therapy as well as in many aspects of hypnotically facilitated psychotherapy. The importance of bringing an end to the "science wars" through the integration of the subjective and the objective, of phenomenological studies and evidence-based studies in ego state therapy and hypnosis research, is proposed.

  6. Mathematics difficulties in children born very preterm: current research and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Victoria; Cragg, Lucy; Gilmore, Camilla; Marlow, Neil; Johnson, Samantha

    2013-09-01

    Children born very preterm have poorer attainment in all school subjects, and a markedly greater reliance on special educational support than their term-born peers. In particular, difficulties with mathematics are especially common and account for the vast majority of learning difficulties in this population. In this paper, we review research relating to the causes of mathematics learning difficulties in typically developing children, and the impact of very preterm birth on attainment in mathematics. Research is needed to understand the specific nature and origins of mathematics difficulties in very preterm children to target the development of effective intervention strategies.

  7. Perspective on everyday technologies for Alzheimer's care: research findings, directions, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishman, Eric; Carrillo, Maria C

    2007-07-01

    The Everyday Technologies for Alzheimer's Care (ETAC) initiative was launched by the Alzheimer's Association and Intel Corporation in 2003 to identify and fund promising research in the use of technology--especially information and communication technologies (ICTs)--for monitoring, diagnosing, and treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). Agilent Technologies joined the initiative in 2005. In October 2006, representatives of the three partners, together with ETAC award grantees, met to review the most recent research, and discuss how current and developing technologies can address growing needs in Alzheimer's care.

  8. The Research of Self-Management Team and Superior-Direction Team in Team Learning Influential Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Team learning is a cure for bureaucracy; it facilitates team innovation and team performance. But team learning occurs only when necessary conditions were met. This research focused on differences of team learning influential factors between self-management team and superior-direction team. Four variables were chosen as predictors of team learning though literature review and pilot interview. The 4 variables are team motivation, team trust, team conflict and team leadership. Selected 54 self ...

  9. A Model for Estimating Direct-Funded Civilian Scientist, Engineer, and Technician Staffing in the Navy Research and Development Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    NOTATION 17 COSATI CODES I8 SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse of necehsary and identify by block number) FIEL GRUP SB-GOUP Manpower requirements, manpower...workforce and developing staffing controls for direct R&D functions . Support in model and software development was provided by Mathtech, Inc. of Falls...standards. While recognizing that SHORSTAMPS could be used for the overhead functions within research and development (R&D) centers, the Chief of Naval

  10. Historicising ESE - potential new directions and priorities for ESE policy and policy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jonas Greve; Van Poeck, Katrien

    and controversial (both in factual and normative terms) and drastically affect our planet and its inhabitants, researchers argue that these issues raise major democratic challenges (Lundegård and Wickman 2012; Sund and Öhman 2014; Van Poeck et al. 2014). ESE is characterised by a certain entanglement of educational...

  11. What Factors Influence the Direction of Global Brain Circulation: The Case of Chinese Canada Research Chairholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    As part of globalisation, academics have become more mobile and are tempted to move to institutions that have the most favourable research funding and work environment. The university is now viewed as a global magnet for academic talent and a key institution that enhances competitiveness by connecting cities and nations to global flows of…

  12. Accuracy in Student Self-Assessment: Directions and Cautions for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gavin T. L.; Andrade, Heidi L.; Chen, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Student self-assessment is a central component of current conceptions of formative and classroom assessment. The research on self-assessment has focused on its efficacy in promoting both academic achievement and self-regulated learning, with little concern for issues of validity. Because reliability of testing is considered a sine qua non for the…

  13. The Utility of Male Domestic Violence Offender Typologies: New Directions for Research, Policy, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Mary M.; Gelles, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The development of empirically based behavioral and psychological typologies provides clear evidence that offenders vary across types. A review and synthesis of the literature reveals three types of batterers common across current typology research - a low, moderate, and high-risk offender. Examination of these types demonstrates that most male…

  14. Recent Research on Emergent Verbal Behavior: Clinical Applications and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grow, Laura L.; Kodak, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the acquisition of verbal behavior in children with developmental disabilities has focused on teaching four primary verbal operants: (1) "mand"; (2) "tact"; (3) "echoic"; and (4) "intraverbal". In Skinner's (1957) analysis of verbal behavior, he stated that each verbal operant is maintained by unique antecedent and consequence…

  15. Charting Future Directions for Research in Jazz Pedagogy: Implications of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kevin E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper surveys and evaluates extant empirical research in jazz pedagogy. Investigations in the following areas are addressed: (a) variables that predict achievement in jazz improvisation; (b) content analyses of published instructional materials; (c) effectiveness of pedagogical methods; (d) construction and evaluation of jazz improvisation…

  16. Summary of the 6th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank: new directions in urologic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svatek, Robert S; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Galsky, Matthew D; Lee, Cheryl T; Latini, David M; Bochner, Bernard H; Weizer, Alon Z; Apolo, Andrea B; Sridhar, Srikala S; Kamat, Ashish M; Hansel, Donna; Flaig, Thomas W; Smith, Norm D; Lotan, Yair

    2013-10-01

    The 6th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and representatives from the National Cancer Institute and Industry in an effort to advance bladder cancer research efforts. This year's meeting comprised panel discussions and research involving 5 separate working groups, including the Survivorship, Clinical Trials, Standardization of Care, Data Mining, and Translational Science working groups. In this manuscript, the accomplishments and objectives of the working groups are summarized. Notable efforts include: (1) the development of a survivorship care plan for early and late-stage bladder cancer; (2) the development of consensus criteria for eligibility and endpoints for bladder cancer clinical trials; (3) an improved understanding of current practice patterns regarding the use of perioperative chemotherapy in an effort to standardize care; (4) creation of a comprehensive handbook to assist researchers with developing bladder cancer databases; and (5) identification of response to therapy of high-grade non muscle invasive disease through a collaborative exchange of expertise and resources.

  17. Sensor Based Process Control (SBPC) Laboratories Directed Research and Development (LDRD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wronosky, J.B.

    1993-03-01

    This report describes the activities and results of an LDRD entitled Sensor Based Process Control. This research examined the needs of the plating industry for monitor and control capabilities with particular emphasis on water effluent from rinse baths. A personal computer-based monitor and control development system was used as a test bed.

  18. Landbird migration in the American West: Recent progress and future research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, J.D.; Skagen, S.K.; Kus, B.E.; van Riper, Charles; Paxton, K.L.; Kelly, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Our knowledge of avian behaviors during the nonbreeding period still lags behind that of the breeding season, but the last decade has witnessed a proliferation in research that has yielded significant progress in understanding migration patterns of North American birds. And, although historically the great majority of migration research has been conducted in the eastern half of the continent, there has been much recent progress on aspects of avian migration in the West. In particular, expanded use of techniques such as radar, plasma metabolites, mist-netting, count surveys, stable isotopes, genetic data, and animal tracking, coupled with an increase in multi-investigator collaborations, have all contributed to this growth of knowledge. There is increasing recognition that migration is likely the most limiting time of year for migratory birds, increasing the importance of continuing to decipher patterns of stopover ecology, identifying critical stopover habitats, and documenting migration routes in the diverse and changing landscapes of the American West. Here, we review and briefly synthesize the latest findings and advances in avian migration and consider research needs to guide future research on migration in the West. ?? 2009 by The Cooper Ornithological Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Building on New Foundations: Core Principles and New Directions for Qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Gary; Villella, Orlando

    2004-01-01

    The authors review and comment on 24 qualitative research articles published in the JER from 1992 to 2001, which represent a wide range of qualitative approaches. The key finding was that patterns shifted from an average of 1 article per year for the 1st 7 years to an average of 1 article per issue for the final 3 years. The authors discussed the…

  20. Future Directions in Adventure-based Therapy Research: Methodological Considerations and Design Suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newes, Sandra L.

