WorldWideScience

Sample records for calidris canutus rufa

  1. Avian influenza virus antibodies in Pacific Coast Red Knots (Calidris canutus rufa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James A.; DeCicco, Lucas H.; Ruthrauff, Daniel R.; Krauss, Scott; Hall, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence of avian influenza virus (AIV) antibodies in the western Atlantic subspecies of Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) is among the highest for any shorebird. To assess whether the frequency of detection of AIV antibodies is high for the species in general or restricted only to C. c. rufa, we sampled the northeastern Pacific Coast subspecies of Red Knot (Calidris canutus roselaari) breeding in northwestern Alaska. Antibodies were detected in 90% of adults and none of the chicks sampled. Viral shedding was not detected in adults or chicks. These results suggest a predisposition of Red Knots to AIV infection. High antibody titers to subtypes H3 and H4 were detected, whereas low to intermediate antibody levels were found for subtypes H10 and H11. These four subtypes have previously been detected in shorebirds at Delaware Bay (at the border of New Jersey and Delaware) and in waterfowl along the Pacific Coast of North America.

  2. PRESENCE OF RED KNOT (CALIDRIS CANUTUS IN ITE WETLANDS, TACNA, PERU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhonson K. Vizcarra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Red Knot (Calidris canutus, Linnaeus 1758 in Ite Wetlands, Tacna, Peru is documented. Two individuals were observed in October 2011. This species had only one occurrence without details in this area.

  3. Spring migration of the Siberian Knots Calidris canutus canutus : results of a co-operative Wader Study Group project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dick, William J.A.; Piersma, Theunis; Prokosch, Peter

    1987-01-01

    In spring 1979 the Wader Study Group organised a co-operative project to study the spring migration of Siberian Knots Calidris c. canutus from their west and south African wintering grounds to the breeding grounds in central Siberia. S. African wintering birds migrate via the western seaboards of Af

  4. Cost reduction in the cold : heat generated by terrestrial locomotion partly substitutes for thermoregulation costs in Knot Calidris canutus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinzeel, Leo W.; Piersma, T

    1998-01-01

    To test whether heat generated during locomotion substitutes for the thermoregulation cost, oxygen consumption of four post-absorptive temperate-wintering Knot Calidris canutus was measured at air temperatures of 25 degrees C (thermoneutral) and 10 degrees C (c. 10 degrees below the lower critical t

  5. Cost reduction in the cold: heat generated by terrestrial locomotion partly substitutes for thermoregulation costs in Knot Calidris canutus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinzeel, L.W.; Piersma, T.

    1998-01-01

    To test whether heat generated during locomotion substitutes for the thermoregulation cost, oxygen consumption of four post-absorptive temperate-wintering Knot Calidris canutus was measured at air temperatures of 25 degrees C (thermoneutral) and 10 degrees C (c. 10 degrees below the lower critical t

  6. Twofold seasonal variation in the supposedly constant, species-specific, ratio of upstroke to downstroke flight muscles in red knots Calidris canutus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, Theunis; Dietz, Maurine W.

    2007-01-01

    We show that in a long-distance migrant shorebird species with outspoken seasonal changes in body mass and composition, the red knot Calidris canutus, the ratio between the masses of the small flight muscle (musculus supracoracoideus, powering twists and active upstrokes of the wings) and the larger

  7. Changing balance between survival and recruitment explains population trends in Red Knots Calidris canutus islandica wintering in Britain, 1969-1995

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyd, H; Piersma, T; Camphuysen, Kees (C.J.)

    2001-01-01

    The demography of Red Knots Calidris canutus islandica wintering in Britain from 1969 to 1995 was examined using published data on winter numbers, unpublished ringing data, and information on the percentages first year birds in late autumn and winter (defined here as 'recruitment'). The maximum time

  8. Twofold seasonal variation in the supposedly constant, species-specific, ratio of upstroke to downstroke flight muscles in red knots Calidris canutus

    OpenAIRE

    Piersma, Theunis; Dietz, Maurine W.

    2007-01-01

    We show that in a long-distance migrant shorebird species with outspoken seasonal changes in body mass and composition, the red knot Calidris canutus, the ratio between the masses of the small flight muscle (musculus supracoracoideus, powering twists and active upstrokes of the wings) and the larger flight muscle (musculus pectoralis, for the downstrokes) is far from constant. During an annual cycle the supracoracoideus/pectoralis ratio varied more than twofold between values of 0.058 (+/- 0....

  9. Modelling phenotypic flexibility: an optimality analysis of gizzard size in Red Knots Calidris canutus

    OpenAIRE

    van Gils, Jan A; Piersma, Theunis; Dekinga, Anne; Battley, Phil F.

    2006-01-01

    Reversible phenotypic changes, such as those observed in nutritional organs of long-distance migrants, increasingly receive the attention of ornithologists. In this paper we review the cost-benefit studies that have been performed on the flexible gizzard of Red Knots Calidris cunutus. By varying the hardness of the diet on offer gizzard mass could experimentally be manipulated, which allowed quantification of the energetic costs and benefits as a function of gizzard size. These functions were...

  10. Hematologic and plasma biochemistry values for endangered red knots (Calidris canutus rufa) at wintering and migratory sites in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Verónica L; Bertellotti, Marcelo; Baker, Allan J; González, Patricia M

    2010-04-01

    We obtained hematologic and plasma biochemistry values for adult, long-distance migrant Red Knots at their southernmost wintering site in Río Grande (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina) and at the first stopover site in San Antonio Oeste (Río Negro, Argentina). Lymphocytes (L) followed by heterophils (H) were the most abundant leukocytes. H/L ratio and glucose levels were significantly higher at Río Grande, possibly because of the stress of migration and molting. Packed cell volume results ranged widely, probably in response to increased oxygen demand for migration. Protein profiles and lipids were higher at the stopover site and attributable to birds storing reserves for subsequent flights. PMID:20688666

  11. Assessing the Importance of Horseshoe Crab (Limulus polyphemus) Eggs in the Diets of Migrating Red Knots (Calidris canutus rufa) and Sanderlings (Calidris alba) During Refueling Stops on Selected Florida Beaches

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The projects main goals are to look at the diet content, habitat use, and body condition of migratory red knots and sanderlings and to examine these factors...

  12. Foraging in a tidally structured environment by red knots (Calidris canutus) : Ideal, but not free

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gils, JA; Spaans, B; Dekinga, A; Piersma, T; Speirs, D.C.

    2006-01-01

    Besides the "normal" challenge of obtaining adequate intake rates in a patchy and dangerous world, shorebirds foraging in intertidal habitats face additional environmental hurdles. The tide forces them to commute between a roosting site and feeding grounds, twice a day. Moreover, because intertidal

  13. Foraging in a tidally structured environment by red knots (Calidris canutus): Ideal, but not free

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gils, J.A.; Spaans, B.; Dekinga, A.; Piersma, T.

    2006-01-01

    Besides the “normal” challenge of obtaining adequate intake rates in a patchy and dangerous world, shorebirds foraging in intertidal habitats face additional environmental hurdles. The tide forces them to commute between a roosting site and feeding grounds, twice a day. Moreover, because intertidal

  14. Food, feeding, and refuelling of Red Knots during northward migration at San Antonio Oeste, Rio Negro, Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, PM; Piersma, T; Verkuil, Y; González, Patricia M.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the food and feeding ecology of Red Knots Calidris canutus rufa on an area of rocky flat, or restinga, near San Antonio Oeste in the northwest of Golfo San Matias, Provincia de Rio Negro, Argentina in March 1992. These Red Knots are on their way north, from ''wintering'' areas in Tierra d

  15. Exploitation of intertidal feeding resources by the red knot Calidris canutus under megatidal conditions (Bay of Saint-Brieuc, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturbois, Anthony; Ponsero, Alain; Desroy, Nicolas; Le Mao, Patrick; Fournier, Jérôme

    2015-02-01

    The feeding ecology of the red knot has been widely studied across its wintering range. Red knots mainly select bivalves and gastropods, with differences between sites due to variation in prey availability. The shorebird's diet is also influenced or controlled by the tidal regime. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the adaptation of foraging red knots to the megatidal environment. The variation in their diet during tidal cycles was studied in the bay of Saint-Brieuc, a functional unit for this species. The method used combined macrofauna, distribution of foraging birds and diet data. Comparative spatial analyses of macrofauna and distribution of foraging red knots have shown that the bay's four benthic assemblages are exploited by birds. By analysing droppings, we highlighted that bivalve molluscs are the main component of their diet, as shown in most overwintering sites. Fifteen types of prey were identified and Donax vittatus was discovered to be a significant prey item. The relative proportion of each main prey item differs significantly depending on the benthic assemblage used to forage. All available benthic assemblages and all potential feeding resources can be used during a single tidal cycle, reflecting an adaptation to megatidal conditions. This approach develops accurate knowledge about the feeding ecology of birds which managers need in order to identify optimal areas for the conservation of waders based on the areas and resources actually used by the birds.

  16. Mortality of therapeutic fish Garra rufa caused by Aeromonas sobria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juraj Majtn; Jaroslaverny; Alena Ofkan; Peter Tak; Milan Koznek

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate a case of mass mortality of Garra rufa (G. rufa) from a fish hatchery farm in Slovakia. Methods: Causative bacterial agent was swabbing out of affected fish skin area and subsequently identified using commercial test system. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method. Results: Infected G. rufa was characterized by abnormal swimming behaviour, bleeding of skin lesions and local haemorrhages. Despite of using recommended aquatic antibiotic treatment no improvement was achieved and Aeromonas sobria (A. sobria) was identified as a causative agent of fish mortality. Due to massive fish mortality, antibiotic susceptibility of pure isolated culture of A. sobria was evaluated employing eight antibiotics against human infections. A. sobria was resistant only against one antibiotic, namely ampicilin. Conclusions: These results indicate that A. sobria can act as a primary pathogen of G. rufa and may be a potential risk factor for immunodeficient or immunoincompetent patients during the ichthyotherapy.

  17. Captive and free-living red knots Calidris canutus exhibit differences in non-induced immunity that suggest different immune strategies in different environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buehler, Deborah M.; Piersma, Theunis; Tieleman, B. Irene

    2008-01-01

    Experiments on captive animals, in which conditions can be controlled, are useful for examining complex biological phenomena such as immune function. Such experiments have increased our understanding of immune responses in the context of trade-offs and pathogen pressure. However, few studies have ex

  18. Captive and free-living red knots Calidris canutus exhibit differences in non-induced immunity that suggest different immune strategies in different environments

    OpenAIRE

    Buehler, Deborah M.; Piersma, Theunis; Tieleman, B. Irene

    2008-01-01

    Experiments on captive animals, in which conditions can be controlled, are useful for examining complex biological phenomena such as immune function. Such experiments have increased our understanding of immune responses in the context of trade-offs and pathogen pressure. However, few studies have examined how captivity itself affects immune function. We used microbial killing, leukocyte concentrations and complement-natural antibody assays to examine non-induced (constitutive) immunity in cap...

  19. Microsatellites for the inference of population structures in the Red Mason bee Osmia rufa (Hymenoptera, Megachilidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Karsten; Seidelmann, Karsten

    2006-01-01

    Microsatellite loci were isolated from the solitary Red Mason bee (Osmia rufa) by an enrichment protocol for partial genomic libraries. Six polymorphic microsatellite loci were used for a first population structure survey including 9 continental European and one island population. Observed levels of genetic variability and heterozygosity proved to be moderate. There was no significant differentiation among continental O. rufa populations. Only the island population from Cyprus was clearly sep...

  20. IDIOSYNCRASY OF LOCAL FUNGAL ISOLATE HYPOCREA RUFA STRAIN P2: PLANT GROWTH PROMOTION AND MYCOPARASITISM

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    Parth Thakor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Trichoderma viride an anamorph of Hypocrea rufa, is a known bio-control agent against various fungal phytopathogens. In the present study, H. rufa strain P2 was tested for plant growth promoting (PGP traits and antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum, Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus niger, Sclerotium rolfsii. In-vitro assessment of H. rufa strain P2 showed maximum IAA production of 68 µg ml-1, solubilised tri-calcium phosphate up to 72 µg ml-1 and showed production of chitinase enzyme 120 U ml-1. In order to determine in-vivo plant growth promotion, talc based formulation of H. rufa strain P2 was prepared and tested on Arachis hypogaea L. using seed and soil application. After 15 days, treated plants showed six-fold increases in the fresh and dry root mass whereas, fresh and dry shoot mass was increased up to two folds. The result indicates the local isolate H. rufa strain P2 can be categorized as phyto-friendly fungi which can be used as both, bio-control agent as well as phyto-augmenting bio-fertilizer.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Compounds from the Stem Bark of Uvaria rufa (Annonaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolation of compounds from methanol extract of the stem bark of Uvaria rufa has been conducted by using radial chromatography. Their structures were elucidated by UV, IR, NMR and mass spectroscopy, and by comparison with the literature. Seven compounds were isolated namely benzyl benzoate (1), caryophyllene oxide (2), glutinol (3), 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone (4), 5-hydroxy-6,7-dimethoxyflavone (5), 2,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone (6) and 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (7). Separation of the caryophyllene oxide (2), glutinol (3) and 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (7) from Uvaria rufa has never been reported. (author)

  2. Polygyny and strong genetic structuring within an isolated population of the wood ant Formica rufa

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    Wouter Dekoninck

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Social structuring of populations within some Formica species exhibits considerable variation going from monodomous and monogynous populations to polydomous, polygynous populations. The wood ant species Formica rufa appears to be mainly monodomous and monogynous throughout most of its distribution area in central and northern Europe. Only occasionally it was mentioned that F. rufa can have both polygynous and monogynous colonies in the same geographical region. We studied an isolated polydomous F. rufa population in a deciduous mixed forest in the north-west of Belgium. The level of polydomy within the colonies varied from monodomous to 11 nests per colony. Our genetic analysis of eight variable microsatellites suggest an oligo- to polygynous structure for at least the major part of the sampled nests. Relatedness amongst nest mate workers varies considerable within the population and colonies but confirms in general a polygynous structure. Additionally high genetic diversity (e.g. up to 8 out of 11 alleles per nest for the most variable locus and high within nest genetic variance (93% indicate that multiple queens contribute to the gene pool of workers of the same nest. Moreover significant genetic structuring among colonies indicates that gene flow between colonies is restricted and that exchange of workers between colonies is very limited. Finally we explain how possible factors as budding and the absence of Serviformica can explain the differences in genetic structure within this polygynous F. rufa population.

  3. Eggshell thickness variation in red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa) from Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castilla, Aurora M.; de Aragón, Juan Martínez; Herrel, Anthony;

    2009-01-01

    Eggshell thickness is commonly used as an indicator of habitat quality and effects of environmental pollution on avian reproduction. We present the first data available on eggshell thickness for Red-legged Partridge (Alectoris rufa) in Spain. We compared eggshell thickness between eggs collected ...

  4. Supercooling points and diapause termination in overwintering adults of orchard bees Osmia cornuta and O. rufa (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krunić, M D; Stanisavljević, L Z

    2006-06-01

    The orchard bee species Osmia cornuta (Latreille) and O. rufa (Linnaeus) are both European in distribution. Osmia cornuta is distributed in the central and southern half of the continent, while O. rufa is distributed additionally in more northern parts of Europe, including Great Britain. These bees over-winter in cocoons as diapausing adults. The freezing temperatures of overwintering adults of O. cornuta and O. rufa during diapause are similar: -30 degrees C to -24 degrees C and -31 degrees C to -26 degrees C, respectively. However, there are differences in the termination of their diapause. Under natural conditions in the wider area of Belgrade, O. rufa appears in spring about two weeks later than O. cornuta. PMID:16768821

  5. Growth of Little Stint Calidris minuta chicks on the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schekkerman, H; Nehls, G; Hotker, H; Tomkovich, PS; Kania, W; Chylarecki, P; Soloviev, M; Van Roomen, M

    1998-01-01

    Growth of mass and linear body dimensions (bill, tarsus and wing length) was studied in the Little Stint Calidris minuta at several locations on the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (73 degrees-76 degrees N) in 1983-94. Little Stints fledged at near-adult body mass, at 15 days of age. Growth followed an S-

  6. The Proteolytic Activity of Diapausing and Newly Hatched Red Mason Bees (Osmia Rufa: Megachilidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Zaobidna Ewa A.; Dmochowska Kamila; Frączek Regina; Dymczyk Ewa; Żółtowska Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Osmia rufa is a solitary bee that is used commercially for pollinating crops. The bee enters obligatory diapause as an imago. The activity of proteolytic enzymes during diapause has not been investigated. We studied the proteinase activity on four substrates - casein, haemoglobin, bovine serum albumin (BSA ), and gelatine - during diapause (from October to March) and in newly hatched males and females in April. During diapause, greater fluctuations in enzyme activity levels were noted in male...

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Variability in Populations of Alectoris rufa: A Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Fresno, M.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A variable domain of the mitochondrial DNA of the red-legged partridge Alectoris rufa was analysed by single-stranded DNA polymorphism (SSCP, in animals of different populations. Ten mitochondrial types were detected unevenly distributed among samples. A preserved natural population in Northern Spain, Fuentes Carrionas, showed the highest degree of polymorphism. Farm bred animals seem to be less variable and show some genotypes not usually found in the natural sites, suggesting an alien origin of many breeders.

  8. Estimation of the ideal dosage and feeding frequency for Garra rufa (Cyprinidae

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    Mafalda M. R. S. Catarino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Garra rufa are widely used in skin treatments at beauty and wellness institutes. This freshwater species is native from Eurasia and has a large distribution area, including river basins in Turkey and Iran. It has a high commercial value and arouse interest among fish farmers. Even so, G. rufa methods of production are still unknown. In fact, aspects that sustain a rapid and healthy growth of these fish need to be investigated, like an adequate daily dose and feeding frequency. This work aimed to establish: 1 the optimal feed dose per day, correspondent to the amount necessary for obtaining satiation, with a commercial granulated food; and 2 the optimal frequency of feeding for intensive production of G. rufa in Aquaculture. A total of 60 fishes underwent a 3 weeks acclimation period in laboratory, distributed by 6 aquaria, containing 10 fishes with similar body weight and length. The animals were initially fed with a dose correspondent to 10% of their body weight. This dose was gradually increased until complete satiation of the fishes. An optimal dose of 0.04 g fish-1 day-1 was found. Afterwards, the same fishes went through a 1 month experimental trial to evaluate the ideal feeding frequency. Fish growth was compared between feeding 0.2 g twice per day and 0.1333 g three times per day. Variations in size (total and fork length, plus body weight were evaluated at the end of the trial. One-Way ANOVA procedures revealed that the variations in weight and in fork length were similar between treatments, but the variation in total length was significantly higher with 3 daily feeding moments (p<0.05. In conclusion, the present results showed that the optimal dose that ensures satiation for G. rufa is 0.04 g fish-1 day-1 and that 3 daily feeding moments promotes higher growth rates.

  9. Reproductive biology and age determination of Garra rufa Heckel, 1843 (Actinopterygii: Cyprinidae) in central Iran

    OpenAIRE

    ABEDI, Masoud; SHIVA, Amir Houshang; Mohammadi, Hamid; MALEKPOUR, Rokhsareh

    2011-01-01

    Some aspects of the reproductive biology of Garra rufa Heckel, 1843, a native cyprinid fish species from the Armand stream in Chaharmahal-o-Bakhtiari province, central Iran, were investigated by regular monthly collections throughout 1 year. A significant relationship between length and weight and the isometric growth pattern were observed in this fish. There were no significant differences in the total number of male and female specimens. The population of this cyprinid fish had a narrow age...

  10. Reproductive potential and nesting effects of Osmia rufa (syn. bicornis female (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae

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    Giejdasz Karol

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The red mason bee Osmia rufa is a solitary bee belonging to the family Megachilidae, and is prone to nest in aggregations. Each female builds a nest separately in pre-existing cavities such as holes in wood and walls or empty plant stems. This is done by successively setting the cells in a linear series. In this study, we elucidate the nesting behavior and the reproductive potential of a single O. rufa female. The reproductive potential of nesting females was evaluated after the offspring finished development. We observed that an individual female may colonize up to five nest tubes and build 5-34 cells in them (16 on an average. During the nesting time the number of cells decreased with the sequence of nest tubes colonized by one female, which built a maximum of 11 cells in the first occupied nest and 5 cells in the last (fifth nest. Our observations indicated that 40% of nesting females colonized one nest tube as compared to 7% colonizing five nest tubes. Furthermore, in subsequent nest tubes the number of cells with freshly emerged females gradually decreased which was the reverse with males. Thus, the sex ratio (proportion of male and female offspring may change during the nesting period. The female offspring predominated in the first two nesting tubes, while in the subsequent three tubes male offspring dominated. We also cataloged different causes of reduction in abundance of offspring in O. rufa females such as parasitization or problem associated with moulting.

  11. The Proteolytic Activity of Diapausing and Newly Hatched Red Mason Bees (Osmia Rufa: Megachilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaobidna Ewa A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Osmia rufa is a solitary bee that is used commercially for pollinating crops. The bee enters obligatory diapause as an imago. The activity of proteolytic enzymes during diapause has not been investigated. We studied the proteinase activity on four substrates - casein, haemoglobin, bovine serum albumin (BSA , and gelatine - during diapause (from October to March and in newly hatched males and females in April. During diapause, greater fluctuations in enzyme activity levels were noted in males than in females, and a significant decrease in male enzyme activity was observed in January and March. Male enzymes were most effective in decomposing gelatine; whereas, female enzymes were equally effective in hydrolysing gelatine and BSA . The differences in substrate preferences between male and female enzymes were particularly pronounced in October and in the newly hatched individuals. The levels of gelatinolytic activity likely indicate that a high proportion of proteinases in O. rufa are elastase-like enzymes. They are involved in the digestion and remodelling of proteins with numerous peptide bonds formed by amino acids with short side-chains.

  12. Genetic characterization of Garra rufa (Heckel, 1843 populations in Tigris Basin, Iran using microsatellite markers

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    Hamed Kolangi Miandare

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The isolation-by-distance theory states that the genetic differentiation between individuals raised by increasing geographic distance. Therefore, this study tested this hypothesis for Garra rufa, a freshwater fish species of Iranian inland waters, from six rivers located at the different distances in Tirgis basin. For this purpose, eight variable microsatellite loci were applied to identify geographic-based population structure of G. rufa. From 240 fish of six populations, 102 alleles were found with a mean number of 11.625 to 13.250 alleles. Heterozygosity was ranged 0.567-0.638 in six studied populations. Moreover, a significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg were found in the studied populations. Unweight pair group analysis indicated that the six studied populations could be divided into four major clusters. The results revealed a fairly high level of genetic variation in the microsatellite loci within six studied populations. Wright’s fixation index (Fst ranged between 0.013-0.044 indicating little genetic differentiation between populations. Within this range, however, we found a strong positive relation between Fst and geographical distance lending support to the isolation-by-distance theory.

  13. Genetic variation of Garra rufa fish in Kermanshah and Bushehr provinces, Iran, using SSR microsatellite markers

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    Ali Shabani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Six highly variable microsatellite loci were used to investigate the genetic diversity and population structure of the Garra rufa in Kermanshah and Bushehr provinces, Iran. All of the 6 microsatellite loci screened in this study showed polymorphism. A total of 90 individual fish from 3 populations were genotyped and 60 alleles were observed in all loci. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 6 to14. The average allelic number of these polymorphic markers was 10. The averages of observed (Ho and expected heterozygosity (He was 0.529 and 0.826, respectively. The genetic distance values ranged between 0.235-0.570. The UPGMA dendrogram based on genetic distance resulted in three clusters: Gamasiab population alone was classified as one and the other two populations as the second cluster. This study revealed a fairly high level of genetic variation in the microsatellite loci within the three populations, and identified distinct population groups of Garra rufa. This study gains significance for the analysis of the populations’ genetic diversity as well as the management of this important fish resource.

  14. Ovary growth and protein levels in ovary and fat body during adult-wintering period in the red mason bee, Osmia rufa

    OpenAIRE

    Wasielewski, Oskar; Giejdasz, Karol; Wojciechowicz, Tatiana; Skrzypski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Winter months are supposed to be a crucial period for the development of the reproductive system, especially ovaries, in Osmia rufa females. During 7 months of the wintering period (from September till March), the length and width of terminal oocytes and protein concentrations in ovary and fat body tissue extracts of red mason bee females, O. rufa, were studied. Our observations indicate statistically significant differences in the size of terminal oocytes for three different periods of over-...

  15. Female choice in the red mason bee, Osmia rufa (L.) (Megachilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Taina; Paxton, Robert J; Barth, Friedrich G; Francke, Wittko; Ayasse, Manfred

    2010-12-01

    Females are often thought to use several cues and more than one modality in selection of a mate, possibly because they offer complementary information on a mate's suitability. In the red mason bee, Osmia rufa, we investigated the criteria a female uses to choose a mating partner. We hypothesized that the female uses male thorax vibrations and size as signs of male viability and male odor for kin discrimination and assessment of genetic relatedness. We therefore compared males that had been accepted by a female for copulation with those rejected, in terms of their size, their immediate precopulatory vibrations (using laser vibrometry), the genetic relatedness of unmated and mated pairs (using microsatellite markers) and emitted volatiles (using chemical analyses). Females showed a preference for intermediate-sized males that were slightly larger than the modal male size. Furthermore, male precopulatory vibration burst duration was significantly longer in males accepted for copulation compared with rejected males. Vibrations may indicate vigor and assure that males selected by females are metabolically active and healthy. Females preferentially copulated with males that were genetically more closely related, possibly to avoid outbreeding depression. Volatiles of the cuticular surface differed significantly between accepted and rejected males in the relative amounts of certain hydrocarbons, although the relationship between male odor and female preference was complex. Females may therefore also use differences in odor bouquet to select among males. Our investigations show that O. rufa females appear to use multiple cues in selecting a male. Future investigations are needed to demonstrate whether odor plays a role in kin recognition and how the multiple cues are integrated in mate choice by females. PMID:21075948

  16. Biofilm grazing in a higher vertebrate: the western sandpiper, Calidris mauri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwae, Tomohiro; Beninger, Peter G; Decottignies, Priscilla; Mathot, Kimberley J; Lund, Dieta R; Elner, Robert W

    2008-03-01

    We show that a higher vertebrate can graze surficial intertidal biofilm, previously only considered a food source for rasping invertebrates and a few specialized fish. Using evidence from video recordings, stomach contents, and stable isotopes, we describe for the first time the grazing behavior of Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) and estimate that biofilm accounts for 45-59% of their total diet or 50% of their daily energy budget. Our finding of shorebirds as herbivores extends the trophic range of shorebirds to primary consumers and potential competitors with grazing invertebrates. Also, given individual grazing rates estimated at seven times body mass per day and flock sizes into the tens of thousands, biofilm-feeding shorebirds could have major impacts on sediment dynamics. We stress the importance of the physical and biological processes maintaining biofilm to shorebird and intertidal conservation. PMID:18459323

  17. Effects of oilfield brinewater discharges on western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) in Nueces Bay, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) were studied at an oilfield brinewater discharge site near Corpus Christi, Texas, and at a reference site near Galveston, Texas. Morphological indices, hepatic monooxygenase activities, and contaminant burdens were quantified to evaluate exposure and effects. Pooled stomach contents of birds collected at the discharge site contained higher concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons than the reference site. Total pristane concentration, and the ratio of pristane:n-heptadecane in sandpiper carcasses were significantly greater at the oil discharge site, indicative of chronic exposure. Concentrations of other organic contaminants (petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides and metabolites) in carcasses at both study sites were relatively low. Neither body weight, bill length or hepatic monooxygenase activities differed between sites, although liver weight and liver weight:body weight ratio were significantly lower at the discharge site. These data suggest that oilfield brinewater discharges have only limited toxicity to sandpipers wintering near the site

  18. Prolonged postdiapause: influence on some indicators of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism of the red mason bee, Osmia rufa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowska, Kamila; Giejdasz, Karol; Fliszkiewicz, Monika; Zółtowska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Bees of the genus Osmia are being used in crop pollination at an increasing rate. However, a short life expectancy of adult individuals limits the feasibility of their use. Cocoons of the red mason bee, Osmia rufa L. (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae), can be stored at 4° C in a postdiapause state, and adult bees can be used for pollination outside their natural flight period. The period of storage in this form has an unfavorable influence on the survival rate, life expectancy, and fertility of the bee. It was suggested that the negative results are connected with exhaustion of energy reserves. To test this hypothesis, the present study examined the contents of protein, carbohydrates, lipids, and the activities of some enzymes, and their degradation in red mason bees that emerged in spring according to their biological clock and in summer after elongated diapause. It was found that postdiapause artificially elongated by 3 months caused significant decreases in body weight, total sugar, glycogen, lipids, and protein content in O. rufa. Glucose level was highest in bees that emerged in the summer, which was coincident with increased activities of maltase and trehalase. The activities of sucrase and cellobiase were not changed, while amylase activity was considerably decreased. The activities of triacylglycerols lipase and C2, C4, C10 carboxylesterases were highest in bees that emerged in July. Low temperatures restrict O. rufa emergence, and during prolonged postdiapause, metabolic processes lead to significant reductions of structural and energetic compounds. PMID:24219557

  19. Demography and Behavior of Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) Breeding on the Yukon-Kuskokwim River Delta, Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, James Matthew

    2006-01-01

    I conducted demographic and behavioral studies of Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) breeding on the Yukon-Kuskokwim River Delta, Alaska (1998-2005). In chapter one, I estimated apparent annual survival (product of true survival and site fidelity) while correcting for the probability of encounter for 237 males and 296 females. Overall return rates (individual returned to the site in a subsequent season) were lower for females (40%) than males (65%), as was apparent annual survival (± ...

  20. The effect of wood ant Formica rufa nests on distribution and growth of Impatients parviflora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holec, Michal; Holcová, Diana; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The effect of wood ants Formica rufa on distribution of introduces invasive jewelweed Impatiens parviflora was studied in oak forest in North west of the Czech Republic. Jewelweed occured only rarely in the forest floor, the average density was 3.2 plant m-2 here while on and around the ant nest mounds the jewelweed density reached 85.4 plant m-2. Jevelweed growing on the nest mounds were also significantly taller, bigger, with more flowers and produced more seeds that plants in surrounding forest floor. Better growth of jevelweed in ant nests apparently corresponds with significantly higher content of nitrates and available phosporus in the nest compare to forest floor. Seed collection experiment show that ants do not selectively collect jevelweed seeds but may collect them randomly in about the same rates as other organic material. This non targeted collection however may be sufficient to make sure that some seeds get close or in to the nest where population can grow vigorously due to suitable soil conditions.

  1. An assessment of Osmia rufa (syn. bicornis) as a pollinator of the sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) cv. Stevnsbaer in eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansted, Lise; Grout, Brian William Wilson; Toldam-Andersen, Torben Bo;

    2014-01-01

    The sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) cv. Stevnsbaer is self-fertile but it is recommended that bees are placed in the orchards during flowering. The solitary bee Osmia rufa can be managed, and has previously been suggested as an alternative pollinator to Apis mellifera, so consequently, this study....... The remaining 8 pollen types were from entomophilous plants. Based on the results it is estimated that a mean of 220,000 O. rufa cocoons would be needed per hectare if the species were to be an effective, supplementary pollinator of P. cerasus cv. Stevnsbaer. Practical, economic and environmental...

  2. Prolonged Postdiapause: Influence on some Indicators of Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism of the Red Mason Bee, Osmia rufa

    OpenAIRE

    Dmochowska, Kamila; Giejdasz, Karol; Fliszkiewicz, Monika; Żółtowska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Bees of the genus Osmia are being used in crop pollination at an increasing rate. However, a short life expectancy of adult individuals limits the feasibility of their use. Cocoons of the red mason bee, Osmia rufa L. (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae), can be stored at 4° C in a postdiapause state, and adult bees can be used for pollination outside their natural flight period. The period of storage in this form has an unfavorable influence on the survival rate, life expectancy, and fertility of the ...

  3. Physical characteristics of the eggs of red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa reared in captivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ribeiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar os efeitos da idade das fêmeas (um, dois e três anos e do mês de postura (março, abril e maio sobre as características físicas dos ovos da perdiz vermelha (Alectoris rufa criada em cativeiro. O peso (W, o comprimento máximo (L e a largura máxima (B de 2878 ovos foram determinados diretamente, enquanto o índice de forma (B/L, o volume (V e a superfície (S foram calculados com base nos parâmetros determinados diretamente. A análise mostrou diferenças significativas (P0,05. Observaram-se diferenças significativas (P<0,01 na largura máxima e no índice de forma do ovo entre as diferentes classes de idades, com valores mais elevados nas fêmeas mais velhas e no período de postura mais tardio. O volume dos ovos estimados por meio de V1= 0,51LB2e V2=0,913W foi afetado significativamente (P<0,01 pela idade e pelo mês de postura, bem como as áreas, S1=4.835W0,662, S2=4,951V10,666e S3=4,951V20,666, as quais apresentaram os mesmos efeitos.

  4. Estudo da reprodução e desenvolvimento embrionário de Garra rufa (Heckel,1843), com vista à sua produção em Aquacultura

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Mónica Raquel Sousa

    2015-01-01

    Garra Rufa é um pequeno ciprinídeo, bentopelágico de água doce, originalmente do sudoeste da Ásia, que se tornou economicamente relevante durante a última década. G. rufa é um elemento digno para controlar o crescimento de algas em aquariophilia, mas é conhecido principalmente por seu uso em tratamentos de problemas de pele em Spas e clinicas. Foi feita uma tentativa de reproduzir G. rufa em cativeiro, a fim de responder à demanda crescente do mercado para este peixe, além de o...

  5. Foraging ecology of sanderlings Calidris alba wintering in estuarine and non-estuarine intertidal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Pedro M.; Alves, José A.; Catry, Teresa; Granadeiro, José P.

    2015-10-01

    Outside the breeding season, most shorebirds use either estuarine or non-estuarine intertidal areas as foraging grounds. The sanderling Calidris alba is mostly associated with coastal sandy beaches, a habitat which is currently at risk worldwide due to increasing coastal erosion, but may also use estuarine sites as alternative foraging areas. We aimed to compare the trophic conditions for sanderlings wintering in estuarine and non-estuarine sites within and around the Tejo estuary, Portugal, where these two alternative wintering options are available within a relatively small spatial scale. To achieve this, we analysed sanderling diet, prey availability, foraging behaviour, and time and energy budgets in the different substrates available in estuarine and non-estuarine sites. In terms of biomass, the most important sanderling prey in the estuarine sites were siphons of the bivalve Scrobicularia plana, polychaetes, staphylinids and the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae. In non-estuarine sites the main prey were polychaetes, the bivalve Donax trunculus and chironomid larvae. Both food availability and energetic intake rates were higher on estuarine sites, and sanderlings spent a higher proportion of time foraging on non-estuarine sites. In the estuary, sanderlings foraged in muddy-sand substrate whenever it was available, achieving higher intake rates than in sandy substrates. In the non-estuarine sites they used both sandy and rocky substrates throughout the tidal cycle but had higher intakes rates in sandy substrate. Estuarine sites seem to offer better foraging conditions for wintering sanderlings than non-estuarine sites. However, sanderlings only use muddy-sand and sandy substrates, which represent a small proportion of the intertidal area of the estuary. The extent of these substrates and the current sanderling density in the estuary suggest it is unlikely that the estuary could provide alternative wintering habitat for sanderlings if they face habitat loss and

  6. High renesting rates in arctic-breeding Dunlin (Calidris alpina): a clutch-removal experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, H. River; Lanctot, Richard B.; Powell, Abby N.

