WorldWideScience

Sample records for calibration transfer procedures

  1. UV irradiance radiometers calibration procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Doctorovich I. V.; Butenko V. K.; Hodovaniouk V. N.; Fodchuk I. M.; Yuriev V. G.

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the problems arising at calibration of narrow-band spectral-sensitive radiometers. The procedure of irradiance unit transfer to UV radiometers — UV radiometers calibration procedure — is presented.

  2. Development of the calibration transfer procedures for the XRF analyser AF-20

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalska, E

    2001-01-01

    Two standardization techniques; Direct (DS) and Picewise Direct Standardization (PDS) were applied to multivariate models developed using x-ray spectra. The data were obtained for the determination of Ca and fe in flying ash from brown coal using low resolution XRF analysis. The analyser AF-20 was used with an argon proportional counter and a Cd-109 radioisotope source. Number and comparison of samples from the calibration set were selected. Root mean square error of prediction (RMSEPr) was used as a criterion for assessment of the standardization quality. The best performance was obtained for the PDS method using 5 samples chosen with the leverage method. The RMSEPr value was 4 times lower for Ca determination and 2 times lower for Fe compared with the results without standardization. Software package was designed for fast computation of the standardization transform. The program can be used when the instrument parameters have changed as well as for calibration of the new instrument.

  3. Instrument Calibration and Certification Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R. Wesley [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-05-31

    The Amptec 640SL-2 is a 4-wire Kelvin failsafe resistance meter, designed to reliably use very low-test currents for its resistance measurements. The 640SL-1 is a 2-wire version, designed to support customers using the Reynolds Industries type 311 connector. For both versions, a passive (analog) dual function DC Milliameter/Voltmeter allows the user to verify the actual 640SL output current level and the open circuit voltage on the test leads. This procedure includes tests of essential performance parameters. Any malfunction noticed during calibration, whether specifically tested for or not, shall be corrected before calibration continues or is completed.

  4. Calibration procedure for fire resistance furnaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twilt, L.; Leur, P.H.E. van de; Wickström, U.

    1996-01-01

    On behalf of CEN/TC 127 "Fire Safety in Buildings", a series of tests has been carried out to evaluate and complete the draft calibration procedure for fire resistance furnaces [4]. Fourteen laboratories in nine European countries participated in the test series, each carrying out one calibration

  5. Temporal transferability of soil moisture calibration equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlandson, Tracy L.; Berg, Aaron A.; Bullock, Paul R.; Hanis-Gervais, Krista; Ojo, E. RoTimi; Cosh, Michael H.; Powers, Jarrett; McNairn, Heather

    2018-01-01

    Several large-scale field campaigns have been conducted over the last 20 years that require accurate measurements of soil moisture conditions. These measurements are manually conducted using soil moisture probes which require calibration. The calibration process involves the collection of hundreds of soil moisture cores, which is extremely labor intensive. In 2012, a field campaign was conducted in southern Manitoba in which 55 fields were sampled and calibration equations were derived for each field. The Soil Moisture Active Passive Experiment 2016 (SMAPVEX16) was conducted in this same region, and 21 of the same fields were resampled. This study examines the temporal transferability of calibration equations between these two field campaigns. It was found that the larger range in soil moisture over which samples were collected in 2012 (average range 0.11-0.41 m3 m-3) generally resulted in lower errors when used in 2016 (average range 0.24-0.44 m3 m-3) than the equations derived in 2016 when used with data collected in 2012. Combining the data collected in 2012 and 2016 did not improve the errors, overall. These results suggest that the transfer of calibration equations from one year to the next is not recommended.

  6. CALIBRATION PROCEDURES ON OBLIQUE CAMERA SETUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kemper

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Beside the creation of virtual animated 3D City models, analysis for homeland security and city planning, the accurately determination of geometric features out of oblique imagery is an important task today. Due to the huge number of single images the reduction of control points force to make use of direct referencing devices. This causes a precise camera-calibration and additional adjustment procedures. This paper aims to show the workflow of the various calibration steps and will present examples of the calibration flight with the final 3D City model. In difference to most other software, the oblique cameras are used not as co-registered sensors in relation to the nadir one, all camera images enter the AT process as single pre-oriented data. This enables a better post calibration in order to detect variations in the single camera calibration and other mechanical effects. The shown sensor (Oblique Imager is based o 5 Phase One cameras were the nadir one has 80 MPIX equipped with a 50 mm lens while the oblique ones capture images with 50 MPix using 80 mm lenses. The cameras are mounted robust inside a housing to protect this against physical and thermal deformations. The sensor head hosts also an IMU which is connected to a POS AV GNSS Receiver. The sensor is stabilized by a gyro-mount which creates floating Antenna –IMU lever arms. They had to be registered together with the Raw GNSS-IMU Data. The camera calibration procedure was performed based on a special calibration flight with 351 shoots of all 5 cameras and registered the GPS/IMU data. This specific mission was designed in two different altitudes with additional cross lines on each flying heights. The five images from each exposure positions have no overlaps but in the block there are many overlaps resulting in up to 200 measurements per points. On each photo there were in average 110 well distributed measured points which is a satisfying number for the camera calibration. In a first

  7. Calibration Procedures on Oblique Camera Setups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, G.; Melykuti, B.; Yu, C.

    2016-06-01

    Beside the creation of virtual animated 3D City models, analysis for homeland security and city planning, the accurately determination of geometric features out of oblique imagery is an important task today. Due to the huge number of single images the reduction of control points force to make use of direct referencing devices. This causes a precise camera-calibration and additional adjustment procedures. This paper aims to show the workflow of the various calibration steps and will present examples of the calibration flight with the final 3D City model. In difference to most other software, the oblique cameras are used not as co-registered sensors in relation to the nadir one, all camera images enter the AT process as single pre-oriented data. This enables a better post calibration in order to detect variations in the single camera calibration and other mechanical effects. The shown sensor (Oblique Imager) is based o 5 Phase One cameras were the nadir one has 80 MPIX equipped with a 50 mm lens while the oblique ones capture images with 50 MPix using 80 mm lenses. The cameras are mounted robust inside a housing to protect this against physical and thermal deformations. The sensor head hosts also an IMU which is connected to a POS AV GNSS Receiver. The sensor is stabilized by a gyro-mount which creates floating Antenna -IMU lever arms. They had to be registered together with the Raw GNSS-IMU Data. The camera calibration procedure was performed based on a special calibration flight with 351 shoots of all 5 cameras and registered the GPS/IMU data. This specific mission was designed in two different altitudes with additional cross lines on each flying heights. The five images from each exposure positions have no overlaps but in the block there are many overlaps resulting in up to 200 measurements per points. On each photo there were in average 110 well distributed measured points which is a satisfying number for the camera calibration. In a first step with the help of

  8. NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel: 2012 Cloud Calibration Procedure and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ide, Robert F.; Steen, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, NASA Glenn s Icing Research Tunnel underwent a major modification to it s refrigeration plant and heat exchanger. This paper presents the results of the subsequent full cloud calibration. Details of the calibration procedure and results are presented herein. The steps include developing a nozzle transfer map, establishing a uniform cloud, conducting a drop sizing calibration and finally a liquid water content calibration. The goal of the calibration is to develop a uniform cloud, and to build a transfer map from the inputs of air speed, spray bar atomizing air pressure and water pressure to the output of median volumetric droplet diameter and liquid water content.

  9. The transfer voltage standard for calibration outside of a laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urekar Marjan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The transfer voltage standard is designed for transferring the analog voltage from a calibrator to the process control workstation for multi-electrode electrolysis process in a plating plant. Transfer voltage standard is based on polypropylene capacitors and operational amplifiers with tera-ohm range input resistance needed for capacitor self-discharging effect cancellation. Dielectric absorption effect is described. An instrument for comparison of reference and control voltages is devised, based on precise window comparator. Detailed description of the main task is given, including constraints, theoretical and practical solutions. Procedure for usage of the standard outside of a laboratory conditions is explained. Comparison of expected and realized standard characteristics is given. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. TR-32019

  10. pH sensor calibration procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Artero Delgado, Carola; Nogueras Cervera, Marc; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio; Prat Tasias, Jordi; Prat Farran, Joana d'Arc

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration of pH sensor located at the OBSEA marine Observatory. This instrument is based on an industrial pH electrode that is connected to a CTD instrument (Conductivity, Temperature, and Depth ). The calibration of the pH sensor has been done using a high precision spectrophotometer pH meter from Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM), and in this way it has been obtained a numerical function for the p H sensor propor...

  11. A survey of calibration procedures for SQUID gradiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ornelas, P H; Bruno, A C; Barbosa, C Hall; Lima, E Andrade; Ribeiro, P Costa [Department of Physics, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente, 225, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22453-900 (Brazil)

    2003-04-01

    The accuracy of three distinct experimental procedures for calibrating axial SQUID gradiometers has been compared, for the same gradiometer design and experimental setup. Each procedure employs a different field source, and a nonlinear least-squares optimization is used to fit the measured voltage to the theoretical field, thus determining Tesla/Volt calibration factors. We also studied the effect of noise and gradiometer imbalance on the accuracy of each procedure.

  12. A survey of calibration procedures for SQUID gradiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Ornelas, P H; Barbosa, C H; Lima, E A; Ribeiro, P C

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of three distinct experimental procedures for calibrating axial SQUID gradiometers has been compared, for the same gradiometer design and experimental setup. Each procedure employs a different field source, and a nonlinear least-squares optimization is used to fit the measured voltage to the theoretical field, thus determining Tesla/Volt calibration factors. We also studied the effect of noise and gradiometer imbalance on the accuracy of each procedure.

  13. Calibration Procedure for 3D Turning Dynamometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axinte, Dragos Aurelian; Belluci, Walter

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the static calibration of the dynamometer is to obtain the matrix for evaluating cutting forces through the output voltage of the piezoelectric cells and charge amplifiers. In the same time, it is worth to evaluate the linearity of the dependencies between applied forces and output...

  14. Brookhaven National Laboratory meteorological services instrument calibration plan and procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, John [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-02-16

    This document describes the Meteorological Services (Met Services) Calibration and Maintenance Schedule and Procedures, The purpose is to establish the frequency and mechanism for the calibration and maintenance of the network of meteorological instrumentation operated by Met Services. The goal is to maintain the network in a manner that will result in accurate, precise and reliable readings from the instrumentation.

  15. CALIBRATION PROCEDURES IN MID FORMAT CAMERA SETUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pivnicka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of mid-format cameras are used for aerial surveying projects. To achieve a reliable and geometrically precise result also in the photogrammetric workflow, awareness on the sensitive parts is important. The use of direct referencing systems (GPS/IMU, the mounting on a stabilizing camera platform and the specific values of the mid format camera make a professional setup with various calibration and misalignment operations necessary. An important part is to have a proper camera calibration. Using aerial images over a well designed test field with 3D structures and/or different flight altitudes enable the determination of calibration values in Bingo software. It will be demonstrated how such a calibration can be performed. The direct referencing device must be mounted in a solid and reliable way to the camera. Beside the mechanical work especially in mounting the camera beside the IMU, 2 lever arms have to be measured in mm accuracy. Important are the lever arms from the GPS Antenna to the IMU's calibrated centre and also the lever arm from the IMU centre to the Camera projection centre. In fact, the measurement with a total station is not a difficult task but the definition of the right centres and the need for using rotation matrices can cause serious accuracy problems. The benefit of small and medium format cameras is that also smaller aircrafts can be used. Like that, a gyro bases stabilized platform is recommended. This causes, that the IMU must be mounted beside the camera on the stabilizer. The advantage is, that the IMU can be used to control the platform, the problematic thing is, that the IMU to GPS antenna lever arm is floating. In fact we have to deal with an additional data stream, the values of the movement of the stabiliser to correct the floating lever arm distances. If the post-processing of the GPS-IMU data by taking the floating levers into account, delivers an expected result, the lever arms between IMU and

  16. Calibration procedure for Slocum glider deployed optical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinić, Ivona; Toro-Farmer, Gerardo; Ragan, Matthew; Oberg, Carl; Jones, Burton H

    2009-08-31

    Recent developments in the field of the autonomous underwater vehicles allow the wide usage of these platforms as part of scientific experiments, monitoring campaigns and more. The vehicles are often equipped with sensors measuring temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll a fluorescence (Chl a), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence, phycoerithrin (PE) fluorescence and spectral volume scattering function at 117 degrees, providing users with high resolution, real time data. However, calibration of these instruments can be problematic. Most in situ calibrations are performed by deploying complementary instrument packages or water samplers in the proximity of the glider. Laboratory calibrations of the mounted sensors are difficult due to the placement of the instruments within the body of the vehicle. For the laboratory calibrations of the Slocum glider instruments we developed a small calibration chamber where we can perform precise calibrations of the optical instruments aboard our glider, as well as sensors from other deployment platforms. These procedures enable us to obtain pre- and post-deployment calibrations for optical fluorescence instruments, which may differ due to the biofouling and other physical damage that can occur during long-term glider deployments. We found that biofouling caused significant changes in the calibration scaling factors of fluorescent sensors, suggesting the need for consistent and repetitive calibrations for gliders as proposed in this paper.

  17. 22 CFR 62.76 - Transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) § 62.76 Transfer procedures. (a) Program sponsors may, pursuant...) The transfer sponsor shall validate the exchange visitor's participation in its program within 30...

  18. A simple prescan calibration procedure for Ultrashort echo time imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Latta, P.; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Gruwel, M.; Tománek, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 29, S1 (2016), S42 E-ISSN 1352-8661. [ESMRMB 2016 Congress. 29.09.2016-01.10.2016, Vienna] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-12607S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ultrashort echo time * calibration * prescan procedure Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment

  19. A multivariate calibration procedure for the tensammetric determination of detergents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.

    1989-01-01

    A multivariate calibration procedure based on singular value decomposition (SVD) and the Ho-Kashyap algorithm is used for the tensammetric determination of the cationic detergents Hyamine 1622, benzalkonium chloride (BACl), N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) and mixtures of CTABr and

  20. Evaluation of multivariate calibration models transferred between spectroscopic instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Carl Emil Aae; Hansen, Per W.; Skov, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    for the same samples using the transferred model. However, sometimes the success of a model transfer is evaluated by comparing the transferred model predictions with the reference values. This is not optimal, as uncertainties in the reference method will impact the evaluation. This paper proposes a new method...... for calibration model transfer evaluation. The new method is based on comparing predictions from different instruments, rather than comparing predictions and reference values. A total of 75 flour samples were available for the study. All samples were measured on ten near infrared (NIR) instruments from two......, this paper highlights the problems of including reference values in the evaluation of a model transfer, as uncertainties in the reference method impact the evaluation. At the same time, this paper highlights the power of the proposed model transfer evaluation, which is based on comparing predictions obtained...

  1. Stepwise calibration procedure for regional coupled hydrological-hydrogeological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarthe, Baptiste; Abasq, Lena; de Fouquet, Chantal; Flipo, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Stream-aquifer interaction is a complex process depending on regional and local processes. Indeed, the groundwater component of hydrosystem and large scale heterogeneities control the regional flows towards the alluvial plains and the rivers. In second instance, the local distribution of the stream bed permeabilities controls the dynamics of stream-aquifer water fluxes within the alluvial plain, and therefore the near-river piezometric head distribution. In order to better understand the water circulation and pollutant transport in watersheds, the integration of these multi-dimensional processes in modelling platform has to be performed. Thus, the nested interfaces concept in continental hydrosystem modelling (where regional fluxes, simulated by large scale models, are imposed at local stream-aquifer interfaces) has been presented in Flipo et al (2014). This concept has been implemented in EauDyssée modelling platform for a large alluvial plain model (900km2) part of a 11000km2 multi-layer aquifer system, located in the Seine basin (France). The hydrosystem modelling platform is composed of four spatially distributed modules (Surface, Sub-surface, River and Groundwater), corresponding to four components of the terrestrial water cycle. Considering the large number of parameters to be inferred simultaneously, the calibration process of coupled models is highly computationally demanding and therefore hardly applicable to a real case study of 10000km2. In order to improve the efficiency of the calibration process, a stepwise calibration procedure is proposed. The stepwise methodology involves determining optimal parameters of all components of the coupled model, to provide a near optimum prior information for the global calibration. It starts with the surface component parameters calibration. The surface parameters are optimised based on the comparison between simulated and observed discharges (or filtered discharges) at various locations. Once the surface parameters

  2. Calibration transfer via an extreme learning machine auto-encoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wo-Ruo; Bin, Jun; Lu, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2016-03-21

    In order to solve the spectra standardization problem in near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, a Transfer via Extreme learning machine Auto-encoder Method (TEAM) has been proposed in this study. A comparative study among TEAM, piecewise direct standardization (PDS), generalized least squares (GLS) and calibration transfer methods based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was conducted, and the performances of these algorithms were benchmarked with three spectral datasets: corn, tobacco and pharmaceutical tablet spectra. The results show that TEAM is a stable method and can significantly reduce prediction errors compared with PDS, GLS and CCA. TEAM can also achieve the best RMSEPs in most cases with a small number of calibration sets. TEAM is implemented in Python language and available as an open source package at https://github.com/zmzhang/TEAM.

  3. Description, calibration, and preliminary testing of the coal liquefaction heat transfer coefficient measurement test unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulcahey, T.P.; Lo, R.N.K.; Bump, T.R.; Mulcahey, M.E.; Fischer, J.; Cannon, T.F.; Brock, R.E.; Wilson, W.I.; Bowyer, D.

    1979-06-01

    The efficiency of energy utilization within coal-liquefaction process is of major significance to the commercialization of the process. Heat exchange equipment is also one of the major economic investments in new plants. Consequently, reliable heat transfer data are required for the economical design of heat exchange equipment. Since accurate heat transfer coefficients of coal slurries, especially with a gas phase present, cannot be accurately calculated from known physical data for the operational conditions found in the coal-liquefaction process, experimentally determined heat transfer coefficients under actual process conditions are needed. A liquefaction heat-transfer-coefficient measurement test unit for a nominal one-half-ton-per-day coal slurry was constructed, calibrated, and operated at ANL. This test unit was built to determine heat transfer coefficients needed for design of feed-heat and effluent-heat exchangers used in coal-liquefaction processes. The heat-transfer test module was substituted for the preheater and reactor used in the normal coal-liquefaction process. The heat transfer coefficient can be evaluated for the heat transfer between the three-phase feed and effluent fluids in turbulent flow and a heated or cooled stainless steel surface. A description is presented of the unit and its capabilities, calibration procedures and results, and preliminary operation and data analysis. Recommendations are made that should improve accuracy and ease of operation and data analysis of the test unit.

  4. Impact of data quality and quantity and the calibration procedure on crop growth model calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Sabine J.; Werisch, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Crop growth models are a commonly used tool for impact assessment of climate variability and climate change on crop yields and water use. Process-based crop models rely on algorithms that approximate the main physiological plant processes by a set of equations containing several calibration parameters as well as basic underlying assumptions. It is well recognized that model calibration is essential to improve the accuracy and reliability of model predictions. However, model calibration and validation is often hindered by a limited quantity and quality of available data. Recent studies suggest that crop model parameters can only be derived from field experiments in which plant growth and development processes have been measured. To be able to achieve a reliable prediction of crop growth under irrigation or drought stress, the correct characterization of the whole soil-plant-atmosphere system is essential. In this context is the accurate simulation of crop development, yield and the soil water dynamics plays an important role. In this study we aim to investigate the importance of a site and cultivar-specific model calibration based on experimental data using the SVAT model Daisy. We investigate to which extent different data sets and different parameter estimation procedures affect particularly yield estimates, irrigation water demand and the soil water dynamics. The comprehensive experimental data has been derived from an experiment conducted in Germany where five irrigation regimes were imposed on cabbage. Data collection included continuous measurements of soil tension and soil water content in two plots at three depths, weekly measurements of LAI, plant heights, leaf-N-content, stomatal conductivity, biomass partitioning, rooting depth as well as harvested yields and duration of growing period. Three crop growth calibration strategies were compared: (1) manual calibration based on yield and duration of growing period, (2) manual calibration based on yield

  5. Investigating the Transferability of Calibrated Microsimulation Parameters for Operational Performance Analysis in Roundabouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Gallelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsimulation models are widespread for the analysis of roundabouts operational performance providing realistic modelling of vehicle movements. These models are based on many independent parameters to describe traffic and driver behaviour, which need to be calibrated in order to better match field data. In practice, despite the well-recognized importance of calibration and validation processes, simulation is conducted under default values because of difficulties in field data collection and deficiency in available guidelines. These issues can be faced by using transferability methodologies that allow applying the parameters calibrated for a case study to other similar locations. Therefore, this paper investigates the suitability of the transferability procedure adopting both the application-based and estimation-based approaches, by considering two roundabouts and a microsimulation tool. A Genetic Algorithm technique was used to determine the best estimates of these model parameters. After that, the authors compared field-measured with simulated queue lengths, considering four different scenarios. The results show that the application of Wiedemann 99 parameters calibrated for the first case study to the second one allows reducing the RMSNE more than 50%, thus confirming an acceptable level of transferability of these parameters between the two case studies.

  6. Algebraic analysis of the phase-calibration problem in the self-calibration procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannes, A.; Prieur, J.-L.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the phase-calibration problem encountered in astronomy when mapping incoherent sources with aperture-synthesis devices. More precisely, this analysis concerns the phase-calibration operation involved in the self-calibration procedures of phase-closure imaging. The paper revisits and completes a previous analysis presented by Lannes in the Journal of the Optical Society of America A in 2005. It also benefits from some recent developments made for solving similar problems encountered in global navigation satellite systems. In radio-astronomy, the related optimization problems have been stated and solved hitherto at the phasor level. We present here an analysis conducted at the phase level, from which we derive a method for diagnosing and solving the difficulties of the phasor approach. In the most general case, the techniques to be implemented appeal to the algebraic graph theory and the algebraic number theory. The minima of the objective functionals to be minimized are identified by raising phase-closure integer ambiguities. We also show that in some configurations, to benefit from all the available information, closure phases of order greater than three are to be introduced. In summary, this study leads to a better understanding of the difficulties related to the very principle of phase-closure imaging. To circumvent these difficulties, we propose a strategy both simple and robust.

  7. An improved outdoor calibration procedure for broadband ultraviolet radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancillo, M L; Serrano, A; Antón, M; García, J A; Vilaplana, J M; de la Morena, B

    2005-01-01

    This article aims at improving the broadband ultraviolet radiometer's calibration methodology. For this goal, three broadband radiometers are calibrated against a spectrophotometer of reference. Three different one-step calibration models are tested: ratio, first order and second order. The latter is proposed in order to adequately reproduce the high dependence on the solar zenith angle shown by the other two models and, therefore, to improve the calibration performance at high solar elevations. The proposed new second-order model requires no additional information and, thus, keeps the operational character of the one-step methodology. The models are compared in terms of their root mean square error and the most qualified is subsequently validated by comparing its predictions with the spectrophotometer measurements within an independent validation data subset. Results show that the best calibration is achieved by the second-order model, with a mean bias error and mean absolute bias error lower than 2.2 and 6.7%, respectively.

  8. Traceable calibration and demonstration of a portable dynamic force transfer standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlajic, Nicholas; Chijioke, Ako

    2017-08-01

    In general, the dynamic sensitivity of a force transducer depends upon the mechanical system in which it is used. This dependence serves as motivation to develop a dynamic force transfer standard, which can be used to calibrate an application transducer in situ. In this work, we SI-traceably calibrate a hand-held force transducer, namely an impact hammer, by using a mass suspended from a thin line which is cut to produce a known dynamic force in the form of a step function. We show that this instrument is a promising candidate as a transfer standard, since its dynamic response has small variance between different users. This calibrated transfer standard is then used to calibrate a secondary force transducer in an example application setting. The combined standard uncertainty (k  =  2) in the calibration of the transfer standard was determined to be 2.1% or less, up to a bandwidth of 5 kHz. The combined standard uncertainty (k  =  2) in the performed transfer calibration was less than 4%, up to 3 kHz. An advantage of the transfer calibration framework presented here, is that the transfer standard can be used to transfer SI-traceable calibrations without the use of any SI-traceable voltage metrology instrumentation.

  9. Validation of calibration procedures for freeform parts on CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savio, Enrico; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    workpiece in different orientations, ii) measurement of calibrated length and form standards, and iii) additional investigations with variation of measuring parameters. The feasibility of the method for the case of complex freeform geometries is documented through extensive experimental work involving...... calibration of local deviations on CMMs in two different laboratories, as well as of three different freeform items from industrial applications: a turbine blade, a screw compressor rotor and a bevel gear....

  10. Endcap Muon Chamber Calibration and Monitoring Procedures in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Vickey Boeriu, Oana

    2009-01-01

    The cathode strip chamber (CSC) system is one of the three types of muon detectors used in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It consists of 468 chambers, with a total of $\\sim$218k strips and $\\sim$183k wires, placed onto two endcaps. Calibration tests which monitor the system stability, measure configuration constants that will be downloaded to electronics and calculate the calibration constants needed in the offline reconstruction - like crosstalk, gains, noise and connectivity - are performed regularly. The full chain of acquiring, analyzing and applying the calibration constants was successfully tested recently for the first time on the CSC system, using cosmic-ray data recorded during the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC).

  11. Generic calibration procedures for nacelle-based profiling lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine; Courtney, Michael; Wagner, Rozenn

    In power performance testing, it has been demonstrated that the effects of wind speed and direction variations over the rotor disk can no longer be neglected for large wind turbines [1]. A new generation of commercial nacelle-based lidars is now available, offering wind profiling capabilities...... to calibrate profiling nacelle lidars....

  12. Calibration and correction procedure for quantitative out-of-plane shearography

    OpenAIRE

    Zastavnik, Filip; Pyl, Lincy; Gu, Jun; Sol, Hugo; Kersemans, Mathias; van Paepegem, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative shearography applications continue to gain practical importance. However, a study of the errors inherent in shearography measurements, related to calibration of the instrument and correction of the results, is most often lacking. This paper proposes a calibration and correction procedure for the out-of-plane shearography with a Michelson interferometer. The calibration is based on the shearography measurement of known rigid-body rotations of a flat plate and accounts for the loca...

  13. NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel: 2014 Cloud Calibration Procedure and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zante, Judith F.; Ide, Robert F.; Steen, Laura E.; Acosta, Waldo J.

    2014-01-01

    The results of the December 2013 to February 2014 Icing Research Tunnel full icing cloud calibration are presented. The calibration steps included establishing a uniform cloud and conducting drop size and liquid water content calibrations. The goal of the calibration was to develop a uniform cloud, and to generate a transfer function from the inputs of air speed, spray bar atomizing air pressure and water pressure to the outputs of median volumetric drop diameter and liquid water content. This was done for both 14 CFR Parts 25 and 29, Appendix C ('typical' icing) and soon-to-be released Appendix O (supercooled large drop) conditions.

  14. Calibration and correction procedure for quantitative out-of-plane shearography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastavnik, Filip; Pyl, Lincy; Gu, Jun; Sol, Hugo; Kersemans, Mathias; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative shearography applications continue to gain practical importance. However, a study of the errors inherent in shearography measurements, related to calibration of the instrument and correction of the results, is most often lacking. This paper proposes a calibration and correction procedure for the out-of-plane shearography with a Michelson interferometer. The calibration is based on the shearography measurement of known rigid-body rotations of a flat plate and accounts for the local variability of the shearing distance. The correction procedure further compensates for the variability of the sensitivity vector and separates the two out-of-plane deformation gradients when they are coupled in the measurement. The correction procedure utilizes two shearography measurements of the same experiment with distinct shearing distances. The effectiveness of the proposed calibration procedure is demonstrated in the case of a static deformation of a centrally loaded plate, where the discrepancy between experimental and finite element analysis results is minimized.

  15. Importance of prediction outlier diagnostics in determining a successful inter-vendor multivariate calibration model transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenard, Robert D; Wehlburg, Christine M; Pell, Randy J; Haaland, David M

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports on the transfer of calibration models between Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) instruments from four different manufacturers. The piecewise direct standardization (PDS) method is compared with the new hybrid calibration method known as prediction augmented classical least squares/partial least squares (PACLS/PLS). The success of a calibration transfer experiment is judged by prediction error and by the number of samples that are flagged as outliers that would not have been flagged as such if a complete recalibration were performed. Prediction results must be acceptable and the outlier diagnostics capabilities must be preserved for the transfer to be deemed successful. Previous studies have measured the success of a calibration transfer method by comparing only the prediction performance (e.g., the root mean square error of prediction, RMSEP). However, our study emphasizes the need to consider outlier detection performance as well. As our study illustrates, the RMSEP values for a calibration transfer can be within acceptable range; however, statistical analysis of the spectral residuals can show that differences in outlier performance can vary significantly between competing transfer methods. There was no statistically significant difference in the prediction error between the PDS and PACLS/PLS methods when the same subset sample selection method was used for both methods. However, the PACLS/PLS method was better at preserving the outlier detection capabilities and therefore was judged to have performed better than the PDS algorithm when transferring calibrations with the use of a subset of samples to define the transfer function. The method of sample subset selection was found to make a significant difference in the calibration transfer results using the PDS algorithm, while the transfer results were less sensitive to subset selection when the PACLS/PLS method was used.

  16. Experience with Calibration Procedures for LIPP Test Set-up Using Solid Calibration Specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mogens; Holbøll, Joachim; Fleming, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the short and the long term behaviour of two different materials that have been suggested for calibration of space charge measuring systems. Two different space charge measuring systems were planned to be used for the investigation; more specifically, the laser induced pressu...

  17. Izogenic cartilage transfer in rhinoplasty procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Baris; Bicer, Ahmet; Aytop, Derya

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage is commonly grafted during primary and secondary rhinoplasties as a means of addressing both functional and esthetic issues. Generally, such grafts are taken from the nasal septum, but auricular conchae or ribs may serve as donor sites if needed. However, the latter often entail considerable morbidity and graft mismatch. To circumvent these drawbacks, use of implants or processed cartilage (allogenic or xenogenic in origin) has been proposed. Herein, the isogenic transfer of nasal septal cartilage between identical twins is reported.

  18. Calibrated Pulse-Thermography Procedure for Inspecting HDPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Omar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript discusses the application of a pulse-thermography modality to evaluate the integrity of a high-density polyethylene HDPE joint for delamination, in nonintrusive manner. The inspected HDPE structure is a twin-cup shape, molded through extrusion, and the inspection system comprises a high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulse to excite thermal emission; the text calibrates the experiment settings (pulse duration, and detector sampling rate to accommodate HDPE bulks thermal response. The acquired thermal scans are processed through new contrast computation named “self-referencing”, to investigate the joint tensile strength and further map its adhesion interface in real-time. The proposed system (hardware, software combination performance is assessed through an ultrasound C-scan validation and further benchmarked using a standard pulse phase thermography (PPT routine.

  19. Calibration of Discrete Element Heat Transfer Parameters by Central Composite Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zongquan; Cui, Jinsheng; Hou, Xuyan; Jiang, Shengyuan

    2017-03-01

    The efficiency and precision of parameter calibration in discrete element method (DEM) are not satisfactory, and parameter calibration for granular heat transfer is rarely involved. Accordingly, parameter calibration for granular heat transfer with the DEM is studied. The heat transfer in granular assemblies is simulated with DEM, and the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of these granular assemblies is measured with the transient method in simulations. The measurement testbed is designed to test the ETC of the granular assemblies under normal pressure and a vacuum based on the steady method. Central composite design (CCD) is used to simulate the impact of the DEM parameters on the ETC of granular assemblies, and the heat transfer parameters are calibrated and compared with experimental data. The results show that, within the scope of the considered parameters, the ETC of the granular assemblies increases with an increasing particle thermal conductivity and decreases with an increasing particle shear modulus and particle diameter. The particle thermal conductivity has the greatest impact on the ETC of granular assemblies followed by the particle shear modulus and then the particle diameter. The calibration results show good agreement with the experimental results. The error is less than 4%, which is within a reasonable range for the scope of the CCD parameters. The proposed research provides high efficiency and high accuracy parameter calibration for granular heat transfer in DEM.

  20. Archimedean Spiral Antenna Calibration Procedures to Increase the Downrange Resolution of a SFCW Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolaescu, I.; Van Genderen, P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the calibration procedures of an Archimedean spiral antenna used for a stepped frequency continuous wave radar (SFCW), which works from 400MHz to 4845MHz. Two procedures are investigated, one based on an error-term flow graph for the frequency signal and the second based on a

  1. Calibrating GPS With TWSTFT For Accurate Time Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    and O. Koudelka, 2008, “Time transfer with nanosecond accuracy for the realization of International Atomic Time,” Metrologia , 45, 185- 198. [4] Z...468-475. [7] Z. Jiang, 2008, “Towards a TWSTFT Network Time Transfer,” Metrologia , 45, S6-S11.

  2. Least-MSE calibration procedures for corrections of measurement and misclassification errors in generalized linear models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parnchit Wattanasaruch

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The analyses of clinical and epidemiologic studies are often based on some kind of regression analysis, mainly linearregression and logistic models. These analyses are often affected by the fact that one or more of the predictors are measuredwith error. The error in the predictors is also known to bias the estimates and hypothesis testing results. One of the proceduresfrequently used to handle such problem in order to reduce the measurement errors is the method of regression calibration forpredicting the continuous covariate. The idea is to predict the true value of error-prone predictor from the observed data, thento use the predicted value for the analyses. In this research we develop four calibration procedures, namely probit, complementary log-log, logit, and logistic calibration procedures for corrections of the measurement error and/or the misclassification error to predict the true values for the misclassification explanatory variables used in generalized linear models. Theprocesses give the predicted true values of a binary explanatory variable using the calibration techniques then use thesepredicted values to fit the three models such that the probit, the complementary log-log, and the logit models under the binaryresponse. All of which are investigated by considering the mean square error (MSE in 1,000 simulation studies in each caseof the known parameters and conditions. The results show that the proposed working calibration techniques that can performadequately well are the probit, logistic, and logit calibration procedures. Both the probit calibration procedure and the probitmodel are superior to the logistic and logit calibrations due to the smallest MSE. Furthermore, the probit model-parameterestimates also improve the effects of the misclassification explanatory variable. Only the complementary log-log model andits calibration technique are appropriate when measurement error is moderate and sample size is high.

  3. A recommendation for revised dose calibrator measurement procedures for 89Zr and 124I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J Beattie

    Full Text Available Because of their chemical properties and multiday half lives, iodine-124 and zirconium-89 are being used in a growing number of PET imaging studies. Some aspects of their quantitation, however, still need attention. For (89Zr the PET images should, in principle, be as quantitatively accurate as similarly reconstructed 18F measurements. We found, however, that images of a 20 cm well calibration phantom containing (89Zr underestimated the activity by approximately 10% relative to a dose calibrator measurement (Capintec CRC-15R using a published calibration setting number of 465. PET images of (124I, in contrast, are complicated by the contribution of decays in cascade that add spurious coincident events to the PET data. When these cascade coincidences are properly accounted for, quantitatively accurate images should be possible. We found, however, that even with this correction we still encountered what appeared to be a large variability in the accuracy of the PET images when compared to dose calibrator measurements made using the calibration setting number, 570, recommended by Capintec. We derive new calibration setting numbers for (89Zr and (124I based on their 511 keV photon peaks as measured on an HPGe detector. The peaks were calibrated relative to an 18F standard, the activity level of which was precisely measured in a dose calibrator under well-defined measurement conditions. When measuring (89Zr on a Capintec CRC-15R we propose the use of calibration setting number 517. And for (124I, we recommend the use of a copper filter surrounding the sample and the use of calibration setting number 494. The new dose calibrator measurement procedures we propose will result in more consistent and accurate radioactivity measurements of (89Zr and (124I. These and other positron emitting radionuclides can be accurately calibrated relative to 18F based on measurements of their 511 keV peaks and knowledge of their relative positron abundances.

  4. Discharge and Nitrogen Transfer Modelling in the Berze River: A HYPE Setup and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinbergs, Arturs; Lagzdins, Ainis; Jansons, Viesturs; Abramenko, Kaspars; Sudars, Ritvars

    2017-05-01

    This study is focused on water quality and quantity modelling in the Berze River basin located in the Zemgale region of Latvia. The contributing basin area of 872 km2 is furthermore divided into 15 sub-basins designated according to the characteristics of hydrological network and water sampling programme. The river basin of interest is a spatially complex system with agricultural land and forests as two predominant land use types. Complexity of the system reflects in the discharge intensity and diffuse pollution of nitrogen compounds into the water bodies of the river basin. The presence of urban area has an impact as the load from the existing wastewater treatment plants consist up to 76 % of the total nitrogen load in the Berze River basin. Representative data sets of land cover, agricultural field data base for crop distribution analysis, estimation of crop management, soil type map, digital elevation model, drainage conditions, network of water bodies and point sources were used for the modelling procedures. The semi-distributed hydro chemical model HYPE has a setup to simulate discharge and nitrogen transfer. In order to make the model more robust and appropriate for the current study the data sets previously stated were classified by unifying similar spatially located polygons. The data layers were overlaid and 53 hydrological response units (SLCs) were created. Agricultural land consists of 48 SLCs with the details of soils, drainage conditions, crop types, and land management practices. Manual calibration procedure was applied to improve the performance of discharge simulation. Simulated discharge values showed good agreement with the observed values with the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.82 and bias of -6.6 %. Manual calibration of parameters related to nitrogen leakage simulation was applied to test the most sensitive parameters.

  5. Radiation Heat Transfer Procedures for Space-Related Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last contract year, a numerical procedure for combined conduction-radiation heat transfer using unstructured grids has been developed. As a result of this research, one paper has been published in the Numerical Heat Transfer Journal. One paper has been accepted for presentation at the International Center for Heat and Mass Transfer's International Symposium on Computational Heat Transfer to be held in Australia next year. A journal paper is under review by my NASA's contact. A conference paper for the ASME National Heat Transfer conference is under preparation. In summary, a total of four (4) papers (two journal and two conference) have been published, accepted or are under preparation. There are two (2) to three (3) more papers to be written for the project. In addition to the above publications, one book chapter, one journal paper and six conference papers have been published as a result of this project. Over the last contract year, the research project resulted in one Ph.D. thesis and partially supported another Ph.D. student. My NASA contact and myself have formulated radiation heat transfer procedures for materials with different indices of refraction and for combined conduction-radiation heat transfer. We are trying to find other applications for the procedures developed under this grant.

  6. Calibration of Modulation Transfer Function of Surface Profilometers with 1D and 2D Binary Pseudo-random Array Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.

    2008-05-19

    We suggest and describe the use of a binary pseudo-random grating as a standard test surface for calibration of the modulation transfer function of microscopes. Results from calibration of a MicromapTM-570 interferometric microscope are presented.

  7. Flush Airdata Sensing (FADS) System Calibration Procedures and Results for Blunt Forebodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.; Whitmore, Stephen A.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Borrer, Jerry; Roback, V. Eric

    1999-01-01

    Blunt-forebody pressure data are used to study the behavior of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center flush airdata sensing (FADS) pressure model and solution algorithm. The model relates surface pressure measurements to the airdata state. Spliced from the potential flow solution for uniform flow over a sphere and the modified Newtonian impact theory, the model was shown to apply to a wide range of blunt-forebody shapes and Mach numbers. Calibrations of a sphere, spherical cones, a Rankine half body, and the F-14, F/A-18, X-33, X-34, and X-38 configurations are shown. The three calibration parameters are well-behaved from Mach 0.25 to Mach 5.0, an angle-of-attack range extending to greater than 30 deg, and an angle-of-sideslip range extending to greater than 15 deg. Contrary to the sharp calibration changes found on traditional pitot-static systems at transonic speeds, the FADS calibrations are smooth, monotonic functions of Mach number and effective angles of attack and sideslip. Because the FADS calibration is sensitive to pressure port location, detailed measurements of the actual pressure port locations on the flight vehicle are required and the wind-tunnel calibration model should have pressure ports in similar locations. The procedure for calibrating a FADS system is outlined.

  8. Calibration procedure for a potato crop growth model using information from across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidmann, Tove; Tofteng, Charlotte; Abrahamsen, Per

    2008-01-01

    In the FertOrgaNic EU project, 3 years of field experiments with drip irrigation and fertigation were carried out at six different sites across Europe, involving seven different varieties of potato. The Daisy model, which simulates plant growth together with water and nitrogen dynamics, was used...... to simulate the field experiments. An initial potato parameterisation was generated from an independent dataset and was used for site-specific calibrations. At those sites where the same variety was used for all 3 years, the calibration of the initial potato model was based on the first 2 years using the last...... for adaptation of the Daisy model to new potato varieties or for the improvement of the existing parameter set. The procedure is then, as a starting point, to focus the calibration process on the recommended list of parameters to change. We demonstrate this approach by showing the procedure for recalibrating...

  9. 32 CFR 171.6 - Reutilization and transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... transfer procedures. Prior to any sales effort, the Secretary of Defense shall, to the maximum extent... reutilization: (1) USDA shall notify Army, Navy, and/or Air Force, in writing, of their aircraft requirements as... ready for sale to Headquarters, Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service, ATTN: DRMS-LMI, Federal...

  10. Rapid procedure to calibrate EC-10 and EC-20 capacitance sensors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rapid calibration procedure for EC-10 and EC-20 sensors is introduced to promote the commercial use of these sensors for hydroponic irrigation management in coir. The method is comprised of taking one sensor reading, by a sensor installed under hydroponic crop production conditions, and one gravimetric sample, ...

  11. Calibration procedure and data processing for a TV Thomson scattering system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, C. J.; Chu, C.C.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; van der Meiden, H. J.

    2001-01-01

    Calibration procedures for Thomson scattering systems based on television-like cameras, so-called TVTS systems, are described. The TVTS systems of the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), the TJ-II stellarator, and the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR) tokamak combine a 10-15 J

  12. Rapid procedure to calibrate EC-10 and EC-20 capacitance sensors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-04

    Oct 4, 2013 ... A rapid calibration procedure for EC-10 and EC-20 sensors is introduced to promote the commercial use of these sensors for hydroponic irrigation management in coir. The method is comprised of taking one sensor reading, by a sensor installed under hydroponic crop production conditions, and one ...

  13. Calibration of a Numerical Model for Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in an Extruder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; Pedersen, David Bue; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses experiments performed in order to validate simulations on a fused deposition modelling (FDM) extruder. The nozzle has been simulated in terms of heat transfer and fluid flow. In order to calibrate and validate these simulations, experiments were performed giving a significant...

  14. Calibration transfer for solving the signal instability in quantitative headspace-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Pavón, José Luis; del Nogal Sánchez, Miguel; García Pinto, Carmelo; Fernández Laespada, M Esther; Moreno Cordero, Bernardo

    2003-11-15

    It is reported that calibration transfer is able to compensate the variations in sensitivity in direct coupling of a headspace sampler to a mass spectrometer when used for quantification purposes using multivariate calibration techniques. This strategy of signal stability compensation allows the use of models constructed from large calibration standard sets without having to repeat their measurement even though variations occur in sensitivity, which may or may not be constant along the mass range. This technique offers advantages over the use of internal standards in this methodology and only requires the measurement of a small number of transfer samples with each set of unknown samples. The results obtained in the determination of six volatile organic compounds-benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene (BTEX), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and mesitylene-are reported. To obtain an appropriate calibration set, a Plackett-Burman design with five levels of concentration for each component was employed. A PLS multivariate calibration model was constructed with a group of 25 samples. For selection of the optimum number of principal components, an external validation set (5 samples) was used and the prediction capacity of this set was checked with an additional group of samples that had not been used either in the construction or in the validation of the model. The results obtained can be considered highly satisfactory, and the methodology was successfully tested with natural matrixes (river and tap water).

  15. Randomized trial to examine procedure-to-procedure transfer in laparoscopic simulator training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, F; Sorensen, J L; Konge, L

    2016-01-01

    -centre educational superiority trial. Surgical novices practised basic skills on a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator. On reaching proficiency, participants were randomized to proficiency-based training. The intervention group practised two procedures on the simulator (appendicectomy followed by salpingectomy......BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic simulation has become a standard component of surgical training, but there is limited knowledge regarding skills transfer between procedural tasks. The objective was to investigate the specificity of procedural simulator training. METHODS: This was randomized single......), whereas the control group trained on only one procedure (salpingectomy). The main outcomes were number of repetitions and time to proficiency for the second procedure. RESULTS: Ninety-six participants were randomized, of whom 74 per cent were women, with a median age of 26 years. The intervention group...

  16. Tolerance on sphere radius for the calibration of the transfer function of coherence scanning interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rong; Coupland, Jeremy M.; Wang, Yuhang; Leach, Richard K.

    2017-06-01

    Although coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) commonly achieves a sub-nanometre noise level in surface topography measurement, the absolute accuracy is difficult to determine when measuring a surface that contains varying local slope angles and curvatures. Recent research has shown that it is possible to use a single sphere with a radius much greater than the source wavelength to calibrate the three-dimensional transfer function of a CSI system. A major requirement is the accurate knowledge of the sphere radius, but the three-dimensional measurement of a sphere with nanometre level uncertainty is a highly challenging metrology problem, and is not currently feasible. Perfect spheres do not exist and every measurement has uncertainty. Without having a quantitative understanding of the tolerance of the sphere radius, the calibration method cannot be used confidently for calibration of the transfer function of a CSI system that may be used in research laboratories or industry. In this paper, the effects of the tolerance of the radius of the calibration sphere on surface topography measurements are quantitatively analysed through a computational approach. CSI measurements of spherical, sinusoidal and rough surfaces are investigated in the presence of various degrees of radius error. A lookup table that relates the surface height error as a function of the radius error and surface slope angle is provided. The users may estimate the required tolerances of the sphere radius for their specific surface measurements if this calibration approach is used. The output of this paper provides a feasibility analysis for this calibration method for further development and applications.

  17. An alternative method for calibration of narrow band radiometer using a radiative transfer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador, J; Wolfram, E; D' Elia, R [Centro de Investigaciones en Laseres y Aplicaciones, CEILAP (CITEFA-CONICET), Juan B. de La Salle 4397 (B1603ALO), Villa Martelli, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zamorano, F; Casiccia, C [Laboratorio de Ozono y Radiacion UV, Universidad de Magallanes, Punta Arenas (Chile) (Chile); Rosales, A [Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco, UNPSJB, Facultad de Ingenieria, Trelew (Argentina) (Argentina); Quel, E, E-mail: jsalvador@citefa.gov.ar [Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral, Unidad Academica Rio Gallegos Avda. Lisandro de la Torre 1070 ciudad de Rio Gallegos-Sta Cruz (Argentina) (Argentina)

    2011-01-01

    The continual monitoring of solar UV radiation is one of the major objectives proposed by many atmosphere research groups. The purpose of this task is to determine the status and degree of progress over time of the anthropogenic composition perturbation of the atmosphere. Such changes affect the intensity of the UV solar radiation transmitted through the atmosphere that then interacts with living organisms and all materials, causing serious consequences in terms of human health and durability of materials that interact with this radiation. One of the many challenges that need to be faced to perform these measurements correctly is the maintenance of periodic calibrations of these instruments. Otherwise, damage caused by the UV radiation received will render any one calibration useless after the passage of some time. This requirement makes the usage of these instruments unattractive, and the lack of frequent calibration may lead to the loss of large amounts of acquired data. Motivated by this need to maintain calibration or, at least, know the degree of stability of instrumental behavior, we have developed a calibration methodology that uses the potential of radiative transfer models to model solar radiation with 5% accuracy or better relative to actual conditions. Voltage values in each radiometer channel involved in the calibration process are carefully selected from clear sky data. Thus, tables are constructed with voltage values corresponding to various atmospheric conditions for a given solar zenith angle. Then we model with a radiative transfer model using the same conditions as for the measurements to assemble sets of values for each zenith angle. The ratio of each group (measured and modeled) allows us to calculate the calibration coefficient value as a function of zenith angle as well as the cosine response presented by the radiometer. The calibration results obtained by this method were compared with those obtained with a Brewer MKIII SN 80 located in the

  18. Calibration procedures for improved accuracy of wind turbine blade load measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, J.Aa. [Aeronautical Research Inst. of Sweden, Bromma (Sweden); Johansson, Hjalmar [Teknikgruppen AB, Sollentuna (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    External loads acting on wind turbine blades are mainly transferred via the hub to the rest of the structure. It is therefore a normal approach to measure the loads acting on the turbine by load measurements in the blade roots. The load measurement is often accomplished by measurements of strain on the surface of the blade or the hub. The strain signals are converted to loads by applying calibration factors to the measurements. This paper deals with difficulties associated with load measurements on two different wind turbines; one with strain gauges applied to a steel hub where a linear stress-load relationship is expected and the other with strain gauges applied to the GFRP blade close to the bearings where strong non-linearity`s and temperature effects are expected. This paper suggests calibration methods to overcome these problems. 2 refs, 11 figs

  19. No transfer of calibration between action and perception in learning a golf putting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lier, Wim; Van der Kamp, John; van der Zanden, Anne; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2011-10-01

    We assessed calibration of perception and action in the context of a golf putting task. Previous research has shown that right-handed novice golfers make rightward errors both in the perception of the perfect aiming line from the ball to the hole and in the putting action. Right-handed experts, however, produce accurate putting actions but tend to make leftward errors in perception. In two experiments, we examined whether these skill-related differences in directional error reflect transfer of calibration from action to perception. In the main experiment, three groups of right-handed novice participants followed a pretest, practice, posttest, retention test design. During the tests, directional error for the putting action and the perception of the perfect aiming line were determined. During practice, participants were provided only with verbal outcome feedback about directional error; one group trained perception and the second trained action, whereas the third group did not practice. Practice led to a relatively permanent annihilation of directional error, but these improvements in accuracy were specific to the trained task. Hence, no transfer of calibration occurred between perception and action. The findings are discussed within the two-visual-system model for perception and action, and implications for perceptual learning in action are raised.