    2001-01-01

    More methodologically sound research in adventure therapy is needed if the field is to claim empirically-based efficacy as a treatment modality. Some considerations for conducting outcome studies in adventure therapy relate to standardization, multiple domain assessment, regression techniques, objective assessment of participant change, client and…

  1. Moving in Unexpected Directions: Texas Elementary Uses Exploratory Research to Map Out an Evaluation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Sue; Ortloff, Debora; Weaver, Laurie; Vesey, Winona; Anderson, Mary; Marquez, Michael; Sanchez, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the actions taken by the members of the school leadership team at McWhirter Elementary Professional Development Laboratory School in Webster, Texas, when the results of the state reading assessment in spring 2010, had taken a sudden and dramatic drop from the previous year. The team designed an action research study to…

  2. Current Trends and Future Directions in Data Curation Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Nicholas M.; Palmer, Carole L.; Chao, Tiffany C.

    2012-01-01

    Digital research data have introduced a new set of collection, preservation, and service demands into the tradition of digital librarianship. Consequently, the role of an information professional has evolved to include the activities of data curation. This new field more specifically addresses the needs of stewarding and preserving digital…

  3. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-31

    A. G. Eubanks, G. F. Pieper and J. H. Bredekamp, Appl. Optics, 14, 2104 (1975). (13) J. F. Walkup and R. B. Asher , Optics News, 5 - No. 4, 8 (1979...York 333 Jay Street Brocklvn. NY 1201 Director Research Laboratory of Electronics Massachusetts institute of Technology Camoridge, MA 02139 Direccor

  4. Using the Internet for B2B Activities: A Review and Future Directions for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattiker, Urs E.; Perlusz, Stefano; Bohmann, Kristoffer

    2000-01-01

    Illustrates some of the challenges that electronic commerce practitioners and researchers face, focusing on business to business (B2B) transactions. Highlights include a conceptual framework of Web user behavior; purchasing context; socio-demographic characteristics; cultural factors; economic factors; attitudes toward information technology;…

  5. Physical Education PLC: Neoliberalism, Curriculum and Governance. New Directions for PESP Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John; Davies, Brian

    2014-01-01

    How might Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy (PESP) communities in the UK, Europe, Australasia and elsewhere go about researching the implications of neoliberalism and increasing privatisation of Education for the entitlements of young people to a common, comprehensive, high quality, equitable Physical Education (PE)? Our analyses suggest that…

  6. History of Education Research in Australia: Some Current Trends and Possible Directions for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The history of education as a distinct field has been the focus of study, research and writing in Australia for over a century. It achieved maturity with the establishment of the Australian and New Zealand History of Education Society in 1970 and the subsequent establishment of the Society's journal, "History of Education Review." Since…

  7. Juvenile Delinquency and Special Education Laws: Policy Implementation Issues and Directions for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard J.; Thompson, Kristin C.

    2008-01-01

    The research literature has repeatedly demonstrated that there is an overrepresentation of juveniles with disabilities who are incarcerated in short-term and long-term correctional facilities. Despite these findings, special education programs in many juvenile correctional facilities have been shown to be lacking many of the necessary services…

  8. Dynamic pricing and learning: historical origins, current research, and new directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, den Arnoud V.

    2015-01-01

    The topic of dynamic pricing and learning has received a considerable amount of attention in recent years, from different scientific communities. We survey these literature streams: we provide a brief introduction to the historical origins of quantitative research on pricing and demand estimation, p

  9. Water use in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Justin; Sneed, Michelle; Rogers, Laurel Lynn; Metzger, Loren F.; Rewis, Diane; House, Sally F.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the USGS National Water Use Compilation, the California Water Science Center works in cooperation with local, State, and Federal agencies as well as academic and private organizations to collect and report total water withdrawals for California. The 2010 California water use data are aggregated here, in this website, for the first time. The California Water Science Center released these data ahead of the online USGS National Water Use Compilation circular report, in response to increased interest associated with current drought conditions. The national report is expected to be released late in 2014. The data on this website represents the most current California water use data available in the USGS National Water Use Compilation. It contains a section on water use in California for 2010. Water-use estimates are compiled by withdrawal source type, use category, and county. Withdrawal source types include groundwater, both fresh and saline,

  10. Research on the adaptation of skeletal muscle to hypogravity Past and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D. A.; Ellis, S.

    1983-01-01

    The results of previous research on the cellular effects of microgravity on rat tissue are reviewed and areas of future necessary research are identified. The rats were flown on board Cosmos 605, 782, and 936. Postflight tissue analyses revealed increases in connective tissue cells and focal disruption of muscle fibers due to the microgravity environment of space. Evidence has been found for muscular and neural changes occurring as a result of reentry stresses. It is suggested that a data base be established for quantizing muscle function with electromyography, measurements of force output, and length measurement. The data can serve as a reference for comparisons with data obtained in orbiting laboratories such as the Spacelab. The experiments will have a goal of defining and preventing the mechanism of neuromuscular atrophy.

  11. Future human health research directions for the Canadian Northern Contaminants Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn G. Donaldson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies conducted in the mid-1980s and early 1990s demonstrated that persistent organic pollutants (POPs and metals were reaching the Arctic ecosystem at unexpectedly high levels, many of which had no Arctic or Canadian sources. Epidemiological and toxicological studies in Canada and in other countries have found that these contaminants may pose a risk to human health. The objective of this paper is to provide the foundation for the discussion on future northern human health research under the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP in Canada. This short discussion of human health priorities will help guide a path forward for future northern human health research in Canada to address on-going and new health concerns related to contaminants exposure in the Canadian Arctic.

  12. The direction of research into visual disability and quality of life in glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Garway-Heath David F; Crabb David P; Glen Fiona C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Glaucoma will undoubtedly impact on a person's ability to function as they go about their day-to-day life. The purpose of this study is to investigate the amount of published knowledge in quality of life (QoL) and visual disability studies for glaucoma, and make comparisons with similar research in other chronic conditions. Methods A systematic literature search of the Global Health, EMBASE Psychiatry and MEDLINE databases. Title searches for glaucoma and six other example...

  13. Design Rework Prediction in Concurrent Design Environment: Current Trends and Future Research Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Arundachawat, Panumas; Roy, Rajkumar; Al-Ashaab, Ahmed; Shehab, Essam

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to present state-of-the-art and formulate future research areas on design rework in concurrent design environment. Related literatures are analysed to extract the key factors which impact design rework. Design rework occurs due to changes from upstream design activities and/or by feedbacks from downstream design activities. Design rework is considered as negative iteration; therefore, value in design activities will be increased if design rework is reduced. Set-bas...

  14. Coastal Benthic Boundary Layer Special Research Program. Program Direction and Workshop Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    University of Washington George Frisk Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Paul Hines Defence Research Establishment, Atlantic, Canada William A. Kuperman...process of horizontal mixing (Wheatcroft et al. 1990, Wheatcroft 1991). Except for some correlation with bedform periodicity ( Eckman 1979; Hogue and...Jumars 1978). An important caveat, however, is that the data are very gappy, making even strong autocorrelation easy to miss (Jumars and Eckman 1983

  15. The direction of research into visual disability and quality of life in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garway-Heath David F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glaucoma will undoubtedly impact on a person's ability to function as they go about their day-to-day life. The purpose of this study is to investigate the amount of published knowledge in quality of life (QoL and visual disability studies for glaucoma, and make comparisons with similar research in other chronic conditions. Methods A systematic literature search of the Global Health, EMBASE Psychiatry and MEDLINE databases. Title searches for glaucoma and six other example chronic diseases were entered alongside a selection of keywords chosen to capture studies focusing on QoL and everyday task ability. These results were further filtered during a manual search of resulting abstracts. Outcomes were the number of publications per year for each disease, number relating to QoL and type of glaucoma QoL research. Results Fifteen years ago there were no published studies relating to the impact of glaucoma on QoL but by 2009 this had risen to 1.2% of all glaucoma articles. The number of papers relating to QoL as a proportion of all papers in glaucoma in the past 10 years (0.6% is smaller than for AMD and some other disabling chronic diseases. Most QoL studies in glaucoma (82% involve questionnaires. Conclusion QoL studies in glaucoma are increasing in number but represent a tiny minority of the total publications in glaucoma research. There are fewer QoL articles in glaucoma compared to some other disabling chronic conditions. The majority of QoL articles in glaucoma research use questionnaires; performance-based measures of visual disability may offer an additional method of determining how the disease impacts on QoL.