    2013-01-01

    The propensity to replace a clutch is a complex component of avian reproduction and poorly understood. We experimentally removed clutches from an Arctic-breeding shorebird, the Dunlin (Calidris alpina arcticola), during early and late stages of incubation to investigate replacement clutch rates, renesting interval, and mate and site fidelity between nesting attempts. In contrast to other Arctic studies, we documented renesting by radiotracking individuals to find replacement clutches. We also examined clutch size and mean egg volume to document changes in individual females’ investment in initial and replacement clutches. Finally, we examined the influence of adult body mass, clutch volume, dates of clutch initiation and nest loss, and year on the propensity to renest. We found high (82–95%) and moderate (35–50%) rates of renesting for early and late incubation treatments. Renesting intervals averaged 4.7–6.8 days and were not different for clutches removed early or late in incubation. Most pairs remained together for renesting attempts. Larger females were more likely to replace a clutch; female body mass was the most important parameter predicting propensity to renest. Clutches lost later in the season were less likely to be replaced. We present evidence that renesting is more common in Arctic-breeding shorebirds than was previously thought, and suggest that renesting is constrained by energetic and temporal factors as well as mate availability. Obtaining rates of renesting in species breeding at different latitudes will help determine when this behavior is likely to occur; such information is necessary for demographic models that include individual and population-level fecundity estimates.

  7. Exposure and effects of oilfield brine discharges on western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) in Nueces Bay, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J. [National Biological Survey, Laurel, MD (United States); Capizzi, J.L. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); King, K.A. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Phoenix, AZ (United States); LeCaptain, L.J. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Spokane, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Discharge of oilfield brines into fresh and estuarine waters is a common disposal practice in Texas. Petroleum crude oil (PCO) extraction from underground stores includes the removal of a significant amount of water along with the oil. Several methods may be used to separate the oil and water fractions, including tank batteries, heat separation, and skimming ponds. Disposal of the resultant produced water (oilfield brine) may be accomplished by deep-well injection or discharge to surface waters. In Texas, an estimated 766,000 barrels of oilfield brine were discharged daily into tidal waters in 1979. The maximum concentration for oil and grease in these discharges permitted by the Texas Railroad Commission is 25 ppm. Several studies have shown that oilfield brines are toxic to a wide range of marine life, yet little is known about their effects on birds and mammals. Exposure to petroleum in oilfield wastes could evoke toxicological effects in some waterbird species. Avian responses to PCO exposure are highly variable, including cessation of growth, osmoregulatory impairment, endocrine dysfunction, hemolytic anemia, altered blood chemistry, cytochrome P450 induction, reduced reproductive success, and mortality. Oilfield brine discharges may soon be the largest and most pervasive source of contaminants entering Texas estuaries. Migratory and resident birds feeding in the vicinity of discharge sites may be ingesting food items contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals and salts in sufficient quantities to evoke toxicity. The present study of wintering western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) that feed and roost near discharge sites sought to examine oilfield brine exposure and effects through quantification of contaminant burdens, morphological characteristics, and cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenase activities. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Growth and energetics of a small shorebird species in a cold environment: the little stint Calidris minuta on the Taimyr Peninsulam Siberia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjorve, K.M.C.; Schekkerman, H.; Tulp, I.Y.M.; Underhill, L.G.; Leeuw, de J.J.; Visser, G.H.

    2007-01-01

    The little stint Calidris minuta is one of the smallest shorebird species breeding in the Arctic (weighing 4.3 g on hatching). Their chicks are small and have a high surface area-to-volume ratio. We determined prefledging growth, energy expenditure and time budgets for little stint chicks in northwe

  9. Growth and energetics of a small shorebird species in a cold environment : the little stint Calidris minuta on the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjorve, Kathleen M. C.; Schekkerman, Hans; Tulp, Ingrid; Underhill, Leslie G.; de Leeuw, Joep J.; Visser, G. Henk

    2007-01-01

    The little stint Calidris minuta is one of the smallest shorebird species breeding in the Arctic (weighing 4.3 g on hatching). Their chicks are small and have a high surface area-to-volume ratio. We determined prefledging growth, energy expenditure and time budgets for little stint chicks in northwe

  10. Metals in tissues of migrant semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) from Delaware Bay, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an abundance of field data on levels of metals for feathers in a variety of birds, but relatively few data for tissues, especially for migrant species from one location. In this paper we examine the levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in muscle, liver, brain, fat and breast feathers from migrant semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) collected from Delaware Bay, New Jersey. Our primary objectives were to (1) examine variation as a function of tissue, (2) determine the relationship of metal levels among tissues, and (3) determine the selenium:mercury molar ratio in different tissues since selenium is thought to protect against mercury toxicity. We were also interested in whether the large physiological changes that occur while shorebirds are on Delaware Bay (e.g. large weight gains in 2–3 weeks) affected metal levels, especially in the brain. There were significant differences among tissues for all metals. The brain had the lowest levels of arsenic and cadmium, and was tied for the lowest levels of all other metals except lead and selenium. Correlations among metals in tissues were varied, with mercury levels being positively correlated for muscle and brain, and for liver and breast feathers. Weights vary among individuals at the Delaware Bay stopover, as they arrive light, and gain weight prior to migration north. Bird weight and levels of arsenic, cadmium, and selenium in the brain were negatively correlated, while they were positively correlated for lead. There was no positive correlation for mercury in the brain as a function of body weight. The selenium:mercury molar ratio varied significantly among tissues, with brain (ratio of 141) and fat having the highest ratios, and liver and breast feathers having the lowest. In all cases, the ratio was above 21, suggesting the potential for amelioration of mercury toxicity. - Highlights: • Metal levels were examined for migrant semipalmated sandpipers. • There

  11. Application of RAPD Methodology to Preserve the Purity of Wild Red-LeggedPartridges (Alectoris rufa, L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, C. B.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa is a typical avian species of the Mediterranean area. Crossings of red-legged partridges with other Alectoris partridges have been done in order to increase the productivity of this species when captive bred. Restocking of hunting grounds with such hybrid partridges could damage the genetic heritage of the pure red-legged partridge in the wild. In order to avoid this problem RAPD-PCR has been developed to identify hybrid individuals. This methodology has been used to study wild red-legged partridges as well as partridges from different farms. RAPD analysis results in different patterns for different species. Hybrids can be detected among presumed red-legged partridges if they present a diagnostic band which characterises another species.

  12. Studies on the effect of Osmia rufa L. (Apoidea, Megachilidae) on the effectiveness of pod and seed development in the subgenus Glycine

    OpenAIRE

    Halina Skorupska; Jerzy Nawracała; Zdzisław Wilkaniec

    2014-01-01

    Three abundantly blooming forms of Glycogen tabacina and one G. tomentella form were studied. The experiment was conducted under isolated conditions. The effect of Osmia rufa L. on the fertility of raceme flowers was studied. It was found that the G. tabacina and G. tomentella flowers were intensively penetrated by the insects. A very clear increase (3-4 fold) in pod development was observed. The results ol the experiment indicate that geitonogamic pollination has a favorable influence on the...

  13. Stopover ecology of Semipalmated Sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) at coastal deltas of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchwell, Roy T.

    Avian migration is one of the wonders of the natural world. Stored fats are the main source of nutrients and fuel for avian migration and it is assumed the fat deposition at stopover sites is a critical component of a successful migration. Stopover sites are crucial in the successful migration of many birds, but particularly for arctic-breeding shorebirds that migrate long distances from breeding to wintering grounds. Despite the importance of stopover sites, it is often difficult to determine the importance of these sites to migrating shorebirds. I investigated three aspects of stopover ecology of Semipalmated Sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) foraging at coastal deltas on the Beaufort Sea coast, Alaska. First, I quantified the spatial and temporal distribution and abundance of the benthic macroinvertebrate community living within the mudflats. I found that there were two ecological groups of macroinvertebrates using river deltas, one originated in terrestrial freshwater habitats and most importantly could withstand freezing in delta sediments over the winter, and the other originated from the marine environment, could not withstand freezing and had to migrate to intertidal habitats each summer from deeper water areas that did not freeze over the winter. Stable isotope analysis allowed me to describe the origin of carbon consumed by invertebrates in intertidal habitats. I predicted freshwater invertebrates would consume terrestrial carbon, and marine invertebrates would consume marine carbon, but I found that both groups utilized the same carbon, which was a mixture of terrestrial and marine sources. My second research question determined the importance of delta foraging habitat for fall migrating Semipalmated Sandpipers. I mapped the temporal distribution and abundance of birds and quantified this relationship to invertebrate distribution and abundance. I researched fattening rates of shorebirds by measuring triglycerides in the blood of shorebirds I captured. I

  14. High rates of energy expenditure and water flux in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, D.E.; Kofahl, N.; Fellers, G.D.; Gates, N.B.; Houser, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    We measured water flux and energy expenditure in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea by using the doubly labeled water method. Previous laboratory investigations have suggested weak urinary concentrating ability, high rates of water flux, and low basal metabolic rates in this species. However, free-ranging measurements from hygric mammals are rare, and it is not known how these features interact in the environment. Rates of water flux (210 ?? 32 mL d-1) and field metabolic rates (1,488 ?? 486 kJ d-1) were 159% and 265%, respectively, of values predicted by allometric equations for similar-sized herbivores. Mountain beavers can likely meet their water needs through metabolic water production and preformed water in food and thus remain in water balance without access to free water. Arginine-vasopressin levels were strongly correlated with rates of water flux and plasma urea : creatinine ratios, suggesting an important role for this hormone in regulating urinary water loss in mountain beavers. High field metabolic rates may result from cool burrow temperatures that are well below lower critical temperatures measured in previous laboratory studies and suggest that thermoregulation costs may strongly influence field energetics and water flux in semifossorial mammals. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of lead shot ingestion on bone mineralization in a population of red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez-Lloret, Pedro, E-mail: pedroalvarez@geol.uniovi.es [Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, University of Granada, Avd. Fuentenueva s/n, 18002 Granada (Spain); Departament of Geology, University of Oviedo, C/Jesús Arias de Velasco, s/n, 33005 Oviedo (Spain); Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro B. [Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, University of Granada, Avd. Fuentenueva s/n, 18002 Granada (Spain); Romanek, Christopher S. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Ferrandis, Pablo [Department of Plant Production and Agricultural Technology, E.T.S. Ingenieros Agrónomos, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, 02071 Albacete (Spain); Martínez-Haro, Mónica [Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos, IREC (CSIC, UCLM, JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain); IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal); Mateo, Rafael [Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos, IREC (CSIC, UCLM, JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-01-01

    The effect of lead (Pb) toxicity on bone mineralization was investigated in a wild population of red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa) inhabiting a farmland area contaminated with Pb-shot from recreational hunting activities in Albacete, a southeastern province of Spain. Femora from 40 specimens of red-legged partridge were analyzed for Pb by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS), and for bone composition by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The FTIR and DRX data of bone were analyzed in detail to determine possible alterations in bone mineral chemistry and crystallinity due to Pb toxicity. Results showed a marked decrease in the degree of mineralization as Pb concentrations in bone tissue increased while XRD analyses showed that the crystallinity of apatite crystals increased with the Pb load in bone. These load-dependent effects are indicative that Pb contamination altered bone remodeling by reducing new bone mineral formation and demonstrate that bone quality is a sensitive indicator of adverse effects on wild bird populations exposed to Pb pollution. - Highlights: •The effect of Pb toxicity on bone mineralization was investigated in partridges. •Lead exposure decreased bone mineralization degree. •Demonstrated usefulness of FTIR and DRX to evaluate alterations in bone chemistry and crystallinity by Pb exposure.

  16. Decomposition of Arachis pintoi and Hyparrhenia rufa litters in monoculture and intercropped systems under lowland soil Decomposição da serrapilheira de Arachis pintoi e Hyparrhenia rufa em sistemas de monocultura e consórcio sob solo de várzea

    OpenAIRE

    Christiane Abreu de Oliveira; Maria Rita Scotti Muzzi; Hortênsia Abrantes Purcino; Ivanildo Evódio Marriel; Nadja Maria Horta de Sá

    2003-01-01

    Tropical grasslands under lowland soils are generally underutilized and the litter of forage legumes may be used to recover these degraded pastures. The objective of this work was to study the dynamics of litter decomposition of Arachis pintoi (pinto peanut), Hyparrhenia rufa (thatching grass) and a mixture of both species in a lowland soil. These treatments were analyzed in three areas: grass monoculture, legume monoculture and legume intercropped with the grass during the dry and wet season...

  17. Identical metabolic rate and thermal conductance in Rock Sandpiper (Calidris ptilocnemis) subspecies with contrasting nonbreeding life histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthrauff, Daniel R.; Dekinga, Anne; Gill, Robert E., Jr.; Piersma, Theunis

    2013-01-01

    Closely related species or subspecies can exhibit metabolic differences that reflect site-specific environmental conditions. Whether such differences represent fixed traits or flexible adjustments to local conditions, however, is difficult to predict across taxa. The nominate race of Rock Sandpiper (Calidris ptilocnemis) exhibits the most northerly nonbreeding distribution of any shorebird in the North Pacific, being common during winter in cold, dark locations as far north as upper Cook Inlet, Alaska (61°N). By contrast, the tschuktschorum subspecies migrates to sites ranging from about 59°N to more benign locations as far south as ~37°N. These distributional extremes exert contrasting energetic demands, and we measured common metabolic parameters in the two subspecies held under identical laboratory conditions to determine whether differences in these parameters are reflected by their nonbreeding life histories. Basal metabolic rate and thermal conductance did not differ between subspecies, and the subspecies had a similar metabolic response to temperatures below their thermoneutral zone. Relatively low thermal conductance values may, however, reflect intrinsic metabolic adaptations to northerly latitudes. In the absence of differences in basic metabolic parameters, the two subspecies’ nonbreeding distributions will likely be more strongly influenced by adaptations to regional variation in ecological factors such as prey density, prey quality, and foraging habitat.

  18. Studies on the effect of Osmia rufa L. (Apoidea, Megachilidae on the effectiveness of pod and seed development in the subgenus Glycine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Skorupska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Three abundantly blooming forms of Glycogen tabacina and one G. tomentella form were studied. The experiment was conducted under isolated conditions. The effect of Osmia rufa L. on the fertility of raceme flowers was studied. It was found that the G. tabacina and G. tomentella flowers were intensively penetrated by the insects. A very clear increase (3-4 fold in pod development was observed. The results ol the experiment indicate that geitonogamic pollination has a favorable influence on the effectiveness of the blooming of the chasmogamic flowers of the studied species.

  19. Influence of winter temperature and simulated climate change on body mass and fat body depletion during diapause in adults of the solitary bee, Osmia rufa (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliszkiewicz, Monika; Giejdasz, Karol; Wasielewski, Oskar; Krishnan, Natraj

    2012-12-01

    The influence of simulated climate change on body weight and depletion of fat body reserves was studied during diapause in the European solitary bee Osmia rufa L. (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae). Insects (females) were reared and collected from outdoor nests from September to March. One cohort of females was weighed and dissected immediately for analyses, whereas another cohort was subjected to simulated warmer temperature (15°C for 7 d) before analyses. A gradual decline in body mass and fat body content was recorded with declining temperatures from September to January in female bees from natural conditions. Temperature increased gradually from January to March with a further decline in body mass and fat body content. The fat body development index dropped from five in September-October (≈ 89% individuals) to four for the period from November to February (≈ 84% individuals) and further to three in March (95% individuals) before emergence. Simulated warmer winter temperature also resulted in a similar decline in body weight and fat body content; however, body weight and fat body content declined faster. The fat body development index dropped to three in December in the majority of individuals and continued at this level until March just before emergence. Taken together, our data indicate an earlier depletion of fat body reserves under simulated climate change conditions that may impact ovarian development and reproductive fitness in O. rufa. PMID:23321111

  20. Polyploidy Analysis and Attenuation of Oxidative Stress in Hepatic Tissue of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Treated with an Aqueous Extract of Vochysia rufa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Barbosa Moraes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is characterized by hyperglycemia and alterations in the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins. Due to its hypoglycemic effect Vochysia rufa is frequently used in Uberlandia, Brazil, to treat DM. Despite its popularity, there is little information about its effect on hepatic tissue. Therefore, we evaluated the histoarchitecture, oxidative stress parameters, and polyploidy of liver tissue from streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats treated with aqueous extract of Vochysia rufa (AEV. Histology was determined by fixing the livers, processing, and staining with HE. Oxidative stress was determined by evaluating CAT, GPx, and SOD activity in liver homogenates and hepatic mitochondria fraction and by measuring GST, GSH levels and lipid peroxidation (MDA. Polyploidy was determined by subjecting isolated hepatocyte nuclei to flow cytometry. In the diabetic group, GST activity and GSH rates decreased whereas liver homogenate analysis showed that GPx, SOD activity and MDA increased. AEV treatment restored all parameters to normal levels. The oxidative stress analysis of hepatic mitochondria fraction showed similar results. Lower polyploid cell populations were found in the diabetic rat livers, even after glibenclamide treatment. Thus, AEV treatment efficiently reduced hepatic oxidative stress caused by STZ-induced diabetes and produced no morphological changes in the histological analysis.

  1. Monitoramento do maçarico-branco, Calidris alba (Pallas (Aves, Scolopacidae, através de recuperações de anilhas coloridas, na Coroa do Avião, Igarassu, Pernambuco, Brasil Monitoring of the sanderling, Calidris alba (Pallas (Aves, Scolopacidae, across recuperations of color band, in the Coroa do Avião, Pernambuco State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. de Lyra-Neves

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Programas de marcação de espécies migratórias vêm sendo desenvolvidos desde a década de 1980, dentre eles o PASP Pan-American Shorebirds Programs, o qual, consistia na marcação de aves migratórias neárticas com anéis e bandeirolas coloridas possibilitando formação de códigos individuais permitindo a observação das aves marcadas sem que necessitasse capturar. Esta pesquisa objetivou a recuperação de códigos do PASP de indivíduos de Calidris alba (Pallas 1764 entre os anos de 1993 a 1995 na Coroa do Avião. Essas recuperações visuais demonstraram a fidelidade de Calidris alba ao seu sítio de invernada, a Coroa do Avião. O alto percentual de recuperações de Calidris alba, bem como, as recuperações de indivíduos anilhados na Lagoa do Peixe e em algumas áreas de invernada nos Estados Unidos, demonstram a utilização da rota do Atlântico e reforça a idéia de que bandos provenientes da costa leste do Alaska migram por esta rota. A idade máxima estimada para Calidris alba durante esta pesquisa foi de 11 anos, nada se tem sobre a idade desta espécie em bibliografias específicas no estudo de Scolopacidae.Marking programs for migratory species have been developed since the 1980 decade, among them the PASP Pan-American Shorebirds Programs which consisted in the marking of nearctic migratory birds with color bands and flags, enabling the development of individual codes, allowing the observation of the marked birds without the need of capture. The purpose of this study was the recuperation of PASP codes of individuals of Calidris alba (Pallas, 1764 between 1993 and 1995 in the Coroa do Avião. These visual recuperations demonstrated the fidelity of this specie to its winter site, the Coroa do Avião. The high percentual of recuperations of Calidris alba, as well as the recuperations of marked individuals in the Lagoa do Peixe and in some wintering areas in the United States, demonstrated the use of the Atlantic route and

  2. Intestinal Microbiota and Species Diversity of Campylobacter and Helicobacter spp. in Migrating Shorebirds in Delaware Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using rDNA sequencing analysis, we examined the bacterial diversity and the presence of opportunistic bacterial pathogens (i.e., Campylobacter and Helicobacter) in Red Knot (Calidris canutus, n=40), Ruddy Turnstone (Arenaria interpres, n=35), and Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris ...

  3. High-tide habitat choice : insights from modelling roost selection by shorebirds around a tropical bay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, Danny I.; Battley, Phil F.; Piersma, Theunis; Van Gils, Jan A.; Rogers, Ken G.

    2006-01-01

    High tides force shorebirds from intertidal feeding areas to sites known as roosts. We investigated the roost selection of great knots, Calidris tenuirostris, and red knots, Calidris canutus, on a tropical coastline in northwestern Australia, assessing several roost attributes and recording the freq

  4. Biological Impacts of Climatic Change on a Beringian Endemic. Cryptic Refugia in the Establishment and Differentiation of the Rock Sandpiper (Calidris Ptilocnemis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruett, C.L. [Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, Texas A and M University, TAMU 2258, College Station, Texas, 77843 (United States); Winker, K. [University of Alaska Museum, Fairbanks, Alaska (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The importance of climatic change on the establishment and differentiation of high-latitude species is largely unknown. Biological effects of historic climate change can be determined from historic signals in genetic data. The rock sandpiper (Calidris ptilocnemis) is a good test case for examining these biological effects because it has a known sister species, the purple sandpiper (Calidris maritima), and it is the only endemic Beringian bird with multiple described subspecies, suggesting a process of initial establishment and subsequent differentiation in the high-latitude regions of Beringia. We sequenced 2,074 bp of mitochondrial DNA from 40 rock sandpipers from nine breeding locations and four purple sandpipers. We used phylogenetic and coalescence methods to reconstruct trees and to evaluate the population demography, migration rates, and relative times of population divergence. Phylogenetic trees show that purple and rock sandpipers are monophyletic sister species. Within the rock sandpiper, clade branching patterns and coalescence estimates suggest that there were multiple refugial populations in Beringia, which correspond loosely to different glacial cycles. Rock sandpipers show the establishment, persistence, and accumulation of partitioned genetic diversity across several glacial cycles, implicating the presence of multiple cryptic biological refugia in this region through repeated cycles of climate change.

  5. Experimental challenge and pathology of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 in dunlin (Calidris alpina), an intercontinental migrant shorebird species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Franson, J. Christian; Gill, Robert E., Jr.; Meteyer, Carol U.; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean; Dusek, Robert J.; Ip, Hon S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Shorebirds (Charadriiformes) are considered one of the primary reservoirs of avian influenza. Because these species are highly migratory, there is concern that infected shorebirds may be a mechanism by which highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 could be introduced into North America from Asia. Large numbers of dunlin (Calidris alpina) migrate from wintering areas in central and eastern Asia, where HPAIV H5N1 is endemic, across the Bering Sea to breeding areas in Alaska. Low pathogenic avian influenza virus has been previously detected in dunlin, and thus, dunlin represent a potential risk to transport HPAIV to North America. To date no experimental challenge studies have been performed in shorebirds.

  6. Influence of methoprene and temperature on diapause termination in adult females of the over-wintering solitary bee, Osmia rufa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasielewski, Oskar; Wojciechowicz, Tatiana; Giejdasz, Karol; Krishnan, Natraj

    2011-12-01

    Females of Osmia rufa, as most species in this genus, enter an obligatory diapause, overwintering as an imago inside a cocoon until the ensuing spring when after emergence - mating, egg development and oviposition occur. Diapause in this species is initiated in November, undergoes 2 months of a pre-wintering period that is terminated at the end of January, after 1 month of maintenance. In this study, factors that affect the termination of adult diapause in the female of this species were investigated. The experimental material consisted of bees that were brought from nests kept in natural conditions 1 month prior to natural termination of diapause. Three different experimental treatments were planned to evaluate the potential effect of methoprene and temperature on diapause termination. During the 5 day experimental period the first group of females was kept at 4°C, the second group at 15°C and the last group of females was kept at 20°C. All groups of females were treated with methoprene topically at a dose of 200 μg. After methoprene application a significant increase (p<0.001) in the size of terminal oocytes was recorded in the three experimental groups. However, no changes in the size of terminal oocytes between acetone treated and untreated control groups were observed. The number of oocytes progressively increased following topical application of methoprene compared to non-treated or acetone treated females. In successive applications of 200 μg methoprene gradual changes in ovary and fat body protein concentration were observed. As compared to controls, protein content in ovaries isolated from methoprene-treated females increased, whereas it decreased in fat body. The least differences in oocyte size and protein concentration in ovary and fat body between control groups and with methoprene application occurred at 4°C. Differences increased and were higher in females kept at 20°C and increased rapidly after methoprene application. Exposure to increasing

  7. Effects of horseshoe crab harvest in delaware bay on red knots: Are harvest restrictions working?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, L.J.; Bart, J.; Sitters, H.P.; Dey, A.D.; Clark, K.E.; Atkinson, P.W.; Baker, A.J.; Bennett, K.A.; Kalasz, K.S.; Clark, N.A.; Clark, J.; Gillings, S.; Gates, A.S.; Gonzalez, P.M.; Hernandez, D.E.; Minton, C.D.T.; Morrison, R.I.G.; Porter, R.R.; Ross, R.K.; Veitch, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Each May, red knots (Calidris canutus rufa) congregate in Delaware Bay during their northward migration to feed on horseshoe crab eggs (Limulus polyphemus) and refuel for breeding in the Arctic. During the 1990s, the Delaware Bay harvest of horseshoe crabs for bait increased 10-fold, leading to a more than 90% decline in the availability of their eggs for knots. The proportion of knots achieving weights of more than 180 grams by 26-28 May, their main departure period, dropped from 0.6-0.8 to 0.14-0.4 over 1997-2007. During the same period, the red knot population stopping in Delaware Bay declined by more than 75%, in part because the annual survival rate of adult knots wintering in Tierra del Fuego declined. Despite restrictions, the 2007 horseshoe crab harvest was still greater than the 1990 harvest, and no recovery of knots was detectable. We propose an adaptive management strategy with recovery goals and annual monitoring that, if adopted, will both allow red knot and horseshoe crab populations to recover and permit a sustainable harvest of horseshoe crabs.

  8. Domesticating nature? Surveillance and conservation of migratory shorebirds in the "Atlantic Flyway".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Kristoffer

    2014-03-01

    Using a recent environmental controversy on the U.S. east coast over the conservation of red knots (Calidris canutus rufa) as a lens, I present a history of North American efforts to understand and conserve migratory shorebirds. Focusing on a few signal pieces of American legislation and their associated bureaucracies, I show the ways in which migratory wildlife have been thoroughly enrolled in efforts to quantify and protect their populations. Interactions between wildlife biologists and endangered species have been described by some scholars as "domestication"-a level of surveillance and intervention into nonhuman nature that constitutes a form of dependence. I pause to reflect on this historical trajectory, pointing out the breaks and continuities with older forms of natural history. Using the oft-mobilized Foucauldian metaphor of the panopticon as a foil, I question the utility and ethics of too-easily declaring "domesticated" wildlife an act of "biopower." Instead, I argue that Jacob von Uexküll's "umwelt" from early ecology and ethology, and more contemporary Science and Technology Studies (STS) analyses emphasizing multiple ontologies, offer more illuminating accounts of endangered species science. Neither science, conservation, nor history are well-served by the conflation of wildlife "surveillance" with the language of Foucauldian discipline. PMID:24268929

  9. Structural identification by mass spectrometry of a novel antimicrobial peptide from the venom of the solitary bee Osmia rufa (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöcklin, Reto; Favreau, Philippe; Thai, Robert; Pflugfelder, Jochen; Bulet, Philippe; Mebs, Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    The venom from the solitary bee Osmia rufa (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) was analyzed using mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques. Sensitive proteomic methods such as on-line LC-ESI-MS and nanoESI-MS analyses revealed more than 50 different compounds with molecular masses ranging from 400 to 4000Da. The major component has a monoisotopic molecular mass of 1924.20Da and its amino acid sequence was elucidated by de novo sequencing using tandem mass spectrometry and Edman degradation. This 17-residue cysteine-free peptide, named osmin, shows some similarities with the mast cell degranulation (MCD) peptide family. Free acid and C-terminally amidated osmins were chemically synthesized and tested for antimicrobial and haemolytic activities. The synthetic C-amidated peptide (native osmin) was found to be about three times more haemolytic than its free acid counterpart, but both peptides are much less lytic than melittin from social bee venom. Preliminary antimicrobial and antifungal tests indicate that both peptides are able to inhibit bacterial and fungal growth at micromolar concentrations. PMID:19109988

  10. Effects of phosphorus application on photosynthetic carbon and nitrogen metabolism, water use efficiency and growth of dwarf bamboo (Fargesia rufa) subjected to water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenggang; Wang, Yanjie; Pan, Kaiwen; Jin, Yanqiang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lin

    2015-11-01

    Dwarf bamboo (Fargesia rufa Yi), one of the staple foods for the endangered giant pandas, is highly susceptible to water deficit due to its shallow roots. In the face of climate change, maintenance and improvement in its productivity is very necessary for the management of the giant pandas' habitats. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying plant responses to water deficit are poorly known. To investigate the effects of P application on photosynthetic C and N metabolism, water use efficiency (WUE) and growth of dwarf bamboo under water deficit, a completely randomized design with two factors of two watering (well-watered and water-stressed) and two P regimes (with and without P fertilization) was arranged. P application hardly changed growth, net CO2 assimilation rate (P(n)) and WUE in well-watered plants but significantly increased relative growth rate (RGR) and P(n) in water-stressed plants. The effect of P application on RGR under water stress was mostly associated with physiological adjustments rather than with differences in biomass allocation. P application maintained the balance of C metabolism in well-watered plants, but altered the proportion of nitrogenous compounds in N metabolism. By contrast, P application remarkably increased sucrose-metabolizing enzymes activities with an obvious decrease in sucrose content in water-stressed plants, suggesting an accelerated sucrose metabolism. Activation of nitrogen-metabolizing enzymes in water-stressed plants was attenuated after P application, thus slowing nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation. P application hardly enlarged the phenotypic plasticity of dwarf bamboo in response to water in the short term. Generally, these examined traits of dwarf bamboo displayed weak or negligible responses to water-P interaction. In conclusion, P application could accelerate P(n) and sucrose metabolism and slow N metabolism in water-stressed dwarf bamboo, and as a result improved RGR and alleviated damage from soil

  11. Transcriptomic Characterization of Innate and Acquired Immune Responses in Red-Legged Partridges (Alectoris rufa: A Resource for Immunoecology and Robustness Selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Sevane

    Full Text Available Present and future challenges for wild partridge populations include the resistance against possible disease transmission after restocking with captive-reared individuals, and the need to cope with the stress prompted by new dynamic and challenging scenarios. Selection of individuals with the best immune ability may be a good strategy to improve general immunity, and hence adaptation to stress. In this study, non-infectious challenges with phytohemagglutinin (PHA and sheep red blood cells allowed the classification of red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa according to their overall immune responses (IR. Skin from the area of injection of PHA and spleen, both from animals showing extreme high and low IR, were selected to investigate the transcriptional profiles underlying the different ability to cope with pathogens and external aggressions. RNA-seq yielded 97 million raw reads from eight sequencing libraries and approximately 84% of the processed reads were mapped to the reference chicken genome. Differential expression analysis identified 1488 up- and 107 down-regulated loci in individuals with high IR versus low IR. Partridges displaying higher innate IR show an enhanced activation of host defence gene pathways complemented with a tightly controlled desensitization that facilitates the return to cellular homeostasis. These findings indicate that the immune system ability to respond to aggressions (either diseases or stress produced by environmental changes involves extensive transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations, and expand our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of the avian immune system, opening the possibility of improving disease resistance or robustness using genome assisted selection (GAS approaches for increased IR in partridges by using genes such as AVN or BF2 as markers. This study provides the first transcriptome sequencing data of the Alectoris genus, a resource for molecular ecology that enables integration

  12. Bruk av biometriske mål for kjønnsbestemmelse av fjæreplytt, Calidris maritima, på høsttrekkplassen Sørkappøya, Svalbard, Norge

    OpenAIRE

    Nordsteien, Ola

    2013-01-01

    Fjæreplytt, Calidris maritima, er den vanligst forekommende vaderen på Svalbard. Generelt vet man forholdsvis lite om arktiske vadefugler, også fjæreplytt, og denne masteroppgaven tar for seg fangst og ringmerking av fjæreplytt, og måling av biometriske variabler. Dette kan brukes til å kjønnsbestemme de forskjellige individene, og ut i fra det kan man se på fordelingen av kjønn over tid. I perioden 5. juli- 25. september 2009 ble det fanget inn 516 fjæreplytt for biometriske a...

  13. Flyway-scale variation in plasma triglyceride levels as an index of refueling rate in spring-migrating western sandpipers (Calidris mauri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T.D.; Warnock, N.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Bishop, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    We combined radiotelemetry, plasma metabolite analyses, and macro-invertebrate prey sampling to investigate variation in putative fattening rates (estimated as plasma triglyceride levels) at the flyway scale in Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) migrating between Punta Banda, Mexico (31??N), and Hartney Bay, Alaska (60??N), a distance of 4,240 km. Birds were caught at a wintering site (San Francisco Bay) and eight stopover sites along this Pacific Flyway. Body mass was higher in females than in males at six sites, but variation was not correlated with latitude for either sex, and the relationship of change in mass by date within sites was uninformative with regard to possible latitudinal variation in fattening rates. At San Francisco Bay, triglyceride levels were higher in the spring than in the winter. Mean plasma triglyceride varied among stopover sites, and there was a significant linear trend of increasing triglyceride levels with latitude as birds migrated north. At San Francisco Bay, length of stay was negatively related to triglyceride levels. However, plasma triglyceride levels at wintering or initial stopover sites (San Francisco and Punta Banda) did not predict individual variation in subsequent rates of travel during migration. We found no significant relationship between triglyceride levels and prey biomass at different stopover sites, which suggests that the latitudinal pattern is not explained by latitudinal changes in food availability. Rather, we suggest that differences in physiology of migratory birds at southern versus northern stopover sites or behavioral differences may allow birds to sustain higher fattening rates closer to the breeding grounds. ?? The American Ornithologists' Union, 2007.

  14. Selección de hábitat de la Perdiz Roja Alectoris rufa en periodo reproductor en relación con las características del paisaje de un agrosistema de La Mancha (España)

    OpenAIRE

    Fortuna, Miguel A.

    2002-01-01

    [EN] Habitat selection of Red Partridges Alectoris rufa during the breeding season in the croplands of the Iberian southern plateau has been characterised by me- ans of line transects carried out along unpaved roads and paths during late March 1999. Habitat selection was measured as the differences between the average values of a number of landscape variables (Table 1) mea- sured on circles of 100 m of radius either centered on individual Partridges or on random points. In addition, Partridge...

  15. Avian pectoral muscle size rapidly tracks body mass changes during flight, fasting and fuelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindstrom, A; Kvist, A; Piersma, T; Dekinga, A; Dietz, MW; Lindström, Åke

    2000-01-01

    We used ultrasonic imaging to monitor short-term changes in the pectoral muscle size of captive red knots Calidris canutus. Pectoral muscle thickness changed rapidly and consistently in parallel with body mass changes caused by flight, fasting;and fuelling. Four knots hew repeatedly for 10h periods

  16. Fuel use and metabolic response to endurance exercise : a wind tunnel study of a long-distance migrant shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenni-Eiermann, Susanne; Jenni, Lukas; Kvist, Anders; Lindström, Åke; Piersma, Theunis; Visser, G. Henk

    2002-01-01

    This study examines fuel use and metabolism in a group of long-distance migrating birds, red knots Calidris canutus (Scolopacidae), flying under controlled conditions in a wind tunnel for up to 10 h. Data are compared with values for resting birds fasting for the same time. Plasma levels of free fat

  17. Hormonal Correlates and Thermoregulatory Consequences of Molting on Metabolic Rate in a Northerly Wintering Shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vezina, Francois; Gustowska, Anna; Jalvingh, Kirsten M.; Chastel, Olivier; Piersma, Theunis

    2009-01-01

    Even though molt involves both endocrine and energetic changes in bird bodies, this study is among the first to combine assessments of energy costs together with thyroid hormone variations in molting birds. Individual shorebirds (red knots Calidris canutus islandica) were measured while in full summ

  18. Thermogenic side effects to migratory predisposition in shorebirds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vezina, Francois; Jalvingh, Kirsten M.; Dekinga, Anne; Piersma, Theunis

    2007-01-01

    In the calidrine sandpiper red knot (Calidris canutus), the weeks preceding takeoff for long-distance migration are characterized by a rapid increase in body mass, largely made up of fat but also including a significant proportion of lean tissue. Before takeoff, the pectoral muscles are known to hyp

  19. Roost availability may constrain shorebird distribution : Exploring the energetic costs of roosting and disturbance around a tropical bay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, Danny I.; Piersma, Theunis; Hassell, Chris J.