  20. Calibration procedure of Hukseflux SR25 to Establish the Diffuse Reference for the Outdoor Broadband Radiometer Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reda, Ibrahim M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Andreas, Afshin M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Accurate pyranometer calibrations, traceable to internationally recognized standards, are critical for solar irradiance measurements. One calibration method is the component summation method, where the pyranometers are calibrated outdoors under clear sky conditions, and the reference global solar irradiance is calculated as the sum of two reference components, the diffuse horizontal and subtended beam solar irradiances. The beam component is measured with pyrheliometers traceable to the World Radiometric Reference, while there is no internationally recognized reference for the diffuse component. In the absence of such a reference, we present a method to consistently calibrate pyranometers for measuring the diffuse component. The method is based on using a modified shade/unshade method and a pyranometer with less than 0.5 W/m2 thermal offset. The calibration result shows that the responsivity of Hukseflux SR25 pyranometer equals 10.98 uV/(W/m2) with +/-0.86 percent uncertainty.

  1. Calibrating Bosch motronic systems - Efficiently using Bosch/AVL iProcedures with AVL Cameo; Bosch/AVL-iProcedures fuer AVL Cameo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuder, J.; Kruse, T.; Wuelfers, S.; Stuber, A. [Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany); Gschweitl, K.; Lick, P.; Fuerhapter, A. [AVL List GmbH, Graz (Austria)

    2003-12-01

    In 2000, Bosch and AVL began joint development of tailor-made test routine procedures for calibrating Bosch-Motronic systems. The aim was to provide worldwide support to customers calibrating their Motronic engine management systems. Bosch and AVL strove to create a solution which would provide reproducible calibration results of high quality and systemize and accelerate the calibration process. The resulting Bosch/AVL-iProcedures are available to all customers of Bosch and AVL. (orig.) [German] Seit dem Jahr 2000 entwickeln Bosch und AVL gemeinsam massgeschneiderte Prueflaufprozeduren zur Applikation von Bosch-Motronic-Systemen. Ziele sind die weltweite Unterstuetzung der Kunden bei der Applikation der Motorsteuerung Motronic hinsichtlich reproduzierbarer Abstimmungen auf hohem Qualitaetsniveau sowie eine Systematisierung und Beschleunigung des Applikationsprozesses. Die so enstandenen Produkte sind als so genannte Bosch/AVL-iProcedures fuer alle Kunden von Bosch und AVL erhaeltlich. (orig.)

  2. A simple evaluation procedure of the TAN calibration and the influence of non-ideal calibration elements on VNA S-parameter measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Stumper

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available For the 7-term general TAN (Through-Attenuator-Network self-calibration method of a four-sampler vector network analyser (VNA, and for all derived calibration methods like TLN, TRL, TRM, TAR, or TMN, it is shown that a very simple evaluation procedure of the seven error terms is possible, even if the Through connection is replaced by a reflectionless network with known transmission. Expressions for the deviations of the measured S-parameters of two-port test objects (d.u.t.s from the true values, which are caused by deviations of the modeled S-parameters of non-ideal calibration elements ("standards" from their true values, are also presented. Additionally, it is shown that a TAN calibration is also possible in case of unequal reflections of the Network.

  3. Stability of modulation transfer function calibration of surface profilometers using binary pseudo-random gratings and arrays with nonideal groove shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Samuel K.; Anderson, Erik H.; Cambie, Rossana; Marchesini, Stefano; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitry L.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-03-31

    The major problem of measurement of a power spectral density (PSD) distribution of surface heights with surface profilometers arises due to the unknown Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of the instruments, which tends to distort the PSD at higher spatial frequencies. The special mathematical properties of binary pseudo-random patterns make them an ideal basis for developing MTF calibration test surfaces. Two-dimensional binary pseudo-random arrays (BPRAs) have been fabricated and used for the MTF calibration of the MicroMap{trademark}-570 interferometric microscope with all available objectives. An investigation into the effects of fabrication imperfections on the quality of the MTF calibration and a procedure for accounting for such imperfections are presented.

  4. A novel tool and procedure for in-situ volumetric calibration of motion capture systems for breathing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, C; Schena, E; Saccomandi, P; Silvestri, S

    2016-08-01

    Optical motion capture systems are widely used in biomechanics although have not been significantly explored for measuring volumes and volume variations yet. The aim of this study was to propose and test a completely novel procedure for the calibration of motion capture systems for the breathing analysis in terms of volume measurements, by the use of a tool consisting in an ad-hoc designed in-situ calibration device (CD) and two algorithms for calibration. Both the calibration tool and the calibration procedure performed in the range 0-2780mL on an Optoelectronic Plethysmography (OEP) system are presented. The CD delivered known volume (ΔVCD) variations to the OEP; the two algorithms performed the calibration by the comparison between ΔVCD and OEP recorded volume (ΔVOEP), in both static and dynamic conditions. Discrimination threshold, accuracy, precision and repeatability for the volume variation measurements have been evaluated, as well as the calibration curve of the OEP. OEP volume threshold of ±8.92mL was assessed; the volume measurement accuracy was always better than 6.0% of measured volume, and a volume repeatability of ±2.7mL was found. Lastly, the calibration curve was assessed to be ΔVOEP= 0.962·ΔVCD. Results demonstrate that the proposed calibration procedure can be useful to provide an in-situ accurate calibration of motion capture systems in the volume analysis, to optimize the hardware and the software of the available system for volume measurement as well as to establish the motion capture system appropriateness, in terms of technical suitability and data quality.

  5. The three-measurement two-calibration method for measuring the transfer matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, S; Gibiat, V; Lefebvre, A; Guilain, Stephane

    2011-05-01

    Extensive use of transfer matrices (TMs) is made in determining the acoustic properties of a duct and in in-duct acoustic propagation models in the automotive industry and for musical acoustics purposes. The experimental apparatuses of classical TM measurement methods feature two measurement heads. Two microphones are flush with the walls of each head. The pressure signals are processed following the transfer function method constructed on an analytical model of acoustic propagation in measurement heads. The present paper aims at presenting a measurement method based on a three-microphone experimental apparatus and on its acoustic calibration through two reference measurements: the three-measurement two-calibration method for measuring the TM (3M2C-TM). Two microphones are flush with the measurement head walls and one is in the cap closing one side of the measured duct. 3M2C-TM proved essential for an accurate measurement of the four TM elements of two different ducts: a cylindrical duct and an expansion chamber.

  6. Design, calibration and error analysis of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Tree, D. R.; Dewitt, D. P.; Wahiduzzaman, S. A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the methodology and uncertainty analyses of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines. Results are presented for determining the local wall heat flux in an internal combustion engine (using a surface thermocouple-type heat flux gage) and the apparent flame-temperature and soot volume fraction path length product in a diesel engine (using two-color pyrometry). It is shown that a surface thermocouple heat transfer gage suitably constructed and calibrated will have an accuracy of 5 to 10 percent. It is also shown that, when applying two-color pyrometry to measure the apparent flame temperature and soot volume fraction-path length, it is important to choose at least one of the two wavelengths to lie in the range of 1.3 to 2.3 micrometers. Carefully calibrated two-color pyrometer can ensure that random errors in the apparent flame temperature and in the soot volume fraction path length will remain small (within about 1 percent and 10-percent, respectively).

  7. Calibration and intercomparison of acetic acid measurements using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, K.B.; Keene, W.C.; Pszenny, A.A.P.; Mayne, H.R.; Talbot, R.W.; Sive, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Acetic acid is one of the most abundant organic acids in the ambient atmosphere, with maximum mixing ratios reaching into the tens of parts per billion by volume (ppbv) range. The identities and associated magnitudes of the major sources and sinks for acetic acid are poorly characterized, due in part to the limitation in available measurement techniques. This paper demonstrates that Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) can reliably quantify acetic acid vapor in ambient air. Three different PTR-MS configurations were calibrated at low ppbv mixing ratios using permeation tubes, which yielded calibration factors between 7.0 and 10.9 normalized counts per second per ppbv (ncps ppbv−1) at a drift tube field strength of 132 townsend (Td). Detection limits ranged from 0.06 to 0.32 ppbv with dwell times of 5 s. These calibration factors showed negligible humidity dependence. Using the experimentally determined calibration factors, PTR-MS measurements of acetic acid during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) campaign were validated against results obtained using Mist Chambers coupled with Ion Chromatography (MC/IC). An orthogonal least squares linear regression of paired data yielded a slope of 1.14 ± 0.06 (2σ), an intercept of 0.049 ± 20 (2σ) ppbv, and an R2 of 0.78. The median mixing ratio of acetic acid on Appledore Island, ME during the ICARTT campaign was 0.530 ± 0.025 ppbv with a minimum of 0.075 ± 0.004 ppbv, and a maximum of 3.555 ± 0.171 ppbv.

  8. Controlling gray-level variation in contrast-enhanced digital mammography: design of a calibration procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeunehomme, Fanny; Iordache, Razvan; Muller, Serge L.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2003-06-01

    Ideally, the gray level changes in a Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography (CEDM) sequence reflect the uptake and wash-out of contrast medium in the breast. While insignificant in standard mammography, gray level variations with time caused both by patient and system related factors, have been observed in clinical CEDM sequences. We have acquired phantom image series on digital mammography systems using a Mo/Cu anode-filter combination and a tube voltage between 45 and 49 kVp, in order to derive a model for gray level change with time as a function of system parameters. The gray level variation exhibits a fair degree of inter-series repeatability, and strongly depends on the dose received by the detector and timing of the image acquisition series. Moreover, for tissue-equivalent compositions, the relative gray level change with respect to the first image does not depend on the composition. We designed a calibration procedure that can be used to compensate for the tiny system-dependent signal variation that has been observed. A global reduction of 80-93% of the variation has been demonstrated in sequences acquired on a breast shaped phantom. Local improvement is effective across the whole field of view. When imaging iodine inserts (0.5-2 mg/cm2 concentration), the calibration increases the constancy with time of iodine signal on subtracted sequences by a factor of 4 (median value).

  9. Threshold calibration and threshold finding procedure in various LHCb muon MWPC

    CERN Document Server

    Kashchuk, A

    2007-01-01

    Threshold calibration and threshold finding procedure in the LHCb muon MWPCs are discussed in this note. Two thresholds in units of charge [fC] are needed in principle: one for the anodes, e.g. 12fC, and one for the cathodes, e.g. 6fC. In reality 120,000 individual thresholds due to variations in offset in CARIOCA chip, different detector capacitances of pads with different size resulting variations in sensitivity from chamber to chamber have to be calculated in register units [r.u.] and move to the threshold registers located in DIALOG chip. The general formula for thresholds in [r.u.] for a given charge unit [fC] is presented. A list of detector capacitance and the averaged sensitivity needed for threshold calculations are given for the inner-most LHCb muon MWPCs in Appendix.

  10. Development of a procedure of calibration of meters of product Kerma-Area; Desarrollo de un procedimiento de calibracion de medidores de producto Kerma-Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginjaume, M.; Roig, M.; Amores, M.; Ortega, X.

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the calibration procedure developed, uncertainties associated and scope of accredited degree. Also the objectives of EURAMET 1177 and calibrations are described conducted by our laboratory in this intercomparison. (Author)

  11. Assessment of a calibration procedure to estimate soil water content with Sentek Diviner 2000 capacitance probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallo, G.; Giordano, G.; Provenzano, G.

    2012-04-01

    soil pores, affecting the bulk density/water content relationship (Allbrook, 1992). Field experiments in shrinking-swelling clay soils evidenced that soil water content can be affect by errors of 20-30% if the soil shrinkage curve is not considered (Fares et al., 2004). The main objective of the paper was to propose a practical calibration procedure for FDR sensor using mini-lysimeter containing undisturbed soil, allowing to take in to account the possible variations of the bulk density with the soil water content. Moreover, the possibility of using disturbed soil samples for determining the sensor calibration curve was also investigated, in order to simplify the proposed methodology. Experiments were carried out on three different soil, two of which containing a percentage of clay higher than 40%, in order to compare the specific calibration curves with that suggested by the manufactures. The investigation showed how for swelling/shrinkage soils it is necessary the knowledge of the actual soil bulk density and also that using disturbed soil sample is not possible to consider the effects of the soil shrinkage consequent to the soil water content reductions.

  12. Calibration Transfer Between a Bench Scanning and a Submersible Diode Array Spectrophotometer for In Situ Wastewater Quality Monitoring in Sewer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Rita S; Pinheiro, Helena M; Ferreira, Filipa; Matos, José S; Pinheiro, Alexandre; Lourenço, Nídia D

    2016-03-01

    Online monitoring programs based on spectroscopy have a high application potential for the detection of hazardous wastewater discharges in sewer systems. Wastewater hydraulics poses a challenge for in situ spectroscopy, especially when the system includes storm water connections leading to rapid changes in water depth, velocity, and in the water quality matrix. Thus, there is a need to optimize and fix the location of in situ instruments, limiting their availability for calibration. In this context, the development of calibration models on bench spectrophotometers to estimate wastewater quality parameters from spectra acquired with in situ instruments could be very useful. However, spectra contain information not only from the samples, but also from the spectrophotometer generally invalidating this approach. The use of calibration transfer methods is a promising solution to this problem. In this study, calibration models were developed using interval partial least squares (iPLS), for the estimation of total suspended solids (TSS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in sewage from Ultraviolet-visible spectra acquired in a bench scanning spectrophotometer. The feasibility of calibration transfer to a submersible, diode array equipment, to be subsequently operated in situ, was assessed using three procedures: slope and bias correction (SBC); single wavelength standardization (SWS) on mean spectra; and local centering (LC). The results showed that SBC was the most adequate for the available data, adding insignificant error to the base model estimates. Single wavelength standardization was a close second best, potentially more robust, and independent of the base iPLS model. Local centering was shown to be inadequate for the samples and instruments used. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 50 - Measurement Principle and Calibration Procedure for the Measurement of Ozone in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reference 8. 3. Apparatus. A complete UV calibration system consists of an ozone generator, an output port... necessary to meet the output stability and photometer precision requirements. 3.3 Ozone generator. Device... Procedure for the Measurement of Ozone in the Atmosphere D Appendix D to Part 50 Protection of Environment...

  14. Calibration of the Modulation Transfer Function of Surface Profilometers with Binary Pseudorandom Test Standards: Expanding the Application Range to Fizeau Interferometers and Electron Microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, V.V.; Takacs, P.; Anderson, E.H.; Barber, S.K.; Bouet, N.; Cambie, R.; Conley, R.; McKinney, W.R.; Voronov, D.L.

    2011-09-16

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudorandom (BPR) gratings and arrays has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer. Here we report on a further expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 in. phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to the BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  15. Linear model correction: A method for transferring a near-infrared multivariate calibration model without standard samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2016-12-05

    Calibration transfer is essential for practical applications of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy because the measurements of the spectra may be performed on different instruments and the difference between the instruments must be corrected. For most of calibration transfer methods, standard samples are necessary to construct the transfer model using the spectra of the samples measured on two instruments, named as master and slave instrument, respectively. In this work, a method named as linear model correction (LMC) is proposed for calibration transfer without standard samples. The method is based on the fact that, for the samples with similar physical and chemical properties, the spectra measured on different instruments are linearly correlated. The fact makes the coefficients of the linear models constructed by the spectra measured on different instruments are similar in profile. Therefore, by using the constrained optimization method, the coefficients of the master model can be transferred into that of the slave model with a few spectra measured on slave instrument. Two NIR datasets of corn and plant leaf samples measured with different instruments are used to test the performance of the method. The results show that, for both the datasets, the spectra can be correctly predicted using the transferred partial least squares (PLS) models. Because standard samples are not necessary in the method, it may be more useful in practical uses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel Real-time Calibration and Alignment Procedure for LHCb Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Prouve, Claire

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve optimal detector performance the LHCb experiment has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II of the LHC. For the alignment tasks, data is collected and processed at the beginning of each fill while the calibrations are performed for each run. This real time alignment and calibration allows the same constants being used in both the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. Additionally the newly computed alignment and calibration constants can be instantly used in the trigger, making it more efficient. The online alignment and calibration of the RICH detectors also enable the use of hadronic particle identification in the trigger. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the LHCb trigger. An overview of all alignment and calibration tasks is presented and their performance is shown.

  17. Poster - Thur Eve - 01: Development of simple and fast EBT2 film calibration procedure using PDD table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhakeem, E; Zavgorodni, S

    2012-07-01

    Standard calibration procedure for EBT films is laborious and time-consuming. The objective of this work was to develop a simple and fast approach of EBT2 film calibration using PDD tables. EBT2 sheet is cut into 3 stripes of 5×25.5cm2 . The strips were exposed to dose of 600, 200 and 70cGy at dmax each while placed horizontally in the middle of a 30×30×30cm3 solid water phantom. Varian 21EX 6MV 10×10cm2 beam was used with the gantry rotated to 90° and SSD of 100cm to the phantom surface. After at least 24 hours, the films were digitized with flatbed scanner (Epson10000XL), according to a modified ISP scanning protocol. All images were analysed using an in-house Matlab code and ImageJ software. The net-optical densities against depths in the solid phantom were calibrated using PDD tables measured with ionization chamber for same machine. For verification, another calibration curve was generated for the same film batch following the same calibration protocol. Seven pieces of films were exposed to known doses and these doses were reconstructed using two derived calibration curves. The proposed approach was 3.6 times faster than the standard considering the number of films used in each methods, 3 stripes compared to11 pieces. The mean relative dose difference calculated for these films using the PDD calibration and the standard methods was 1.0±1.2% and 0.5±2.2% with maximum relative differences of 3.0% and 4.7% respectively. Our results show that PDD calibration approach is much easier, faster and predicts dose more reproducibly and accurately than the standard approach. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  18. 16 CFR 1209.8 - Procedure for calibration of radiation instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... radiation pyrometer. Repeat for each temperature. (b) Total heat flux meter. The total flux meter shall be... meter. This latter calibration shall make use of the radiant panel tester as the heat source... maintain a dedicated calibrated reference flux meter against which one or more working flux meters can be...

  19. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 03-2-827 Test Procedures for Video Target Scoring Using Calibration Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    Calibration Light Pole. Light poles should be erected as straight as possible (plumb). Its base must be firmly set. Where applicable, poles should...function of the Quazar** application to record the event until the projectile impacts the farthest target while monitoring the live video feedback . The

  20. Binary Pseudo-Random Gratings and Arrays for Calibration of Modulation Transfer Functions of Surface Profilometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Samuel K.; Anderson, Erik D.; Cambie, Rossana; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Stover, John C.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2009-09-11

    A technique for precise measurement of the modulation transfer function (MTF), suitable for characterization of a broad class of surface profilometers, is investigated in detail. The technique suggested in [Proc. SPIE 7077-7, (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)]is based on use of binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays as standard MTF test surfaces. Unlike most conventional test surfaces, BPR gratings and arrays possess white-noise-like inherent power spectral densities (PSD), allowing the direct determination of the one- and two-dimensional MTF, respectively, with a sensitivity uniform over the entire spatial frequency range of a profiler. In the cited work, a one dimensional realization of the suggested method based on use of BPR gratings has been demonstrated. Here, a high-confidence of the MTF calibration technique is demonstrated via cross comparison measurements of a number of two dimensional BPR arrays using two different interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer. We also present the results of application of the experimentally determined MTF correction to the measurement taken with the MicromapTM-570 interferometric microscope of the surface roughness of a super-polished test mirror. In this particular case, without accounting for the instrumental MTF, the surface rms roughness over half of the instrumental spatial frequency bandwidth would be underestimated by a factor of approximately 1.4.

  1. Nitrous oxide emissions from cropland: a procedure for calibrating the DayCent biogeochemical model using inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Rashad; Fienen, Michael N.; Parkin, Timothy B.; Anex, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    DayCent is a biogeochemical model of intermediate complexity widely used to simulate greenhouse gases (GHG), soil organic carbon and nutrients in crop, grassland, forest and savannah ecosystems. Although this model has been applied to a wide range of ecosystems, it is still typically parameterized through a traditional “trial and error” approach and has not been calibrated using statistical inverse modelling (i.e. algorithmic parameter estimation). The aim of this study is to establish and demonstrate a procedure for calibration of DayCent to improve estimation of GHG emissions. We coupled DayCent with the parameter estimation (PEST) software for inverse modelling. The PEST software can be used for calibration through regularized inversion as well as model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The DayCent model was analysed and calibrated using N2O flux data collected over 2 years at the Iowa State University Agronomy and Agricultural Engineering Research Farms, Boone, IA. Crop year 2003 data were used for model calibration and 2004 data were used for validation. The optimization of DayCent model parameters using PEST significantly reduced model residuals relative to the default DayCent parameter values. Parameter estimation improved the model performance by reducing the sum of weighted squared residual difference between measured and modelled outputs by up to 67 %. For the calibration period, simulation with the default model parameter values underestimated mean daily N2O flux by 98 %. After parameter estimation, the model underestimated the mean daily fluxes by 35 %. During the validation period, the calibrated model reduced sum of weighted squared residuals by 20 % relative to the default simulation. Sensitivity analysis performed provides important insights into the model structure providing guidance for model improvement.

  2. Energy calibration procedure for γ-radiation and conversion electron spectra using level scheme a priori information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabina, L. P.; Kondurov, I. A.; Sushkov, P. A.

    1996-02-01

    A procedure for energy calibration of gamma- and electron-line spectra using a priori information about the relationships between gamma-ray and conversion electron energies and their corresponding peak positions in the spectrum has been developed in the GTLM computer program. The transition energy estimations and the excited states' energies of the nucleus under investigation are calculated using all the experimental data available from different experiments and the relationships deduced from the level scheme. The minimised function consists of five terms having as parameters the coefficients of the energy calibration curves (polynomials) and the level energies of the nucleus under investigation. The procedure was tested with two γ-spectra, in the energy range 1.5-8 MeV, measured with the pair spectrometer at the High Flux Reactor of the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL), Grenoble and allowed us to estimate transition energies with uncertainties of 10 eV.

  3. NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel: 2014 and 2015 Cloud Calibration Procedures and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Laura E.; Ide, Robert F.; Van Zante, Judith F.; Acosta, Waldo J.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the current status of the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Icing Research Tunnel cloud calibration: specifically, the cloud uniformity, liquid water content, and drop-size calibration results from both the January-February 2014 full cloud calibration and the January 2015 interim cloud calibration. Some aspects of the cloud have remained the same as what was reported for the 2014 full calibration, including the cloud uniformity from the Standard nozzles, the drop-size equations for Standard and Mod1 nozzles, and the liquid water content for large-drop conditions. Overall, the tests performed in January 2015 showed good repeatability to 2014, but there is new information to report as well. There have been minor updates to the Mod1 cloud uniformity on the north side of the test section. Also, successful testing with the OAP-230Y has allowed the IRT to re-expand its operating envelopes for large-drop conditions to a maximum median volumetric diameter of 270 microns. Lastly, improvements to the collection-efficiency correction for the SEA multi-wire have resulted in new calibration equations for Standard- and Mod1-nozzle liquid water content.

  4. Optimized Spectrometers Characterization Procedure for Near Ground Support of ESA FLEX Observations: Part 1 Spectral Calibration and Characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mihai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents two procedures for the wavelength calibration, in the oxygen telluric absorption spectral bands (O2-A, λc = 687 nm and O2-B, λc = 760.6 nm, of field fixed-point spectrometers used for reflectance and Sun-induced fluorescence measurements. In the first case, Ne and Ar pen-type spectral lamps were employed, while the second approach is based on a double monochromator setup. The double monochromator system was characterized for the estimation of errors associated with different operating configurations. The proposed methods were applied to three Piccolo Doppio-type systems built around two QE Pros and one USB2 + H16355 Ocean Optics spectrometers. The wavelength calibration errors for all the calibrations performed on the three spectrometers are reported and potential methodological improvements discussed. The suggested calibration methods were validated, as the wavelength corrections obtained by both techniques for the QE Pro designed for fluorescence investigations were similar. However, it is recommended that a neon emission line source, as well as an argon or mercury-argon source be used to have a reference wavelength closer to the O2-B feature. The wavelength calibration can then be optimised as close to the O2-B and O2-A features as possible. The monochromator approach could also be used, but that instrument would need to be fully characterized prior to use, and although it may offer a more accurate calibration, as it could be tuned to emit light at the same wavelengths as the absorption features, it would be more time consuming as it is a scanning approach.

  5. A Novel Camera Calibration Algorithm as Part of an HCI System: Experimental Procedure and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauer Kristal

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Camera calibration is an initial step employed in many computer vision applications for the estimation of camera parameters. Along with images of an arbitrary scene, these parameters allow for inference of the scene's metric information. This is a primary reason for camera calibration's significance to computer vision. In this paper, we present a novel approach to solving the camera calibration problem. The method was developed as part of a Human Computer Interaction (HCI System for the NASA Virtual GloveBox (VGX Project. Our algorithm is based on the geometric properties of perspective projections and provides a closed form solution for the camera parameters. Its accuracy is evaluated in the context of the NASA VGX, and the results indicate that our algorithm achieves accuracy similar to other calibration methods which are characterized by greater complexity and computational cost. Because of its reliability and wide variety of potential applications, we are confident that our calibration algorithm will be of interest to many.

  6. Transfer of calibration between length and sweet-spot perception by dynamic touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withagen, Rob; Michaels, Claire F.

    2007-01-01

    Calibration is the process that scales perceptual judgment or action to information. An earlier study (Withagen & Michaels, 2004) suggested that perceptual calibration is specific to information-to-perception relations. In the present experiments, the authors tested this hypothesis by asking whether

  7. Boiling heat transfer on fins – experimental and numerical procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzechowski T.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research methodology, the test facility and the results of investigations into non-isothermal surfaces in water boiling at atmospheric pressure, together with a discussion of errors. The investigations were conducted for two aluminium samples with technically smooth surfaces and thickness of 4 mm and 10 mm, respectively. For the sample of lower thickness, on the basis of the surface temperature distribution measured with an infrared camera, the local heat flux and the heat transfer coefficient were determined and shown in the form of a boiling curve. For the thicker sample, for which 1-D model cannot be used, numerical calculations were conducted. They resulted in obtaining the values of the local heat flux on the surface the invisible to the infrared, camera i.e. on the side on which the boiling of the medium proceeds.

  8. Cuban-Brazilian comparison of the calibration procedures for surface contamination monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, Gonzalo W.; Garcia, Jose A.T. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones (CPHR), Guanabacoa, Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: gonzalo@cphr.edu.cu; Ramos, Manoel M.O. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: mmoramos@ird.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    The calibration laboratory of the CPHR, Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, is the only laboratory that performs calibrations of radiation protection instruments in Cuba. Recently they started a cooperation project with IAEA, code number CUB3002-01 with the task title 'Assuring and Demonstrating the safety of radioactive Waste Management'. Within the frame of this project they have a compromise to implement the calibration service for surface contamination monitors, for which they received instruments and sources. In 2006 the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI) from the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, IRD/CNEN, was invited to perform a mission to CPHR in order to evaluate the level of implementation of the service trough the insertion of the service in the Quality Assurance System of their laboratory, and perform a comparison exercise to test the calibration method implemented. The results were evaluated by the methodology recommended in the ISO/IEC 43-1 standard. These results show that all values from both laboratories are comparable for most radionuclides except for Cl-36. The preliminary investigation about this situation is presented in the paper. (author)

  9. Community Radiative Transfer Model for Inter-Satellites Calibration and Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Nalli, N. R.; Ignatov, A.; Garrett, K.; Chen, Y.; Weng, F.; Boukabara, S. A.; van Delst, P. F.; Groff, D. N.; Collard, A.; Joseph, E.; Morris, V. R.; Minnett, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Developed at the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) [1], operationally supports satellite radiance assimilation for weather forecasting. The CRTM also supports JPSS/NPP and GOES-R missions [2] for instrument calibration, validation, monitoring long-term trending, and satellite retrieved products [3]. The CRTM is used daily at the NOAA NCEP to quantify the biases and standard deviations between radiance simulations and satellite radiance measurements in a time series and angular dependency. The purposes of monitoring the data assimilation system are to ensure the proper performance of the assimilation system and to diagnose problems with the system for future improvements. The CRTM is a very useful tool for cross-sensor verifications. Using the double difference method, it can remove the biases caused by slight differences in spectral response and geometric angles between measurements of the two instruments. The CRTM is particularly useful to reduce the difference between instruments for climate studies [4]. In this study, we will carry out the assessment of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) [5] Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) data [6], Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) data, and data for Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) [7][8] thermal emissive bands. We use dedicated radiosondes and surface data acquired from NOAA Aerosols and Ocean Science Expeditions (AEROSE) [9]. The high quality radiosondes were launched when Suomi NPP flew over NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown situated in the tropical Atlantic Ocean. The atmospheric data include profiles of temperature, water vapor, and ozone, as well as total aerosol optical depths. The surface data includes air temperature and humidity at 2 meters, skin temperature (Marine Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, M-AERI [10]), surface temperature, and surface wind vector. [1] Liu, Q., and F. Weng, 2006: JAS [2] Liu, Q

  10. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  11. Cassini VIMS observations of the Galilean satellites including the VIMS calibration procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Capaccioni, F.; Hansen, G.B.; Filacchione, G.; Clark, R.N.; Cerroni, P.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Bussoletti, E.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, Christophe

    2004-01-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observed the Galilean satellites during the Cassini spacecraft's 2000/2001 flyby of Jupiter, providing compositional and thermal information about their surfaces. The Cassini spacecraft approached the jovian system no closer than about 126 Jupiter radii, about 9 million kilometers, at a phase angle of Galilean satellites. Nevertheless, most of the spectral features discovered by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) aboard the Galileo spacecraft during more than four years of observations have been identified in the VIMS data analyzed so far, including a possible 13C absorption. In addition, VIMS made observations in the visible part of the spectrum and at several new phase angles for all the Galilean satellites and the calculated phase functions are presented. In the process of analyzing these data, the VIMS radiometric and spectral calibrations were better determined in preparation for entry into the Saturn system. Treatment of these data is presented as an example of the VIMS data reduction, calibration and analysis process and a detailed explanation is given of the calibration process applied to the Jupiter data. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transfer standard device to improve the traceable calibration of physiotherapy ultrasound machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkenberg, R.T.; Richards, A.; Beissner, K.; Zeqiri, B.; Bezemer, R.A.; Hodnett, M.; Prout, G.; Cantrall, C.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) physiotherapy as a clinical treatment is extremely common in the Western world. Internationally, regulation to ensure safe application of US physiotherapy by regular calibration ranges from nil to mandatory. The need for a portable power standard (PPS) has been addressed within a

  13. No transfer of calibration between action and perception in learning a golf putting task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lier, W; van der Kamp, J.; van der Zanden, A; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed calibration of perception and action in the context of a golf putting task. Previous research has shown that right-handed novice golfers make rightward errors both in the perception of the perfect aiming line from the ball to the hole and in the putting action. Right-handed experts,

  14. Calibration and absolute normalization procedure of a new Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Palomino, L.A.; Blostein, J.J. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Dawidowski, J., E-mail: javier@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2011-08-01

    We describe the calibration process of a new Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) spectrometer, recently implemented at the Bariloche Electron LINAC (Argentina), consisting in the determination of the incident neutron spectrum, dead-time and electronic delay of the data acquisition line, and detector bank efficiency. For this purpose, samples of lead, polyethylene and graphite of different sizes were employed. Their measured spectra were corrected by multiple scattering, attenuation and detector efficiency effects, by means of an ad hoc Monte Carlo code. We show that the corrected spectra are correctly scaled with respect to the scattering power of the tested materials within a 2% of experimental error, thus allowing us to define an experimental constant that links the arbitrary experimental scale (number of recorded counts per monitor counts) with the involved cross-sections. The present work also serves to analyze the existence of possible sources of systematic errors.

  15. Treatment of irregular geometries using a Cartesian coordinates finite-volume radiation heat transfer procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, J.C.; Patankar, S.V. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Lee, H.S. (NASA, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center)

    1994-09-01

    This article presents a blocked-off-region procedure to model radiative transfer in irregular geometries using a Cartesian coordinates finite-column method (FVM). Straight-edged, inclined and curved boundaries can be treated. It is capable of handling participating or transparent media enclosed by black or reflecting walls. With this procedure, irregular geometries can be specified through the problem specification portion of the program. Four test problems are used to show that the procedure is capable of reproducing available results for inclined and curved walls, transparent, nonscattering, and anisotropically scattering media.

  16. REMINDER Saved Leave Scheme (SLS) : Simplified procedure for the transfer of leave to saved leave accounts

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Division

    2001-01-01

    As part of the process of streamlining procedures, the HR and AS Divisions have jointly developed a system whereby annual and compensatory leave will henceforth be automatically transferred1) to saved leave accounts. Under the provisions of the voluntary saved leave scheme (SLS), a maximum total of 10 days'2)Previously, every person taking part in the scheme has been individually issued with a form for the purposes of requesting the transfer of leave to the leave account and the transfer has then had to be done manually by HR Division. To streamline the procedure, unused leave of all those taking part in the saved leave scheme at the closure of the leave-year accounts will henceforth be transferred automatically to the saved leave account on that date. This simplification is in the interest of all parties concerned. This automatic transfer procedure has a number of advantages for participants in the SLS scheme. First, staff members will no longer have to take any administrative steps. Secondly, the new proced...

  17. Recursive Solution Procedures for Flexible Multibody Systems: Comparing Condensation and Transfer Matrix Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilder, Jurnan; Ellenbroek, Marcel; de Boer, Andre

    2017-01-01

    In this work two different recursive solution procedures for flexible multibody systems are considered: the condensation method and the transfer matrix method. A comparison between these methods is made based on the equation of motion of an arbitrary 3D linear elastic body, in which the absolute

  18. Finite element procedures for coupled linear analysis of heat transfer, fluid and solid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    Coupled finite element formulations for fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and solid mechanics are derived from the conservation laws for energy, mass, and momentum. To model the physics of interactions among the participating disciplines, the linearized equations are coupled by combining domain and boundary coupling procedures. Iterative numerical solution strategy is presented to solve the equations, with the partitioning of temporal discretization implemented.

  19. NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel: Upgrade and Cloud Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ide, Robert F.; Steen, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, NASA Glenn s Icing Research Tunnel underwent a major modification to it s refrigeration plant and heat exchanger. This paper presents the results of the subsequent full cloud calibration. Details of the calibration procedure and results are presented herein. The steps include developing a nozzle transfer map, establishing a uniform cloud, conducting a drop sizing calibration and finally a liquid water content calibration. The goal of the calibration is to develop a uniform cloud, and to build a transfer map from the inputs of air speed, spray bar atomizing air pressure and water pressure to the output of median volumetric droplet diameter and liquid water content.

  20. Improvement of sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir and sup 1 sup 5 sup 2 Eu gamma-ray calibration energies by using a self-calibration procedure

    CERN Document Server

    Helene, O; Tsai, S P

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a calibration procedure based on the least-squares method that enables an improvement of the precision of data through a functional relationship between variables. New and more precise values of physical quantities used as input data are determined using the information contained in the calibration curve. A simulation is provided in order to study the improvement in precision. The procedure was applied to the gamma-ray energies of sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir and sup 1 sup 5 sup 2 Eu.

  1. Application and testing of a procedure to evaluate transferability of habitat suitability criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jeff A.; Bovee, Ken D.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure designed to test the transferability of habitat suitability criteria was evaluated in the Cache la Poudre River, Colorado. Habitat suitability criteria were developed for active adult and juvenile rainbow trout in the South Platte River, Colorado. These criteria were tested by comparing microhabitat use predicted from the criteria with observed microhabitat use by adult rainbow trout in the Cache la Poudre River. A one-sided X2 test, using counts of occupied and unoccupied cells in each suitability classification, was used to test for non-random selection for optimum habitat use over usable habitat and for suitable over unsuitable habitat. Criteria for adult rainbow trout were judged to be transferable to the Cache la Poudre River, but juvenile criteria (applied to adults) were not transferable. Random subsampling of occupied and unoccupied cells was conducted to determine the effect of sample size on the reliability of the test procedure. The incidence of type I and type II errors increased rapidly as the sample size was reduced below 55 occupied and 200 unoccupied cells. Recommended modifications to the procedure included the adoption of a systematic or randomized sampling design and direct measurement of microhabitat variables. With these modifications, the procedure is economical, simple and reliable. Use of the procedure as a quality assurance device in routine applications of the instream flow incremental methodology was encouraged.

  2. Procedural learning, consolidation, and transfer of a new skill in Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, Caroline; Wansard, Murielle; Geurten, Marie; Meulemans, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the differences in procedural learning abilities between children with DCD and typically developing children by investigating the steps that lead to skill automatization (i.e., the stages of fast learning, consolidation, and slow learning). Transfer of the skill to a new situation was also assessed. We tested 34 children aged 6-12 years with and without DCD on a perceptuomotor adaptation task, a form of procedural learning that is thought to involve the cerebellum and the basal ganglia (regions whose impairment has been associated with DCD) but also other brain areas including frontal regions. The results showed similar rates of learning, consolidation, and transfer in DCD and control children. However, the DCD children's performance remained slower than that of controls throughout the procedural task and they reached a lower asymptotic performance level; the difficulties observed at the outset did not diminish with practice.

  3. Determination of suspended particulate matter concentration from turbidity measurements: particle size effects and calibration procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannkuche, J.; Schmidt, A.

    2003-07-01

    Measurements of suspended particulate matter concentration and turbidity point towards the possibility of a site-specific algorithm (SPM), relating SPM to nephelometric turbidity units (NTU). In this paper regression models are presented that account for changes in the relationship of SPM and NTU as a result of changes in particle properties. The models have been developed by the use of daily measurements of SPM concentration and a continuous record of turbidity for the period from June 1996 to February 2001 in the River Elbe, a major river in the eastern part of Germany.The effect of changes in the particle properties with increasing water discharge was taken into account by varying the slope of a linear regression equation according to a logistic function. Water discharge, Q, was defined to be the only variable of this function - as an adequate substitute of the parameter bottom shear stress, which cannot be measured directly. Measurements of flow velocity in the River Elbe show that bottom shear stress is related almost linearly to water discharge up to bankful discharges.Regression models with slopes varying continuously with hydraulic parameters may account for the effects resulting from changes of particle characteristics and thus may have some advantages compared with models with a constant slope or models calibrated for different seasons.

  4. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health Mental Health Surveillance Study: calibration study design and field procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpe, Lisa J; Barker, Peggy R; Karg, Rhonda S; Batts, Kathy R; Morton, Katherine B; Gfroerer, Joseph C; Stolzenberg, Stephanie J; Cunningham, David B; First, Michael B; Aldworth, Jeremy

    2010-06-01

    The Mental Health Surveillance Study (MHSS) is an ongoing initiative by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to monitor the prevalence of serious mental illness (SMI) among adults in the USA. In 2008, the MHSS used data from clinical interviews to calibrate mental health data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) for estimating the prevalence of SMI based on the full NSDUH sample. The clinical interview used was the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th edition (DSM-IV; SCID). NSDUH interviews were administered via audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) to a nationally representative sample of the population aged 12 years or older. A total of 46,180 NSDUH interviews were completed with adults aged 18 years or older in 2008. The SCID was administered by mental health clinicians to a sub-sample of 1506 adults via telephone. This paper describes the MHSS calibration study procedures, including information on sample selection, instrumentation, follow-up, data quality protocols, and management of distressed respondents.

  5. Saved Leave Scheme (SLS) : Simplified procedure for the transfer of leave to saved leave accounts

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Division

    2001-01-01

    As part of the process of streamlining procedures, the HR and AS Divisions have jointly developed a system whereby annual and compensatory leave will henceforth be automatically transferred1) to saved leave accounts. Under the provisions of the voluntary saved leave scheme (SLS), a maximum total of 10 days'2) annual and compensatory leave (excluding saved leave accumulated in accordance with the provisions of Administrative Circular No. 22 B) can be transferred to the saved leave account at the end of the leave year (30 September). Previously, every person taking part in the scheme has been individually issued with a form for the purposes of requesting the transfer of leave to the leave account and the transfer has then had to be done manually by HR Division. To streamline the procedure, unused leave of all those taking part in the saved leave scheme at the closure of of the leave-year accounts will henceforth be transferred automatically to the saved leave account on that date. This simplification is in the ...

  6. An Innovative Procedure for Calibration of Strapdown Electro-Optical Sensors Onboard Unmanned Air Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attilio Rispoli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an innovative method for estimating the attitude of airborne electro-optical cameras with respect to the onboard autonomous navigation unit. The procedure is based on the use of attitude measurements under static conditions taken by an inertial unit and carrier-phase differential Global Positioning System to obtain accurate camera position estimates in the aircraft body reference frame, while image analysis allows line-of-sight unit vectors in the camera based reference frame to be computed. The method has been applied to the alignment of the visible and infrared cameras installed onboard the experimental aircraft of the Italian Aerospace Research Center and adopted for in-flight obstacle detection and collision avoidance. Results show an angular uncertainty on the order of 0.1° (rms.

  7. Rapid measurement of methyl cellulose precipitable tannins using ultraviolet spectroscopy with chemometrics: application to red wine and inter-laboratory calibration transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambergs, Robert G; Mercurio, Meagan D; Kassara, Stella; Cozzolino, Daniel; Smith, Paul A

    2012-06-01

    Information relating to tannin concentration in grapes and wine is not currently available simply and rapidly enough to inform decision-making by grape growers, winemakers, and wine researchers. Spectroscopy and chemometrics have been implemented for the analysis of critical grape and wine parameters and offer a possible solution for rapid tannin analysis. We report here the development and validation of an ultraviolet (UV) spectral calibration for the prediction of tannin concentration in red wines. Such spectral calibrations reduce the time and resource requirements involved in measuring tannins. A diverse calibration set (n = 204) was prepared with samples of Australian wines of five varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz, Merlot, Pinot Noir, and Durif), from regions spanning the wine grape growing areas of Australia, with varying climate and soils, and with vintages ranging from 1991 to 2007. The relationship between tannin measured by the methyl cellulose precipitation (MCP) reference method at 280 nm and tannin predicted with a multiple linear regression (MLR) calibration, using ultraviolet (UV) absorbance at 250, 270, 280, 290, and 315 nm, was strong (r(2)val = 0.92; SECV = 0.20 g/L). An independent validation set (n = 85) was predicted using the MLR algorithm developed with the calibration set and gave confidence in the ability to predict new samples, independent of the samples used to prepare the calibration (r(2)val = 0.94; SEP = 0.18 g/L). The MLR algorithm could also predict tannin in fermenting wines (r(2)val = 0.76; SEP = 0.18 g/L), but worked best from the second day of ferment on. This study also explored instrument-to-instrument transfer of a spectral calibration for MCP tannin. After slope and bias adjustments of the calibration, efficient calibration transfer to other laboratories was clearly demonstrated, with all instruments in the study effectively giving identical results on a transfer set.

  8. Consequences of the mismatch between the depth at which planktonic foraminifera live and the calibration depth of SST transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, R. J.; Kucera, M.

    2012-04-01

    Although many palaeoceanographic proxies are described as sea-surface temperature (SST) proxies, there is a growing realisation that the seasonal and depth sensitivity of proxies may differ substantially. Exploiting information on the seasonal and depth sensitivity of proxies can give new insights into palaeoceanographic processes, and deliver more precise reconstructions. Transfer functions for quantitatively reconstructing past sea surface temperatures from planktonic foraminifera assemblages are typically calibrated against temperatures at 10m water depth. However, planktonic foraminifera are not usually most abundant at 10m depth, but have a geographically variable peak in abundance often near or even below the thermocline. This discrepancy between the depth at which foraminifera live, and the depth against they are calibrated may bias SST reconstructions. With a collation of 18 North Atlantic foraminifera records that cover the time since the Last Glacial Maximum, we make reconstructions of summer and winter temperatures for each standard depth in the World Ocean Atlas down to 500m using the modern analogue technique. We test how much of the variance in the fossil data is explained by each reconstruction, and whether each reconstruction explains more than expected under the null hypothesis that temperature did not influence assemblage composition. We find that changes in North Atlantic foraminifera assemblages since the Last Glacial Maximum are, for most records, better explained by variability near the thermocline than at the surface, and that reconstructions of summer temperatures within the seasonal thermocline are often poor. If the thermal structure of the water column has changed over time, such that the relationship between 10m temperature and the temperature at the depth which most affects foraminifera assemblages is not constant, then reconstructions of SST calibrated to 10m temperature may be biased. This bias will propagate into, for example

  9. Transient, compressible heat and mass transfer in porous media using the strongly implicit iteration procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, D. M.; Cox, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Coupled nonlinear partial differential equations describing heat and mass transfer in a porous matrix are solved in finite difference form with the aid of a new iterative technique (the strongly implicit procedure). Example numerical results demonstrate the characteristics of heat and mass transport in a porous matrix such as a charring ablator. It is emphasized that multidimensional flow must be considered when predicting the thermal response of a porous material subjected to nonuniform boundary conditions.

  10. The Influence of Learning Strategies in the Acquisition, Retention, and Transfer of a Procedural Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    positions, indicative of a primacy - recency effect . Thus, the per- formance curve across positions resembles the how-shaped curve associated with the...of research is being conducted on the effects of various learn- ing strategies on skill acquisition and retention. ARI, in cooperation with the Defense...skills. This report discusses the learning, retention, and transfer effectiveness of several different learning strategies for a procedural task involving

  11. EXPERIMENTAL CALIBRATION OF UNDERGROUND HEAT TRANSFER MODELS UNDER A WINERY BUILDING IN A RURAL AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tinti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground temperature and hydrogeological conditions are key parameters for many engineering applications, such as the design of building basements and underground spaces and the assessment of shallow geothermal energy potential. Especially in urban areas, in the very shallow depths, it is diffi cult to fi nd natural undisturbed underground thermal conditions because of anthropic interventions. The assessment of underground behaviour in disturbed conditions will become more and more relevant because of increasing awareness to energy effi ciency and renewable energy topics. The purpose of this paper is to show a three-dimensional representation - based on models calibrated on experimental data - of the underground thermal behaviour aff ected by a building in a rural area in Italy. Temperature varies in space and time and it depends on ground, climate and building characteristics, and all these parameters are taken into account by the seasonal periodic modelling implemented. The results obtained in a context of low urbanization indirectly suggest the importance of these eff ects in dense urban areas; taking greater account of these aspects could lead to improvements in the design of underground spaces and geo-exchanger fi elds for geothermal energy exploitation.

  12. Validation of an efficiency calibration procedure for a coaxial n-type and a well-type HPGe detector used for the measurement of environmental radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morera-Gómez, Yasser, E-mail: ymore24@gamail.com [Centro de Estudios Ambientales de Cienfuegos, AP 5. Ciudad Nuclear, CP 59350 Cienfuegos (Cuba); Departamento de Química y Edafología, Universidad de Navarra, Irunlarrea No 1, Pamplona 31009, Navarra (Spain); Cartas-Aguila, Héctor A.; Alonso-Hernández, Carlos M.; Nuñez-Duartes, Carlos [Centro de Estudios Ambientales de Cienfuegos, AP 5. Ciudad Nuclear, CP 59350 Cienfuegos (Cuba)

    2016-05-11

    To obtain reliable measurements of the environmental radionuclide activity using HPGe (High Purity Germanium) detectors, the knowledge of the absolute peak efficiency is required. This work presents a practical procedure for efficiency calibration of a coaxial n-type and a well-type HPGe detector using experimental and Monte Carlo simulations methods. The method was performed in an energy range from 40 to 1460 keV and it can be used for both, solid and liquid environmental samples. The calibration was initially verified measuring several reference materials provided by the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). Finally, through the participation in two Proficiency Tests organized by IAEA for the members of the ALMERA network (Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity) the validity of the developed procedure was confirmed. The validation also showed that measurement of {sup 226}Ra should be conducted using coaxial n-type HPGe detector in order to minimize the true coincidence summing effect. - Highlights: • An efficiency calibration for a coaxial and a well-type HPGe detector was performed. • The calibration was made using experimental and Monte Carlo simulations methods. • The procedure was verified measuring several reference materials provided by IAEA. • Calibrations were validated through the participation in 2 ALMERA Proficiency Tests.