  16. Islamic Banking and Finance: Recent Empirical Literature and Directions for Future Research

    OpenAIRE

    Abedifar, Pejman; Ebrahim, Shahid; Molyneux, Philip; Tarazi , Amine

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the recent empirical literature in Islamic banking and finance, highlights the main findings and provides a guide for future research. Early studies focus on the efficiency, production technology and general performance features of Islamic versus conventional banks, whereas more recent work looks at profit and loss-sharing (PLS) behaviour, competition, risks as well as other dimensions such as small business lending and financial inclusion. Apart from key exceptions, the e...

  17. Multidisciplinary research program directed toward utilization of solar energy through bioconversion of renewable resources. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnerty, W. R.

    1976-07-01

    Progress is reported in four research areas of solar bioconversion. The first program deals with the genetic selection of superior trees, physiological basis of vigor, tissue culture, haploid cell lines, and somatic hybridization. The second deals with the physiology of paraquat-induced oleoresin biogenesis. Separate abstracts were prepared for the other two program areas: biochemical basis of paraquat-induced oleoresin production in pines and biochemistry of methanogenesis. (JSR)

  18. California Least Tern Foraging Ecology in Southern California: A Review of Foraging Behavior Relative to Proposed Dredging Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    endangered by the federal and California Endangered Species Acts, is afforded protection at its nesting sites in California. The relative importance of... importance of various foraging areas and foraging habitats near CLT nesting sites has not been evaluated, nor has official protection been designated to any...ER D C/ EL C R- 16 -3 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program California Least Tern Foraging Ecology in Southern

  19. Status of cardiovascular issues related to space flight: Implications for future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A

    2009-10-01

    Compromised cardiovascular performance, occurrence of serious cardiac dysrhythmias, cardiac atrophy, orthostatic intolerance, reduced aerobic capacity, operational impacts of regular physical exercise, and space radiation are risks of space flight to the cardiovascular system identified in the 2007 NASA Human Integrated Research Program. An evidence-based approach to identify the research priorities needed to resolve those cardiovascular risks that could most likely compromise the successful completion of extended-duration space missions is presented. Based on data obtained from astronauts who have flown in space, there is no compelling experimental evidence to support significant occurrence of autonomic or vascular dysfunction, cardiac dysrhythmias, or manifestation of asymptomatic cardiovascular disease. The operational impact of prolonged daily exercise and space radiation needs to be defined. In contrast, data from the literature support the notion that the highest probability of occurrence and operational impact with space flight involving cardiovascular risks to astronaut health, safety and operational performance are reduced orthostatic tolerance and aerobic capacity, the resource cost of effective countermeasures, and the potential effects of space radiation. Future research should focus on these challenges.

  20. The current state and future directions of marine turtle toxicology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Kimberly A; Leusch, Frederic D L; van de Merwe, Jason P

    2016-09-01

    Chemical contamination of marine turtles has been well documented in the literature, although information on the toxicological effects of these contaminants is poorly understood. This paper systematically and quantitatively presents the available marine turtle toxicological research (excluding oil chemicals and natural toxins) and the related fields of cell line establishment and biomarkers as indicators of exposure. Examination of the published literature identified a total of 49 papers on marine turtle toxicology, which were split into three categories: toxicity studies (n=33, 67%), cell line establishment (n=7, 14%), and publications using biomarkers (n=13, 27%). Toxicity studies were further broken down into four subcategories: those correlating contaminants with toxicological endpoints (n=16, 48%); in vitro exposure experiments (n=11, 33%); in vivo exposure experiments (n=5, 15%); and screening risk assessments using hazard quotients (n=3, 9%). In quantitatively assessing the literature, trends and gaps in this field of research were identified. This paper highlights the need for more marine turtle toxicology research on all species, particularly using high throughput and non-invasive in vitro assays developed for marine turtle cells, including investigations into further toxicological endpoints and mixture effects. This will provide more comprehensive species-specific assessment of the impacts of chemical contaminants on these threatened animals, and improve conservation and management strategies globally.

  1. Treading lightly on shifting ground: The direction and motivation of future geological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    The future of the geosciences and geological research will involve complex scientific challenges, primarily concerning global and regional environmental issues, in the next 20-30 years. It is quite reasonable to suspect, based on current political and socioeconomic events, that young geoscientists will be faced with and involved in helping to resolve some well defined problems: water and energy security, the effects of anthropogenic climate change, coastal sea level rise and development, and the mitigation of geohazards. It is how we choose to approach these challenges that will define our future. Interdisciplinary applied research, improved modeling and prediction augmented with faster and more sophisticated computing, and a greater role in creating and guiding public policy, will help us achieve our goals of a cleaner and safer Earth environment in the next 30 years. In the far future, even grander possibilities for eliminating the risk of certain geohazards and finding sustainable solutions to our energy needs can be envisioned. Looking deeper into the future, the possibilities for geoscience research push the limits of the imagination.

  2. Social science research on HIV in Vietnam: a critical review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Amy; Hirsch, Jennifer S; Giang, Le Minh; Parker, Richard G

    2013-01-01

    Social science research can enhance the response to Vietnam's growing HIV epidemic by capturing the country's rapidly changing social and political context. The present paper reviews the published, peer-reviewed and English-language social science literature on HIV in Vietnam in order to identify critical theoretical and substantive gaps, while laying the groundwork for future research. We found four broad foci for work on the social context of HIV and AIDS in Vietnam: the cultural meanings and social relationships that shape Vietnam's HIV epidemic; stigma and discrimination; social inequality and structural violence as contributors to HIV risk; and, finally, how broader global and social systems shape Vietnam's HIV epidemic. We signal the particular need for additional research on the effects of the media on attitudes towards HIV and AIDS, on social movements, and on health systems, as well as on a number of other key areas. Work along these lines, in addition to more effective communication of policy-relevant findings to those responsible for the development and implementation of policies and programmes, will strengthen Vietnam's response to HIV and AIDS.

  3. A systematic review of microfinance and women's health literature: Directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, T L; Burke, J G

    2016-04-15

    While growing evidence suggests that microfinance is an effective approach for improved women's health, a significant gap remains in our understanding. The objective of this review is to synthesise the findings from published literature focused on microfinance and health issues particularly affecting women, including HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, mental health, and violence. Forty-one articles that examine the impact of microfinance participation on women's health were identified through a systematic search of electronic databases, coded using a structured abstraction form, and synthesised. Review results indicate that the impact of microfinance on women's health is an area in great need of research and publication attention. Varied quality and reporting in the identified articles restricted the ability to draw concrete conclusions regarding the relationship between microfinance participation and women's health, but led to the identification of current gaps in existing published research. Future research should work to address the recommendations provided in order to offer additional evidence to better understand the use of microfinance programming as a structural intervention to improve women's health.