    2006-01-01

    High tides force shorebirds from their intertidal feeding areas to refuges known as roosts. This paper explores the energetic costs of roost disturbance of great knot (Calidris tenuirostris) and red knot (C. canutus) at Roebuck Bay, North-western Australia, assessing disturbance levels at different

  20. Body-building without power training : Endogenously regulated pectoral muscle hypertrophy in confined shorebirds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, MW; Piersma, T; Dekinga, A

    1999-01-01

    Shorebirds such as red knots Calidris canutus routinely make migratory flights of 3000 km or more. Previous studies on this species, based on compositional analyses, suggest extensive pectoral muscle hypertrophy in addition to fat storage before take-off. Such hypertrophy could be due to power train

  1. Demographic consequences of migratory stopover: linking red knot survival to horseshoe crab spawning abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Conor P.; Hines, James E.; Nichols, James D.; Lyons, James E.; Smith, David; Kalasz, Kevin S.; Niles, Lawrence J.; Dey, Amanda D.; Clark, Nigel A.; Atkinson, Philip W.; Minton, Clive D.T.; Kendall, William

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how events during one period of the annual cycle carry over to affect survival and other fitness components in other periods is essential to understanding migratory bird demography and conservation needs. Previous research has suggested that western Atlantic red knot (Calidris canutus rufa) populations are greatly affected by horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) egg availability at Delaware Bay stopover sites during their spring northward migration. We present a mass-based multistate, capturerecapture/resighting model linking (1) red knot stopover mass gain to horseshoe crab spawning abundance and (2) subsequent apparent annual survival to mass state at the time of departure from the Delaware Bay stopover area. The model and analysis use capture-recapture/resighting data with over 16,000 individual captures and 13,000 resightings collected in Delaware Bay over a 12 year period from 1997–2008, and the results are used to evaluate the central management hypothesis that red knot populations can be influenced by horseshoe crab harvest regulations as part of a larger adaptive management effort. Model selection statistics showed support for a positive relationship between horseshoe crab spawning abundance during the stopover and the probability of red knots gaining mass (parameter coefficient from the top model b = 1.71, SE = 0.46). Our analyses also supported the link between red knot mass and apparent annual survival, although average estimates for the two mass classes differed only slightly. The addition of arctic snow depth as a covariate influencing apparent survival improved the fit of the data to the models (parameter coefficient from the top model b = 0.50, SE = 0.08). Our results indicate that managing horseshoe crab resources in the Delaware Bay has the potential to improve red knot population status.

  2. Aplicación del método de Emlen en la obtención de estimas de densidad de perdiz roja (Alectoris rufa) en período reproductor: la estabilización del coeficiente de detectabilidad

    OpenAIRE

    Fortuna, Miguel A.

    2001-01-01

    Con el presente trabajo se pretende poner de manifiesto la importancia de estabilizar el coeficiente de detectabilidad en el que se basa el método de Emlen para aumentar la exactitud en la estima de densidades de poblaciones reproductoras de perdiz roja (Alec- toris rufa). Los resultados experimentales ponen de manifiesto que en el agrosistema de cereal y viñedo estudiado no podemos aventurarnos a estimar densidades poblacionales mediante un conjunto de transectos inferior a 50 km, o un númer...

  3. CO2浓度升高和模拟氮沉降对青川箭竹叶营养质量的影响%Effects of elevated CO2 and nitrogen deposition on leaf nutrient quality of Fargesia rufa Yi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周先容; 汪建华; 张红; 王进闯; 张远彬

    2012-01-01

    通过研究大熊猫主食竹之一的青川箭竹(Fargesia rufa Yi)叶营养质量对CO2浓度升高和模拟氮沉降的响应,预测在气候变化下箭竹和大熊猫之间的取食关系,以期为大熊猫的长久保护提供科学参考.利用人工环境控制生长室对青川箭竹幼苗进行了1个生长季节的大气CO2浓度和施氮处理:(1)CON(对照,不添加N和环境CO2浓度),(2)EC(环境CO2浓度+350μmol/mol、不添加N),(3)EN(添加5gNm-2a-1、环境CO2浓度),(4)ECN(环境CO2浓度+350 μmol/mol、添加5 g N m-2 a-1).结果表明:EC处理对青川箭竹叶片的C含量无显著影响,但降低了叶片中N和P含量,从而导致C:N增加,而N:P没显著变化.另外,EC处理增加了叶片中可溶性蛋白、可溶性糖、淀粉、蔗糖和果糖的含量,但降低了木质素和纤维素含量.同时,EC也明显增加了叶片中防御物质单宁的含量.另一方面,EN处理显著降低了叶片中C的含量,并增加了N的含量,但没有改变P的含量,从而C:N减小,而N:P增加.EN显著提高了箭竹叶片可溶性蛋白、可溶性糖和木质素含量,减少了淀粉和纤维素,但对单宁无明显影响.ECN减少了箭竹叶的单宁和N、P的含量,但显著增加了叶的可溶性蛋白、可溶性糖、果糖、蔗糖和淀粉含量.大气CO2浓度升高和氮沉降对叶的N、单宁、可溶性糖和淀粉含量具有显著的交互作用.在未来气候变化情景下,箭竹叶营养质量提高将可能影响叶的生物化学过程以及箭竹-大熊猫之间的取食关系.%Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide ( CO2 ) levels and increasing nitrogen deposition resulting from human activities have the potential to alter leaf nutrient quality and consequently alter plant/herbivore interactions. Fargesia rufa (Poaceae; Bambusoideae) is an important dietary bamboo for endangered giant pandas and is very vulnerable to climate change because it is one of the most widely distributed understory plants in subalpine

  4. Avian pectoral muscle size rapidly tracks body mass changes during flight, fasting and fuelling

    OpenAIRE

    Lindstrom, A; Kvist, A.; Piersma, T; Dekinga, A; Dietz, MW; Lindström, Åke

    2000-01-01

    We used ultrasonic imaging to monitor short-term changes in the pectoral muscle size of captive red knots Calidris canutus. Pectoral muscle thickness changed rapidly and consistently in parallel with body mass changes caused by flight, fasting;and fuelling. Four knots hew repeatedly for 10h periods in a wind tunnel. Over this period, pectoral muscle thickness decreased in parallel with the decrease in body mass. The change in pectoral muscle thickness during flight wats indistinguishable from...

  5. Structurally complex sea grass obstructs the sixth sense of a specialized avian molluscivore

    OpenAIRE

    de Fouw, J.; van der Heide, T.; Oudman, T.; Maas, L.R.M.; Piersma, T; van Gils, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Predators have evolved many different ways to detect hidden prey by using advanced sensory organs.However, in some environmental contexts sensory information may be obscured. The relation betweensensory organs, obstruction and searching efficiency remains little explored. In this study we experimentallyexamined the ways in which a sensory system (‘remote detection’), which enables red knots,Calidris canutus, to detect hard objects buried in wet soft sediments, is obstructed by plants. At anim...

  6. Body-building without power training: Endogenously regulated pectoral muscle hypertrophy in confined shorebirds

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, MW; Piersma, T; Dekinga, A.

    1999-01-01

    Shorebirds such as red knots Calidris canutus routinely make migratory flights of 3000 km or more. Previous studies on this species, based on compositional analyses, suggest extensive pectoral muscle hypertrophy in addition to fat storage before take-off. Such hypertrophy could be due to power training and/or be effected by an endogenous circannual rhythm. Red knots of two subspecies with contrasting migration patterns were placed in a climate-controlled aviary (12 h:12 h L:D photoperiod) whe...

  7. Vision and touch in relation to foraging and predator detection: insightful contrasts between a plover and a sandpiper

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Graham R.; Piersma, Theunis

    2008-01-01

    Visual fields were determined in two species of shorebirds (Charadriiformes) whose foraging is guided primarily by different sources of information: red knots (Calidris canutus, tactile foragers) and European golden plovers (Pluvialis apricaria, visual foragers). The visual fields of both species showed features that are found in a wide range of birds whose foraging involves precision pecking or lunging at food items. Surprisingly, red knots did not show comprehensive panoramic vision as foun...

  8. Roost availability may constrain shorebird distribution: Exploring the energetic costs of roosting and disturbance around a tropical bay

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Danny I.; Piersma, Theunis; Hassell, Chris J.

    2006-01-01

    High tides force shorebirds from their intertidal feeding areas to refuges known as roosts. This paper explores the energetic costs of roost disturbance of great knot (Calidris tenuirostris) and red knot (C. canutus) at Roebuck Bay, North-western Australia, assessing disturbance levels at different roost sites through direct observation and automatic radio-telemetry, and applying physiological equations and predictive roost choice models to estimate energetic costs of disturbance through a co...

  9. Disentangling the roles of frequency-vs. state-dependence in generating individual differences in behavioural plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Mathot, Kimberley J.; van den Hout, Piet J.; Piersma, Theunis; Kempenaers, Bart; Reale, Denis; Dingemanse, Niels J.; Sih, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical work suggests that both negative frequency-dependent payoffs and state-dependent payoffs can lead to individual variation in behavioural plasticity. We investigated the roles of both frequency- and state-dependence on the occurrence of individual variation in behavioural plasticity in a series of experiments where we manipulated perceived predation danger for red knots (Calidris canutus islandica). We found individual variation in plasticity in a trait with negative frequency-depe...

  10. Constitutive immune function responds more slowly to handling stress than corticosterone in a shorebird

    OpenAIRE

    Buehler, Deborah M.; Bhola, Nina; Barjaktarov, Daliborka; Goymann, Wolfgang; Schwabl, Ingrid; Tieleman, B Irene; Piersma, Theunis

    2008-01-01

    Ecological immunologists are interested in how immune function changes during different seasons and under different environmental conditions. However, an obstacle to answering such questions is discerning the effects of biological factors of interest and investigation artifacts such as handling stress. Here we examined handling stress and its effects on constitutive (noninduced) immune function via two protocols on captive red knots (Calidris canutus). We investigated how constitutive immunit...

  11. Thermogenic side effects to migratory predisposition in shorebirds

    OpenAIRE

    Vezina, Francois; Jalvingh, Kirsten M.; Dekinga, Anne; Piersma, Theunis

    2007-01-01

    In the calidrine sandpiper red knot (Calidris canutus), the weeks preceding takeoff for long-distance migration are characterized by a rapid increase in body mass, largely made up of fat but also including a significant proportion of lean tissue. Before takeoff, the pectoral muscles are known to hypertrophy in preparation for endurance flight without any specific training. Because birds facing cold environments counterbalance heat loss through shivering thermogenesis, and since pectoral muscl...

  12. Rezultati prstenovanja i nalazi prstenovanih ptica 2001. i 2002. godine (XXXIII. izvješće)

    OpenAIRE

    Ćiković, Davor; Kralj, Jelena

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, 26 921 birds of 138 species were ringed. In 2002, 37 920 birds of 163 species were ringed. The grand total of ringed birds in Croatia is now 697 558 birds of 295 species. The new species are: Audouin’s Gull Larus audouinii, Knot Calidris canutus, Yellow-browed Warbler Phylloscopus inornatus and Citril Finch Serinus citrinella. In 2002 a total of 581 recoveries of birds ringed by Zagreb Ringing Scheme and 164 ringed by foreign ringing centers were recorded. Birds were ringed by 16 rin...

  13. Rapid changes in the size of different functional organ and muscle groups during refueling in a long-distance migrating shorebird

    OpenAIRE

    Piersma, T.; Gudmundsson, GA; Lilliendahl, K; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur A.

    1999-01-01

    The adaptive value of size changes in different organ and muscle groups was studied in red knots (Calidris canutus islandica) in relation to their migration. Birds were sampled on five occasions: at arrival in Iceland in May 1994, two times during subsequent refueling, at departure toward, and on return from, the high arctic breeding grounds. During their 24-d stopover in May, body mass increased from 144.3 to 214.5 g. Mass gains were lowest over the first week (0.85 g/d, only fat-free tissue...

  14. Notes on the identity of Hygroproropsis rufa (Basidiomycota, Boletales)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holec, J.; Kolařík, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 1 (2013), s. 15-24. ISSN 1211-0981 R&D Projects: GA MK DKRVO2013/06; GA MŠk(CZ) 0021620828 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : boletales * mycology * rare fungus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  15. Influence of environmental gradients on the distribution of benthic resources available for shorebirds on intertidal mudflats of Yves Bay, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Anne S.; Pinaud, David; Cayatte, Marie-Laure; Goulevant, Cyril; Lachaussée, Nicolas; Pineau, Philippe; Karpytchev, Mikhail; Bocher, Pierrick

    2016-06-01

    The case study of Yves Bay (Pertuis Charentais, France) highlighted links between environmental gradients (i.e. sediment characteristics and emersion time) and prey distribution and availability for the two most numerous shorebird species overwintering in Yves Bay: the red knot Calidris canutus and the dunlin Calidris alpina. Two hundred and fifty-two stations were sampled on a predetermined 250 m regular grid covering the intertidal mudflats of this major wintering site in France for east-Atlantic migratory shorebirds. The distribution of principal benthic species abundance and biomass was modelled along two environmental gradients: sediment structure (particularly pronounced north-south sand-mud gradient) and emersion time. The effect of emersion time combined with sedimentary structure strongly explained abundances and biomasses of the main prey for C. canutus and C. alpina in the bay (Cerastoderma edule, Hydrobia ulvae, Macoma balthica, Scrobicularia plana, and Nephtys hombergii). This study highlighted prey species-specific spatial segregation/overlapping as well as spatial interferences in the trophic niche of the two shorebirds.

  16. Influence of environmental gradients on the distribution of benthic resources available for shorebirds on intertidal mudflats of Yves Bay, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Anne S.; Pinaud, David; Cayatte, Marie-Laure; Goulevant, Cyril; Lachaussée, Nicolas; Pineau, Philippe; Karpytchev, Mikhail; Bocher, Pierrick

    2016-06-01

    The case study of Yves Bay (Pertuis Charentais, France) highlighted links between environmental gradients (i.e. sediment characteristics and emersion time) and prey distribution and availability for the two most numerous shorebird species overwintering in Yves Bay: the red knot Calidris canutus and the dunlin Calidris alpina. Two hundred and fifty-two stations were sampled on a predetermined 250 m regular grid covering the intertidal mudflats of this major wintering site in France for east-Atlantic migratory shorebirds. The distribution of principal benthic species abundance and biomass was modelled along two environmental gradients: sediment structure (particularly pronounced north-south sand-mud gradient) and emersion time. The effect of emersion time combined with sedimentary structure strongly explained abundances and biomasses of the main prey for C. canutus and C. alpina in the bay (Cerastoderma edule, Hydrobia ulvae, Macoma balthica, Scrobicularia plana, and Nephtys hombergii). This study highlighted prey species-specific spatial segregation/overlapping as well as spatial interferences in the trophic niche of the two shorebirds.

  17. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gils, Jan A; Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Vall

    2015-01-01

    The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canutus canutus), consuming a chemosymbiotic lucinid bivalve (Loripes lucinalis). Because this bivalve forms a symbiosis with chemoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria living inside its gill, the bivalve is isotopically distinct from 'normal' bivalves whose food has a photosynthetic basis. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis that isotope discrimination and incorporation dynamics are different when consuming such chemosynthesis-based prey. The experiment showed that neither the isotopic discrimination factor, nor isotopic turnover time, differed between birds consuming the chemosymbiotic lucinid and a control group consuming a photosynthesis-based bivalve. This was true for 13C as well as for 15N. However, in both groups the 15N discrimination factor was much higher than expected, which probably had to do with the birds losing body mass over the course of the experiment. PMID:26458005

  18. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan A van Gils

    Full Text Available The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canutus canutus, consuming a chemosymbiotic lucinid bivalve (Loripes lucinalis. Because this bivalve forms a symbiosis with chemoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria living inside its gill, the bivalve is isotopically distinct from 'normal' bivalves whose food has a photosynthetic basis. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis that isotope discrimination and incorporation dynamics are different when consuming such chemosynthesis-based prey. The experiment showed that neither the isotopic discrimination factor, nor isotopic turnover time, differed between birds consuming the chemosymbiotic lucinid and a control group consuming a photosynthesis-based bivalve. This was true for 13C as well as for 15N. However, in both groups the 15N discrimination factor was much higher than expected, which probably had to do with the birds losing body mass over the course of the experiment.

  19. Mercury, Lead, Cadmium, Arsenic, Chromium and Selenium in Feathers of Shorebirds during Migrating through Delaware Bay, New Jersey: Comparing the 1990s and 2011/2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Burger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding temporal changes in contaminant levels in coastal environments requires comparing levels of contaminants from the same species from different time periods, particularly if species are declining. Several species of shorebirds migrating through Delaware Bay have declined from the 1980s to the present. To evaluate some contaminants as cause for the declines, we examine levels of mercury, lead, cadmium, arsenic, chromium and selenium in feathers of red knot (Calidris canutus, N = 46 individuals, semipalmated sandpiper (Calidris pusilla, N = 70 and sanderling (Calidris alba, N = 32 migrating through Delaware Bay, New Jersey, USA, from 1991 to 1992 (N = 40, 1995 (N = 28, and 2011–2012 (N = 80 to determine if levels have changed. We found: (1 arsenic, chromium, and lead increased in red knot and decreased in semipalmated sandpiper; (2 cadmium decreased in semipalmated sandpipers; (3 mercury decreased in red knot and sanderlings; (4 selenium decreased in red knot and increased in semipalmated sandpipers. In 2011/2012 there were significant interspecific differences for arsenic, mercury and selenium. Except for selenium, the element levels were well below levels reported for feathers of other species. The levels in feathers in red knots, sanderling, and semipalmated sandpipers from Delaware Bay in 2011/2012 were well below levels in feathers that are associated with effect levels, except for selenium. Selenium levels ranged from 3.0 µg·g−1 dry weight to 5.8 µg·g−1 (semipalmated sandpiper, within the range known to cause adverse effects, suggesting the need for further examination of selenium levels in birds. The levels of all elements were well below those reported for other marine species, except for selenium, which was near levels suggesting possible toxic effects.

  20. Insights on the Reproduction and Embryonic Development of Garra rufa (Cyprinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica R S Gomes

    2015-11-01

    In a total of 28 postures, only 17 resulted in newly born fish. This was mostly due to fungal development around the eggs that caused the embryos to degenerate. There was a hatching success of 60%. The eggs showed no adhesive properties, being deposited on the bottom. The most prominent structures of the embryos were noticeable after: 3h - tail bud; 6h - optic primordium; 10h - heart beating; 15h - pectoral fins buds. They hatched between 24 to 48h and the larvae consumed the yolk sac in 48h.

  1. Distribución espacial y temporal de aves playeras (Orden: Charadriiformes en Laguna San Ignacio, Baja California Sur, México Temporal and spatial distribution of shorebirds (Charadriiformes at San Ignacio Lagoon, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Francisco Mendoza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Con la pérdida o degradación de humedales han declinado las poblaciones de algunas especies tales como las aves playeras. En vista de que ha crecido el interés internacional por los estudios ecológicos sobre estas especies, se determinó la abundancia, distribución y riqueza espacio-temporal de las aves playeras en Laguna San Ignacio, Península de Baja California. Se realizaron 12 censos mensuales (octubre 2007-septiembre 2008 en el perímetro interno de la laguna; la cual se dividió en cuatro zonas, dos al norte y dos al sur. Temporalmente las abundancias menores se presentaron en mayo (1 585 aves y las mayores en octubre (47 410. Las especies más abundantes fueron: el picopando canelo (Limosa fedoa; 55% de los registros totales, el playero occidental (Calidris mauri; 23% y el playero pihuiuí (Tringa semipalmata; 10%. Estas especies fueron más abundantes en otoño. El picopando canelo y el playero pihuiuí estabilizaron sus números en invierno y primavera y estuvieron presentes en verano en bajos números, el playero occidental mostró oscilaciones notorias. Se presentan los primeros reportes del playero rojizo del Pacifico (Calidris canutus roselaari para la zona. La riqueza y abundancia estuvieron influenciadas temporal y espacialmente por las aves migratorias. Las mayores abundancias se presentaron al sur de la laguna, probablemente por la disponibilidad del alimento. Los resultados presentes permitieron incluir al área en la Red Hemisférica de Reservas para las Aves Playeras como sitio de importancia internacional.Baja California Peninsula has several wetlands that represent important ecosystems for shorebirds. San Ignacio Lagoon is one of these sites, and supports 10% of the total abundance of shorebirds reported in this Peninsula. Since there is few information about this group in this area, we studied spatial and temporal changes in abundance and distribution of shorebirds in San Ignacio Lagoon. For this, we conducted twelve

  2. 78 FR 60023 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Threatened Status for the Rufa Red Knot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Caribbean (especially Puerto Rico and the Lesser Antilles); and the northern coast of South America from... review published in the Federal Register on July 1, 1994 (59 FR 34270), we have sought the expert..., and foraging areas are located near nest sites in freshwater wetlands (Niles et al. 2008, p....

  3. Local and global influences on population declines of coastal waders: Purple Sandpiper Calidris maritima numbers in the Moray Firth, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Ron W.; Foster, Simon; Swann, Bob; Etheridge, Brian

    2012-05-01

    Declines in numbers by several wader species in Britain have been linked to climate change, but the mechanism for the declines has rarely been explored. Britain lies at the northern end of the East Atlantic Flyway, and supports 1.3 million out of the Flyway's 8.5 million coastal waders (Charadrii) in winter and the Purple Sandpiper is one of the species whose numbers have declined. Here, we examine the dynamics of the decline as observed in the Moray Firth, northeast Scotland, investigating whether the decline was due to poorer apparent survival (return rate) or poorer recruitment of young birds. The maximum number in the Moray Firth declined from 860 in 1987/88 to 236 in 2006/07, with some increase during winters 2007/08 and 2008/09. At the three main high-tide roosts (Balintore, Lossiemouth and Buckie) the maximum combined number declined from 574 to 90. Changes in survival and recruitment (percentage of first-year birds) were examined at these roosts from captured samples, which were ringed and recaptured. There were no significant changes between winters in survival rates, nor were there differences between the survival rates of age groups (first-year and adult) or bill size groups, which represented birds of different sex and breeding origin. Annual survival estimates for the three roosts ranged from 72 to 77%. The percentage of first-year birds varied among roosts and years; the lowest values were during the late 1980s/early 1990s and early 2000s. A free-running population model incorporating varying percentages of first-year birds and constant mortality for each roost provided a plausible explanation for the decline. Although modelled numbers followed the observed pattern, a discrepancy in one year was carried forward in subsequent years, so that the fit with the observed numbers was parallel rather than similar. However, it seems that the decline in numbers was largely due to poorer recruitment. We discuss whether breeding success had declined, whether the population had responded to changes in the local sewage treatment systems, which could affect invertebrate food for Purple Sandpipers, or whether fewer birds chose to winter in Scotland. The Moray Firth population is derived from Norway and possibly Canada, and there is evidence that the Norwegian population was disproportionately affected. The reason for poor recruitment requires further study, and other wader species require examination to test if poor recruitment is a common feature of decline in numbers.

  4. Growth, behaviour of broods and weather-related variation in breeding productivity of Curlew Sandpipers Calidris ferruginea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schekkerman, H; Van Roomen, MWJ; Underhill, LG

    1998-01-01

    Growth and survival of chicks and movements of broods were studied in Curlew Sandpipers in N.E. Taimyr, Siberia, in 1991. Breeding was synchronised, 73% of 30 clutches hatching during 10-15 July. Nests were distributed clumped in dry frost-heaved tundra. Broods were tended by females only and moved

  5. Growth, behaviour of broods and weather-related variation in breeding productivity of curlew sandpipers Calidris ferruginea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schekkerman, H.; Roomen, van M.J.W.; Underhill, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    Growth and survival of chicks and movements of broods were studied in Curlew Sandpipers in N.E. Taimyr, Siberia, in 1991. Breeding was synchronised, 73% of 30 clutches hatching during 10-15 July. Nests were distributed clumped in dry frost-heaved tundra. Broods were tended by females only and moved

  6. Health status of seabirds and coastal birds found at the German North Sea coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebert Ursula

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic pathological investigations to assess the health status of seabirds and coastal birds in Germany were performed. The investigation was conducted to obtain data on possible causes of decline in seabird and coastal bird populations. Methods 48 individuals of 11 different species of seabirds and coastal birds were collected by the stranding network along the entire German North Sea coast from 1997 to 2008, including mainly waders such as Eurasian oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus and red knots (Calidris canutus as well as seabirds such as northern fulmars (Fulmaris glacialis and common scoters (Melanitta nigra. For most birds (n = 31 found dead along the shore no obvious cause of death was evident, while 17 individuals were killed by collisions with lighthouses. Results Overall, the nutritional status of the investigated birds was very poor, and the body mass in most cases was significantly lower compared to masses of living birds caught during the same periods of the year. This is partly linked to chronic parasitic or bacterial infections in different organs or to septicaemia. In some cases infections with zoonotic tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium spp. were found. Avian influenza was not found in any of the collected birds. Conclusion The presented data contribute to the evaluation of the health status of birds in the German North Sea. Moreover, they present an important tool for the assessment of potential pathogens with an impact on the health status of seabirds and coastal birds.

  7. No evidence for melatonin-linked immunoenhancement over the annual cycle of an avian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Deborah M; Koolhaas, Anita; Van't Hof, Thomas J; Schwabl, Ingrid; Dekinga, Anne; Piersma, Theunis; Tieleman, B Irene

    2009-05-01

    The winter immunoenhancement hypothesis associates long nights and increased exposure to melatonin with enhanced immune function in winter when resource availability is low and the chances of becoming ill are high. Thus, increased exposure to melatonin in the winter could be adaptive for species facing difficult winter conditions. This idea has found some support in studies of resident mammals. In birds, the link between day length and melatonin over the annual cycle is weaker, and contributions of melatonin to seasonal timing are unclear. Furthermore, many species, especially migrants, do not experience the most difficult conditions of their annual cycle in winter. In this study, we tested whether the winter immunoenhancement hypothesis holds in an avian species, the red knot Calidris canutus. We found that melatonin duration and amplitude varied significantly over the annual cycle with the highest values occurring in winter. However, peaks did not correspond to the winter solstice or with annual variation in immune function. Our findings do not support the winter immunoenhancement hypothesis in knots and question whether the idea that immune function should be bolstered in winter can be generalized to systems where winter is not the most difficult time of the year. PMID:19234709

  8. Shellfish dredging pushes a flexible avian top predator out of a marine protected area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan A van Gils

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a widespread concern about the direct and indirect effects of industrial fisheries; this concern is particularly pertinent for so-called "marine protected areas" (MPAs, which should be safeguarded by national and international law. The intertidal flats of the Dutch Wadden Sea are a State Nature Monument and are protected under the Ramsar convention and the European Union's Habitat and Birds Directives. Until 2004, the Dutch government granted permission for ~75% of the intertidal flats to be exploited by mechanical dredgers for edible cockles (Cerastoderma edule. Here we show that dredged areas belonged to the limited area of intertidal flats that were of sufficient quality for red knots (Calidris canutus islandica, a long-distance migrant molluscivore specialist, to feed. Dredging led to relatively lower settlement rates of cockles and also reduced their quality (ratio of flesh to shell. From 1998 to 2002, red knots increased gizzard mass to compensate for a gradual loss in shellfish quality, but this compensation was not sufficient and led to decreases in local survival. Therefore, the gradual destruction of the necessary intertidal resources explains both the loss of red knots from the Dutch Wadden Sea and the decline of the European wintering population. This study shows that MPAs that do not provide adequate protection from fishing may fail in their conservation objectives.

  9. Trace elements have limited utility for studying migratory connectivity in shorebirds that winter in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Dowdall, J.; Farmer, A.H.; Abril, M.; Bucher, E.H.; Ridley, I.

    2010-01-01

    Trace-element analysis has been suggested as a tool for the study of migratory connectivity because (1) trace-element abundance varies spatially in the environment, (2) trace elements are assimilated into animals' tissues through the diet, and (3) current technology permits the analysis of multiple trace elements in a small tissue sample, allowing the simultaneous exploration of several elements. We explored the potential of trace elements (B, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Cs, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Th, and U) to clarify the migratory connectivity of shorebirds that breed in North America and winter in southern South America. We collected 66 recently replaced secondary feathers from Red Knots (Calidris canutus) at three sites in Patagonia and 76 from White-rumped Sandpipers (C. fuscicollis) at nine sites across Argentina. There were significant differences in trace-element abundance in shorebird feathers grown at different nonbreeding sites, and annual variability within a site was small compared to variability among sites. Across Argentina, there was no large-scale gradient in trace elements. The lack of such a gradient restricts the application of this technique to questions concerning the origin of shorebirds to a small number of discrete sites. Furthermore, our results including three additional species, the Pectoral Sandpiper (C. melanotos), Wilson's Phalarope (Phalaropus tricolor), and Collared Plover (Charadrius collaris), suggest that trace-element profiles change as feathers age. Temporal instability of trace-element values could undermine their application to the study of migratory connectivity in shorebirds. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2010.

  10. Ambient temperature does not affect fuelling rate in absence of digestive constraints in long-distance migrant shorebird fuelling up in captivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Magali; Vézina, François; Piersma, Theunis

    2010-08-01

    Pre-flight fuelling rates in free-living red knots Calidris canutus, a specialized long-distance migrating shorebird species, are positively correlated with latitude and negatively with temperature. The single published hypothesis to explain these relationships is the heat load hypothesis that states that in warm climates red knots may overheat during fuelling. To limit endogenous heat production (measurable as basal metabolic rate BMR), birds would minimize the growth of digestive organs at a time they need. This hypothesis makes the implicit assumption that BMR is mainly driven by digestive organ size variation during pre-flight fuelling. To test the validity of this assumption, we fed captive knots with trout pellet food, a diet previously shown to quickly lead to atrophied digestive organs, during a fuelling episode. Birds were exposed to two thermal treatments (6 and 24 degrees C) previously shown to generate different fuelling rates in knots. We made two predictions. First, easily digested trout pellet food rather than hard-shelled prey removes the heat contribution of the gut and would therefore eliminate an ambient temperature effect on fuelling rate. Second, if digestive organs were the main contributors to variations in BMR but did not change in size during fuelling, we would expect no or little change in BMR in birds fed ad libitum with trout pellets. We show that cold-acclimated birds maintained higher body mass and food intake (8 and 51%) than warm-acclimated birds. Air temperature had no effect on fuelling rate, timing of fuelling, timing of peak body mass or BMR. During fuelling, average body mass increased by 32% while average BMR increased by 15% at peak of mass and 26% by the end of the experiment. Our results show that the small digestive organs characteristic of a trout pellet diet did not prevent BMR from increasing during premigratory fuelling. Our results are not consistent with the heat load hypothesis as currently formulated. PMID:20339851

  11. When the seasons don't fit: speedy molt as a routine carry-over cost of reproduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurine W Dietz

    Full Text Available The failure of animals to fit all life-cycle stages into an annual cycle could reduce the chances of successful breeding. In some cases, non-optimal strategies will be adopted in order to maintain the life-cycle within the scope of one year. We studied trade-offs made by a High Arctic migrant shorebird, the red knot Calidris canutus islandica, between reproduction and wing feather molt carried out in the non-breeding period in the Dutch Wadden Sea. We compared primary molt duration between birds undertaking the full migratory and breeding schedule with birds that forego breeding because they are young or are maintained in captivity. Molt duration was ca. 71 days in breeding adults, which was achieved by an accelerated feather replacement strategy. Second-year birds and captive adults took ca. 22% and 27% longer, respectively. Second-year birds start molt in late June, more than four weeks before captive adults, and almost seven weeks before adults that return from breeding in late July-August. Adults finish molt in October when steeply increasing thermostatic costs and reductions in food availability occur. Primary molt duration was longer in female than in male knots (all ages, which was accordance with the somewhat larger body size of females. Since fast growth leads to lower quality feathers, the speedy wing molt shown by Arctic-breeding birds may represent a time constraint that is an unavoidable and routine cost of reproduction. So far it was hypothesized that only birds over 1 kg would have difficulty fitting molt within a year. Here we show that in birds an order of magnitude smaller, temporal imperatives may impose the adoption of non-optimal life-cycle routines in the entire actively breeding population.

  12. When the seasons don't fit: speedy molt as a routine carry-over cost of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Maurine W; Rogers, Ken G; Piersma, Theunis

    2013-01-01

    The failure of animals to fit all life-cycle stages into an annual cycle could reduce the chances of successful breeding. In some cases, non-optimal strategies will be adopted in order to maintain the life-cycle within the scope of one year. We studied trade-offs made by a High Arctic migrant shorebird, the red knot Calidris canutus islandica, between reproduction and wing feather molt carried out in the non-breeding period in the Dutch Wadden Sea. We compared primary molt duration between birds undertaking the full migratory and breeding schedule with birds that forego breeding because they are young or are maintained in captivity. Molt duration was ca. 71 days in breeding adults, which was achieved by an accelerated feather replacement strategy. Second-year birds and captive adults took ca. 22% and 27% longer, respectively. Second-year birds start molt in late June, more than four weeks before captive adults, and almost seven weeks before adults that return from breeding in late July-August. Adults finish molt in October when steeply increasing thermostatic costs and reductions in food availability occur. Primary molt duration was longer in female than in male knots (all ages), which was accordance with the somewhat larger body size of females. Since fast growth leads to lower quality feathers, the speedy wing molt shown by Arctic-breeding birds may represent a time constraint that is an unavoidable and routine cost of reproduction. So far it was hypothesized that only birds over 1 kg would have difficulty fitting molt within a year. Here we show that in birds an order of magnitude smaller, temporal imperatives may impose the adoption of non-optimal life-cycle routines in the entire actively breeding population. PMID:23349758

  13. THE IMPACT OF RED WOOD ANTS FORMICA RUFA ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF INVERTEBRATE FAUNA FROM THE FOREST’S FLOOR (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Duma

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that ants are generalist predators and will catch everything in their path. Due to their huge number they decrease food availability for many invertebrates and also their high density per area unit reduces the available space for other invertebrate species. This however does not explain entirely the low density of other predatory arthropods in ants’ area. Our direct field studies showed that the interactions between ants and other predatory species of invertebrates (spiders: Aranea, may include exploitation and predation but the most important interactions are at the behavioral level: interference competition. This study it’s only a part of a more complex research project regarding the ecology of this forest.