  13. Application of Quasi-Heat-Pulse Solutions for Luikov’s Equations of Heat and Moisture Transfer for Calibrating and Utilizing Thermal Properties Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman

    2014-01-01

    Several years ago the Laplace transform solutions of Luikov’s differential equations were presented for one-dimensional heat and moisture transfer in porous hydroscopic orthotropic materials for the boundary condition of a gradual heat pulse applied to both surfaces of a flat slab. This paper presents calibration methods and data for the K-tester 637 (Lasercomp),...

  14. A procedure for calibration and validation of FE modelling of laser-assisted metal to polymer direct joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambiase, F.; Genna, S.; Kant, R.

    2018-01-01

    The quality of the joints produced by means of Laser-Assisted Metal to Polymer direct joining (LAMP) is strongly influenced by the temperature field produced during the laser treatment. The main phenomena including the adhesion of the plastic to the metal sheet and the development of bubbles (on the plastic surface) depend on the temperature reached by the polymer at the interface. Such a temperature should be higher than the softening temperature, but lower than the degradation temperature of the polymer. However, the temperature distribution is difficult to be measured by experimental tests since the most polymers (which are transparent to the laser radiation) are often opaque to the infrared wavelength. Thus, infrared analysis involving pyrometers and infrared camera is not suitable for this purpose. On the other hand, thermocouples are difficult to be placed at the interface without influencing the temperature conditions. In this paper, an integrated approach involving both experimental measurements and a Finite Element (FE) model were used to perform such an analysis. LAMP of Polycarbonate and AISI304 stainless steel was performed by means of high power diode laser and the main process parameters i.e. laser power and scanning speed were varied. Comparing the experimental measurements and the FE model prediction of the thermal field, a good correspondence was achieved proving the suitability of the developed model and the proposed calibration procedure to be ready used for process design and optimization.

  15. Repairing the Capsule to the Transferred Coracoid Preserves External Rotation in the Modified Latarjet Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Hooke, Alexander W; Sperling, John W; Steinmann, Scott P; Zhao, Kristin D; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2016-09-07

    It is not clear whether the anterior capsule should be repaired to the coracoid process or to the native glenoid during the modified Latarjet procedure. We investigated joint stability and range of motion of the shoulder after the modified Latarjet procedure with both of these methods of capsular repair. Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were used. After a Bankart lesion and 6-mm glenoid defect were created, the coracoid process was transferred to the glenoid and fixed with screws. The anterior capsule was repaired either to the coracoid process (coracoid group) or to the native glenoid (glenoid group). The ranges of internal and external axial rotation were measured with the arm at 0° and 60° of glenohumeral abduction. The range of motion was measured with a constant torque of 200 N-mm. Joint stability was measured using a custom stability testing device. The stability ratio in the anterior-posterior direction was measured with the arm at maximal external rotation and neutral rotation. The range of external rotation was greater at both 0° and 60° of abduction in the coracoid group compared with the glenoid group (p Latarjet procedure appears to be beneficial to avoid the limited range of motion in external rotation, but the direct contact of the humeral head and the transferred coracoid might confer a risk of osteoarthritis. Long-term consequences in the clinical setting need to be clarified. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  16. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology at the Instituto de Geociências, USP: instrumentation, analytical procedures, and calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO M. VASCONCELOS

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser heating 40Ar/39Ar geochronology provides high analytical precision and accuracy, mum-scale spatial resolution, and statistically significant data sets for the study of geological and planetary processes. A newly commissioned 40Ar/39Ar laboratory at CPGeo/USP, São Paulo, Brazil, equips the Brazilian scientific community with a new powerful tool applicable to the study of geological and cosmochemical processes. Detailed information about laboratory layout, environmental conditions, and instrumentation provides the necessary parameters for the evaluation of the CPGeo/USP 40Ar/39Ar suitability to a diverse range of applications. Details about analytical procedures, including mineral separation, irradiation at the IPEN/CNEN reactor at USP, and mass spectrometric analysis enable potential researchers to design the necessary sampling and sample preparation program suitable to the objectives of their study. Finally, the results of calibration tests using Ca and K salts and glasses, international mineral standards, and in-house mineral standards show that the accuracy and precision obtained at the 40Ar/39Ar laboratory at CPGeo/USP are comparable to results obtained in the most respected laboratories internationally. The extensive calibration and standardization procedures undertaken ensure that the results of analytical studies carried out in our laboratories will gain immediate international credibility, enabling Brazilian students and scientists to conduct forefront research in earth and planetary sciences.A geocronologia de 40Ar/39Ar por aquecimento a laser permite alta precisão e acurácia analítica, tem resolução espacial em escala micrométrica, e fornece um número de dados estatisticamente significantes para o estudo de processos geológicos e planetários. Um recém construído laboratório de 40Ar/39Ar no CPGeo/USP, São Paulo, Brazil, mune a sociedade científica brasileira com uma técnica eficaz aplicável aos estudos geol

  17. Normalization Procedure for the Baptista Depression Scale - Adult Version (EBADEP-A: Transferring of Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Oliveira Gomes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the standardization of psychological instruments, that is, the construction of referential interpretations of a test, we can find different procedures performed both by Classical Test Theory and the Theory of Item Response. Especially in this case (IRT, we can admit a test as a norm, in order to use its standardization and transfer the cut-off point to another instrument. Based on this information, the present study aimed to provide a cutoff score for the Baptista Depression Scale - Adult Version (EBADEP-A through procedures of norms-transfer based on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies – Depression Scale (CES-D. The EBADEP-A presented good distribution and ability to discriminate depressive symptoms, and the sample, consisting of Brazilian College students, received a cutoff score of 32 points. It is emphasized that this is an exploratory and preliminary study, and it we suggest further analyzes to be performed with clinical samples for which results can be corroborated or confronted.

  18. The Latarjet coracoid process transfer procedure: alterations in the neurovascular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freehill, Michael T; Srikumaran, Umasuthan; Archer, Kristin R; McFarland, Edward G; Petersen, Steve A

    2013-05-01

    The Latarjet coracoid process transfer procedure is an established, reliable treatment for glenoid deficiency associated with recurrent anterior shoulder instability, but changes in neurovascular anatomy resulting from the procedure are a concern. The purpose of our cadaveric study was to identify changes in the neurovascular anatomy after a Latarjet procedure. We obtained 4 paired, fresh-frozen cadaveric forequarters (8 shoulders) from the Maryland State Anatomy Board. In each shoulder, we preoperatively measured the distances from the midanterior glenoid rim to the musculocutaneous nerve, axillary nerve, and axillary artery in 2 directions (lateral to medial and superior to inferior) and with the arm in 2 positions (0° abduction/neutral rotation; 30° abduction/30° external rotation), for a total of 12 measurements. We then created a standardized bony defect in the anterior-inferior glenoid, reconstructed it with the Latarjet procedure, and repeated the same measurements. Two examiners independently took each measurement twice. Inter-rater reliability was adequate, allowing pre-Latarjet measurements to be combined, averaged, and compared with combined and averaged post-Latarjet measurements by using paired Student t tests (significance, P ≤ .05). We found (1) significant differences in the location of the musculocutaneous nerve in the superior-to-inferior direction for both arm positions, (2) notably lax and consistently overlapping musculocutaneous and axillary nerves, and (3) an unchanged axillary artery location. The Latarjet procedure resulted in consistent and clinically significant alterations in the anatomic relationships of the musculocutaneous and axillary nerves, which may make them vulnerable to injury during revision surgery. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transferring the calibration of direct solar irradiance to diffuse-sky radiance measurements for CIMEL Sun-sky radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Blarel, Luc; Podvin, Thierry; Goloub, Philippe; Buis, Jean-Pierre; Morel, Jean-Philippe

    2008-04-01

    Two types of sunphotometric measurement are considered in this study: direct-Sun irradiance and diffuse-sky radiance. Based on CIMEL CE318 Sun-sky radiometer characteristics, we introduce a gain-corrected solid angle that allows interconverting calibration coefficients of these two types of measurement, thus realizing a "vicarious" radiance calibration. The accuracy of the gain-corrected solid angle depends on the number of available historical calibration records. The method is easy to use, provided that at least one laboratory calibration has been made previously. Examples coming from three distinct CE318 versions belonging to the AERONET/PHOTONS network are presented to provide details on the vicarious calibration method and protocols. From the error propagation analysis and the comparison with laboratory results, the uncertainty of the vicarious radiance calibration is shown to be comparable with the laboratory one, e.g., 3%-5%.

  20. Evaluation of assay procedures for prediction of passive transfer status in lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimini, Genesio; Peli, Angelo; Boari, Andrea; Britti, Domenico

    2006-04-01

    To compare 4 assay procedures for prediction of passive transfer status in lambs. Thirty-one 1-day-old Sardinian lambs. Serum IgG concentration was determined by use of single radial immunodiffusion. The following were determined: serum total protein concentration as measured by refractometry (ie, refractometry serum total protein concentration), serum total protein concentration as determined by the biuret method (ie, biuret method serum total protein concentration), serum gamma-globulin concentration as determined by serum protein electrophoresis, and serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity as measured by spectrophotometry. Accuracy of these assays for estimation of serum IgG concentration in 1-day-old lambs was established by use of linear regression analysis. Refractometry serum total protein concentration, biuret method serum total protein concentration, and serum gamma-globulin concentration were closely and linearly correlated with serum IgG concentration. The natural logarithm (ln) of serum GGT activity was closely and linearly correlated with serum IgG concentration (ln). Refractometry serum total protein concentration, biuret method serum total protein concentration, and gamma-globulin concentration accounted for approximately 85%, 91%, and 95% of the variation in serum IgG concentration, respectively. Serum GGT activity (ln) accounted for approximately 92% of the variation in serum IgG concentration (ln). For prediction of passive transfer status in 1-day-old lambs, serum GGT activity or biuret method serum total protein concentration determination will allow for passive transfer monitoring program development. Immediate refractometry serum total protein concentration determination is beneficial in making timely management and treatment decisions. Serum gamma-globulin concentration determination can be used as a confirmatory test.

  1. 2016 NIST (133Xe) and Transfer (131mXe, 133mXe, 135Xe) Calibration Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Troy A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-03-01

    A significantly improved calibration of the High Purity Germanium detectors used by the Idaho National Laboratory Noble Gas Laboratory was performed during the annual NIST calibration. New sample spacers provide reproducible and secure support of samples at distances of 4, 12, 24, 50 and 100 cm. Bean, 15mL and 50mL Schlenk tube geometries were calibrated. Also included in this year’s calibration was a correlation of detector dead-time with sample activity that can be used to predict the schedule of counting the samples at each distance for each geometry. This schedule prediction will help staff members set calendar reminders so that collection of calibration data at each geometry will not be missed. This report also correlates the counting efficiencies between detectors, so that if the counting efficiency on one detector is not known, it can be estimated from the same geometry on another detector.

  2. The tabletting machine as an analytical instrument: qualification of the measurement devices for punch forces and validation of the calibration procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, P M; Mielck, J B

    1998-11-01

    The quality of force measurement in an eccentric tabletting machine equipped with piezo-electric load washers mounted under pre-stress at the upper and lower punches, and the reliability of their calibration in situ and under working conditions were carefully investigated, since this tabletting machine is used as an 'analytical instrument' for the evaluation of the compression behaviour of pharmaceutical materials. For a quasistatic calibration procedure the repeatability under standard conditions and the robustness against variations in machine settings, installation conditions, equipment and handling were evaluated. Two differently constructed reference load cells equipped with strain gauges were used for the calibration of the upper punch sensor. The lower punch sensor was calibrated against the upper one. Except for a mechanical hysteresis, owing to uneven stress distribution over the piezo-electric sensors, the results of the quasistatic measurements are assessed to be satisfactory. In addition, dynamic calibrations were performed. One of the strain-gauged load cells was used in addition to two piezo-electric load washers installed without pre-stress. The dynamic behaviour of all the transducers used is deficient. While for the piezo-electric sensors a significant change in the slope of the calibration function with respect to the quasistatic behaviour was observed, for the strain-gauged load cell a pronounced hysteresis must be noted. Comparing the dynamic behaviour at different profiles of rates of force development generated by variations in machine speed and by maximum force setting, the variability in the sensitivity of the upper and lower punch piezo-electric load washers is comparatively small. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. ESTIMATION OF RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION COEFFICIENTS OF EGYPTSAT-1 SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Nasr

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Sensors usually must be calibrated as part of a measurement system. Calibration may include the procedure of correcting the transfer of the sensor, using the reference measurements, in such a way that a specific input-output relation can be guaranteed with a certain accuracy and under certain conditions. It is necessary to perform a calibration to relate the output signal precisely to the physical input signal (e.g., the output Digital Numbers (DNs to the absolute units of at-sensor spectral radiance. Generic calibration data associated with Egyptsat-1 sensor are not provided by the manufacturer. Therefore, this study was conducted to estimate Egyptsat-1 sensor specific calibration data and tabulates the necessary constants for its different multispectral bands. We focused our attention on the relative calibration between Egyptsat-1 and Spot-4 sensors for their great spectral similarity. The key idea is to use concurrent correlation of signals received at both sensors in the same day (i.e., sensors are observing the same phenomenon. Calibration formula constructed from Spot-4 sensor is used to derive the calibration coefficients for Egyptsat-1. A brief overview of the radiometric calibration coefficients retrieval procedures is presented. A reasonable estimate of the overall calibration coefficient is obtained. They have been used to calibrate reflectances of Egyptsat-1 sensor. Further updates to evaluate and improve the retrieved calibration data are being investigated.

  4. Knowing How and Knowing Why: testing the effect of instruction designed for cognitive integration on procedural skills transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Woods, Nicole N; Moulton, Carol-Anne; Ringsted, Charlotte V; Brydges, Ryan

    2017-04-22

    Transfer is a desired outcome of simulation-based training, yet evidence for how instructional design features promote transfer is lacking. In clinical reasoning, transfer is improved when trainees experience instruction integrating basic science explanations with clinical signs and symptoms. To test whether integrated instruction has similar effects in procedural skills (i.e., psychomotor skills) training, we studied the impact of instruction that integrates conceptual (why) and procedural (how) knowledge on the retention and transfer of simulation-based lumbar puncture (LP) skill. Medical students (N = 30) were randomized into two groups that accessed different instructional videos during a 60-min self-regulated training session. An unintegrated video provided procedural How instruction via step-by-step demonstrations of LP, and an integrated video provided the same How instruction with integrated conceptual Why explanations (e.g., anatomy) for key steps. Two blinded raters scored post-test, retention, and transfer performances using a global rating scale. Participants also completed written procedural and conceptual knowledge tests. We used simple mediation regression analyses to assess the total and indirect effects (mediated by conceptual knowledge) of integrated instruction on retention and transfer. Integrated instruction was associated with improved conceptual (p  .05). We did find a positive indirect group effect on skill retention (B ab  = .93, p instruction may improve trainees' skill retention and transfer through gains in conceptual knowledge. Such integrated instruction may be an instructional design feature for simulation-based training aimed at improving transfer outcomes.

  5. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 50 - Measurement Principle and Calibration Procedure for the Measurement of Carbon Monoxide in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... NATIONAL PRIMARY AND SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS Pt. 50, App. C Appendix C to Part 50... cylinders should be recertified on a regular basis as determined by the local quality control program. 3.2... Adjust the calibration system to deliver zero air to the output manifold. The total air flow must exceed...

  6. 10 CFR 70.39 - Specific licenses for the manufacture or initial transfer of calibration or reference sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... using radiation detection instrumentation capable of detecting 0.005 microcurie of plutonium. If any... calibration or reference source pertinent to evaluation of the potential radiation exposure, including: (i...

  7. Development of transfer standard devices for ensuring the accurate calibration of ultrasonic physical therapy machines in clinical use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hekkenberg, R T [TNO Prevention and Health, Zernikedreef 9, 2333 CK Leiden (Netherlands); Richards, A [National Measurement Laboratory, CSIRO, Bradfield Rd, West Lindfield 2070, Sydney (Australia); Beissner, K [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, PTB, Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Zeqiri, B [National Physical Laboratory, NPL, Queens Road, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Prout, G [National Measurement Laboratory, CSIRO, Bradfield Rd, West Lindfield 2070, Sydney (Australia); Cantrall, Ch [National Measurement Laboratory, CSIRO, Bradfield Rd, West Lindfield 2070, Sydney (Australia); Bezemer, R A [TNO Prevention and Health, Zernikedreef 9, 2333 CK Leiden (Netherlands); Koch, Ch [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, PTB, Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig, (Germany); Hodnett, M [National Physical Laboratory, NPL, Queens Road, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    Physical therapy ultrasound is widely applied to patients. However, many devices do not comply with the relevant standard stating that the actual power output shall be within {+-}20% of the device indication. Extreme cases have been reported: from delivering effectively no ultrasound or operating at maximum power at all powers indicated. This can potentially lead to patient injury as well as mistreatment. The present European (EC) project is an ongoing attempt to improve the quality of the treatment of patients being treated with ultrasonic physical-therapy. A Portable ultrasound Power Standard (PPS) is being developed and accurately calibrated. The PPS includes: Ultrasound transducers (including one exhibiting an unusual output) and a driver for the ultrasound transducers that has calibration and proficiency test functions. Also included with the PPS is a Cavitation Detector to determine the onset of cavitation occurring within the propagation medium. The PPS will be suitable for conducting in-the-field accreditation (proficiency testing and calibration). In order to be accredited it will be important to be able to show traceability of the calibration, the calibration process and qualification of testing staff. The clinical user will benefit from traceability because treatments will be performed more reliably.

  8. Implementation of a Transfer Intervention Procedure (TIP) to improve handovers from hospital to home: interrupted time series analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Seben, Rosanne; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Verhaegh, Kim J. M.; Hilders, Carina G. J. M.; Buurman, Bianca M.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and timely patient handovers from hospital to other health care settings are essential in order to provide high quality of care and to ensure patient safety. We aim to investigate the effect of a comprehensive discharge bundle, the Transfer Intervention Procedure (TIP), on the time between

  9. Implementation of a Transfer Intervention Procedure (TIP) to improve handovers from hospital to home: interrupted time series analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Seben, Rosanne; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Verhaegh, Kim J.M.; Hilders, Carina G.J.M.; Buurman, Bianca M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accurate and timely patient handovers from hospital to other health care settings are essential in order to provide high quality of care and to ensure patient safety. We aim to investigate the effect of a comprehensive discharge bundle, the Transfer Intervention Procedure (TIP), on the

  10. A simulation and optimisation procedure to model daily suppression resource transfers during a fire season in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu Wei; Erin J. Belval; Matthew P. Thompson; Dave E. Calkin; Crystal S. Stonesifer

    2016-01-01

    Sharing fire engines and crews between fire suppression dispatch zones may help improve the utilisation of fire suppression resources. Using the Resource Ordering and Status System, the Predictive Services’ Fire Potential Outlooks and the Rocky Mountain Region Preparedness Levels from 2010 to 2013, we tested a simulation and optimisation procedure to transfer crews and...

  11. UV scale calibration transfer from an improved pyroelectric detector standard to field UV-A meters and 365 nm excitation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Podobedov, V. B.; Cooksey, C. C.

    2017-05-01

    Calibration of the emitted radiation from UV sources peaking at 365 nm, is necessary to perform the ASTM required 1 mW/cm2 minimum irradiance in certain military material (ships, airplanes etc) tests. These UV "black lights" are applied for crack-recognition using fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection. At present, these nondestructive tests are performed using Hg-lamps. Lack of a proper standard and the different spectral responsivities of the available UV meters cause significant measurement errors even if the same UV-365 source is measured. A pyroelectric radiometer standard with spectrally flat (constant) response in the UV-VIS range has been developed to solve the problem. The response curve of this standard determined from spectral reflectance measurement, is converted into spectral irradiance responsivity with standard cryogenic radiometer. The flat pyroelectric radiometer standard can be used to perform uniform integrated irradiance measurements from all kinds of UV sources (with different peaks and distributions) without using any source standard. Using this broadband calibration method, yearly spectral calibrations for the reference UV (LED) sources and irradiance meters is not needed. Field UV sources and meters can be calibrated against the pyroelectric radiometer standard for broadband (integrated) irradiance and integrated responsivity. Using the broadband measurement procedure, the UV measurements give uniform results with significantly decreased uncertainties.

  12. Do basic psychomotor skills transfer between different image-based procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzink, Sonja N; Goossens, Richard H M; Schoon, Erik J; de Ridder, Huib; Jakimowicz, Jack J

    2010-05-01

    Surgical techniques that draw from multiple types of image-based procedures (IBP) are increasing, such as Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery, fusing laparoscopy and flexible endoscopy. However, little is known about the relation between psychomotor skills for performing different types of IBP. For example, do basic psychomotor colonoscopy and laparoscopy skills interact? Following a cross-over study design, 29 naïve endoscopists were trained on the Simbionix GI Mentor and the SimSurgery SEP simulators. Group C (n = 15) commenced with a laparoscopy session, followed by four colonoscopy sessions and a second laparoscopy session. Group L (n = 14) started with a colonoscopy session, followed by four laparoscopy sessions and a second colonoscopy session. No significant differences were found between the performances of group L and group C in their first training sessions on either technique. With additional colonoscopy training, group C outperformed group L in the second laparoscopy training session on the camera navigation task. Overall, training in the basic colonoscopy tasks does not affect performance of basic laparoscopy tasks (and vice versa). However, to limited extent, training of basic psychomotor skills for colonoscopy do appear to contribute to the performance of angled laparoscope navigation tasks. Thus, training and assessment of IBP type-specific skills should focus on each type of tasks independently. Future research should further investigate the influence of psychometric abilities on the performance of IBP and the transfer of skills for physicians who are experienced in one IBP type and would like to become proficient in another type of IBP.

  13. Calibration of the Al2O3:C optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal for linear energy transfer (LET) measurements in therapeutic proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granville, Dal A.; Sahoo, Narayan; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.

    2014-08-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors (OSLDs) have shown potential for measurements of linear energy transfer (LET) in proton therapy beams. However, the technique lacks the efficiency needed for clinical implementation, and a faster, simpler approach to LET measurements is desirable. The goal of this work was to demonstrate and evaluate the potential of calibrating Al2O3:C OSLDs for LET measurements using new methods. We exposed batches of OSLDs to unmodulated proton beams of varying LET and calibrated three parameters of the resulting OSL signals as functions of fluence-averaged LET (ϕ-LET) and dose-averaged LET (D-LET). These three parameters included the OSL curve shape evaluated under continuous wave stimulation (CW-OSL), the OSL curve shape evaluated under pulsed stimulation (P-OSL), and the intensity ratio of the two main emission bands in the Al2O3:C OSL emission spectrum (ultraviolet [UV]/blue ratio). To test the calibration, we then irradiated new batches of OSLDs in modulated proton beams of varying LET, and used the OSL signal parameters to calculate ϕ-LET and D-LET under these new test conditions. Using the P-OSL curve shape, D-LET was measured within 5.7% of the expected value. We conclude that from a single 10 s readout (following initial calibration), both the absorbed dose and LET in proton therapy beams can be measured using OSLDs. This has potential future applications in the quality assurance of proton therapy treatment plans, particularly for those that may account for LET or relative biological effectiveness in their optimization. The methods demonstrated in this work may also be applicable to other particle therapy beams, including carbon ion beams.

  14. Transference patron for the calibration of activemeters for use in nuclear medicine; Patron de transferencia para la calibracion de activimetros de uso en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes P, A.; Garcia D, O.C.; Ortiz P, I.; Becerril V, A. [Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Laboratorio de Patrones Radiactivos, Departamento de Metrologia, A.P. 18-1027. C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    With the object to improve the calibration service of the activemetersof the users (nuclear medicine centres) so internal as external users at ININ and initiating the establishment of the traceability of the activity measures that carry out in the country, with respect to the National Patron of Nuclear Activity No. ININ-PNM-2, it is initiated the characterization and the performance control of the activemeter make Capintec, model CRC-7BT of the laboratory of Radioactive Patrons (LPR) of the Department of Metrology for to convert it in a transference patron. This characterization and control are based in the sustained review of the activemeter calibration for the I-131, Mo-99 and Sm-153 radioisotopes with activities from 100 mCi until some {mu} Ci and the Tc-99m, In-111, Tl-201, Ga-67, Cs-137, Co-60, and Ba-133 with activities of the range of some {mu} Ci. To verify the good performance of the instrument it was revised the linearity of its scale, the stability of readings, the variation of readings respect of the source position inside the activemeter well and it was determined the calibration factors for each one of the radiosotopes mentionated. The radioactive sources of mid-short life that are used which consist in radioactive solutions of 10 cm{sup 3} contained in polyethylene small bottles of 25 cm{sup 3} elaborated in the LPR and whose activity is measured with respect to the National Patron ININ-PNM-2. The sources of mid-large life are ampoules with 5 cm{sup 3} of radioactive solution, calibrated in activity by the primary laboratory, LNHB (formerly LMRI) of France. (Author)

  15. 20 CFR 725.497 - Procedures in special claims transferred to the fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... an informed consideration of the transferability of the claim. Where the issue of the transferability... sufficient for a resolution of the issue, the hearing record may be reopened or the case remanded for the... to, the assignment of the claim to the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund for the payment of benefits...

  16. In vitro assessment of a direct transfer vitrification procedure for bovine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Chillòn, L F; Walker, D J; de la Torre-Sanchez, J F; Seidel, G E

    2006-04-01

    We developed a simple vitrification technique for bovine embryos that could permit direct transfer. Embryos were produced in-vitro by standard procedures. The base medium for cryopreservation was a chemically defined medium similar to SOF + 25 mM Hepes and 0.25% fatty acid free bovine serum albumin (FAF-BSA) (HCDM2). In experiment 1, embryos were first exposed to 3.5M ethylene glycol (V1) for 1, 2 or 3 min at room temperature (20-24 degrees C), and then moved to 7 M ethylene glycol (V2) at 4 or 20-24 degrees C and loaded in 0.25-mL straws. After 45 s in 7 M ethylene glycol, straws were placed in liquid nitrogen. Embryos that were loaded at 20-24 degrees C had higher survival rates than those loaded at 4 degrees C (Pembryos survived well after 15 min in straws if warmed at 37 degrees C. In experiment 3, ethylene glycol concentration (3, 4 or 5 M) and exposure time (0.5 or 1 min) during two-step addition of cryoprotectant were studied for bovine morulae. In experiment 4, morulae were exposed to V2 for 30 or 45 s in HCDM2 or Vigro holding medium and then held in 22-24 degrees C air or 37 degrees C water post-warming. Experiment 5 was like experiment 4 except blastocysts were used. Overall survival rates of blastocysts in experiment 5 averaged 80% of non-vitrified controls after 48 h culture. The survival rates with in vitro-produced morulae in experiments 1, 3 and 4 were unacceptable. Vitrification solutions based on Vigro tended to result in higher survival than HCDM2 for blastocysts, but not morulae. In experiment 6, the survival rate in vitro of in vivo-produced morulae and blastocysts after two-step vitrification was nearly 100%. Our vitrification technique was very effective for in vitro produced blastocysts, but not for in vitro-produced morulae.

  17. Two-demensional analysis of heat and mass transfer in porous media using the strongly implicit procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical results of the heat and mass transfer in a porous matrix are presented. The coupled, nonlinear partial differential equations describing this physical phenomenon are solved in finite difference form for two dimensions, using a new iterative technique (the strongly implicit procedure). The influence of the external environment conditions (heating and pressure) is shown to produce two-dimensional flow in the porous matrix. Typical fluid and solid temperature distributions in the porous matrix and internal pressure distributions are presented.

  18. Changes to booking, transfer criteria and procedures in birth centres in Australia from 1997-2007: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Paula J; Lim, Carylyn; Tracy, Sally K; Dahlen, Hannah; Sullivan, Elizabeth A

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to describe booking and transfer criteria and procedures available in birth centres in Australia in 2007 and to compare results with those of a previous national birth centre study undertaken in 1997. Approximately 2% of women who give birth in Australia each year do so in a birth centre. A national study on birth centre procedures was conducted in 1997. There have been changes in the management of women in birth centres during the past 10 years and this may be due in part to changes in booking and transfer criteria. Survey. Questionnaires were sent to 23 birth centres. Questions included: types of procedures, equipment and pain relief available and exclusion criteria for booking and transfer. Of the birth centres, 19 satisfied the inclusion criteria and 16 completed surveys. Changes were noted in booking and transfer criteria and procedures for birth centres between 1997-2007. These included a decline in birth centres accepting postterm pregnancies, vaginal births after caesarean section and women who are obese. There were also reductions in the use of artificial rupture of membranes for augmentation of labour, forceps and opioids. Use of natural therapies was widespread in 2007. Increases in birth centres managing induction of labour and electronic fetal monitoring were also noted. The changes observed in birth centre practice reflect overall changes in maternity care in Australia from 1997-2007. Findings of the study suggest that factors such as increasing obesity and limited admission for vaginal births after caesarean section may lead to proportionately more women being unable to access birth centres as their preferred place of birth. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. An analysis of patients transferred to a tertiary oncological intensive care unit for defined procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Sunil; Chawla, Sanjay; Rajendram, Prabalini; Pastores, Stephen M; Kostelecky, Natalie; Halpern, Neil A

    2015-05-01

    Up to 50 000 intensive care unit interhospital transfers occur annually in the United States. To determine the prevalence, characteristics, and outcomes of cancer patients transferred from an intensive care unit in one hospital to another intensive care unit at an oncological center and to evaluate whether interventions planned before transfer were performed. Data on transfers for planned interventions from January 2008 through December 2012 were identified retrospectively. Demographic and clinical variables, receipt of planned interventions, and outcome data were analyzed. Of 4625 admissions to an intensive care unit at the oncological center, 143 (3%) were transfers from intensive care units of other hospitals. Of these, 47 (33%) were transfers for planned interventions. Patients' mean age was 57 years, and 68% were men. At the time of intensive care unit transfer, 20 (43%) were receiving mechanical ventilation. Interventions included management of airway (n = 19) or gastrointestinal (n = 2) obstruction, treatment of tumor bleeding (n = 12), chemotherapy (n = 10), and other (n = 4). A total of 37 patients (79%) received the planned interventions within 48 hours of intensive care unit arrival; 10 (21%) did not because their signs and symptoms abated. Median intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay at the oncological center were 4 and 13 days, respectively. Intensive care unit and hospital mortality rates were 11% and 19%, respectively. Deaths occurred only in patients who received interventions. Interhospital transfers of cancer patients to an intensive care unit at an oncological center are infrequent but are most commonly done for direct interventional care. Most patients received planned interventions soon after transfer. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  20. Precision limits and interval estimation in the calibration of 1-hydroxypyrene in urine and hexachlorbenzene in water, applying the regression triplet procedure on chromatographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloun, Milan; Dluhosová, Zdenka

    2008-04-01

    A method for the determination of 1-hydroxypyrene in urine and hexachlorbenzene in water applying the regression triplet in the calibration procedure of chromatographic data has been applied. The detection limit and quantification limit are currently calculated on the basis of the standard deviation of replicate analyses at a single concentration. However, since the standard deviation depends on concentration, these single-concentration techniques result in limits that are directly dependent on spiking concentration. A more rigorous approach requires first careful attention to the three components of the regression triplet (data, model, method), examining (1) the data quality of the proposed model, (2) the model quality and (3) the least-squares method to be used for fulfilment of all least-squares assumptions. For high-performance liquid chromatography determination of 1-hydroxypyrene in urine and gas chromatography analysis of hexachlorbenzene in water, this paper describes the effects of deviations from five basic assumptions The paper considers the correction of deviations: identifying influential points, namely, outliers, the calibration task depends on the regression model used, and the least-squares method is based on the assumptions of the normality of the errors, homoscedasticity and the independence of errors. Results show that the approach developed provides improved estimates of analytical limits and that the single-concentration approaches currently in wide use are seriously flawed.

  1. 47 CFR 63.03 - Streamlining procedures for domestic transfer of control applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., OUTAGE AND IMPAIRMENT OF SERVICE BY COMMON CARRIERS; AND GRANTS OF RECOGNIZED PRIVATE OPERATING AGENCY...) The proposed transaction involves only the transfer of the local exchange assets of an incumbent LEC...

  2. Flow matters 2: How to improve irrigation flow in small-calibre percutaneous procedures-the purging effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagele, Udo; Walcher, Ute; Bader, Markus; Herrmann, Thomas; Kruck, Stephan; Schilling, David

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate whether the combination of high-pressure irrigation inflow combined with simultaneous sensor-controlled suction could improve irrigation turnover without leading to high peak intrarenal pressure in small-calibre percutaneous instruments (SCPI). M + M: A MIP XS sheath (9.5 Fr. outer diameter and 8.5 Fr. inner diameter) and a 7.5-Fr. nephroscope (3-Fr. irrigation channel; MIP XS by Nagele, Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany) was inserted into the collecting system of a non-perfused cadaveric porcine kidney, an 8-Fr. mono-J catheter was introduced through the ureter. Irrigation was performed using a pressure-controlled, combined irrigation/suction pump (Uromat E.A.S.I., Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany) in either single-flow or continuous-flow (=combination of irrigation and suction) mode. Intrarenal pressure was measured and irrigation fluid turnover was measured by a cystometry catheter inserted trans-parenchymally into the renal pelvis. Pressure changes were recorded by a urodynamic workstation. Applying pressure-controlled suction, irrigation fluid turnover could be increased by 5 % at an inflow pressure of 75 mmHg (80-84 ml/min) and 15 % at an inflow pressure of 110 mmHg (196-110 ml/min). Suction decreased the intrarenal pressure by 14 % at 75 mmHg (19-14.5 cm H2O) and 28 % at 110 mmHg inflow pressure (37-26.5 cm H2O). Although combination of pressure irrigation with sensor-controlled suction increases irrigation flow in SCPI, the intrarenal pressure could be reduced with combined suction via a transurethral mono-J catheter. This irrigation method in percutaneous surgery is called purging effect.

  3. Tests of Sunspot Number Sequences: 3. Effects of Regression Procedures on the Calibration of Historic Sunspot Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, M.; Owens, M. J.; Barnard, L.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2016-11-01

    We use sunspot-group observations from the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO) to investigate the effects of intercalibrating data from observers with different visual acuities. The tests are made by counting the number of groups [RB] above a variable cut-off threshold of observed total whole spot area (uncorrected for foreshortening) to simulate what a lower-acuity observer would have seen. The synthesised annual means of RB are then re-scaled to the full observed RGO group number [RA] using a variety of regression techniques. It is found that a very high correlation between RA and RB (r_{AB} > 0.98) does not prevent large errors in the intercalibration (for example sunspot-maximum values can be over 30 % too large even for such levels of r_{AB}). In generating the backbone sunspot number [R_{BB}], Svalgaard and Schatten ( Solar Phys., 2016) force regression fits to pass through the scatter-plot origin, which generates unreliable fits (the residuals do not form a normal distribution) and causes sunspot-cycle amplitudes to be exaggerated in the intercalibrated data. It is demonstrated that the use of Quantile-Quantile ("Q-Q") plots to test for a normal distribution is a useful indicator of erroneous and misleading regression fits. Ordinary least-squares linear fits, not forced to pass through the origin, are sometimes reliable (although the optimum method used is shown to be different when matching peak and average sunspot-group numbers). However, other fits are only reliable if non-linear regression is used. From these results it is entirely possible that the inflation of solar-cycle amplitudes in the backbone group sunspot number as one goes back in time, relative to related solar-terrestrial parameters, is entirely caused by the use of inappropriate and non-robust regression techniques to calibrate the sunspot data.

  4. Free Thyroid Transfer: A Novel Procedure to Prevent Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jeffrey [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Almarzouki, Hani [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Barber, Brittany, E-mail: brittanybarber0@gmail.com [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Scrimger, Rufus [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Romney, Jacques [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); O' Connell, Daniel [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Urken, Mark [Institute for Head and Neck and Thyroid Cancers, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York (United States); Seikaly, Hadi [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The incidence of hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) has been found to be ≤53%. Medical treatment of hypothyroidism can be costly and difficult to titrate. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of free thyroid transfer as a strategy for the prevention of radiation-induced damage to the thyroid gland during radiation therapy for HNC. Methods and Materials: A prospective feasibility study was performed involving 10 patients with a new diagnosis of advanced HNC undergoing ablative surgery, radial forearm free-tissue transfer reconstruction, and postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy. During the neck dissection, hemithyroid dissection was completed with preservation of the thyroid arterial and venous supply for implantation into the donor forearm site. All patients underwent a diagnostic thyroid technetium scan 6 weeks and 12 months postoperatively to examine the functional integrity of the transferred thyroid tissue. Results: Free thyroid transfer was executed in 9 of the 10 recruited patients with advanced HNC. The postoperative technetium scans demonstrated strong uptake of technetium at the forearm donor site at 6 weeks and 12 months for all 9 of the transplanted patients. Conclusions: The thyroid gland can be transferred as a microvascular free transfer with maintenance of function. This technique could represent a novel strategy for maintenance of thyroid function after head and neck irradiation.

  5. Evaluation of procedural learning transfer from a virtual environment to a real situation: a case study on tank maintenance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganier, Franck; Hoareau, Charlotte; Tisseau, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality opens new opportunities for operator training in complex tasks. It lowers costs and has fewer constraints than traditional training. The ultimate goal of virtual training is to transfer knowledge gained in a virtual environment to an actual real-world setting. This study tested whether a maintenance procedure could be learnt equally well by virtual-environment and conventional training. Forty-two adults were divided into three equally sized groups: virtual training (GVT® [generic virtual training]), conventional training (using a real tank suspension and preparation station) and control (no training). Participants then performed the procedure individually in the real environment. Both training types (conventional and virtual) produced similar levels of performance when the procedure was carried out in real conditions. Performance level for the two trained groups was better in terms of success and time taken to complete the task, time spent consulting job instructions and number of times the instructor provided guidance.

  6. Binary pseudo-random patterned structures for modulation transfer function calibration and resolution characterization of a full-field transmission soft x-ray microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, V. V., E-mail: VVYashchuk@lbl.gov; Chan, E. R.; Lacey, I. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Fischer, P. J. [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 94056 (United States); Conley, R. [Advance Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); McKinney, W. R. [Diablo Valley College, 321 Golf Club Road, Pleasant Hill, California 94523 (United States); Artemiev, N. A. [KLA-Tencor Corp., 1 Technology Drive, Milpitas, California 95035 (United States); Bouet, N. [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Cabrini, S. [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Calafiore, G.; Peroz, C.; Babin, S. [aBeam Technologies, Inc., Hayward, California 94541 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We present a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) one-dimensional sequences and two-dimensional arrays as an effective method for spectral characterization in the spatial frequency domain of a broad variety of metrology instrumentation, including interferometric microscopes, scatterometers, phase shifting Fizeau interferometers, scanning and transmission electron microscopes, and at this time, x-ray microscopes. The inherent power spectral density of BPR gratings and arrays, which has a deterministic white-noise-like character, allows a direct determination of the MTF with a uniform sensitivity over the entire spatial frequency range and field of view of an instrument. We demonstrate the MTF calibration and resolution characterization over the full field of a transmission soft x-ray microscope using a BPR multilayer (ML) test sample with 2.8 nm fundamental layer thickness. We show that beyond providing a direct measurement of the microscope’s MTF, tests with the BPRML sample can be used to fine tune the instrument’s focal distance. Our results confirm the universality of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  7. Do Basic Psychomotor Skills Transfer Between Different Image-based Procedures?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzink, S.N.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Schoon, E.J.; De Ridder, H.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background - Surgical techniques that draw from multiple types of image-based procedures (IBP) are increasing, such as Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery, fusing laparoscopy and flexible endoscopy. However, little is known about the relation between psychomotor skills for performing

  8. In vitro calibration of a system for measurement of in vivo convective heat transfer coefficient in animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster John G

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We need a sensor to measure the convective heat transfer coefficient during ablation of the heart or liver. Methods We built a minimally invasive instrument to measure the in vivo convective heat transfer coefficient, h in animals, using a Wheatstone-bridge circuit, similar to a hot-wire anemometer circuit. One arm is connected to a steerable catheter sensor whose tip is a 1.9 mm × 3.2 mm thin film resistive temperature detector (RTD sensor. We used a circulation system to simulate different flow rates at 39°C for in vitro experiments using distilled water, tap water and saline. We heated the sensor approximately 5°C above the fluid temperature. We measured the power consumed by the sensor and the resistance of the sensor during the experiments and analyzed these data to determine the value of the convective heat transfer coefficient at various flow rates. Results From 0 to 5 L/min, experimental values of h in W/(m2·K were for distilled water 5100 to 13000, for tap water 5500 to 12300, and for saline 5400 to 13600. Theoretical values were 1900 to 10700. Conclusion We believe this system is the smallest, most accurate method of minimally invasive measurement of in vivo h in animals and provides the least disturbance of flow.

  9. Jurisprudential aspects regarding the action in annulment of the debtor’s patrimonial transfers, the debtor being in insolvency procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela MIFF

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to present relevant aspects from the jurisprudential solutions of the High Court of Cassation and Justice in matters of the action in annulment of the patrimonial transfers of the debtor in insolvency procedure and of other judicial actions introduced by the procedure bodies or, by case, the participants to the procedure who are enabled to use the measures prescribed by the law for the purpose of restoring the debtor’s patrimony. The jurisprudential solutions adopted under the incidence of the former Law no.85/2006 on the insolvency procedure represent, in present, under diverse aspects, elements of continuity with the principles and rules established by the new law in this matter. Law no.85/2014 on the prevention insolvency procedures and of insolvency establishes the legal frame for the exertion of the measures having as purpose the restoration, in the debtor’s patrimony, of certain assets, transferred by the debtor to the fraud of the creditors’ interests, or of their value, in the scope of covering the passive part to satisfy the creditors’ interests. The new law continues the tradition of the former regulations in this matter but, also, brings some novelty elements such as the decrease or, in some cases, the increase of the duration of certain terms that the exertion of the mentioned judicial actions or their object refer to or the completion of the category of the persons entitled to introduce the mentioned judicial actions with the creditor who holds more than 50% of the value of the claims enlisted in the amount of claims.

  10. Hierarchical calibration and validation for modeling bench-scale solvent-based carbon capture. Part 1: Non-reactive physical mass transfer across the wetted wall column: Original Research Article: Hierarchical calibration and validation for modeling bench-scale solvent-based carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA; Xu, Zhijie [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA; Lai, Canhai [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA; Whyatt, Greg [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy and Environment Directorate, Richland WA; Marcy, Peter [Statistical Sciences Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM; Sun, Xin [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA

    2017-04-27

    A hierarchical model calibration and validation is proposed for quantifying the confidence level of mass transfer prediction using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, where the solvent-based carbon dioxide (CO2) capture is simulated and simulation results are compared to the parallel bench-scale experimental data. Two unit problems with increasing level of complexity are proposed to breakdown the complex physical/chemical processes of solvent-based CO2 capture into relatively simpler problems to separate the effects of physical transport and chemical reaction. This paper focuses on the calibration and validation of the first unit problem, i.e. the CO2 mass transfer across a falling ethanolamine (MEA) film in absence of chemical reaction. This problem is investigated both experimentally and numerically using nitrous oxide (N2O) as a surrogate for CO2. To capture the motion of gas-liquid interface, a volume of fluid method is employed together with a one-fluid formulation to compute the mass transfer between the two phases. Bench-scale parallel experiments are designed and conducted to validate and calibrate the CFD models using a general Bayesian calibration. Two important transport parameters, e.g. Henry’s constant and gas diffusivity, are calibrated to produce the posterior distributions, which will be used as the input for the second unit problem to address the chemical adsorption of CO2 across the MEA falling film, where both mass transfer and chemical reaction are involved.

  11. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Quenching of curcumine fluorescence by thionine, both immobilised in cellulose acetate occurs in accordance with the Forster mechanism of energy transfer. The rate constant of energy transfer for this donor - acceptor pair is found to be 9.4 x 109 L ' mol S1 with R0 = 37±1 Б. When this donor - acceptor pair is ...

  12. Is there inter-procedural transfer of skills in intraocular surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; la Cour, Morten

    2017-01-01

    surgery on a virtual-reality simulator until passing a test with predefined validity evidence (cataract trainees) or to (2) no cataract surgery training (novices). Possible skill transfer was assessed using a test consisting of all 11 vitreoretinal modules on the EyeSi virtual-reality simulator. All......PURPOSE: To investigate how experience in simulated cataract surgery impacts and transfers to the learning curves for novices in vitreoretinal surgery. METHODS: Twelve ophthalmology residents without previous experience in intraocular surgery were randomized to (1) intensive training in cataract...... participants repeated the test of vitreoretinal surgical skills until their performance curve plateaued. Three experienced vitreoretinal surgeons also performed the test to establish validity evidence. Analysis with independent samples t-tests was performed. RESULTS: The vitreoretinal test on the Eye...

  13. 47 CFR 73.3597 - Procedures on transfer and assignment applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.3597 Procedures... parties rely upon for the requisite showing that those expenses represent legitimate and prudent outlays... transaction involves actual or potential gain to the seller over and above the legitimate and prudent out-of...

  14. Internal calibration Förster resonance energy transfer assay: a real-time approach for determining protease kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Liu, Yan; Song, Yang; Saavedra, Amanda N; Pan, Songqin; Xiang, Wensheng; Liao, Jiayu

    2013-04-08

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology has been widely used in biological and biomedical research. This powerful tool can elucidate protein interactions in either a dynamic or steady state. We recently developed a series of FRET-based technologies to determine protein interaction dissociation constant and for use in high-throughput screening assays of SUMOylation. SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) is conjugated to substrates through an enzymatic cascade. This important posttranslational protein modification is critical for multiple biological processes. Sentrin/SUMO-specific proteases (SENPs) act as endopeptidases to process the pre-SUMO or as isopeptidases to deconjugate SUMO from its substrate. Here, we describe a novel quantitative FRET-based protease assay for determining the kinetics of SENP1. Our strategy is based on the quantitative analysis and differentiation of fluorescent emission signals at the FRET acceptor emission wavelengths. Those fluorescent emission signals consist of three components: the FRET signal and the fluorescent emissions of donor (CyPet) and acceptor (YPet). Unlike our previous method in which donor and acceptor direct emissions were excluded by standard curves, the three fluorescent emissions were determined quantitatively during the SENP digestion process from onesample. New mathematical algorithms were developed to determine digested substrate concentrations directly from the FRET signal and donor/acceptor direct emissions. The kinetic parameters, kcat, KM, and catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) of SENP1 catalytic domain for pre-SUMO1/2/3 were derived. Importantly, the general principles of this new quantitative methodology of FRET-based protease kinetic determinations can be applied to other proteases in a robust and systems biology approach.

  15. Internal Calibration Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Assay: A Real-Time Approach for Determining Protease Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Liu, Yan; Song, Yang; Saavedra, Amanda N.; Pan, Songqin; Xiang, Wensheng; Liao, Jiayu

    2013-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology has been widely used in biological and biomedical research. This powerful tool can elucidate protein interactions in either a dynamic or steady state. We recently developed a series of FRET-based technologies to determine protein interaction dissociation constant and for use in high-throughput screening assays of SUMOylation. SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) is conjugated to substrates through an enzymatic cascade. This important posttranslational protein modification is critical for multiple biological processes. Sentrin/SUMO-specific proteases (SENPs) act as endopeptidases to process the pre-SUMO or as isopeptidases to deconjugate SUMO from its substrate. Here, we describe a novel quantitative FRET-based protease assay for determining the kinetics of SENP1. Our strategy is based on the quantitative analysis and differentiation of fluorescent emission signals at the FRET acceptor emission wavelengths. Those fluorescent emission signals consist of three components: the FRET signal and the fluorescent emissions of donor (CyPet) and acceptor (YPet). Unlike our previous method in which donor and acceptor direct emissions were excluded by standard curves, the three fluorescent emissions were determined quantitatively during the SENP digestion process from onesample. New mathematical algorithms were developed to determine digested substrate concentrations directly from the FRET signal and donor/acceptor direct emissions. The kinetic parameters, kcat, KM, and catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) of SENP1 catalytic domain for pre-SUMO1/2/3 were derived. Importantly, the general principles of this new quantitative methodology of FRET-based protease kinetic determinations can be applied to other proteases in a robust and systems biology approach. PMID:23567524

  16. Cross-Leg as Salvage Procedure after Free Flaps Transfer Failure: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Contedini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic wounds of the lower leg with soft tissue defects and exposed fractures are a reconstructive challenge due to the scarce availability of local tissues and recipient vessels. Even when a free tissue transfer can be performed the risk of failure remains considerable. When a free flap is contraindicated or after a free flap failure, the cross-leg flap is still nowadays a possible option. We report a case of a male with a severe posttraumatic wound of the lower leg with exposed tibia fracture firstly treated with two consecutive latissimus dorsi muscular free flaps, failed for vascular thrombosis; the coverage was then achieved with a cross-leg flap with acceptable results.