  4. Hot spots and future directions of research on the neuroprotective effects of nimodipine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Runhui Li

    2014-01-01

    Calcium antagonists are widely used in the clinical treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular disease because of their vascular and neuroprotective effects. Nimodipine, a typical calcium antagonist, can cross the blood-brain barrier and act selectively at neurons and blood vessels of target tis-sues, thus exerting neuroprotective effects. The aim of the present study was to explore the hot spots and future trends of research on the neuroprotective effects of nimodipine. We retrieved 425 articles on the neuroprotective effects of nimodipine that were indexed in the Web of the Science database between 2000 and 2014. The retrieved articles were analyzed using document analysis reporting and the derived information function in the Web of Science, and the infor-mation visualization software CiteSpace III. The reference co-citation network was plotted, and the high frequency key words in these publications were used to analyze the research fronts and development trends for nimodipine neuroprotection. According to these co-citation clusters, the research front of nimodipine neuroprotection is the use of randomized controlled trials to study nimodipine intervention of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Using time zone view analysis on hot spots labeled with a key word, the areas of interest in the ifeld of nimodipine neuroprotection are nimodipine pharmacology and therapeutics, blood-brain barrier, trials, and anti-angiospasm.

  5. Research on lamellar structure and micro-hardness of directionally solidified Sn-58Bi eutectic alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Xiaowu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the Sn-58Bi (weight percent eutectic alloy was directionally solidified at a constant temperature gradient (G = 12 K·mm-1 with different growth rates using a Bridgman type directional solidification furnace. A lamellar microstructure was observed in the Sn-58Bi samples. The lamellar spacing and micro-hardness of longitudinal and transversal sections were measured. The values of lamellar spacing of both longitudinal and transversal sections decrease with an increase in growth rate. The microhardness increases with an increase in the growth rate and decreases with an increase in the lamellar spacing. The dependence of lamellar spacing on growth rate, and micro-hardness on both growth rate and lamellar spacing were obtained by linear regression analysis. The relationships between the lamellar spacing and growth rate, microhardness and growth rate, and micro-hardness and lamellar spacing for transversal and longitudinal sections of Sn-58Bi eutectic alloy were given. The fitted exponent values obtained in this work were compared with the previous similar experimental results and a good agreement was obtained.

  6. A new direction for dark matter research: intermediate mass compact halo objects

    CERN Document Server

    Axelrod, T; Dawson, W; Frampton, P H

    2016-01-01

    The failure to find evidence for elementary particles that could serve as the constituents of dark matter brings to mind suggestions that dark matter might consist of massive compact objects (MACHOs). In particular, it has recently been argued that MACHOs with masses > 15 solar masses may have been prolifically produced at the onset of the big bang. Although a variety of astrophysical signatures for primordial MACHOs with masses in this range have been discussed in the literature, we favor a strategy that uses the potential for gravitational microlensing of stars outside our galaxy to directly detect the presence of MACHOs in the halo of our galaxy. We point out that the effect of the motion of the Earth on the shape of the microlensing brightening curves provides a promising approach to confirming over the course of next several years that dark matter consists of MACHOs.

  7. [Research on direct forming of comminuted fracture surgery orienting model by selective laser melting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xingrong; Yang, Yongqiang; Wu, Weihui; Wang, Di; Ding, Huanwen; Huang, Weihong

    2010-06-01

    In order to simplify the distal femoral comminuted fracture surgery and improve the accuracy of the parts to be reset, a kind of surgery orienting model for the surgery operation was designed according to the scanning data of computer tomography and the three-dimensional reconstruction image. With the use of DiMetal-280 selective laser melting rapid prototyping system, the surgery orienting model of 316L stainless steel was made through orthogonal experiment for processing parameter optimization. The technology of direct manufacturing of surgery orienting model by selective laser melting was noted to have obvious superiority with high speed, precise profile and good accuracy in size when compared with the conventional one. The model was applied in a real surgical operation for thighbone replacement; it worked well. The successful development of the model provides a new method for the automatic manufacture of customized surgery model, thus building a foundation for more clinical applications in the future.

  8. The research of high-directive anisotropic magnetic metamaterial antenna loaded with frequency-selective surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yong-Zhi; Ran Li-Xin; Peng Liang; Wang Wei-Guang; Li Ting; Zhao Xu; Chen Qiu-Lin

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses a Computer Simulation Technology microwave studio to simulate the performance of a new highdirectivity anisotropic magnetic metamaterial antenna loaded with a frequency-selective surface. Frequency-selective surface with cross-dipole element has a great effect on the directivity, radiation pattern, and gain of such an antenna. The experimental results show that frequency-selective surface (FSS) significantly improve the radiation performance of anisotropic magnetic metamaterial antenna. For example, as a single anisotropic magnetic metamaterial antenna, half power beam width is 4 degrees in the H planes, and the gain of this antenna is 19.5dBi at 10GHz, achieving a 2.1 degree increment in half power beam width, and a 7.3dB gain increment by loading with the FSS reflector. The simulating results are consistent with our experimental results.

  9. Experimental research for direction of arrival estimation based on signal phase matching principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Hong; XIAO Hui; SUN Jincai

    2007-01-01

    In order to test the validity of signal phase matching principle (SPMP) applied to direction of arrival (DOA) estimation, experiments are carried out at a reservoir using 16 sensors array. Two kinds of method, Least Square Method for Signal Matching principle (LSMSPM) and singular value decomposition method for signal matching principle (SVDSPM), are used for DOA estimation. Their performances were analyzed and compared with MUSIC and conventional beam-forming (CBF) method. The results show that the 3 dB beam width obtained by SPMP is 1/4 to 1/7 as much as that obtained by CBF and 1/2 to 1/3 by MUSIC method.In addition, LSMSPM and SVDSPM are available for multi-sources DOA estimation and high resolution DOA estimation, which demonstrates that DOA estimation by SPMP method is better than that by MUSIC and CBF method.

  10. Health and wellness programs for commercial motor-vehicle drivers: organizational assessment and new research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Michael; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos

    2015-02-01

    The workplace is an invaluable venue for health protection and promotion interventions, particularly for truck drivers due to their overreliance on their work environments, a plethora of work-related stressors, and their morbidity rates. Extant efforts of trucking companies to address driver health through worksite health and wellness programs have been inadequate, producing unsustainable results. The Driver Health and Wellness Program Survey was designed for and disseminated to 46 trucking companies to assess the current state of health and wellness programs in the trucking industry, including program participation rates and longevity, program evaluation procedures, and program activities and resources. Findings indicate that programmatic efforts in trucking companies continue to fall short, and health and wellness programs are insufficient to improve health outcomes in a sustainably positive direction. A new integrated, systems-based paradigm is proposed as a conceptual and methodological framework with the potential to meaningfully advance interventions in blue-collar work settings.

  11. New directions for the Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SR and ED) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miedzybrodzka, K. (Revenue Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    1999-01-01

    Essential features of the Canadian federal government's Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SR and ED) Program are described, with an update of recent initiatives taken to enhance the delivery of the program. In this instance, the emphasis is on the implications of these changes for the mining and energy industries. The objective of the SR and ED program is to encourage research and experimental development in Canada by the private sector through broad-based support, with incentives that are as much as possible of immediate benefit, recognizing that science and technology are the cornerstones of progress and hence the foundations of Canada's prosperity. The essence of the program is investment tax credits in the form of fixed percentages of qualified SR and ED current and capital expenditures. Initiatives introduced in 1997 include clarification of definitions to enhance the certainty of what qualifies as SR and ED; enhancing the consistency in SR and ED reviews and audits; enhancing timeliness in processing SR and ED tax credits; and reducing the costs and administrative burden for claimants, most particularly for small and first-time claimants. Proposed initiatives to improve delivery include reorganization of the Program into a stand-alone unit with a focus on the science and incentive aspects; more consistent interpretation of relevant legislation across all industry sectors; further clarification of practices and procedures and resolution of problems associated with program administration; the appointment of a Steering Committee to oversee the administration of these initiatives and the appointment of industry sector committees (including the mining, oil and natural gas industries) to develop issue sheets, standards and interpretation guidelines for their respective sectors. The investment credits to companies doing SR and ED amount to $1.3 billion annually, which represents 27 per cent of federal government expenditures on research and