  14. Characterization of a genetic and antigenic variant of avian paramyxovirus 6 isolated from a migratory wild bird, the red-necked stint (Calidris ruficollis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Vuong Nghia; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Nguyen, Tung Hoang; Trinh, Dai Quang; Awad, Sanaa S A; Minoungou, Germaine L; Yamamoto, Yu; Nakamura, Kikuyasu; Saito, Keisuke; Watanabe, Yukiko; Runstadler, Jonathan; Huettmann, Falk; Ogawa, Haruko; Imai, Kunitoshi

    2014-11-01

    A hemagglutinating virus (8KS0813) was isolated from a red-necked stint. Hemagglutination inhibition and neutralization tests indicated that 8KS0813 was antigenically related to a prototype strain, APMV-6/duck/Hong Kong/18/199/77, but with an 8- and 16-fold difference, respectively, in their titers. The full genome sequence of 8KS0813 showed 98.6 % nucleotide sequence identity to that of APMV-6/duck/Italy/4524-2/07, which has been reported to belong to an APMV-6 subgroup, and showed less similarity to that of the prototype strain (70.6 % similarity). The growth of 8KS0813 and the prototype strain in four different cell cultures was greatly enhanced by adding trypsin. Interestingly, this virus induced syncytia only in Vero cells. 8KS0813 was identified as APMV-6/red-necked stint/Japan/8KS0813/08, but it is antigenically and genetically distinguishable from the prototype strain, suggesting that variant APMV-6 is circulating in migratory birds. PMID:25000900

  15. Testing an attachment method for solar-powered tracking devices on a long-distance migrating shorebird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ying-Chi; Brugge, Martin; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Dekinga, Anne; Porter, Ron; Klaassen, Raymond H. G.; Piersma, Theunis

    2016-01-01

    Small solar-powered satellite transmitters and GPS data loggers enable continuous, multi-year, and global tracking of birds. What is lacking, however, are reliable methods to attach these tracking devices to small migratory birds so that (1) flight performance is not impacted and (2) tags are retained during periods of substantial mass change associated with long-distance migration. We developed a full-body harness to attach tags to Red Knots (Calidris canutus), a medium-sized shorebird (average mass 124 g) that undertakes long-distance migrations. First, we deployed dummy tags on captive birds and monitored them over a complete migratory fattening cycle (February–July 2013) during which time they gained and lost 31–110 g and underwent a pre-alternate moult of body feathers. Using each individual’s previous year fattening and moult data in captivity as controls, we compared individual mass and moult differences between years between the tagged and reference groups, and concluded that the attachment did not impact mass and moult cycles. However, some birds shed feathers under the tags and under the polyester harness line commonly used in avian harnesses. Feather shedding was alleviated by switching to smoothed-bottom tags and monofilament harness lines. To field-trial this design, we deployed 5-g satellite transmitters on ten Red Knots released on 3 October 2013 in the Dutch Wadden Sea. Bird movements and tag performance appeared normal. However, nine tags stopped transmitting 11–170 days post-release which was earlier than expected. We attribute this to bird mortality rather than failure of the attachments or transmitters and suggest that the extra weight and drag caused by the tag and its feather-blocking shield increased the chance of depredation by the locally common Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus). Our results demonstrate that species- and place-specific contexts can strongly determine tagging success. While captive trials are an important first

  16. Molluscs of an intertidal soft-sediment area in China: Does overfishing explain a high density but low diversity community that benefits staging shorebirds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Yan; Chen, Bing; Piersma, Theunis; Zhang, Zhengwang; Ding, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    The Yellow Sea is a key staging ground for shorebirds that migrate from Australasia to the Arctic each spring. A lot of attention has been paid to the impact of habitat loss due to land reclamation on shorebird survival, but any effects of overfishing of coastal resources are unclear. In this study, the abundance of molluscs in the intertidal mudflats of northern Bohai Bay on the Chinese Yellow Sea was investigated in 2008-2014 from the perspective of their importance as food for northward migrating shorebirds, especially Red Knots Calidris canutus. Numerically contributing 96% to the numbers of 17 species found in spring 2008, the bivalve Potamocorbula laevis (the staple food of Red Knots and other shorebirds) dominated the intertidal mollusc community. In the spring of 2008-2014, the densities of P. laevis were surprisingly high, varying between 3900 and 41,000 individuals/m2 at distinctly small sizes (average shell lengths of 1.1 to 4.8 mm), and thus reaching some of the highest densities of marine bivalves recorded worldwide and providing good food for shorebirds. The distribution of P. laevis was associated with relatively soft sediments in close proximity to the recently built seawalls. A monthly sampling programme showed steep seasonal changes in abundance and size. P. laevis were nearly absent in winter, each year settling on the intertidal mudflats anew. Peak densities were reached in spring, when 0-age P. laevis were 1-3 mm long. The findings point to a highly unusual demographic structure of the species, suggesting that some interfering factors are at play. We hypothesise that the current dominance of young P. laevis in Bohai Bay reflects the combined pressures of a nearly complete active removal of adult populations from mid-summer to autumn for shrimp farming (this clearing of adults may offer space for recruitment during the next spring) and low numbers of epibenthic predators of bivalves, such as shrimps and crabs, due to persistent overfishing in

  17. Thermoregulation strategies in ants in comparison to other social insects, with a focus on red wood ants (Formica rufa group [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/35p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štěpánka Kadochová

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature influences every aspect of ant biology, especially metabolic rate, growth and development. Maintenance of high inner nest temperature increases the rate of sexual brood development and thereby increases the colony fitness. Insect societies can achieve better thermoregulation than solitary insects due to the former’s ability to build large and elaborated nests and display complex behaviour. In ants and termites the upper part of the nest, the mound, often works as a solar collector and can also have an efficient ventilation system. Two thermoregulatory strategies could be applied. Firstly the ants use an increased thermal gradient available in the mound for brood relocation. Nurse workers move the brood according to the thermal gradients to ensure the ideal conditions for development. A precise perception of temperature and evolution of temperature preferences are needed to make the correct choices. A second thermoregulatory strategy used by mound nesting ants is keeping a high temperature inside large nests. The unique thermal and insulation properties of the nest material help to maintain stable conditions, which is the case of the Wood ant genus Formica. Ants can regulate thermal loss by moving nest aggregation and alternating nest ventilation. Metabolic heat produced by ant workers or associated micro organisms is an important additional source of heat which helps to maintain thermal homeostasis in the nest.

  18. Estudio de la infección experimental con Toxoplasma gondii en la perdiz roja (Alectoris rufa) / Carlos Martínez-Carrasco Pleite ; director Francisco Domingo Alonso de Vega.

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Carrasco Pleite, Carlos; Bernabé Salazar, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    Tesis-Universidad de Murcia. Consulte la tesis en: BCA. GENERAL. DEPOSITO. T.M-2136. Consulte la tesis en: BCA. GENERAL. Fac. Veterinaria. Departamentos. E002B TESIS 93. Consulte la tesis en: BCA. GENERAL. Fac. Veterinaria. Sala de estudio. Tesis-V 135.

  19. Thermoregulation strategies in ants in comparison to other social insects, with a focus on Formica rufa [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2fv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štěpánka Kadochová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperature influences every aspect of ant biology, especially metabolic rate, growth and development. Maintenance of high inner nest temperature increases the rate of sexual brood development and thereby increases the colony fitness. Insect societies can achieve better thermoregulation than solitary insects due to the former’s ability to build large and elaborated nests and display complex behaviour. In ants and termites the upper part of the nest, the mound, often works as a solar collector and can also have an efficient ventilation system. Two thermoregulatory strategies could be applied. Firstly the ants use an increased thermal gradient available in the mound for brood relocation. Nurse workers move the brood according to the thermal gradients to ensure the ideal conditions for development. A precise perception of temperature and evolution of temperature preferences are needed to make the correct choices. A second thermoregulatory strategy used by mound nesting ants is keeping a high temperature inside large nests. The unique thermal and insulation properties of the nest material help to maintain stable conditions, which is the case of the Wood ant genus Formica. Ants can regulate thermal loss by moving nest aggregation and alternating nest ventilation. Metabolic heat produced by ant workers or associated micro organisms is an important additional source of heat which helps to maintain thermal homeostasis in the nest.

  20. A novel feruloyl esterase from rumen microbial metagenome: Gene cloning and enzyme characterization in the release of mono- and diferulic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    A feruloyl esterase (FAE) gene was isolated from a rumen microbial metagenome, cloned into E. coli, and expressed in active form. The enzyme (RuFae4) was classified as a Type D feruloyl esterase based on its action on synthetic substrates and ability to release diferulates. The RuFae4 alone releas...

  1. Habitat use and diet selection of northward migrating waders in the Sivash (Ukraine): the use of brine shrimp Artemia salina in a variably saline lagoon complex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuil, Y.; Have, van der T.M.; Winden, van der J.; Chernichko, I.I.

    2003-01-01

    Wader species migrating through the Sivash (Ukraine) use hypersaline and brackish lagoons. We studied the use of the two habitat types, and focused on the profitability of Brine Shrimp Artemia salina, prey species in hypersaline lagoons for Dunlins Calidris alpina, Curlew Sandpipers Calidris ferrugi

  2. Habitat use and diet selection of northward migrating waders in the Sivash (Ukraine) : The use of Brine Shrimp Artemia salina in a variably saline lagoon complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuil, Y; Van der Have, TM; Van der Winden, J; Chernichko, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    Wader species migrating through the Sivash (Ukraine) use hypersaline and brackish lagoons. We studied the use of the two habitat types, and focused on the profitability of Brine Shrimp Artemia salina, prey species in hypersaline lagoons for Dunlins Calidris alpina, Curlew Sandpipers Calidris ferrugi

  3. How the food supply harvestable by waders in the Wadden Sea depends on the variation in energy density, body weight, biomass, burying depth and behaviour of tidal-flat invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwarts, Leo; Wanink, Jan H.

    For several reasons, waders in the Wadden Sea face a large seasonal and annual variation in their food supply. Observations on a tidal flat in the Dutch Wadden Sea have shown that: - (1) The average energy density of ten invertebrate prey species varies between 21 and 23 kJ·g -1 AFDW. In Scrobicularia plana and Mya arenaria, but not in Macoma balthica, the energy density is 10% lower in winter than in summer. - (2) Depending on the species, body weights of prey of similar size are 30 to 60% lower in winter than in summer. - (3) The year-to-year fluctuation in standing-crop biomass is larger in some species than in others, the difference depending mainly on the frequency of successful recruitment. The overall biomass of the macrobenthos in winter is half of that in summer, but the timing of the peak biomass differs per species. - (4) The burying depth varies per species: Cerastoderma edule live just beneath the surface, while M. balthica, S. plana, M. arenaria, Arenicola marina and Nereis diversicolor bury more deeply and the majority of these prey live out of reach of the bird's bill. In all six species, burying depth increases with size. There is no seasonal variation in depth of C. edule and M. arenaria, but the four other species live at most shallow depth in early summer and most deeply in midwinter. Burying depths in winter vary from year to year, but are unrelated to temperature. Neither has temperature any effect on depth within months. For knot Calidris canutus feeding on M. balthica, the fluctuation in the accessible fraction was the main source of variation in the biomass of prey that is actually harvestable, i.e. the biomass of prey of suitable size that is accessible. Accordingly, the paper reviews the available data on the temporal variations in accessibility, detectability, ingestibility, digestibility and profitability of prey for waders. Only a small part of the prey is harvestable since many accessible prey are ignored because of their low

  4. Foraging Ecology of Fall-Migrating Shorebirds in the Illinois River Valley

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Randolph V.; Joshua D Stafford; Yetter, Aaron P.; Michelle M Horath; Christopher S Hine; Hoover, Jeffery P.

    2012-01-01

    Populations of many shorebird species appear to be declining in North America, and food resources at stopover habitats may limit migratory bird populations. We investigated body condition of, and foraging habitat and diet selection by 4 species of shorebirds in the central Illinois River valley during fall migrations 2007 and 2008 (Killdeer [Charadrius vociferus], Least Sandpiper [Calidris minutilla], Pectoral Sandpiper [Calidris melanotos], and Lesser Yellowlegs [Tringa flavipes]). All speci...

  5. Louse (Insecta: Phthiraptera infestations of the Amur Falcon (Falco amurensis and the Red-footed Falcon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piross Imre Sándor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the louse species harboured by Red-footed and Amur Falcons despite the fact that various life-history traits of these hosts make them good model species to study host-parasite interactions. We collected lice samples from fully grown Amur (n=20 and Red-footed Falcons (n=59, and from nestlings of Red-footed Falcons (n=179 in four countries: Hungary, India, Italy and South Africa. We identified 3 louse species on both host species, namely Degeeriella rufa, Colpocephalum subzerafae and Laembothrion tinnunculi. The latter species has never been found on these hosts. Comparing population parameters of lice between hosts we found significantly higher prevalence levels of D. rufa and C. subzerafae on Amur Falcons. Adult Red-footed Falcons had higher D. rufa prevalence compared to C. subzerafae. For the first time we also show inter-annual shift in prevalence and intensity levels of these species on Red-footed Falcons; in 2012 on adult hosts C. subzerafae had higher intensity levels than D. rufa, however in 2014 D. rufa had significantly higher intensity compared to C. subzerafae. In case of nestlings both louse species had significantly higher preva lence levels than in 2014. The exact causes of such inter-annual shifts are yet to be understood.

  6. 50 CFR 10.13 - List of Migratory Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... canutus LAPWING, Northern, Vanellus vanellus LARK, Horned, Eremophila alpestris Sky, Alauda arvensis... scientific name. To help clarify species relationships, we also list the higher-level taxonomic categories of...-billed, Neocrex erythrops Spotless, Porzana tabuensis Yellow-breasted, Porzana flaviventer CRANE,...

  7. Two New Species of Ascosphaera and Notes on the Conidial State of Bettsia Alvei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Jens-Peder

    1975-01-01

    Two new species, A. aggregata and A. fimicola, are described. A. aggregata is probably pathogenic in the leaf-cutting bees, Megachile pacifica and M. centuncularis, and in the mason bee, Osmia rufa. In all 3 spp. it causes a swelling of the larval body due to development of the spore cysts beneath...

  8. Observations on the slime moulds growing on the moulder beech wood

    OpenAIRE

    Wanda Stojanowska

    2014-01-01

    We have found that the most suitable substrate for slime molds developement is the wood of dicotyledoneus trees especially that of beech. This is due to its impermanency and weak resistance to biological agents. In Silesia 42 slime molds species were found to grow on beech wood. The development of Fuligo rufa and Lucogala exiguum seems to be closely connected with beech wood.

  9. Is long-distance bird flight equivalent to a high-energy fast? Body composition changes in freely migrating and captive fasting great knots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battley, PF; Dietz, MW; Piersma, T; Dekinga, A; Tang, SX; Hulsman, K; Battley, Phil F.; Tang, Sixian

    2001-01-01

    We studied changes in body composition in great knots, Calidris tenuirostris, before and after a migratory flight of 5,400 km from northwest Australia to eastern China. We also took premigratory birds into captivity and fasted them down to their equivalent arrival mass after migration to compare org

  10. HISTOLOGICAL STRUCTURE OF THE DIGESTIVE TRACT OF WADERS (AVES, СHARADRII)

    OpenAIRE

    L. P. Kharchenko; I. A. Lykova

    2014-01-01

    Histological structure of digestive tracts of 12 species of waders (Aves, Сharadrii) has been studied: Pluvialis squatarola (Linnaeus, 1758), Charadrius hiaticula (Linnaeus, 1758), Recurvirostra avosetta (Linnaeus, 1758), Tringa ochropus (Linnaeus, 1758), T. glareola (Linnaeus, 1758), T. nebularia (Gunnerus, 1767), T. erythropus (Pallas, 1764), Philomachus pugnax (Linnaeus, 1758), Calidris minuta (Leisler, 1812), C. ferruginea (Pontoppidan, 1763), C. alpina (Linnaeus, 1758) and Gallinago gall...

  11. Winter body mass and over-ocean flocking as components of danger management by Pacific dunlins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ydenberg, R.C.; Dekker, D.; Kaiser, G.; Shepherd, P.C.F.; Ogden, L.E.; Rickards, K.; Lank, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: We compared records of the body mass and roosting behavior of Pacific dunlins (Calidris alpina pacifica) wintering on the Fraser River estuary in southwest British Columbia between the 1970s and the 1990s. 'Over-ocean flocking' is a relatively safe but energetically-expensive alternative

  12. Do staging semipalmated sandpipers spend the high-tide period in flight over the Ocean to Avoid Falcon Attacks along Shore?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, D.; Dekker, I.; Christie, D.; Ydenberg, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of aerial predators and migrant Semipalmated Sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) was studied at Mary's Point in the upper Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada, during August of 2009 and 2010. Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) were locally reintroduced and increased from one active nest s

  13. Raptor predation on wintering Dunlins in relation to the tidal cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, D.; Ydenberg, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    At Boundary Bay, British Columbia, Canada, Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) captured 94 Dunlins (Calidris alpina) in 652 hunts. The two main hunting methods were open attacks on flying Dunlins (62%) and stealth attacks on roosting or foraging Dunlins (35%). Peregrines hunted throughout the day,

  14. Does predation danger on southward migration curtail parental investment by female western sandpipers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamieson, S.E.; Ydenberg, R.C.; Lank, D.B.

    2014-01-01

    Theory predicts that if extending parental care delays migratory departure, and if later migration is more dangerous, then parental care should be curtailed to make an earlier departure. Adult western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) depart Alaska in July, and the presence of peregrine falcons (Falco per

  15. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in shorebird populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenink, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes the global molecular population structure of two shorebird species, in particular of the dunlin, Calidris alpina, by means of comparative sequence analysis of the most variable part of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome. There are several reasons why mtDNA is the molecule of

  16. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance

    OpenAIRE

    Oliva, Maria Luiza V.; Sampaio, Misako U.

    2009-01-01

    Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized,...

  17. Observaciones ornitológicas realizadas en La Fraila (Valladolid) durante agosto de 1951

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Observaciones ornitológicas realizadas en la finca de La Fraila, en Valladolid, durante el mes de agosto de 1951, que corresponden a las siguientes especies: Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Anthus campestris (Bisbita campestre), Apus apus (Vencejo común), Buteo buteo (Busardo ratonero), Calandrella sp. (Terrera), Caprimulgus europaeus (Chotacabras europeo), Caprimulgus ruficollis (Chotacabras cuellirojo), Carduelis carduelis (Jilguero), Certhia sp. (Agateador), Clamator glandarius (Críalo europ...

  18. Salida de campo a Villaester (Valladolid) el 14 de septiembre de 1951

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo a Villaester, en la provincia de Valladolid, durante la tarde del 14 de septiembre de 1951, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre las siguientes aves: Acrocephalus sp. (Carricerín), Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Anthus campestris (Bisbita campestre), Athene noctua (Mochuelo europeo), Burhinus oedicnemus (Alcaraván común), Caprimulgus ruficollis (Chotacabras cuellirojo), Clamator glandarius (Críalo europeo), Columba palumbus (Paloma torcaz), Coracias garrulus (Carraca euro...

  19. Análisis de los nidos de algunas Osmia (Hymenoptera, Megachilidae) nidificantes en cavidades preestablecidas

    OpenAIRE

    Vicens, Narcís; Bosch, Jordi; Blas, Marina

    1993-01-01

    Nests of some cavity-nesting Osmia (Hymenoptera, Megachilidae). Nests of seven Osmia species (0. cornuta, 0 . rufa, O. tricornis, 0. coerulescens, 0. fulviventris, 0. latreillei, and 0 . submicans) nesting in preestablished holes were obtained through placement of trap-nests in the field. Analyses of nests provided data on nest architecture (number of cells per nest, materials used for nest construction), structure of provisions (including types of pollens collected), structure of cocoons and...

  20. Ichthyotherapy as Alternative Treatment for Patients with Psoriasis: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Grassberger; Hoch, W

    2006-01-01

    Ichthyotherapy (therapy with the so-called ‘Doctorfish of Kangal’, Garra rufa) has been shown to be effective in patients with psoriasis in the Kangal hot springs in Turkey. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of ichthyotherapy in combination with short-term ultraviolet A sunbed radiation in the treatment of psoriasis under controlled conditions. We retrospectively analyzed 67 patients diagnosed with psoriasis who underwent 3 weeks of ichthyotherapy at an outpatient treatment facil...

  1. Observations on the slime moulds growing on the moulder beech wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Stojanowska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have found that the most suitable substrate for slime molds developement is the wood of dicotyledoneus trees especially that of beech. This is due to its impermanency and weak resistance to biological agents. In Silesia 42 slime molds species were found to grow on beech wood. The development of Fuligo rufa and Lucogala exiguum seems to be closely connected with beech wood.

  2. Allozymic variation in the clam genus Eurhomalea (Bivalvia: Veneriidae) along southern South American coast Variación alozímica en el género de almejas Eurhomalea (Bivalvia: Veneriidae) a lo largo de la costa sur de Sudamérica

    OpenAIRE

    M.H GALLARDO; González, C; Mena, C; Lomovasky, B.; Morriconi, E.; E CLASING

    2003-01-01

    The correspondence between allozymic variation and specific differentiation was studied in four populations corresponding to the three nominal, allopatric species of clam genus Eurhomalea (E. rufa, E. lenticularis, E. exalbida) described for southern South America. Allozyme variation scored in 12 loci was high as indicated by heterozygosity levels (15.8-20.7 %) and by the presence of only three monomorphic loci (Hk-2, Icd-2, and Xdh-1). These high estimates of allelic variability were influen...

  3. Does small-game management benefit steppe birds of conservation concern? A field study in central Spain

    OpenAIRE

    ESTRADA, A.; Delibes-Mateos, Miguel; Caro, Jesús; Viñuela, Javier; Díaz-Fernández, Silvia; Casas, Fabián; Arroyo, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, hunting and game management are centuries-old activities that have had profound effects on the landscapes and the biodiversity they support. Game management is a potentially important tool to enhance game populations and may also affect other wildlife. We investigated the relationship between redlegged partridge Alectoris rufa game management and steppe-bird abundance in central Spain. We surveyed 54 red-legged partridge hunting estates with varying game-managemen...

  4. Salida de campo a Peñaflor de Hormija (Valladolid) el 15 de agosto de 1954

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo a la dehesa de Peñaflor de Hormija, en la provincia de Valladolid, el 15 de agosto de 1954, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre las siguientes aves: Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Coturnix coturnix (Codorniz común), Falco naumanni (Cernícalo primilla), Milvus milvus (Milano real) y Streptopelia sp. (Tórtola). Se incluye el análisis de varios contenidos estomacales.

  5. Salida de campo a Laguna de Duero (Valladolid) el 31 de marzo de 1951

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo a Laguna de Duero (Valladolid) el 31 de marzo de 1951, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre las siguientes aves: Acrocephalus sp. (Carricero), Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Anas platyrhynchos (Ánade azulón), Anser anser (Ánsar común), Anthus spinoletta (Bisbita alpino), Ardea sp. (Garza), Carduelis cannabina (Pardillo común, llamada Acanthis cannabina por el autor), Ciconia ciconia (Cigüeña blanca), Circus aeruginosus (Aguilucho lagunero occidental), Clamator glandarius ...

  6. Salida de campo a Medina de Campo y Villafuente (Valladolid) el 8 de junio de 1952

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo a Medina del Campo y Villafuente (no quedando claro si el autor se refiere a la localidade de Villafuerte, en Valladolid), en Valladolid, el 8 de junio de 1952, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre Oryctolagus cuniculus (Conejo) y las siguientes aves: Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Apus sp. (Vencejo), Athene noctua (Mochuelo europeo), Burhinus oedicnemus (Alcaraván común), Buteo buteo (Busardo ratonero), Caprimulgus ruficollis (Chotacabras cuellirojo), Carduelis cannabina ...

  7. Salida de campo a las Cortas de Blas (Villalba de los Alcores, Valladolid) el 3 de enero de 1952

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo a las Cortas de Blas, en Villalba de los Alcores (Valladolid), el 3 de enero de 1952, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre las siguientes aves: Alauda arvensis (Alondra común), Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Anthus pratensis (Bisbita común), Burhinus oedicnemus (Alcaraván común), Carduelis sp. (probablemente, el Jilguero, C.carduelis), Corvus corone (Corneja negra), Corvus frugilegus (Graja), Corvus monedula (Grajilla, llamada, Coloeus por el autor), Emberiza cia (Escriban...

  8. Visita a La Rubia, finca del Habanero, en Valladolid, el 29 de noviembre de 1950

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Visita a La Rubia, finca del Habanero, en Valladolid capital, durante la tarde del 29 de noviembre de 1950, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre las siguientes aves: Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Athene noctua (Mochuelo europeo), Corvus corone (Corneja negra), Larus ridibundus (Gaviota reidora), Milvus milvus (Milano real), Parus major (Carbonero común), Passer domesticus (Gorrión domestico), Passer montanus (Gorrión molinero) y Phoenicurus ochruros (Colirrojo tizón). Se incluye una ilus...

  9. Salida de campo al Puente Colgante y la finca de Bárbara, en Valladolid, el 15 de marzo de 1954

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo al Puente Colgante y la finca de Bárbara, en Valladolid capital, el 15 de marzo de 1954, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre un sapo, probablemente Alytes sp. (Sapo partero), y las siguientes aves: Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Athene noctua (Mochuelo europeo), Cettia cetti (Ruiseñor bastardo), Clamator glandarius (Críalo europeo), Corvus corone (Corneja negra), Corvus frugilegus (Graja), Cyanistes caeruleus (Herrerillo común, llamado Parus coeruleus por el autor), Falc...

  10. Měkkýši navrhované PR Údolí Vrchlice u Kutné Hory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Juřičková

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper brings the first malacological research of the proposal nature reserve Vrchlice Valley (Central Bohemia, Czech Republic after hundred years. Altogether, 44 mollusc species have been recorded in a very diverse mosaic of floodplain forests, cliffs and meadows. Rare or locally important species Vertigo pusilla, Semilimax semilimax, Daudebardia rufa, Isognomostoma isognomostomos, Oxyloma elegans, Vitrea crystallina and Laciniaria plicata were recorded in the area of the reserve.

  11. The establishment of species-specific primers for the molecular identification of ten stored-product psocids based on ITS2 rDNA

    OpenAIRE

    Zi-Hua Zhao; Bing-Yi Cui; Zhi-Hong Li; Fan Jiang; Qian-Qian Yang; Zuzana Kučerová; Václav Stejskal; George Opit; Yang Cao; Fu-Jun Li

    2016-01-01

    Psocids are important stored product pests found worldwide that can be spread through grain trade. Most stored-product psocids, including eggs, nymphs, and adults, are very small (~1 mm) and difficult to identify morphologically. Here, we collected 10 economically important stored-product Liposcelis spp. psocids (L. bostrychophila, L. entomophila, L. decolor, L. paeta, L. brunnea, L. corrodens, L. mendax, L. rufa, L. pearmani, and L. tricolor) from 35 geographical locations in 5 countries (Ch...

  12. Improving decision-making for sustainable hunting: regulatory mechanisms of hunting pressure in red-legged partridge

    OpenAIRE

    Caro, Jesús; Delibes-Mateos, Miguel; Viñuela, Javier; López-Lucero. Juan Francisco; Arroyo, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about how hunting pressure is determined, and the relative efficacy of different mechanisms to regulate harvest, can help to improve the managers’ decision-making process. We developed a general framework about the decision-making process that regulates red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa) hunting pressure in central Spain based on information from a focus group and individual interviews with game managers. We also used available information to compare the efficiency of different t...

  13. Ecological Factors Underlying the Nonbreeding Distribution of Western Sandpipers

    OpenAIRE

    Nebel, Silke

    2003-01-01

    Avian species in which males and females migrate to different nonbreeding areas provide candidate systems to study ecological factors underlying distribution patterns. Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) are such 'differential migrants'. They breed mainly in Alaska and overwinter along the American Pacific and Caribbean coastlines. In this thesis, I document an increasing proportion of females at more southerly latitudes. I review existing explanatory hypotheses for differential migratio...

  14. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in shorebird populations.

    OpenAIRE

    Wenink, P W

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes the global molecular population structure of two shorebird species, in particular of the dunlin, Calidris alpina, by means of comparative sequence analysis of the most variable part of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome. There are several reasons why mtDNA is the molecule of choice to probe the recent evolutionary history of a species. Most importantly, mtDNA accumulates substitutions at a high average rate that permits the tracing of genealogies within the time frame ...

  15. The Long and the Short of It: No Dietary Specialisation between Male and Female Western Sandpipers Despite Strong Bill Size Dimorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Franks, Samantha E.; Guillermo Fernández; Hodkinson, David J.; T. Kurt. Kyser; Lank, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Many bird species show spatial or habitat segregation of the sexes during the non-breeding season. One potential ecological explanation is that differences in bill morphology favour foraging niche specialisation and segregation. Western sandpipers Calidris mauri have pronounced bill size dimorphism, with female bills averaging 15% longer than those of males. The sexes differ in foraging behaviour and exhibit partial latitudinal segregation during the non-breeding season, with males predominan...

  16. Molecular sexing of prey remains permits a test of sex-biased predation in a wintering population of western sandpipers.

    OpenAIRE

    Nebel, Silke; Cloutier, Alison; Thompson, Graham J.

    2004-01-01

    Population sex ratios in monogamous birds are often male biased. One factor that can affect population sex ratios is sex-biased predation. However, most estimates of sex-biased predation in birds have focused on species with obvious sexual colour dimorphism or body size dimorphism. Data on sexually monomorphic birds are generally lacking. In the present study, we adopt a PCR-based sexing procedure to help test for sex-biased predation in a wintering population of western sandpipers (Calidris ...

  17. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve

    OpenAIRE

    Jan A van Gils; Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Vall

    2015-01-01

    The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris...

  18. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve

    OpenAIRE

    Van Gils, J.A.; Ahmedou Salem, M.V.

    2015-01-01

    The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal dietsrequire controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite severalpleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notablyin consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we presentsuch a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of amedium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canu...

  19. Stable Isotope Analysis Reveals That Agricultural Habitat Provides an Important Dietary Component for Nonbreeding Dunlin

    OpenAIRE

    Lesley Joan Evans Ogden; Hobson, Keith A.; Lank, David B.; Shabtai Bittman

    2005-01-01

    Although shorebirds spending the winter in temperate areas frequently use estuarine and supratidal (upland) feeding habitats, the relative contribution of each habitat to individual diets has not been directly quantified. We quantified the proportional use that Calidris alpina pacifica (Dunlin) made of estuarine vs. terrestrial farmland resources on the Fraser River Delta, British Columbia, using stable isotope analysis (δ13C, δ15N) of blood from 268 Dunlin over four winters, 1997 t...

  20. Niche dynamics of shorebirds in Delaware Bay: Foraging behavior, habitat choice and migration timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novcic, Ivana

    2016-08-01

    Niche differentiation through resource partitioning is seen as one of the most important mechanisms of diversity maintenance contributing to stable coexistence of different species within communities. In this study, I examined whether four species of migrating shorebirds, dunlins (Calidris alpina), semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla), least sandpipers (Calidris minutilla) and short-billed dowitchers (Limnodromus griseus), segregate by time of passage, habitat use and foraging behavior at their major stopover in Delaware Bay during spring migration. I tested the prediction that most of the separation between morphologically similar species will be achieved by differential migration timing. Despite the high level of overlap along observed niche dimensions, this study demonstrates a certain level of ecological separation between migrating shorebirds. The results of analyses suggest that differential timing of spring migration might be the most important dimension along which shorebird species segregate while at stopover in Delaware Bay. Besides differences in time of passage, species exhibited differences in habitat use, particularly least sandpipers that foraged in vegetated areas of tidal marshes more frequently than other species, as well as short-billed dowitchers that foraged in deeper water more often than small sandpipers did. Partitioning along foraging techniques was less prominent than segregation along temporal or microhabitat dimensions. Such ranking of niche dimensions emphasizes significance of temporal segregation of migratory species - separation of species by time of passage may reduce the opportunity for interspecific aggressive encounters, which in turn can have positive effects on birds' time and energy budget during stopover period.

  1. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Sampaio, Misako U

    2009-09-01

    Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models. PMID:19722028

  2. Notas sobre el museo de Santo Domingo de Silos (Burgos), 1953-1954

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Notas sobre el museo de Santo Domingo de Silos, en Burgos, de 1953 y 1954, en las que incluyeron observaciones sobre los siguientes mamíferos: Canis lupus (Lobo), Capreolus capreolus (Corzo) y Sus scrofa (Jabalí), y las siguientes aves: Accipiter nisus (Gavilán común, también llamado Astur palumbarius por el autor), Alauda arvensis (Alondra común), Alcedo atthis (Martín pescador común), Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Anas platyrhynchos (Ánade azulón, también llamado Pato bravío por el autor), ...

  3. Salida de campo a las Cortas de Blas (Villalba de los Alcores, Valladolid) y páramo de los Torozos, en Valladolid, el 16 y 17 de agosto de 1951

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo a las Cortas de Blas (Villalba de los Alcores, Valladolid) y el páramo de los Torozos, en la provincia de Valladolid, los días 16 y 17 de agosto de 1951, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre un Psammodromus hispanicus (Lagartija cenicienta), los siguientes mamíferos: Apodemus sp. (Ratón), Eliomys quercinus (Lirón careto), Lepus granatensis (Liebre ibérica) y Oryctolagus cuniculus (Conejo), y las siguientes aves: Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Anthus campestris (Bisbita cam...

  4. Excursión a Simancas (Valladolid) y alrededores el 23 de agosto de 1951

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Excursión a Simancas y alrededores, en la ribera del río Pisuerga, en la provincia de Valladolid, el 23 de agosto de 1951, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre las siguientes aves: Acrocephalus arundinaceus (Carricero tordal), Acrocephalus scirpaceus (Carricero común), Actitis hypoleucos (Andarríos chico, llamado Actynioides hypoleucus por el autor), Alcedo atthis (Martín pescador común), Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Anas platyrhynchos (Ánade azulón), Apus apus (Vencejo común), Buteo ...

  5. Visita al Monte de Zaratán (Valladolid) el 26 de mayo de 1951

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo al Monte de Zaratán (Zaratán, Valladolid) el día 26 de mayo de 1951, en la que se anotó una descripción de la vegetación del enclave, se observó un anifibio (posiblemente, un Gallipato, Pleurodeles waltl) y anotaron también observaciones sobre los siguientes mamíferos: Apodemus sp. (Ratón) y Oryctolagus cuniculus (Conejo), y aves: Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Anthus campestris (Bisbita campestre), Apus apus (Vencejo común), Calandrella sp. (Terrera), Caprimulgus sp. (Chotac...

  6. Análise comparativa de fragmentos identificáveis de forrageiras, pela técnica micro-histológica Comparative analysis of identifiable fragments of forages, by the microhistological technique

    OpenAIRE

    Maristela de Oliveira Bauer; José Alberto Gomide; Eldo Antônio Monteiro da Silva; Adair José Regazzi; José Franklim Chichorro

    2005-01-01

    Objetivou-se, com este trabalho, verificar, pela técnica micro-histológica, diferenças entre espécies forrageiras quanto ao percentual de fragmentos identificáveis, em função do processo digestivo e da época do ano. Lâminas foliares frescas recém-expandidas, correspondentes à última e à penúltima posição no perfilho, das espécies Melinis minutiflora Pal. de Beauv (capim-gordura), Hyparrhenia rufa (Nees) Stapf. (capim-jaraguá), Brachiaria decumbens Stapf. (capim-braquiária), Imperata brasilien...

  7. Effectiveness of managed populations of wild and honey bees as supplemental pollinators of sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) under different climatic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansted, Lise; Grout, Brian William Wilson; Toldam-Andersen, Torben Bo;

    2015-01-01

    rufa and B. terrestris to add to the pollination activity of conventionally employed A. mellifera. However, in a season with a less favourable weather history, and despite comparable activity of the three species during the pollen-receptive period, introduced bees had only a limited effect on fruit set...... and yield and could not raise yield above that of freely pollinated branches. The contribution of appropriately dense populations of introduced bees in the orchard, given favourable weather conditions, is clear, but maintenance of populations of introduced, wild bees, compared with honey bees may well...

  8. Salida de campo a Laguna de Duero (Valladolid) el 15 de mayo de 1951

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo a Laguna de Duero (Valladolid) el 15 de mayo de 1951, en la que se anotó una observación sobre la disminución de población de ranas y renacuajos en la laguna (no se identifican especies) y anotaron observaciones sobre las siguientes aves: Acrocephalus scirpaceus (Carricero común), Actitis hypoleucos (Andarríos chico, llamado Actynioides hypoleucus por el autor), Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Anas platyrhynchos (Ánade azulón), Charadrius hiaticula (Chorlitejo grande), Ciconia ...

  9. Salida de campo de Carlos Valverde Gómez a Valdestillas (Valladolid) el 30 de enero de 1954

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo de Carlos Valverde Gómez, hermano del autor, a Valdestillas (Valladolid) el 30 de enero de 1954, recorriento la orilla del río y pinares adyacentes, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre el mamífero Lepus sp. (Liebre), y las siguientes aves: Accipiter nisus (Gavilán común, también llamado Astur palumbarius por el autor), Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Anas crecca (Cerceta común), Anas platyrhynchos (Ánade azulón, también llamado Pato bravío por el autor), Anthus spinoletta ...