  17. Calibration of Galileo signals for time metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defraigne, Pascale; Aerts, Wim; Cerretto, Giancarlo; Cantoni, Elena; Sleewaegen, Jean-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Using global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signals for accurate timing and time transfer requires the knowledge of all electric delays of the signals inside the receiving system. GNSS stations dedicated to timing or time transfer are classically calibrated only for Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. This paper proposes a procedure to determine the hardware delays of a GNSS receiving station for Galileo signals, once the delays of the GPS signals are known. This approach makes use of the broadcast satellite inter-signal biases, and is based on the ionospheric delay measured from dual-frequency combinations of GPS and Galileo signals. The uncertainty on the so-determined hardware delays is estimated to 3.7 ns for each isolated code in the L5 frequency band, and 4.2 ns for the ionosphere-free combination of E1 with a code of the L5 frequency band. For the calibration of a time transfer link between two stations, another approach can be used, based on the difference between the common-view time transfer results obtained with calibrated GPS data and with uncalibrated Galileo data. It is shown that the results obtained with this approach or with the ionospheric method are equivalent.

  18. QA experience at the University of Wisconsin accredited dosimetry calibration laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWard, L.A.; Micka, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UW ADCL) employs procedure manuals as part of its Quality Assurance (QA) program. One of these manuals covers the QA procedures and results for all of the UW ADCL measurement equipment. The QA procedures are divided into two main areas: QA for laboratory equipment and QA for external chambers sent for calibration. All internal laboratory equipment is checked and recalibrated on an annual basis, after establishing its consistency on a 6-month basis. QA for external instruments involves checking past calibration history as well as comparing to a range of calibration values for specific instrument models. Generally, the authors find that a chamber will have a variation of less than 0.5 % from previous Co-60 calibration factors, and falls within two standard deviations of previous calibrations. If x-ray calibrations are also performed, the energy response of the chamber is plotted and compared to previous instruments of the same model. These procedures give the authors confidence in the transfer of calibration values from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  19. SPOTS Calibration Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The results are presented using the procedure outlined by the Standardisation Project for Optical Techniques of Strain measurement to calibrate a digital image correlation system. The process involves comparing the experimental data obtained with the optical measurement system to the theoretical values for a specially designed specimen. The standard states the criteria which must be met in order to achieve successful calibration, in addition to quantifying the measurement uncertainty in the system. The system was evaluated at three different displacement load levels, generating strain ranges from 289 µstrain to 2110 µstrain. At the 289 µstrain range, the calibration uncertainty was found to be 14.1 µstrain, and at the 2110 µstrain range it was found to be 28.9 µstrain. This calibration procedure was performed without painting a speckle pattern on the surface of the metal. Instead, the specimen surface was prepared using different grades of grit paper to produce the desired texture.

  20. The technique of measuring thrombin generation with fluorescent substrates: 4. The H-transform, a mathematical procedure to obtain thrombin concentrations without external calibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemker, H.C.; Hemker, P.W.; Al Dieri, R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In fluorogenic thrombin generation (TG) experiments, thrombin concentrations cannot be easily calculated from the rate of the fluorescent signal increase, because the calibration coefficient increases during the experiment, due to substrate consumption and quenching of the fluorescent signal

  1. Calibrating nacelle lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, M.

    2013-01-15

    Nacelle mounted, forward looking wind lidars are beginning to be used to provide reference wind speed measurements for the power performance testing of wind turbines. In such applications, a formal calibration procedure with a corresponding uncertainty assessment will be necessary. This report presents four concepts for performing such a nacelle lidar calibration. Of the four methods, two are found to be immediately relevant and are pursued in some detail. The first of these is a line of sight calibration method in which both lines of sight (for a two beam lidar) are individually calibrated by accurately aligning the beam to pass close to a reference wind speed sensor. A testing procedure is presented, reporting requirements outlined and the uncertainty of the method analysed. It is seen that the main limitation of the line of sight calibration method is the time required to obtain a representative distribution of radial wind speeds. An alternative method is to place the nacelle lidar on the ground and incline the beams upwards to bisect a mast equipped with reference instrumentation at a known height and range. This method will be easier and faster to implement and execute but the beam inclination introduces extra uncertainties. A procedure for conducting such a calibration is presented and initial indications of the uncertainties given. A discussion of the merits and weaknesses of the two methods is given together with some proposals for the next important steps to be taken in this work. (Author)

  2. Determination of beam-position dependent transfer functions of LCR-G gravimeters by means of moving mass calibration device in the Mátyáshegy Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory, Budapest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppán, András; Kis, Márta; Merényi, László; Papp, Gábor; Benedek, Judit; Meurers, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    In this presentation authors propose a method for the determination of transfer characteristics and fine calibration of LCR relative gravimeters used for earth-tide recordings, by means of the moving-mass gravimeter calibration device of Budapest-Mátyáshegy Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory. Beam-position dependent transfer functions of four relative LCR G type gravimeters were determined and compared. In order to make these instruments applicable for observatory tidal recordings, there is a need for examining the unique characteristics of equipments and adequately correcting these inherent distorting effects. Thus, the sensitivity for the tilting, temporal changes of scale factors and beam-position dependent transfer characteristics are necessary to be determined for observatory use of these instruments. During the calibration a cylindrical ring of 3200 kg mass is vertically moving around the equipment, generating gravity variations. The effect of the moving mass can be precisely calculated from the known mass and geometrical parameters. The maximum theoretical gravity variation produced by the vertical movement of the mass is ab. 110 microGal, so it provides excellent possibility for the fine calibration of gravimeters in the tidal range. Magnetic experiments were also carried out on the pillar of the calibration device as well, in order to analyse the magnetic effect of the moving stainless steel-mass. According to the magnetic measurements, a correction for the magnetic effect was applied on the measured gravimetric data series. The calibration process is aided by intelligent controller electronics. A PLC-based system has been developed to allow easy control of the movement of the calibrating mass and to measure the mass position. It enables also programmed steps of movements (waiting positions and waiting times) for refined gravity changes. All parameters (position of the mass, CPI data, X/Y leveling positions) are recorded with 1/sec. sampling rate. The

  3. Enhancing treatment gains in a school-based intervention for children of divorce through skill training, parental involvement, and transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolberg, A L; Mahler, J

    1994-02-01

    The school-based Children's Support Group procedure teaches skills to cope with divorce-related events and provides strategies for mastering disrupted developmental tasks. Ss were 103 3rd-through 5th-grade children of separated or divorced parents who were assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: support; support and skill building; support, skill building, transfer, and parent training procedures; or no-treatment control. Twenty-six children from intact homes served as nonstressed controls. The two skill-building conditions yielded durable improvements in adjustive behaviors in the home. Transfer components yielded additional improvements in affect, but the absence of substantial increments in benefits suggests the need for a closer look at the format and expectations of the transfer vehicle. The benefits of the support-alone condition were experienced most by children who entered the intervention with significant problems, with the greatest reductions in clinical symptomatology at follow-up being found in this group.

  4. Calibration of Spatially Distributed Hydrological Processes and Model Parameters in SWAT Using Remote Sensing Data and an Auto-Calibration Procedure: A Case Study in a Vietnamese River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Thanh Ha

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, evapotranspiration (ET and leaf area index (LAI were used to calibrate the SWAT model, whereas remotely sensed precipitation and other climatic parameters were used as forcing data for the 6300 km2 Day Basin, a tributary of the Red River in Vietnam. The efficacy of the Sequential Uncertainty Fitting (SUFI-2 parameter sensitivity and optimization model was tested with area specific remote sensing input parameters for every Hydrological Response Units (HRU, rather than with measurements of river flow representing a large set of HRUs, i.e., a bulk calibration. Simulated monthly ET correlations with remote sensing estimates showed an R2 = 0.71, Nash–Sutcliffe Efficiency NSE = 0.65, and Kling Gupta Efficiency KGE = 0.80 while monthly LAI showed correlations of R2 = 0.59, NSE = 0.57 and KGE = 0.83 over a five-year validation period. Accumulated modelled ET over the 5-year calibration period amounted to 5713 mm compared to 6015 mm of remotely sensed ET, yielding a difference of 302 mm (5.3%. The monthly flow at two flow measurement stations were adequately estimated (R2 = 0.78 and 0.55, NSE = 0.71 and 0.63, KGE = 0.59 and 0.75 for Phu Ly and Ninh Binh, respectively. This outcome demonstrates the capability of SWAT model to obtain spatial and accurate simulation of eco-hydrological processes, also when rivers are ungauged and the water withdrawal system is complex.

  5. Site Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    This Site Calibration report is describing the results of a measured site calibration for a site in Denmark. The calibration is carried out by DTU Wind Energy in accordance with Ref.[3] and Ref.[4]. The measurement period is given. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance...... measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio between the wind speed at the center of the turbine hub and at the met mast. The wind speed at the turbine is measured by a temporary mast placed at the foundation for the turbine. The site and measurement equipment...

  6. Calibration uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Anglov, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Methods recommended by the International Standardization Organisation and Eurachem are not satisfactory for the correct estimation of calibration uncertainty. A novel approach is introduced and tested on actual calibration data for the determination of Pb by ICP-AES. The improved calibration...... uncertainty was verified from independent measurements of the same sample by demonstrating statistical control of analytical results and the absence of bias. The proposed method takes into account uncertainties of the measurement, as well as of the amount of calibrant. It is applicable to all types...

  7. GPI Calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.

    2017-09-01

    "The Gemini Planet Imager requires a large set of Calibrations. These can be split into two major sets, one set associated with each observation and one set related to biweekly calibrations. The observation set is to optimize the correction of miscroshifts in the IFU spectra and the latter set is for correction of detector and instrument cosmetics."

  8. Modified Pectoralis Major Tendon Transfer for Reanimation of Elbow Flexion as a Salvage Procedure in Complete Brachial Plexus Injury: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Taran

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brachial plexus injuries rarely recover spontaneously and if the window period for neurotisation has elapsed, the only option for restoration of function lies in a salvage procedure. Many such salvage procedures have been described in the literature with variable functional results. We report the case of a 16-year-old boy who presented after unsuccessful treatment for a complete brachial plexus injury; we performed a pectoralis major tendon transfer to attain elbow flexion. Postoperatively, the elbow was splinted with flexion at 100°. After 4 weeks of immobilization the splint was removed and the patient could actively flex his elbow from 30° to 100°.

  9. Calibration of environmental radionuclide transfer models using a Bayesian approach with Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations and model comparisons - Calibration of radionuclides transfer models in the environment using a Bayesian approach with Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation and comparison of models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoulaud-Gouin, V.; Giacalone, M.; Gonze, M.A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire-PRP-ENV/SERIS/LM2E (France); Martin-Garin, A.; Garcia-Sanchez, L. [IRSN-PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT (France)

    2014-07-01

    Calibration of transfer models according to observation data is a challenge, especially if parameters uncertainty is required, and if competing models should be decided between them. Generally two main calibration methods are used: The frequentist approach in which the unknown parameter of interest is supposed fixed and its estimation is based on the data only. In this category, least squared method has many restrictions in nonlinear models and competing models need to be nested in order to be compared. The bayesian inference in which the unknown parameter of interest is supposed random and its estimation is based on the data and on prior information. Compared to frequentist method, it provides probability density functions and therefore pointwise estimation with credible intervals. However, in practical cases, Bayesian inference is a complex problem of numerical integration, which explains its low use in operational modeling including radioecology. This study aims to illustrate the interest and feasibility of Bayesian approach in radioecology particularly in the case of ordinary differential equations with non-constant coefficients models, which cover most radiological risk assessment models, notably those implemented in the Symbiose platform (Gonze et al, 2010). Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method (Metropolis et al., 1953) was used because the posterior expectations are intractable integrals. The invariant distribution of the parameters was performed by the metropolis-Hasting algorithm (Hastings, 1970). GNU-MCSim software (Bois and Maszle, 2011) a bayesian hierarchical framework, was used to deal with nonlinear differential models. Two case studies including this type of model were investigated: An Equilibrium Kinetic sorption model (EK) (e.g. van Genuchten et al, 1974), with experimental data concerning {sup 137}Cs and {sup 85}Sr sorption and desorption in different soils studied in stirred flow-through reactors. This model, generalizing the K{sub d} approach

  10. Certification, self-calibration, and uncertainty in testing optical flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Chris J.

    2010-10-01

    Many different approaches may be taken in the certification of reference flats used for acceptance testing of optical quality surfaces. Measurement services offered by national measurement institutes cover a limited size range and the uncertainties associated with the transfer of a calibration must be considered when data from any testing service is used in quality assurance. In-situ self-calibration using a full area variant of the 3-flat test enables the lowest possible uncertainty. The first part of this paper shows the options for external calibration and certification as a function of flat size, and orientation. Next the conditions that must be met to achieve traceability, according to the requirements of ISO 17025, will be discussed. Finally hardware and procedures will be described, and data presented, showing traceable measurement of a 450 mm aperture flat with nm level uncertainties.

  11. Calibration and simulation of Heston model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrázek Milan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We calibrate Heston stochastic volatility model to real market data using several optimization techniques. We compare both global and local optimizers for different weights showing remarkable differences even for data (DAX options from two consecutive days. We provide a novel calibration procedure that incorporates the usage of approximation formula and outperforms significantly other existing calibration methods.

  12. Calibration of 4π NaI(Tl) detectors with coincidence summing correction using new numerical procedure and ANGLE4 software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Mohamed S.; Jovanovic, Slobodan I.; Thabet, Abouzeid A.; El-Khatib, Ahmed M.; Dlabac, Aleksandar D.; Salem, Bohaysa A.; Gouda, Mona M.; Mihaljevic, Nikola N.; Almugren, Kholud S.; Abbas, Mahmoud I.

    2017-03-01

    The 4π NaI(Tl) γ-ray detectors are consisted of the well cavity with cylindrical cross section, and the enclosing geometry of measurements with large detection angle. This leads to exceptionally high efficiency level and a significant coincidence summing effect, much more than a single cylindrical or coaxial detector especially in very low activity measurements. In the present work, the detection effective solid angle in addition to both full-energy peak and total efficiencies of well-type detectors, were mainly calculated by the new numerical simulation method (NSM) and ANGLE4 software. To obtain the coincidence summing correction factors through the previously mentioned methods, the simulation of the coincident emission of photons was modeled mathematically, based on the analytical equations and complex integrations over the radioactive volumetric sources including the self-attenuation factor. The measured full-energy peak efficiencies and correction factors were done by using 152Eu, where an exact adjustment is required for the detector efficiency curve, because neglecting the coincidence summing effect can make the results inconsistent with the whole. These phenomena, in general due to the efficiency calibration process and the coincidence summing corrections, appear jointly. The full-energy peak and the total efficiencies from the two methods typically agree with discrepancy 10%. The discrepancy between the simulation, ANGLE4 and measured full-energy peak after corrections for the coincidence summing effect was on the average, while not exceeding 14%. Therefore, this technique can be easily applied in establishing the efficiency calibration curves of well-type detectors.

  13. Site calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Georgieva Yankova, Ginka

    The report describes site calibration measurements carried out on a site in Denmark. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio...... between the wind speed at the center of the turbine hub and at the met mast. The wind speed at the turbine is measured by a temporary mast placed at the foundation for the turbine. The site and measurement equipment is detailed described in [2]. The possible measurement sector for power performance...... according to [1] is also described in [2] and no results from the site calibration have shown any necessary exclusion from this sector. All parts of the sensors and the measurement system have been installed by DTU....

  14. 36 CFR 1232.18 - What procedures must an agency follow to transfer records to an agency records center or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... office before the disposal of temporary records unless disposal of temporary records is initiated by the... within one year of their re-appraisal, if not already in such a facility. (Paper-based permanent records... agency follow to transfer records to an agency records center or commercial records storage facility...

  15. Radiometric Cross-Calibration of GF-4 in Multispectral Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aixia Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The GaoFen-4 (GF-4, launched at the end of December 2015, is China’s first high-resolution geostationary optical satellite. A panchromatic and multispectral sensor (PMS is onboard the GF-4 satellite. Unfortunately, the GF-4 has no onboard calibration assembly, so on-orbit radiometric calibration is required. Like the charge-coupled device (CCD onboard HuanJing-1 (HJ or the wide field of view sensor (WFV onboard GaoFen-1 (GF-1, GF-4 also has a wide field of view, which provides challenges for cross-calibration with narrow field of view sensors, like the Landsat series. A new technique has been developed and used to calibrate HJ-1/CCD and GF-1/WFV, which is verified viable. The technique has three key steps: (1 calculate the surface using the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF characterization of a site, taking advantage of its uniform surface material and natural topographic variation using Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+/Operational Land Imager (OLI imagery and digital elevation model (DEM products; (2 calculate the radiance at the top-of-the atmosphere (TOA with the simulated surface reflectance using the atmosphere radiant transfer model; and (3 fit the calibration coefficients with the TOA radiance and corresponding Digital Number (DN values of the image. This study attempts to demonstrate the technique is also feasible to calibrate GF-4 multispectral bands. After fitting the calibration coefficients using the technique, extensive validation is conducted by cross-validation using the image pairs of GF-4/PMS and Landsat-8/OLI with similar transit times and close view zenith. The validation result indicates a higher accuracy and frequency than that given by the China Centre for Resources Satellite Data and Application (CRESDA using vicarious calibration. The study shows that the new technique is also quite feasible for GF-4 multispectral bands as a routine long-term procedure.

  16. System for measuring the effect of fouling and corrosion on heat transfer under simulated OTEC conditions. [HTAU and LABTTF codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetkovich, J.G.

    1976-12-01

    A complete system designed to measure, with high precision, changes in heat transfer rates due to fouling and corrosion of simulated heat exchanger tubes, at sea and under OTEC conditions is described. All aspects of the system are described in detail, including theory, mechanical design, electronics design, assembly procedures, test and calibration, operating procedures, laboratory results, field results, and data analysis programs.

  17. Objective calibration of numerical weather prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voudouri, A.; Khain, P.; Carmona, I.; Bellprat, O.; Grazzini, F.; Avgoustoglou, E.; Bettems, J. M.; Kaufmann, P.

    2017-07-01

    Numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models use parameterization schemes for physical processes, which often include free or poorly confined parameters. Model developers normally calibrate the values of these parameters subjectively to improve the agreement of forecasts with available observations, a procedure referred as expert tuning. A practicable objective multi-variate calibration method build on a quadratic meta-model (MM), that has been applied for a regional climate model (RCM) has shown to be at least as good as expert tuning. Based on these results, an approach to implement the methodology to an NWP model is presented in this study. Challenges in transferring the methodology from RCM to NWP are not only restricted to the use of higher resolution and different time scales. The sensitivity of the NWP model quality with respect to the model parameter space has to be clarified, as well as optimize the overall procedure, in terms of required amount of computing resources for the calibration of an NWP model. Three free model parameters affecting mainly turbulence parameterization schemes were originally selected with respect to their influence on the variables associated to daily forecasts such as daily minimum and maximum 2 m temperature as well as 24 h accumulated precipitation. Preliminary results indicate that it is both affordable in terms of computer resources and meaningful in terms of improved forecast quality. In addition, the proposed methodology has the advantage of being a replicable procedure that can be applied when an updated model version is launched and/or customize the same model implementation over different climatological areas.

  18. Lidar to lidar calibration phase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the results from phase 2 of a lidar to lidar (L2L) calibration procedure. Phase two of the project included two measurement campaigns conducted at given sites. The purpose was to find out if the lidar-to-lidar calibration procedure can be conducted with similar results...

  19. Calculation procedure to determine average mass transfer coefficients in packed columns from experimental data for ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieres, Jaime; Fernandez-Seara, Jose [University of Vigo, Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Vigo (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    The ammonia purification process is critical in ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems. In this paper, a detailed and a simplified analytical model are presented to characterize the performance of the ammonia rectification process in packed columns. The detailed model is based on mass and energy balances and simultaneous heat and mass transfer equations. The simplified model is derived and compared with the detailed model. The range of applicability of the simplified model is determined. A calculation procedure based on the simplified model is developed to determine the volumetric mass transfer coefficients in the vapour phase from experimental data. Finally, the proposed model and other simple calculation methods found in the general literature are compared. (orig.)

  20. Intercomparison of calibration procedures of high dose rate {sup 192} Ir sources in Brazil and a proposal of a new methodology; Intercomparacao de procedimientos de calibracao de fontes de {sup 192} Ir de alta taxa de dose no Brasil e proposta de uma nova metodologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marechal, M.H.; Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes IRD/CNEN. Caixa Postal 37750 CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to report the results of an intercomparison of the calibration procedures for {sup 192} Ir sources presently in use in Brazil and to proposal a calibration procedure to derive the N{sub k} for a Farmer type ionization chamber for {sup 192} Ir energy by interpolating from a {sup 60} Co gamma-rays and 250 kV x-rays calibration factors. the intercomparison results were all within {+-} 3.0 % except one case where 4.6 % was observed and latter identified as a problem with N-k value for X-rays. The method proposed by the present work make possible the improvement of the metrological coherence among the calibration laboratories and their users once the N{sub k} values could then provided by any of the members of SSDL network. (Author)

  1. Local hadron calibration with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The method of Local Hadron Calibration is used in ATLAS as one of the two major calibration schemes for the reconstruction of jets and missing transverse energy. The method starts from noise suppressed clusters and corrects them for non-compensation effects and for losses due to noise threshold and dead material. Jets are reconstructed on the calibrated clusters and are then corrected for out of cone effects. The performance of the corrections applied to the calorimeter clusters is tested with detailed GEANT4 information. Results obtained with this procedure are discussed both for single pion simulations and for di-jet simulations. The calibration schema is validated on data, by comparing the calibrated cluster energy with data and Mote Carlo simulations. Preliminary results obtained with sqrt(s)=900 GeV are presented. The agreement between data and Monte Carlo is inside 5% for the final cluster scale.

  2. Calibration procedures and first dataset of Southern Ocean chlorophyll a profiles collected by elephant seals equipped with a newly developed CTD-fluorescence tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guinet

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In situ observation of the marine environment has traditionally relied on ship-based platforms. The obvious consequence is that physical and biogeochemical properties have been dramatically undersampled, especially in the remote Southern Ocean (SO. The difficulty in obtaining in situ data represents the major limitations to our understanding, and interpretation of the coupling between physical forcing and the biogeochemical response. Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina equipped with a new generation of oceanographic sensors can measure ocean structure in regions and seasons rarely observed with traditional oceanographic platforms. Over the last few years, seals have allowed for a considerable increase in temperature and salinity profiles from the SO, but we were still lacking information on the spatiotemporal variation of phytoplankton concentration. This information is critical to assess how the biological productivity of the SO, with direct consequences on the amount of CO2 "fixed'' by the biological pump, will respond to global warming. In this research programme, we use an innovative sampling fluorescence approach to quantify phytoplankton concentration at sea. For the first time, a low energy consumption fluorometer was added to Argos CTD-SRDL tags, and these novel instruments were deployed on 27 southern elephant seals between 25 December 2007 and the 4 February 2011. As many as 3388 fluorescence profiles associated with temperature and salinity measurements were thereby collected from a vast sector of the Southern Indian Ocean. This paper addresses the calibration issue of the fluorometer before being deployed on elephant seals and presents the first results obtained for the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. This in situ system is implemented in synergy with satellite ocean colour radiometry. Satellite-derived data is limited to the surface layer and is restricted over the SO by extensive cloud cover. However, with the addition

  3. Camera calibration in photogrammetric practice, introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, G.

    Laboratory, stellar and ground calibrations are developed to assess accuracy and reliability of photographic systems and their components. Calibration of photographic systems is based on analytic assessment systems and software and calibration of aerial images in close-range photogrammetry. Algorithms to obtain simultaneous calibration of photographic systems and aerial images are developed. System reproduction, film printing plate flatness, filter glass plane parallelism, and definition of image plane or image coordinate system are calibrated in laboratory with a visual procedure using goniometers, theodolites and lens/mirror systems. Stellar calibration with or without filters is influenced by emulsion sensitivity. Ground calibration is based on image measurement and geodetic observations. Economical application of the different procedures is assessed.

  4. Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

    2009-03-12

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma

  5. Calibration and validation of a model describing complete autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular SBR system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mutlu, Ayten Gizem; Gernaey, Krist

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A validated model describing the nitritation-anammox process in a granular sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system is an important tool for: a) design of future experiments and b) prediction of process performance during optimization, while applying process control, or during system scale......-up. RESULTS: A model was calibrated using a step-wise procedure customized for the specific needs of the system. The important steps in the procedure were initialization, steady-state and dynamic calibration, and validation. A fast and effective initialization approach was developed to approximate pseudo...... steady-state in the biofilm system. For oxygen mass transfer coefficient (kLa) estimation, long-term data, removal efficiencies, and the stoichiometry of the reactions were used. For the dynamic calibration a pragmatic model fitting approach was used - in this case an iterative Monte Carlo based...

  6. Evaluation of the induced electric field and compliance procedure for a wireless power transfer system in an electrical vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2013-11-07

    In this study, an induced electric field in a human body is evaluated for the magnetic field leaked from a wireless power transfer system for charging an electrical vehicle. The magnetic field from the wireless power transfer system is modelled computationally, and its effectiveness is confirmed by comparison with the field measured in a previous study. The induced electric field in a human standing around the vehicle is smaller than the allowable limit prescribed in international guidelines, although the magnetic field strength in the human body is locally higher than the allowable external field strength. Correlation between the external magnetic field and the induced electric field is confirmed to be reasonable at least in the standing posture, which is the case discussed in the international standard. Based on this finding, we discussed and confirmed the applicability of a three-point magnetic field measurement at heights of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m for safety compliance.

  7. Analysis on the revision of the United States authorizing procedure for the transfer of unclassified nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sung-ho; Seo, Hana; Lee, Chansuh; Kim, Jong-sook [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The DOE (Department Of Energy) has not comprehensively update 10CFR810 since 1986. Since then, the global civil nuclear market has expanded, particularly in China, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe, with vendors from France, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Russia, and Canada. In result, DOE issued revised 810 in respond to comments received from the public and commercial nuclear market changes. This regulation revision improves the efficiency of authorization process to promote national nuclear industry while maintaining nonproliferation control. Even though ROK has initiated a legal basis for Intangible technology transfer (ITT) for nuclear export control, working implementation system is not set up. This research proposes recommendable ITT implementation of the ROK according to the analysis result of the US regulation. In this revision, of 124 countries had been classified as general authorization under 10CFR810, 80 countries reclassified into the specific authorization. By remaining 'fast track' for specific authorization, in particular, time frames for internal DOE and interagency reviews are reduced. This means the US government actively copes with commercial nuclear market expands to promote their industry. Meanwhile, by remaining some of nuclear-weapon states (China, Russia, India) as specific authorization maintaining that the determinations are consistent with current US national security, diplomatic, and trade policy. By benchmarking the US regulation, Korea can improve the efficiency of the technology transfer authorization process easing the regulatory burden by reducing uncertainty and timelines while maintaining the highest level of nonproliferation control.

  8. Pulse-based internal calibration of polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Skou, Niels; Christensen, Erik Lintz

    1994-01-01

    Internal calibration greatly diminishes the dependence on calibration target deployment compared to external calibration. Therefore the Electromagnetics Institute (EMI) at the Technical University of Denmark (TUD) has equipped its polarimetric SAR, EMISAR, with several calibration loops and devel......Internal calibration greatly diminishes the dependence on calibration target deployment compared to external calibration. Therefore the Electromagnetics Institute (EMI) at the Technical University of Denmark (TUD) has equipped its polarimetric SAR, EMISAR, with several calibration loops...... and developed a procedure for calibrating the entire system except a few passive components which must be measured in the laboratory. The calibration procedure has great potential as it takes into account the SAR point target response (PTR) unlike most other internal calibration schemes. However, it requires...

  9. Dynamic Calibration of the NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus Steady/Dynamic Rotor Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Randall L.; vanAken, Johannes M.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus was modified to include a Steady/Dynamic Rotor Balance. The dynamic calibration procedures and configurations are discussed. Random excitation was applied at the rotor hub, and vibratory force and moment responses were measured on the steady/dynamic rotor balance. Transfer functions were computed using the load cell data and the vibratory force and moment responses from the rotor balance. Calibration results showing the influence of frequency bandwidth, hub mass, rotor RPM, thrust preload, and dynamic loads through the stationary push rods are presented and discussed.

  10. Automated calibration of TECAN genesis liquid handling workstation utilizing an online balance and density meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Iris H; Wang, Michael H; Carpenter, Richard; Wu, Henry Y

    2004-02-01

    With robotics widely used in bioanalytical assays, accurate system performance is essential to ensure the quality and productivity of the robotics. In our lab, an automated calibration procedure has been developed to evaluate the precision and accuracy of the TECAN (Research Triangle Park, NC, U.S.A.) Genesis liquid handling system in a bioanalytical laboratory setting. The calibrations were performed by transferring and weighing the solvents automatically on a microbalance controlled by a Gemini program. From the data acquired, calibration reports were generated using a template. The novel aspect of this approach is the use of an on-line balance and a density meter, both of which combine to make the calibration process simple, efficient, and precise. For quantitative bioanalysis, a variety of solvents, including methanol, water, mixed solvents, and plasma, are typically used to prepare standards and unknown samples. Density information is usually unknown for the mixed solvents, and the density of plasma can vary from species to species. However, with the use of a universal density meter, the density could be obtained in seconds. The issue of solvent evaporation during the calibration process was also addressed. Calibration curves were set up for various liquid classes. Pipetting volumes ranged from 10 microL to 900 microL. Precision and accuracy results obtained from the semiannual performance evaluations showed this procedure to be reliable and user-friendly. Using the automated calibration procedure, the calibration and performance evaluation of the robotic system is considerably more efficient, and the incidence of unacceptable precision and accuracy is greatly reduced.

  11. Calibration of transfer functions between phytolith, vegetation and climate for integration of grassland dynamics in vegetation models. Application to a 50,000 yr crater lake core in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremond, L.; Alexandre, A.; Hely, C.; Vincens, A.; Williamson, D.; Guiot, J.

    2004-12-01

    Global vegetation models provide a way to translate the outputs from climate models into maps of potential vegetation distribution for present, past and future. Validation of these models goes through the comparison between model outputs and vegetation proxies for well constrained past climatic periods. Grass-dominated biomes are widespread and numerous. This diversity is hardly mirrored by common proxies such as pollen, charcoal or carbon isotopes. Phytoliths are amorphous silica that precipitate in and/or between living plant cells. They are commonly used to trace grasslands dynamics. However, calibration between phytolith assemblages, vegetation, and climate parameters are scarce. This work introduces transfer functions between phytolith indices, inter-tropical grassland physiognomy, and bio-climatic data that will be available for model/data comparisons. The Iph phytolith index discriminates tall from short grass savannas in West Africa. A transfer function allows to estimate evapo-transpiration AET/PET. The Ic phytolith index accurately estimates the proportion of Pooideae and Panicoideae grass sub-families, and potentially the C4/C3 grass dominance on East African mountains. The D/P index appears as a good proxy of Leaf Area Index (LAI) in tropical areas. These environmental parameters are commonly used as vegetation model outputs, but have been, up to now, hardly estimated by vegetation proxies. These transfer functions are applied to a 50,000 yr phytolith sequence from a crater lake (9°S; 33°E Tanzania). The record is compared to the pollen vegetation reconstruction and confronted to simulations of the LPJ-GUESS vegetation model (Stitch et. al, 2003).

  12. Mercury Calibration System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  13. 40 CFR 91.425 - CVS calibration frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.425 CVS calibration frequency. Calibrate the CVS positive displacement pump or critical flow venturi...

  14. 40 CFR 90.425 - CVS calibration frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.425 CVS calibration frequency. Calibrate the CVS positive displacement pump or...

  15. Mexican national pyronometer network calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAldes, M.; Villarreal, L.; Estevez, H.; Riveros, D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to take advantage of the solar radiation as an alternate energy source it is necessary to evaluate the spatial and temporal availability. The Mexican National Meterological Service (SMN) has a network with 136 meteorological stations, each coupled with a pyronometer for measuring the global solar radiation. Some of these stations had not been calibrated in several years. The Mexican Department of Energy (SENER) in order to count on a reliable evaluation of the solar resource funded this project to calibrate the SMN pyrometer network and validate the data. The calibration of the 136 pyronometers by the intercomparison method recommended by the World Meterological Organization (WMO) requires lengthy observations and specific environmental conditions such as clear skies and a stable atmosphere, circumstances that determine the site and season of the calibration. The Solar Radiation Section of the Instituto de Geofísica of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México is a Regional Center of the WMO and is certified to carry out the calibration procedures and emit certificates. We are responsible for the recalibration of the pyronometer network of the SMN. A continuous emission solar simulator with exposed areas with 30cm diameters was acquired to reduce the calibration time and not depend on atmospheric conditions. We present the results of the calibration of 10 thermopile pyronometers and one photovoltaic cell by the intercomparison method with more than 10000 observations each and those obtained with the solar simulator.

  16. Development of a Compact VLBI System for Providing over 10-km Baseline Calibration and Its Implications to Geodesy and Precise Time Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, R.; Ishii, A.; Takiguchi, H.; Koyama, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kurihara, S.; Kokado, K.; Matsuzaka, S.

    2009-04-01

    We are developing a compact VLBI system with 1.6 m diameter aperture dish in order to provide reference baseline lengths for calibration. The reference baselines are used to validate surveying instruments such as GPS and EDM and maintained by the Geographical Survey Institute (GSI) of Japan. The compact VLBI system will be installed at both ends of the reference baseline. However, it is too insensitive to detect fringe between both stations using such compact dish. Thus, we have designed a new observation concept including one large dish station into the baseline observation. We can detect two group delays between each compact VLBI system and the large dish station based on conventional VLBI measurement. A group delay between the two compact dishs can be indirectly calculated using a simple equation. We named the idea 'Multiple Antenna Radio-interferometry of Baseline Length Evaluation (MARBLE)' system. The compact VLBI system is designed to be assembled with muscle power simply in order to perform short-term (about one week) measurements at several reference baselines in Japan islands. The compact VLBI system is also capable to be used as a fiducial station of a local geodetic observation network at remote locations. We have evaluated a front-end system with a wide-band quad-ridged horn antenna (QRHA) by installing it on the 2.4 m diameter dish at Kashima. The 2.4 m VLBI station is operated in order to test equipments which will be planed to install on the compact VLBI system. On December 5 of 2007, we have successfully detected first fringes of the 3C84 signal for S/X band using the new front-end system. Moreover, we have succeeded to perform two geodetic VLBI experiments on 54 km baseline between the 2.4 m dish equipped with the QRHA and the Tsukuba 32 m station of GSI. The results of determined baseline length between the 2.4 m station and Tsukuba 32 m station are almost identical with the previous results which are used by X-band feed only on the 2.4 m dish

  17. Flexible calibration and measurement strategy for a multi-sensor fringe projection unit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Albers, O; Poesch, A; Reithmeier, E

    2015-01-01

    .... The objective is the development of an easy to use calibration and measurement procedure. Only one simple geometrical calibration target is needed and the calibration of the projection unit is not mandatory...

  18. El fenómeno de transferencia en gramáticas artificiales: efectos de la forma de entrenamiento Transference in artificial grammar: effects of training procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Arismendi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se utilizó una gramática artificial, consistente en una serie de reglas que especifican posibles órdenes de secuencias de letras, para evaluar la capacidad de transferencia de los sujetos, esto es la extracción de estas reglas y su aplicación a patrones de letras novedosas. Para ello 57 sujetos se asignaron aleatoriamente a dos formas de entrenamiento: una estándar donde debían memorizar y transcribir las secuencias correctas (gramaticales, y otra donde debían discriminar por ensayo y error entre secuencias correctas e incorrectas (no gramaticales mediante un procedimiento de realimentación. Con esta forma de entrenamiento se obtuvieron desempeños significativamente mejores que con el procedimiento estándar. Se discuten los resultados en el contexto de la aplicación de las gramáticas artificiales como paradigma experimental para el estudio de los procesos subyacentes a la adquisición del lenguaje.In this work an artificial grammar has been used, which consists in a set of rules that specifies possible orders of strings of letters, to evaluate subjects ability to transfer the extracted rules and implement these to patterns of novel letters. 57 subjects were randomly assigned to two learning procedures: a standard one in which they had to memorize and transcribe the correct (grammatical sequences, and one in which they had to discriminate between correct and incorrect (ungrammatical sequences by use of a feedback procedure. Subjects trained with the feedback procedure had a significantly better performance than subjects trained with the standard one. These results are discussed in the context of the implementation of artificial grammar as an experimental paradigm for studying processes underlying language acquisition.

  19. NIST display colorimeter calibration facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven W.; Ohno, Yoshihiro

    2003-07-01

    A facility has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to provide calibration services for color-measuring instruments to address the need for improving and certifying the measurement uncertainties of this type of instrument. While NIST has active programs in photometry, flat panel display metrology, and color and appearance measurements, these are the first services offered by NIST tailored to color-measuring instruments for displays. An overview of the facility, the calibration approach, and associated uncertainties are presented. Details of a new tunable colorimetric source and the development of new transfer standard instruments are discussed.

  20. Modelling Experimental Procedures for Manipulator Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    Trans(a,O,O)Rot(x,a) (23) Carrying out the indicated matrix multiplication, cosO -sin~cosa sin~sina acosO ] sin6 cos~cosa -cos~sina asinO (24) 0 sina...be in the form of Equation 29. 27 = cosOcosp-sinOsinaasinp t = sinOcosa L. = costheatsinp+sin~sinacos3 t= acosO t - = sinbcosP+cosesinasinP :22

  1. Calibrated segmentation of CBCT and CT images for digitization of dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Veerle; Mollemans, Wouter; Schutyser, Filip

    2011-09-01

    State of the art computer aided implant planning procedures typically use a surgical template to transfer the digital 3D planning to the operating room. This surgical template can be generated based on an acrylic copy of the patient's removable prosthesis--the so-called radiographic guide--which is digitized using a CBCT or CT scanner. Since the same accurate fit between the surgical template and the patient as with the radiographic guide and the patient should be ensured, a procedure to accurately digitize this guide is needed. A procedure is created to accurately digitize radiographic guides based on a calibrated segmentation. Therefore, two steps have to be executed. First, during a calibration step a calibration object is CBCT or CT scanned and a calibration algorithm which results in an optimal threshold value is executed. Next the guide is CBCT or CT scanned and a 3D model is created using the obtained optimal threshold. To validate our method, we compared a high accuracy laser scanned copy of the guide with the generated 3D model by creating a distance map between both models. The procedure was performed for different CBCT and CT scanners, and the digitization error for each scanner was defined. The 90th percentile error measured on average 0.15 mm, which was always less than the applied voxel size for all CBCT and CT test scans. The calibration procedure evaluated in this study solves the known problem of digitizing a radiographic guide based on non-standardized gray value CBCT images. The procedure can easily be executed by a clinician and allows an accurate digitization of a radiographic guide using a CBCT or CT scanner. Starting from this digitization, an accurate surgical template can be made which has a good fit on the patient's remaining teeth and surrounding soft tissues.

  2. TECHNIQUE OF ESTIMATION OF ERROR IN THE REFERENCE VALUE OF THE DOSE DURING THE LINEAR ACCELERATOR RADIATION OUTPUT CALIBRATION PROCEDURE. Part 2. Dependence on the characteristics of collimator, optical sourse-distance indicator, treatment field, lasers and treatment couch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Tsitovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To ensure the safety of radiation oncology patients needed to provide consistent functional characteristics of the medical linear accelerators, which affect the accuracy of dose delivery. To this end, their quality control procedures, which include the calibration of radiation output of the linac, the error in determining the dose reference value during which must not exceed 2 %, is provided. The aim is to develop a methodology for determining the error (difference between a measured value of quantity and its true value in determining this value, depending on the characteristics of the collimator, the source to surface distance pointer, lasers, radiation field and treatment table. To achieve the objectives have been carried out dosimetric measurements of Trilogy S/N 3567 linac dose distributions, on the basis of which dose errors depending on the accuracy setting the zero position of the collimator, the deviation of the collimator rotation isocenter, the sourcesurface distance pointer accuracy, field size accuracy, the accuracy of lasers and treatment table positioning were obtained. It was found that the greatest impact on the value of the error has the error in the optical SSD indication and the error in the lasers position in the plane perpendicular to the plane of incidence of the radiation beam (up to 3.64 % for the energy of 6 MV. Dose errors caused by error in the field size were different for two photon energies, and reached 2.54 % for 6 MeV and 1.33% for 18 MeV. Errors caused by the rest of the characteristic do not exceed 1 %. Thus, it is possible to express the results of periodic quality control of these devices integrated in linac in terms of dose and use them to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the possibility of clinical use of a linear accelerator for oncology patients irradiation on the basis of the calibration of radiation output in case of development of techniques that allow to analyze the influence dosimetric

  3. Test surfaces useful for calibration of surface profilometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z

    2013-12-31

    The present invention provides for test surfaces and methods for calibration of surface profilometers, including interferometric and atomic force microscopes. Calibration is performed using a specially designed test surface, or the Binary Pseudo-random (BPR) grating (array). Utilizing the BPR grating (array) to measure the power spectral density (PSD) spectrum, the profilometer is calibrated by determining the instrumental modulation transfer.

  4. Absolute, pressure-dependent validation of a calibration-free, airborne laser hygrometer transfer standard (SEALDH-II from 5 to 1200 ppmv using a metrological humidity generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Buchholz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly accurate water vapor measurements are indispensable for understanding a variety of scientific questions as well as industrial processes. While in metrology water vapor concentrations can be defined, generated, and measured with relative uncertainties in the single percentage range, field-deployable airborne instruments deviate even under quasistatic laboratory conditions up to 10–20 %. The novel SEALDH-II hygrometer, a calibration-free, tuneable diode laser spectrometer, bridges this gap by implementing a new holistic concept to achieve higher accuracy levels in the field. We present in this paper the absolute validation of SEALDH-II at a traceable humidity generator during 23 days of permanent operation at 15 different H2O mole fraction levels between 5 and 1200 ppmv. At each mole fraction level, we studied the pressure dependence at six different gas pressures between 65 and 950 hPa. Further, we describe the setup for this metrological validation, the challenges to overcome when assessing water vapor measurements on a high accuracy level, and the comparison results. With this validation, SEALDH-II is the first airborne, metrologically validated humidity transfer standard which links several scientific airborne and laboratory measurement campaigns to the international metrological water vapor scale.

  5. Using a heterodyne vibrometer in combination with pulse excitation for primary calibration of ultrasonic hydrophones in amplitude and phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Martin; Wilkens, Volker

    2017-08-01

    A high-frequency vibrometer was used with ultrasonic pulse excitation in order to perform a primary hydrophone calibration. This approach enables the simultaneous characterization of the amplitude and phase transfer characteristic of ultrasonic hydrophones. The method allows a high frequency resolution in a considerably short time for the measurement. Furthermore, the uncertainty contributions of this approach were investigated and quantified. A membrane hydrophone was calibrated and the uncertainty budget for this measurement was determined. The calibration results are presented up to 70~\\text{MHz} . The measurement results show good agreement with the results obtained by sinusoidal burst excitation through the use of the vibrometer and by a homodyne laser interferometer, with RMS deviation of approximately 3% -4% in the frequency range from 1 to 60~\\text{MHz} . Further hydrophones were characterized up to 100~\\text{MHz} with this procedure to demonstrate the suitability for very high frequency calibration.

  6. Calibration of high resolution remote sensing instruments in the visible and near infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüller, L.; Fischer, J.; Armbruster, W.; Bartsch, B.

    1997-05-01

    Measurements of the reflected solar radiation with high spectral resolution airborne instruments are usually used to develop new remote sensing techniques. The observed spectral features in the signals provide the possibility to define useful band settings for future satellite instruments. A precise wavelength and radiometric calibration is a prerequisite for such tasks. In this paper, a calibration procedure for the airborne spectrometer OVID is presented. The Optical Visible and near Infrared Detector consists of two similar detector systems, (600 - 1100 nm = VIS and 900 - 1700 nm = NIR). The spectral resolution is ~1.7 nm for the VIS-system and ~6 nm for the IR-system. This instrument is applied for the retrieval of water vapour content, aerosol and cloud properties. Besides the spectral and intensity calibration, also corrections for the dark current signals and for defective pixels have been performed. An indirect verification of the calibration procedure by the comparison of OVID measurements in cloudy and cloud free atmospheres with radiative transfer simulations is discussed in this paper. The used radiation transfer model MOMO is based on the matrix operator method.

  7. Calibration of ultrasonic sensors of a mobile robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paunović Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses a mobile robot localization. Due to cost and simplicity of signal processing, the ultrasonic sensors are very suitable for this application. However, their nonlinear characteristics requires thorough calibrating procedure in order to achieve reliable readings from the obstacles around the robot. Here we describe SMR400 ultrasonic sensor and its calibration procedure. The suggested calibration procedure was tested through a number of experiments, and the results are presented in this paper. .

  8. On the absolute calibration of SO2 cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lübcke

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulphur dioxide emission rate measurements are an important tool for volcanic monitoring and eruption risk assessment. The SO2 camera technique remotely measures volcanic emissions by analysing the ultraviolet absorption of SO2 in a narrow spectral window between 300 and 320 nm using solar radiation scattered in the atmosphere. The SO2 absorption is selectively detected by mounting band-pass interference filters in front of a two-dimensional, UV-sensitive CCD detector. One important step for correct SO2 emission rate measurements that can be compared with other measurement techniques is a correct calibration. This requires conversion from the measured optical density to the desired SO2 column density (CD. The conversion factor is most commonly determined by inserting quartz cells (cuvettes with known amounts of SO2 into the light path. Another calibration method uses an additional narrow field-of-view Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy system (NFOV-DOAS, which measures the column density simultaneously in a small area of the camera's field-of-view. This procedure combines the very good spatial and temporal resolution of the SO2 camera technique with the more accurate column densities obtainable from DOAS measurements. This work investigates the uncertainty of results gained through the two commonly used, but quite different, calibration methods (DOAS and calibration cells. Measurements with three different instruments, an SO2 camera, a NFOV-DOAS system and an Imaging DOAS (I-DOAS, are presented. We compare the calibration-cell approach with the calibration from the NFOV-DOAS system. The respective results are compared with measurements from an I-DOAS to verify the calibration curve over the spatial extent of the image. The results show that calibration cells, while working fine in some cases, can lead to an overestimation of the SO2 CD by up to 60% compared with CDs from the DOAS measurements. Besides these errors of calibration

  9. Lidar to lidar calibration phase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents a feasibility study of a lidar to lidar (L2L) calibration procedure. Phase one of the project was conducted at Høvsøre, Denmark. Two windcubes were placed next to the 116m met mast and different methods were applied to obtain the sensing height error of the lidars. The purpose...... is to find the most consistent method and use it in a potential lidar to lidar calibration procedure....

  10. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina

    2016-05-02

    This poster presents the development, implementation, and operation of the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL) Longwave (LW) system at the Southern Great Plains Radiometric Calibration Facility for the calibration of pyrgeometers that provide traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group.

  11. Pressure reciprocity calibration of a MEMS microphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Randall P; Fick, Steven E

    2017-09-01

    This article reports the first use of the pressure reciprocity technique to calibrate a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) microphone. This standardized primary calibration method is conventionally used to calibrate laboratory standard microphones. Results for the pressure reciprocity calibration of a MEMS microphone and two laboratory standard microphones are presented for the frequency range 100-10 000 Hz. Because the amplifier in the MEMS microphone package prevents reciprocal operation, this microphone was used only as a receiver of sound. A description of the procedure is presented along with checks of the measurement results and data regarding the uncertainties of these results.