  12. New directions for the Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SR and ED) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miedzybrodzka, K. [Revenue Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1999-10-01

    Essential features of the Canadian federal government`s Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SR and ED) Program are described, with an update of recent initiatives taken to enhance the delivery of the program. In this instance, the emphasis is on the implications of these changes for the mining and energy industries. The objective of the SR and ED program is to encourage research and experimental development in Canada by the private sector through broad-based support, with incentives that are as much as possible of immediate benefit, recognizing that science and technology are the cornerstones of progress and hence the foundations of Canada`s prosperity. The essence of the program is investment tax credits in the form of fixed percentages of qualified SR and ED current and capital expenditures. Initiatives introduced in 1997 include clarification of definitions to enhance the certainty of what qualifies as SR and ED; enhancing the consistency in SR and ED reviews and audits; enhancing timeliness in processing SR and ED tax credits; and reducing the costs and administrative burden for claimants, most particularly for small and first-time claimants. Proposed initiatives to improve delivery include reorganization of the Program into a stand-alone unit with a focus on the science and incentive aspects; more consistent interpretation of relevant legislation across all industry sectors; further clarification of practices and procedures and resolution of problems associated with program administration; the appointment of a Steering Committee to oversee the administration of these initiatives and the appointment of industry sector committees (including the mining, oil and natural gas industries) to develop issue sheets, standards and interpretation guidelines for their respective sectors. The investment credits to companies doing SR and ED amount to $1.3 billion annually, which represents 27 per cent of federal government expenditures on research and

  13. Selected achievements, science directions, and new opportunities for the WEBB small watershed research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Pierre D.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Greene, Earl A.; Buss, Heather L.; Clow, David W.; Hunt, Randall J.; Mast, M. Alisa; Murphy, Sheila F.; Peters, Norman E.; Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Shanley, James B.; Walker, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Over nearly two decades, the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) small watershed research program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has documented how water and solute fluxes, nutrient, carbon, and mercury dynamics, and weathering and sediment transport respond to natural and humancaused drivers, including climate, climate change, and atmospheric deposition. Together with a continued and increasing focus on the effects of climate change, more investigations are needed that examine ecological effects (e.g., evapotranspiration, nutrient uptake) and responses (e.g., species abundances, biodiversity) that are coupled with the physical and chemical processes historically observed in the WEBB program. Greater use of remote sensing, geographic modeling, and habitat/watershed modeling tools is needed, as is closer integration with the USGS-led National Phenology Network. Better understanding of process and system response times is needed. The analysis and observation of land-use and climate change effects over time should be improved by pooling data obtained by the WEBB program during the last two decades with data obtained earlier and (or) concurrently from other research and monitoring studies conducted at or near the five WEBB watershed sites. These data can be supplemented with historical and paleo-environmental information, such as could be obtained from tree rings and lake cores. Because of the relatively pristine nature and small size of its watersheds, the WEBB program could provide process understanding and basic data to better characterize and quantify ecosystem services and to develop and apply indicators of ecosystem health. In collaboration with other Federal and State watershed research programs, the WEBB program has an opportunity to contribute to tracking the short-term dynamics and long-term evolution of ecosystem services and health indicators at a multiplicity of scales across the landscape. 

  14. [The main directions of research on the causes conditioning the occurrence of the borderline personality disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogłodek, Ewa; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2011-10-01

    Currently, there are two main directions of explaining the occurrence of the borderline personality disorders (BPD). The first of them attempts to explain them upon the constitutional basis, finding the causes in the genetic conditioning, biological and organic factors. The other one underline a role of the psychological developmental categories. A significant role is ascribed to traumatic childhood mental experiences such as: harassment and sexual abuse, as well as neglect of emotional and developmental needs of a child. About 40-71% of the infirm with the borderline personality admits to have been sexually abused. It was observed that there is a connection between the extent of sexual abuse of an individual in childhood and the intensification of the disorders proper for the borderline personality. One should, however, point out that sexual abuse, although they are regarded as a risk factor, are not seen as specific to the infirm with the borderline personality disorders. Moreover, there is a third direction referred to in the literature, seeking the causes of the occurrence of the borderline personality in a significant influence of social-cultural and environment factors. It was noticed that there is a significant correlation between the social situation and the degree of dissemination of those disorders. The borderline personality disorders are more frequent among the people of the low social status background and with relatively low level of education. More and more frequently, theorists and clinical personnel adhere to the view that the development of that disorder is caused by a combination of neurobiological and social factors, together with the pathological qualities of early-childhood development.

  15. Mathematical Models for Immunology: Current State of the Art and Future Research Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Raluca EFTIMIE; Gillard, Joseph J.; Cantrell, Doreen A.

    2016-01-01

    The advances in genetics and biochemistry that have taken place over the last 10 years led to significant advances in experimental and clinical immunology. In turn, this has led to the development of new mathematical models to investigate qualitatively and quantitatively various open questions in immunology. In this study we present a review of some research areas in mathematical immunology that evolved over the last 10 years. To this end, we take a step-by-step approach in discussing a range...

  16. Crash data quality for road safety research: Current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imprialou, Marianna; Quddus, Mohammed

    2017-03-02

    Crash databases are one of the primary data sources for road safety research. Therefore, their quality is fundamental for the accuracy of crash analyses and, consequently the design of effective countermeasures. Although crash data often suffer from correctness and completeness issues, these are rarely discussed or addressed in crash analyses. Crash reports aim to answer the five "W" questions (i.e. When?, Where?, What?, Who? and Why?) of each crash by including a range of attributes. This paper reviews current literature on the state of crash data quality for each of these questions separately. The most serious data quality issues appear to be: inaccuracies in crash location and time, difficulties in data linkage (e.g. with traffic data) due to inconsistencies in databases, severity misclassification, inaccuracies and incompleteness of involved users' demographics and inaccurate identification of crash contributory factors. It is shown that the extent and the severity of data quality issues are not equal between attributes and the level of impact in road safety analyses is not yet entirely known. This paper highlights areas that require further research and provides some suggestions for the development of intelligent crash reporting systems.

  17. Rectal cancer: future directions and priorities for treatment, research and policy in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christopher; Ehrenberg, Nieves; Frizelle, Frank; Sarfati, Diana; Balasingam, Adrian; Pearse, Maria; Parry, Susan; Print, Cristin; Findlay, Michael; Bissett, Ian

    2014-06-06

    New Zealand has one of the highest incidences of rectal cancer in the world, and its optimal management requires a multidisciplinary approach. A National Rectal Cancer Summit was convened in August 2013 to discuss management of rectal cancer in the New Zealand context, to highlight controversies and discuss domestic priorities for the future. This paper summarises the priorities for treatment, research and policy for rectal cancer services in New Zealand identified as part of the Summit in August. The following priorities were identified: - Access to high-quality information for service planning, review of outcomes, identification of inequities and gaps in provision, and quality improvement; - Engagement with the entire sector, including private providers; - Focus on equity; - Emerging technologies; - Harmonisation of best practice; - Importance of multidisciplinary team meetings. In conclusion, improvements in outcomes for patients with rectal cancer in New Zealand will require significant engagement between policy makers, providers, researchers, and patients in order to ensure equitable access to high quality treatment, and strategic incorporation of emerging technologies into clinical practice. A robust clinical information framework is required in order to facilitate monitoring of quality improvements and to ensure that equitable care is delivered.

  18. MicroRNAs in fruit trees: discovery, diversity and future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solofoharivelo, M C; van der Walt, A P; Stephan, D; Burger, J T; Murray, S L

    2014-09-01

    Since the first description of microRNAs (miRNAs) 20 years ago, the number of miRNAs identified in different eukaryotic organisms has exploded, largely due to the recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies. Functional studies, mostly from model species, have revealed that miRNAs are major post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in eukaryotes. In plants, they are implicated in fundamental biological processes, from plant development and morphogenesis, to regulation of plant pathogen and abiotic stress responses. Although a substantial number of miRNAs have been identified in fruit trees to date, their functions remain largely uncharacterised. The present review aims to summarise the progress made in miRNA research in fruit trees, focusing specifically on the economically important species Prunus persica, Malus domestica, Citrus spp, and Vitis vinifera. We also discuss future miRNA research prospects in these plants and highlight potential applications of miRNAs in the on-going improvement of fruit trees.