  10. Salida de campo a Valdestillas (Valladolid) el 13 de agosto de 1955

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo a Valdestillas (Valladolid) el 13 de agosto de 1955, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre las siguientes aves: Actitis hypoleucos (Andarríos chico, llamado Actynioides hypoleucus por el autor), Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Anas platyrhynchos (Ánade azulón, también llamado Pato bravío por el autor), Ardea cinerea (Garza real), Athene noctua (Mochuelo europeo), Burhinus oedicnemus (Alcaraván común), Charadrius dubius (Chorlitejo chico), Ciconia ciconia (Cigüeña blanca), Cl...

  11. Salida de campo a Montejo de Arévalo (Segovia) el 27 y 28 de mayo de 1956

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo a Montejo de Arévalo (Segovia) el 27 y 28 de mayo de 1956, de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre Vulpes vulpes (Zorro), y las siguientes aves: Alectoris rufa (Perdiz roja), Apus apus (Vencejo común), "Biblis rupestris", Corvus corax (Cuervo), Corvus monedula (Grajilla, llamada Coloeus por el autor), Emberiza cia (Escribano montesino), Falco peregrinus (Halcón peregrino, también llamado Alcotán palomero), Falco tinnunculus (Cernícalo vulgar), Fringilla coelebs (Pinzón vulga...

  12. Basal metabolic rate declines during long-distance migratory flight in great knots

    OpenAIRE

    Battley, PF; Dekinga, A; Dietz, MW; Piersma, T; Tang, SX; Hulsman, K; Battley, Phil F; Tang, Sixian

    2001-01-01

    Great Knots (Calidris tenuirostris) make one of the longest migratory flights in the avian world, flying almost 5500 km from Australia to China during northward migration. We measured basal metabolic rate (BMR) and body composition in birds before and after this flight and found that BMR decreased 42%. The mass-specific BMR based on lean mass decreased 33%. We also starved a group of pre-migratory Great Knots in captivity to determine whether they showed the same reduction in BMR without havi...

  13. Salida de campo a Laguna de Duero (Valladolid) en marzo de 1948

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Gómez, José Antonio, 1926-2003

    2008-01-01

    Salida de campo de varios días de duración a Laguna de Duero (Valladolid) durante marzo de 1948 de la que se anotaron observaciones sobre las siguientes aves: Alauda arvensis (Alondra común), Anas acuta (Ánade rabudo), Anas platyrhynchos (Ánade azulón), Anas querquedula (Cerceta carretona), Anthus pratensis (Bisbita común), Ardea cinerea (Garza real), Ardea purpurea (Garza imperial), Calidris alpina (Correlimos común), Ciconia ciconia (Cigüeña blanca), Circus cyaneus (Aguilucho pálido), Ember...

  14. Raptor predation on wintering Dunlins in relation to the tidal cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, D; Ydenberg, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    At Boundary Bay, British Columbia, Canada, Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) captured 94 Dunlins (Calidris alpina) in 652 hunts. The two main hunting methods were open attacks on flying Dunlins (62%) and stealth attacks on roosting or foraging Dunlins (35%). Peregrines hunted throughout the day, yet the kill rate per observation hour dropped 1¿2 hr before high tide and peaked 1¿2 hr after high tide. The drop in kill rate coincided with the departure of the mass of Dunlins for over-ocean fl...

  15. Early Results of Three-Year Monitoring of Red Wood Ants’ Behavioral Changes and Their Possible Correlation with Earthquake Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Berberich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Short-term earthquake predictions with an advance warning of several hours or days are currently not possible due to both incomplete understanding of the complex tectonic processes and inadequate observations. Abnormal animal behaviors before earthquakes have been reported previously, but create problems in monitoring and reliability. The situation is different with red wood ants (RWA; Formica rufa-group (Hymenoptera: Formicidae. They have stationary mounds on tectonically active, gas-bearing fault systems. These faults may be potential earthquake areas. For three years (2009–2012, two red wood ant mounds (Formica rufa-group, located at the seismically active Neuwied Basin (Eifel, Germany, have been monitored 24/7 by high-resolution cameras with both a color and an infrared sensor. Early results show that ants have a well-identifiable standard daily routine. Correlation with local seismic events suggests changes in the ants’ behavior hours before the earthquake: the nocturnal rest phase and daily activity are suppressed, and standard daily routine does not resume until the next day. At present, an automated image evaluation routine is being applied to the more than 45,000 hours of video streams. Based on this automated approach, a statistical analysis of the ants’ behavior will be carried out. In addition, other parameters (climate, geotectonic and biological, which may influence behavior, will be included in the analysis.

  16. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza V. Oliva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models.Obtidas de sementes leguminosas, várias proteínas inibem proteinases de origem animal, incluindo humanas, e podem ser consideradas para o desenvolvimento de compostos com atividade biológica. Inibidores da família Bowman-Birk e da família Kunitz vegetal tem sido caracterizados em relação a especificidade para proteinase, estrutura primária e sitio reativo. O nosso grupo majoritariamente vem estudando o gênero Bauhinia, principalmente as espécies bauhinioides, rufa, ungulatae variegata. Em algumas espécies, mais de um inibidor com propriedades diferentes foi caracterizado. Embora tais proteínas apresentem alta similaridade estrutural, diferem quanto à inibição de proteinases, e foram exploradas em estudos utilizando diversos modelos biológicos.

  17. High-density interspecific genetic maps of kiwifruit and the identification of sex-specific markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Yifei; VanBuren, Robert; Yao, Xiaohong; Zhong, Caihong; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-10-01

    Kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis Planchon) is an important specialty fruit crop that suffers from narrow genetic diversity stemming from recent global commercialization and limited cultivar improvement. Here, we present high-density RAD-seq-based genetic maps using an interspecific F1 cross between Actinidia rufa 'MT570001' and A. chinensis 'Guihai No4'. The A. rufa (maternal) map consists of 2,426 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers with a total length of 2,651 cM in 29 linkage groups (LGs) corresponding to the 29 chromosomes. The A. chinensis (paternal) map consists of 4,214 SNP markers over 3,142 cM in 29 LGs. Using these maps, we were able to anchor an additional 440 scaffolds from the kiwifruit draft genome assembly. Kiwifruit is functionally dioecious, which presents unique challenges for breeding and production. Three sex-specific simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers can be used to accurately sex type male and female kiwifruit in breeding programmes. The sex-determination region (SDR) in kiwifruit was narrowed to a 1-Mb subtelomeric region on chromosome 25. Localizing the SDR will expedite the discovery of genes controlling carpel abortion in males and pollen sterility in females. PMID:26370666

  18. INFLUÊNCIA DOS MATERIAIS DE COBERTURA NA TEMPERATURA INTERNA DAS CONSTRUÇÕES INFLUENCE OF COVER MATERIALS IN THE INTERNAL TEMPERATURE OF RURAL BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Kravchenko

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Foi testado o comportamento da temperatura interna de ambientes fechados, quando cobertos com telhas de fibrocimento, alumínio, francesas e o capim Jaraguá (Hyparrhenia rufa. As condições mais favoráveis foram observadas nos ambientes cobertos com o capim e, em segundo lugar, com as telhas francesas, vindo a seguir as de alumínio. As condições mais drásticas foram constatadas nos ambientes cobertos com as telhas de fibrocimento de cor vermelha (em maior grau e cinza (em menor grau, onde ocorreram as maiores amplitudes térmicas.

    Temperature changes were observed in enclosed shelters covered with different roofing materia1s. The best thermis conditions occurred in the shelters covered with thatch (Hyparrhenia rufa. The second and third best temperatures were found, respectively, in the shelters covered with clay tile roofing and aluminum roofing. The least favorable temperatures were found in shelters covered with corrugated, asbestos—cement sheet roofing, with the shelters covered with gray—tinted sheets registering lower temperatures than the shelters covered with the red—tinted sheets.

  19. Application of a modified harness design for attachment of radio transmitters to shorebirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzenbacher, Peter; Haig, Susan M.; Oring, L.W.

    2000-01-01

    Radio transmitter attachment methodology is important to the design of radio telemetry studies. In 1998, we attached 5 transmitters to a captive population of Western Sandpipers(Calidris mauri) and 7 transmitters to wild Killdeer (Charadriusv ociferus) using a modified version of the Rappolea nd Tipton (1991) figure-8 leg-loop harness. Captive birds fitted with harnesses did not exhibit quantifiable differences in behavior relative to control birds. Based on initial success in using the leg-loop harnesses, we used harnesses to attach transmitters in the wild to 30 Killdeer and 49 Dunlin (Calidris alpina) during the winters of 1998-1999 and 1999-2000. This was part of a study on movements of wintering shorebirds in the Willamette Valley of Oregon,USA. Wild birds showed no adverse effects of the harnesses.Thus, the described harness is a practical method for attachment of transmitters to shorebirds. Advantages of this harness method include a reduction in handling time at capture, elimination of the need to clip feathers for attachment, and increased transmitter retention time.

  20. Censo de aves migratórias (Charadriidae, Scolopacidae e Laridae na Coroa do Avião, Igarassu, Pernambuco, Brasil Census of shorebirds and Seabirds (Charadriidae, Scolopacidae and Laridae in the Coroa do Avião, Igarassu, Pernambuco State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace R. Telino-Júnior

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of shorebirds and seabirds use the Atlantic route through the northeastern coast of Brazil every year to migrate to South America. In this study was made a census of individuals that uses the Coroa do Avião (7º40'S and 34º50"W, an islet located on the south bar of the Santa Cruz channel on the north coast of Pernambuco state, from May 1993 throughout April 1995 and from August 1996 throughout July 1997. Four species of the family Charadriidae, seven species of the family Scolopacidae, and two species of the family Laridae was observed. The populational peaks match both the period of arrival to the winter season site and the period of departure to the reproduction site. The species considered very frequent were: Charadrius semipalmatus Bonaparte, 1825 and Calidris alba (Pallas, 1764. All the other species were considered rather frequent. There was a strong linear correlation between 1993 and 1994 among Pluvialis squatarola (Linnaeus, 1758 and Arenaria interpres (Linnaeus, 1758; A. interpres and Calidris pusilla (Linnaues, 1766; A. interpres and C. alba; and C. pusilla and C. alba. From 1994 to April 1995 it occured between P. squatarola and C. alba; C. semipalmatus and C. pusilla; C. semipalmatus and C. pusilla; and A. interpres and C. pusilla. From August 1996 throughout July 1997 there was correlation only between P. squatarola and C. pusilla. The obtained results demonstrate the great importance of the Coroa do Avião as a winter season site.

  1. Heterospecific sociality of birds on beaches from southeastern Brazil

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    César Cestari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the sociality of heterospecific assemblages of birds have promoted a greater understanding of the types of interactions and survivorship between coexisting species. This study verified the group compositions in bird assemblages and analyzed the sociality of migratory and resident species on sandy beaches of southeastern Brazil. A transect was established on the median portion of beaches and all the groups of bird species (monospecific, heterospecific and solitary individuals were registered four days per month from November 2006 to April 2007. The sociality of each species was calculated by its frequency in heterospecific groups, its proportional number of contacts with other species in heterospecific groups, and the number of species that it associated with. Semipalmated Sandpiper Calidris pusilla (Linnaeus, 1766 and Semipalmated Plover Charadrius semipalmatus Bonaparte, 1825 (both migratory had the highest degree of sociality and did not show a preference to associate with either residents or migratory species. Sanderling Calidris alba (Pallas, 1764 (migratory occupied the third position in the sociality rank and associated with migratory species frequently. Southern Caracara Carara plancus (Miller, 1777 and Black Vulture Coragyps atratus (Beschstein, 1793 (both resident were uniquely found among heterospecific groups with necrophagous and resident species. Kelp Gull Larus dominicanus Lichtenstein, 1823 (resident associated more frequently with resident species. The sociality in assemblages of birds may promote advantages such as an increased collective awareness in dangerous situations and indication of sites with abundant food sources.

  2. Ecological correlates of variable organ sizes and fat loads in the most northerly-wintering shorebirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthrauff, Daniel R.; Dekinga, Anne; Gill, R.E., Jr.; Summers, R.W.; Piersma, Theunis

    2013-01-01

    Shorebirds at northern latitudes during the nonbreeding season typically carry relatively large lipid stores and exhibit an up-regulation of lean tissues associated with digestion and thermogenesis. Intraspecific variation in these tissues across sites primarily reflects differences in environmental conditions. Rock (Calidris ptilocnemis (Coues, 1873)) and Purple (Calidris maritima (Brünnich, 1764)) sandpipers are closely related species having the most northerly nonbreeding distributions among shorebirds, living at latitudes up to 61°N in Cook Inlet, Alaska, and up to 71°N in northern Norway, respectively. Cook Inlet is the coldest known site used by nonbreeding shorebirds, and the region’s mudflats annually experience extensive coverage of foraging sites by sea and shore-fast ice. Accordingly, Rock Sandpipers increase their fat stores to nearly 20% of body mass during winter. In contrast, Purple Sandpipers exploit predictably ice-free rocky intertidal foraging sites and maintain low (<6.5%) fat stores. Rock Sandpipers increase the mass of lean tissues from fall to winter, including contour feathers, stomach, and liver components. They also have greater lean pectoralis and supracoracoideus muscle and liver and kidney tissues compared with Purple Sandpipers in winter. This demonstrates a combined emphasis on digestive processes and thermogenesis, whereas Purple Sandpipers primarily augment organs associated with digestive processes. The high winter fat loads and increased lean tissues of Rock Sandpipers in Cook Inlet reflect the region’s persistent cold and abundant but sporadically unavailable food resources.

  3. The Ghost in the Shell : Local and Remote Forcing of a Coastal Bivalve Inhabiting the Humboldt Current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The external skeleton of mollusc bivalves, the shell, can furnish a recording of the environmental changes to which the organisms and population are exposed during their lives. The bivalve's growth is subjected to the thermocline variability; which itself is affected by environmental and climatic events. A highly variable environment such as the Humboldt current system (HCS) requires tools capable of recording its variations over a wide range of periodicities. Upwelling, Coastal trapped waves (CTWs), El Niño Southern Oscillation, and Pacific decadal oscillation events contribute to this environmental and climatic variability. The thermocline depth is modified by these different events at their own time-scales (respectively, daily to weekly, intraseasonally, interseasonally to interannually, and on a decadal scale). The thermocline variation translates into changes in Sea surface temperature (SST) and in the qualitative and quantitative productivity of phytoplankton. These two environmental factors are critical to bivalve growth.The sclerochronological (increment width) and sclerochemical (δ18O and δ13C) study consisted on the analysis of the Chilean bivalve Eurhomalea rufa, collected in 2005, as a recorder of the environmental HCS variability. The calibration step identified daily, monthly, and annual marks in the growth patterns of E. rufa. The results confirmed that the thermocline variability mainly drives the bivalve's activity and led to the establishment of a paleotemperature equation. Moreover, periodogram and wavelet analyses exposed the respective impacts of each environmental event from daily to interannual periodicities. In particular, the growth pattern of E. rufa follows SST variability at an intraseasonal periodicity (~ 60 days) which is remotely induced by CTWs. CTWs are generated by Kelvin oceanic waves, which are formed primarily by eastward equatorial Pacific winds (e.g. Shaffer et al. 1997; Montecino and Lange 2009).Sclerochronological studies

  4. 新疆准噶尔盆地北缘中中新世早期的原圆齿鼠(Promylagaulinae,Mylagaulidae)%Mylagaulids (Mammalia: Rodentia) from the early Middle Miocene of northern Junggar Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴文裕; 倪喜军; 叶捷; 孟津; 毕顺东

    2013-01-01

    Application of CT (computed tomography) scanning technology to the study of tooth morphology of mylagaulids makes better understanding the tooth structure of high-crowned mylagaulids. Two genera and species from the early Middle Miocene Halamagai Formation innorthern Junggar Basin of Xinjiang are recognized: Tschalimys ckhikvadzei Shevyreva, 1971,the senior synonym of Sinomylagaulus halamagaiensis Wu, 1988 and Simpligaulus yangi gen.et sp. nov. Both taxa undoubtedly belong to the subfamily Promylagaulinae. The integrated lithological, paleontological and paleomagnetic studies on sediments of the Late Oligocene through Late Miocene in the northern Junggar Basin of Xinjiang demonstrate that Halamagai Formation is fluvial-lacustrine sediments formed during the time coincident to the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum. T. ckhikvadzei and S. yangi probably inhabit the humid and warm regions with forests and densely vegetated thickets as the living mountain beaver Aplodontia rufa does. Thesemylagaulids are probably immigrants or the descendants of the immigrants from west North America.

  5. Problemi oprašivanja kruške

    OpenAIRE

    Ševar, Marija

    2008-01-01

    Pogodna svojstva tla i optimalni ekološki uvjeti nisu dostatni za uspješnu proizvodnju kruške. Ograničavajući čimbenici su: klimatski, odabir sortimenta, odabir podloge, te vrste i brojnost kukaca oprašivača. Pri podizanju nasada kruške zanemaruje se problem oprašivanja kukcima, jer vlada uvjerenje da će krušku oprašiti pčele medarice (Apis mellifera). Voćari moraju razmišljati i o uporabi drugih kukaca: bumbara (Bombus spp.) i solitarnih pčela iz roda Osmia (Osmia rufa i Osmia cornuta), jer ...

  6. Tracing the pathways of neotropical migratory shorebirds using stable isotopes: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, A; Rye, R; Landis, G; Bern, C; Kester, C; Ridley, I

    2003-09-01

    We evaluated the potential use of stable isotopes to establish linkages between the wintering grounds and the breeding grounds of the Pectoral Sandpiper (Calidris melanotos), the White-rumped Sandpiper (Calidris fuscicollis), the Baird's Sandpiper (Calidris bairdii), and other Neotropical migratory shorebird species (e.g., Tringa spp.). These species molt their flight feathers on the wintering grounds and hence their flight feathers carry chemical signatures that are characteristic of their winter habitat. The objective of our pilot study was to assess the feasibility of identifying the winter origin of individual birds by: (1) collecting shorebird flight feathers from several widely separated Argentine sites and analyzing these for a suite of stable isotopes; and 2) analyzing the deuterium and 18O isotope data that were available from precipitation measurement stations in Argentina. Isotopic ratios (delta13C, delta15N and delta34S) of flight feathers were significantly different among three widely separated sites in Argentina during January 2001. In terms of relative importance in separating the sites, delta34S was most important, followed by delta15N, and then delta13C. In the complete discriminant analysis, the classification function correctly predicted group membership in 85% of the cases (jackknifed classification matrix). In a stepwise analysis delta13C was dropped from the solution, and site membership was correctly predicted in 92% of cases (jackknifed matrix). Analysis of precipitation data showed that both deltaD and delta18O were significantly related to both latitude and longitude on a countrywide scale (p Argentina. There was unexplained variation in isotope ratios within and among the different wing feathers from individual birds. Such variation may indicate that birds are not faithful to a local site during their winter stay in Argentina. There was significant interannual variation in the deltaD and delta18O of precipitation. Hence, specific

  7. BIODIVERSIDAD DEL DEPARTAMENTO DE CASANARE:IDENTIFICACIÓN DE ECOSISTEMAS ESTRATÉGICOS

    OpenAIRE

    Usma Oviedo, José Saulo; Trujillo González, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Gracias a un convenio de cooperación entre la Gobernación de Casanare, WWF Colombia y el apoyo de Corporinoquía, Fundación Omacha, Universidad del Tolima, Calidris y la Alcaldía de Tauramena, se produce este libro. En él se integra y analiza toda la información físico-biótica del Casanare, su biodiversidad de plantas, insectos, peces, anfibios, reptiles, aves y mamíferos; presenta una adaptación de la metodología de Áreas de Alto Valor de Conservación (AAVC) para los ecosistemas del depar...

  8. Trapped in the extinction vortex? Strong genetic effects in a declining vertebrate population

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    Larsson Mikael

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity are expected to increase the extinction risk of small populations, but detailed tests in natural populations are scarce. We combine long-term population and fitness data with those from two types of molecular markers to examine the role of genetic effects in a declining metapopulation of southern dunlins Calidris alpina schinzii, an endangered shorebird. Results The decline is associated with increased pairings between related individuals, including close inbreeding (as revealed by both field observations of parentage and molecular markers. Furthermore, reduced genetic diversity seems to affect individual fitness at several life stages. Higher genetic similarity between mates correlates negatively with the pair's hatching success. Moreover, offspring produced by related parents are more homozygous and suffer from increased mortality during embryonic development and possibly also after hatching. Conclusions Our results demonstrate strong genetic effects in a rapidly declining population, emphasizing the importance of genetic factors for the persistence of small populations.

  9. Helminth parasites in six species of shorebirds (Charadrii from the Coast of Belize

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    Canaris Albert G

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen species of helminth parasites were recovered from six species of charadriid shorebirds (Aves: Charadriiformes from Belize: the ruddy turnstone, Arenaria interpres, the snowy plover, Charadrius alexandrinus, the semipalmated plover, C. semipalmatus, the killdeer, C. vociferus, the white-rumped sandpiper, Calidris fuscicollis, and the black-bellied plover, Pluvialis squatarola. Cestode species were predominant (N = 8, followed by trematode species (N = 3 and acanthocephala (N = 2. The trematode, Paramaritremopsis solielangi infected four of the six species of hosts. The cestodes, Nadejdolepis litoralis and N. paranitidulans infected three and two host species respectively. Helminth parasite species were contagious (clumped and not evenly distributed among hosts. Twelve of the 13 species were generalists. The one specialist Microphallus kinsellae was recovered from one C. fuscicollis. Three of the four types of feeding guilds were present and in approximately the same number. All but M. kinsellae have been reported from other species of hosts, mostly from Eurasia and North America.

  10. Thermal emissivity of avian eggshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björn, Lars Olof; Bengtson, Sven-Axel; Li, Shaoshan; Hecker, Christoph; Ullah, Saleem; Roos, Arne; Nilsson, Annica M

    2016-04-01

    The hypothesis has been tested that evolution has resulted in lower thermal emissivity of eggs of birds breeding openly in cold climates than of eggs of birds that nest under protective covering or in warmer climates. Directional thermal emissivity has been estimated from directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra. Due to several methodological difficulties the absolute emissivity is not accurately determined, but differences between species are obvious. Most notably, small waders of the genus Calidris, breeding in cold climates on the tundra, and in most cases with uniparental nest attendance, have low directional emissivity of their eggshells, about 0.92 when integration is carried out for wavelengths up to 16μm. Species belonging to Galloanserinae have the highest directional emissivity, about 0.96, of their eggs. No differences due to climate or breeding conditions were found within this group. Eggs of most other birds tested possess intermediate emissivity, but the values for Pica pica and Corvus corone cornix are as low as for Calidris. Large species-dependent differences in spectral reflectance were found at specific wavelengths. For instance, at 4.259μm the directional-hemispherical reflectance for galliforms range from 0.05 to 0.09, while for Fratercula arctica and Fulmarus glacialis it is about 0.3. The reflection peaks at 6.5 and 11.3μm due to calcite are differentially attenuated in different species. In conclusion, the hypothesis that evolution has resulted in lower thermal emissivity of bird eggs being exposed in cold climates is not supported by our results. The emissivity is not clearly related to nesting habits or climate, and it is unlikely that the small differences observed are ecologically important. The spectral differences between eggs that nevertheless exist should be taken into account when using infrared thermometers for estimating the surface temperature of avian eggs. PMID:27033033

  11. Foraging ecology of fall-migrating shorebirds in the Illinois River valley.

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    Randolph V Smith

    Full Text Available Populations of many shorebird species appear to be declining in North America, and food resources at stopover habitats may limit migratory bird populations. We investigated body condition of, and foraging habitat and diet selection by 4 species of shorebirds in the central Illinois River valley during fall migrations 2007 and 2008 (Killdeer [Charadrius vociferus], Least Sandpiper [Calidris minutilla], Pectoral Sandpiper [Calidris melanotos], and Lesser Yellowlegs [Tringa flavipes]. All species except Killdeer were in good to excellent condition, based on size-corrected body mass and fat scores. Shorebird diets were dominated by invertebrate taxa from Orders Diptera and Coleoptera. Additionally, Isopoda, Hemiptera, Hirudinea, Nematoda, and Cyprinodontiformes contribution to diets varied by shorebird species and year. We evaluated diet and foraging habitat selection by comparing aggregate percent dry mass of food items in shorebird diets and core samples from foraging substrates. Invertebrate abundances at shorebird collection sites and random sites were generally similar, indicating that birds did not select foraging patches within wetlands based on invertebrate abundance. Conversely, we found considerable evidence for selection of some diet items within particular foraging sites, and consistent avoidance of Oligochaeta. We suspect the diet selectivity we observed was a function of overall invertebrate biomass (51.2 ± 4.4 [SE] kg/ha; dry mass at our study sites, which was greater than estimates reported in most other food selection studies. Diet selectivity in shorebirds may follow tenants of optimal foraging theory; that is, at low food abundances shorebirds forage opportunistically, with the likelihood of selectivity increasing as food availability increases. Nonetheless, relationships between the abundance, availability, and consumption of Oligochaetes for and by waterbirds should be the focus of future research, because estimates of foraging

  12. Wind effects on prey availability: How northward migrating waders use brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the sivash, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuil, Yvonne; Koolhaas, Anita; Van Der Winden, Jan

    Large numbers of waders migrating northward in spring use the Sivash, a large system of shallow, brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the Black Sea and Azov Sea region (Ukraine). The bottoms of these lagoons are often uncovered by the wind. Hence, for waders the time and space available for feeding depend on wind conditions. In hypersaline lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was very poor, consisting mainly of chironomid larvae (0.19 g AFDM·m -2) and brine shrimps Artemia salina, respectively. Brine shrimp abundance was correlated with salinity, wind force, wind direction and water depth. Dunlin Calidris alpina and curlew sandpiper Calidris ferruginea were the only species feeding on brine shrimp. As brine shrimp densities are higher in deeper water, smaller waders such as broad-billed sandpipers Limicola falcinellus are too short-legged to reach exploitable densities of brine shrimp. In brackish lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was rich, consisting of polychaetes, bivalves, gastropods, chironomid larvae, isopods and amphipods (8.9 to 30.5 g AFDM·m -2), but there were no brine shrimps. Prey biomass increased with the distance from the coast, being highest on the site that was most frequently inundated. Dunlin, broad-billed sandpiper and grey plover Pluvialis squatarola were the most abundant birds in the brackish lagoon. Due to the effects of wind-tides only a small area was usually available as a feeding site. Gammarus insensibilis was the alternative prey resource in the water layer, and their density varied with wind direction in the same way as brine shrimp. Curlew sandpipers and dunlins in the hypersaline lagoons and broad-billed sandpipers in the brackish lagoons often changed feeding sites, probably following the variation in prey availability. Only because of the large size and variety of lagoons are waders in the Sivash always able to find good feeding sites.

  13. Inorganic and organic contaminants in Alaskan shorebird eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saalfeld, David T; Matz, Angela C; McCaffery, Brian J; Johnson, Oscar W; Bruner, Phil; Lanctot, Richard B

    2016-05-01

    Many shorebird populations throughout North America are thought to be declining, with potential causes attributed to habitat loss and fragmentation, reduced prey availability, increased predation, human disturbance, and increased exposure to environmental pollutants. Shorebirds may be particularly vulnerable to contaminant exposure throughout their life cycle, as they forage primarily on invertebrates in wetlands, where many contaminants accumulate disproportionately in the sediments. Therefore, it is important to document and monitor shorebird populations thought to be at risk and assess the role that environmental contaminants may have on population declines. To investigate potential threats and provide baseline data on shorebird contaminant levels in Alaskan shorebirds, contaminant concentrations were evaluated in shorebird eggs from 16 species residing in seven geographic distinct regions of Alaska. Similar to previous studies, low levels of most inorganic and organic contaminants were found, although concentrations of several inorganic and organic contaminants were higher than those of previous studies. For example, elevated strontium levels were observed in several species, especially black oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani) sampled in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Additionally, contaminant concentrations varied among species, with significantly higher concentrations of inorganic contaminants found in eggs of pectoral sandpiper (Calidris melanotos), semipalmated sandpiper (Calidris pusilla), black oystercatcher, and bar-tailed godwit (Limosa lapponica). Similarly, significantly higher concentrations of some organic contaminants were found in the eggs of American golden plover (Pluvialis dominica), black-bellied plover (Pluvialis squatarola), pacific golden plover (Pluvialis fulva), bar-tailed godwit, and semipalmated sandpiper. Despite these elevated levels, current concentrations of contaminants in shorebird eggs suggest that breeding environments are

  14. Renovação de pastagem degradada de capim-gordura com a introdução de forrageiras tropicais adubadas com nitrogênio ou em consórcios Renewing the degraded Melinis minutiflora pasture by introduction of tropical forages fertilized with nitrogen or under mixture cropping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano de Melo Moreira

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Um experimento foi conduzido com objetivo de avaliar a produtividade e qualidade do capim-braquiária (Brachiaria decumbens Stapf. cv. Basilisk e do capim-jaraguá (Hyparrhenia rufa (Ness Stapf. adubados com nitrogênio (N ou em consórcios com estilosantes (Stylosanthes guianensis (Aubl. Swartz cv. Mineirão, introduzidos em uma pastagem degradada. Foram avaliadas duas gramíneas (capim-braquiária e capim-jaraguá, quatro doses de N (0, 50, 100 e 150 kg/ha e dois tratamentos referentes aos consórcios capim-braquiária + estilosantes e capim-jaraguá + estilosantes. Após estabelecimento das forrageiras, foram realizadas duas avaliações (colheitas. As produções de matéria seca (MS do capim-braquiária aumentaram de 1.824 para 4.604 kg/ha e de 1.019 para 2.149 kg/ha nas duas colheitas, respectivamente, quando as doses de N extremas foram comparadas, porém não houve resposta do capim-jaraguá. O teor de proteína bruta (PB do capim-braquiária elevou de 3,18 para 5,68 dag/kg apenas na primeira colheita, enquanto o capim-jaraguá apresentou incremento de 2,53 para 3,72 dag/kg e de 7,32 para 8,45 dag/kg, respectivamente, em ambas as colheitas, quando comparadas às doses extremas. Os teores de fibra em detergente neutro (FDN e fibra em detergente ácido das gramíneas não foram influenciados pela aplicação de N. Em ambas as colheitas, ao se elevarem as doses de N, houve diminuição dos teores de P nas duas gramíneas e de K no capim-braquiária. Os teores de Ca e Mg das gramíneas, em sua maioria, não foram influenciados pelo N, em ambas as colheitas. As produções médias de MS dos dois consórcios foram superiores às produções médias das duas gramíneas adubadas, com incrementos de 42,62 e 15,00% no rendimento forrageiro, na primeira e segunda colheitas, respectivamente. As forrageiras em consórcios, de forma geral, apresentaram teores de PB e Ca mais elevados e de FDN mais baixos que as gramíneas puras adubadas com N

  15. Caracterização fitofisionômica e levantamento florístico preliminar no Pantanal dos Rios Mortes-Araguaia, Cocalinho, Mato Grosso, Brasil Vegetation types and preliminary floristic survey in the Mortes-Araguaia Pantanal, Cocalinho, Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Schwantes Marimon

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo realizou-se no Pantanal dos Rios Mortes-Araguaia, extensa planície inundável localizada no municípo de Cocalinho, nordeste de Mato Grosso, Brasil. Efetuou-se uma caracterização fitofisionômica e um levantamento florístico preliminar da região. Foram selecionados três Sítios, com fitofisionomias representativas: proximidades do Rio das Mortes (12° 37'S; 50° 55'W, foz do Rio das Mortes com o Araguaia (11° 54'S; 50° 48'W e porção mediana do Rio Cristalino (12° 52'S; 50° 49'W. O método de amostragem adotado foi o de levantamentos rápidos. Foram identificadas oito fitofisionomias: Mata Inundável, Caapão, Babaçual, Cerradão, Cerrado stricto sensu, Campo de Murunduns, Campo de Byrsonima orbignyana e Campo Cerrado de Vochysia rufa. Foram levantadas 248 espécies de árvores, arbustos, sub-arbustos e lianas, distribuídas em 158 gêneros e 62 famílias. As fitofisionomias apresentaram um padrão heterogêneo, sendo que nenhuma das espécies ocorreu em todas elas. Porém, Alibertia edulis (L. Rich. A. Rich., Andira cuyabensis Benth., Maprounea guianensis (Aubl. M. Arg., entre outras, ocorreram em seis das oito fitofisionomias. As famílias com maior riqueza foram: Caesalpiniaceae, Annonaceae e Myrtaceae. Ocorreram algumas semelhanças florísticas com o Pantanal do Rio Paraguai, porém, são necessários estudos mais aprofundados para confirmar. Os padrões de heterogeneidade fitofisionômica indicam que a área estudada necessita de medidas conservacionistas.This study was carried out in the Pantanal of the Mortes and Araguaia rivers, a flooded plain located in Cocalinho, northeastern Mato Grosso, Brazil. The objectives of this study were to conduct a preliminary survey of the flora and to characterize the vegetation types. Three representative sites were selected: one near Rio das Mortes (12° 37'S; 50° 55'W, one at the mouth of Araguaia and Mortes rivers (11° 54'S; 50° 48'W and one in the middle portion of

  16. Efeito inibidor dos extratos hidroalcóolicos de coberturas mortas sobre a germinação de sementes de cenoura e alface Inhibitory effects of hydroalcoholic extracts of five plant species used as mulches on germination of lettuce and carrot seeds

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    Cláudio L. M. de Souza

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi obter a prospecção fitoquímica e avaliar o efeito inibitório dos extratos hidroalcóolicos de capim-gordura (Melinis minutiflora, capim-jaraguá (Hyparrhenia rufa, capim-colonião (Panicum maximum, mucuna (Mucuna aterrima e serrapilheira de bambu (Bambuza spp., sobre a germinação de sementes de alface e cenoura. O teste de germinação foi conduzido sobre papel umedecido com extrato das espécies citadas diluídos em 25, 50, 75 e 100 % (v/v, e água destilada. Avaliou-se a porcentagem de final e o índice de velocidade de germinação. O índice de velocidade de germinação e a porcentagem de germinação de sementes de cenoura e alface, reduziram significativamente nas diluições de 50 a 100 % (v/v em relação as demais diluições e ao controle. O extrato de mucuna apresentou significativamente maior efeito inibidor em comparação com os demais extratos testados, principalmente sobre a germinação de sementes de alface. A prospecção fitoquímica indicou a presença de classes de substâncias com potencial alelopático.Studies were undertaken to evaluate the inhibitory activity of hydroalcoholic extracts from dry mass of plant species used as mulches: Melinis minutiflora, Hyparrhenia rufa, Panicum maximum, Mucuna aterrima and bamboo leaves (Bambuza spp.. The inhibitory activity was measured on germination tests of lettuce and carrot seeds. Five extract concentrations of each species were used: 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 % (v/v. The rate of speed germination and percentage of germination of both species decreased significatly in function of the extract concentrations in the range from 50 to 100 % (v/v. Mucuna aterrima extract was significatly more inibitory than the other extracts, mainly for lettuce seeds. Bioassays with extracts showed the presence of several groups of alleopathic compounds.