  12. Comparison of spectral irradiance standards used to calibrate shortwave radiometers and spectroradiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiedron, P W; Michalsky, J J; Berndt, J L; Harrison, L C

    1999-04-20

    Absolute calibration of spectral shortwave radiometers is usually performed with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) or NIST-traceable incandescent lamps. We compare 18 irradiance standards from NIST and three commercial vendors using the same spectrometer to assess their agreement with our working standard. The NIST procedure is followed for the 1000-W FEL lamps from NIST, Optronics, and EG&G. A modified calibration procedure developed by Li-Cor is followed for their 200-W tungsten-halogen lamps. Results are reproducible from one day to the next to approximately 0.1% using the same spectrometer. Measurements taken four months apart using two similar but different spectrometers were reproducible to 0.5%. The comparisons suggest that even NIST standards may disagree with each other beyond their stated accuracy. Some of the 1000-W commercial lamps agreed with the NIST lamps to within their stated accuracy, but not all. Surprisingly, the lowest-cost lamps from Li-Cor agreed much better with the NIST lamps than their stated accuracy of 4%, typically within 2%. An analysis of errors leads us to conclude that we can transfer the calibration from a standard lamp to a secondary standard lamp with approximately 1% added uncertainty. A field spectrometer was calibrated with a secondary standard, producing a responsivity for the spectrometer that was within 5% of the responsivity obtained by Langley calibration using routine field measurements.

  13. The Preflight Calibration of the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ramsey; Reuter, Dennis; Irons, James; Lunsford, Allen; Montanero, Matthew; Tesfaye, Zelalem; Wenny, Brian; Thome, Kurtis

    2011-01-01

    The preflight calibration testing of TIRS evaluates the performance of the instrument at the component, subsystem and system level, The overall objective is to provide an instrument that is well calibrated and well characterized with specification compliant data that will ensure the data continuity of Landsat from the previous missions to the LDCM, The TIRS flight build unit and the flight instrument were assessed through a series of calibration tests at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Instrument-level requirements played a strong role in defining the test equipment and procedures used for the calibration in the thermal/vacuum chamber. The calibration ground support equipment (CGSE), manufactured by MEI and ATK Corporation, was used to measure the optical, radiometric and geometric characteristics of TIRS, The CGSE operates in three test configurations: GeoRad (geometric, radiometric and spatial), flood source and spectral, TIRS was evaluated though the following tests: bright target recovery, radiometry, spectral response, spatial shape, scatter, stray light, focus, and uniformity, Data were obtained for the instrument and various subsystems under conditions simulating those on orbit In the spectral configuration, a monochromator system with a blackbody source is used for in-band and out-of-band relative spectral response characterization, In the flood source configuration the entire focal plane array is illuminated simultaneously to investigate pixel-to-pixel uniformity and dead or inoperable pixels, The remaining tests were executed in the GeoRad configuration and use a NIST calibrated cavity blackbody source, The NIST calibration is transferred to the TIRS sensor and to the blackbody source on-board TIRS, The onboard calibrator will be the primary calibration source for the TIRS sensor on orbit.

  14. The VTTVIS line imaging spectrometer - principles, error sources, and calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, R.N.

    2002-01-01

    work describing the basic principles, potential error sources, and/or adjustment and calibration procedures. This report fulfils the need for such documentationwith special focus on the system at KVL. The PGP based system has several severe error sources, which should be removed prior any analysis....... Most of the random noise sources can be minimised by carefully selecting high-grade components especially withconcern to the camera. Systematic error sources like CCD fixed pattern noise (FPN), CCD photoresponse nonuniformity (PRNU), CCD charge transfer efficiency (CTE), slit width variations, changes...... in off-axis transmission efficiencies, diffractionefficiencies, and image distortion have a significant impact on the instrument performance. Procedures removing or minimising these systematic error sources are developed and described for the system build at KVL but can be generalised to other PGP...

  15. Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration with $\\pi^{0}$

    CERN Multimedia

    Puig Navarro, A

    2009-01-01

    Several methods can be used in order to achieve precise calibration of the LHCb Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) once reasonable cell equalization has been reached. At low transverse energy, the standard calibration procedure is an iterative method based on the fit of the $\\gamma\\gamma$ invariant mass distribution for each cell of the decay $\\pi^{0}\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ with resolved photons. A new technique for generating the combinatorial background of such decays directly from data has been developed. Knowledge of the background could allow an alternative calibration method based on a event by event fit of the same $\\gamma\\gamma$ invariant mass distribution where contributions from groups of cells are considered in a single fit. The background generation procedure and this possible new calibration method are presented in this poster, in addition to an overview of the LHCb Calorimetry system and ECAL calibration techniques.

  16. Reliability-Based Code Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, M.H.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2003-01-01

    The present paper addresses fundamental concepts of reliability based code calibration. First basic principles of structural reliability theory are introduced and it is shown how the results of FORM based reliability analysis may be related to partial safety factors and characteristic values....... Thereafter the code calibration problem is presented in its principal decision theoretical form and it is discussed how acceptable levels of failure probability (or target reliabilities) may be established. Furthermore suggested values for acceptable annual failure probabilities are given for ultimate...... and serviceability limit states. Finally the paper describes the Joint Committee on Structural Safety (JCSS) recommended procedure - CodeCal - for the practical implementation of reliability based code calibration of LRFD based design codes....

  17. 40 CFR 86.521-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Regulations for 1978 and Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.521-90 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the following initial and periodic calibration. The...

  18. Intercomparison and calibration of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, A M D

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish a working standard for intercomparison and calibration of dose calibrators used in most of nuclear medicine facilities for the determination of the activity of radionuclides administered to patients in specific examinations or therapeutic procedures. A commercial dose calibrator, a set of standard radioactive sources, and syringes, vials and ampoules with radionuclide solutions used in nuclear medicine were utilized in this work. The commercial dose calibrator was calibrated for radionuclide solutions used in nuclear medicine. Simple instrument tests, such as linearity response and variation response with the source volume at a constant source activity concentration were performed. This instrument may be used as a reference system for intercomparison and calibration of other activity meters, as a method of quality control of dose calibrators utilized in nuclear medicine facilities.

  19. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  20. Sensor Calibration Design Based on D-Optimality Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajiyev Chingiz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a procedure for optimal selection of measurement points using the D-optimality criterion to find the best calibration curves of measurement sensors is proposed. The coefficients of calibration curve are evaluated by applying the classical Least Squares Method (LSM. As an example, the problem of optimal selection for standard pressure setters when calibrating a differential pressure sensor is solved. The values obtained from the D-optimum measurement points for calibration of the differential pressure sensor are compared with those from actual experiments. Comparison of the calibration errors corresponding to the D-optimal, A-optimal and Equidistant calibration curves is done.

  1. The ATLAS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Hong Ma; Isabelle Wingerter

    The ATLAS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration Workshop took place at LAPP-Annecy from the 1st to the 3rd of October; 45 people attended the workshop. A detailed program was setup before the workshop. The agenda was organised around very focused presentations where questions were raised to allow arguments to be exchanged and answers to be proposed. The main topics were: Electronics calibration Handling of problematic channels Cluster level corrections for electrons and photons Absolute energy scale Streams for calibration samples Calibration constants processing Learning from commissioning Forty-five people attended the workshop. The workshop was on the whole lively and fruitful. Based on years of experience with test beam analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, and the recent operation of the detector in the commissioning, the methods to calibrate the electromagnetic calorimeter are well known. Some of the procedures are being exercised in the commisssioning, which have demonstrated the c...

  2. A method for the temperature calibration of an infrared camera using water as a radiative source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, S M; Kou, J; Saylor, J R

    2009-09-01

    Presented here is an effective low-cost method for the temperature calibration of infrared cameras, for applications in the 0-100 degrees C range. The calibration of image gray level intensity to temperature is achieved by imaging an upwelling flow of water, the temperature of which is measured with a thermistor probe. The upwelling flow is created by a diffuser located below the water surface of a constant temperature water bath. The thermistor probe is kept immediately below the surface, and the distance from the diffuser outlet to the surface is adjusted so that the deformation of the water surface on account of the flow is small, yet the difference between the surface temperature seen by the camera and the bulk temperature measured by the thermistor is also small. The benefit of this method compared to typical calibration procedures is that, without sacrificing the quality of the calibration, relatively expensive commercial blackbodies are replaced by water as the radiative source (epsilon approximately 0.98 for the wavelengths considered here). A heat transfer analysis is provided, which improves the accuracy of the calibration method and also provides the user with guidance to further increases in accuracy of the method.

  3. Synthesis Polarimetry Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moellenbrock, George

    2017-10-01

    Synthesis instrumental polarization calibration fundamentals for both linear (ALMA) and circular (EVLA) feed bases are reviewed, with special attention to the calibration heuristics supported in CASA. Practical problems affecting modern instruments are also discussed.

  4. Force Measurement Services at Kebs: AN Overview of Equipment, Procedures and Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangi, J. O.; Maranga, S. M.; Nganga, S. P.; Mutuli, S. M.

    This paper describes the facilities, instrumentation and procedures currently used in the force laboratory at the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS) for force measurement services. The laboratory uses the Force Calibration Machine (FCM) to calibrate force-measuring instruments. The FCM derives its traceability via comparisons using reference transfer force transducers calibrated by the Force Standard Machines (FSM) of a National Metrology Institute (NMI). The force laboratory is accredited to ISO/IEC 17025 by the Germany Accreditation Body (DAkkS). The accredited measurement scope of the laboratory is 1 MN to calibrate force transducers in both compression and tension modes. ISO 376 procedures are used while calibrating force transducers. The KEBS reference transfer standards have capacities of 10, 50, 300 and 1000 kN to cover the full range of the FCM. The uncertainty in the forces measured by the FCM were reviewed and determined in accordance to the new EURAMET calibration guide. The relative expanded uncertainty of force W realized by FCM was evaluated in a range from 10 kN-1 MN, and was found to be 5.0 × 10-4 with the coverage factor k being equal to 2. The overall normalized error (En) of the comparison results was also found to be less than 1. The accredited Calibration and Measurement Capability (CMC) of the KEBS force laboratory was based on the results of those intercomparisons. The FCM enables KEBS to provide traceability for the calibration of class ‘1’ force instruments as per the ISO 376.

  5. Calibration and Rating of Photovoltaics: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.

    2012-06-01

    Rating the performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules is critical to determining the cost per watt, and efficiency is useful to assess the relative progress among PV concepts. Procedures for determining the efficiency for PV technologies from 1-sun to low concentration to high concentration are discussed. We also discuss the state of the art in primary and secondary calibration of PV reference cells used by calibration laboratories around the world. Finally, we consider challenges to rating PV technologies and areas for improvement.

  6. The procedural egalitarian solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietzenbacher, Bas; Borm, Peter; Hendrickx, Ruud

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we introduce and analyze the procedural egalitarian solution for transferable utility games. This new concept is based on the result of a coalitional bargaining procedure in which egalitarian considerations play a central role. The procedural egalitarian solution is the first

  7. The Procedural Egalitarian Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietzenbacher, Bas; Borm, Peter; Hendrickx, Ruud

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce and analyze the procedural egalitarian solution for transferable utility games. This new concept is based on the result of a coalitional bargaining procedure in which egalitarian considerations play a central role. The procedural egalitarian solution is the first

  8. Pyrgeometer calibration at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Ibrahim; Hickey, John R.; Stoffel, Tom; Myers, Daryl

    2002-10-01

    Pyrgeometers are used to measure longwave terrestrial radiation. Regular pyrgeometer calibration against an internationally recognized standard is required in order to measure the longwave radiation consistently at different sites around the globe. At present, there is no internationally recognized standard to calibrate pyrgeometers. A well-characterized blackbody is, however, an accepted approach. This paper describes a method of establishing a precise blackbody reference and using it to calibrate a group of four transfer reference pyrgeometers. The group is then deployed outdoors to evaluate the precision of the blackbody calibration. The results from the outdoor data shows that the percentage mean-square-error of each transfer reference pyrgeometer is 0.12%, 0.07%, 0.46%, and 0.10% with a resultant percentage root-mean-square of 0.43%. The errors are calculated with respect to the average of the irradiance readings of the transfer reference pyrgeometers. To minimize the number of transfer reference pyrgeometers and to allow more space for calibrating test pyrgeometers, a sub-set of the transfer reference pyrgeometers is then used to calibrate a test pyrgeometer outdoors. The calibration of the test pyrgeometer resulted in reducing its error from /+4.00% to /+/-0.32% with respect to the irradiance measured by the sub-set of the transfer reference pyrgeometers. The outdoor calibration method can minimize the calibration cost resulting from using the lengthy and costly blackbody calibration because many pyrgeometers can be calibrated at the same time. Appendix A shows a diagram that describes the paper's concept.

  9. Independent System Calibration of Sentinel-1B

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Schwerdt; Kersten Schmidt; Núria Tous Ramon; Patrick Klenk; Nestor Yague-Martinez; Pau Prats-Iraola; Manfred Zink; Dirk Geudtner

    2017-01-01

    Sentinel-1B is the second of two C-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites of the Sentinel-1 mission, launched in April 2016—two years after the launch of the first satellite, Sentinel-1A. In addition to the commissioning of Sentinel-1B executed by the European Space Agency (ESA), an independent system calibration was performed by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) on behalf of ESA. Based on an efficient calibration strategy and the different calibration procedures already developed and...

  10. Increased Automation in Stereo Camera Calibration Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi House

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Robotic vision has become a very popular field in recent years due to the numerous promising applications it may enhance. However, errors within the cameras and in their perception of their environment can cause applications in robotics to fail. To help correct these internal and external imperfections, stereo camera calibrations are performed. There are currently many accurate methods of camera calibration available; however, most or all of them are time consuming and labor intensive. This research seeks to automate the most labor intensive aspects of a popular calibration technique developed by Jean-Yves Bouguet. His process requires manual selection of the extreme corners of a checkerboard pattern. The modified process uses embedded LEDs in the checkerboard pattern to act as active fiducials. Images are captured of the checkerboard with the LEDs on and off in rapid succession. The difference of the two images automatically highlights the location of the four extreme corners, and these corner locations take the place of the manual selections. With this modification to the calibration routine, upwards of eighty mouse clicks are eliminated per stereo calibration. Preliminary test results indicate that accuracy is not substantially affected by the modified procedure. Improved automation to camera calibration procedures may finally penetrate the barriers to the use of calibration in practice.

  11. Calibration of the ROSAT HRI Spectral Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Silverman, John; McDowell, Jonathan; Callanan, Paul; Snowden, Steve

    2000-01-01

    The ROSAT High Resolution Imager has a limited (2-band) spectral response. This spectral capability can give X-ray hardness ratios on spatial scales of 5 arcseconds. The spectral response of the center of the detector was calibrated before the launch of ROSAT, but the gain decreases with time and also is a function of position on the detector. To complicate matters further, the satellite is 'wobbled', possibly moving a source across several spatial gain states. These difficulties have prevented the spectral response of the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) from being used for scientific measurements. We have used Bright Earth data and in-flight calibration sources to map the spatial and temporal gain changes, and written software which will allow ROSAT users to generate a calibrated XSPEC (an x ray spectral fitting package) response matrix and hence determine a calibrated hardness ratio. In this report, we describe the calibration procedure and show how to obtain a response matrix. In Section 2 we give an overview of the calibration procedure, in Section 3 we give a summary of HRI spatial and temporal gain variations. Section 4 describes the routines used to determine the gain distribution of a source. In Sections 5 and 6, we describe in detail how, the Bright Earth database and calibration sources are used to derive a corrected response matrix for a given observation. Finally, Section 7 describes how to use the software.

  12. Calibration methods for rotating shadowband irradiometers and evaluation of calibration duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, W.; Wilbert, S.; Nouri, B.; Geuder, N.; Fritz, H.

    2015-10-01

    Resource assessment for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) needs accurate Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) measurements. An option for such measurement campaigns are Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers (RSIs) with a thorough calibration. Calibration of RSIs and Si-sensors in general is complex because of the inhomogeneous spectral response of such sensors and incorporates the use of several correction functions. A calibration for a given atmospheric condition and air mass might not work well for a different condition. This paper covers procedures and requirements for two calibration methods for the calibration of Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers. The necessary duration of acquisition of test measurements is examined in regard to the site specific conditions at Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) in Spain. Data sets of several long-term calibration periods from PSA are used to evaluate the deviation of results from calibrations with varying duration from the long-term result. The findings show that seasonal changes of environmental conditions are causing small but noticeable fluctuation of calibration results. Certain periods (i.e. November to January and April to May) show a higher likelihood of particularly adverse calibration results. These effects can partially be compensated by increasing the inclusions of measurements from outside these periods. Consequently, the duration of calibrations at PSA can now be selected depending on the time of the year in which measurements are commenced.

  13. Generic methodology for calibrating profiling nacelle lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine; Courtney, Michael; Wagner, Rozenn

    Improving power performance assessment by measuring at different heights has been demonstrated using ground-based profiling LIDARs. More recently, nacelle-mounted lidars studies have shown promising capabilities to assess power performance. Using nacelle lidars avoids the erection of expensive...... meteorology masts, especially offshore. A new generation of commercially developed profiling nacelle lidars has sophisticated measurement capabilities. As for any other measuring system, lidars measurements have uncertainties. Their estimation is the ultimate goal of a calibration. Field calibration...... procedures have been developed for non-profiling nacelle lidars. However, their specificity to one type of lidar or another highlights the need for developing generic calibration procedures. Such procedures should be applicable to any type of existing and upcoming lidar technology. Profiling nacelle lidars...

  14. Evaluation of an ASM1 Model Calibration Precedure on a Municipal-Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Britta; Gernaey, Krist; Henze, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the calibrated model determines how to approach a model calibration, e.g. which information is needed and to which level of detail the model should be calibrated. A systematic model calibration procedure was therefore defined and evaluated for a municipal–industrial wastewater trea...

  15. Calibration of Geodetic Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bajtala

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of metrology and security systems of unification, correctness and standard reproducibilities belong to the preferred requirements of theory and technical practice in geodesy. Requirements on the control and verification of measured instruments and equipments increase and the importance and up-to-date of calibration get into the foreground. Calibration possibilities of length-scales (of electronic rangefinders and angle-scales (of horizontal circles of geodetic instruments. Calibration of electronic rangefinders on the linear comparative baseline in terrain. Primary standard of planar angle – optical traverse and its exploitation for calibration of the horizontal circles of theodolites. The calibration equipment of the Institute of Slovak Metrology in Bratislava. The Calibration process and results from the calibration of horizontal circles of selected geodetic instruments.

  16. Results from source-based and detector-based calibrations of a CLARREO calibration demonstration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal, Amit; McCorkel, Joel; Thome, Kurt

    2016-09-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is formulated to determine long-term climate trends using SI-traceable measurements. The CLARREO mission will include instruments operating in the reflected solar (RS) wavelength region from 320 nm to 2300 nm. The Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO and facilitates testing and evaluation of calibration approaches. The basis of CLARREO and SOLARIS calibration is the Goddard Laser for Absolute Measurement of Response (GLAMR) that provides a radiance-based calibration at reflective solar wavelengths using continuously tunable lasers. SI-traceability is achieved via detector-based standards that, in GLAMR's case, are a set of NIST-calibrated transfer radiometers. A portable version of the SOLARIS, Suitcase SOLARIS is used to evaluate GLAMR's calibration accuracies. The calibration of Suitcase SOLARIS using GLAMR agrees with that obtained from source-based results of the Remote Sensing Group (RSG) at the University of Arizona to better than 5% (k=2) in the 720-860 nm spectral range. The differences are within the uncertainties of the NIST-calibrated FEL lamp-based approach of RSG and give confidence that GLAMR is operating at Suitcase SOLARIS instrument also discussed and the next edition of the SOLARIS instrument (Suitcase SOLARIS- 2) is expected to provide an improved mechanism to further assess GLAMR and CLARREO calibration approaches.

  17. High-heat-flux sensor calibration using calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestrín, J.; Estrada, C. A.; Rodríguez-Alonso, M.; Pérez-Rábago, C.; Langley, L. W.; Barnes, A.

    2004-08-01

    This paper demonstrates a calorimetric procedure for calibrating high-heat-flux sensors. The results are in agreement with calibrations obtained using black-body radiation. However, the proposed method has the potential of being more accurate than traditional approaches. This new procedure calibrates sensors to measure correctly under conditions of concentrated solar radiation. At present, the thermal balance calibration technique in the laboratory is limited to solar irradiances of approximately 100 kW m-2. The next step is to demonstrate this methodology to higher irradiances under non-laboratory conditions in the CIEMAT solar furnace at Plataforma Solar de Almería.

  18. Scalar Calibration of Vector Magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter; Primdahl, Fritz

    2000-01-01

    The calibration parameters of a vector magnetometer are estimated only by the use of a scalar reference magnetometer. The method presented in this paper differs from those previously reported in its linearized parametrization. This allows the determination of three offsets or signals in the absence...... of a magnetic field, three scale factors for normalization of the axes and three non-orthogonality angles which build up an orthogonal system intrinsically in the sensor. The advantage of this method compared with others lies in its linear least squares estimator, which finds independently and uniquely...... the parameters for a given data set. Therefore, a magnetometer may be characterized inexpensively in the Earth's magnetic-field environment. This procedure has been used successfully in the pre-flight calibration of the state-of-the-art magnetometers on board the magnetic mapping satellites Orsted, Astrid-2...

  19. Radiometer calibration methods and resulting irradiance differences: Radiometer calibration methods and resulting irradiance differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Andreas, Afshin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Reda, Ibrahim [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Robinson, Justin [GroundWork Renewables Inc., Logan UT 84321 USA

    2016-10-07

    Accurate solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on instrument performance specifications, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of different calibration methodologies and resulting differences provided by radiometric calibration service providers such as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and manufacturers of radiometers. Some of these methods calibrate radiometers indoors and some outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodologies, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from radiometers deployed for 10 months at NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. These different methods of calibration resulted in a difference of +/-1% to +/-2% in solar irradiance measurements. Analyzing these differences will ultimately assist in determining the uncertainties of the field radiometer data and will help develop a consensus on a standard for calibration. Further advancing procedures for precisely calibrating radiometers to world reference standards that reduce measurement uncertainties will help the accurate prediction of the output of planned solar conversion projects and improve the bankability of financing solar projects.

  20. Interlaboratory comparison in the pressure range from 0 to 2 MPa for accredited calibration laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bermanec Lovorka Grgec

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes procedure and results of the interlaboratory comparison that was organised by Croatian national pressure laboratory (HMI/FSB-LPM between eight accredited pressure calibration laboratories. Comparison was performed in the gauge pressure range from 0 to 2 MPa with pressure transducer as transfer standard and using gas as transmitting medium. Basic aim of this comparison was to improve measurement methods and the measurement uncertainties of each participating laboratory. Analysis of the measurement results are given by calculating the deviation, En, normalized with respect to the stated measurement uncertainties.

  1. Calibration systems of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lundberg, O; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from the over 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. A multi-faceted calibration system allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. This calibration system is based on signal generation from different sources: a Cs radioactive source, laser light, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. This talk presents a brief description of the different TileCal calibration systems and presents the latest results on their performance in terms of calibration factors...

  2. Study of Lever-Arm Effect Using Embedded Photogrammetry and On-Board GPS Receiver on Uav for Metrological Mapping Purpose and Proposal of a Free Ground Measurements Calibration Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daakir, M.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.; Bosser, P.; Pichard, F.; Thom, C.; Rabot, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) on-board photogrammetry knows a significant growth due to the democratization of using drones in the civilian sector. Also, due to changes in regulations laws governing the rules of inclusion of a UAV in the airspace which become suitable for the development of professional activities. Fields of application of photogrammetry are diverse, for instance: architecture, geology, archaeology, mapping, industrial metrology, etc. Our research concerns the latter area. Vinci-Construction- Terrassement is a private company specialized in public earthworks that uses UAVs for metrology applications. This article deals with maximum accuracy one can achieve with a coupled camera and GPS receiver system for direct-georeferencing of Digital Surface Models (DSMs) without relying on Ground Control Points (GCPs) measurements. This article focuses specially on the lever-arm calibration part. This proposed calibration method is based on two steps: a first step involves the proper calibration for each sensor, i.e. to determine the position of the optical center of the camera and the GPS antenna phase center in a local coordinate system relative to the sensor. A second step concerns a 3d modeling of the UAV with embedded sensors through a photogrammetric acquisition. Processing this acquisition allows to determine the value of the lever-arm offset without using GCPs.

  3. Calibration of a Hydrological Model using Ensemble Satellite Rainfall Inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Christopher; Bellerby, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    A combination of satellite rainfall estimates (SRFE) and hydrological models can provide useful information for many remote areas of the planet. However, each component contains its own uncertainties and these uncertainties will interact when SRFE are used as inputs for hydrological models. For any assessment of a coupled system such as this there is a requirement for a comprehensive analysis of all sources of uncertainty, with full consideration of both facets. SRFE have been shown to be useful in many areas that lack the infrastructure to make timely and accurate estimations of rainfall from the ground. Sub-Saharan Africa is typical of this, where a paucity of rain recording radar and sparse gauging networks combine with a highly variable climate and a reliance on rain-fed agriculture. When operating at higher spatial and temporal resolutions, SRFE contain large uncertainties which will propagate through a hydrological model if used as a driving input. This study used a sequential method to produce ensemble SRFE based around the full conditional distribution of recorded rainfall from a sparse, historic raingauge network. The TAMSIM method (introduced by Teo, 2006) was used to produce 200 unique yet equiprobable SRFE, each used as a driver to a downstream hydrological model. Traditional hydrological modelling uses the adjustment of variable parameters within the model to reduce the error between a recorded record of discharge and the modelled one, and many automatic procedures have been produced to refine this calibration process. When SRFE have been used as a driver, little consideration has been paid to this process and often a calibration using the raingauge data has been used, without any consideration to the resulting uncertainty within the hydrological model and its calibration. A similar issue arises when ensemble inputs are used to a hydrological model that has been calibrated using a deterministic estimate of rainfall. This study has shown that such

  4. Calibration methods for rotating shadowband irradiometers and optimizing the calibration duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Wilko; Wilbert, Stefan; Nouri, Bijan; Geuder, Norbert; Fritz, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Resource assessment for concentrated solar power (CSP) needs accurate direct normal irradiance (DNI) measurements. An option for such measurement campaigns is the use of thoroughly calibrated rotating shadowband irradiometers (RSIs). Calibration of RSIs and Si-sensors is complex because of the inhomogeneous spectral response of these sensors and incorporates the use of several correction functions. One calibration for a given atmospheric condition and air mass might not be suitable under different conditions. This paper covers procedures and requirements of two calibration methods for the calibration of rotating shadowband irradiometers. The necessary duration of acquisition of test measurements is examined with regard to the site-specific conditions at Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) in Spain. Seven data sets of long-term test measurements were collected. For each data set, calibration results of varying durations were compared to its respective long-term result. Our findings show that seasonal changes of environmental conditions are causing small but noticeable fluctuation of calibration results. Calibration results within certain periods (i.e. November to January and April to May) show a higher likelihood of deviation. These effects can partially be attenuated by including more measurements from outside these periods. Consequently, the duration of calibrations at PSA can now be selected depending on the time of year in which measurements commence.

  5. Validated Test Method 1315: Mass Transfer Rates of Constituents in Monolithic or Compacted Granular Materials Using a Semi-Dynamic Tank Leaching Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes procedures written based on the assumption that they will be performed by analysts who are formally trained in at least the basic principles of chemical analysis and in the use of the subject technology.

  6. Calibration of an ingestible temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A P; Stewart, I B

    2008-11-01

    An ingestible telemetric sensor for measuring core body temperature is increasingly being utilized in occupational and athletic studies of heat strain. There is a need for a uniform method of calibrating these sensors in the scientific community in order to effectively compare the results of different researchers. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine and present such a calibration procedure. Sensors were placed in a water bath heated to nine discrete temperatures, and the recorded values were compared to that of a traceable thermometer. It was observed that sensor 2 recorded temperatures higher than sensors 1 and 3, and that all sensors were higher than the traceable thermometer, highlighting the need for a calibration procedure. The findings of this study suggest a number of recommendations for a calibration procedure including: (1) four water bath temperatures in the range of 33-41 degrees C should be utilized; (2) sensors should be immersed for a minimum of 4 min prior to taking a measurement; (3) a linear regression relating sensor temperature to a traceable thermometer is an appropriate method to adjust raw data. Switching the sensor off after calibration and reactivating it prior to ingestion will not influence the accuracy of temperature measurement.

  7. CATE 2016 Indonesia: Image Calibration, Intensity Calibration, and Drift Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, H. S.; Kovac, S. A.; Jensen, L.; McKay, M. A.; Bosh, R.; Watson, Z.; Mitchell, A. M.; Penn, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    The citizen Continental America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) experiment aims to provide equipment for 60 sites across the path of totality for the United States August 21st, 2017 total solar eclipse. The opportunity to gather ninety minutes of continuous images of the solar corona is unmatched by any other previous eclipse event. In March of 2016, 5 teams were sent to Indonesia to test CATE equipment and procedures on the March 9th, 2016 total solar eclipse. Also, a goal of the trip was practice and gathering data to use in testing data reduction methods. Of the five teams, four collected data. While in Indonesia, each group participated in community outreach in the location of their site. The 2016 eclipse allowed CATE to test the calibration techniques for the 2017 eclipse. Calibration dark current and flat field images were collected to remove variation across the cameras. Drift scan observations provided information to rotationally align the images from each site. These image's intensity values allowed for intensity calibration for each of the sites. A GPS at each site corrected for major computer errors in time measurement of images. Further refinement of these processes is required before the 2017 eclipse. This work was made possible through the NSO Training for the 2017 Citizen CATE Experiment funded by NASA (NASA NNX16AB92A).

  8. Calibration of reference KAP-meters at SSDL and cross calibration of clinical KAP-meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Per O; Friberg, Eva G; Ovrebø, Kirsti M; Bjerke, Hans H

    2009-01-01

    In the summer of 2007 the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) in Norway established a calibration service for reference air-kerma product meter (KAP-meter). The air-kerma area product, P(KA), is a dosimetric quantity that can be directly related to the patient dose and used for risk assessment associated with different x-ray examinations. The calibration of reference KAP-meters at the SSDL gives important information on parameters influencing the calibration factor for different types of KAP-meters. The use of reference KAP-meters calibrated at the SSDL is an easy and reliable way to calibrate or verify the P(KA) indicated by the x-ray equipment out in the clinics. Twelve KAP-meters were calibrated at the SSDL by use of the substitution method at five diagnostic radiation qualities (RQRs). The calibration factors varied from 0.94 to 1.18. The energy response of the individual KAP-meters varied by a total of 20% between the different RQRs and the typical chamber transmission factors ranged from 0.78 to 0.91. It is important to use a calibrated reference KAP-meter and a harmonised calibration method in the P(KA) calibration in hospitals. The obtained uncertainty in the P(KA) readings is comparable with other calibration methods if the information in the calibration certificate is correct used, corrections are made and proper positioning of the KAP-chamber is performed. This will ensure a reliable estimate of the patient dose and a proper optimisation of conventional x-ray examinations and interventional procedures.

  9. Site Calibration, FGW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    This Site Calibration report is describing the results of a measured site calibration for a site in Denmark. The calibration is carried out by DTU Wind Energy in accordance with Ref.[3] and Ref.[4]. The measurement period is given. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance...... measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio between the wind speed at the center of the turbine hub and at the met mast. The wind speed at the turbine is measured by a temporary mast placed at the foundation for the turbine. The site and measurement equipment...

  10. Calibrators and control samples for bilirubinometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blijenberg, B G; Brügmann, G; Geilenkeuser, W J; Kusyschyn, R; Röhle, G; Schlebusch, H; Schneider, C

    1993-06-01

    The different matrix properties of neonatal serum and commercial control samples can lead to considerable errors in the calibration and control of bilirubinometers. These difficulties can be avoided by calibration with serum from healthy adults which is supplemented with unconjugated bilirubin. But this procedure is impracticable for most routine laboratories. Under certain preconditions, control samples, with bilirubin concentrations determined with correctly calibrated bilirubinometers or spectrophotometers, are also suitable as calibrators. This was established by determination of the bilirubin concentration of 16 different control samples, using both the reference method and correctly calibrated bilirubinometers or spectrophotometers in three or four specialist laboratories. This was also confirmed in several interlaboratory surveys, some involving up to 72 laboratories. The results of these investigations show that a control sample should be used for the calibration of a bilirubinometer only if it meets the following preconditions: 1. There should be no significant difference between the bilirubin values determined with the reference method and with a correctly calibrated spectrophotometer or bilirubinometer. 2. The bilirubin concentration should lie in the range 230-300 mumol/l. The photometric response of bilirubinometers has a limited linear range, so that analytical results greater than 300 mumol/l must be rated as basically unreliable.

  11. Transfer of analytical procedures: a panel of strategies selected for risk management, with emphasis on an integrated equivalence-based comparative testing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agut, C; Caron, A; Giordano, C; Hoffman, D; Ségalini, A

    2011-09-10

    In 2001, a multidisciplinary team made of analytical scientists and statisticians at Sanofi-aventis has published a methodology which has governed, from that time, the transfers from R&D sites to Manufacturing sites of the release monographs. This article provides an overview of the recent adaptations brought to this original methodology taking advantage of our experience and the new regulatory framework, and, in particular, the risk management perspective introduced by ICH Q9. Although some alternate strategies have been introduced in our practices, the comparative testing one, based equivalence testing as statistical approach, remains the standard for assays lying on very critical quality attributes. This is conducted with the concern to control the most important consumer's risk involved at two levels in analytical decisions in the frame of transfer studies: risk, for the receiving laboratory, to take poor release decisions with the analytical method and risk, for the sending laboratory, to accredit such a receiving laboratory on account of its insufficient performances with the method. Among the enhancements to the comparative studies, the manuscript presents the process settled within our company for a better integration of the transfer study into the method life-cycle, just as proposals of generic acceptance criteria and designs for assay and related substances methods. While maintaining rigor and selectivity of the original approach, these improvements tend towards an increased efficiency in the transfer operations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. OPEN PULLED STRAW (OPS) VITRIFICATION OF PORCINE BLASTOCYSTS: SIMPLE PROCEDURE YIELDING EXCELLENT IN VITRO SURVIVAL, BUT SO FAR NO PIGLETS FOLLOWING TRANSFER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, P; Vajta, G; Macháty, Z

    1999-01-01

    In 2 trials, 346 porcine in vivo blastocysts were vitrified in heat-softened and pulled French straws by the Open Pulled Straw (OPS) vitrification method. After thawing, embryos were either cultured in vitro (n=89) for 24 to 48 hours or transferred surgically (n=257) to 11 synchronised recipients...

  13. Laser Calibration of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Di Gregorio, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    High performance stability of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is achieved with a set of calibration procedures. One step of the calibration procedure is based on measurements of the response stability to laser excitation of the PMTs that are used to readout the calorimeter cells. A facility to study in lab the PMT stability response is operating in the PISA-INFN laboratories since 2015. Goals of the tests in lab are to study the time evolution of the PMT response to reproduce and to understand the origin of the response drifts seen with the PMT mounted on the Tile calorimeter in its normal operating during LHC run I and run II. A new statistical approach was developed to measure drift of the absolute gain. This approach was applied to both the ATLAS laser calibration data and to data collected in the Pisa local laboratory. The preliminary results from these two studies are shown.

  14. Standard guide for establishing calibration for a measurement method used to analyze nuclear fuel cycle materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides the basis for establishing calibration for a measurement method typically used in an analytical chemistry laboratory analyzing nuclear materials. Guidance is included for such activities as preparing a calibration procedure, selecting a calibration standard, controlling calibrated equipment, and documenting calibration. The guide is generic and any required technical information specific for a given method must be obtained from other sources.

  15. Error Self-calibration Method in Spatial Spectrum Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chuan-lu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An important bottleneck in spatial spectrum estimation theory is array errors. A new error self-calibration method is presented on the basis of active error calibration and online self-calibration theories. An algorithm combining Direction Of Arrival (DOA estimation and array complex gain error calibration is developed using an auxiliary source without accurate spatial location information and numerical optimization calculation; the error calibration parameters can be used in the following spatial spectrum estimation. The method has a higher veracity than the active correction algorithm and is an offline calculation procedure, having the advantage of small computation amount, similar to the online self-calibration method, and avoiding accurate spatial location information in classical active calibration method.

  16. Exploration of new multivariate spectral calibration algorithms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Haaland, David Michael; Melgaard, David Kennett; Martin, Laura Elizabeth; Wehlburg, Christine Marie; Pell, Randy J. (The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI); Guenard, Robert D. (Merck & Co. Inc., West Point, PA)

    2004-03-01

    A variety of multivariate calibration algorithms for quantitative spectral analyses were investigated and compared, and new algorithms were developed in the course of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. We were able to demonstrate the ability of the hybrid classical least squares/partial least squares (CLSIPLS) calibration algorithms to maintain calibrations in the presence of spectrometer drift and to transfer calibrations between spectrometers from the same or different manufacturers. These methods were found to be as good or better in prediction ability as the commonly used partial least squares (PLS) method. We also present the theory for an entirely new class of algorithms labeled augmented classical least squares (ACLS) methods. New factor selection methods are developed and described for the ACLS algorithms. These factor selection methods are demonstrated using near-infrared spectra collected from a system of dilute aqueous solutions. The ACLS algorithm is also shown to provide improved ease of use and better prediction ability than PLS when transferring calibrations between near-infrared calibrations from the same manufacturer. Finally, simulations incorporating either ideal or realistic errors in the spectra were used to compare the prediction abilities of the new ACLS algorithm with that of PLS. We found that in the presence of realistic errors with non-uniform spectral error variance across spectral channels or with spectral errors correlated between frequency channels, ACLS methods generally out-performed the more commonly used PLS method. These results demonstrate the need for realistic error structure in simulations when the prediction abilities of various algorithms are compared. The combination of equal or superior prediction ability and the ease of use of the ACLS algorithms make the new ACLS methods the preferred algorithms to use for multivariate spectral calibrations.

  17. Site Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Vesth, Allan

    This report describes the site calibration carried out at Østerild, during a given period. The site calibration was performed with two Windcube WLS7 (v1) lidars at ten measurements heights. The lidar is not a sensor approved by the current version of the IEC 61400-12-1 [1] and therefore the site...

  18. TWSTFT Link Calibration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302...and Bauch A (2014) THE EUROPEAN TW CALIBRATION CAMPAIGN 2014 IN THE SCOPE OF GALILEO (TGVF- FOC), An opportunity to update, TW link calibrations in

  19. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Villanueva, Héctor

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and correspondi...

  20. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhen, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dean, T.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  1. 40 CFR 86.226-94 - Calibration of other equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calibration of other equipment. 86.226-94 Section 86.226-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.226-94 Calibration of other...

  2. Calibration guidelines for surface texture instruments - horizontal axis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Shem, R. Krüger

    The present report is a documentation of the work carried out at DTU, on TASK 5.1: PROCEDURES FOR CALIBRATION IN X- AND Y- DIRECTION the project with contract SMT4-CT97-2176 with title: Calibration Standards for Surface Topography Measuring Systems down to Nanometric Scale. After a short...

  3. Calibration of solar radiation measuring instruments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahm, R J; Nakos, J C

    1979-11-01

    A review of solar radiation measurement of instruments and some types of errors is given; and procedures for calibrating solar radiation measuring instruments are detailed. An appendix contains a description of various agencies who perform calibration of solar instruments and a description of the methods they used at the time this report was prepared. (WHK)

  4. Marine X-band Weather Radar Data Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    estimates. This paper presents some of the challenges in small marine X-band radar calibration by comparing three calibration procedures for assessing the relationship between radar and rain gauge data. Validation shows similar results for precipitation volumes but more diverse results on peak rain...

  5. Flux calibration of the Herschel(star)-SPIRE photometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bendo, G. J.; Griffin, M. J.; Bock, J. J.; Conversi, L.; Dowell, C. D.; Lim, T.; Lu, N.; North, C. E.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pearson, C. P.; Pohlen, M.; Polehampton, E. T.; Schulz, B.; Shupe, D. L.; Sibthorpe, B.; Spencer, L. D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Valtchanov, I.; Xu, C. K.

    We describe the procedure used to flux calibrate the three-band submillimetre photometer in the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. This includes the equations describing the calibration scheme, a justification for using Neptune as the primary

  6. 40 CFR 86.124-78 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... optimize performance. (b) Zero the carbon dioxide analyzer with either zero-grade air or zero-grade... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.124-78 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. Prior to its...

  7. 40 CFR 86.1324-84 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... performance. (b) Zero the carbon dioxide analyzer with either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (c... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1324-84 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. Prior to its introduction into...

  8. Calibration report for Avent 5-beam Demonstrator lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine; Courtney, Michael

    . This report presents the calibration procedures and results of a 5-beam Demonstrator unit. The calibration was performed at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines, Høvsøre, Denmark. The methods to assess radial wind speed uncertainties are detailed together with an example of how to derive reconstructed wind...

  9. Suomi NPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands Operational Calibration Reprocessing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Blonski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiometric calibration coefficients for the VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite reflective solar bands have been reprocessed from the beginning of the Suomi NPP (National Polar-orbiting Partnership mission until present. An automated calibration procedure, implemented in the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration JPSS (Joint Polar Satellite System operational data production system, was applied to reprocess onboard solar calibration data and solar diffuser degradation measurements. The latest processing parameters from the operational system were used to include corrected solar vectors, optimized directional dependence of attenuation screens transmittance and solar diffuser reflectance, updated prelaunch calibration coefficients without an offset term, and optimized Robust Holt-Winters filter parameters. The parameters were consistently used to generate a complete set of the radiometric calibration coefficients for the entire duration of the Suomi NPP mission. The reprocessing has demonstrated that the automated calibration procedure can be successfully applied to all solar measurements acquired from the beginning of the mission until the full deployment of the automated procedure in the operational processing system. The reprocessed calibration coefficients can be further used to reprocess VIIRS SDR (Sensor Data Record and other data products. The reprocessing has also demonstrated how the automated calibration procedure can be used during activation of the VIIRS instruments on the future JPSS satellites.

  10. Advancing Absolute Calibration for JWST and Other Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, George; Bohlin, Ralph; Boyajian, Tabetha; Carey, Sean; Casagrande, Luca; Deustua, Susana; Gordon, Karl; Kraemer, Kathleen; Marengo, Massimo; Schlawin, Everett; Su, Kate; Sloan, Greg; Volk, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    We propose to exploit the unique optical stability of the Spitzer telescope, along with that of IRAC, to (1) transfer the accurate absolute calibration obtained with MSX on very bright stars directly to two reference stars within the dynamic range of the JWST imagers (and of other modern instrumentation); (2) establish a second accurate absolute calibration based on the absolutely calibrated spectrum of the sun, transferred onto the astronomical system via alpha Cen A; and (3) provide accurate infrared measurements for the 11 (of 15) highest priority stars with no such data but with accurate interferometrically measured diameters, allowing us to optimize determinations of effective temperatures using the infrared flux method and thus to extend the accurate absolute calibration spectrally. This program is integral to plans for an accurate absolute calibration of JWST and will also provide a valuable Spitzer legacy.

  11. Calibration of areal surface topography measuring instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewig, J.; Eifler, M.

    2017-06-01

    The ISO standards which are related to the calibration of areal surface topography measuring instruments are the ISO 25178-6xx series which defines the relevant metrological characteristics for the calibration of different measuring principles and the ISO 25178-7xx series which defines the actual calibration procedures. As the field of areal measurement is however not yet fully standardized, there are still open questions to be addressed which are subject to current research. Based on this, selected research results of the authors in this area are presented. This includes the design and fabrication of areal material measures. For this topic, two examples are presented with the direct laser writing of a stepless material measure for the calibration of the height axis which is based on the Abbott- Curve and the manufacturing of a Siemens star for the determination of the lateral resolution limit. Based on these results, as well a new definition for the resolution criterion, the small scale fidelity, which is still under discussion, is presented. Additionally, a software solution for automated calibration procedures is outlined.

  12. Articulated Arm Coordinate Measuring Machine Calibration by Laser Tracker Multilateration

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Santolaria; Majarena, Ana C.; David Samper; Agustín Brau; Jesús Velázquez

    2014-01-01

    A new procedure for the calibration of an articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM) is presented in this paper. First, a self-calibration algorithm of four laser trackers (LTs) is developed. The spatial localization of a retroreflector target, placed in different positions within the workspace, is determined by means of a geometric multilateration system constructed from the four LTs. Next, a nonlinear optimization algorithm for the identification procedure of the AACMM is explaine...

  13. Calibration and intercomparison methods of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities; Metodos de calibracao e de intercomparacao de calibradores de dose utilizados em servicos de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Alessandro Martins da

    1999-07-01

    Dose calibrators are used in most of the nuclear medicine facilities to determine the amount of radioactivity administered to a patient in a particular investigation or therapeutic procedure. It is therefore of vital importance that the equipment used presents good performance and is regular;y calibrated at a authorized laboratory. This occurs of adequate quality assurance procedures are carried out. Such quality control tests should be performed daily, other biannually or yearly, testing, for example, its accuracy and precision, the reproducibility and response linearity. In this work a commercial dose calibrator was calibrated with solution of radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. Simple instrument tests, such as response linearity and the response variation of the source volume increase at a constant source activity concentration, were performed. This instrument can now be used as a working standard for calibration of other dose calibrators/ An intercomparison procedure was proposed as a method of quality control of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities. (author)

  14. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  15. Transfer Pricing Documentation - A Current Issue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Violeta Isai; Ramona Maxim

    2016-01-01

    .... With the adoption of the Fiscal Procedure Code and Order no. 442/2016 were founded transfer pricing procedures, denoting a means of making taxable transfer of a high tax country to a low tax country...

  16. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). PMT signals are then digitized at 40 MHz and stored on detector and are only transferred off detector once the first level trigger acceptance has been confirmed. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator b...

  17. Accurate wavelength calibration method for compact CCD spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y C; Huang, C; Xia, G; Jin, S Q; Lu, H B

    2017-04-01

    Wavelength calibration is an important step in charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometers. In this paper, an accurate calibration method is proposed. A model of a line profile spectrum is built at the beginning, followed by noise reduction, bandwidth correction, and automatic peak-seeking treatment. Experimental tests are conducted on the USB4000 spectrometer with a mercury-argon calibration light source. Compared with the traditional method, the results show that this wavelength calibration procedure obtains higher accuracy and the deviations are within 0.1 nm.

  18. Approximation Behooves Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Ribeiro, André Manuel; Poulsen, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Calibration based on an expansion approximation for option prices in the Heston stochastic volatility model gives stable, accurate, and fast results for S&P500-index option data over the period 2005–2009....

  19. SRHA calibration curve

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — an UV calibration curve for SRHA quantitation. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Chang, X., and D. Bouchard. Surfactant-Wrapped Multiwalled...

  20. Air Data Calibration Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is for low altitude subsonic altimeter system calibrations of air vehicles. Mission is a direct support of the AFFTC mission. Postflight data merge is...

  1. Ames Balance Calibration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Operations at the lab include calibrating balances for the Ames Wind Tunnels as well as for approved outside projects. Ames has a large inventory of TASK multi-piece...

  2. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina; Webb, Craig

    2016-05-02

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the progress on the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations for all shortwave and longwave radiometers that are deployed by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program.

  3. Jet Calibration at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The accurate measurement of jets at high transverse momentum produced in proton proton collision at a centre of mass energy at \\sqrt(s)=7 TeV is important in many physics analysis at LHC. Due to the non-compensating nature of the ATLAS calorimeter, signal losses due to noise thresholds and in dead material the jet energy needs to be calibrated. Presently, the ATLAS experiment derives the jet calibration from Monte Carlo simulation using a simple correction that relates the true and the reconstructed jet energy. The jet energy scale and its uncertainty are derived from in-situ measurements and variation in the Monte Carlo simulation. Other calibration schemes have been also developed, they use hadronic cell calibrations or the topology of the jet constituents to reduce hadronic fluctuations in the jet response, improving in that way the jet resolution. The performances of the various calibration schemes using data and simulation, the evaluation of the modelling of the properties used to derive each calibration...

  4. Radioactive standards and calibration methods for contamination monitoring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Makoto [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-06-01

    Contamination monitoring in the facilities for handling unsealed radioactive materials is one of the most important procedures for radiation protection as well as radiation dose monitoring. For implementation of the proper contamination monitoring, radiation measuring instruments should not only be suitable to the purpose of monitoring, but also be well calibrated for the objective qualities of measurement. In the calibration of contamination monitoring instruments, quality reference activities need to be used. They are supplied in different such as extended sources, radioactive solutions or radioactive gases. These reference activities must be traceable to the national standards or equivalent standards. On the other hand, the appropriate calibration methods must be applied for each type of contamination monitoring instruments. In this paper, the concepts of calibration for contamination monitoring instruments, reference sources, determination methods of reference quantities and practical calibration methods of contamination monitoring instruments, including the procedures carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and some relevant experimental data. (G.K.)