  19. Structural dynamics of microsystems—current state of research and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. M.; Wang, W. J.

    2006-07-01

    Microsystems or micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), as a newly emerged revolutionary enabling technology, has brought both opportunities and challenges to the field of structural dynamics in a different scale, owing primarily to its interdisciplinary nature of research and extremely small feature size. This paper seeks to present a comprehensive yet critical review on some of the major issues that need to be tackled in the successful realisation of microsystems, with an ultimate objective of further developing and improving the current design capabilities of these systems. The electro-mechanical coupling of typical MEMS devices is first defined and introduced, followed by an in-depth review of the various existing modeling and simulation techniques. Special requirements are discussed when typical MEMS devices need to be tested and existing vibration testing techniques are reviewed. Of particular interest to MEMS devices, structural damping has become a major issue affecting dynamic performance due to the various energy dissipation mechanisms involved. These damping mechanisms have been examined, together with methods developed to model them. Finally, conclusions are made on what have been achieved to date and future prospects of structural dynamics of Microsystems are identified with an intention to stimulate further concerted research in this important emerging area.

  20. The Human Performance Envelope: Past Research, Present Activities and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Tamsyn

    2017-01-01

    Air traffic controllers (ATCOs) must maintain a consistently high level of human performance in order to maintain flight safety and efficiency. In current control environments, performance-influencing factors such as workload, fatigue and situation awareness can co-occur, and interact, to effect performance. However, multifactor influences and the association with performance are under-researched. This study utilized a high fidelity human in the loop enroute air traffic control simulation to investigate the relationship between workload, situation awareness and ATCO performance. The study aimed to replicate and extend Edwards, Sharples, Wilson and Kirwans (2012) previous study and confirm multifactor interactions with a participant sample of ex-controllers. The study also aimed to extend Edwards et als previous research by comparing multifactor relationships across 4 automation conditions. Results suggest that workload and SA may interact to produce a cumulative impact on controller performance, although the effect of the interaction on performance may be dependent on the context and amount of automation present. Findings have implications for human-automation teaming in air traffic control, and the potential prediction and support of ATCO performance.

  1. NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA): Early Results and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Siegfried

    2008-01-01

    This talk will review the status and progress of the NASA/Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) atmospheric global reanalysis project called the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). An overview of NASA's emerging capabilities for assimilating a variety of other Earth Science observations of the land, ocean, and atmospheric constituents will also be presented. MERRA supports NASA Earth science by synthesizing the current suite of research satellite observations in a climate data context (covering the period 1979-present), and by providing the science and applications communities with of a broad range of weather and climate data with an emphasis on improved estimates of the hydrological cycle. MERRA is based on a major new version of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5), that includes the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF)-based GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model and the new NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) unified grid-point statistical interpolation (GST) analysis scheme developed as a collaborative effort between NCEP and the GMAO. In addition to MERRA, the GMAO is developing new capabilities in aerosol and constituent assimilation, ocean, ocean biology, and land surface assimilation. This includes the development of an assimilation capability for tropospheric air quality monitoring and prediction, the development of a carbon-cycle modeling and assimilation system, and an ocean data assimilation system for use in coupled short-term climate forecasting.

  2. Future directions in feedback on second language writing: Overview and research agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Hyland

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of the contributions made to this special issue on feedback by the seven papers, examining how they reflect both the growing interest in different areas of research into feedback on writing and the continuing search by teachers for more effective feedback practices. Focusing first on the papers by Van Beuningen, Storch, Evans, Hartshorn and Allen, it discusses how these papers situate written corrective feedback research in the wider area of second language acquisition research and contribute to the debate in feedback research on research design issues. This is followed by an examination of the major findings of the four situated empirical studies by Bitchener, Ma, El-ebyary and Windeatt, and Martinez and Roca, which make up the second section. Echoing the authors of these papers, this article argues that we need more longitudinal naturalistic studies, adopting both cognitive and socio-cultural SLA frameworks to investigate the role of feedback and its impact on individual learners in more depth. Finally some pedagogic implications are discussed, including the need for feedback practices which facilitate students’ abilities to self regulate and evaluate their performance, and the need to raise teachers’ awareness of the different feedback sources and modes of delivery available to them.Este artículo ofrece una revisión de las siete aportaciones incluidas en este número especial sobre feedback, constatando cómo reflejan tanto el creciente interés por el tema en las distintas áreas de investigación como la continua búsqueda de técnicas más efectivas por parte del profesorado. Centrándose en primer lugar en las contribuciones de Van Beuningen, Storch, Evans, Hartshorn y Allen, analiza cómo estos artículos sitúan la investigación sobre feedback en la corrección de trabajos escritos dentro del área más amplia de adquisición de segundas lenguas, contribuyendo al debate, dentro de la investigaci

  3. Research on Direct Tunnel Solution and Deployment Strategy%Direct Tunnel技术研究及引入策略探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李延斌; 苏玉卓; 高功应; 赫罡

    2010-01-01

    介绍了UMTS网络中Direct Tunnel的网络架构特殊参数和关键流程的处理.详细分析了Direct Tunnel的各种优劣势及Direct Tunnel的部署对网络可能产生的各种影响,并根据分析结果给出合理Direct Tunnel的引入策略建议及部署方案.

  4. The Impact of Neighborhood Social and Built Environment Factors across the Cancer Continuum: Current Research, Methodologic Considerations, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Shariff-Marco, Salma; De Rouen, Mindy; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Yen, Irene H.; Mujahid, Mahasin; Satariano, William A.; Glaser, Sally L.

    2015-01-01

    Neighborhood social and built environments have been recognized as important contexts in which health is shaped. We review the extent to which these neighborhood factors have been addressed in population-level cancer research, with a scan of the literature for research that focuses on specific social and/or built environment characteristics and association with outcomes across the cancer continuum, including incidence, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and survival. We discuss commonalities and differences in methodologies across studies, current challenges in research methodology, and future directions in this research area. The assessment of social and built environment factors in relation to cancer is a relatively new field, with 82% of 34 reviewed papers published since 2010. Across the wide range of social and built environment exposures and cancer outcomes considered by the studies, numerous associations were reported. However, the directions and magnitudes of association varied, due in large part to the variation in cancer sites and outcomes being studied, but also likely due to differences in study populations, geographical region, and, importantly, choice of neighborhood measure and geographic scale. We recommend that future studies consider the life course implications of cancer incidence and survival, integrate secondary and self-report data, consider work neighborhood environments, and further develop analytical and statistical approaches appropriate to the geospatial and multilevel nature of the data. Incorporating social and built environment factors into research on cancer etiology and outcomes can provide insights into disease processes, identify vulnerable populations, and generate results with translational impact of relevance for interventionists and policy makers. PMID:25847484

  5. A critical review of the development, current hotspots, and future directions of Lake Taihu research from the bibliometrics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlin; Yao, Xiaolong; Qin, Boqiang