  17. Revisão taxonômica das espécies brasileiras de abelhas do gênero Lestrimelitta Friese (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponina Taxonomic revision of the Brazilian species of the bee genus Lestrimelitta Friese (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponina

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    Paola Marchi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Revisão taxonômica das espécies de abelhas do gênero Lestrimelitta Friese (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponina que ocorrem no Brasil. Com base em caracteres morfológicos, como aqueles relacionados com a pilosidade, o formato do espiráculo propodeal, as distâncias interorbitais e o comprimento do esporão mesotibial, são reconhecidas catorze espécies, seis das quais novas para a Ciência: L. ciliata. sp. nov., L. maracaia sp. nov., L. similis sp. nov., L. spinosa sp. nov., L sulina. sp. nov. e L. tropica sp. nov. São designados lectótipos para Trigona (Lestrimelitta limao var. rufipes Friese, 1903 e Trigona (Lestrimelitta limao var. rufa Friese, 1903. O macho de L. limao (Smith, 1863 é descrito pela primeira vez. É apresentada também uma diagnose das seguintes espécies: L. ehrhardti Friese, 1931; L. glaberrima Oliveira & Marchi, 2005; L. glabrata Camargo & Moure, 1989; L. monodonta Camargo & Moure, 1989; e L. nana Melo, 2003. São apresentados chaves de identificação para operárias e machos, ilustrações e mapas de ocorrência.The species of Lestrimelitta present in Brazil are revised. Fourteen species are recognized, six of them described as new: L. ciliata. sp. nov., L. maracaia sp. nov., L. similis sp. nov., L. spinosa sp. nov., L. sulina. sp. nov. and L. tropica sp. nov. The main morphological characters used to distinguish the species are pubescence, shape of the propodeal spiracle, the interorbital distances and size of the midtibial spurs. Lectotypes for Trigona (Lestrimelitta rufa Friese, 1903 and Trigona (Lestrimelitta rufipes Friese, 1903 are designated and redescribed. The male of L. limao (Smith, 1863 is described for the first time. The following additional valid species are diagnosed and their distinctive characters presented: L. ehrhardti Friese, 1931; L. glaberrima Oliveira & Marchi, 2005; L.glabrata Camargo & Moure, 1989; L. monodonta Camargo & Moure, 1989 and L. nana Melo, 2003. Identification keys for workers and

  18. Composição química e digestibilidade de fenos tratados com amônia anidra ou uréia Chemical composition and digestibility of the ammoniated hays

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    Ricardo Andrade Reis

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido para se avaliarem as alterações na composição química e na digestibilidade in vitro da matéria seca (DIVMS dos fenos de Brachiaria decumbens Stapf, Brachiaria brizantha (Hochst ex. A. Rich Stapf e jaraguá (Hyparrhenia rufa Ness Stapf, colhidos no estádio de maturação das sementes e tratados com amônia anidra (3,0% MS ou uréia (5,4% MS. A análise dos dados demonstra que a amonização diminuiu os conteúdos de FDN e hemicelulose com a mesma eficiência. Os tratamentos químicos não alteraram os teores de FDA, celulose e lignina. Observou-se aumento nos teores de compostos nitrogenados, como N total e N insolúvel em detergente ácido (NIDA em resposta à amonização. A relação NIDA/NT diminuiu com a amonização, aumentando a quantidade de N disponível para a digestão. A DIVMS aumentou em resposta às alterações observadas na composição química da fração fibrosa e incremento no conteúdo de N prontamente digestível dos fenos tratados.The experiment was conducted to evaluate the changes on the chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD of the Brachiaria decumbens Stapf, Brachiaria brizantha (Hochst ex. A. Rich Stapf, jaragua (Hyparrhenia rufa Ness Stapf hays, harvested following the seed ripening stage and treated with anhydrous ammonia (3.0% DM or urea (5.4% DM. The data showed that anhydrous ammonia and urea decreased NDF and hemicellulose contents with the same efficiency. The treatments did not change ADF, cellulose, and lignin contents. It was observed an increase in the nitrogen as compounds, TN and ADIN due to the ammoniation. The ADIN/TN ratio was reduced due to the ammoniation. The IVDMD increased due to the changes observed in the chemical composition of the fiber, and the increase of the readily digestible nitrogen of the hays.

  19. Use of Aquaculture Ponds and Other Habitats by Autumn Migrating Shorebirds Along the Lower Mississippi River

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    Lehnen, Sarah E.; Krementz, David G.

    2013-08-01

    Populations of many shorebird species are declining; habitat loss and degradation are among the leading causes for these declines. Shorebirds use a variety of habitats along interior migratory routes including managed moist soil units, natural wetlands, sandbars, and agricultural lands such as harvested rice fields. Less well known is shorebird use of freshwater aquaculture facilities, such as commercial cat- and crayfish ponds. We compared shorebird habitat use at drained aquaculture ponds, moist soil units, agricultural areas, sandbars and other natural habitat, and a sewage treatment facility in the in the lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley (LMAV) during autumn 2009. Six species: Least Sandpiper ( Calidris minutilla), Killdeer ( Charadrius vociferous), Semipalmated Sandpiper ( Calidris pusilla), Pectoral Sandpiper ( C. melanotos), Black-necked Stilt ( Himantopus himantopus), and Lesser Yellowlegs ( Tringa flavipes), accounted for 92 % of the 31,165 individuals observed. Sewage settling lagoons (83.4, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 25.3-141.5 birds/ha), drained aquaculture ponds (33.5, 95 % CI 22.4-44.6 birds/ha), and managed moist soil units on public lands (15.7, CI 11.2-20.3 birds/ha) had the highest estimated densities of shorebirds. The estimated 1,100 ha of drained aquaculture ponds available during autumn 2009 provided over half of the estimated requirement of 2,000 ha by the LMAV Joint Venture working group. However, because of the decline in the aquaculture industry, autumn shorebird habitats in the LMAV may be limited in the near future. Recognition of the current aquaculture habitat trends will be important to the future management activities of federal and state agencies. Should these aquaculture habitat trends continue, there may be a need for wildlife biologists to investigate other habitats that can be managed to offset the current and expected loss of aquaculture acreages. This study illustrates the potential for freshwater aquaculture to

  20. Steroid Content of Some Species of Deep Sea Fish in Western Sumatra and Southern Java Ocean

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    Sugeng Heri Suseno

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, some researchers suspect steroid hormone content on Bathypteorois and Erimoensis species of Bajacalifornia atricolor. The purpose of this research is to know steroid content. This research used the 11 species of marine fish in the Western ocean obtained in Southern Sumatra and Java through research vessel Baruna Jaya IV, in September and October 2004. The species are Alepocephalus bicolor, Antigonia rubescens, Barbourisia rufa, Bajacalifornia eromoensis, Caelorinchus divergens, Polymixiasp, Rouleina guentheri, Setarches guentheri, Synagrops japonicus, Tydermania dalgleishi, Xenolepidichthys. From the results of proximate analysis, the nutrient content in some marine fish are 11.94-20.81% protein contents, 0.01-4.84% fat contents, 73.29-82.73% moisture contents and 1.07-2.49% ash content. On analysis of HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography the fat contents of steroid obtained are between 0026-0.016%. Deep sea fish species that assumed have steroids compounds are Bajacalifornia eriomoensis, Caelorinchus divergens, Tydermania navigatoris, Roulenia guentheri, Antigonia rubencens, Alepocephalus bicolor, Synagrops japonicus, Bajacalifornia erimoensis showed the best results on HPLC test so it continued with infrared test to show the similarity of steroid group.

  1. Nivní malakofauna Ploučnice (Severní Čechy The floodplain mollusc fauna of the Ploučnice River (North Bohemia

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    Lucie Juřičková

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a research of the floodplain mollusc communities of the Ploučnice River (Elbe tributary, North Bohemia, Czech Republic. Altogether, 66 mollusc species (65 species of gastropods, one species of bivalve were recorded in the 35 floodplain forest sites during the research between 2007 and 2011, representing 27% of the total Czech malacofauna. More than a half of all species represents the common forest species (52% of all recorded species with some rare woodland species as Aegopinella nitidula, Daudebardia rufa, Macrogastra ventricosa, Oxychilus depressus, O. glaber and two endangered species Clausilia bidentata and Daudebardia brevipes. Rare wetland species protected by the NATURA system Vertigo angustior and vulnerable V. antivertigo were also found. The occurrence of these rare species (two of them endangered, three vulnerable, and 11 near threatened makes the Ploučnice river alluvium as an important mollusc refugium of prime conservation importance in this fragmented Czech landscape of long-term agricultural land use.

  2. Astaxanthin and papilioerythrinone in the skin of birds: a chromatic convergence of two metabolic routes with different precursors?

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    García-de Blas, Esther; Mateo, Rafael; Guzmán Bernardo, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez Martín-Doimeadios, Rosa Carmen; Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Carotenoids are organic pigments involved in several important physiological functions and may serve as indicators of individual quality in animals. These pigments are only obtained by animals from the diet, but they can be later transformed into other carotenoids by specific enzymatic reactions. The diet of farm-reared and probably wild red-legged partridges ( Alectoris rufa) is mainly based on cereals that contain high levels of lutein and zeaxanthin. These two carotenoids are also predominant in internal tissues and blood of red-legged partridges. However, in their integuments, astaxanthin and papilioerythrinone (the last one identified in this work) are mainly present in their free form and esterified with fatty acids. According to available literature about carotenoid metabolism in animals, we propose that astaxanthin ( λ max = 478 nm) and papilioerythrinone ( λ max = 452-478 nm) are the result of a chromatic convergence of the transformation of dietary zeaxanthin and lutein, respectively. Moreover, the results obtained in this work provide the first identification by liquid chromatography coupled to accurate mass quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer system of papilioerythrinone ( m/z 581.3989 [M + H]+) in the skin (i.e., not feathers) of a vertebrate. Astaxanthin and papilioerythrinone are very close in terms of chemical structure and coloration, and the combination of these two keto-carotenoids is responsible for the red color of the ornaments in red-legged partridges.

  3. Evolutionary conservation of candidate osmoregulation genes in plant phloem sap-feeding insects.

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    Jing, X; White, T A; Luan, J; Jiao, C; Fei, Z; Douglas, A E

    2016-06-01

    The high osmotic pressure generated by sugars in plant phloem sap is reduced in phloem-feeding aphids by sugar transformations and facilitated water flux in the gut. The genes mediating these osmoregulatory functions have been identified and validated empirically in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum: sucrase 1 (SUC1), a sucrase in glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13), and aquaporin 1 (AQP1), a member of the Drosophila integral protein (DRIP) family of aquaporins. Here, we describe molecular analysis of GH13 and AQP genes in phloem-feeding representatives of the four phloem-feeding groups: aphids (Myzus persicae), coccids (Planococcus citri), psyllids (Diaphorina citri, Bactericera cockerelli) and whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 and MED). A single candidate GH13-SUC gene and DRIP-AQP gene were identified in the genome/transcriptome of most insects tested by the criteria of sequence motif and gene expression in the gut. Exceptionally, the psyllid Ba. cockerelli transcriptome included a gut-expressed Pyrocoelia rufa integral protein (PRIP)-AQP, but has no DRIP-AQP transcripts, suggesting that PRIP-AQP is recruited for osmoregulatory function in this insect. This study indicates that phylogenetically related SUC and AQP genes may generally mediate osmoregulatory functions in these diverse phloem-feeding insects, and provides candidate genes for empirical validation and development as targets for osmotic disruption of pest species. PMID:26896054

  4. Differential scaling within an insect compound eye.

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    Perl, Craig D; Niven, Jeremy E

    2016-03-01

    Environmental and genetic influences cause individuals of a species to differ in size. As they do so, organ size and shape are scaled to available resources whilst maintaining function. The scaling of entire organs has been investigated extensively but scaling within organs remains poorly understood. By making use of the structure of the insect compound eye, we show that different regions of an organ can respond differentially to changes in body size. Wood ant (Formica rufa) compound eyes contain facets of different diameters in different regions. When the animal body size changes, lens diameters from different regions can increase or decrease in size either at the same rate (a 'grade' shift) or at different rates (a 'slope' shift). These options are not mutually exclusive, and we demonstrate that both types of scaling apply to different regions of the same eye. This demonstrates that different regions within a single organ can use different rules to govern their scaling, responding differently to their developmental environment. Thus, the control of scaling is more nuanced than previously appreciated, diverse responses occurring even among homologous cells within a single organ. Such fine control provides a rich substrate for the diversification of organ morphology. PMID:26979561

  5. HIPOFOSFOROSE EM BOVINOS NO MUNICÍPIO DE CONTAGEM – MINAS GERAIS HYPOPHOSPHOROSIS IN BOVINES IN THE CONTAGEM MUNICIPALITY - MINAS GERAIS, BRAZIL

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    Edalmo Souza Couto

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Foram estudados casos de hipofosforose em bovino do município de Contagem, Estado de Minas Gerais, explorados na produção de leite. Realizou-se as dosagens de cálcio e fósforo séricos em seis animais doentes, antes e 21 dias após iniciado o tratamento com Phos-20 e farinha de osso à vontade no cocho. Foram feitas as determinações de cálcio e fósforo no solo e no capim jaraguá (Hyparrhenia rufa dos pastos nas duas fazendas. Fez-se no lote 1 o tratamento parenteral com Phos-20, na dose diária de 10 ml por 100 quilos de peso animal durante 10 dias e farinha de osso à vontade, no cocho com sal comum ao lado. Ao segundo lote, durante 10 dias, administrou-se 1 mg de sulfato de cobalto, "per os" em 20 ml de água, diariamente por animal e sal comum à vontade; posteriormente, em face do resultado negativo para o cobalto, continuou-se com o tratamento do primeiro lote, apresentando melhora muito acentuada no quadro clínico; o terceiro lote, sem tratamento por igual período. Posteriormente, o tratamento com farinha de osso, sal comum e Phos-20 restabelecendo parcialmente no espaço de algum tempo, persistindo, como seqüela, a esterilidade. Nos bovinos do primeiro lote, após a primeira semana de tratamento com Phos-20 e farinha de osso, verificou-se a remissão dos sintomas. Em todos animais tratados com fontes de fósforos, a fosfatemia se restabeleceu a níveis normais, quando se generalizou o uso da farinha de osso e sal comum à vontade na alimentação. Verificou-se estreita correlação entre os níveis séricos de fósforo animal com teor deste elemento no solo e no capim jaraguá (Hyparrhenia rufa, caracterizado por um limite crítico de deficiência. O diagnóstico de hipofosforose baseou-se na análise dos dados clínicos: anamnese, sintomas, níveis séricos de fósforo dos bovinos, exame histopatológico do tecido ósseo e teores de fósforo na forrageira e no

  6. Predator-prey relationships in a Mediterranean vertebrate system: Bonelli's eagles, rabbits and partridges.

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    Moleón, Marcos; Sánchez-Zapata, José A; Gil-Sánchez, José M; Ballesteros-Duperón, Elena; Barea-Azcón, José M; Virgós, Emilio

    2012-03-01

    How predators impact on prey population dynamics is still an unsolved issue for most wild predator-prey communities. When considering vertebrates, important concerns constrain a comprehensive understanding of the functioning of predator-prey relationships worldwide; e.g. studies simultaneously quantifying 'functional' and 'numerical responses' (i.e., the 'total response') are rare. The functional, the numerical, and the resulting total response (i.e., how the predator per capita intake, the population of predators and the total of prey eaten by the total predators vary with prey densities) are fundamental as they reveal the predator's ability to regulate prey population dynamics. Here, we used a multi-spatio-temporal scale approach to simultaneously explore the functional and numerical responses of a territorial predator (Bonelli's eagle Hieraaetus fasciatus) to its two main prey species (the rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus and the red-legged partridge Alectoris rufa) during the breeding period in a Mediterranean system of south Spain. Bonelli's eagle responded functionally, but not numerically, to rabbit/partridge density changes. Type II, non-regulatory, functional responses (typical of specialist predators) offered the best fitting models for both prey. In the absence of a numerical response, Bonelli's eagle role as a regulating factor of rabbit and partridge populations seems to be weak in our study area. Simple (prey density-dependent) functional response models may well describe the short-term variation in a territorial predator's consumption rate in complex ecosystems. PMID:21947548

  7. Check list of first recorded dragonfly (Odonata: Anisoptera fauna of District Lower Dir, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

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    Farzana Perveen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The dragonflies (Odonata: Anisoptera are large, intermediate to small size, having different colours and variable morphological characters. They also carry ornamental and environmental indicator values. The first recorded, the collection of 318 dragonflies was made during May-July 2011 from district Lower Dir, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. Among them 11 species of dragonflies were identified belonging to 3 families. The golden-ringed, Cordulegaster brevistigma brevistigma Selys is belonging to family Cordulegasteridae and Clubtails, Onychogomphus bistrigatus Selys is belonging to family Gomophidaed. The spine-legged redbolt, Rhodothemis rufa (Rambur; black-tailed skimmer, Orthetrum cancellatum Linnaeus; blue or black-percher, Diplacodes lefebvrei (Ramber; ground-skimmer, Diplacodes trivialis Rambur; common red-skimmer, Orthetrum pruinosum neglectum (Rambur; triangle-skimmer, Orthetrum triangulare triangulare (Selys; common-skimmer, Sympetrum decoloratum Selys; slender-skimmer, Orthetrum Sabina (Drury and wandering-glider or global-skimmer, Pantala flavescens (Fabricius are belonging to family Libellulidae. It is concluded that there is a diversity to explain dragonfly fauna from district Lower Dir.

  8. Natural Bagaza virus infection in game birds in southern Spain

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    Gamino Virginia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In late summer 2010 a mosquito born flavivirus not previously reported in Europe called Bagaza virus (BAGV caused high mortality in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa and ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus. We studied clinical findings, lesions and viral antigen distribution in naturally BAGV infected game birds in order to understand the apparently higher impact on red-legged partridges. The disease induced neurologic signs in the two galliform species and, to a lesser extent, in common wood pigeons (Columba palumbus. In red-legged partridges infection by BAGV caused severe haemosiderosis in the liver and spleen that was absent in pheasants and less evident in common wood pigeons. Also, BAGV antigen was present in vascular endothelium in multiple organs in red-legged partridges, and in the spleen in common wood pigeons, while in ring-necked pheasants it was only detected in neurons and glial cells in the brain. These findings indicate tropism of BAGV for endothelial cells and a severe haemolytic process in red-legged partridges in addition to the central nervous lesions that were found in all three species.

  9. Measuring oxidative stress: the confounding effect of lipid concentration in measures of lipid peroxidation.

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    Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Romero-Haro, Ana A; Sternalski, Audrey; Muriel, Jaime; Mougeot, Francois; Gil, Diego; Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation products are widely used as markers of oxidative damage in the organism. To properly interpret the information provided by these markers, it is necessary to know potential sources of bias and control confounding factors. Here, we investigated the relationship between two indicators of lipid mobilization (circulating levels of triglycerides and cholesterol) and two common markers of oxidative damage (plasma levels of malondialdehyde and hydroperoxides; the latter estimated from the d-ROMs assay kit). The following five avian species were studied: red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa), zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), spotless starling (Sturnus unicolor), marsh harrier (Circus aeroginosus), and Montagu's harrier (Circus pygargus). In all cases, plasma triglyceride levels positively and significantly correlated with lipid peroxidation markers, explaining between 8% and 34% of their variability. Plasma cholesterol, in contrast, showed a significant positive relationship only among spotless starling nestlings and a marginally significant association in zebra finches. These results indicate that lipid peroxidation marker levels covary with circulating lipid levels. We discuss the potential causes and implications of this covariation and recommend that future studies that measure oxidative damage using lipid peroxidation markers report both raw and relative levels (i.e., corrected for circulating triglycerides). Whether the observed pattern also holds for other tissues and in other taxa would deserve further research. PMID:25860832

  10. Garra mondica, a new species from the Mond River drainage with remarks on the genus Garra from the Persian Gulf basin in Iran (Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyadzadeh, Golnaz; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Freyhof, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Garra mondica, new species, from the Mond River drainage in Iran is distinguished from its congeners by having 7½ branched dorsal-fin rays; the breast, belly and back in front of the dorsal-fin origin naked and 9+8 branched caudal-fin rays. Garra mondica is also distinguished from all other congeners in the Persian Gulf basin, except an unidentified species from the Kol River, by having two fixed, diagnostic nucleotide substitutions in the mtDNA COI barcode region. The identity of G. gymnothorax, a nominal species from the Karun River drainage, and G. crenulata, a nominal species from Central Iran, are discussed. Garra populations examined from the Karun have a unique mtDNA COI barcode sequence, but their diagnostic characters are not consistent with the description and syntypes of G. gymnothorax. G. crenulata is considered as a synonym of G. rufa. Two populations of Garra from the Kol River have a sequence of the COI barcode region very similar to G. mondica, but cannot be identified as G. mondica and their identity cannot be resolved here. PMID:26624737

  11. The genus Macroteleia Westwood (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae s. l., Scelioninae from China

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    Chen Huayan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The genus Macroteleia Westwood (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae s. l., Scelioninae from China is revised. Seventeen species are recognized based on 502 specimens, all of which are new records for China. Seven new species are described: M. carinigena sp. n. (China, M. flava sp. n. (China, M. gracilis sp. n. (China, M. salebrosa sp. n. (China, M. semicircula sp. n. (China, M. spinitibia sp. n. (China and M. striatipleuron sp. n. (China. Ten species are redescribed: M. boriviliensis Saraswat (China, India, Thailand, M. crawfordi Kiefer, stat. n. (China, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, M. dolichopa Sharma (China, India, Vietnam, M. emarginata Dodd (China, Malaysia, M. indica Saraswat & Sharma (China, India, Vietnam, M. lamba Saraswat & Sharma (China, India, Thailand, Vietnam, M. livingstoni Saraswat (China, India, M. peliades Kozlov & Lê (China, Vietnam, M. rufa Szelényi (China, Egypt, Georgia, Russia, Thailand, Ukraine and M. striativentris Crawford (China, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam. The following five new synonyms are proposed: M. crates Kozlov & Lê syn. n. and M. demades Kozlov & Lê syn. n. of M. crawfordi Kieffer; M. cebes Kozlov & Lê syn. n. and M. dones Kozlov & Lê syn. n. of M. indica Saraswat & Sharma; M. dores Kozlov & Lê syn. n. of M. lamba Saraswat & Sharma. A key to the Chinese species of the genus is provided.

  12. Malakofauna v nivě Jizery (Severní Čechy The mollusc fauna of the Jizera River floodplain (North Bohemia

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    Vojen Ložek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a research of floodplain mollusc communities of the Jizera River (the Elbe tributary, North Bohemia, Czech Republic. Altogether, 101 mollusc species (100 species of gastropods, one species of bivalve were recorded at 55 selected sites during previous and recent researches in 1945–1997 and 2002–2009, representing 40% of the total Czech malacofauna. The upper well-preserved stretch of the river hosts a rich forest mollusc fauna with some rare woodland species e.g. Arion intermedius, Cochlodina dubiosa corcontica, Daudebardia brevipes, D. rufa, Vertigo alpestris and Vitrea subrimata. Impoverish assemblages of the lower stretch are represented by some common or open/semi-open country species, because the river flows there through the landscape of an intensive agricultural land use and high settlement density. Despite, the occurrence of 31 rare species (four of them endangered, eight vulnerable, and 19 near threatened was recorded at the upper stretch of the Jizera River alluvium, which provides an important refuge for these mollusc faunas.

  13. Colony-Level Differences in the Scaling Rules Governing Wood Ant Compound Eye Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, Craig D; Niven, Jeremy E

    2016-01-01

    Differential organ growth during development is essential for adults to maintain the correct proportions and achieve their characteristic shape. Organs scale with body size, a process known as allometry that has been studied extensively in a range of organisms. Such scaling rules, typically studied from a limited sample, are assumed to apply to all members of a population and/or species. Here we study scaling in the compound eyes of workers of the wood ant, Formica rufa, from different colonies within a single population. Workers' eye area increased with body size in all the colonies showing a negative allometry. However, both the slope and intercept of some allometric scaling relationships differed significantly among colonies. Moreover, though mean facet diameter and facet number increased with body size, some colonies primarily increased facet number whereas others increased facet diameter, showing that the cellular level processes underlying organ scaling differed among colonies. Thus, the rules that govern scaling at the organ and cellular levels can differ even within a single population. PMID:27068571

  14. Sublethal Pb exposure produces season-dependent effects on immune response, oxidative balance and investment in carotenoid-based coloration in red-legged partridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallverdú-Coll, Núria; Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E; Mougeot, François; Vidal, Dolors; Mateo, Rafael

    2015-03-17

    Ingestion of lead (Pb) shot pellets constitutes the main cause of Pb poisoning in avifauna. We studied the effects of sublethal Pb exposure on immunity, carotenoid-based coloration, oxidative stress and trade-offs among these types of responses during spring and autumn in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa). We evaluated constitutive immunity testing lysozyme and natural antibody levels, and blood bactericidal and phagocytic activities. We studied induced immunity by testing PHA and humoral responses. We analyzed fecal parasite and bacterial abundance and oxidative stress biomarkers. Pb exposure in spring reduced natural antibody levels, whereas in autumn, it reduced lysozyme levels and increased phagocytic activity. Pb exposure increased PHA response in both seasons, and decreased T-independent humoral response in autumn. Pb exposure also increased noncoliform and decreased coliform Gram-negative gut bacteria. In spring, Pb exposure decreased antioxidant levels and increased coloration in males, whereas in autumn, it increased retinol levels but reduced coloration in both genders. Our results suggest that in spring, Pb-exposed females used antioxidants to cope with oxidative stress at the expense of coloration, whereas Pb-exposed males increased coloration, which may reflect an increased breeding investment. In autumn, both genders prioritized oxidative balance maintenance at the expense of coloration. PMID:25674808

  15. Adverse effects of thiram-treated seed ingestion on the reproductive performance and the offspring immune function of the red-legged partridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Antia, Ana; Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E; García-de Blas, Esther; Camarero, Pablo R; Mougeot, Francois; Mateo, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    Pesticide research traditionally has focused on compounds with high acute toxicity or persistence, but the adverse sublethal effects of pesticides with different properties also may have important consequences on exposed wildlife. The authors studied the effects of thiram, a fungicide used for seed coating with known effects as endocrine disruptor. Red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa; n = 15 pairs per treatment group) were fed wheat treated with 0%, 20%, or 100% of the thiram application rate used in autumn (25 d) and late winter (10 d) to mimic cereal sowing periods. The authors studied the effects on reproductive performance, carotenoid-based ornamentation and cellular immune responsiveness of adult partridges, and their relationship with changes in oxidative stress biomarkers and plasma biochemistry. The authors also studied the effect of parental exposure on egg antioxidant content and on the survival, growth, and cellular immune response of offspring. Exposure to thiram-coated seeds delayed egg laying, reduced clutch size, and affected egg size and eggshell thickness. Partridges exposed to the 20% thiram dose exhibited reduced egg fertility and brood size (55% and 28% of controls, respectively). Chick survival was unaffected by parental exposure to treated seeds, but adverse effects on their growth rate and cellular immune response were apparent. These effects on reproduction and immune function may have important demographic consequences on farmland bird populations. PMID:25663614

  16. Biologically Inspired Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Jun; Lee, Jaeho; Yang, Sung-Pyo; Kim, Ha Gon; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Yoo, Seunghyup; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-05-11

    Many animal species employ highly conspicuous traits as courtship signals for successful mating. Fireflies utilize their bioluminescent light as visual courtship signals. In addition to efficient bioluminescent light emission, the structural components of the firefly lantern also contribute to the enhancement of conspicuous optical signaling. Recently, these firefly lantern ultrastructures have attracted much interest and inspired highly efficient light management approaches. Here we report on the unique optical function of the hierarchical ultrastructures found in a firefly (Pyrocoelia rufa) and their biological inspiration of highly efficient organic light-emitting diode (OLED) applications. The hierarchical structures are comprised of longitudinal nanostructures and asymmetric microstructures, which were successfully replicated using geometry-guided resist reflow, replica molding, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oxidation. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the bioinspired OLEDs was enhanced by up to 61%. The bioinspired OLEDs clearly showed side-enhanced super-Lambertian emission with a wide-viewing angle. The highly efficient light extraction and wide-angle illumination suggest how the hierarchical structures likely improve the recognition of firefly optical courtship signals over a wide-angle range. At the same time, the biologically inspired designs provide a new paradigm for designing functional optical surfaces for lighting or display applications. PMID:27014918

  17. "A Faunistic Survey on the Bird Helminth Parasites and Their Medically Importance"

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    A Farahnak

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Khuzestan province in the south west of Iran having several seasonal and permanent lagoons which are shelter for domestic and migratory birds including, fish-eating birds. This research study was carried out to find the intestinal helminth parasites of birds in this ecosystem and evaluation of their medically importance with emphasis on heterophyid trematodes. For these reasons, the total of 37 birds including; Himantopus himantopus, Fulica atra, Egretta grazetta, Bubulcus ibis, Ceryle rudis, Vanellus indicus, Vanellus vanellus, Charadrius sp. Calidris sp. and Saher (Local name were hunted and transported to Ahwaz Health Research Center as alive or freshly dead after having been shot. Helminthes collected as alive or dead and fixed in ethanol or formaldehyde. Parasites were identified using morphometric measurements and morphological descriptions. 24 species of intestinal helminth parasites were found as follow: trematodes (Haplorchis taichui, Haplorchis pumilio, Stellantchasmus falcatus, Centrocestus formosanus. Psiloterma marki, Echinostoma revolutum, Parechinostomum cinctum, Echinochasmus coaxatus, Paramonostomum alveatum, Uvitellina pseudocotylea, Cyclocoelum mutabile, Apharyngostrigea cornu, Cardiocephallus brandesi, Cotylurus cornutus, Pseudostrigea buteonis and nematodes (Amidostomum fuligulae, Cosmocephalus diesingii, Microtetrameres accipiter, Strongyloides minimus and cestodes (Gyrocoelia perversa, Infula burhini, Dirorchis tringae, Echinocotyle nitida, Spiniglans microsoma. These results have suggested that, the birds are reservoir for helminth parasitic diseases such as heterophyiasis for man and animals in the areas. These helminthes are reported for the first time in the region.

  18. Distribution of Cd and Pb in a wetland ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何文珊; 陆健健

    2001-01-01

    Cadmium and lead contents in sediments, dominant species of plants (Phargmites aus-tralis and Scripus mariquter), benthos (Helice tridens tientsinensis, llyoplax deschampsi, and Bul-lacta exarata), and waders (Calidris ruficollis) on the Eastern End of Chongming Island were measured. The results showed that, for cadmium, there are clear stratification in the sediment of reclaimed area and bio-amplification in food chain. However, for lead, a phenomenon was different. The amplification factors (AFs) for cadmium of primary producers, primary consumers, and secondary consumers were 2.59-12.38, 0.09-8.44, and 51.1, respectively. For lead, AFs of primary producers, primary consumers and the top trophic layer were 0.29-2.62, 0.06-5.62, and 7.31, respectively. Each species of macrobenthos showed different strategies to cadmium and lead. Large-sized crabs accumulated more lead, while small-sized crabs and snails accumulated more cadmium. Waders had significantly highest AFs for cadmium and lead in the study. Tha

  19. Latitudinal clines in bill length and sex ratio in a migratory shorebird: a case of resource partitioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Silke

    2005-07-01

    Sexual segregation outside the mating season is common in vertebrates. This has been shown to arise through resource partitioning in a number of taxa, but never in avian migrants. Western sandpipers ( Calidris mauri) are migratory shorebirds that mainly breed in Alaska and overwinter along the coast in western and eastern North America down into South America. Females are slightly larger than males but have substantially longer bills. They migrate further south, resulting in a latitudinal bias in sex ratio. Resource partitioning could contribute to this pattern if (1) males and females forage on invertebrates buried at different sediment depths, and if (2) average prey burying depth changes with latitude. In accordance with the hypothesis, it was shown that female western sandpipers used a probing foraging mode more than males. Comparison of individuals overwintering in California, Mexico and Panama revealed that length of tarsus did not change among sites, while bill length increased in both males and females towards the south. Bill length residuals, corrected for length of tarsus, were also larger at a southern site. Between and within sexes, individuals with longer bills are thought to be favoured at southern latitudes because of a postulated general increase in invertebrate burying depth with higher ambient temperatures at lower latitudes. The implications of these findings for the evolution of sexual bill size dimorphism in shorebirds are discussed.

  20. A puzzling migratory detour : Are fueling conditions in Alaska driving the movement of juvenile sharp -tailed sandpipers ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, A.; Gill, R.E., Jr.; Jamieson, S.E.; McCaffery, B.; Wennerberg, L.; Wikelski, M.; Klaassen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Making a detour can be advantageous to a migrating bird if fuel-deposition rates at stopover sites along the detour are considerably higher than at stopover sites along a more direct route. One example of an extensive migratory detour is that of the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata), of which large numbers of juveniles are found during fall migration in western Alaska. These birds take a detour of 1500-3400 km from the most direct route between their natal range in northeastern Siberia and nonbreeding areas in Australia. We studied the autumnal fueling rates and fuel loads of 357 Sharp-tailed Sandpipers captured in western Alaska. In early September the birds increased in mass at a rate of only 0.5% of lean body mass day?1. Later in September, the rate of mass increase was about 6% of lean body mass day?1, among the highest values found among similar-sized shorebirds around the world. Some individuals more than doubled their body mass because of fuel deposition, allowing nonstop flight of between 7100 and 9800 km, presumably including a trans-oceanic flight to the southern hemisphere. Our observations indicated that predator attacks were rare in our study area, adding another potential benefit of the detour. We conclude that the most likely reason for the Alaskan detour is that it allows juvenile Sharp-tailed Sandpipers to put on large fuel stores at exceptionally high rates. Copyright ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  1. Polymorphic microsatellite loci identified through development and cross-species amplification within shorebirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, I.; Guzzetti, B.M.; Gust, J.R.; Sage, G.K.; Gill, R.E.; Tibbitts, T.L.; Sonsthagen, S.A.; Talbot, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed microsatellite loci for demographic assessments of shorebirds, a group with limited markers. First, we isolated five dinucleotide repeat microsatellite loci from the Black Oystercatcher (Haematopodidae: Haematopus bachmani), and three from the Bristle-thighed Curlew (Scolopacidae: Numenius tahitiensis); both species are of conservation concern. All eight loci were polymorphic in their respective target species. Hbaμ loci were characterized by two to three alleles with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.07 to 0.33, and two to nine alleles were detected for Nut loci with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.08 to 0.72. No linkage disequilibrium or departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium were observed. The eight loci were also tested for cross-species amplification in 12 other species within Charadriidae and Scolopacidae, and the results demonstrated transferability across several genera. We further tested all 14 species at 12 additional microsatellite markers developed for other shorebirds: Dunlin (Calidris alpina; four loci) and Ruff (Philomachus pugnax; eight loci). Two markers (Hbaμ4 and Ruff6) were polymorphic in 13 species, while two (Calp6 and Ruff9) were monomorphic. The remaining eight markers revealed polymorphism in one to nine species each. Our results provide further evidence that locus Ruff10 is sex-linked, contrary to the initial description. These markers can be used to enhance our understanding of shorebird biology by, for example, helping to determine migratory connectivity among breeding and wintering populations and detecting relatedness among individuals.

  2. Small population size of Pribilof Rock Sandpipers confirmed through distance-sampling surveys in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthrauff, Daniel R.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Gill, Robert E., Jr.; Dementyev, Maksim N.; Handel, Colleen M.

    2012-01-01

    The Rock Sandpiper (Calidris ptilocnemis) is endemic to the Bering Sea region and unique among shorebirds in the North Pacific for wintering at high latitudes. The nominate subspecies, the Pribilof Rock Sandpiper (C. p. ptilocnemis), breeds on four isolated islands in the Bering Sea and appears to spend the winter primarily in Cook Inlet, Alaska. We used a stratified systematic sampling design and line-transect method to survey the entire breeding range of this population during springs 2001-2003. Densities were up to four times higher on the uninhabited and more northerly St. Matthew and Hall islands than on St. Paul and St. George islands, which both have small human settlements and introduced reindeer herds. Differences in density, however, appeared to be more related to differences in vegetation than to anthropogenic factors, raising some concern for prospective effects of climate change. We estimated the total population at 19 832 birds (95% CI 17 853–21 930), ranking it among the smallest of North American shorebird populations. To determine the vulnerability of C. p. ptilocnemis to anthropogenic and stochastic environmental threats, future studies should focus on determining the amount of gene flow among island subpopulations, the full extent of the subspecies' winter range, and the current trajectory of this small population.