  5. Effects of line fiducial parameters and beamforming on ultrasound calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Golafsoun; Baxter, John S H; McLeod, A Jonathan; Peters, Terry M; Chen, Elvis C S

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided interventions are often enhanced via integration with an augmented reality environment, a necessary component of which is US calibration. Calibration requires the segmentation of fiducials, i.e., a phantom, in US images. Fiducial localization error (FLE) can decrease US calibration accuracy, which fundamentally affects the total accuracy of the interventional guidance system. Here, we investigate the effects of US image reconstruction techniques as well as phantom material and geometry on US calibration. It was shown that the FLE was reduced by 29% with synthetic transmit aperture imaging compared with conventional B-mode imaging in a Z-bar calibration, resulting in a 10% reduction of calibration error. In addition, an evaluation of a variety of calibration phantoms with different geometrical and material properties was performed. The phantoms included braided wire, plastic straws, and polyvinyl alcohol cryogel tubes with different diameters. It was shown that these properties have a significant effect on calibration error, which is a variable based on US beamforming techniques. These results would have important implications for calibration procedures and their feasibility in the context of image-guided procedures.

  6. Chang'E Microwave Radiometer Data Calibration with LRO Diviner Data and Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Ken; Hu, Guo-Ping; Zheng, Yong-Chun; This work is supported by BNU-HKBU United International College Research Grant R201626, Zhuhai Premier Discipline Enhancement Grant code: R1050, and Science and Technology Development Fund in Macao SAR 039/2013/A2

    2016-10-01

    Following usual practice in microwave remote sensing, raw data from multi-channel microwave radiometers (MR) onboard the Chinese Chang'E lunar obiters (CE1 & CE2) were acquired as observed antenna voltages, which were then calibrated and converted to brightness temperatures (TB) by a two-point calibration procedure. While the CE cold calibration antenna is supposed to point to the deep space and taking data for the cold reference point in the two-point calibration scheme, in reality, it picked up undesirable thermal microwave radiation from the lunar surface. Thus the "cold" reference point is not exactly the 2.7K cosmic background assumed and this affects the quality of the calibration.In this work, the small but puzzling differences between the two sets of Level 2C MR data released for CE1 & 2 are attributed to the difference in orbital altitudes between CE1 & 2. This leads to the different degrees of contamination to the cold antenna on CE1 & 2 by thermal radiations from the lunar surface, which showed up as persistent lower night-time TB values in the Level 2C CE2 dataset.We proposed a machine learning approach applied directly to pre-Level 2C data in the voltages to TB convertion process. Since all the antenna voltage data as well as the high temperature referencing point in the calibration procedure are directly measurable, optimized regression algorithms have been employed to determine the effective low temperature referencing points and obtain a single set of statistical consistent TB by combining raw data from CE1 & 2, due to the fact that seasonal variations are less than resolution of the CE MR data from low to medium latitudes.Finally, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner IR data are used as constraints on the boundary condition of the top layer regolith temperature to obtain a consistent sub-surface temperature profile, from which the measured CE MR data can be computed through multi-layer radiation transfer model. This step removes most of

  7. A global model for residential energy use: Uncertainty in calibration to regional data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ruijven, B.; de Vries, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068361599; van Vuuren, D.P.; van der Sluijs, J.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073427489

    2010-01-01

    Uncertainties in energy demand modelling allow for the development of different models, but also leave room for different calibrations of a single model. We apply an automated model calibration procedure to analyse calibration uncertainty of residential sector energy use modelling in the TIMER 2.0

  8. Validation of a Knowledge Transfer Tool According to the OMERACT Filter: Does Web-based Real-time Iterative Calibration Enhance the Evaluation of Bone Marrow Lesions in Hip Osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaremko, Jacob L; Azmat, Omar; Lambert, Robert G W; Bird, Paul; Haugen, Ida K; Jans, Lennart; Weber, Ulrich; Winn, Naomi; Zubler, Veronika; Maksymowych, Walter P

    2017-11-01

    To assess reliability and feasibility of using a Web-based interface and interactive online calibration tool for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring of bone marrow lesions (BML) in osteoarthritis (OA), applied to the Hip MR Inflammation Scoring System (HIMRISS). Seven readers new to HIMRISS (3 radiologists, 4 rheumatologists) scored coronal short-tau inversion recovery MRI from a hip OA observational study obtained pre- and 8-week poststeroid injection (n = 40 × 2 scans × 2 hips = 160 hips). By crossover design, Group B (4 readers) scored 20 patients (40 hips) using conventional spreadsheet-based methods and then another 20 using a Web-based interface and an online real-time iterative calibration (RETIC) training module. Group A (3 readers) reversed the order, scoring the first 20 subjects by the new method and the final 20 conventionally. Outcomes included ICC and reader survey. Interobserver reliability for BML status was high by both spreadsheet and Web-based methods (0.84-0.90), regardless of the order in which scoring was performed. Reliability of change scores was moderate and improved with training. Improvement was greater in readers who began with the spreadsheet method and then used the Web-based method than in those who began with the Web-based method, especially at the acetabulum. Readers found Web-based/RETIC scoring more user-friendly and nearly 50% faster than traditional spreadsheet methods. HIMRISS offers reliable BML scoring in OA, whether by conventional spreadsheet-based scoring or by a Web-based interface with interactive feedback. The new method allowed faster readings, provided a consistent training environment that helped inexperienced readers achieve reliability equivalent to that of conventional methods, and was preferred by the readers.

  9. Quantum-chemistry based calibration of the alkali metal cation series (Li(+)-Cs(+)) for large-scale polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Devereux, Mike; Meuwly, Markus; Lim, Carmay; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Gresh, Nohad

    2015-02-15

    The alkali metal cations in the series Li(+)-Cs(+) act as major partners in a diversity of biological processes and in bioinorganic chemistry. In this article, we present the results of their calibration in the context of the SIBFA polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics procedure. It relies on quantum-chemistry (QC) energy-decomposition analyses of their monoligated complexes with representative O-, N-, S-, and Se- ligands, performed with the aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) basis set at the Hartree-Fock level. Close agreement with QC is obtained for each individual contribution, even though the calibration involves only a limited set of cation-specific parameters. This agreement is preserved in tests on polyligated complexes with four and six O- ligands, water and formamide, indicating the transferability of the procedure. Preliminary extensions to density functional theory calculations are reported. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Calibration Under Uncertainty.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2005-03-01

    This report is a white paper summarizing the literature and different approaches to the problem of calibrating computer model parameters in the face of model uncertainty. Model calibration is often formulated as finding the parameters that minimize the squared difference between the model-computed data (the predicted data) and the actual experimental data. This approach does not allow for explicit treatment of uncertainty or error in the model itself: the model is considered the %22true%22 deterministic representation of reality. While this approach does have utility, it is far from an accurate mathematical treatment of the true model calibration problem in which both the computed data and experimental data have error bars. This year, we examined methods to perform calibration accounting for the error in both the computer model and the data, as well as improving our understanding of its meaning for model predictability. We call this approach Calibration under Uncertainty (CUU). This talk presents our current thinking on CUU. We outline some current approaches in the literature, and discuss the Bayesian approach to CUU in detail.

  11. Dosimetric calibration of solid state detectors with low energy {beta} sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidanzio, Andrea [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy)], E-mail: andrea.fidanzio@rm.unicatt.it; Pia Toni, Maria [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti (ENEA), Rome (Italy); Capote, Roberto; Pena, Juan [Departmento FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Facultad de Fisica, AP 1065, Sevilla 41080 (Spain); Centro de Estudios Aplicados al Desarrollo Nuclear, AP 100, La Habana 11300 (Cuba); Pasciuti, Katia [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); Bovi, Maurizio [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti (ENEA), Rome (Italy); Perrone, Franco [U.O. di Fisica Sanitaria, Spedali Civili Santa Chiara, Pisa (Italy); Azario, Luigi [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); Lazzeri, Mauro [U.O. di Fisica Sanitaria, Spedali Civili Santa Chiara, Pisa (Italy); Gaudino, Diego [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); Piermattei, Angelo [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); U.O. di Fisica Sanitaria, Centro di Ricerca e Formazione ad Alta Tecnologia nelle Scienze Biomediche dell' Universita Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)

    2008-01-15

    A PTW Optidos plastic scintillation and a PTW natural diamond detectors were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water with {beta} fields produced by {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y and {sup 85}Kr reference sources. Each source was characterized at the Italian National Metrological Institute - the Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti of ENEA (ENEA-INMRI) - for two different series, 1 and 2, of ISO reference {beta}-particle radiation fields. Beam flattening filters were used for the series 1 {beta} fields to give uniform absorbed dose rates over a large area at a source-to-reference plane distance of 30 cm. The series 2 {beta} fields were produced at source-to-reference plane distance of 10 cm, without the beam flattening filters, in order to obtain higher absorbed dose rates. The reference absorbed dose rate values were directly determined by the Italian national standard for {beta}-particle dosimetry (a PTW extrapolation ionization chamber) for the series 1 {beta} fields and by a calibrated transfer standard chamber, (a Capintec thin fixed-volume parallel plate ionization chamber) for the series 2 {beta} fields. Finally the two solid state detectors were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water with the series 2 {beta} field. The expanded uncertainties of the calibration coefficients obtained for the plastic scintillation dosimeter were 10% and 12% (2SD) for the {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y and the {sup 85}Kr sources, respectively. The expanded uncertainties obtained for the diamond dosimeter were 10% (2SD) and 16% (2SD) for the {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y and the {sup 85}Kr sources, respectively. The good results obtained with the {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y and the {sup 85}Kr {beta} sources encourage to implement this procedure to calibrate this type of detectors at shorter distances and with other {beta} sources of interest in brachytherapy, for example the {sup 106}Ru source.

  12. Performance and Calibration of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Starovoitov, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider. This detector is instrumental for the measurements of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. After an initial setting of the absolute energy scale in test beams with particles of well-defined momentum, the calibrated scale is transferred to the rest of the detector via the response to radioactive sources. The calibrated scale is validated in situ with muons and single hadrons whereas the timing performance is checked with muons and jets. A brief description of the individual calibration systems (Cs radioactive source, laser, charge injection, minimum bias) is provided. Their combination allows to calibr...

  13. Non-uniformity calibration for MWIR polarization imagery obtained with integrated microgrid polarimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Zheng; Shi, Ze-Lin; Feng, Bin; Hui, Bin; Zhao, Yao-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Integrating microgrid polarimeters on focal plane array (FPA) of an infrared detector causes non-uniformity of polarization response. In order to reduce the effect of polarization non-uniformity, this paper constructs an experimental setup for capturing raw flat-field images and proposes a procedure for acquiring non-uniform calibration (NUC) matrix and calibrating raw polarization images. The proposed procedure takes the incident radiation as a polarization vector and offers a calibration matrix for each pixel. Both our matrix calibration and two-point calibration are applied to our mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) polarization imaging system with integrated microgrid polarimeters. Compared with two point calibration, our matrix calibration reduces non-uniformity by 30 40% under condition of flat-field data test with polarization. The ourdoor scene observation experiment indicates that our calibration can effectively reduce polarization non-uniformity and improve the image quality of our MWIR polarization imaging system.

  14. WFIRST WFI Calibration Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolnic, Daniel; Casertano, Stephano; WFIRST Calibration Group

    2018-01-01

    The Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST), with a planned launch in the mid-2020’s, will enable multiple generation-defining measurements in astrophysics and cosmology. One of the key goals of the mission is to limit calibration uncertainties in order to enable a wide range of experiments. Here we present the work of the WFIRST WFI Calibration Working Group, which has compiled a comprehensive set of calibration needs derived from the Mission science requirements, and has outlined a plan toachieve them. In many areas, the accuracy required has yet to be reached in any comparable mission or project. We present here the various plans of on-ground characterization, pre-launch data; internal measurements and observations in orbit; and external observations.

  15. Site Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Vesth, Allan

    The report describes site calibration measurements carried out on a site in Denmark. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio...... between the wind speed at the center of the turbine hub and at the met mast. The wind speed at the turbine is measured by a temporary mast placed at the foundation for the turbine. The site and measurement equipment is detailed described in [2]. The possible measurement sector for power performance...... according to [1] is also described in [2] and no results from the site calibration have shown any necessary exclusion from this sector. All parts of the sensors and the measurement system have been installed by DTU....

  16. TARGETLESS CAMERA CALIBRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barazzetti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In photogrammetry a camera is considered calibrated if its interior orientation parameters are known. These encompass the principal distance, the principal point position and some Additional Parameters used to model possible systematic errors. The current state of the art for automated camera calibration relies on the use of coded targets to accurately determine the image correspondences. This paper presents a new methodology for the efficient and rigorous photogrammetric calibration of digital cameras which does not require any longer the use of targets. A set of images depicting a scene with a good texture are sufficient for the extraction of natural corresponding image points. These are automatically matched with feature-based approaches and robust estimation techniques. The successive photogrammetric bundle adjustment retrieves the unknown camera parameters and their theoretical accuracies. Examples, considerations and comparisons with real data and different case studies are illustrated to show the potentialities of the proposed methodology.

  17. Calibrating the Athena telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijne, J.; Guainazzi, M.; den Herder, J.; Bavdaz, M.; Burwitz, V.; Ferrando, P.; Lumb, D.; Natalucci, L.; Pajot, F.; Pareschi, G.

    2017-10-01

    Athena is ESA's upcoming X-ray mission, currently set for launch in 2028. With two nationally-funded, state-of-the-art instruments (a high-resolution spectrograph named X-IFU and a wide-field imager named WFI), and a telescope collecting area of 1.4-2 m^2 at 1 keV, the calibration of the spacecraft is a challenge in itself. This poster presents the current (spring 2017) plan of how to calibrate the Athena telescope. It is based on a hybrid approach, using bulk manufacturing and integration data as well as dedicated calibration measurements combined with a refined software model to simulate the full response of the optics.

  18. Deep Impact instrument calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, K.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Baca, M.; Delamere, A.; Desnoyer, M.; Farnham, T.; Groussin, O.; Hampton, D.; Ipatov, S.; Li, J.-Y.; Lisse, C.; Mastrodemos, N.; McLaughlin, S.; Sunshine, J.; Thomas, P.; Wellnitz, D.

    2008-09-01

    Calibration of NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft instruments allows reliable scientific interpretation of the images and spectra returned from comet Tempel 1. Calibrations of the four onboard remote sensing imaging instruments have been performed in the areas of geometric calibration, spatial resolution, spectral resolution, and radiometric response. Error sources such as noise (random, coherent, encoding, data compression), detector readout artifacts, scattered light, and radiation interactions have been quantified. The point spread functions (PSFs) of the medium resolution instrument and its twin impactor targeting sensor are near the theoretical minimum [~1.7 pixels full width at half maximum (FWHM)]. However, the high resolution instrument camera was found to be out of focus with a PSF FWHM of ~9 pixels. The charge coupled device (CCD) read noise is ~1 DN. Electrical cross-talk between the CCD detector quadrants is correctable to <2 DN. The IR spectrometer response nonlinearity is correctable to ~1%. Spectrometer read noise is ~2 DN. The variation in zero-exposure signal level with time and spectrometer temperature is not fully characterized; currently corrections are good to ~10 DN at best. Wavelength mapping onto the detector is known within 1 pixel; spectral lines have a FWHM of ~2 pixels. About 1% of the IR detector pixels behave badly and remain uncalibrated. The spectrometer exhibits a faint ghost image from reflection off a beamsplitter. Instrument absolute radiometric calibration accuracies were determined generally to <10% using star imaging. Flat-field calibration reduces pixel-to-pixel response differences to ~0.5% for the cameras and <2% for the spectrometer. A standard calibration image processing pipeline is used to produce archival image files for analysis by researchers.

  19. Laser calibration of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Di Gregorio, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    High performance stability of the ATLAS Tile calorimeter is achieved with a set of calibration procedures. One step of the calibrtion procedure is based on measurements of the response stability to laser excitation of the photomultipliers (PMTs) that are used to readout the calorimeter cells. A facility to study in lab the PMT stability response is operating in the PISA-INFN laboratories since 2015. Goals of the test in lab are to study the time evolution of the PMT response to reproduce and to understand the origin of the resonse drifts seen with the PMT mounted on the Tile calorimeter in its normal operation during LHC run I and run II. A new statistical approach was developed to measure the drift of the absolute gain. This approach was applied to both the ATLAS laser calibration data and to the data collected in the Pisa local laboratory. The preliminary results from these two studies are shown.

  20. Calibration of scanning Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report describes the tests carried out on a scanning lidar at the DTU Test Station for large wind turbines, Høvsøre. The tests were divided in two parts. In the first part, the purpose was to obtain wind speed calibrations at two heights against two cup anemometers mounted on a mast. Additio......This report describes the tests carried out on a scanning lidar at the DTU Test Station for large wind turbines, Høvsøre. The tests were divided in two parts. In the first part, the purpose was to obtain wind speed calibrations at two heights against two cup anemometers mounted on a mast...

  1. Calibrated entanglement entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmatov, I.; Deger, N. S.; Gutowski, J.; Colgáin, E. Ó.; Yavartanoo, H.

    2017-07-01

    The Ryu-Takayanagi prescription reduces the problem of calculating entanglement entropy in CFTs to the determination of minimal surfaces in a dual anti-de Sitter geometry. For 3D gravity theories and BTZ black holes, we identify the minimal surfaces as special Lagrangian cycles calibrated by the real part of the holomorphic one-form of a spacelike hypersurface. We show that (generalised) calibrations provide a unified way to determine holographic entanglement entropy from minimal surfaces, which is applicable to warped AdS3 geometries. We briefly discuss generalisations to higher dimensions.

  2. Calibrating Legal Judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Schauer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to study the notion and essence of legal judgments calibration the possibilities of using it in the lawenforcement activity to explore the expenses and advantages of using it. Methods dialectic approach to the cognition of social phenomena which enables to analyze them in historical development and functioning in the context of the integrity of objective and subjective factors it determined the choice of the following research methods formallegal comparative legal sociological methods of cognitive psychology and philosophy. Results In ordinary life people who assess other peoplersaquos judgments typically take into account the other judgments of those they are assessing in order to calibrate the judgment presently being assessed. The restaurant and hotel rating website TripAdvisor is exemplary because it facilitates calibration by providing access to a raterrsaquos previous ratings. Such information allows a user to see whether a particular rating comes from a rater who is enthusiastic about every place she patronizes or instead from someone who is incessantly hard to please. And even when less systematized as in assessing a letter of recommendation or college transcript calibration by recourse to the decisional history of those whose judgments are being assessed is ubiquitous. Yet despite the ubiquity and utility of such calibration the legal system seems perversely to reject it. Appellate courts do not openly adjust their standard of review based on the previous judgments of the judge whose decision they are reviewing nor do judges in reviewing legislative or administrative decisions magistrates in evaluating search warrant representations or jurors in assessing witness perception. In most legal domains calibration by reference to the prior decisions of the reviewee is invisible either because it does not exist or because reviewing bodies are unwilling to admit using what they in fact know and employ. Scientific novelty for the first

  3. Calibration with Absolute Shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik; Thyregod, Poul

    2001-01-01

    is suggested to cope with the singular design matrix most often seen in chemometric calibration. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm may be generalized to all convex norms like Sigma/beta (j)/(gamma) where gamma greater than or equal to 1, i.e. a method that continuously varies from ridge regression...... to the lasso. The lasso is applied both directly as a calibration method and as a method to select important variables/wave lengths. It is demonstrated that the lasso algorithm, in general, leads to parameter estimates of which some are zero while others are quite large (compared to e.g. the traditional PLS...

  4. Polymers for Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duez, Quentin; Chirot, Fabien; Liénard, Romain; Josse, Thomas; Choi, ChangMin; Coulembier, Olivier; Dugourd, Philippe; Cornil, Jérôme; Gerbaux, Pascal; De Winter, Julien

    2017-07-01

    One of the main issues when using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) for the determination of collisional cross-section (CCS) concerns the need for a robust calibration procedure built from referent ions of known CCS. Here, we implement synthetic polymer ions as CCS calibrants in positive ion mode. Based on their intrinsic polydispersities, polymers offer in a single sample the opportunity to generate, upon electrospray ionization, numerous ions covering a broad mass range and a large CCS window for different charge states at a time. In addition, the key advantage of polymer ions as CCS calibrants lies in the robustness of their gas-phase structure with respect to the instrumental conditions, making them less prone to collisional-induced unfolding (CIU) than protein ions. In this paper, we present a CCS calibration procedure using sodium cationized polylactide and polyethylene glycol, PLA and PEG, as calibrants with reference CCS determined on a home-made drift tube. Our calibration procedure is further validated by testing the polymer calibration to determine CCS of numerous different ions for which CCS are reported in the literature. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel: 2014 Cloud Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ide, Robert F.; Steen, Laura; Acosta, Waldo J.

    2014-01-01

    The results of the December 2013 to February 2014 Icing Research Tunnel full icing cloud calibration are being presented to the SAE AC-9C committee, as represented in the 2014 cloud calibration report. The calibration steps included establishing a uniform cloud and conducting drop size and liquid water content calibrations. The goal of the calibration was to develop a uniform cloud, and to generate a transfer function from the inputs of air speed, spray bar atomizing air pressure and water pressure to the outputs of median volumetric drop diameter and liquid water content. This was done for both 14 CFR Parts 25 and 29, Appendix C (typical icing) and soon-to-be released Appendix O (supercooled large drop) conditions.

  6. Technical Note: Calibration device for the krypton hygrometer KH20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Foken

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A calibration device for krypton hygrometers (KH20, Campbell Scientific, Inc. with variable path length is presented. This unit allows for in-situ calibrations of the krypton hygrometer, which is typically not very stable over time, during measuring campaigns. It was constructed mainly for application at high altitudes and low temperatures, where further improvements are needed to the IR-hygrometers which are normally used. The changing path length requires that a changing concentration of the absorber be simulated. Because oxygen absorbs more strongly than water vapour, the calibration is made against oxygen and transferred to water vapour. The design of the calibration instrument is made as one unit containing a stepper motor system, PC and humidity sensor. For the calibration, it is necessary to install the krypton hygrometer on this unit.

  7. CLUSTERED RADIO INTERFEROMETRIC CALIBRATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazemi, S.; Yatawatta, S.; Zaroubi, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces an amendment to radio interferometric calibration of sources below the noise level. The main idea is to employ the information of the stronger sources' measured signals as a plug-in criterion to solve for the weaker ones. For this purpose, we construct a number of source

  8. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  9. Calibrating Communication Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surges Tatum, Donna

    2016-11-01

    The Many-faceted Rasch measurement model is used in the creation of a diagnostic instrument by which communication competencies can be calibrated, the severity of observers/raters can be determined, the ability of speakers measured, and comparisons made between various groups.

  10. ECAL Energy Flow Calibration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    My talk will be covering my work as a whole over the course of the semester. The focus will be on using energy flow calibration in ECAL to check the precision of the corrections made by the light monitoring system used to account for transparency loss within ECAL crystals due to radiation damage over time.

  11. Entropic calibration revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brody, Dorje C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: d.brody@imperial.ac.uk; Buckley, Ian R.C. [Centre for Quantitative Finance, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Constantinou, Irene C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Meister, Bernhard K. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-11

    The entropic calibration of the risk-neutral density function is effective in recovering the strike dependence of options, but encounters difficulties in determining the relevant greeks. By use of put-call reversal we apply the entropic method to the time reversed economy, which allows us to obtain the spot price dependence of options and the relevant greeks.

  12. Measurement System & Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Villanueva, Héctor

    This Measurement System & Calibration report is describing DTU’s measurement system installed at a specific wind turbine. A part of the sensors has been installed by others, the rest of the sensors have been installed by DTU. The results of the measurements, described in this report, are only val...

  13. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  14. SCALA: In situ calibration for integral field spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, S.; Küsters, D.; Kowalski, M.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barbary, K.; Baugh, D.; Bongard, S.; Boone, K.; Buton, C.; Chen, J.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Dixon, S.; Fagrelius, P.; Feindt, U.; Fouchez, D.; Gangler, E.; Hayden, B.; Hillebrandt, W.; Hoffmann, A.; Kim, A. G.; Leget, P.-F.; McKay, L.; Nordin, J.; Pain, R.; Pécontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Reif, K.; Rigault, M.; Rubin, D.; Runge, K.; Saunders, C.; Smadja, G.; Suzuki, N.; Taubenberger, S.; Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Nearby Supernova Factory

    2017-11-01

    Aims: The scientific yield of current and future optical surveys is increasingly limited by systematic uncertainties in the flux calibration. This is the case for type Ia supernova (SN Ia) cosmology programs, where an improved calibration directly translates into improved cosmological constraints. Current methodology rests on models of stars. Here we aim to obtain flux calibration that is traceable to state-of-the-art detector-based calibration. Methods: We present the SNIFS Calibration Apparatus (SCALA), a color (relative) flux calibration system developed for the SuperNova integral field spectrograph (SNIFS), operating at the University of Hawaii 2.2 m (UH 88) telescope. Results: By comparing the color trend of the illumination generated by SCALA during two commissioning runs, and to previous laboratory measurements, we show that we can determine the light emitted by SCALA with a long-term repeatability better than 1%. We describe the calibration procedure necessary to control for system aging. We present measurements of the SNIFS throughput as estimated by SCALA observations. Conclusions: The SCALA calibration unit is now fully deployed at the UH 88 telescope, and with it color-calibration between 4000 Å and 9000 Å is stable at the percent level over a one-year baseline.

  15. Field calibration of cup anemometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Hansen, Jens Carsten

    2007-01-01

    A field calibration method and results are described along with the experience gained with the method. The cup anemometers to be calibrated are mounted in a row on a 10-m high rig and calibrated in the free wind against a reference cup anemometer. The method has been reported [1] to improve...... the statistical bias on the data relative to calibrations carried out in a wind tunnel. The methodology is sufficiently accurate for calibration of cup anemometers used for wind resource assessments and provides a simple, reliable and cost-effective solution to cup anemometer calibration, especially suited...

  16. Node-to-node field calibration of wireless distributed air pollution sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizel, Fadi; Etzion, Yael; Shafran-Nathan, Rakefet; Levy, Ilan; Fishbain, Barak; Bartonova, Alena; Broday, David M

    2018-02-01

    Low-cost air quality sensors offer high-resolution spatiotemporal measurements that can be used for air resources management and exposure estimation. Yet, such sensors require frequent calibration to provide reliable data, since even after a laboratory calibration they might not report correct values when they are deployed in the field, due to interference with other pollutants, as a result of sensitivity to environmental conditions and due to sensor aging and drift. Field calibration has been suggested as a means for overcoming these limitations, with the common strategy involving periodical collocations of the sensors at an air quality monitoring station. However, the cost and complexity involved in relocating numerous sensor nodes back and forth, and the loss of data during the repeated calibration periods make this strategy inefficient. This work examines an alternative approach, a node-to-node (N2N) calibration, where only one sensor in each chain is directly calibrated against the reference measurements and the rest of the sensors are calibrated sequentially one against the other while they are deployed and collocated in pairs. The calibration can be performed multiple times as a routine procedure. This procedure minimizes the total number of sensor relocations, and enables calibration while simultaneously collecting data at the deployment sites. We studied N2N chain calibration and the propagation of the calibration error analytically, computationally and experimentally. The in-situ N2N calibration is shown to be generic and applicable for different pollutants, sensing technologies, sensor platforms, chain lengths, and sensor order within the chain. In particular, we show that chain calibration of three nodes, each calibrated for a week, propagate calibration errors that are similar to those found in direct field calibration. Hence, N2N calibration is shown to be suitable for calibration of distributed sensor networks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  17. Standard Practices for Verification and Calibration of Polarimeters

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 Polarimeters and polariscopes used for measuring stress in glass are described in Test Methods F218, C148, and C978. These instruments include a light source and several optical elements (polarizers, optical retarders, filters, and so forth) that require occasional cleaning, realigning, and calibration. The objective of these practices is to describe the calibration and verification procedures required to maintain these instruments in calibration and ensure that the optical setup is within specification for satisfactory measurements. 1.2 It is mandatory throughout these practices that both verification and calibration are carried out by qualified personnel who fully understand the concepts used in measurements of stress retardation and are experienced in the practices of measuring procedures described in Test Methods F218, C148, and C978. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

  18. Calibration and features of air-kerma length product meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merimaa, K; Tapiovaara, M; Kosunen, A; Toroi, P

    2012-12-01

    Pencil-type air-kerma length product meters are generally used for quality control and radiation exposure measurements in computed tomography. To ensure reliable results, these meters should be calibrated so that measurements are traceable to international standards. Suitable calibration procedures, together with the properties of these meters, were examined and compared with the international standards and recommendations. The calibration procedure and setup used in this study were slightly modified compared with international recommendations. The special collimator system was found to cause less scatter than similar setups in earlier studies. The energy dependence of the meter response was investigated for several types of meters with standard radiation qualities. With most tested meter types, the total variation due to energy dependence was meter type varied up to 8 % when rotating the meter around its axis; this should be taken into account when making calibrations with a static setup.

  19. Line fiducial material and thickness considerations for ultrasound calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Golafsoun; McLeod, A. J.; Baxter, John S. H.; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Peters, Terry M.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound calibration is a necessary procedure in many image-guided interventions, relating the position of tools and anatomical structures in the ultrasound image to a common coordinate system. This is a necessary component of augmented reality environments in image-guided interventions as it allows for a 3D visualization where other surgical tools outside the imaging plane can be found. Accuracy of ultrasound calibration fundamentally affects the total accuracy of this interventional guidance system. Many ultrasound calibration procedures have been proposed based on a variety of phantom materials and geometries. These differences lead to differences in representation of the phantom on the ultrasound image which subsequently affect the ability to accurately and automatically segment the phantom. For example, taut wires are commonly used as line fiducials in ultrasound calibration. However, at large depths or oblique angles, the fiducials appear blurred and smeared in ultrasound images making it hard to localize their cross-section with the ultrasound image plane. Intuitively, larger diameter phantoms with lower echogenicity are more accurately segmented in ultrasound images in comparison to highly reflective thin phantoms. In this work, an evaluation of a variety of calibration phantoms with different geometrical and material properties for the phantomless calibration procedure was performed. The phantoms used in this study include braided wire, plastic straws, and polyvinyl alcohol cryogel tubes with different diameters. Conventional B-mode and synthetic aperture images of the phantoms at different positions were obtained. The phantoms were automatically segmented from the ultrasound images using an ellipse fitting algorithm, the centroid of which is subsequently used as a fiducial for calibration. Calibration accuracy was evaluated for these procedures based on the leave-one-out target registration error. It was shown that larger diameter phantoms with lower

  20. Calibration of a physically based, spatially distributed hydrological model in a glacierized basin: On the use of knowledge from glaciometeorological processes to constrain model parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragettli, S.; Pellicciotti, F.

    2012-03-01

    In the Dry Andes of central Chile, summer water resources originate mostly from snowmelt and ice melt. We use the physically based, spatially distributed hydrological model TOPKAPI to study the exchange between glaciers and climate in the upper Aconcagua River Basin during the summer season and identify the model parameters that are robust and transferable and those that are more dependent on calibration. TOPKAPI has recently been adapted to incorporate an enhanced temperature index approach for snow and ice melting. We suggest a calibration procedure that allows calibration of parameters in three steps by separating parameters governing distinct processes. We evaluate the parameters' transferability in time and in space by applying the model at two spatial scales. TOPKAPI's ability to simulate the relevant processes is tested against meteorological, ablation, and glacier runoff data measured on Juncal Norte Glacier during two glacier ablation seasons. The model was applied successfully to the climatic setting of the Dry Andes once its parameters were recalibrated. We found a clear distinction between parameters that are stable in time and those that need recalibration. The parameters of the melt model are transferable from one season to the other, while the parameters governing the extrapolation of meteorological input data and the routing of glacier meltwater need recalibration from one season to the other. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the model is most sensitive to the temperature lapse rate governing the extrapolation of air temperature from point measurements to the glacier scale and to the melt parameter that multiplies the shortwave radiation balance.

  1. Complete calibration of the autonomous hand-eye robot JANUS

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, C.

    1998-01-01

    The current prototype of the JANUS robot consists of two arms and a neck with two mounted color cameras. Calibrating JANUS means to find the geometric relationships between each of these components and the reference coordinate system of the robot. The calibration procedure that we present in this report is completely vision-based: the relationships between each camera and the neck and between each arm and the neck are determined using visual measurements, which leads to a low-cost and automat...

  2. Lidar calibration experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.; Streicher, J.

    1997-01-01

    A series of atmospheric aerosol diffusion experiments combined with lidar detection was conducted to evaluate and calibrate an existing retrieval algorithm for aerosol backscatter lidar systems. The calibration experiments made use of two (almost) identical mini-lidar systems for aerosol cloud...... detection to test the reproducibility and uncertainty of lidars. Lidar data were obtained from both single-ended and double-ended Lidar configurations. A backstop was introduced in one of the experiments and a new method was developed where information obtained from the backstop can be used in the inversion...... algorithm. Independent in-situ aerosol plume concentrations were obtained from a simultaneous tracer gas experiment with SF6, and comparisons with the two lidars were made. The study shows that the reproducibility of the lidars is within 15%, including measurements from both sides of a plume...

  3. Calibrated vapor generator source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  4. Accurate borehole probe calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tchen, T.; Eisler, P. (CSIRO, Mount Waverley, Vic. (Australia). Division of Geomechanics)

    The In Situ Minerals Analysis Group in the CSIRO Division of Geomechanics has developed quantitative borehole logging techniques applicable to iron-ore and coal deposits. They are used currently to determine the formation density, either the iron-ore grades or the raw coal-ash contents, as appropriate, and the borehole diameter. The in-situ analyses depend on probe-calibration equations which were formulated by linear regression analysis that related the probe's spectral outputs with the required geological variable. Calibration equations consisting of a linear combination of first-order terms gave excellent assaying accuracy. The group achieved further improvements in assaying accuracy by developing a more generalised calibration model based on second-order terms and cross-product terms of the probe's spectral parameters. The logging data used for the statistical analysis were recorded in mine development boreholes at three Pilbara iron-ore mines and at a Queensland coal mine. Application of the generalised model, in place of the first-order model, resulted in a reduction of the root mean square (RMS) deviation between assays obtained in the laboratory and by logging, of about 15% relative for iron-ore grades and of about 8% relative for raw coal-ash content. The study also shows that the accuracy obtained using the conventional, non-spectrometric calibration model is inferior to that obtained by using either of the two spectrometric models, where the comparisons made are based on the same set of logging data. 8 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Calibrated Properties Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. H. Liu

    2003-02-14

    This report has documented the methodologies and the data used for developing rock property sets for three infiltration maps. Model calibration is necessary to obtain parameter values appropriate for the scale of the process being modeled. Although some hydrogeologic property data (prior information) are available, these data cannot be directly used to predict flow and transport processes because they were measured on scales smaller than those characterizing property distributions in models used for the prediction. Since model calibrations were done directly on the scales of interest, the upscaling issue was automatically considered. On the other hand, joint use of data and the prior information in inversions can further increase the reliability of the developed parameters compared with those for the prior information. Rock parameter sets were developed for both the mountain and drift scales because of the scale-dependent behavior of fracture permeability. Note that these parameter sets, except those for faults, were determined using the 1-D simulations. Therefore, they cannot be directly used for modeling lateral flow because of perched water in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. Further calibration may be needed for two- and three-dimensional modeling studies. As discussed above in Section 6.4, uncertainties for these calibrated properties are difficult to accurately determine, because of the inaccuracy of simplified methods for this complex problem or the extremely large computational expense of more rigorous methods. One estimate of uncertainty that may be useful to investigators using these properties is the uncertainty used for the prior information. In most cases, the inversions did not change the properties very much with respect to the prior information. The Output DTNs (including the input and output files for all runs) from this study are given in Section 9.4.

  6. The SLAC Comparator for the Calibration of Digital Leveling Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassner, G.L.; Ruland, R.E.; /SLAC

    2006-11-07

    At SLAC digital levels are used for precise leveling, both for setting out and monitoring. A very high precision of 30 {micro}m is required, which can only be achieved by regularly calibrating the leveling equipment. The calibration facility is also used for detailed investigations to refine the SLAC leveling procedure. In this paper the setup of the SLAC vertical comparator is described. In order to also perform traditional staff calibration a CCD camera was integrated into the SLAC comparator. Finally an overview of further investigations of our leveling equipment is presented.

  7. Whole-Body Vibration Sensor Calibration Using a Six-Degree of Freedom Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Cation

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV is associated with a wide variety of health disorders and as a result WBV levels are frequently assessed. Literature outlining WBV accelerations rarely address the calibration techniques and procedures used for WBV sensors to any depth, nor are any detailed information provided regarding such procedures or sensor calibration ranges. The purpose of this paper is to describe a calibration method for a 6 DOF transducer using a hexapod robot. Also described is a separate motion capture technique used to verify the calibration for acceleration values obtained which were outside the robot calibration range in order to include an acceptable calibration range for WBV environments. The sensor calibrated in this study used linear (Y=mX calibration equations resulting in r2 values greater than 0.97 for maximum and minimum acceleration amplitudes of up to ±8 m/s2 and maximum and minimum velocity amplitudes up to ±100°/s. The motion capture technique verified that the translational calibrations held for accelerations up to ±4 g. Thus, the calibration procedures were shown to calibrate the sensor through the expected range for 6-DOF WBV field measurements for off-road vehicles even when subjected to shocks as a result of high speed travel over rough terrain.

  8. The Calibration Home Base for Imaging Spectrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Felix Simon Brachmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Calibration Home Base (CHB is an optical laboratory designed for the calibration of imaging spectrometers for the VNIR/SWIR wavelength range. Radiometric, spectral and geometric calibration as well as the characterization of sensor signal dependency on polarization are realized in a precise and highly automated fashion. This allows to carry out a wide range of time consuming measurements in an ecient way. The implementation of ISO 9001 standards in all procedures ensures a traceable quality of results. Spectral measurements in the wavelength range 380–1000 nm are performed to a wavelength uncertainty of +- 0.1 nm, while an uncertainty of +-0.2 nm is reached in the wavelength range 1000 – 2500 nm. Geometric measurements are performed at increments of 1.7 µrad across track and 7.6 µrad along track. Radiometric measurements reach an absolute uncertainty of +-3% (k=1. Sensor artifacts, such as caused by stray light will be characterizable and correctable in the near future. For now, the CHB is suitable for the characterization of pushbroom sensors, spectrometers and cameras. However, it is planned to extend the CHBs capabilities in the near future such that snapshot hyperspectral imagers can be characterized as well. The calibration services of the CHB are open to third party customers from research institutes as well as industry.

  9. RADCAL Operations Manual Radiation Calibration Laboratory Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogard, J.S.

    1998-12-01

    The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) in its Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments. Operations of the HPRR were terminated in 1987 and the reactor was moved to storage at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; however, RADCAL will continue to be operated in accordance with the guidelines of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Secondary Calibration Laboratory program and will meet all requirements for testing dosimeters under the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). This manual is to serve as the primary instruction and operation manual for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's RADCAL facility. Its purpose is to (1) provide operating protocols for the RADCAL facility, (2) outline the organizational structure, (3) define the Quality Assurance Action Plan, and (4) describe all the procedures, operations, and responsibilities for the safe and proper operation of all routine aspects of the calibration facility.

  10. Calibration of Cryogenic Thermometers for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, Ch; Vauthier, N; Thermeau, JP

    2008-01-01

    6000 cryogenic temperature sensors of resistive type covering the range from room temperature down to 1.6 K are installed on the LHC machine. In order to meet the stringent requirements on temperature control of the superconducting magnets, each single sensor needs to be calibrated individually. In the framework of a special contribution, IPN (Institut de Physique Nucléaire) in Orsay, France built and operated a calibration facility with a throughput of 80 thermometers per week. After reception from the manufacturer, the thermometer is first assembled onto a support specific to the measurement environment, and then thermally cycled ten times and calibrated at least once from 1.6 to 300 K. The procedure for each of these interventions includes various measurements and the acquired data is recorded in an ORACLE®-database. Furthermore random calibrations on some samples are executed at CERN to crosscheck the coherence between the approximation data obtained by both IPN and CERN. In the range of 1.5 K to 30 K...

  11. Calibration algorithm for eyetracking with unrestricted head movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey S; Liu, Li; Thomas, Geb; Spencer, John P

    2007-02-01

    This article reports a calibration procedure that enables researchers to track movements of the eye while allowing relatively unrestricted head and/or body movement. The eye-head calibration algorithm calculates fixation point based on eye-position data acquired by a head-mounted eyetracker and corresponding head-position data acquired by a 3-D motion-tracking system. In a single experiment, we show that this procedure provides robust eye-position estimates while allowing free head movement. Although several companies offer ready-made systems for this purpose, there is no literature available that makes it possible for researchers to explore the details of the calibration procedures used by these systems. By making such details available, we hope to facilitate the development of cost-effective, nonproprietary eyetracking solutions.

  12. Planck 2013 results. V. LFI calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, D.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    We discuss the methods employed to photometrically calibrate the data acquired by the Low Frequency Instrument on Planck. Our calibration is based on a combination of the orbital dipole plus the solar dipole, caused respectively by the motion of the Planck spacecraft with respect to the Sun and by motion of the solar system with respect to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) rest frame. The latter provides a signal of a few mK with the same spectrum as the CMB anisotropies and is visible throughout the mission. In this data releasewe rely on the characterization of the solar dipole as measured by WMAP. We also present preliminary results (at 44 GHz only) on the study of the Orbital Dipole, which agree with the WMAP value of the solar system speed within our uncertainties. We compute the calibration constant for each radiometer roughly once per hour, in order to keep track of changes in the detectors' gain. Since non-idealities in the optical response of the beams proved to be important, we implemented a fast convolution algorithm which considers the full beam response in estimating the signal generated by the dipole. Moreover, in order to further reduce the impact of residual systematics due to sidelobes, we estimated time variations in the calibration constant of the 30 GHz radiometers (the ones with the largest sidelobes) using the signal of an internal reference load at 4 K instead of the CMB dipole. We have estimated the accuracy of the LFI calibration following two strategies: (1) we have run a set of simulations to assess the impact of statistical errors and systematic effects in the instrument and in the calibration procedure; and (2) we have performed a number of internal consistency checks on the data and on the brightness temperature of Jupiter. Errors in the calibration of this Planck/LFI data release are expected to be about 0.6% at 44 and 70 GHz, and 0.8% at 30 GHz. Both these preliminary results at low and high ℓ are consistent with WMAP results

  13. Studies Concerning the ATLAS IBL Calibration Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Kretz, Moritz; Kugel, Andreas

    With the commissioning of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) in 2013 at the ATLAS experiment 12~million additional pixels will be added to the current Pixel Detector. While the idea of employing pairs of VME based Read-Out Driver (ROD) and Back of Crate (BOC) cards in the read-out chain remains unchanged, modifications regarding the IBL calibration procedure were introduced to overcome current hardware limitations. The analysis of calibration histograms will no longer be performed on the RODs, but on an external computing farm that is connected to the RODs via Ethernet. This thesis contributes to the new IBL calibration procedure and presents a concept for a scalable software and hardware architecture. An embedded system targeted to the ROD FPGAs is realized for sending data from the RODs to the fit farm servers and benchmarks are carried out with a Linux based networking stack, as well as a standalone software stack. Furthermore, the histogram fitting algorithm currently being employed on the Pixel Detector RODs i...

  14. Evolvable Cryogenics (ECRYO) Pressure Transducer Calibration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Carlos E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the findings of recent activities conducted by Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) In-Space Propulsion Branch and MSFC's Metrology and Calibration Lab to assess the performance of current "state of the art" pressure transducers for use in long duration storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. A brief historical narrative in this paper describes the Evolvable Cryogenics program and the relevance of these activities to the program. This paper also provides a review of three separate test activities performed throughout this effort, including: (1) the calibration of several pressure transducer designs in a liquid nitrogen cryogenic environmental chamber, (2) the calibration of a pressure transducer in a liquid helium Dewar, and (3) the calibration of several pressure transducers at temperatures ranging from 20 to 70 degrees Kelvin (K) using a "cryostat" environmental chamber. These three separate test activities allowed for study of the sensors along a temperature range from 4 to 300 K. The combined data shows that both the slope and intercept of the sensor's calibration curve vary as a function of temperature. This homogeneous function is contrary to the linearly decreasing relationship assumed at the start of this investigation. Consequently, the data demonstrates the need for lookup tables to change the slope and intercept used by any data acquisition system. This ultimately would allow for more accurate pressure measurements at the desired temperature range. This paper concludes with a review of a request for information (RFI) survey conducted amongst different suppliers to determine the availability of current "state of the art" flight-qualified pressure transducers. The survey identifies requirements that are most difficult for the suppliers to meet, most notably the capability to validate the sensor's performance at temperatures below 70 K.

  15. Tendon Transfers for Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    It is estimated that 65% to 75% of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries could benefit from upper extremity tendon transfer surgery. The goals of surgery are to restore elbow extension, as well as hand pinch, grasp, and release. Patients who have defined goals, actively participate in therapy, and understand expected outcomes, appear to have the highest satisfaction following tendon transfer procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. CALIBRATED HYDRODYNAMIC MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezar Gülbaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The land development and increase in urbanization in a watershed affect water quantityand water quality. On one hand, urbanization provokes the adjustment of geomorphicstructure of the streams, ultimately raises peak flow rate which causes flood; on theother hand, it diminishes water quality which results in an increase in Total SuspendedSolid (TSS. Consequently, sediment accumulation in downstream of urban areas isobserved which is not preferred for longer life of dams. In order to overcome thesediment accumulation problem in dams, the amount of TSS in streams and inwatersheds should be taken under control. Low Impact Development (LID is a BestManagement Practice (BMP which may be used for this purpose. It is a land planningand engineering design method which is applied in managing storm water runoff inorder to reduce flooding as well as simultaneously improve water quality. LID includestechniques to predict suspended solid loads in surface runoff generated over imperviousurban surfaces. In this study, the impact of LID-BMPs on surface runoff and TSS isinvestigated by employing a calibrated hydrodynamic model for Sazlidere Watershedwhich is located in Istanbul, Turkey. For this purpose, a calibrated hydrodynamicmodel was developed by using Environmental Protection Agency Storm WaterManagement Model (EPA SWMM. For model calibration and validation, we set up arain gauge and a flow meter into the field and obtain rainfall and flow rate data. Andthen, we select several LID types such as retention basins, vegetative swales andpermeable pavement and we obtain their influence on peak flow rate and pollutantbuildup and washoff for TSS. Consequently, we observe the possible effects ofLID on surface runoff and TSS in Sazlidere Watershed.

  17. Smart Calibration of Excavators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Marie; Døring, Kasper; Ellekilde, Lars-Peter

    2005-01-01

    Excavators dig holes. But where is the bucket? The purpose of this report is to treat four different problems concerning calibrations of position indicators for excavators in operation at concrete construction sites. All four problems are related to the question of how to determine the precise...... geographic and/or site-relative position of a given excavator and its bucket. However, our presentations and solutions to the problems can, nevertheless, be read and studied in any order and independently of each other. This also implies and induces a gentle warning to the reader: The {\\em{notation}} need...

  18. Local Hadronic Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Barillari, T; Carli, T; Erdmann, J; Giovannini, P; Grahn, K J; Issever, C; Jantsch, A; Kiryunin, A; Lohwasser, K; Maslennikov, A; Menke, S; Oberlack, H; Pospelov, G; Rauter, E; Schacht, P; Spanó, F; Speckmayer, P; Stavina, P; Strízenec, P

    2008-01-01

    The scheme of the hadronic calibration is discussed. Based on the cluster reconstruction an effective noise suppression is achieved. In a first step clusters are classified as electromagnetic or hadronic clusters. The weighting scheme to correct for the different e/pion response in the ATLAS calorimeter is presented. Dead material corrections and out of cluster corrections yield finally a signal which is rather close to the energy deposited by the final state particles in the ATLAS calorimeter. The constants and algorithms are derived from single pion MC studies and tested with jets. The validation of the scheme using testbeam data is presented as well.

  19. ALTEA: The instrument calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaconte, V. [INFN and University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Physics, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: livio.narici@roma2.infn.it; Belli, F.; Bidoli, V.; Casolino, M.; Di Fino, L.; Narici, L.; Picozza, P.; Rinaldi, A. [INFN and University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Physics, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Sannita, W.G. [DISM, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Department of Psychiatry, SUNY, Stoony Brook, NY (United States); Finetti, N.; Nurzia, G.; Rantucci, E.; Scrimaglio, R.; Segreto, E. [Department of Physics, University and INFN, L' Aquila (Italy); Schardt, D. [GSI/Biophysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    The ALTEA program is an international and multi-disciplinary project aimed at studying particle radiation in space environment and its effects on astronauts' brain functions, as the anomalous perception of light flashes first reported during Apollo missions. The ALTEA space facility includes a 6-silicon telescopes particle detector, and is onboard the International Space Station (ISS) since July 2006. In this paper, the detector calibration at the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS18 at GSI Darmstadt will be presented and compared to the Geant 3 Monte Carlo simulation. Finally, the results of a neural network analysis that was used for ion discrimination on fragmentation data will also be presented.