    2016-07-01

    Lake Taihu, as the important drinking water source of the Yangtze River Delta urban agglomeration and the third largest freshwater lake in China, has experienced serious lake eutrophication and water quality deterioration in the past three decades. Growing scientific, political, and public attention has been given to the water quality of Lake Taihu. This study aimed to conduct a comparative quantitative and qualitative analysis of the development, current hotspots, and future directions of Lake Taihu research using a bibliometric analysis of eight well-studied lakes (Lake Taihu, Lake Baikal, Lake Biwa, Lake Erie, Lake Michigan, Lake Ontario, Lake Superior and Lake Victoria) around the world based on the Science Citation Index (SCI) database. A total of 1582 papers discussing Lake Taihu research were published in 322 journals in the past three decades. However, the first paper about Lake Taihu research was not found in the SCI database until 1989, and there were only zero, one, or two papers each year from 1989 to 1995. There had been rapid development in Lake Taihu research since 1996 and a sharp increase in papers since 2005. A keyword analysis showed that "sediment," "eutrophication", "Microcystis aeruginosa", "cyanobacterial blooms", and "remote sensing" were the most frequently used keywords of the study subject. Owing to its significant impact on aquatic ecosystems, a crucial emphasis has been placed on climate change recently. In addition, the future focuses of research directions, including (1) environmental effects of physical processes; (2) nutrient cycles and control and ecosystem responses; (3) cyanobacteria bloom monitoring, causes, forecast and management; (4) eutrophication and climate change interactions; and (5) ecosystem degradation mechanism and ecological practice of lake restoration, are presented based on the keyword analysis. Through multidisciplinary fields (physics, chemistry, and biology) cross and synthesis study of Lake Taihu, the

  6. DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE CONSTRUCTION SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT RESEARCH IN NEW ZEALAND: A REAL OPTIONS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran, Van

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Real Options (RO has been a universally accepted concept in a number of major industries. However, its use in the construction supply chain management (CSCM sector has been limited. Some rare supply chain management RO studies have shown a number of limitations. First, there is a lack of a rigorous theoretical RO framework pertaining specifically to CSCM. All such supply chain management RO studies are based off RO theories or models developed for other sectors (engineering, infrastructure, natural resources. And second, attempts to extend real option to wider uses in CSCM seem premature at the present. This paper reviews all recent literature pertaining to real options and real options applied specifically to the construction supply chain management area. The study proposes a research programme pertaining to CSCM in New Zealand in order to enhance the current understanding of RO in this area and in the process develop a comprehensive theory for the RO application in New Zealand CSCM.

  7. [Endemic, Trend, Research and Direction of Food-borne Parasitic Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Yu, Xin-bing

    2015-12-01

    Food-borne parasitic diseases are exhibiting new epidemiological characteristics in such society that is filled with economic development, ecological environmental changes, more frequent population flow, as well as diversities of dietary source and style. The food-borne parasitic diseases have become a major risk factor for food safety and health care, and a global public health problem. In this review, we will give an overview on the epidemiological information of some major food-borne parasitic diseases both in China and in the world, and summarize their emerging characteristics and epidemiological trends. Research on the prevention techniques and pathogenesis of the diseases is reviewed as well. Finally, perspectives are given on the diagnosis/detection, basic mechanisms of the diseases, and the strategies for prevention and transmission interruption.

  8. RESEARCH ON DIRECT CURRENT ELECTRIC FIELD CHARACTERISTICS OF OVERBURDEN FAILURE AND ITS APPLICATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程久龙; 李莉; 于师建

    1999-01-01

    The overburden failure causes the changes of the constant electric field, and the resistivity is the main parameter in these changes. The experimental simulation about the response relation between the overburden failure and its electrical parameter changes is made by building the similar material physics model of mining. The experiment results are used to analyze and test the in-situ detection. The research indicates that the resistivity changes with the electric characteristic of the rock in cracked zone and caving zone caused by overburden failure, the response characteristics of resistivity vary with the failure degrees at different overburden failure zone and that they are corresponding. The resistivity method used in monitoring the overburden failure can determine the height and the affecting scopes of the cracked zone and caving zone. This can provide reliable technological guarantee for mining design and safe production.

  9. Lick Observatory's Shane telescope adaptive optics system (ShaneAO): research directions and progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavel, Donald T.; Kupke, Renate; Rudy, Alexander R.; Srinath, Srikar; Dillon, Daren; Poyneer, Lisa A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a review of the ongoing research activity surrounding the adaptive optics system at the Shane telescope (ShaneAO) particularly the R&D efforts on the technology and algorithms for that will advance AO into wider application for astronomy. We are pursuing the AO challenges for whole sky coverage diffraction-limited correction down to visible science wavelengths. This demands high-order wavefront correction and bright artificial laser beacons. We present recent advancements in the development of MEMS based AO correction, woofer-tweeter architecture, wind-predictive wavefront control algorithms, atmospheric characterization, and a pulsed fiber amplifier guide star laser tuned for optical pumping of the sodium layer. We present the latest on-sky results from the new AO system and present status and experimental plans for the optical pumping guide star laser.

  10. ABSTRACT——Current Situation and Future Direction of Marxism Popularity Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, academic circles has made important progress in the following studies on the basic connotation of Marxist popularity, the relations between popularity of Marxism and sinicization, the relations between popularity of Marxism and epochal character, the realizing method of popularity of Marxism. Next, study on popularization of Marxism has to make efforts in the following two aspects: the relationship between the popularity of Marxism and socialist theory system with Chinese characteris- tics, and integration of the popularity of Marxism and the ideological and political education. Meanwhile the efforts should be made to deepen the study of Marxism popularity through the process of sinicization of Marxism, to study Marxism popularity from the viewpoint of the three dimensional perspective of the development of Marxism, also to strengthen the research of basic princi- ples of Marxism popularity and deepen the studies of basic forms of Marxism popularity, thus to build a study system of Marxism popularity.

  11. Future agriculture with minimized phosphorus losses to waters: Research needs and direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpley, Andrew N; Bergström, Lars; Aronsson, Helena; Bechmann, Marianne; Bolster, Carl H; Börling, Katarina; Djodjic, Faruk; Jarvie, Helen P; Schoumans, Oscar F; Stamm, Christian; Tonderski, Karin S; Ulén, Barbro; Uusitalo, Risto; Withers, Paul J A

    2015-03-01

    The series of papers in this issue of AMBIO represent technical presentations made at the 7th International Phosphorus Workshop (IPW7), held in September, 2013 in Uppsala, Sweden. At that meeting, the 150 delegates were involved in round table discussions on major, predetermined themes facing the management of agricultural phosphorus (P) for optimum production goals with minimal water quality impairment. The six themes were (1) P management in a changing world; (2) transport pathways of P from soil to water; (3) monitoring, modeling, and communication; (4) importance of manure and agricultural production systems for P management; (5) identification of appropriate mitigation measures for reduction of P loss; and (6) implementation of mitigation strategies to reduce P loss. This paper details the major challenges and research needs that were identified for each theme and identifies a future roadmap for catchment management that cost-effectively minimizes P loss from agricultural activities.

  12. Multidisciplinary research program directed toward utilization of solar energy through bioconversion of renewable resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    Progress is reported in this multidisciplinary research program. Genetic selection of superior trees, physiological basis of vigor, tissue culture systems leading to cloning of diploid and haploid cell lines are discussed in the Program A report. The physiological basis of enhanced oleoresin formation in southern pines when treated with sublethal concentrations of the herbicide paraquat was investigated in Program B. In Program C, metabolic changes in the stems of slash pine, in vivo, after application with paraquat were determined. The use of phdoem and xylem tissue slices as a laboratory model for studying paraquat associated- and normal-terpene synthesis in pines is discussed. The biochemistry and physiology of methane formation from cellulose during anaerobic fermentation are discussed in the Program D report. (DMC)

  13. The Malayic-speaking; Orang Laut Dialects and directions for research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Anderbeck

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Southeast Asia is home to many distinct groups of sea nomads, some of which are known collectively as Orang (Suku Laut. Those located between Sumatra and the Malay Peninsula are all Malayic-speaking. Information about their speech is paltry and scattered; while starting points are provided in publications such as Skeat and Blagden (1906, Kähler (1946a, b, 1960, Sopher (1977: 178–180, Kadir et al. (1986, Stokhof (1987, and Collins (1988, 1995, a comprehensive account and description of Malayic Sea Tribe lects has not been provided to date. This study brings together disparate sources, including a bit of original research, to sketch a unified linguistic picture and point the way for further investigation. While much is still unknown, this paper demonstrates relationships within and between individual Sea Tribe varieties and neighbouring canonical Malay lects. It is proposed that Sea Tribe lects can be assigned to four groupings: Kedah, Riau Islands, Duano, and Sekak.