  3. Landscape context mediates influence of local food abundance on wetland use by wintering shorebirds in an agricultural valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Oriane W.; Haig, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    While it is widely understood that local abundance of benthic invertebrates can greatly influence the distribution and abundance of wetland birds, no studies have examined if wetland landscape context can mediate this relationship. We studied the influence of wetland food abundance and landscape context on use of agricultural wetlands by wintering dunlin (Calidris alpina) and killdeer (Charadrius vociferus) in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, USA, over two winters (1999a??2000, 2000a??2001) of differing rainfall and subsequent habitat distribution. We monitored bird use (frequency of occurrence and abundance) at a sample of wetlands differing in local food abundance (density and biomass) and landscape context [adjacent shorebird habitat (defined as ha of wet habitat with less than 50% vegetative cover and within a 2-km radius) and nearest neighbor distance]. We evaluated predictive models for bird use using linear regression and the Cp criterion to select the most parsimonious model. During the dry winter (2000a??2001), dunlin exhibited greater use of sites with higher invertebrate density and biomass but also with more adjacent shorebird habitat and closest to a wetland neighbor. However, neither landscape context nor food abundance were important predictors of dunlin use during the wet winter (1999a??2000). Use of sites by killdeer was unrelated to either local food abundance or landscape context measures during both winters. Our findings contribute to a growing recognition of the importance of landscape structure to wetland birds and highlight a number of implications for the spatial planning and enhancement of wetlands using a landscape approach.

  4. Behavior and reproductive success of rock sandpipers breeding on the Yukon-Kuskokwim river delta, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M.; Conklin, J.R.; Johnson, B.L.; McCaffery, B.J.; Haig, S.M.; Walters, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    We studied Rock Sandpiper (Calidris ptilocnemis) breeding behavior and monitored reproductive success from 1998 to 2005 on the Yukon-Kuskokwim River Delta, Alaska, USA. We banded 24 adults and monitored 45 nests. Annual return rate of adults ranged between 67 and 100%. Six pairs of Rock Sandpipers bred at our study site for ???2 years, and among these we did not observe mate change (i.e., when both members of a pair returned and each mated with a new individual). Nests were typically initiated by mid-May and 53% of females laid second clutches if first clutches were lost through mid-June. Males regularly incubated clutches during the morning (0800-1259 hrs AKDT) and afternoon (1300-1759 hrs) and rarely during the evening (1800-2300 hrs), whereas female incubation was relatively consistent throughout the day. Apparent nest success (percent of known nests successfully hatching > 1 chick) among first and second nests was 19 and 44%, respectively (n = 45). A minimum of 44% of hatching nests fledged at least one young. Males cared for young but half of females deserted mate and brood 1-7 days post-hatch. This first description of North American Rock Sandpiper breeding behavior from a color-marked population complements previous work on this species on the Chukotsky Peninsula, Russia.

  5. Allozymic variation in the clam genus Eurhomalea (Bivalvia: Veneriidae along southern South American coast Variación alozímica en el género de almejas Eurhomalea (Bivalvia: Veneriidae a lo largo de la costa sur de Sudamérica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H GALLARDO

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The correspondence between allozymic variation and specific differentiation was studied in four populations corresponding to the three nominal, allopatric species of clam genus Eurhomalea (E. rufa, E. lenticularis, E. exalbida described for southern South America. Allozyme variation scored in 12 loci was high as indicated by heterozygosity levels (15.8-20.7 % and by the presence of only three monomorphic loci (Hk-2, Icd-2, and Xdh-1. These high estimates of allelic variability were influenced by the low levels of interspecific genetic similarity (I = 0.64 and for the high conspecific values of genetic identity observed. The high estimates of substructuring found at the species level (F ST = 0.39 contrasted with the low differentiation (F ST = 0.027 and high migration rate (Nm = 9 existing among conspecific samples. Diagnostic allele fixation coinciding with specific recognition was recorded at locus Hk-1 whereas nearly-fixed differences at loci (Adh, alpha-Gpd, Icd-1, Ldh, Odh, Pgm-3 differed sharply in frequency among species. The Wagner procedure and the neighbor-joining algorithm produced a similar tree topology highly related to the geographic distance and to their taxonomic recognition. The lack of coincidence between patterns of allozymic variation and the two distinctive shell morphs (flat and globoid occurring in E. exalbida from Ushuaia bay do not support their taxonomic recognition.Se estudió la correspondencia entre la variación bioquímica y la diferenciación específica en cuatro poblaciones correspondientes a las tres especies nominales y alopátricas en las almejas del género Eurhomalea (E. rufa, E. lenticularis, E. exalbida descritas para la zona sur de Sudamérica. La variación alozímica registrada en 12 loci fue alta como lo indican los altos niveles de heterocigosidad (15,8-20,7 % y por la presencia de solo tres loci monomórficos (Hk-2, Icd-2 y Xdh-1. Esta alta estimación de variabilidad alélica influyó en los bajos

  6. First Results of 3 Year Monitoring of Red Wood Ants' Behavioural Changes and Their Possible Correlation with Earthquake Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberich, Gabriele; Berberich, Martin; Grumpe, Arne; Wöhler, Christian; Schreiber, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Short-term earthquake predictions with an advance warning of several hours or days can currently not be performed reliably and remain limited to only a few minutes before the event. Abnormal animal behaviours prior to earthquakes have been reported previously but their detection creates problems in monitoring and reliability. A different situation is encountered for red wood ants (RWA; Formica rufa-group (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). They have stationary nest sites on tectonically active, gas-bearing fault systems. These faults may be potential earthquake areas and are simultaneously information channels deeply reaching into the crust. A particular advantage of monitoring RWA is their high sensitivity to environmental changes. Besides an evolutionarily developed extremely strong temperature sensitivity of 0.25 K, they have chemoreceptors for the detection of CO2 concentrations and a sensitivity for electromagnetic fields. Changes of the electromagnetic field are discussed or short-lived "thermal anomalies" are reported as trigger mechanisms for bioanomalies of impending earthquakes. For 3 years, we have monitored two Red Wood Ant mounds (Formica rufa-group), located at the seismically active Neuwied Basin (Eifel, Germany), 24/7 by high-resolution cameras equipped with a colour and infrared sensor. In the Neuwied Basin, an average of about 100 earthquakes per year with magnitudes up to M 3.9 occur located on different tectonic fault regimes (strike-slip faults and/or normal or thrust faults). The RWA mounds are located on two different fault regimes approximately 30 km apart. First results show that the ants have a well-identifiable standard daily routine. Correlation with local seismic events suggests changes in the ants' behaviour hours before the earthquake event: The nocturnal rest phase and daily activity are suppressed, and standard daily routine is continued not before the next day. Additional parameters that might have an effect on the ants' daily routine

  7. Análise comparativa de fragmentos identificáveis de forrageiras, pela técnica micro-histológica Comparative analysis of identifiable fragments of forages, by the microhistological technique

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    Maristela de Oliveira Bauer

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, com este trabalho, verificar, pela técnica micro-histológica, diferenças entre espécies forrageiras quanto ao percentual de fragmentos identificáveis, em função do processo digestivo e da época do ano. Lâminas foliares frescas recém-expandidas, correspondentes à última e à penúltima posição no perfilho, das espécies Melinis minutiflora Pal. de Beauv (capim-gordura, Hyparrhenia rufa (Nees Stapf. (capim-jaraguá, Brachiaria decumbens Stapf. (capim-braquiária, Imperata brasiliensis Trin. (capim-sapé, de Medicago sativa L. (alfafa e de Schinus terebenthifolius Raddi (aroeira, amostradas nos períodos chuvoso e seco, foram digeridas in vitro e preparadas de acordo com a técnica micro-histológica. Observou-se que as espécies apresentaram diferenças marcantes na porcentagem de fragmentos identificáveis e que a digestão alterou estas porcentagens em torno de 10 %; que o período de amos­tragem não influenciou a porcentagem de fragmentos identificáveis para a maioria das espécies; que a presença de pigmentos e a adesão da epiderme às células dos tecidos internos da folha prejudicaram a identificação dos fragmentos; e que a digestão melhorou a visualização dos fragmentos dos capins sapé e jaraguá e da aroeira, mas prejudicou a do capim-braquiária e, principalmente, a da alfafa.The objetive of this study was to verify differences among forages species in relation to the percentage of identifiable fragment as affected by the digestion process and season. Fresh last expanded leaf lamina samples of the species Melinis minutiflora Pal. de Beauv (Molassesgrass, Hyparrhenia rufa (Nees Stapf. (Jaraguagrass, Brachiaria decumbens Stapf. (Signalgrass, Imperata brasilienses Trin. (Sapegrass, and foliar laminas of Medicago sativa L. (Alfalfa and Schinus terebenthifolius Raddi (Aroeira, sampled in the rainy and dry seasons, were digested in vitro and prepared according to the microhistological technique. The

  8. Desempenho de seis gramíneas solteiras ou consorciadas com o Stylosanthes guianensis cv. Mineirão e eucalipto em sistema silvipastoril Performance of six tropical grasses alone or associated with Stylosanthes guianensis cv. Mineirão and eucalypt in silvopastoral system

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    Carlos Mauricio Soares de Andrade

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Conduziu-se este estudo na região dos Cerrados de Minas Gerais, visando avaliar o desempenho de seis gramíneas forrageiras (Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu, B. brizantha cv. MG-4, B. decumbens cv. Basilisk, Panicum maximum cv. Mombaça, Melinis minutiflora e Hyparrhenia rufa, consorciadas ou não com a leguminosa Stylosanthes guianensis cv. Mineirão e Eucalyptus sp., em um sistema silvipastoril. As forrageiras foram estabelecidas em parcelas medindo 12 x 10 m, nas entrelinhas do eucalipto, em um delineamento experimental de blocos ao acaso, com três repetições, e avaliadas quanto ao grau de cobertura do solo, % de leguminosa e disponibilidade de matéria seca total no sub-bosque, um ano após o estabelecimento, submetidas a pastejos de curta duração. Após dois ciclos de pastejo, houve redução da proporção da leguminosa no consórcio com todas as gramíneas, sendo mais evidente com as mais agressivas (B. brizantha cv. Marandu e B. decumbens, onde ela quase desapareceu. Entretanto, a presença do estilosantes Mineirão favoreceu a produtividade do sub-bosque, quando consorciado com as demais gramíneas. O melhor desempenho produtivo foi obtido pelas gramíneas B. brizantha cv. Marandu, B. decumbens e P. maximum cv. Mombaça; a última principalmente quando consorciada com o estilosantes Mineirão.A study was conducted in the Brazilian Cerrados to evaluate the performance of six tropical forage grasses (Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu, B. brizantha cv. MG-4, B. decumbens cv. Basilisk, Panicum maximum cv. Mombaça, Melinis minutiflora and Hyparrhenia rufa, associated or not with the tropical forage legume Stylosanthes guianensis cv. Mineirão, in a silvopastoral system with a clone of Eucalyptus sp. The forages were established in plots of 12 x 10 m, in the interrows of eucalypts, in a randomized block design with three replications. Ground cover, proportion of the legume and total dry matter availability in the understorey were

  9. Additions to the flora of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain

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    Verloove, F.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Additions to the flora of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain.- Recent fieldwork in Tenerife, especially in September 2010, yielded several interesting new records of non-native vascular plants. Bothriochloa ischaemum var. songarica, “Asian” Cardamine flexuosa, Cestrum parqui, Digitaria violascens, Ficus lyrata, Ficus rubiginosa, Hoffmannseggia glauca, Hyparrhenia rufa subsp. altissima, Jacaranda mimosifolia, Merremia tuberosa, Passiflora morifolia, Phytolacca dioica, Schefflera actinophylla and Solanum abutiloides are reported for the first time from the Canary Islands, while Eragrostis barrelieri var. pygmaea, Ficus microcarpa, Ipomoea purpurea, Leucaena leucocephala subsp. glabrata, Sechium edule, Tradescantia zebrina and Turnera ulmifolia are new to the flora of the island of Tenerife. New records of Acacia cyclops, Atriplex suberecta, Heliotropium curassavicum, Paspalum dilatatum, P. notatum, Pluchea ovalis, Pulicaria paludosa, Sclerophylax spinescens and Solanum villosum subsp. miniatum confirm their recent expansion on the island of Tenerife. New records are provided for the recently described Sporobolus copei . Finally, Paspalum vaginatum (hitherto possibly confused with P. distichum and Potentilla indica are confirmed from the island of Tenerife.

    Adiciones para la flora de Tenerife (Islas Canarias, España.- Algunos recientes trabajos de campo en Tenerife, especialmente en Septiembre de 2010, trajeron consigo varias nuevas e interesantes adiciones de plantas vasculares no autóctonas. Bothriochloa ischaemum var. songarica, Cardamine flexuosa “Asiática”, Cestrum parqui, Digitaria violascens, Ficus lyrata, Ficus rubiginosa, Hoffmannseggia glauca, Hyparrhenia rufa subsp. altissima, Jacaranda mimosifolia, Merremia tuberosa, Passiflora morifolia, Phytolacca dioica, Schefflera actinophylla y

  10. Características anatômicas e valor nutritivo de quatro gramíneas predominantes em pastagem natural de Viçosa, MG Anatomical evaluation and nutritive value of four prevailing forage grasses in natural pasture of Viçosa-MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela de Oliveira Bauer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a influência das características anatômicas e dos sítios de lignificação dos tecidos sobre o valor nutritivo de lâminas foliares de quatro gramíneas coletadas nas estações chuvosa e seca. Amostras frescas das duas últimas lâminas foliares recém-expandidas, correspondentes à última e à penúltima posição no perfilho de capim-gordura (Melinis minutiflora Pal. De Beauv, capim-braquiária (Brachiaria decumbens Staph., capim-sapé (Imperata brasiliensis Trin. e capim-jaraguá (Hyparrhenia rufa (Nees Staph. foram avaliadas quanto às características anatômicas, segundo técnicas de microscopia de luz e varredura. Nessas amostras analisou-se a proporção de tecidos e de sítios de lignificação. Também foram determinadas as concentrações de fibra em detergente neutro (FDN, fibra em detergente ácido (FDA, lignina e celulose da parede celular, assim como a digestibilidade in vitro da matéria seca (DIVMS. Os dados foram analisados segundo delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com os tratamentos no esquema fatorial, com três repetições. Determinaram-se as correlações entre DIVMS, componentes químicos da parede celular e proporção de tecidos. Observou-se o mesmo padrão de proporção de tecidos e DIVMS no capim-gordura e no capim-braquiária, assim como nos capins sapé e jaraguá. A digestibilidade in vitro da matéria seca e os componentes da parede celular sofreram influência da estação, enquanto as características anatômicas não foram significativamente influenciadas por esse fator. Os capins gordura e braquiária caracterizaram-se por maiores proporções de bainha parenquimática do feixe e os capins sapé e jaraguá por maiores proporções de xilema e esclerênquima. Altos coeficientes negativos de correlação foram estabelecidos entre os coeficientes de digestibilidade e as proporções de xilema e esclerênquima, assim como com os teores de FDN, FDA e lignina das lâminas foliares.It was

  11. Potential effects of oilseed rape expressing oryzacystatin-1 (OC-1 and of purified insecticidal proteins on larvae of the solitary bee Osmia bicornis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Konrad

    Full Text Available Despite their importance as pollinators in crops and wild plants, solitary bees have not previously been included in non-target testing of insect-resistant transgenic crop plants. Larvae of many solitary bees feed almost exclusively on pollen and thus could be highly exposed to transgene products expressed in the pollen. The potential effects of pollen from oilseed rape expressing the cysteine protease inhibitor oryzacystatin-1 (OC-1 were investigated on larvae of the solitary bee Osmia bicornis (= O. rufa. Furthermore, recombinant OC-1 (rOC-1, the Bt toxin Cry1Ab and the snowdrop lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA were evaluated for effects on the life history parameters of this important pollinator. Pollen provisions from transgenic OC-1 oilseed rape did not affect overall development. Similarly, high doses of rOC-1 and Cry1Ab as well as a low dose of GNA failed to cause any significant effects. However, a high dose of GNA (0.1% in the larval diet resulted in significantly increased development time and reduced efficiency in conversion of pollen food into larval body weight. Our results suggest that OC-1 and Cry1Ab expressing transgenic crops would pose a negligible risk for O. bicornis larvae, whereas GNA expressing plants could cause detrimental effects, but only if bees were exposed to high levels of the protein. The described bioassay with bee brood is not only suitable for early tier non-target tests of transgenic plants, but also has broader applicability to other crop protection products.

  12. Potential effects of oilseed rape expressing oryzacystatin-1 (OC-1) and of purified insecticidal proteins on larvae of the solitary bee Osmia bicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Roger; Ferry, Natalie; Gatehouse, Angharad M R; Babendreier, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    Despite their importance as pollinators in crops and wild plants, solitary bees have not previously been included in non-target testing of insect-resistant transgenic crop plants. Larvae of many solitary bees feed almost exclusively on pollen and thus could be highly exposed to transgene products expressed in the pollen. The potential effects of pollen from oilseed rape expressing the cysteine protease inhibitor oryzacystatin-1 (OC-1) were investigated on larvae of the solitary bee Osmia bicornis (= O. rufa). Furthermore, recombinant OC-1 (rOC-1), the Bt toxin Cry1Ab and the snowdrop lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) were evaluated for effects on the life history parameters of this important pollinator. Pollen provisions from transgenic OC-1 oilseed rape did not affect overall development. Similarly, high doses of rOC-1 and Cry1Ab as well as a low dose of GNA failed to cause any significant effects. However, a high dose of GNA (0.1%) in the larval diet resulted in significantly increased development time and reduced efficiency in conversion of pollen food into larval body weight. Our results suggest that OC-1 and Cry1Ab expressing transgenic crops would pose a negligible risk for O. bicornis larvae, whereas GNA expressing plants could cause detrimental effects, but only if bees were exposed to high levels of the protein. The described bioassay with bee brood is not only suitable for early tier non-target tests of transgenic plants, but also has broader applicability to other crop protection products. PMID:18628826

  13. Impact of transgenic oilseed rape expressing oryzacystatin-1 (OC-1) and of insecticidal proteins on longevity and digestive enzymes of the solitary bee Osmia bicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Roger; Connor, Melanie; Ferry, Natalie; Gatehouse, Angharad M R; Babendreier, Dirk

    2009-04-01

    The risk that insect-resistant transgenic plants may pose for solitary bees was assessed by determining longevity of adult Osmia bicornis (O. rufa) chronically exposed to transgenic oilseed rape expressing oryzacystatin-1 (OC-1) or to the purified insecticidal proteins recombinant rOC-1, Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI), Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), or Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ab dissolved in sugar solution (at 0.01 and 0.1%, w:v, Cry1Ab only at 0.01%). Compared to control bees, longevity was significantly reduced by SBTI and GNA at both concentrations and by rOC-1 at 0.1%, but not by Cry1Ab or rOC-1 at 0.01%. Longevity on the OC-1 oilseed rape was not significantly different from the control plants. The effects of SBTI and rOC-1 on longevity were investigated through characterization of the digestive proteinases of O. bicornis and analysis of the response in proteinase profiles to ingestion of these proteinase inhibitors. A relatively complex profile of at least four types of soluble proteolytic enzymes was identified. Serine proteinases were found to be predominant, with metallo and especially cysteine proteinases making a smaller albeit significant contribution. The compensatory response to in vivo enzyme inhibition was similar for SBTI and rOC-1 although less pronounced for rOC-1. It consisted of a non-specific overproduction of native proteinases, both sensitive and insensitive, and the induction of a novel aspartic proteinase. PMID:19135058

  14. Honeydew feeding in the solitary bee Osmia bicornis as affected by aphid species and nectar availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Roger; Wäckers, Felix L; Romeis, Jörg; Babendreier, Dirk

    2009-12-01

    Like honey bees (Apis mellifera), non-Apis bees could exploit honeydew as a carbohydrate source. In addition to providing carbohydrates, this may expose them to potentially harmful plant products secreted in honeydew. However, knowledge on honeydew feeding by solitary bees is very scarce. Here we determine whether the polylectic solitary bee Osmia bicornis (=O. rufa) collects honeydew under semi-field conditions, and whether this is affected by aphid species and presence of floral nectar. Bees were provided with oilseed rape plants containing flowers and/or colonies of either Myzus persicae or Brevicoryne brassicae. We used the total sugar level of the bee crop as a measure of the individual's nutritional state and the oligosaccharide erlose as indicator for honeydew consumption. Erlose was present in honeydews from both aphid species, while absent in oilseed rape nectar, nor being synthesized by O. bicornis. When bees were confined to a single honeydew type as the only carbohydrate source, consumption of M. persicae honeydew was confirmed for 47% of the bees and consumption of B. brassicae honeydew for only 3%. Increased mortality in the latter treatment provided further evidence that B. brassicae honeydew is an unsuitable food source for O. bicornis. All bees that were given the choice between honeydew and floral nectar showed significantly increased total sugar levels. However, the fact that no erlose was detected in these bees indicates that honeydew was not consumed when suitable floral nectar was available. This study demonstrates that honeydew exploitation by O. bicornis is dependent on honeydew type and the presence of floral nectar. PMID:19699745

  15. Laying the foundations for a human-predator conflict solution: assessing the impact of Bonelli's eagle on rabbits and partridges.

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    Marcos Moleón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Predation may potentially lead to negative effects on both prey (directly via predators and predators (indirectly via human persecution. Predation pressure studies are, therefore, of major interest in the fields of theoretical knowledge and conservation of prey or predator species, with wide ramifications and profound implications in human-wildlife conflicts. However, detailed works on this issue in highly valuable--in conservation terms--Mediterranean ecosystems are virtually absent. This paper explores the predator-hunting conflict by examining a paradigmatic, Mediterranean-wide (endangered predator-two prey (small game system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We estimated the predation impact ('kill rate' and 'predation rate', i.e., number of prey and proportion of the prey population eaten, respectively of Bonelli's eagle Aquila fasciata on rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus and red-legged partridge Alectoris rufa populations in two seasons (the eagle's breeding and non-breeding periods, 100 days each in SE Spain. The mean estimated kill rate by the seven eagle reproductive units in the study area was c. 304 rabbits and c. 262 partridges in the breeding season, and c. 237 rabbits and c. 121 partridges in the non-breeding period. This resulted in very low predation rates (range: 0.3-2.5% for both prey and seasons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The potential role of Bonelli's eagles as a limiting factor for rabbits and partridges at the population scale was very poor. The conflict between game profitability and conservation interest of either prey or predators is apparently very localised, and eagles, quarry species and game interests seem compatible in most of the study area. Currently, both the persecution and negative perception of Bonelli's eagle (the 'partridge-eating eagle' in Spanish have a null theoretical basis in most of this area.

  16. Bioaccessibility of Pb from ammunition in game meat is affected by cooking treatment.

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    Rafael Mateo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The presence of lead (Pb ammunition residues in game meat has been widely documented, yet little information exists regarding the bioaccessibility of this Pb contamination. We study how cooking treatment (recipe can affect Pb bioaccessibility in meat of animals hunted with Pb ammunition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used an in vitro gastrointestinal simulation to study bioaccessibility. The simulation was applied to meat from red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa hunted with Pb shot pellets and cooked using various traditional Spanish game recipes involving wine or vinegar. Total Pb concentrations in the meat were higher in samples with visible Pb ammunition by X-ray (mean±SE: 3.29±1.12 µg/g w.w. than in samples without this evidence (1.28±0.61 µg/g. The percentage of Pb that was bioaccessible within the simulated intestine phase was far higher in meat cooked with vinegar (6.75% and wine (4.51% than in uncooked meat (0.7%. Risk assessment simulations using our results transformed to bioavailability and the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic model (IEUBK; US EPA show that the use of wine instead of vinegar in cooking recipes may reduce the percentage of children that would be expected to have >10 µg/dl of Pb in blood from 2.08% to 0.26% when game meat represents 50% of the meat in diet. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Lead from ammunition in game meat is more bioaccessible after cooking, especially when using highly acidic recipes. These results are important because existing theoretical models regarding Pb uptake and subsequent risk in humans should take such factors into account.

  17. Ichthyotherapy as Alternative Treatment for Patients with Psoriasis: A Pilot Study

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    Martin Grassberger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ichthyotherapy (therapy with the so-called ‘Doctorfish of Kangal’, Garra rufa has been shown to be effective in patients with psoriasis in the Kangal hot springs in Turkey. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of ichthyotherapy in combination with short-term ultraviolet A sunbed radiation in the treatment of psoriasis under controlled conditions. We retrospectively analyzed 67 patients diagnosed with psoriasis who underwent 3 weeks of ichthyotherapy at an outpatient treatment facility in Lower Austria between 2002 and 2004. Main outcome measures are as follows: overall relative reduction in Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI score; proportion of patients with an improvement in their PASI score of ≥75% (PASI-75 and ≥50% (PASI-50; patient-reported outcomes assessed with a custom questionnaire; and patient follow-up with a questionnaire sent out in March 2005. Safety was evaluated by reviewing adverse events and vital signs. Overall there was a 71.7% reduction in PASI score compared to baseline (P < 0.0001. Of the 67 patients studied, 31 (46.3% achieved PASI-75 and 61 patients (91% achieved at least PASI-50. Patients reported substantial satisfaction with the treatment. The reported mean remission period was 8.58 months [95% confidence interval (CI 6.05–11.11]. A total of 87.5% of patients reported a more favorable outcome with ichthyotherapy, when asked to compare ichthyotherapy to other previously tried therapies. Sixty-five percent stated that after the relapse their symptoms were less severe than before treatment. There were no significant adverse events. The benefit demonstrated in this study along with the favorable safety profile suggests that ichthyotherapy could provide a viable treatment option for patients with psoriasis.

  18. Discovery and Development of Chemical Attractants Used to Trap Pestiferous Social Wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolt, Peter; Zhang, Qing-He

    2016-07-01

    Chemical attractants for trapping temperate social wasps have been discovered during the screening of chemicals as attractants for flies, the study of pentatomid bug pheromones, and the testing of volatiles of fermented sweet baits. Wasp attraction to these chemicals seems to be related to either food-finding or prey-finding behavior. Of these attractive chemicals, commercial lures marketed in North America for trapping wasps generally contain heptyl butyrate, or the combination of acetic acid and 2-methyl-1-butanol. Heptyl butyrate is a very good attractant for two major pest wasp species in North America and minor wasp pests in the Vespula rufa species group. The combination of acetic acid with isobutanol attracted nearly all North American pest species of social wasps, including yellowjackets (Vespula and Dolichovespula), a hornet (Vespa crabro), and several paper wasps (Polistes spp.). The testing of wasp chemical attractants in different geographic areas demonstrated responses of many wasp taxa and showed a broad potential scope for the marketing of trap lures. Comparisons of compounds structurally similar to isobutanol revealed similar activity with 2-methyl-1-butanol, which is now used commercially because of a vapor pressure that is more favorable than isobutanol for formulations and dispensers. Doses and concentrations needed for good wasp catches were determined for heptyl butyrate, acetic acid, isobutanol, and 2-methyl-1-butanol, either formulated in water or dispensed from a controlled release device. Trap designs were developed based on consumer considerations; visual appeal, ease and safety of use, and low environmental impact. The resultant lures and traps are marketed in numerous physical and on-line retail outlets throughout the United States and southern Canada. PMID:27435228

  19. Pathogenicity of two recent Western Mediterranean West Nile virus isolates in a wild bird species indigenous to Southern Europe: the red-legged partridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotelo Elena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract West Nile virus (WNV is an emerging zoonotic pathogen whose geographic spread and incidence in humans, horses and birds has increased significantly in recent years. WNV has long been considered a mild pathogen causing self-limiting outbreaks. This notion has changed as WNV is causing large epidemics with a high impact on human and animal health. This has been particularly noteworthy since its introduction into North America in 1999. There, native bird species have been shown to be highly susceptible to WNV infection and disease with high mortalities. For this reason, the effect of WNV infection in North American bird species has been thoroughly studied by means of experimental inoculations in controlled trials. To a lesser extent, European wild birds have been shown to be affected clinically by WNV infection. Yet experimental studies on European wild bird species are lacking. The red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa is a gallinaceous bird indigenous to the Iberian Peninsula, widely distributed in South Western Europe. It plays a key role in the Mediterranean ecosystem and constitutes an economically important game species. As such it is raised intensively in outdoor facilities. In this work, red-legged partridges were experimentally infected with two recent WNV isolates from the Western Mediterranean area: Morocco/2003 and Spain/2007. All inoculated birds became viremic and showed clinical disease, with mortality rates of 70% and 30%, respectively. These results show that Western Mediterranean WNV variants can be pathogenic for some European bird species, such as the red-legged partridge.

  20. Experimental approaches to test pesticide-treated seed avoidance by birds under a simulated diversification of food sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Antia, Ana; Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E; Mateo, Rafael

    2014-10-15

    Pesticide coated seeds are known to be potentially toxic for birds, but the risk of poisoning will depend on how likely the individuals are to consume them. To refine the risk assessment of coated seed consumption by birds we studied the consumption and avoidance of seeds treated with imidacloprid, thiram, maneb or rhodamine B under different scenarios of food unpredictability (diversity or changes in food sources). In a first set of experiments, we examined during four days the amount of ingested food by red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) when offered untreated seeds, treated seeds or both. In the latter case, we also assessed the effect of a daily interchange in the position of feeders containing treated and untreated food. A second experiment, conducted with imidacloprid only, consisted of offering, during 27 h, fixed overall amounts of treated and untreated food, equally distributed in a different number of feeders per pen (1, 2, 4 or 8 feeders of each type of food) in order to diversify food sources. All the tested pesticide-treated seeds were avoided in two-choice experiments, and imidacloprid and thiram were also avoided in one-choice experiments. We found that imidacloprid treated seeds were avoided, probably as a consequence of a conditioned aversion effect due to the post-ingestion distress. However, under a diversification of two-choice food sources with multiple feeders, imidacloprid-treated seeds were ingested by partridges at increasing amounts that can produce sublethal effects or even death. Thiram treated seeds were also initially avoided in one-choice experiment, but probably mediated by a sensory repellence that progressively decreased with time. Our results reveal that the risk of pesticide exposure in birds may increase by unpredictability of food resources or prolonged availability of coated seeds, so pesticide registration for seed coating should consider worst-case scenarios to avoid negative impacts on farmland birds. PMID:25079236

  1. Some Uses of Radioisotopes and Radiations in Entomology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the applications of radioisotopes in entomology that have been developed at our two centres during the last few years. Early work (Au198-labelling) related to the bee and more particularly to the radius of dispersion of worker bees from a colony. After investigations on the individual dose received in tagging of this kind, the radioresistance of the bee was determined, the lethal dose being estimated at about 90 kr. Au198 was also used to study exchange of food within a bee-hive. On the other hand, P32 was used for studies of exchange of food, in small hives, between individuals of different functions (males, workers and queens) or different colonies. Similar trophallaxic studies have recently been performed on wasps. Au198 was likewise the basic radioisotope used in work on ant's nests. The most interesting finding from one of the early studies was that exchange of food takes place between nests more than 50 m apart and belonging to different species (Formica rufa and Formica polyctena). A later study, in which an ant run and not the nest itself was labelled, revealed a division of responsibility within the nests the tagged ants were found invariably to explore the same run and to have little contact with other individuals of the same colony. In the same experiment abnormal radioactivity was noted in the ants before labelling, due in particular to (Sr+Nb)95 . This discovery would seem to point to accumulation of radioactive fall-out in ant's nests. At a period of low fall-out, natural radioactivity attributed to K40 was observed and was used for purposes of potassium determination in ants and bees. An attempt was made to label acridians with Ir192 and the findings are described in the paper. Lastly, an autoradiographic study has been made of the distribution of certain radioisotopes (P32 and S35) in the body of the bee. (author)

  2. Imidacloprid-treated seed ingestion has lethal effect on adult partridges and reduces both breeding investment and offspring immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Antia, Ana; Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E; Mougeot, François; Mateo, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The ingestion of imidacloprid treated seeds by farmland birds may result in exposure to toxic amounts of this insecticide. Here we report on the effects that the exposure to the recommended application rate and to 20% of that rate may produce on birds feeding on treated seeds. Experimental exposure to imidacloprid treated seeds was performed on red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) (n=15 pairs per treatment group: control, 20% or 100% of the recommended application rate) during two periods that corresponded to the autumn (duration of exposure: 25 days) and late winter (10 days) cereal sowing times in Spanish farmlands. We studied effects on the survival, body condition, oxidative stress biomarkers, plasma biochemistry, carotenoid-based coloration, T-cell mediated immune response and reproduction of exposed adult partridges, and on the survival and T-cell immune response of their chicks. The high dose (recommended application rate) killed all partridges, with mortality occurring faster in females than in males. The low dose (20% the recommended application rate) had no effect on mortality, but reduced levels of plasma biochemistry parameters (glucose, magnesium and lactate dehydrogenase), increased blood superoxide dismutase activity, produced changes in carotenoid-based integument coloration, reduced the clutch size, delayed the first egg lay date, increased egg yolk vitamins and carotenoids and depressed T-cell immune response of chicks. Moreover, the analysis of the livers of dead partridges revealed an accumulation of imidacloprid during exposure time. Despite the moratorium on the use of neonicotinoids in the European Union, birds may still be at high risk of poisoning by these pesticides through direct sources of exposure to coated seeds in autumn and winter. PMID:25460626

  3. Low prevalence of avian influenza virus in shorebirds on the Pacific coast of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Samuel A.; Takekawa, John Y.; Schwarzbach, Steven; Cardona, Carol J.; Warnock, Nils; Bishop, Mary Anne; Schirato, Greg A.; Paroulek, Sara; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Ip, Hon; Boyce, Walter M.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 has elevated concerns about wild birds as virus hosts; however, little is known about the ecological and epidemiological factors of transmission by shorebirds. Here we summarize results for 2,773 shorebirds that were live-trapped on the Pacific coast of the United States during 2006-2007 and tested for avian influenza virus using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and virus isolation. As was the case throughout North America, HPAI H5N1 was not detected in shorebirds during this interval. Contrary to other wild bird groups, most notably waterfowl, the prevalence of even low pathogenicity virus among shorebirds in our study areas in California, Washington, and Alaska was extremely low (0.5%). Virus was detected by RT-PCR from four different species, including, Dunlin (Calidris alpina; N = 3), Western Sandpiper (C. mauri; N = 8), Long-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus scolopaceus; N = 1), and American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana; N = 1), with the detections in the latter three constituting the first published records for these birds. Based on studies in the eastern United States, we expected, but did not detect (H1 = 1.6, P = 0.21) elevated avian influenza prevalence among shorebirds during spring migration. Diagnostic tests, which were designed to evaluate testing and sampling methods, indicated poor functioning of traditional virus isolation methods and no improvement in detection likelihood by collecting oropharyngeal swabs in addition to cloacal swab samples for low pathogenicity viruses (Z1 = 0.7, P = 0.48).