  20. Calibration report for ZephIR Dual Mode lidar (unit 351)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine; Courtney, Michael

    the calibration process. A generic methodology to calibrate profiling nacelle lidars has been developed and performed on a ZephIR Dual Mode lidar manufactured by ZephIR LiDAR. In essence, the generic methodology calibrates the inputs of the wind reconstruction algorithms rather than their outputs. This report...... presents the calibration procedures and results of the ZephIR Dual Mode lidar unit 351. The calibration was performed at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines, Høvsøre, Denmark. The methods to assess line-of-sight velocity uncertainties are detailed together with an example of how to derive reconstructed...

  1. Cross calibration of IRS-P4 OCM satellite sensor

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Naik, P.; Nayak, S.R.

    The cross calibration of ocean color satellite sensor, IRS-P4 OCM using the radiative transfer code, with SeaWiFS as a reference are presented here. Since the bands of IRS-P4 OCM are identical to those of SeaWiFS and SeaWiFS has been continuously...

  2. High-dose secondary calibration laboratory accreditation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, J.C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    There is a need for high-dose secondary calibration laboratories to serve the multi-billion dollar radiation processing industry. This need is driven by the desires of industry for less costly calibrations and faster calibration-cycle response time. Services needed include calibration irradiations of routine processing dosimeters and the supply of reference standard transfer dosimeters for irradiation in the production processing facility. In order to provide measurement quality assurance and to demonstrate consistency with national standards, the high-dose secondary laboratories would be accredited by means of an expansion of an existing National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program. A laboratory performance criteria document is under development to implement the new program.

  3. Precision Measurement and Calibration. Volume 1. Statistical Concepts and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-02-01

    lengths of the x-intervals over which they ac- obtained simply by plotting the lines y = 0, x crue , i.e., if u!. = (x, - x,_1 ) ul, then the best and y...statistics, through probability theory, the game of Crown and Anchor, the design of sampling schemes, production quality control, correlation and ranking

  4. An auto-calibration procedure for empirical solar radiation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojanowski, J.S.; Donatelli, Marcello; Skidmore, A.K.; Vrieling, A.

    2013-01-01

    Solar radiation data are an important input for estimating evapotranspiration and modelling crop growth. Direct measurement of solar radiation is now carried out in most European countries, but the network of measuring stations is too sparse for reliable interpolation of measured values. Instead of

  5. An orientation calibration procedure for two acoustic vector sensor configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Bree, H.E. de; Yntema, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensors can be used for far field sound source localization, offering an alternative to far field beamforming. These sensors are able to measure the 3D acoustic particle velocity vector and the scalar value sound pressure. Two sensor configurations exist. The USP probe is based upon

  6. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards.

  7. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, R. A.; Islamy, M. R. F.; Munir, M. M.; Latief, H.; Irsyam, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM.

  8. Optical calibration of SNO +

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leming, Edward; SNO+ Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Situated 2 km underground in Sudbury, Northern Ontario, the SNO + detector consists of an acrylic sphere 12 m in diameter containing 780 tons of target mass, surrounded by approximately 9,500 PMTs. For SNO, this target mass was heavy water, however the change to SNO + is defined by the change of this target mass to a novel scintillator. With the lower energy threshold, low intrinsic radioactivity levels and the best shielding against muons and cosmogenic activation of all existing neutrino experiments, SNO + will be sensitive to exciting new physics. The experiment will be studying solar, reactor, super nova and geo-neutrinos, though the main purpose of SNO + is the search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of Te-130. To meet the requirements imposed by the physics on detector performance, a detailed optical calibration is needed. Source deployment must be kept to a minimum and eliminated if possible, in order to meet the stringent radiopurity requirements. This led to the development of the Embedded LED/laser Light Injection Entity (ELLIE) system. This talk provides a summary of the upgrades to from SNO to SNO +, discussing the requirements on and methods of optical calibration, focusing on the deployed laserball and ELLIE system.

  9. Leveraging microwave polarization information for calibration of a land data assimilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    This letter contributes a new approach to calibrating a tau-omega radiative transfer model coupled to a land surface model with low frequency (< 10 GHz) microwave brightness temperature (TB) observations. The problem of calibrating this system is generally poorlyposed because various parameter combi...

  10. Assessment of Radiographic Image Quality by Visual Examination of Neutron Radiographs of the Calibration Fuel Pin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    of a calibration fuel pin. The radiographs were made by the direct, transfer and tracketch methods using different film recording materials. These neutron radiographs of the calibration fuel pin were used for the assessement of radiographic image quality. This was done by visual examination of the radiographs...... and assessing their radiographic image quality on an arbitrary scale....

  11. Hot-wire calibration in subsonic/transonic flow regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagabushana, K. A.; Ash, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    A different approach for calibrating hot-wires, which simplifies the calibration procedure and reduces the tunnel run-time by an order of magnitude was sought. In general, it is accepted that the directly measurable quantities in any flow are velocity, density, and total temperature. Very few facilities have the capability of varying the total temperature over an adequate range. However, if the overheat temperature parameter, a(sub w), is used to calibrate the hot-wire then the directly measurable quantity, voltage, will be a function of the flow variables and the overheat parameter i.e., E = f(u,p,a(sub w), T(sub w)) where a(sub w) will contain the needed total temperature information. In this report, various methods of evaluating sensitivities with different dependent and independent variables to calibrate a 3-Wire hot-wire probe using a constant temperature anemometer (CTA) in subsonic/transonic flow regimes is presented. The advantage of using a(sub w) as the independent variable instead of total temperature, t(sub o), or overheat temperature parameter, tau, is that while running a calibration test it is not necessary to know the recovery factor, the coefficients in a wire resistance to temperature relationship for a given probe. It was deduced that the method employing the relationship E = f (u,p,a(sub w)) should result in the most accurate calibration of hot wire probes. Any other method would require additional measurements. Also this method will allow calibration and determination of accurate temperature fluctuation information even in atmospheric wind tunnels where there is no ability to obtain any temperature sensitivity information at present. This technique greatly simplifies the calibration process for hot-wires, provides the required calibration information needed in obtaining temperature fluctuations, and reduces both the tunnel run-time and the test matrix required to calibrate hotwires. Some of the results using the above techniques are presented

  12. Calibration of the125I-induced x-ray fluorescence spectrometry-based system of in vivo bone strontium determinations using hydroxyapatite as a phantom material: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Eric; Pejović-Milić, Ana

    2017-06-01

    The calibration of in vivo x-ray fluorescence systems of bone strontium quantification, based on 125 I excitation, is dependent on a coherent normalization procedure. Application of this procedure with the use of plaster of Paris (poP) as a phantom material requires the application of a coherent conversion factor (CCF) to make the calibration functions transferable between the phantom material and human bone. In this work we evaluate, with the use of Monte Carlo simulation, the potential benefit of employing a newly developed hydroxyapatite phantom material into the calibration protocol. Simulations being performed on bare bone phantoms, as the emission spectrum in this case is equivalent to an emission spectrum of an adequately corrected measurement for soft tissue attenuation of emitted strontium signal. We report that the application of hydroxyapatite phantoms does in fact remove the need for a coherent correction factor (CCF). The newly developed phantoms can thus be used for the calibration of in vivo bone strontium systems removing one step of the calibration protocol. Calibration is, however, limited to cases in which the concentration is relative to the amount of calcium in the specimen, which is, the most useful quantity in a clinical sense. Determining concentrations on a per-mass-of-material basis, that is, a concentration not normalized to the calcium content of the phantom/bone, results in large biases in estimated bone strontium content. The use of an HAp phantom material was found to remove the need for a CCF. It was also found that in the case of an incomplete conversion ratio when preparing the phantom material that there would be little effect on the differential coherent cross-section and thereby the coherent normalization-based calibration protocol.

  13. On chromatic and geometrical calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folm-Hansen, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The main subject of the present thesis is different methods for the geometrical and chromatic calibration of cameras in various environments. For the monochromatic issues of the calibration we present the acquisition of monochrome images, the classic monochrome aberrations and the various sources...... to design calibration targets for both geometrical and chromatic calibration are described. We present some possible systematical errors on the detection of the objects in the calibration targets, if viewed in a non orthogonal angle, if the intensities are uneven or if the image blurring is uneven. Finally...... of non-uniformity of the illumination of the image plane. Only the image deforming aberrations and the non-uniformity of illumination are included in the calibration models. The topics of the pinhole camera model and the extension to the Direct Linear Transform (DLT) are described. It is shown how...

  14. Satellite imager calibration and validation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vhengani, L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available and Validation Lufuno Vhengani*, Minette Lubbe, Derek Griffith and Meena Lysko Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Defence Peace Safety and Security, Pretoria, South Africa E-mail: * lvhengani@csir.co.za Abstract: The success or failure... sensor designs incorporate onboard calibration instruments to facilitate post-launch characterisation. However, on-board calibrators are also susceptible to degradation over time. Therefore, post-launch calibration is made possible by taking in...

  15. On chromatic and geometrical calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Folm-Hansen, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The main subject of the present thesis is different methods for the geometrical and chromatic calibration of cameras in various environments. For the monochromatic issues of the calibration we present the acquisition of monochrome images, the classic monochrome aberrations and the various sources of non-uniformity of the illumination of the image plane. Only the image deforming aberrations and the non-uniformity of illumination are included in the calibration models. The topics of the pinhole...

  16. Radiological Calibration and Standards Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL maintains a state-of-the-art Radiological Calibration and Standards Laboratory on the Hanford Site at Richland, Washington. Laboratory staff provide expertise...

  17. SURF Model Calibration Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-10

    SURF and SURFplus are high explosive reactive burn models for shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves. They are engineering models motivated by the ignition & growth concept of high spots and for SURFplus a second slow reaction for the energy release from carbon clustering. A key feature of the SURF model is that there is a partial decoupling between model parameters and detonation properties. This enables reduced sets of independent parameters to be calibrated sequentially for the initiation and propagation regimes. Here we focus on a methodology for tting the initiation parameters to Pop plot data based on 1-D simulations to compute a numerical Pop plot. In addition, the strategy for tting the remaining parameters for the propagation regime and failure diameter is discussed.

  18. RX130 Robot Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugal, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In order to create precision magnets for an experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a new reverse engineering method has been proposed that uses the magnetic scalar potential to solve for the currents necessary to produce the desired field. To make the magnet it is proposed to use a copper coated G10 form, upon which a drill, mounted on a robotic arm, will carve wires. The accuracy required in the manufacturing of the wires exceeds nominal robot capabilities. However, due to the rigidity as well as the precision servo motor and harmonic gear drivers, there are robots capable of meeting this requirement with proper calibration. Improving the accuracy of an RX130 to be within 35 microns (the accuracy necessary of the wires) is the goal of this project. Using feedback from a displacement sensor, or camera and inverse kinematics it is possible to achieve this accuracy.

  19. Measurement quality assurance for beta particle calibrations at NIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, C.G.; Pruitt, J.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Standardized beta-particle fields have been established in an international standard and have been adopted for use in several U.S. dosimeter and instrument testing standards. Calibration methods and measurement quality assurance procedures employed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for beta-particle calibrations in these reference fields are discussed. The calibration facility including the NIST-automated extrapolation ionization chamber is described, and some sample results of calibrations are shown. Methods for establishing and maintaining traceability to NIST of secondary laboratories are discussed. Currently, there are problems in finding a good method for routine testing of traceability to NIST. Some examples of past testing methods are given and solutions to this problem are proposed.

  20. A new method for thread calibration on coordinate measuring machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmignato, Simone; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    portions with corresponding paths on a calibrated sphere. The feasibility of applying the method to calibrate a parallel thread gauge with respect to all the relevant thread parameters was demonstrated experimentally using a precision CMM. Application of the comparator approach as described in ISO 15530......CIRP Annals – Paper proposal temporary reference: P15. This paper presents a new method for the calibration of thread gauges on coordinate measuring machines. The procedure involves scanning of thread profiles using a needle-like probe, achieving traceability by substitution of different thread......-3 gave measuring uncertainties comparable to the values from usual calibration methods on dedicated equipment, e.g. a measuring uncertainty of 1.5 µm was achieved for measurement of the pitch, and 2-2.5 µm for diameter measurements....

  1. Absolute calibration of a multilayer-based XUV diagnostic

    CERN Document Server

    Stuik, R; Tümmler, J; Bijkerk, F

    2002-01-01

    A portable, universal narrowband XUV diagnostic suitable for calibration of various XUV light sources, was built, tested and fully calibrated. The diagnostic allows measurement of the absolute XUV energy and average power in two selected wavelength bands, at 11.4 and 13.4 nm. In addition, the pulse-to-pulse and long-term XUV stability of the source can be assessed, as well as the contamination of multilayer XUV optics exposed to the source. This paper describes the full calibration procedure: all optical elements were calibrated at the wavelength of operation by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the storage ring Bessy II, a full analysis of geometrical factors was done, and the influence of the spectral emissivity of the source on the calibration was analyzed in detail. The calibration was performed both for the centroid wavelength as for the full bandwidth of the diagnostic. The total uncertainty in the absolute calibration allowed measurement of source characteristics with an uncertainty of less than...

  2. Marsis Calibration Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, R.; Safaeinili, A.; Kofman, W.; Picardi, G.

    MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding) is the first of a new generation of radio sounders. MARSIS will be flown on the ESA Mars Express spacecraft. It will arrive at Mars in early 2004 for a two-year mission. MAR- SIS is the result of an international collaboration between NASA, the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and European Space Agency (ESA), is designed to sense planets in- terior to a depth of up to 5 km. MARSISS main objective is to search for water if it exists in liquid form under the surface. It will also attempt to map and characterize the subsurface geological structure of Mars, which is hidden under a layer of surface dust. In addition to its subsurface exploration goals, MARSIS will study the ionosphere of Mars providing the most extensive amount of data on Martian ionosphere to date. One of the main challenges of MARSIS is the calibration of the sounder instrument. The main objective of MARSIS is to probe the subsurface of Mars using low fre- quency radio waves and provide science data related to the electromagnetic behavior of the surface and subsurface. However, the sounder data is impacted by the instru- ment response and other environmental factors such as the ionosphere, Mars magnetic field and surface clutter. Removal from the scientific data of these effects will involve testing on the ground before flight and data acquisition after Mars orbit insertion. Re- moval of the effects of surface clutter will use avail-able digital terrain maps of Mars provided by the MGS Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) team. This talk will highlight the calibration activities for MARSIS.

  3. Calibration of high-heat-flux sensors in a solar furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestrín, J.; Rodríguez-Alonso, M.; Rodríguez, J.; Cañadas, I.; Barbero, F. J.; Langley, L. W.; Barnes, A.

    2006-12-01

    The most common sensors used for the measurement of high solar irradiance are the Gardon gauges, which are usually calibrated using a black body at a certain temperature as the radiant source. This calibration procedure is assumed to produce a systematic error when solar irradiance measurements are taken using these sensors. This paper demonstrates a calorimetric method for calibrating these high-heat-flux gauges in a solar furnace. This procedure has enabled these sensors to be calibrated under concentrated solar radiation at higher irradiances under non-laboratory conditions in the CIEMAT solar furnace at the Plataforma Solar de Almería. Working at higher irradiances has allowed the uncertainty in the calibration constant of these sensors to be reduced. This work experimentally confirms the predicted systematic errors committed when measuring high solar irradiances using Gardon sensors calibrated with a black body.

  4. 12 CFR 611.501 - Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures. 611.501 Section 611.501 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ORGANIZATION Transfer of Authorities § 611.501 Procedures. (a) The boards of directors of a bank and an association which seek to transfer authorities may...

  5. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  6. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Ahn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1 A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2 To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4. Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  7. Field study of lyophilised plasmas for local prothrombin time calibration in The Netherlands.

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Besselaar, A M

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of a lyophilised calibrant plasma procedure on the international normalised ratio (INR) and its interlaboratory variation. METHODS: INR equivalent values were assigned to five lyophilised plasmas (one from normal donors and four from coumarin treated patients) by a reference laboratory using three calibrated thromboplastin reagents. The calibrant plasmas and five artificial control blood specimens were mailed to 44 Dutch laboratories for prothrombin time (PT) determi...

  8. A critical comparison of systematic calibration protocols for activated sludge models: a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Gürkan; Van Hulle, Stijn W H; De Pauw, Dirk J W; van Griensven, Ann; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2005-07-01

    Modelling activated sludge systems has gained an increasing momentum after the introduction of activated sludge models (ASMs) in 1987. Application of dynamic models for full-scale systems requires essentially a calibration of the chosen ASM to the case under study. Numerous full-scale model applications have been performed so far which were mostly based on ad hoc approaches and expert knowledge. Further, each modelling study has followed a different calibration approach: e.g. different influent wastewater characterization methods, different kinetic parameter estimation methods, different selection of parameters to be calibrated, different priorities within the calibration steps, etc. In short, there was no standard approach in performing the calibration study, which makes it difficult, if not impossible, to (1) compare different calibrations of ASMs with each other and (2) perform internal quality checks for each calibration study. To address these concerns, systematic calibration protocols have recently been proposed to bring guidance to the modeling of activated sludge systems and in particular to the calibration of full-scale models. In this contribution four existing calibration approaches (BIOMATH, HSG, STOWA and WERF) will be critically discussed using a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis. It will also be assessed in what way these approaches can be further developed in view of further improving the quality of ASM calibration. In this respect, the potential of automating some steps of the calibration procedure by use of mathematical algorithms is highlighted.

  9. The Impact of Indoor and Outdoor Radiometer Calibration on Solar Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-07-01

    Accurate solar radiation data sets are critical to reducing the expenses associated with mitigating performance risk for solar energy conversion systems, and they help utility planners and grid system operators understand the impacts of solar resource variability. The accuracy of solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on the instrument performance specification, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of calibration methodologies and the resulting calibration responsivities provided by radiometric calibration service providers such as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and manufacturers of radiometers. Some of these radiometers are calibrated indoors, and some are calibrated outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodology, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from these radiometers. This study investigates calibration responsivities provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The reference radiometer calibrations are traceable to the World Radiometric Reference. These different methods of calibration demonstrated 1% to 2% differences in solar irradiance measurement. Analyzing these values will ultimately assist in determining the uncertainties of the radiometer data and will assist in developing consensus on a standard for calibration.

  10. 40 CFR 86.221-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86.221-94 Section 86.221-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.221-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer...

  11. Ambient Light Calibration of a Scanning Slope Sensor,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-26

    This paper outlines a procedure developed to calibrate a laser-based water surface slope sensor against ambient light variations. An analysis of the...optical position sensor used in the system indicates how variations in the ambient light intensity cause shifts in the illumination pattern centroid

  12. Generic System for Remote Testing and Calibration of Measuring Instruments: Security Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčević, M.; Hegeduš, H.; Golub, M.

    2010-01-01

    Testing and calibration of laboratory instruments and reference standards is a routine activity and is a resource and time consuming process. Since many of the modern instruments include some communication interfaces, it is possible to create a remote calibration system. This approach addresses a wide range of possible applications and permits to drive a number of different devices. On the other hand, remote calibration process involves a number of security issues due to recommendations specified in standard ISO/IEC 17025, since it is not under total control of the calibration laboratory personnel who will sign the calibration certificate. This approach implies that the traceability and integrity of the calibration process directly depends on the collected measurement data. The reliable and secure remote control and monitoring of instruments is a crucial aspect of internet-enabled calibration procedure.

  13. Field calibration of cup anemometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L.; Jensen, G.; Hansen, A.

    2001-01-01

    An outdoor calibration facility for cup anemometers, where the signals from 10 anemometers of which at least one is a reference can be can be recorded simultaneously, has been established. The results are discussed with special emphasis on the statisticalsignificance of the calibration expressions...

  14. 3D-Calibration for IMU of the Strapdown Inertial Navigation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Avrutov V.V.; Geraimchuk M.D.; Xiangming Xing

    2017-01-01

    A new calibration method for Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) of Strapdown Iner-tial Navigation Systems was presented. IMU has been composed of accelerometers, gyroscopes and a circuit of signal processing. Normally, a rate transfer test and multi-position tests are us-ing for IMU calibration. The new calibration method is based on whole angle rotation or finite rotation. In fact it’s suggested to turn over IMU around three axes simultaneously. In order to solve the equation of calibration, it...

  15. Receiver calibration and the nonlinearity parameter measurement of thick solid samples with diffraction and attenuation corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Barnard, Daniel; Cho, Sungjong; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents analytical and experimental techniques for accurate determination of the nonlinearity parameter (β) in thick solid samples. When piezoelectric transducers are used for β measurements, the receiver calibration is required to determine the transfer function from which the absolute displacement can be calculated. The measured fundamental and second harmonic displacement amplitudes should be modified to account for beam diffraction and material absorption. All these issues are addressed in this study and the proposed technique is validated through the β measurements of thick solid samples. A simplified self-reciprocity calibration procedure for a broadband receiver is described. The diffraction and attenuation corrections for the fundamental and second harmonics are explicitly derived. Aluminum alloy samples in five different thicknesses (4, 6, 8, 10, 12cm) are prepared and β measurements are made using the finite amplitude, through-transmission method. The effects of diffraction and attenuation corrections on β measurements are systematically investigated. When diffraction and attenuation corrections are all properly made, the variation of β between different thickness samples is found to be less than 3.2%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Embodying, calibrating and caring for a local model of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Jonas; Hillersdal, Line

    and technologies herein lead to the emergence of what we propose to be local models of obesity. Describing the emergence of local models of obesity we show how a specific model is being cared for, calibrated and embodied by research staff as well as research subjects and how interdisciplinary obesity research...... is an ongoing process of configuring but also extending beyond already established models of obesity. We argue that an articulation of such practices of local care, embodiment and calibration are crucial for the appreciation, evaluation and transferability of interdisciplinary obesity research....

  17. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP CIRCUIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, V.L.; Carstensen, H.K.

    1959-11-24

    An improved time calibrated sweep circuit is presented, which extends the range of usefulness of conventional oscilloscopes as utilized for time calibrated display applications in accordance with U. S. Patent No. 2,832,002. Principal novelty resides in the provision of a pair of separate signal paths, each of which is phase and amplitude adjustable, to connect a high-frequency calibration oscillator to the output of a sawtooth generator also connected to the respective horizontal deflection plates of an oscilloscope cathode ray tube. The amplitude and phase of the calibration oscillator signals in the two signal paths are adjusted to balance out feedthrough currents capacitively coupled at high frequencies of the calibration oscillator from each horizontal deflection plate to the vertical plates of the cathode ray tube.

  18. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  19. Digital camera self-calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Clive S.

    Over the 25 years since the introduction of analytical camera self-calibration there has been a revolution in close-range photogrammetric image acquisition systems. High-resolution, large-area 'digital' CCD sensors have all but replaced film cameras. Throughout the period of this transition, self-calibration models have remained essentially unchanged. This paper reviews the application of analytical self-calibration to digital cameras. Computer vision perspectives are touched upon, the quality of self-calibration is discussed, and an overview is given of each of the four main sources of departures from collinearity in CCD cameras. Practical issues are also addressed and experimental results are used to highlight important characteristics of digital camera self-calibration.

  20. Calibration of well-type ionization chambers; Calibracao de camaras de ionizacao do tipo poco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, C.F.E.; Leite, S.P.; Pires, E.J.; Magalhaes, L.A.G.; David, M.G.; Almeida, C.E. de, E-mail: cfealves@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Di Prinzio, R. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the methodology developed by the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas and presently in use for determining of the calibration coefficient for well-type chambers used in the dosimetry of {sup 192}Ir high dose rate sources. Uncertainty analysis involving the calibration procedure are discussed. (author)

  1. Balanced calibration of resonant piezoelectric RL shunts with quasi-static background flexibility correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Krenk, Steen

    2015-01-01

    Resonant RL shunt circuits constitute a robust approach to piezoelectric damping, where the performance with respect to damping of flexible structures requires a precise calibration of the corresponding circuit components. The balanced calibration procedure of the present paper is based on equal...

  2. Hydrological processes and model representation: impact of soft data on calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.G. Arnold; M.A. Youssef; H. Yen; M.J. White; A.Y. Sheshukov; A.M. Sadeghi; D.N. Moriasi; J.L. Steiner; Devendra Amatya; R.W. Skaggs; E.B. Haney; J. Jeong; M. Arabi; P.H. Gowda

    2015-01-01

    Hydrologic and water quality models are increasingly used to determine the environmental impacts of climate variability and land management. Due to differing model objectives and differences in monitored data, there are currently no universally accepted procedures for model calibration and validation in the literature. In an effort to develop accepted model calibration...

  3. Combined calibration and sensitivity analysis for a water quality model of the Biebrza River, Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perk, van der M.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    1995-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the error in results of a water quality model of the Biebrza River, Poland, due to uncertainties in calibrated model parameters. The procedure used in this study combines calibration and sensitivity analysis. Finally,the model was validated to test the model

  4. Calibration and Industrial Application of Instrument for Surface Mapping based on AFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kofod, Niels; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2002-01-01

    .e., measurement and tiling of adjacent areas. A calibration procedure was proposed involving a glass artefact featuring chromium lines with different pitch distances, giving the possibility to identify the exact position of single surface areas. The calibrated system was used to surface map a hip joint prosthesis...

  5. Digital breast tomosynthesis geometry calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinying; Mainprize, James G.; Kempston, Michael P.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2007-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D x-ray technique for imaging the breast. The x-ray tube, mounted on a gantry, moves in an arc over a limited angular range around the breast while 7-15 images are acquired over a period of a few seconds. A reconstruction algorithm is used to create a 3D volume dataset from the projection images. This procedure reduces the effects of tissue superposition, often responsible for degrading the quality of projection mammograms. This may help improve sensitivity of cancer detection, while reducing the number of false positive results. For DBT, images are acquired at a set of gantry rotation angles. The image reconstruction process requires several geometrical factors associated with image acquisition to be known accurately, however, vibration, encoder inaccuracy, the effects of gravity on the gantry arm and manufacturing tolerances can produce deviations from the desired acquisition geometry. Unlike cone-beam CT, in which a complete dataset is acquired (500+ projections over 180°), tomosynthesis reconstruction is challenging in that the angular range is narrow (typically from 20°-45°) and there are fewer projection images (~7-15). With such a limited dataset, reconstruction is very sensitive to geometric alignment. Uncertainties in factors such as detector tilt, gantry angle, focal spot location, source-detector distance and source-pivot distance can produce several artifacts in the reconstructed volume. To accurately and efficiently calculate the location and angles of orientation of critical components of the system in DBT geometry, a suitable phantom is required. We have designed a calibration phantom for tomosynthesis and developed software for accurate measurement of the geometric parameters of a DBT system. These have been tested both by simulation and experiment. We will present estimates of the precision available with this technique for a prototype DBT system.

  6. Magnetic suspension dynamic calibration device of measurement system for dynamic characteristics of sliding bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wu; Zhao, Zhiming; Cai, Le; Yuan, Xiaoyang

    2017-10-01

    A measurement system error is a key factor that disturbs the identification precision of sliding bearing's dynamic characteristic coefficients. The transfer process and influence rule of errors from a measurement system to dynamic characteristic coefficients are analyzed by solving the dynamic characteristic measurement model. In order to ensure that the identification errors are no more than 40%, the amplitude error and phase error of the transfer function of the measurement system should be controlled within 10% and 1°, respectively. A novel magnetic suspension calibration method of the measurement system, which generates a vibration through a noncontact electromagnetic force rather than a traditional contact force, is proposed. A magnetic dynamic calibration device is developed. The experiment results show that the device can make dynamic calibration at different frequencies successfully, which is favorable to improve the controllability of the calibration process and the stability of calibration results.

  7. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Against a background of rather mixed evidence about transfer pricing practices in multinational enterprises (MNEs) and varying attitudes on the part of tax authorities, this paper explores how multiple aims in transfer pricing can be pursued across four different transfer pricing regimes. A MNE h...

  8. Photodigitizing procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, P. D.; Gottbrath, J. H.

    1984-02-01

    This report documents procedures and programs for efficiently running the Photo Digitizing System at the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory. Procedures have been tested and have been found to be effective. Any future acquisitions of programs or changes to current programs should be incorporated in these procedures. On-going research programs use high speed instrumentation cameras to record the motion of test subjects during biodynamic experiments. The films are digitized and the 3-dimensional motion is reconstructed and analyzed. Experimental research is performed to determine the effects of aircraft crashes, ship motion, vibration, aircraft ejection and parachute opening forces on the health and performance of Navy personnel.

  9. Standard practice for torque calibration of testing machines and devices

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures and requirements for the calibration of torque for static and quasi-static torque capable testing machines or devices. These may, or may not, have torque indicating systems and include those devices used for the calibration of hand torque tools. Testing machines may be calibrated by one of the three following methods or combination thereof: 1.1.1 Use of standard weights and lever arms. 1.1.2 Use of elastic torque measuring devices. 1.1.3 Use of elastic force measuring devices and lever arms. 1.1.4 Any of the methods require a specific uncertainty of measurement and a traceability derived from national standards of mass and length. 1.2 The procedures of 1.1.1, 1.1.2, and 1.1.3 apply to the calibration of the torque-indicating systems associated with the testing machine, such as a scale, dial, marked or unmarked recorder chart, digital display, etc. In all cases the buyer/owner/user must designate the torque-indicating system(s) to be calibrated and included in the repor...

  10. Tendon lengthening and transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitoussi, F; Bachy, M

    2015-02-01

    Tendon lengthening and transfer are usually indicated for certain neuromuscular disorders, peripheral or central nerve injury, congenital disorder or direct traumatic or degenerative musculotendinous lesion. In musculotendinous lengthening, technique depends on muscle anatomy, degree of correction required, and the need to avoid excessive loss of force. Lengthening within the muscle or aponeurosis is stable. In the tendon, however, it may provide greater gain but is not stable and requires postoperative immobilization to avoid excessive lengthening. Tendon transfer consists in displacing a muscle's tendon insertion in order to restore function. The muscle to be transferred is chosen according to strength, architecture and course, contraction timing, intended direction, synergy and the joint moment arm to be restored. Functions to be restored have to be prioritized, and alternatives to transfer should be identified. The principles of tendon transfer require preoperative assessment of the quality of the tissue through which the transfer is to pass and of the suppleness of the joints concerned. During the procedure, transfer tension should be optimized and the neurovascular bundle should be protected. The method of fixation, whether tendon-to-bone or tendon-to-tendon suture, should be planned according to local conditions and the surgeon's experience. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. NIRS prediction of the feed value of temperate forages: efficacy of four calibration strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andueza, D; Picard, F; Jestin, M; Andrieu, J; Baumont, R

    2011-05-01

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) of 924 fresh temperate forages were used to develop calibration models for chemical composition - crude ash (CA) and crude protein (CP) - organic matter digestibility (OMD) and voluntary intake (VI). We used 110 samples to assess the models. Four calibration strategies for determining forage quality were compared: (i) species-specific calibration, (ii) family-specific calibration, (iii) a global procedure and (iv) a local approach. Forage calibration data sets displayed CA values ranging from 52 to 205 g/kg of dry matter (DM), CP values from 50 to 280 g/kg DM, OMD values from 0.48 to 0.85 g/g and VI values from 22.5 to 115.2 g DM/kg metabolic body weight (BW0.75). The calibration models performed well for all the variables except for VI. For CA, local procedure showed lower standard error of prediction (SEP) than species-specific, family-specific or global models. For CP, the calibration models all showed similar SEP values (11.13, 11.08, 11.38 and 11.34 g/kg DM for species-specific, family-specific, global and local approaches). For OMD, the local procedure gave a similar SEP (0.024 g/g) to specific species and global procedures (0.027 g/g) and a lower SEP than the family-specific approach (0.028 g/g). For VI, the local approach and species-specific calibration showed lower SEP (7.08 and 7.16 g/kg BW0.75) than the broad-based calibrations (8.09 and 8.34 g/kg BW0.75 for family-specific model and global procedure, respectively). Local calibration may thus offer a practical way to develop robust universal equations for animal response determinations.

  12. Jet energy calibration in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, Doug

    A correct energy calibration for jets is essential to the success of the ATLAS experi- ment. In this thesis I study a method for deriving an in situ jet energy calibration for the ATLAS detector. In particular, I show the applicability of the missing transverse energy projection fraction method. This method is shown to set the correct mean energy for jets. Pileup effects due to the high luminosities at ATLAS are also stud- ied. I study the correlations in lateral distributions of pileup energy, as well as the luminosity dependence of the in situ calibration metho

  13. Calibration and testing of wide-field UV instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H. U.; Mende, S. B.; Loicq, J.; Habraken, S.

    2017-06-01

    As with all optical systems the calibration of wide-field ultraviolet (UV) systems includes three main areas: sensitivity, imaging quality, and imaging capability. The one thing that makes UV calibrations difficult is the need for working in vacuum substantially extending the required time and effort compared to visible systems. In theory a ray tracing and characterization of each individual component of the optical system (mirrors, windows, and grating) should provide the transmission efficiency of the combined system. However, potentially unknown effects (contamination, misalignment, and measurement errors) can make the final error too large and unacceptable for most applications. Therefore, it is desirable to test and measure the optical properties of the whole system in vacuum and compare the overall response to the response of a calibrated photon detector. A proper comparison then allows the quantification of individual sources of uncertainty and ensures that the whole instrument performance is within acceptable tolerances or pinpoints which parts fail to meet requirements. Based on the experience with the IMAGE Spectrographic Imager, the Wide-band Imaging Camera, and the ICON Far Ultraviolet instruments, we discuss the steps and procedures for the proper radiometric sensitivity and passband calibration, spot size, imaging distortions, flatfield, and field of view determination.Plain Language SummaryAs with all optical systems the calibration of wide-field ultraviolet (UV) systems includes three main areas: sensitivity, imaging quality, and imaging capability. The one thing that makes UV calibrations difficult is the need for working in vacuum substantially extending the required time and effort compared to visible systems. Based on the experience with the IMAGE Spectrographic Imager, the Wide-band Imaging Camera (WIC), and the ICON Far Ultraviolet instruments, we discuss the steps and procedures for the proper radiometric sensitivity and pass-band calibration

  14. Articulated Arm Coordinate Measuring Machine Calibration by Laser Tracker Multilateration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Santolaria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure for the calibration of an articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM is presented in this paper. First, a self-calibration algorithm of four laser trackers (LTs is developed. The spatial localization of a retroreflector target, placed in different positions within the workspace, is determined by means of a geometric multilateration system constructed from the four LTs. Next, a nonlinear optimization algorithm for the identification procedure of the AACMM is explained. An objective function based on Euclidean distances and standard deviations is developed. This function is obtained from the captured nominal data (given by the LTs used as a gauge instrument and the data obtained by the AACMM and compares the measured and calculated coordinates of the target to obtain the identified model parameters that minimize this difference. Finally, results show that the procedure presented, using the measurements of the LTs as a gauge instrument, is very effective by improving the AACMM precision.

  15. Articulated arm coordinate measuring machine calibration by laser tracker multilateration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolaria, Jorge; Majarena, Ana C; Samper, David; Brau, Agustín; Velázquez, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    A new procedure for the calibration of an articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM) is presented in this paper. First, a self-calibration algorithm of four laser trackers (LTs) is developed. The spatial localization of a retroreflector target, placed in different positions within the workspace, is determined by means of a geometric multilateration system constructed from the four LTs. Next, a nonlinear optimization algorithm for the identification procedure of the AACMM is explained. An objective function based on Euclidean distances and standard deviations is developed. This function is obtained from the captured nominal data (given by the LTs used as a gauge instrument) and the data obtained by the AACMM and compares the measured and calculated coordinates of the target to obtain the identified model parameters that minimize this difference. Finally, results show that the procedure presented, using the measurements of the LTs as a gauge instrument, is very effective by improving the AACMM precision.

  16. Analysis of Nigeria research reactor-1 thermal power calibration methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agbo, Sunday Arome; Ahmed, Yusuf Aminu; Ewa, Ita Okon; Jibrin, Yahaya [Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria (Nigeria)

    2016-06-15

    This paper analyzes the accuracy of the methods used in calibrating the thermal power of Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1), a low-power miniature neutron source reactor located at the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. The calibration was performed at three different power levels: low power (3.6 kW), half power (15 kW), and full power (30 kW). Two methods were used in the calibration, namely, slope and heat balance methods. The thermal power obtained by the heat balance method at low power, half power, and full power was 3.7 ± 0.2 kW, 15.2 ± 1.2 kW, and 30.7 ± 2.5 kW, respectively. The thermal power obtained by the slope method at half power and full power was 15.8 ± 0.7 kW and 30.2 ± 1.5 kW, respectively. It was observed that the slope method is more accurate with deviations of 4% and 5% for calibrations at half and full power, respectively, although the linear fit (slope method) on average temperature-rising rates during the thermal power calibration procedure at low power (3.6 kW) is not fitting. As such, the slope method of power calibration is not suitable at lower power for NIRR-1.

  17. Multiple height calibration artefact for 3D microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Carli, Lorenzo; Eriksen, Rasmus Solmer

    2011-01-01

    A novel artefact for calibration of the height in 3D microscopy is presented. The artefact comprises three steps having a common vertical axis, which allows z-coordinate calibration at different magnifications without requiring repositioning. The artefact is suitable for transferring traceability...... to 3D techniques at the micrometer and nanometer scale, e.g. 3D SEM, confocal microscopes etc. Two different series of samples were fabricated using EDM with three steps of 2–5–7μm, and 20–50–70μm, respectively, from a 3mm diameter carbide wire. The artefact steps were calibrated on a stylus instrument...... according to ISO 5436 and measured on 3D microscopes....

  18. Calibration and monitoring of the ATLAS Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). PMT signals are then digitized at 40~MHz and stored on detector and are only transferred off detector once the first level trigger acceptance has been confirmed. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator b...

  19. Reconstruction and Calibration of Small Radius Jets in the ATLAS Experiment for LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Loch, Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Small radius jets with R = 0.4 are standard tools in ATLAS for physics analysis. They are calibrated using a sequence of Monte Carlo simulation-derived calibrations and corrections followed by in-situ calibrations based on the transverse momentum balance between the probed jets and well-measured reference signals. In this talk the inputs to jet reconstruction in LHC Run 2 comprising calorimeter cell clusters, reconstructed charge particle tracks, and particle flow objects, are discussed together with the jet energy calibration scheme. Selected results from the performance of the procedure and the associated systematic uncertainties are presented.

  20. Calibration model for the MDT chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bagnaia, P; Biebel, O; Bini, C; Borroni, S; Celio, P; Cirilli, M; Curti, M; De Salvo, A; Deile, M; Di Luise, S; Di Mattia, A; Diehl, E; Dimitrov, G; Dubbert, J; Duckeck, G; Falciano, S; Gadomski, S; Gauzzi, P; Groh, M; Hertenberger, R; Hessey, N; Horvat, S; Iodice, M; Kaiser, S; Kortner, O; Kroha, H; Kolos, S; Levin, D; Luminari, L; Martin, B; McKee, S; Merkl, D; Orestano, D; Pasqualucci, E; Petrucci, F; Pontecorvo, L; Potrap, I; Rauscher, F; Rosati, S; Solfaroli Camillocci, E; Spogli, L; Ströhmer, R; Tique Aires Viegas, F; Verducci, M; Vilucchi, E; Van Eldik, N; van Kesteren, Z; von Loeben, J; Woudstra, M; Zhou, B

    2008-01-01

    The calibration procedures defined for the Monitored Drift Tube detectors of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer are reviewed with special emphasis on the model developed and on the data processing. The calibration is based upon track segments reconstructed in the spectrometer, therefore the achievable accuracy depends upon the muon tracks statistics. The calibration parameters have to be produced, validated and made available to be used in reconstruction within one day from the end of the LHC fill. These requirements on the statistics and the latency dictated the development of a dedicated data stream for calibration. The data collection, processing and computing is described.

  1. Geometrical Characterisation of a 2D Laser System and Calibration of a Cross-Grid Encoder by Means of a Self-Calibration Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torralba, Marta; Díaz-Pérez, Lucía C; Valenzuela, Margarita; Albajez, José A; Yagüe-Fabra, José A

    2017-08-31

    This article presents a self-calibration procedure and the experimental results for the geometrical characterisation of a 2D laser system operating along a large working range (50 mm × 50 mm) with submicrometre uncertainty. Its purpose is to correct the geometric errors of the 2D laser system setup generated when positioning the two laser heads and the plane mirrors used as reflectors. The non-calibrated artefact used in this procedure is a commercial grid encoder that is also a measuring instrument. Therefore, the self-calibration procedure also allows the determination of the geometrical errors of the grid encoder, including its squareness error. The precision of the proposed algorithm is tested using virtual data. Actual measurements are subsequently registered, and the algorithm is applied. Once the laser system is characterised, the error of the grid encoder is calculated along the working range, resulting in an expanded submicrometre calibration uncertainty (k = 2) for the X and Y axes. The results of the grid encoder calibration are comparable to the errors provided by the calibration certificate for its main central axes. It is, therefore, possible to confirm the suitability of the self-calibration methodology proposed in this article.

  2. Automatic energy calibration of germanium detectors using fuzzy set theory

    CERN Document Server

    Stezowski, O; Prevost, A; Smith, A G; Wall, R

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of multi-detector arrays, many tasks that are usually performed by physicists, such as energy calibration, become very time consuming. There is therefore a need to develop more and more complex algorithms able to mimic human expertise. Fuzzy logic proposes a theoretical framework to build algorithms that are close to the human way of thinking. In this paper we apply fuzzy set theory in order to develop an automatic procedure for energy calibration. The algorithm, based on fuzzy concepts, has been tested on data taken with the EUROBALL IV gamma-ray array.

  3. Challenges in X-band Weather Radar Data Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Application of weather radar data in urban hydrology is evolving and radar data is now applied for both modelling, analysis and real time control purposes. In these contexts, it is all-important that the radar data well calibrated and adjusted in order to obtain valid quantitative precipitation e...... estimates. This paper compares two calibration procedures for a small marine X-band radar by comparing radar data with rain gauge data. Validation shows a very good consensus with regards to precipitation volumes, but more diverse results on peak rain intensities....

  4. Calibration of windowless photodiode for extreme ultraviolet pulse energy measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav; Frolov, Oleksandr

    2015-12-10

    For energy measurement of extreme ultraviolet pulses, no universal commercially available device is available. Therefore, a co-axial setup of a vacuum photodiode was developed and tested. First its unsuccessful calibration at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA) is mentioned. Then our own single-wavelength (46.9 nm) calibration procedure is described in detail. It is based on tabulated photoemission efficiency and on measured (1) anode collection efficiency, (2) attenuation of Al filters, and (3) attenuation of measuring cables. Some other relevant attenuating factors are also taken into account.

  5. Calibration of "Babyline" RP instruments

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

      If you have old RP instrumentation of the “Babyline” type, as shown in the photo, please contact the Radiation Protection Group (Joffrey Germa, 73171) to have the instrument checked and calibrated. Thank you. Radiation Protection Group

  6. Field calibration of cup anemometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, L.; Jensen, G.; Hansen, A.; Kirkegaard, P.

    2001-01-01

    An outdoor calibration facility for cup anemometers, where the signals from 10 anemometers of which at least one is a reference can be recorded simultaneously, has been established. The results are discussed with special emphasis on the statistical significance of the calibration expressions. It is concluded that the method has the advantage that many anemometers can be calibrated accurately with a minimum of work and cost. The obvious disadvantage is that the calibration of a set of anemometers may take more than one month in order to have wind speeds covering a sufficiently large magnitude range in a wind direction sector where we can be sure that the instruments are exposed to identical, simultaneous wind flows. Another main conclusion is that statistical uncertainty must be carefully evaluated since the individual 10 minute wind-speed averages are not statistically independent. (au)

  7. MAVEN SWEA Calibrated Data Bundle

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This bundle contains fully calibrated electron energy/angle (3D) distributions, pitch angle distributions, and omni-directional energy spectra. Tables of sensitivity...

  8. MAVEN LPW Calibrated Data Bundle

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This bundle contains fully calibrated, science quality data produced by the LPW instrument. The data include spacecraft potential, electric field waveforms and wave...

  9. Using Active Learning for Speeding up Calibration in Simulation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Mucahit; Ergun, Mehmet Ali; Stout, Natasha K; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Craven, Mark; Alagoz, Oguzhan

    2016-07-01

    Most cancer simulation models include unobservable parameters that determine disease onset and tumor growth. These parameters play an important role in matching key outcomes such as cancer incidence and mortality, and their values are typically estimated via a lengthy calibration procedure, which involves evaluating a large number of combinations of parameter values via simulation. The objective of this study is to demonstrate how machine learning approaches can be used to accelerate the calibration process by reducing the number of parameter combinations that are actually evaluated. Active learning is a popular machine learning method that enables a learning algorithm such as artificial neural networks to interactively choose which parameter combinations to evaluate. We developed an active learning algorithm to expedite the calibration process. Our algorithm determines the parameter combinations that are more likely to produce desired outputs and therefore reduces the number of simulation runs performed during calibration. We demonstrate our method using the previously developed University of Wisconsin breast cancer simulation model (UWBCS). In a recent study, calibration of the UWBCS required the evaluation of 378 000 input parameter combinations to build a race-specific model, and only 69 of these combinations produced results that closely matched observed data. By using the active learning algorithm in conjunction with standard calibration methods, we identify all 69 parameter combinations by evaluating only 5620 of the 378 000 combinations. Machine learning methods hold potential in guiding model developers in the selection of more promising parameter combinations and hence speeding up the calibration process. Applying our machine learning algorithm to one model shows that evaluating only 1.49% of all parameter combinations would be sufficient for the calibration. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Results of dark target vicarious calibration using Lake Tahoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, Robert J., Jr.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Santer, Richard P.

    1997-01-01

    The ability to conduct in-flight absolute radiometric calibrations of ocean color sensors will determine their usefulness in the decade to come. On-board calibration systems are often integrated into the overall system design of such sensors and have claimed uncertainly levels from 2-3 percent, but independent means of system calibration are desirable to confirm that such systems are operating properly. Vicarious methods are an attractive means of this verification. Due to the high sensitivity of ocean color sensors, the use for bright reflectance surfaces often results in sensor saturation. Low reflectance targets, such as water bodies, should therefore be used. This paper presents the results of sensitivity studies of the reflectance- and radiance-based approaches when applied to a water target and method uncertainties for calibrations of the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). The paper also present the results of a field campaign which took place at Lake Tahoe in June 1995. This lake represents a typical oligotrophic water body and has the advantage of being located at a high elevation where tropospheric aerosol loading is low. Aircraft-based radiance data and surface measurements of reflectance are sued to calibrate SeaWiFS- simulated bands from Advanced VIsible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data. Atmospheric characterization is obtained using solar extinction measurements, surface-level atmospheric pressure readings, and columnar gaseous absorber amounts at sensor overpass. The measured radiances are transferred to the top of the atmosphere using a radiative transfer code which fully computes the contributions of multiple scattering by the atmosphere. The results are compared to those obtained form a laboratory-based calibration of AVIRIS.

  11. Calibration of passive remote observing optical and microwave instrumentation; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 3-5, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Bruce W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on the calibration of passive remote observing optical and microwave instrumentation are presented. Individual topics addressed include: on-board calibration device for a wide field-of-view instrument, calibration for the medium-resolution imaging spectrometer, cryogenic radiometers and intensity-stabilized lasers for EOS radiometric calibrations, radiometric stability of the Shuttle-borne solar backscatter ultraviolet spectrometer, ratioing radiometer for use with a solar diffuser, requirements of a solar diffuser and measurements of some candidate materials, reflectance stability analysis of Spectralon diffuse calibration panels, stray light effects on calibrations using a solar diffuser, radiometric calibration of SPOT 23 HRVs, surface and aerosol models for use in radiative transfer codes. Also addressed are: calibrated intercepts for solar radiometers used in remote sensor calibration, radiometric calibration of an airborne multispectral scanner, in-flight calibration of a helicopter-mounted Daedalus multispectral scanner, technique for improving the calibration of large-area sphere sources, remote colorimetry and its applications, spatial sampling errors for a satellite-borne scanning radiometer, calibration of EOS multispectral imaging sensors and solar irradiance variability.

  12. Pressures Detector Calibration and Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2156315

    2016-01-01

    This is report of my first and second projects (of 3) in NA61. I did data taking and analysis in order to do calibration of pressure detectors and verified it. I analyzed the data by ROOT software using the C ++ programming language. The first part of my project was determination of calibration factor of pressure sensors. Based on that result, I examined the relation between pressure drop, gas flow rate of in paper filter and its diameter.