  14. Future directions in engineering ethics research: microethics, macroethics and the role of professional societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkert, J R

    2001-07-01

    Three frames of reference for engineering ethics are discussed--individual, professional and social--which can be further broken down into "microethics" concerned with individuals and the internal relations of the engineering profession and "macroethics" referring to the collective social responsibility of the engineering profession and to societal decisions about technology. Few attempts have been made at integrating microethical and macroethical approaches to engineering ethics. The approach suggested here is to focus on the role of professional engineering societies in linking individual and professional ethics and in linking professional and social ethics. A research program is outlined using ethics support as an example of the former, and the issuance of position statements on product liability as an example of the latter.

  15. Science for a wilder Anthropocene: Synthesis and future directions for trophic rewilding research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenning, Jens-Christian; Pedersen, Pil B M; Donlan, C Josh; Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Faurby, Søren; Galetti, Mauro; Hansen, Dennis M; Sandel, Brody; Sandom, Christopher J; Terborgh, John W; Vera, Frans W M

    2016-01-26

    Trophic rewilding is an ecological restoration strategy that uses species introductions to restore top-down trophic interactions and associated trophic cascades to promote self-regulating biodiverse ecosystems. Given the importance of large animals in trophic cascades and their widespread losses and resulting trophic downgrading, it often focuses on restoring functional megafaunas. Trophic rewilding is increasingly being implemented for conservation, but remains controversial. Here, we provide a synthesis of its current scientific basis, highlighting trophic cascades as the key conceptual framework, discussing the main lessons learned from ongoing rewilding projects, systematically reviewing the current literature, and highlighting unintentional rewilding and spontaneous wildlife comebacks as underused sources of information. Together, these lines of evidence show that trophic cascades may be restored via species reintroductions and ecological replacements. It is clear, however, that megafauna effects may be affected by poorly understood trophic complexity effects and interactions with landscape settings, human activities, and other factors. Unfortunately, empirical research on trophic rewilding is still rare, fragmented, and geographically biased, with the literature dominated by essays and opinion pieces. We highlight the need for applied programs to include hypothesis testing and science-based monitoring, and outline priorities for future research, notably assessing the role of trophic complexity, interplay with landscape settings, land use, and climate change, as well as developing the global scope for rewilding and tools to optimize benefits and reduce human-wildlife conflicts. Finally, we recommend developing a decision framework for species selection, building on functional and phylogenetic information and with attention to the potential contribution from synthetic biology.

  16. A review paper on offline inspection of finished and semi-finished products and emerging research directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babar Ramzan Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organizations want to focus on product quality along with productivity to get their competitive advantage in global market. In order to achieve this aim, quality management system and its different aspects are becoming more valuable than before. This study has considered quality control and its activities with specific focus on offline inspection. The objective of this study is to provide a literature review that identifies different models and methodologies, developed for offline inspection under different manufacturing and inspection conditions. This review is based on research work accepted by international journals and published in the years from 2000 to 2016. These studies are classified into six groups on the basis of their research objectives, model developed, adopted methodologies, and research outcomes. This review paper also gives а brief look at the offline inspection to propose future research opportunities and emerging trends. The proposed research directions can be helpful in developing new models or modifying the existing models to improve the performance of offline inspection.

  17. RESEARCH ON LASER DIRECT DEPOSITION PROCESS OF Ti-6Al-4V ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Y. Gao; Y.Z. Zhang; L.K. Shi; B.L. Du; M.Z. Xi; H.Z. Ji

    2007-01-01

    Laser direct deposition (LDD) of metallic components is an advanced technology of combining CAD/CAM (computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing), high power laser, and rapid prototyping. This technology uses laser beam to melt the powders fed coaxially into the molten pool by the laser beam to fabricate fully dense metallic components. The present article mainly studies the LDD of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, which can be used to fabricate aircraft components. The mechanical properties of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, fabricated by LDD, are obtained using the tension test, and the oxygen content of used powders and deposited specimens are measured. In the present article, it can be seen that the mechanical properties obtained using this method are higher than the ones obtained by casting, and equal to those got by wrought anneal. One aircraft pan has been made using the LDD process. Because of this aircraft part, with sophisticated shape, the effect of the laser scanning track on the internal soundness of the deposited part was discussed.

  18. Authentic Assessment in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Leadership, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Describes the teacher-developed California Assessment Program (CAP) writing measure, designed to support California's reform curriculum and based on matrix sampling techniques. This program will be supplemented by literature and mathematics assessments. The greatest challenge is designing an assessment to match the state's new history and social…

  19. Research status on the sequestration of carbon dioxide by direct aqueous mineral carbonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Rush, Gilbert E.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2001-01-01

    Direct aqueous mineral carbonation has been investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO2 into a geologically stable, solid final form. The process utilizes a solution of distilled water, or sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), sodium chloride (NaCl), and water, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg2SiO4) or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. Carbon dioxide is dissolved into this slurry, by diffusion through the surface and gas dispersion within the aqueous phase. The process includes dissolution of the mineral and precipitation of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) in a single unit operation. Mineral reactivity has been increased by pretreatment of the minerals. Thermal activation of serpentine can be achieved by heat pretreatment at 630 C. Carbonation of the thermally activated serpentine, using the bicarbonate-bearing solution, at T=155 C, PCO2=185 atm, and 15% solids, achieved 78% stoichiometric conversion of the silicate to the carbonate in 30 minutes. Recent studies have investigated mechanical activation as an alternative to thermal treatment. The addition of a high intensity attrition grinding step to the size reduction circuit successfully activated both serpentine and olivine. Over 80% stoichiometric conversion of the mechanically activated olivine was achieved in 60 minutes, using the bicarbonate solution at T=185 C, PCO2=150 atm, and 15% solids. Significant carbonation of the mechanically activated minerals, at up to 66% stoichiometric conversion, has also been achieved at ambient temperature (25 C) and PCO2 ={approx}10 atm.

  20. Laboratory Directed Research & Development program. Annual report to the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the following projects coordinated at Brookhaven National Laboratory: investigation of the utility of max-entropy methods for the analysis of powder diffraction data; analysis of structures and interactions of nucleic acids and proteins by small angle x-ray diffraction; relaxographic MRI and functional MRI; very low temperature infra-red laser absorption as a potential analytical tool; state-resolved measurements of H{sub 2} photodesorption: development of laser probes of H{sub 2} for in-situ accelerator measurements; Siberian snake prototype development for RHIC; synthesis and characterization of novel microporous solids; ozone depletion, chemistry and physics of stratospheric aerosols; understanding the molecular basis for the synthesis of plant fatty acids possessing unusual double bond positions; structure determination of outer surface proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete; low mass, low-cost multi-wire proportional chambers for muon systems of collider experiments; theory of self-organized criticality; development of the PCR-SSCP technique for the detection, at the single cell level, of specific genetic changes; feasibility of SPECT in imaging of F-18 FDG accumulation in tumors; visible free electron laser oscillator experiment; study of possible 2 + 2 TeV muon-muon collider; ultraviolet FEL R & D; precision machining using hard x-rays; new directions in in-vivo enzyme mapping: catechol-O-methyltransferase; proposal to develop a high rate muon polarimeter; development of intense, tunable 20-femtosecond laser systems; use of extreme thermophilic bacterium thermatoga maritima as a source of ribosomal components and translation factors for structural studies; and biochemical and structural studies of Chaperon proteins from thermophilic bacteria and other experiments.