  4. Avian BMR in marine and non-marine habitats: a test using shorebirds.

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    Jorge S Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available Basal metabolic rate (BMR is closely linked to different habitats and way of life. In birds, some studies have noted that BMR is higher in marine species compared to those inhabiting terrestrial habitats. However, the extent of such metabolic dichotomy and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Migratory shorebirds (Charadriiformes offer a particularly interesting opportunity for testing this marine-non-marine difference as they are typically divided into two broad categories in terms of their habitat occupancy outside the breeding season: 'coastal' and 'inland' shorebirds. Here, we measured BMR for 12 species of migratory shorebirds wintering in temperate inland habitats and collected additional BMR values from the literature for coastal and inland shorebirds along their migratory route to make inter- and intraspecific comparisons. We also measured the BMR of inland and coastal dunlins Calidris alpina wintering at a similar latitude to facilitate a more direct intraspecific comparison. Our interspecific analyses showed that BMR was significantly lower in inland shorebirds than in coastal shorebirds after the effects of potentially confounding climatic (latitude, temperature, solar radiation, wind conditions and organismal (body mass, migratory status, phylogeny factors were accounted for. This indicates that part of the variation in basal metabolism might be attributed to genotypic divergence. Intraspecific comparisons showed that the mass-specific BMR of dunlins wintering in inland freshwater habitats was 15% lower than in coastal saline habitats, suggesting that phenotypic plasticity also plays an important role in generating these metabolic differences. We propose that the absence of tidally-induced food restrictions, low salinity, and less windy microclimates associated with inland freshwater habitats may reduce the levels of energy expenditure, and hence BMR. Further research including common-garden experiments that eliminate

  5. Differentiation of subspecies and sexes of Beringian Dunlins using morphometric measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, H. River; Yezerinac, Stephen; Powell, Abby N.; Tomkovich, Pavel S.; Valchuk, Olga P.; Lanctot, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Five subspecies of Dunlins (Calidris alpina) that breed in Beringia are potentially sympatric during the non-breeding season. Studying their ecology during this period requires techniques to distinguish individuals by subspecies. Our objectives were to determine (1) if five morphometric measures (body mass, culmen, head, tarsus, and wing chord) differed between sexes and among subspecies (C. a. actites, arcticola, kistchinski, pacifica, and sakhalina), and (2) if these differences were sufficient to allow for correct classification of individuals using equations derived from discriminant function analyses. We conducted analyses using morphometric data from 10 Dunlin populations breeding in northern Russia and Alaska, USA. Univariate tests revealed significant differences between sexes in most morphometric traits of all subspecies, and discriminant function equations predicted the sex of individuals with an accuracy of 83–100% for each subspecies. We provide equations to determine sex and subspecies of individuals in mixed subspecies groups, including the (1) Western Alaska group of arcticola and pacifica (known to stage together in western Alaska) and (2) East Asia group of arcticola, actites, kistchinski, and sakhalina (known to winter together in East Asia). Equations that predict the sex of individuals in mixed groups had classification accuracies between 75% and 87%, yielding reliable classification equations. We also provide equations that predict the subspecies of individuals with an accuracy of 22–96% for different mixed subspecies groups. When the sex of individuals can be predetermined, the accuracy of these equations is increased substantially. Investigators are cautioned to consider limitations due to age and feather wear when using these equations during the non-breeding season. These equations will allow determination of sexual and subspecies segregation in non-breeding areas, allowing implementation of taxonomic-specific conservation actions.

  6. Feeding–Danger Trade-Offs Underlie Stopover Site Selection by Migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C. Pomeroy

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available To migrate successfully, birds need to store adequate fat reserves to fuel each leg of the journey. Migrants acquire their fuel reserves at stopover sites; this often entails exposure to predators. Therefore, the safety attributes of sites may be as important as the feeding opportunities. Furthermore, site choice might depend on fuel load, with lean birds more willing to accept danger to obtain good feeding. Here, we evaluate the factors underlying stopover-site usage by migrant Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri on a landscape scale. We measured the food and danger attributes of 17 potential stopover sites in the Strait of Georgia and Puget Sound region. We used logistic regression models to test whether food, safety, or both were best able to predict usage of these sites by Western Sandpipers. Eight of the 17 sites were used by sandpipers on migration. Generally, sites that were high in food and safety were used, whereas sites that were low in food and safety were not. However, dangerous sites were used if there was ample food abundance, and sites with low food abundance were used if they were safe. The model including both food and safety best-predicted site usage by sandpipers. Furthermore, lean sandpipers used the most dangerous sites, whereas heavier birds (which do not need to risk feeding in dangerous locations used safer sites. This study demonstrates that both food and danger attributes are considered by migrant birds when selecting stopover sites, thus both these attributes should be considered to prioritize and manage stopover sites for conservation.

  7. Spring Migration Stopover Ecology of Avian Influenza Virus Shorebird Hosts at Delaware Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxted, Angela M; Sitters, Humphrey P; Luttrell, M Page; Dey, Amanda D; Kalasz, Kevin S; Niles, Lawrence J; Stallknecht, David E

    2016-05-01

    Although low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) are detected in shorebirds at Delaware Bay annually, little is known about affected species habitat preferences or the movement patterns that might influence virus transmission and spread. During the 5-wk spring migration stopover period during 2007-2008, we conducted a radiotelemetry study of often-infected ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres morinella; n = 60) and rarely infected sanderlings (Calidris alba; n = 20) to identify locations and habitats important to these species (during daytime and nighttime), determine the extent of overlap with other AIV reservoir species or poultry production areas, reveal possible movements of AIV around the Bay, and assess whether long-distance movement of AIV is likely after shorebird departure. Ruddy turnstones and sanderlings both fed on Bay beaches during the daytime. However, sanderlings used remote sandy points and islands during the nighttime while ruddy turnstones primarily used salt marsh harboring waterfowl and gull breeding colonies, suggesting that this environment supports AIV circulation. Shorebird locations were farther from agricultural land and poultry operations than were random locations, suggesting selection away from poultry. Further, there was no areal overlap between shorebird home ranges and poultry production areas. Only 37% (22/60) of ruddy turnstones crossed into Delaware from capture sites in New Jersey, suggesting partial site fidelity and AIV gene pool separation between the states. Ruddy turnstones departed en masse around June 1 when AIV prevalence was low or declining, suggesting that a limited number of birds could disperse AIV onto the breeding grounds. This study provides needed insight into AIV and migratory host ecology, and results can inform both domestic animal AIV prevention and shorebird conservation efforts. PMID:27309084

  8. Winter body mass and over-ocean flocking as components of danger management by Pacific dunlins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogden Lesley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We compared records of the body mass and roosting behavior of Pacific dunlins (Calidris alpina pacifica wintering on the Fraser River estuary in southwest British Columbia between the 1970s and the 1990s. 'Over-ocean flocking' is a relatively safe but energetically-expensive alternative to roosting during the high tide period. Fat stores offer protection against starvation, but are a liability in escape performance, and increase flight costs. Peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus were scarce on the Fraser River estuary in the 1970s, but their numbers have since recovered, and they prey heavily on dunlins. The increase has altered the balance between predation and starvation risks for dunlins, and thus how dunlins regulate roosting behavior and body mass to manage the danger. We therefore predicted an increase in the frequency of over-ocean flocking as well as a decrease in the amount of fat carried by dunlins over these decades. Results Historical observations indicate that over-ocean flocking of dunlins was rare prior to the mid-1990s and became common thereafter. Residual body masses of dunlins were higher in the 1970s, with the greatest difference between the decades coinciding with peak peregrine abundance in October, and shrinking over the course of winter as falcon seasonal abundance declines. Whole-body fat content of dunlins was lower in the 1990s, and accounted for most of the change in body mass. Conclusions Pacific dunlins appear to manage danger in a complex manner that involves adjustments both in fat reserves and roosting behavior. We discuss reasons why over-ocean flocking has apparently become more common on the Fraser estuary than at other dunlin wintering sites.

  9. Intense predation cannot always be detected experimentally: A case study of shorebird predation on nereid polychaetes in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalejta, B.

    The effect of predation by curlew sandpipers Calidris ferruginea L. and grey plovers Pluvialis squatarola (L.) on populations of nereid worms Ceratonereis keiskama (Day) and C. erythraeensis (Fauvel) was studied at the Berg River estuary, South Africa, by comparing observations of shorebird-foraging intensity with the results of a population study of two species of nereid worms within and outside bird exclosures. The study was carried out during the four-month period prior to northward migration of shorebirds. Population structure of the two nereid species differed considerably. Ceratonereis keiskama reproduced earlier than C. erythraeensis and only young individuals were present during the study. By contrast, old C. erythraeensis were available to the birds at the start of the experiment and young animals entered the population during the experiment. Despite selective predation on certain size classes of nereids by the birds, no significant changes in the population structure of either nereid were detected by the cage experiment. Numbers and biomass of both Ceratonereis spp. in paired controls and cages tracked each other and did not diverge as predicted. A consistent difference in the depth stratification of the two nereids may, however, have been due to predation pressure. Curlew sandpipers were calculated to remove 3112 nereids per m 2 during the three months, equivalent to 4.4. g (dry weight) per m 2. This represents 58% of the initial numbers and 77% of the initial biomass of nereids. Although predation on nereids by waders was exceptionally high at the Berg River estuary, any depletion in numbers or biomass of nereids caused by these predators was masked by the reproduction of the nereids. The fact that the predators' high energy requirements prior to northward migration coincide with the period of peak production of invertebrate prey makes the Berg River estuary an exceptionally favourable wintering area.

  10. Stable Isotope Analysis Reveals That Agricultural Habitat Provides an Important Dietary Component for Nonbreeding Dunlin

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    Lesley Joan Evans Ogden

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Although shorebirds spending the winter in temperate areas frequently use estuarine and supratidal (upland feeding habitats, the relative contribution of each habitat to individual diets has not been directly quantified. We quantified the proportional use that Calidris alpina pacifica (Dunlin made of estuarine vs. terrestrial farmland resources on the Fraser River Delta, British Columbia, using stable isotope analysis (δ13C, δ15N of blood from 268 Dunlin over four winters, 1997 through 2000. We tested for individual, age, sex, morphological, seasonal, and weather-related differences in dietary sources. Based on single- (δ13C and dual-isotope mixing models, the agricultural habitat contributed approximately 38% of Dunlin diet averaged over four winters, with the balance from intertidal flats. However, there was a wide variation among individuals in the extent of agricultural feeding, ranging from about 1% to 95% of diet. Younger birds had a significantly higher terrestrial contribution to diet (43% than did adults (35%. We estimated that 6% of adults and 13% of juveniles were obtaining at least 75% of their diet from terrestrial sources. The isotope data provided no evidence for sex or overall body size effects on the proportion of diet that is terrestrial in origin. The use of agricultural habitat by Dunlin peaked in early January. Adult Dunlin obtained a greater proportion of their diet terrestrially during periods of lower temperatures and high precipitation, whereas no such relationship existed for juveniles. Seasonal variation in the use of agricultural habitat suggests that it is used more during energetically stressful periods. The terrestrial farmland zone appears to be consistently important as a habitat for juveniles, but for adults it may provide an alternative feeding site used as a buffer against starvation during periods of extreme weather. Loss or reduction of agricultural habitat adjacent to estuaries may negatively impact

  11. On the Biomass of Four Major Tree Species in Vegetation Restoration Pattern Area of Beichuan Nature Reserve%北川自然保护区植被恢复模式区4种主要树种生物量研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯永林; 沈金亮; 张建设; 邓东周; 邵文; 王刚; 孙志鹏; 苏春英; 王刚

    2015-01-01

    In the experiment, by taking Quercus engleriana Seem., Betula albo-sinensis Burk., Abies faxoniana Rehd. and Fargesia rufa Yi, in the vegetation restoration pattern area of Beichuan Nature Reserve as the research objects, the study on the biomass models, the biomass distribution law of single plant and the growth rule of every organ of the four tree species was made. The results indicated that in the compositions of al of the species, the proportion of trunk biomass was the highest, while that of trunk biomass was the lowest, the proportions of branch and root biomasses varied depending on species; in the comparison of correlativity between the proportions of biomasses of al nutrition organs and biomass of single plant, the relations were general y significant, the tree trunks were positively related while the roots were negatively related; the proportion of trunk biomass of al species was significantly and negatively related to the proportions of leaf and branch biomasses, while the biomass of leaves was significantly and positively related to the biomass of branches.%以北川自然保护区植被恢复模式区巴东栎、红桦、岷江冷杉、青川箭竹为研究对象,对四种树种生物量模型、单株生物量分配规律以及各器官生长规律等进行研究。结果表明:在各树种生物量组成中,干生物量比例最大,叶最小,枝和根生物量比例因树种不同而有所差异;在各营养器官生物量比例与其单株生物量相关关系的比较中,整体上关系明显,树干为正相关,树根为负相关;树种干生物量比例与枝和叶生物量比例存在显著的负相关关系,而枝和叶生物量之间存在显著的正相关关系。

  12. Reef fish dynamic response to climatic variability in a warm eastern Mediterranean semi-enclosed basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agiadi, K.; Koskeridou, E.; Giamali, Ch.; Karakitsios, V.

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies on the effects of global warming on fish populations reveal that the resulting hypoxia-based habitat compression due to the expansion of the oxygen minimum zone may lead to the restriction of fish depth distributions to the oxygenated near-surface layer1. Here we postulate that similar phenomena may have affected the fish distribution in the early Pliocene Heraklion semi-enclosed sea (Crete, eastern Mediterranean). Fish otoliths from Voutes section are systematically identified and the data is examined from a palaeoecologic perspective in response to the Pliocene climatic variability. Bregmaceros and Diaphus taaningi otoliths' relative abundances are used as reliable palaeoclimatic indicators2. The Voutes section sediments contain a very rich fish fauna. Diaphus spp., Bregmaceros sp., Sardinella maderensis, Phosichthyidae and Sternoptychyidae form the pelagic component. Mesopelagic taxa belong mostly to Myctophids. The benthopelagic and benthic component of the fish fauna is very well diversified and is comprised of Gobiids, such as Gobius cf. niger, Callogobius sp., Lesueurigobius aff. sanzoi, and Aphya sp., as well as Gadiculus labiatus, Laemonema sp., Oblada melanura, Parascombrus mutinensis, Barbourisia rufa, Blennius sp., Ammodytes sp., Solea aff. solea. The presence of Oligopus sp., Spratelloides sp., and Brotula cf. mutlibarbata in the middle part of the section indicate the development of a reef in the study area. The palaeoecologic analysis of the surface, intermediate and deep water faunal groups indicate that the pelagic fish populations in the semi-enclosed early Pliocene Heraklion basin directly reflect the climatic variability. However, the intermediate and deep water fish did not respond to climate change in the same manner. Indeed, two dysoxic events are recorded in this section, where the pelagic component of the fauna is almost exclusively comprised of Bregmaceros sp., few Myctophids are present, and the benthic and benthopelagic

  13. Effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and temperature on photosynthesis and leaf traits of an understory dwarf bamboo in subalpine forest zone, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongping Li; Yuanbin Zhang; Xiaolu Zhang; Chunyang Li [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); Korpelainenc, H. [Univ. of Helsinki. Dept. of Agricultural Sciences, Helsinki (Finland); Berningerd, F. [Univ. of Helsinki. Dept. of Forest Sciences, Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-06-01

    The dwarf bamboo (Fargesia rufa Yi), growing understory in subalpine dark coniferous forest, is one of the main foods for giant panda, and it influences the regeneration of subalpine coniferous forests in southwestern China. To investigate the effects of elevated CO{sub 2}, temperature and their combination, the dwarf bamboo plantlets were exposed to two CO{sub 2} regimes (ambient and double ambient CO{sub 2} concentration) and two temperatures (ambient and +2.2 deg. C) in growth chambers. Gas exchange, leaf traits and carbohydrates concentration were measured after the 150-day experiment. Elevated CO{sub 2} significantly increased the net photosynthetic rate (A{sub net}), intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUE{sub i}) and carbon isotope composition ({delta}{sup 13}C) and decreased stomatal conductance (g{sub s}) and total chlorophyll concentration based on mass (Chl{sub m}) and area (Chl{sub a}). On the other hand, elevated CO{sub 2} decreased specific leaf area (SLA), which was increased by elevated temperature. Elevated CO{sub 2} also increased foliar carbon concentration based on mass (C{sub m}) and area (C{sub a}), nitrogen concentration based on area (N{sub a}), carbohydrates concentration (i.e. sucrose, sugar, starch and non-structural carbohydrates) and the slope of the A{sub net}-N{sub a} relationship. However, elevated temperature decreased C{sub m}, C{sub a} and N{sub a}. The combination of elevated CO{sub 2} and temperature hardly affected SLA, C{sub m}, C{sub a}, N{sub m}, N{sub a}, Chl{sub m} and Chl{sub a}. Variables A{sub net} and N{sub a} had positive linear relationships in all treatments. Our results showed that photosynthetic acclimation did not occur in dwarf bamboo at elevated CO{sub 2} and it could adjust physiology and morphology to enable the capture of more light, to increase WUE and improve nutritional conditions. (Author)

  14. Índice climático de crescimento para gramíneas forrageiras no Estado de São Paulo Climatic growth index for forage grasses in the State of São Paulo (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário José Pedro Júnior

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizou-se o índice climático de crescimento (ICC para gramíneas forrageiras, com base em temperatura, radiação solar e relação entre evapotranspiração real e potencial, a fim de estimar a produção de matéria seca (TAMS de capim-colonião, gordura, jaraguá e pangola através da seguinte equação exponencial: ICC = a EXP (b ICC, onde a e b são constantes que diferem para cada espécie. Determinou-se o índice climático médio mensal para 47 localidades paulistas e regiões limítrofes. A variação espacial do índice para o inverno e para o verão é apresentada em forma de mapas. Os valores de ICC no inverno, período crítico, variaram de 0,1 a 0,15 na região central do Estado; no Norte e no Oeste, foram superiores a 0,15 e, na Serra da Mantiqueira, inferiores a 0,1.The climatic growth index (ICC for forage grasses, based on temperature, solar radiation and the ratio of actual to potential evapotranspiration, was used to estimate dry matter production (TAMS for the following grasses: "colonião" (Panicum maximum Jacq, "gordura" (Melinis minutiflora Pal de Beauv, "jaraguá" (Hyparrhenia rufa (Ness Stapf and "pangola" (Digitaria pentzii Stent, using exponential equations: ICC = a EXP (b ICC, where a and b are constants which differ for each specie analised. The monthly mean climatic index was calculated for forty seven localities of the State of São Paulo and neighbours. Its spatial distribution considering summer and winter is shown as maps. ICC values during the critical season of the winter varied from 0.1 to 0.15 for the central part of the State; at the northern and western regions it is larger than 0.15 and at the "Mantiqueira" mountains it is less than 0.1.

  15. Characterisation of wild rabbit commercial game farms in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro González-Redondo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to characterise the wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus commercial game farms in Spain using variables related to structure, management and marketing. To this end, a structured survey was administered in 2009 to 21 privately-owned farms. This subsector was an average age of 13. The average size of the breeding stock of the farms was 431 does and 64 bucks. Eighty-five percent of the farms kept all or part of the breeding stock in cages and 38.1% used artificial insemination. All the farms carried out breeder self-replacement, 4.8% by buying wild rabbits from other farms, whereas 38.1% captured wild rabbits for this purpose. Nineteen percent of the wild rabbit game farms also produced other game species, mainly red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa, pheasant (Phasianus colchicus and quail (Coturnix coturnix. Fourteen percent of the farms supplied wild rabbits to be used as prey to be released in programmes for the conservation of endangered predators, and 38.1% supplied breeding rabbits to be used by other farms to replace culled animals. Eighty-six percent of the farms offered the service of transporting the animals from the farm to the hunting grounds to their clients, and 14.3% advised customers on how to successfully release and restock hunting grounds. Seventy-six percent of the farms marketed their products throughout Spain, and 38.1% exported wild rabbits to neighbouring countries, mainly Portugal and France. Forty-three percent of the farms advertised themselves in hunting magazines, 19.1% promoted themselves by attending livestock and game fairs, and 38.1% had their own websites. In conclusion, this alternative rabbit production system constitutes a well-established subsector in Spain, despite being only 2 decades old. It also seems that it has not yet reached its development maturity. It shows wide diversity in terms of farm size and structure, as well as marketing and promotional activities.

  16. [Sequence variation of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and phylogenetic relationships among twelve species of Charadriiformes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Xiang; Yuan, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Min-Qian; Li, Yu-Xiang; Guo, Yu-Mei; Li, Qing-Wei

    2003-05-01

    Studies of the phylogenetic relationships of the Charadriiformes have been largely based on conservative morphological characters. During the past 10 years, many studies on the evolutionary biology of birds adopted phylogenetic information obtained from mitochondrial DNA, but few work on the Charadriiformes has been reported to date. Therefore, phylogenetic relationships and classification of the Charadriiformes remains controversial. In this study, we try to shed light on these relationships via DNA sequence analysis of the mitochondrial Cyt b gene in 12 species of Charadriiformes. It was a preliminary study of the origin and evolution of the species by using nucleotide sequence data. Using the well-known PCR techniques, the complete mitochondrial Cyt b gene sequences were amplified and sequenced respectively from Charadrius mongolus, Charadrius alexandrinus, Numenius madagascariensis, Numenius arquat, Numenius phaeopus, Tringa totanus, Tringa glareola, Xenus cineres, Arenaria interpres, Calidris tenuirostris, Recurvirostra avosetts and Haematopus ostralensis. The 1143 bp long DNA sequences of the gene from these species were obtained, in which 381 variable sites were identified without insertions or deletions. The nucleic acid sequence variation of the mitochondrial Cyt b gene was 5.16%-16.01% among these species. Phylogenetic trees constructed using the NJ method, MP method and ML method with Ciconia ciconia as the outgroup indicate that the 12 species of Charadriiformes examined in this study are clustered in two major clades. The first clade includes T. totanus, T. glareola, A. interpres, C. tenuirostris, X. cineres, N. madagascariensis, N. arquata and N. phaeopus. The second one includes C. mongolus, C. alexandrinus, R. avosetts and H. ostralensis. Our molecular data show that the phylogenetic relationships among species of Scolopacidae are consistent with the classification based on morphological studies; R. avosetts and H. ostralensis are relatively closer

  17. Roberts Bank: Ecological crucible of the Fraser River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Terri F.; Elner, Robert W.; O'Neill, Jennifer D.

    2013-08-01

    relationship was found between biofilm components (chlorophyll and silt), polydora, and harpacticoid copepod abundance, which, together with cumaceans, are food for Western Sandpipers, Calidris mauri. Finally, 52% of the intercauseway variation was explained by direct correlations between eelgrass attributes and fauna consisting of bivalves, caprellids, and harpacticoid copepods (root biomass, leaf area index), the latter being prey for juvenile salmon which depend on eelgrass beds as rearing habitat. These habitats are vulnerable to changes in tidal flow patterns, tidal elevation, sediment transport, and water clarity that could be caused by future port development and/or sea level rise in response to climate change.

  18. The long and the short of it: no dietary specialisation between male and female western sandpipers despite strong bill size dimorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha E Franks

    Full Text Available Many bird species show spatial or habitat segregation of the sexes during the non-breeding season. One potential ecological explanation is that differences in bill morphology favour foraging niche specialisation and segregation. Western sandpipers Calidris mauri have pronounced bill size dimorphism, with female bills averaging 15% longer than those of males. The sexes differ in foraging behaviour and exhibit partial latitudinal segregation during the non-breeding season, with males predominant in the north and females in the south. Niche specialisation at a local scale might account for this broad geographic pattern, and we investigated whether longer-billed females and shorter-billed males occupy different foraging niches at 16 sites across the non-breeding range. We used stable-nitrogen (δ(15N isotope analysis of whole blood to test for dietary specialisation according to bill length and sex. Stable-nitrogen isotope ratios increase with trophic level. We predicted that δ(15N values would increase with bill length and would be higher for females, which use a greater proportion of foraging behaviour that targets higher-trophic level prey. We used stable-carbon (δ(13C isotope analysis to test for habitat segregation according to bill length and sex. Stable-carbon isotope ratios vary between marine- and freshwater-influenced habitats. We predicted that δ(13C values would differ between males and females if the sexes segregate between habitat types. Using a model selection approach, we found little support for a relationship between δ(15N and either bill length or sex. There was some indication, however, that more marine δ(13C values occur with shorter bill lengths. Our findings provide little evidence that male and female western sandpipers exhibit dietary specialisation as a function of their bill size, but indicate that the sexes may segregate in different habitats according to bill length at some non-breeding sites. Potential ecological

  19. Concentrations of 17 elements, including mercury, in the tissues, food and abiotic environment of Arctic shorebirds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to contaminants is one hypothesis proposed to explain the global decline in shorebirds, and is also an increasing concern in the Arctic. We assessed potential contaminants (As, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Tl, V, and Zn) at a shorebird breeding site in Nunavut, Canada. We compared element levels in soil, invertebrates and shorebird blood to assess evidence for bioconcentration and biomagnification within the Arctic-based food chain. We tested whether elements in blood, feathers and eggs of six shorebird species (Pluvialis squatarola, Calidris alpina, C. fuscicollis, Phalaropus fulicarius, Charadrius semipalmatus, and Arenaria interpres) were related to fitness endpoints: adult body condition, blood-parasite load, egg size, eggshell thickness, nest duration, and hatching success. To facilitate comparison to other sites, we summarise the published data on toxic metals in shorebird blood and egg contents. Element concentrations and invertebrate composition differed strongly among habitats, and habitat use and element concentrations differed among shorebird species. Hg, Se, Cd, Cu, and Zn bioconcentrated from soil to invertebrates, and Hg, Se and Fe biomagnified from invertebrates to shorebird blood. As, Ni, Pb, Co and Mn showed significant biodilution from soil to invertebrates to shorebirds. Soil element levels were within Canadian guidelines, and invertebrate Hg levels were below dietary levels suggested for the protection of wildlife. However, maximum Hg in blood and eggs approached levels associated with toxicological effects and Hg-pollution in other bird species. Parental blood-Hg was negatively related to egg volume, although the relationship varied among species. No other elements approached established toxicological thresholds. In conclusion, whereas we found little evidence that exposure to elements at this site is leading to the declines of the species studied, Hg, as found elsewhere in the Canadian Arctic, is of potential

  20. Spring migration of waterbirds and raptors at Medvedce reservoir (Dravsko polje, NE Slovenia/ Spomladanska selitev vodnih ptic in ujed na zadrževalniku Medvedce (Dravsko polje, SV Slovenija

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordjan Dejan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Spring migration of birds, particularly waterbirds and raptors, was monitored from dawn till dusk from an observation point located on the levee on the northern side of the Medvedce reservoir (Dravsko polje, NE Slovenia in three separate years (1-17 Mar 2009; 25 Mar-10 Apr 2011; 28 Feb-12 Apr 2012. In all three years, 42,045 individuals of 89 species (66 waterbirds, 23 raptors migrated over the site. 38,238 of these were waterbirds. The most numerous species was Lapwing Vanellus vanellus (11,813 individuals, followed by Blackheaded Gull Chroicocephalus ridibundus (10,515 individuals. In total, 3807 migratory storks, raptors and Cranes Grus grus were counted. Harriers (2303 individuals were by far the most numerous group. The prevailing direction of migration was SW-NE. Half of all migrating birds were observed in the altitudinal belt between 10 and 100 m above ground level. Harriers were mostly observed up to 100 m above ground level, whereas storks, other raptors and Cranes were observed most often in the altitudinal belt between 100 and 500 m above ground level. The highest numbers of waterbirds were observed between 10 and 100 m above ground level. In the first five hours after sunrise, 61.3% of all waterbirds, 44.0% of all storks and raptors and only 20.5% of Cranes were observed. Although other parts of Dravsko polje have never been studied in such detail, it is possible that a significant portion of migrating birds from a larger area gathers at this site. This study confirms the importance of the area for migrating and staging birds, especially for Great Egret Ardea alba, Marsh Circus aeruginosus and Hen Harriers C. cyaneus, Osprey Pandion haliaetus, Crane, Ruff Calidris pugnax and Black-headed Gull that all reached at least 0.1% of their respective biogeographic populations. Internationally significant are particularly the numbers of migrating Marsh (1079 individuals in 2012 and Hen Harriers (408 individuals in 2012, as there are only few

  1. First Results of 3 Year Monitoring of Red Wood Ants' Behavioural Changes and Their Possible Correlation with Earthquake Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberich, Gabriele; Berberich, Martin; Grumpe, Arne; Wöhler, Christian; Schreiber, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Short-term earthquake predictions with an advance warning of several hours or days can currently not be performed reliably and remain limited to only a few minutes before the event. Abnormal animal behaviours prior to earthquakes have been reported previously but their detection creates problems in monitoring and reliability. A different situation is encountered for red wood ants (RWA; Formica rufa-group (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). They have stationary nest sites on tectonically active, gas-bearing fault systems. These faults may be potential earthquake areas and are simultaneously information channels deeply reaching into the crust. A particular advantage of monitoring RWA is their high sensitivity to environmental changes. Besides an evolutionarily developed extremely strong temperature sensitivity of 0.25 K, they have chemoreceptors for the detection of CO2 concentrations and a sensitivity for electromagnetic fields. Changes of the electromagnetic field are discussed or short-lived "thermal anomalies" are reported as trigger mechanisms for bioanomalies of impending earthquakes. For 3 years, we have monitored two Red Wood Ant mounds (Formica rufa-group), located at the seismically active Neuwied Basin (Eifel, Germany), 24/7 by high-resolution cameras equipped with a colour and infrared sensor. In the Neuwied Basin, an average of about 100 earthquakes per year with magnitudes up to M 3.9 occur located on different tectonic fault regimes (strike-slip faults and/or normal or thrust faults). The RWA mounds are located on two different fault regimes approximately 30 km apart. First results show that the ants have a well-identifiable standard daily routine. Correlation with local seismic events suggests changes in the ants' behaviour hours before the earthquake event: The nocturnal rest phase and daily activity are suppressed, and standard daily routine is continued not before the next day. Additional parameters that might have an effect on the ants' daily routine

  2. Levantamento etnobotânico de plantas utilizadas como anti-hiperlipidêmicas e anorexígenas pela população de Nova Xavantina-MT, Brasil Ethnobotanical survey of plants used as anti-hyperlipidemic and anorexigenic by the population of Nova Xavantina-MT, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcondes Alves B. da Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho verificou a utilização de plantas medicinais encontradas no Cerrado mato-grossense para o tratamento de hiperlipidemias e obesidade. Entrevistas com 180 pessoas acima de 50 anos foram realizadas em Nova Xavantina-MT. O questionário abordou nome popular, parte utilizada, forma de preparo e uso das espécies citadas, além de informações gerais sobre o uso de plantas. As dez plantas mais citadas foram coletadas, identificadas e estudadas por meio de uma revisão bibliográfica. A maioria dos entrevistados (95,6% declarou utilizar plantas medicinais regularmente, sendo que 71,5% deles herdaram o conhecimento sobre plantas dos pais e avós e 94,20% relataram aconselhar o uso aos mais jovens. Além disso, 93,6% atestaram que as plantas são mais eficazes que os medicamentos de farmácia e 57% consideraram forte o efeito das mesmas, ou seja, sempre resolvem o problema de saúde. Quanto aos efeitos adversos, 95,9% disseram nunca ter sentido após o uso de plantas. Dos entrevistados, 56,7% conheciam ou já haviam utilizado plantas medicinais no tratamento de hiperlipidemias e obesidade, sendo citadas 54 espécies medicinais diferentes pertencentes a 53 gêneros e 38 famílias, com destaque para Fabaceae (13%. As dez plantas mais citadas foram: guatambu (Aspidosperma tomentosum Mart., quina-do-cerrado (Strychnos pseudoquina St. Hil., ipê-roxo [Tabebuia impetiginosa (Mart. Ex DC. Standl], embaúba (Cecropia pachystachya Trec., calunga (Simaba sp., pata-de-vaca [Bauhinia rufa (Bong. Steud.], mangaba (Hancornia speciosa Gomez, batata-de-tiú [Jatropha elliptica (Pohl. Muell. Arg.], folha-de-carne (Casearia sylvestris Sw. e manacá (Spiranthera odoratissima A. St.-Hil.. A folha foi a parte mais utilizada (46% e o preparo das plantas ocorre principalmente por meio de infusão citado por 36,5% dos entrevistados. Apesar do uso popular destas plantas no combate as hiperlipidemias e obesidade, há necessidade de estudos fitoquímicos e

  3. Euophryine jumping spiders of the Afrotropical Region-new taxa and a checklist (Araneae: Salticidae: Euophryinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesołowska, Wanda; Azarkina, Galina N; Russell-Smith, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Two new genera, Rumburak gen. nov. and Yimbulunga gen. nov., of euophryine jumping spiders are established from the Afrotropical Region. Thirty three new species included in this subfamily are diagnosed and described: Chinophrys trifasciata sp. nov. (♂, South Africa), Euophrys bifida sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), E. cochlea sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), E. elizabethae sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), E. falciger sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), E. gracilis sp. nov. (♂♀, Lesotho, South Africa), E. griswoldi sp. nov. (♂, Namibia), E. limpopo sp. nov. (♂, South Africa), E. maseruensis sp. nov. (♂, Lesotho), E. meridionalis sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), E. miranda sp. nov. (♀, South Africa), E. nana sp. nov. (♂, South Africa), E. recta sp. nov. (♂, South Africa), E. subtilis sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), Rumburak bellus sp. nov. (♂, South Africa), R. hilaris sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), R. lateripunctatus sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), R. mirabilis sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), R. tuberatus (♂, South Africa), R. virilis (♂♀, South Africa), Tanzania parvulus sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), T. striatus sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), Thyenula alotama sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), T. cheliceroides sp. nov. (♂, South Africa), T. clarosignata sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), T. dentatidens sp. nov. (♂, South Africa), T. haddadi (♂♀, South Africa), T. montana sp. nov. (♂, Lesotho), T. rufa sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa), T. tenebrica sp. nov. (♀, South Africa), T. virgulata sp. nov. (♂, South Africa), T. vulnifica sp. nov. (♂♀, South Africa) and Yimbulunga foordi sp. nov. (♂, South Africa). Two species names are newly synonymized: Thyenula hortensis Wesołowska & Cumming, 2008 with T. munda (Peckham & Peckham, 1903) and Thyenula nelshoogte Zhang & Maddison, 2012 with T. laxa Zhang & Maddison, 2012.  Three new combinations are proposed: Heliophanus kittenbergeri (Caporiacco, 1947) (ex Euophrys

  4. Histological structure of the digestive tract of waders (Aves, Сharadrii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Kharchenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Histological structure of digestive tracts of 12 species of waders (Aves, Сharadrii has been studied: Pluvialis squatarola (Linnaeus, 1758, Charadrius hiaticula (Linnaeus, 1758, Recurvirostra avosetta (Linnaeus, 1758, Tringa ochropus (Linnaeus, 1758, T. glareola (Linnaeus, 1758, T. nebularia (Gunnerus, 1767, T. erythropus (Pallas, 1764, Philomachus pugnax (Linnaeus, 1758, Calidris minuta (Leisler, 1812, C. ferruginea (Pontoppidan, 1763, C. alpina (Linnaeus, 1758 and Gallinago gallinago (Linnaeus, 1758. The features of histological structure of all parts of the digestive tract of the waders species under analysis were defined and adaptations in the structure of the digestive system to distant migrations were detected. It is determined that the histological structure of the wall of the esophagus of the studied species of waders is universal, and the relief of mucosa is folded; stratified squamous epithelium of the mucous membrane has an insignificant degree of hornification. A large number of esophagus glands is observed in the lamina propria of the mucosa; these glands secrete mucus which facilitates the movement of food along the esophagus. The muscular coat is well-developed and formed by longitudinal and circular layers of smooth muscle tissue. It is found that characteristics of histological structure of the stomach wall of the waders species under analysis are presupposed by the following functions: 1 glandular stomach wall provides secretion of digestive enzymes through active secretory activity of glands of deep complex; 2 secretion (mucus of simple tubular glands is excreted to the surface of glandular stomach performing the protective function; 3 the wall of the muscular stomach provides mechanical treatment of food through well-developed muscle layer and solid layer of the cuticle. It is established that the waders’ intestine is shortened, that is compensated by the complication of the relief of intestinal mucosa by plates that form