  13. Beam Imaging and Luminosity Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081126; Klute, Markus; Medlock, Catherine Aiko

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a method to reconstruct two-dimensional proton bunch densities using vertex distributions accumulated during LHC beam-beam scans. The x-y correlations in the beam shapes are studied and an alternative luminosity calibration technique is introduced. We demonstrate the method on simulated beam-beam scans and estimate the uncertainty on the luminosity calibration associated to the beam-shape reconstruction to be below 1%.

  14. Neutron Imaging Calibration to Measure Void Fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Sharma, Vishaldeep [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Void fraction is an intuitive parameter that describes the fraction of vapor in a two-phase flow. It appears as a key variable in most heat transfer and pressure drop correlations used to design evaporating and condensing heat exchangers, as well as determining charge inventory in refrigeration systems. Void fraction measurement is not straightforward, however, and assumptions on the invasiveness of the measuring technique must be made. Neutron radiography or neutron imaging has the potential to be a truly non-invasive void fraction measuring technique but has until recently only offered qualitative descriptions of two-phase flow, in terms of flow maldistributions, for example. This paper describes the calibration approach necessary to employ neutron imaging to measure steady-state void fraction. Experiments were conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold Guide 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

  15. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; 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Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  16. Calibrating the PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter Using Fits to ADC Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, James; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC), a homogeneous electromagnetic calorimeter located in the forward and backward directions (3.1 < η < 3.9) is being used to measure transverse energy from RHIC Au+Au collisions obtained in 2010. While the detector has been partially calibrated using the reconstruction of neutral pions in an iterative procedure, the calibration constants for some areas of the detector are not converging. In order to improve the initial set of calibration constants, a parameterization of the energy distributions as a function of distance from the beamline (obtained using well calibrated towers) is used to provide initial values to problem towers in the iterative procedure. The work done to produce this parameterization and its effects on the calibration process will be described. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1507841.

  17. A Flexible Calibration Approach for Cameras with Double-Sided Telecentric Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linshen Yao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With their constant perspective and large magnification in the working distance, double-sided telecentric lenses have been widely used in machine-vision applications. This paper puts forward a flexible calibration approach for the double-sided telecentric camera. Based on an orthographic projection model considering the major sources of lens distortions, a two-step calibration procedure is proposed. In this approach, the camera parameters apart from the lens distortions are achieved by a closed-form solution. Then a double non-linear optimization is performed to refine all the parameters, including the distortion coefficients and distortion centre. In addition, to achieve a flexible calibration procedure, the calibration pattern used is a cheap print product rather than a professional customized calibration pattern. Simulation and real-world experiments are performed to validate the performance of the proposed calibration approach. In addition, the comparison experiments between the print calibration pattern and professional calibration pattern are carried out, and the accuracy of calibration results are at the same level.

  18. Input variable selection and calibration data selection for storm water quality regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Siao; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Storm water quality models are useful tools in storm water management. Interest has been growing in analyzing existing data for developing models for urban storm water quality evaluations. It is important to select appropriate model inputs when many candidate explanatory variables are available. Model calibration and verification are essential steps in any storm water quality modeling. This study investigates input variable selection and calibration data selection in storm water quality regression models. The two selection problems are mutually interacted. A procedure is developed in order to fulfil the two selection tasks in order. The procedure firstly selects model input variables using a cross validation method. An appropriate number of variables are identified as model inputs to ensure that a model is neither overfitted nor underfitted. Based on the model input selection results, calibration data selection is studied. Uncertainty of model performances due to calibration data selection is investigated with a random selection method. An approach using the cluster method is applied in order to enhance model calibration practice based on the principle of selecting representative data for calibration. The comparison between results from the cluster selection method and random selection shows that the former can significantly improve performances of calibrated models. It is found that the information content in calibration data is important in addition to the size of calibration data.

  19. Development and validation of a novel approach to the calibration of internal and external threads on coordinate measuring machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmignato, Simone; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Savio, Enrico

    The paper reports on the development and validation of a new experimental method for the traceable measurement of threads on coordinate measuring machines. The calibration procedure involves scanning of thread profiles using a needle-like probe, extracting all the main parameters of the thread...... geometry from this single scanning operation. The procedure was tested and validated by measuring internal and external thread gauges on two different coordinate measuring machines. Experimental investigations are presented and results compared to data from traditional calibration procedure....

  20. Ross procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Sievers, H.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In 1967 Donald Ross introduced the subcoronary Ross procedure consisting of transplantation of the autologous pulmonary valve into aortic position. We describe our 15-year experience in Ross procedures. Methods 576 subcoronary operations have been performed (436 male and 140 female patients); the mean age was 45?11.9 years. (range, 13 to 70 years). The mean follow-up was 7?4.2 years (range, 0 to 16 years). There were 4597 patient years at follow-up with a clinical completeness of...

  1. Camera calibration method of binocular stereo vision based on OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wanzhen; Dong, Xiaona

    2015-10-01

    Camera calibration, an important part of the binocular stereo vision research, is the essential foundation of 3D reconstruction of the spatial object. In this paper, the camera calibration method based on OpenCV (open source computer vision library) is submitted to make the process better as a result of obtaining higher precision and efficiency. First, the camera model in OpenCV and an algorithm of camera calibration are presented, especially considering the influence of camera lens radial distortion and decentering distortion. Then, camera calibration procedure is designed to compute those parameters of camera and calculate calibration errors. High-accurate profile extraction algorithm and a checkboard with 48 corners have also been used in this part. Finally, results of calibration program are presented, demonstrating the high efficiency and accuracy of the proposed approach. The results can reach the requirement of robot binocular stereo vision.

  2. An automatic calibration approach for left ventricular volume assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béatrice, Perrenot; Régis, Vaillant; Philippe, Douek; Rémy, Prost; Françoise, Peyrin; Gérard, Finet

    2007-01-01

    The development of interventional procedures in the catheterisation laboratory drives the introduction of simple, fast and accurate quantification methods. Quantification is used to evaluate the volume of the left ventricle but also for choosing the size of a balloon or a stent during the percutaneous coronary angioplasty procedure. The objective of the calibration procedure is to establish the relation between the true size of the analyzed organ and its apparent size in the image. This calibration step aims at measuring the pixel size in mm. Traditional approach measures a known object on the image, but suffers from several limitations and constraints; in particular, the size of the reference object is often not exactly known. Besides, the therapeutic procedures are done in the continuity of the diagnosis and the physician has a very little amount of time to spend on the determination of the quantitative information like the chosen reference size. A new approach has been proposed [1], allowed by the introduction of the flat-panel technology and modern positioning systems. With the absence of distortion in the image and accurate knowledge of the system geometry, a model can be used to automatically identify the calibration factor using an additional input provided by the operator: the target organ height above the table top. The objective of our study was to estimate this input parameter in the particular case of the Left Ventricle (LV) volume angiographic computation.

  3. Automatic Chessboard Detection for Intrinsic and Extrinsic Camera Parameter Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose María Armingol

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available There are increasing applications that require precise calibration of cameras to perform accurate measurements on objects located within images, and an automatic algorithm would reduce this time consuming calibration procedure. The method proposed in this article uses a pattern similar to that of a chess board, which is found automatically in each image, when no information regarding the number of rows or columns is supplied to aid its detection. This is carried out by means of a combined analysis of two Hough transforms, image corners and invariant properties of the perspective transformation. Comparative analysis with more commonly used algorithms demonstrate the viability of the algorithm proposed, as a valuable tool for camera calibration.

  4. Mathematical properties of numerical inversion for jet calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cukierman, Aviv [Physics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Nachman, Benjamin, E-mail: bnachman@cern.ch [Physics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94704 (United States)

    2017-06-21

    Numerical inversion is a general detector calibration technique that is independent of the underlying spectrum. This procedure is formalized and important statistical properties are presented, using high energy jets at the Large Hadron Collider as an example setting. In particular, numerical inversion is inherently biased and common approximations to the calibrated jet energy tend to over-estimate the resolution. Analytic approximations to the closure and calibrated resolutions are demonstrated to effectively predict the full forms under realistic conditions. Finally, extensions of numerical inversion are presented which can reduce the inherent biases. These methods will be increasingly important to consider with degraded resolution at low jet energies due to a much higher instantaneous luminosity in the near future.

  5. Mathematical properties of numerical inversion for jet calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukierman, Aviv; Nachman, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    Numerical inversion is a general detector calibration technique that is independent of the underlying spectrum. This procedure is formalized and important statistical properties are presented, using high energy jets at the Large Hadron Collider as an example setting. In particular, numerical inversion is inherently biased and common approximations to the calibrated jet energy tend to over-estimate the resolution. Analytic approximations to the closure and calibrated resolutions are demonstrated to effectively predict the full forms under realistic conditions. Finally, extensions of numerical inversion are presented which can reduce the inherent biases. These methods will be increasingly important to consider with degraded resolution at low jet energies due to a much higher instantaneous luminosity in the near future.

  6. Fair Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaneman, Paulette S.; And Others

    These materials are part of the Project Benchmark series designed to teach secondary students about our legal concepts and systems. This unit focuses on individual rights and fair procedures under the law. The materials outline the Bill of Rights, due process guarantees, the right to a fair hearing, fair and unfair trials, search and seizure laws,…

  7. (TIPSS) procedure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    mental animals.7. In 1982, Colapinto and co-workers described the creation of percutaneous intrahepatic shunts in 6 human subjects.8 A tract was dilated through the ... REVIEW ARTICLE. 4. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • October 2004. The transjugular intrahepatic porto- systemic shunt. (TIPSS) procedure — a review.

  8. Bore-sight calibration of the profile laser scanner using a large size exterior calibration field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, Bronislav; Křemen, Tomáš; Štroner, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The bore-sight calibration procedure and results of a profile laser scanner using a large size exterior calibration field is presented in the paper. The task is a part of Autonomous Mapping Airship (AMA) project which aims to create s surveying system with specific properties suitable for effective surveying of medium-wide areas (units to tens of square kilometers per a day). As is obvious from the project name an airship is used as a carrier. This vehicle has some specific properties. The most important properties are high carrying capacity (15 kg), long flight time (3 hours), high operating safety and special flight characteristics such as stability of flight, in terms of vibrations, and possibility to flight at low speed. The high carrying capacity enables using of high quality sensors like professional infrared (IR) camera FLIR SC645, high-end visible spectrum (VIS) digital camera and optics in the visible spectrum and tactical grade INSGPS sensor iMAR iTracerRT-F200 and profile laser scanner SICK LD-LRS1000. The calibration method is based on direct laboratory measuring of coordinate offset (lever-arm) and in-flight determination of rotation offsets (bore-sights). The bore-sight determination is based on the minimization of squares of individual point distances from measured planar surfaces.

  9. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Carsten; Rossing, Christian Plesner

    trade internally as the units have to decide what prices should be paid for such inter-unit transfers. One important challenge is to uncover the consequences that different transfer prices have on the willingness in the organizational units to coordinate activities and trade internally. At the same time...

  10. Calibration of LOFAR data on the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, J.; Sánchez-Expósito, S.; Best, P.; Garrido, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Lezzi, D.

    2017-04-01

    New scientific instruments are starting to generate an unprecedented amount of data. The Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), one of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) pathfinders, is already producing data on a petabyte scale. The calibration of these data presents a huge challenge for final users: (a) extensive storage and computing resources are required; (b) the installation and maintenance of the software required for the processing is not trivial; and (c) the requirements of calibration pipelines, which are experimental and under development, are quickly evolving. After encountering some limitations in classical infrastructures like dedicated clusters, we investigated the viability of cloud infrastructures as a solution. We found that the installation and operation of LOFAR data calibration pipelines is not only possible, but can also be efficient in cloud infrastructures. The main advantages were: (1) the ease of software installation and maintenance, and the availability of standard APIs and tools, widely used in the industry; this reduces the requirement for significant manual intervention, which can have a highly negative impact in some infrastructures; (2) the flexibility to adapt the infrastructure to the needs of the problem, especially as those demands change over time; (3) the on-demand consumption of (shared) resources. We found that a critical factor (also in other infrastructures) is the availability of scratch storage areas of an appropriate size. We found no significant impediments associated with the speed of data transfer, the use of virtualization, the use of external block storage, or the memory available (provided a minimum threshold is reached). Finally, we considered the cost-effectiveness of a commercial cloud like Amazon Web Services. While a cloud solution is more expensive than the operation of a large, fully-utilized cluster completely dedicated to LOFAR data reduction, we found that its costs are competitive if the number of datasets to be

  11. 21 CFR 868.6400 - Calibration gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibration gas. 868.6400 Section 868.6400 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6400 Calibration gas. (a) Identification. A calibration gas is a device consisting of a container of gas of known concentration intended to calibrate medical...

  12. Validation of Calibrated Energy Models: Common Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Ramos Ruiz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is growing interest in all the smart technologies that provide us with information and knowledge about the human environment. In the energy field, thanks to the amount of data received from smart meters and devices and the progress made in both energy software and computers, the quality of energy models is gradually improving and, hence, also the suitability of Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs. For this reason, the measurement of the accuracy of building energy models is an important task, because once the model is validated through a calibration procedure, it can be used, for example, to apply and study different strategies to reduce its energy consumption in maintaining human comfort. There are several agencies that have developed guidelines and methodologies to establish a measure of the accuracy of these models, and the most widely recognized are: ASHRAE Guideline 14-2014, the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP and the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP. This article intends to shed light on these validation measurements (uncertainty indices by focusing on the typical mistakes made, as these errors could produce a false belief that the models used are calibrated.

  13. Calibration of action cameras for photogrammetric purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balletti, Caterina; Guerra, Francesco; Tsioukas, Vassilios; Vernier, Paolo

    2014-09-18

    The use of action cameras for photogrammetry purposes is not widespread due to the fact that until recently the images provided by the sensors, using either still or video capture mode, were not big enough to perform and provide the appropriate analysis with the necessary photogrammetric accuracy. However, several manufacturers have recently produced and released new lightweight devices which are: (a) easy to handle, (b) capable of performing under extreme conditions and more importantly (c) able to provide both still images and video sequences of high resolution. In order to be able to use the sensor of action cameras we must apply a careful and reliable self-calibration prior to the use of any photogrammetric procedure, a relatively difficult scenario because of the short focal length of the camera and its wide angle lens that is used to obtain the maximum possible resolution of images. Special software, using functions of the OpenCV library, has been created to perform both the calibration and the production of undistorted scenes for each one of the still and video image capturing mode of a novel action camera, the GoPro Hero 3 camera that can provide still images up to 12 Mp and video up 8 Mp resolution.

  14. Calibration of Action Cameras for Photogrammetric Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Balletti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of action cameras for photogrammetry purposes is not widespread due to the fact that until recently the images provided by the sensors, using either still or video capture mode, were not big enough to perform and provide the appropriate analysis with the necessary photogrammetric accuracy. However, several manufacturers have recently produced and released new lightweight devices which are: (a easy to handle, (b capable of performing under extreme conditions and more importantly (c able to provide both still images and video sequences of high resolution. In order to be able to use the sensor of action cameras we must apply a careful and reliable self-calibration prior to the use of any photogrammetric procedure, a relatively difficult scenario because of the short focal length of the camera and its wide angle lens that is used to obtain the maximum possible resolution of images. Special software, using functions of the OpenCV library, has been created to perform both the calibration and the production of undistorted scenes for each one of the still and video image capturing mode of a novel action camera, the GoPro Hero 3 camera that can provide still images up to 12 Mp and video up 8 Mp resolution.

  15. CALIBRATION OF ONLINE ANALYZERS USING NEURAL NETWORKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajive Ganguli; Daniel E. Walsh; Shaohai Yu

    2003-12-05

    Neural networks were used to calibrate an online ash analyzer at the Usibelli Coal Mine, Healy, Alaska, by relating the Americium and Cesium counts to the ash content. A total of 104 samples were collected from the mine, with 47 being from screened coal, and the rest being from unscreened coal. Each sample corresponded to 20 seconds of coal on the running conveyor belt. Neural network modeling used the quick stop training procedure. Therefore, the samples were split into training, calibration and prediction subsets. Special techniques, using genetic algorithms, were developed to representatively split the sample into the three subsets. Two separate approaches were tried. In one approach, the screened and unscreened coal was modeled separately. In another, a single model was developed for the entire dataset. No advantage was seen from modeling the two subsets separately. The neural network method performed very well on average but not individually, i.e. though each prediction was unreliable, the average of a few predictions was close to the true average. Thus, the method demonstrated that the analyzers were accurate at 2-3 minutes intervals (average of 6-9 samples), but not at 20 seconds (each prediction).

  16. Calibration of the SNO+ experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneira, J.; Falk, E.; Leming, E.; Peeters, S.; SNO+ Collaboration.

    2017-09-01

    The main goal of the SNO+ experiment is to perform a low-background and high-isotope-mass search for neutrinoless double-beta decay, employing 780 tonnes of liquid scintillator loaded with tellurium, in its initial phase at 0.5% by mass for a total mass of 1330 kg of 130Te. The SNO+ physics program includes also measurements of geo- and reactor neutrinos, supernova and solar neutrinos. Calibrations are an essential component of the SNO+ data-taking and analysis plan. The achievement of the physics goals requires both an extensive and regular calibration. This serves several goals: the measurement of several detector parameters, the validation of the simulation model and the constraint of systematic uncertainties on the reconstruction and particle identification algorithms. SNO+ faces stringent radiopurity requirements which, in turn, largely determine the materials selection, sealing and overall design of both the sources and deployment systems. In fact, to avoid frequent access to the inner volume of the detector, several permanent optical calibration systems have been developed and installed outside that volume. At the same time, the calibration source internal deployment system was re-designed as a fully sealed system, with more stringent material selection, but following the same working principle as the system used in SNO. This poster described the overall SNO+ calibration strategy, discussed the several new and innovative sources, both optical and radioactive, and covered the developments on source deployment systems.

  17. Calibration techniques for fringe projectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Joerg; Patzelt, Stefan; Horn, Frank; Goch, Gert

    2001-10-01

    Fringe Projection systems generate phase distributions of an object illuminated with a specific fringe pattern. These phase correspond to the object coordinates. It is mostly necessary to transform the dimension-less phases to a metric dimension. Until today this is realized by photogrammetric techniques, which are subdivided into three main processes. At first a reference plane is defined. Then a grid within this plane is fixed. In the third step, the height axis is calibrated by different methods, for example, by use of a single height step or another well defined base object. This article describes a new method to calibrate the measuring volume by a multi-value calibration algorithm. As a first step, the fringe projection systems detects the phase distribution of a plane, denoted as reference plane. The, the plane moves stepwise in z-direction. In each step the phase distribution is detected, while an interferometer measures the distance of the z-coordinate form the reference plane. Together with the discrete x-y-coordinates of a CCD- detection unit, a 3D measuring volume is defined. The volume calibration is performed by separate polynomials for each x- y-coordinate, which are derived from the corresponding values of the phase distributions and the interferometric height values. With this method some problems of the conventional 'single value calibration' can be solved. This contribution describes the theoretical solution of the problem and presents first experimental results.

  18. Multi-Sensor Calibration of Low-Cost Magnetic, Angular Rate and Gravity Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Lüken

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new calibration procedure for low-cost nine degrees-of-freedom (9DOF magnetic, angular rate and gravity (MARG sensor systems, which relies on a calibration cube, a reference table and a body sensor network (BSN. The 9DOF MARG sensor is part of our recently-developed “Integrated Posture and Activity Network by Medit Aachen” (IPANEMA BSN. The advantage of this new approach is the use of the calibration cube, which allows for easy integration of two sensor nodes of the IPANEMA BSN. One 9DOF MARG sensor node is thereby used for calibration; the second 9DOF MARG sensor node is used for reference measurements. A novel algorithm uses these measurements to further improve the performance of the calibration procedure by processing arbitrarily-executed motions. In addition, the calibration routine can be used in an alignment procedure to minimize errors in the orientation between the 9DOF MARG sensor system and a motion capture inertial reference system. A two-stage experimental study is conducted to underline the performance of our calibration procedure. In both stages of the proposed calibration procedure, the BSN data, as well as reference tracking data are recorded. In the first stage, the mean values of all sensor outputs are determined as the absolute measurement offset to minimize integration errors in the derived movement model of the corresponding body segment. The second stage deals with the dynamic characteristics of the measurement system where the dynamic deviation of the sensor output compared to a reference system is Sensors 2015, 15 25920 corrected. In practical validation experiments, this procedure showed promising results with a maximum RMS error of 3.89°.

  19. Integrated Performance Testing Workshop - Supplemental Materials (Scripts and Procedures)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Gregory A.

    2014-02-01

    A variety of performance tests are described relating to: Material Transfers; Emergency Evacuation; Alarm Response Assessment; and an Enhanced Limited Scope Performance Test (ELSPT). Procedures are given for: nuclear material physical inventory and discrepancy; material transfers; and emergency evacuation.

  20. Astrid-2 EMMA Magnetic Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter; Risbo, Torben

    1998-01-01

    of the magnetometer readings in each position were related to the field magnitudes from the Observatory, and a least squares fit for the 9 magnetometer calibration parameters was performed (3 offsets, 3 scale values and 3 inter-axes angles). After corrections for the magnetometer digital-to-analogue converters...... experiment built as a collaboration between the DTU, Department of Automation and the Department of Plasma Physics, The Alfvenlaboratory, Royal Institute of Technology (RIT), Stockholm. The final magnetic calibration of the Astrid-2 satellite was done at the Lovoe Magnetic Observatory under the Geological...... Survey of Sweden near Stockholm on the night of May 15.-16., 1997. The magnetic calibration and the intercalibration between the star camera and the magnetic sensor was performed by measuring the Earth's magnetic field and simultaneously observing the star sky with the camera. The rotation matrix between...

  1. IMU-based online kinematic calibration of robot manipulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guanglong; Zhang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Robot calibration is a useful diagnostic method for improving the positioning accuracy in robot production and maintenance. An online robot self-calibration method based on inertial measurement unit (IMU) is presented in this paper. The method requires that the IMU is rigidly attached to the robot manipulator, which makes it possible to obtain the orientation of the manipulator with the orientation of the IMU in real time. This paper proposed an efficient approach which incorporates Factored Quaternion Algorithm (FQA) and Kalman Filter (KF) to estimate the orientation of the IMU. Then, an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is used to estimate kinematic parameter errors. Using this proposed orientation estimation method will result in improved reliability and accuracy in determining the orientation of the manipulator. Compared with the existing vision-based self-calibration methods, the great advantage of this method is that it does not need the complex steps, such as camera calibration, images capture, and corner detection, which make the robot calibration procedure more autonomous in a dynamic manufacturing environment. Experimental studies on a GOOGOL GRB3016 robot show that this method has better accuracy, convenience, and effectiveness than vision-based methods.

  2. Fluorescence calibration method for single-particle aerosol fluorescence instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley Robinson, Ellis; Gao, Ru-Shan; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Fahey, David W.; Perring, Anne E.

    2017-05-01

    Real-time, single-particle fluorescence instruments used to detect atmospheric bioaerosol particles are increasingly common, yet no standard fluorescence calibration method exists for this technique. This gap limits the utility of these instruments as quantitative tools and complicates comparisons between different measurement campaigns. To address this need, we have developed a method to produce size-selected particles with a known mass of fluorophore, which we use to calibrate the fluorescence detection of a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A). We use mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles to calibrate one detector (FL1; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 310-400 nm) and pure quinine particles to calibrate the other (FL2; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 420-650 nm). The relationship between fluorescence and mass for the mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles is linear, while that for the pure quinine particles is nonlinear, likely indicating that not all of the quinine mass contributes to the observed fluorescence. Nonetheless, both materials produce a repeatable response between observed fluorescence and particle mass. This procedure allows users to set the detector gains to achieve a known absolute response, calculate the limits of detection for a given instrument, improve the repeatability of the instrumental setup, and facilitate intercomparisons between different instruments. We recommend calibration of single-particle fluorescence instruments using these methods.

  3. IMU-Based Online Kinematic Calibration of Robot Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglong Du

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot calibration is a useful diagnostic method for improving the positioning accuracy in robot production and maintenance. An online robot self-calibration method based on inertial measurement unit (IMU is presented in this paper. The method requires that the IMU is rigidly attached to the robot manipulator, which makes it possible to obtain the orientation of the manipulator with the orientation of the IMU in real time. This paper proposed an efficient approach which incorporates Factored Quaternion Algorithm (FQA and Kalman Filter (KF to estimate the orientation of the IMU. Then, an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF is used to estimate kinematic parameter errors. Using this proposed orientation estimation method will result in improved reliability and accuracy in determining the orientation of the manipulator. Compared with the existing vision-based self-calibration methods, the great advantage of this method is that it does not need the complex steps, such as camera calibration, images capture, and corner detection, which make the robot calibration procedure more autonomous in a dynamic manufacturing environment. Experimental studies on a GOOGOL GRB3016 robot show that this method has better accuracy, convenience, and effectiveness than vision-based methods.

  4. Peritonectomy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarbaker, P H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: New surgical procedures designed to assist in the treatment of peritoneal surface malignancy were sought. BACKGROUND: Decisions regarding the treatment of cancer depend on the anatomic location of the malignancy and the biologic aggressiveness of the disease. Some patients may have isolated intra-abdominal seeding of malignancy of limited extent or of low biologic grade. In the past, these clinical situations have been regarded as lethal. METHODS: The cytoreductive approach may require six peritonectomy procedures to resect or strip cancer from all intra-abdominal surfaces. RESULTS: These are greater omentectomy-splenectomy; left upper quadrant peritonectomy; right upper quadrant peritonectomy; lesser omentectomy-cholecystectomy with stripping of the omental bursa; pelvic peritonectomy with sleeve resection of the sigmoid colon; and antrectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Peritonectomy procedures and preparation of the abdomen for early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy were described. The author has used the cytoreductive approach to achieve long-term, disease-free survival in selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis, peritoneal sarcomatosis or mesothelioma. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 10. Figure 11. Figure 12. Figure 13. PMID:7826158

  5. Source point calibration from an arbitrary electron backscattering pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Niels Christian Krieger

    1999-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the position of the source point is a requirement if electron backscattering patterns (EBSPs) are to be used for crystal orientation measurements or other types of measurements which demand a geometrical analysis of the patterns. Today, possibly the most popular method...... for locating the source point is a computational technique which uses the positions of a number of indexed Kikuchi bands for calculating the coordinates of the point. A serious limitation of this calibration technique is, however, that the localized bands must first be indexed, which is difficult...... by this new calibration procedure is the same crystallographic information which is used for normal indexing of EBSPs. The procedure is shown to work successfully with patterns from a simple cubic crystal, as well as with patterns from an orthorhombic BiSCCO superconductor. In the former case, four bands...

  6. Performance standard for dose Calibrator

    CERN Document Server

    Darmawati, S

    2002-01-01

    Dose calibrator is an instrument used in hospitals to determine the activity of radionuclide for nuclear medicine purposes. International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has published IEC 1303:1994 standard that can be used as guidance to test the performance of the instrument. This paper briefly describes content of the document,as well as explains the assessment that had been carried out to test the instrument accuracy in Indonesia through intercomparison measurement.Its is suggested that hospitals acquire a medical physicist to perform the test for its dose calibrator. The need for performance standard in the form of Indonesia Standard is also touched.

  7. Model Calibration in Option Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Loerx

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider calibration problems for models of pricing derivatives which occur in mathematical finance. We discuss various approaches such as using stochastic differential equations or partial differential equations for the modeling process. We discuss the development in the past literature and give an outlook into modern approaches of modelling. Furthermore, we address important numerical issues in the valuation of options and likewise the calibration of these models. This leads to interesting problems in optimization, where, e.g., the use of adjoint equations or the choice of the parametrization for the model parameters play an important role.

  8. Tank calibration; Arqueacao de tanques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Ana [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    This work relates the analysis of the norms ISO (International Organization for Standardization) for calibration of vertical cylindrical tanks used in fiscal measurement, established on Joint Regulation no 1 of June 19, 2000 between the ANP (National Agency of Petroleum) and the INMETRO (National Institute of Metrology, Normalization and Industrial Quality). In this work a comparison between norms ISO and norms published by the API (American Petroleum Institute) and the IP (Institute of Petroleum) up to 2001 was made. It was concluded that norms ISO are wider than norms API, IP, and INMETRO methods in the calibration of vertical cylindrical tanks. (author)

  9. Wind Tunnel Balance Calibration: Are 1,000,000 Data Points Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Parker, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement systems are typically calibrated based on standard practices established by a metrology standards laboratory, for example the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), or dictated by an organization's metrology manual. Therefore, the calibration is designed and executed according to an established procedure. However, for many aerodynamic research measurement systems a universally accepted standard, traceable approach does not exist. Therefore, a strategy for how to develop a calibration protocol is left to the developer or user to define based on experience and recommended practice in their respective industry. Wind tunnel balances are one such measurement system. Many different calibration systems, load schedules and procedures have been developed for balances with little consensus on a recommended approach. Especially lacking is guidance the number of calibration data points needed. Regrettably, the number of data points tends to be correlated with the perceived quality of the calibration. Often, the number of data points is associated with ones ability to generate the data rather than by a defined need in support of measurement objectives. Hence the title of the paper was conceived to challenge recent observations in the wind tunnel balance community that shows an ever increasing desire for more data points per calibration absent of guidance to determine when there are enough. This paper presents fundamental concepts and theory to aid in the development of calibration procedures for wind tunnel balances and provides a framework that is generally applicable to the characterization and calibration of other measurement systems. Questions that need to be answered are for example: What constitutes an adequate calibration? How much data are needed in the calibration? How good is the calibration? This paper will assist a practitioner in answering these questions by presenting an underlying theory on how to evaluate a calibration based on

  10. Reliability Based Code calibration. The use of the JCSS Probabilistic Model Code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M.

    2002-01-01

    A reliability based code calibration procedure is a two step procedure. In the first step target reliabilities are set on the basis of experience or optimisation and in the second step corresponding partial factors and other safety elements (e.g. PSI-values as in Eurocode 1) are derived. This paper

  11. A calibration technique for measuring the complex permittivity of materials with planar transmission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple two-standard calibration procedure for determining the permittivity of a material from the propagation constant measured with planar transmission lines is presented. The suitability of this procedure is demonstrated by using a coplanar waveguide transmission-line sensor to measure the permi...

  12. Video-guided calibration of an augmented reality mobile C-arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Naik, Hemal; Wang, Lejing; Navab, Nassir; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2014-11-01

    The augmented reality (AR) fluoroscope augments an X-ray image by video and provides the surgeon with a real-time in situ overlay of the anatomy. The overlay alignment is crucial for diagnostic and intra-operative guidance, so precise calibration of the AR fluoroscope is required. The first and most complex step of the calibration procedure is the determination of the X-ray source position. Currently, this is achieved using a biplane phantom with movable metallic rings on its top layer and fixed X-ray opaque markers on its bottom layer. The metallic rings must be moved to positions where at least two pairs of rings and markers are isocentric in the X-ray image. The current "trial and error" calibration process currently requires acquisition of many X-ray images, a task that is both time consuming and radiation intensive. An improved process was developed and tested for C-arm calibration. Video guidance was used to drive the calibration procedure to minimize both X-ray exposure and the time involved. For this, a homography between X-ray and video images is estimated. This homography is valid for the plane at which the metallic rings are positioned and is employed to guide the calibration procedure. Eight users having varying calibration experience (i.e., 2 experts, 2 semi-experts, 4 novices) were asked to participate in the evaluation. The video-guided technique reduced the number of intra-operative X-ray calibration images by 89% and decreased the total time required by 59%. A video-based C-arm calibration method has been developed that improves the usability of the AR fluoroscope with a friendlier interface, reduced calibration time and clinically acceptable radiation doses.

  13. Station Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — ixed rail transit external system transfers for systems within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The modes of...

  14. On the calibration of astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry for microflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cierpka, C.; Rossi, M.; Segura, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry (APTV) is a method to determine three components (3C) of the velocity field in a volume (3D) using a single camera. The depth position of the particles is coded by optical distortions caused by a cylindrical lens in the optical setup. This technique is particularly suited for microfluidic applications as measurement errors due to spatial averaging and depth of correlation, typically encountered with μPIV approaches, are eliminated so that the measurement precision is enhanced. Unfortunately, the current state of the technique is limited by the small measurement region achievable with the current calibration procedures as well as by higher order image aberrations (Cierpka et al 2010 Meas. Sci. Technol. 21 045401). In order to extend the size of the measurement volume and to account for all image aberrations, a new intrinsic calibration procedure, based on the imaging function of the particles, is proposed in the paper at hand. It provides an extended measurement depth, taking into account all image aberrations. In this work, the calibration procedure was applied to a μPIV arrangement but could also be implemented on macroscopic experimental setups. The calibration procedure is qualified with synthetic data as well as Poiseuille flow in a straight rectangular micro-channel with a cross-sectional area of 200 × 500 µm2. The three-dimensional velocity distribution of the whole channel was resolved via APTV with uncertainties of 0.9% and 3.7% of the centerline velocity, uc, for the in-plane and out-of-plane components, respectively. Further investigations using different cylindrical-lens focal lengths, magnifications and particle sizes provide information about achievable measurement depths and help to design and adapt the optimal system for the desired experiment.

  15. Liquid Scintillation Counting - Packard Triple-Label Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torretto, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-23

    The Radiological Measurements Laboratory (RML) maintains and operates nine Packard Liquid Scintillation Counters (LSCs). These counters were obtained through various sources and were generally purchased as 2500, 2700 or 3100 series counters. In 2004/2005 the software and firmware on the counters were upgraded. The counters are now designated as 3100 series counters running the Quantasmart software package. Thus, a single procedure can be used to calibrate and operate the Packard LSCs.

  16. 3D-Calibration for IMU of the Strapdown Inertial Navigation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avrutov V.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new calibration method for Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU of Strapdown Iner-tial Navigation Systems was presented. IMU has been composed of accelerometers, gyroscopes and a circuit of signal processing. Normally, a rate transfer test and multi-position tests are us-ing for IMU calibration. The new calibration method is based on whole angle rotation or finite rotation. In fact it’s suggested to turn over IMU around three axes simultaneously. In order to solve the equation of calibration, it is necessary to provide an equality of a rank of basic matrix into degree of basic matrix. The results of simulated IMU data presented to demonstrate the performance of the new calibration method.

  17. Towards a global network of gamma-ray detector calibration facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijs, Marco; Koomans, Ronald; Limburg, Han

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray logging tools are applied worldwide. At various locations, calibration facilities are used to calibrate these gamma-ray logging systems. Several attempts have been made to cross-correlate well known calibration pits, but this cross-correlation does not include calibration facilities in Europe or private company calibration facilities. Our aim is to set-up a framework that gives the possibility to interlink all calibration facilities worldwide by using `tools of opportunity' - tools that have been calibrated in different calibration facilities, whether this usage was on a coordinated basis or by coincidence. To compare the measurement of different tools, it is important to understand the behaviour of the tools in the different calibration pits. Borehole properties, such as diameter, fluid, casing and probe diameter strongly influence the outcome of gamma-ray borehole logging. Logs need to be properly calibrated and compensated for these borehole properties in order to obtain in-situ grades or to do cross-hole correlation. Some tool providers provide tool-specific correction curves for this purpose. Others rely on reference measurements against sources of known radionuclide concentration and geometry. In this article, we present an attempt to set-up a framework for transferring `local' calibrations to be applied `globally'. This framework includes corrections for any geometry and detector size to give absolute concentrations of radionuclides from borehole measurements. This model is used to compare measurements in the calibration pits of Grand Junction, located in the USA; Adelaide (previously known as AMDEL), located in Adelaide Australia; and Stonehenge, located at Medusa Explorations BV in the Netherlands.

  18. Shortwave Radiometer Calibration Methods Comparison and Resulting Solar Irradiance Measurement Differences: A User Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-11-21

    Banks financing solar energy projects require assurance that these systems will produce the energy predicted. Furthermore, utility planners and grid system operators need to understand the impact of the variable solar resource on solar energy conversion system performance. Accurate solar radiation data sets reduce the expense associated with mitigating performance risk and assist in understanding the impacts of solar resource variability. The accuracy of solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on the instrument performance specification, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of different calibration methods provided by radiometric calibration service providers, such as NREL and manufacturers of radiometers, on the resulting calibration responsivity. Some of these radiometers are calibrated indoors and some outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodology, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from these radiometers. This study investigates calibration responsivities provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The BORCAL method provides the outdoor calibration responsivity of pyranometers and pyrheliometers at 45 degree solar zenith angle, and as a function of solar zenith angle determined by clear-sky comparisons with reference irradiance. The BORCAL method also employs a thermal offset correction to the calibration responsivity of single-black thermopile detectors used in pyranometers. Indoor calibrations of radiometers by their manufacturers are performed using a stable artificial light source in a side-by-side comparison between the test radiometer under calibration and a reference radiometer of the same type. In both methods, the reference radiometer calibrations are traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR). These

  19. Calibration and Measurement Uncertainty Estimation of Radiometric Data: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Reda, I.; Andreas, A.; Konings, J.

    2014-11-01

    Evaluating the performance of photovoltaic cells, modules, and arrays that form large solar deployments relies on accurate measurements of the available solar resource. Therefore, determining the accuracy of these solar radiation measurements provides a better understanding of investment risks. This paper provides guidelines and recommended procedures for estimating the uncertainty in calibrations and measurements by radiometers using methods that follow the International Bureau of Weights and Measures Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty (GUM). Standardized analysis based on these procedures ensures that the uncertainty quoted is well documented.

  20. A Subjectivist View of Calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    the predictions its staff makes about possible new drugs are well-calibrated proba- bilities (Balthasar, Boschi , & Menke, 1978). For the cognitive...under uncertainty: Heuristics and biases. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1982. Balthasar, H. A., Boschi , R. A. A., & Menke, M. M. Calling the

  1. Laboratory panel and radiometer calibration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Deadman, AJ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available this is not possible, that a look-up table be created to correct 8?/hemispherical reflectance values. 6. REFERENCES [1] N.P. Fox ?QA4EO-WGCV-IVO-CLP-008: Protocol for the CEOS WGCV pilot Comparison of techniques/instruments used for vicarious calibration...

  2. Model Calibration for Ship Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.F.G. van Daalen (Ed); J. Fehribach; T. van Leeuwen (Tristan); C. Reinhardt; N. Schenkels; R. Sheombarsing

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractModel calibration is an important aspect in ship simulation. Here, ship motion is described by an ODE which includes tuning parameters that capture complex physical processes such as friction of the hull. In order for the simulations to be realistic for a wide range of

  3. Model Calibration for Ship Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daalen, Ed; Fehribach, Joseph; van Leeuwen, Tristan; Reinhardt, Christian; Schenkels, Nick; Sheombarsing, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Model calibration is an important aspect in ship simulation. Here, ship motion is described by an ODE which includes tuning parameters that capture complex physical processes such as friction of the hull. In order for the simulations to be realistic for a wide range of scenarios these tuning

  4. Recommended Inorganic Chemicals for Calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, John R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    All analytical techniques depend on the use of calibration chemicals to relate analyte concentration to instrumental parameters. Discusses the preparation of standard solutions and provides a critical evaluation of available materials. Lists elements by group and discusses the purity and uses of each. (MVL)

  5. Measurement System and Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Allan; Kock, Carsten Weber

    The report describes power curve measurements carried out on a given wind turbine. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. A site calibration has been carried out; see Ref. [2], and the measured flow correction factors for different wind directions are used in the present...

  6. Measurement System and Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Villanueva, Héctor

    This Measurement System & Calibration report is describing DTU’s measurement system installed at a specific wind turbine. A major part of the sensors has been installed by others (see [1]) the rest of the sensors have been installed by DTU. The results of the measurements, described in this repor...

  7. The analytical calibration in (bio)imaging/mapping of the metallic elements in biological samples--definitions, nomenclature and strategies: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurowski, Kamil; Buszewski, Bogusław; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, studies related to the distribution of metallic elements in biological samples are one of the most important issues. There are many articles dedicated to specific analytical atomic spectrometry techniques used for mapping/(bio)imaging the metallic elements in various kinds of biological samples. However, in such literature, there is a lack of articles dedicated to reviewing calibration strategies, and their problems, nomenclature, definitions, ways and methods used to obtain quantitative distribution maps. The aim of this article was to characterize the analytical calibration in the (bio)imaging/mapping of the metallic elements in biological samples including (1) nomenclature; (2) definitions, and (3) selected and sophisticated, examples of calibration strategies with analytical calibration procedures applied in the different analytical methods currently used to study an element's distribution in biological samples/materials such as LA ICP-MS, SIMS, EDS, XRF and others. The main emphasis was placed on the procedures and methodology of the analytical calibration strategy. Additionally, the aim of this work is to systematize the nomenclature for the calibration terms: analytical calibration, analytical calibration method, analytical calibration procedure and analytical calibration strategy. The authors also want to popularize the division of calibration methods that are different than those hitherto used. This article is the first work in literature that refers to and emphasizes many different and complex aspects of analytical calibration problems in studies related to (bio)imaging/mapping metallic elements in different kinds of biological samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ross procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, H H

    2012-01-01

    In 1967 Donald Ross introduced the subcoronary Ross procedure consisting of transplantation of the autologous pulmonary valve into aortic position. We describe our 15-year experience in Ross procedures. 576 subcoronary operations have been performed (436 male and 140 female patients); the mean age was 45±11.9 years. (range, 13 to 70 years). The mean follow-up was 7±4.2 years (range, 0 to 16 years). There were 4597 patient years at follow-up with a clinical completeness of 95% and echo completeness of 91%. There were two operative deaths (0.3%) and 31 patients with reoperation. The survival is similar to that of the normal population and the freedom from allo- and autograft reoperation is 87% at 15 years. Autograft regurgitation at last examination was grade 0 in 40%, trace in 54%, grade I in 19%, grade II in 4% and grade III in 0.4%; the pressure gradient was smaller than 5 mmHg in 57% and between 5 and 10 mmHg in 24%. Only 6% had a transvalvular pressure gradient of more than 10 mmHg. After 15 years of experience it can be concluded that the subcoronary technique provides near normal survival in adult patients, with excellent hemodynamics and acceptable rate of reoperations.

  9. Mathematical efficiency calibration in gamma spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminski, S; Wilhelm, C

    2003-01-01

    Mathematical efficiency calibration with the LabSOCS software was introduced for two detectors in the measurement laboratory of the Central Safety Department of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. In the present contribution, conventional efficiency calibration of gamma spectroscopy systems and mathematical efficiency calibration with LabSOCS are compared with respect to their performance, uncertainties, expenses, and results. It is reported about the experience gained, and the advantages and disadvantages of both methods of efficiency calibration are listed. The results allow the conclusion to be drawn that mathematical efficiency calibration is a real alternative to conventional efficiency calibration of gamma spectroscopy systems as obtained by measurements of mixed gamma ray standard sources.

  10. Operation and calibration of the Silicon Drift Detectors of the ALICE experiment during the 2008 cosmic ray data taking period

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandro, B; Bala, R; Batigne, G; Beolè, S; Biolcati, E; Bock Garcia, N; Bruna, E; Cerello, P; Coli, S; Corrales Morales, Y; Costa, F; Crescio, E; De Remigis, P; Di Liberto, S; Falchieri, D; Feofilov, G; Ferrarese, W; Gandolfi, E; Garcia, C; Gaudichet, L; Giraudo, G; Giubellino, P; Humanic, T J; Igolkin, S; Idzik, M; Kiprich, S K; Kisiel, A; Kolozhvari, A; Kotov, I; Kral, J; Kushpil, S; Kushpil, V; Lea, R; Lisa, M A; Martinez, M I; Marzari Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masetti, M; Mazza, G; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Montano Zetina, L M; Monteno, M; Nilsen, B S; Nouais, D; Padilla Cabal, F; Petrácek, V; Poghosyan, M G; Prino, F; Ramello, L; Rashevsky, A; Riccati, L; Rivetti, A S; Senyukov, S; Siciliano, M; Sitta, M; Subieta Vasquez, M A; Sumbera, M L; Toscano, L; Tosello, F; Truesdale, D; Urciuoli, G M; Vacchi, A; Vallero, S; Werbrouck, A; Zampa, G; Zinovjev, G

    2010-01-01

    The calibration and performance of the Silicon Drift Detector of the ALICE experiment during the 2008 cosmic ray run will be presented. In particular the procedures to monitor the running parameters (baselines, noise, drift speed) are detailed. Other relevant parameters (SOP delay, time-zero, charge calibration) were also determined.

  11. 40 CFR 86.120-94 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. 86.120-94 Section 86.120-94 Protection of... Procedures § 86.120-94 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate, methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas meters...

  12. Procedural knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgeff, Michael P.; Lansky, Amy L.

    1986-01-01

    Much of commonsense knowledge about the real world is in the form of procedures or sequences of actions for achieving particular goals. In this paper, a formalism is presented for representing such knowledge using the notion of process. A declarative semantics for the representation is given, which allows a user to state facts about the effects of doing things in the problem domain of interest. An operational semantics is also provided, which shows how this knowledge can be used to achieve particular goals or to form intentions regarding their achievement. Given both semantics, the formalism additionally serves as an executable specification language suitable for constructing complex systems. A system based on this formalism is described, and examples involving control of an autonomous robot and fault diagnosis for NASA's Space Shuttle are provided.

  13. Procedural knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgeff, M.P.; Lansky, A.L.

    1986-10-01

    Much of commonsense knowledge about the real world is in the form of procedures or sequences of actions for achieving particular goals. In this paper, a formalism is presented for representing such knowledge using the notion of process. A declarative semantics for the representation is given, which allows a user to state facts about the effects of doing things in the problem domain of interest. An operational semantics is also provided, which shows how this knowledge can be used to achieve particular goals or to form intentions regarding their achievement. Given both semantics, our formalism additionally serves as an executable specification language suitable for constructing complex systems. A system based on this formalism is described, and examples involving control of an autonomous robot and fault diagnosis for NASA's space shuttle are provided.

  14. Debugging data transfers in CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagliesi, G.; Belforte, S.; Bloom, K.; Bockelman, B.; Bonacorsi, D.; Fisk, I.; Flix, J.; Hernandez, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Kadastik, M.; Klem, J.; Kodolova, O.; Kuo, C.-M.; Letts, J.; Maes, J.; Magini, N.; Metson, S.; Piedra, J.; Pukhaeva, N.; Tuura, L.; Sõnajalg, S.; Wu, Y.; Van Mulders, P.; Villella, I.; Würthwein, F.

    2010-04-01

    The CMS experiment at CERN is preparing for LHC data taking in several computing preparation activities. In early 2007 a traffic load generator infrastructure for distributed data transfer tests was designed and deployed to equip the WLCG tiers which support the CMS virtual organization with a means for debugging, load-testing and commissioning data transfer routes among CMS computing centres. The LoadTest is based upon PhEDEx as a reliable, scalable data set replication system. The Debugging Data Transfers (DDT) task force was created to coordinate the debugging of the data transfer links. The task force aimed to commission most crucial transfer routes among CMS tiers by designing and enforcing a clear procedure to debug problematic links. Such procedure aimed to move a link from a debugging phase in a separate and independent environment to a production environment when a set of agreed conditions are achieved for that link. The goal was to deliver one by one working transfer routes to the CMS data operations team. The preparation, activities and experience of the DDT task force within the CMS experiment are discussed. Common technical problems and challenges encountered during the lifetime of the taskforce in debugging data transfer links in CMS are explained and summarized.

  15. Wavenumber Calibration of CCD Detector Raman Spectrometers Controlled by a Sinus Arm Drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Nørbygaard, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The calibration procedures needed for use of dispersive Raman spectrometers have been reviewed. Like other high-precision spectrometers incorporating moving gratings, Raman spectrometers are subject to problems with wavenumber scale accuracy. Commercially available Raman Spectrometers of types...... "DILOR-HORIBA LabRam" and "RENISHAW System 1000" have been examined for wavenumber scale stability, linearity and reproducibility. For reliable use of the wavenumber data, daily calibration is a necessity. A procedure to examine the linearity of such mechanical drive systems is presented. A new finding...... was that the examined spectrometers give wavenumber calibration errors that were quite reproducible from day to day at a given temperature in the laboratory but depended markedly on the selected setting of the gratings. Knowledge of this linearity problem is essential for obtaining a reliable calibration. The most...

  16. Identification of calibration and operating limits of a low-cost embedded system with MEMS accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Emilia, G.; Di Gasbarro, D.; Gaspari, A.; Natale, E.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper some aspects concerning the calibration uncertainty of three-axis low-cost accelerometers for possible use in diagnostics of civil buildings are considered, using a linear slide and a laser vibrometer as the reference. In order to analyse the principal and cross sensitivity and the offset of the sensor in dynamic conditions, the sensitivity matrix method has been used. Some considerations about the operating limits of a low-cost embedded system with MEMS accelerometer have been discussed, with reference to the calibration procedure. In particular, the effects of the non-constant sampling and of the achievable sampling rate, are studied with reference to the calibration uncertainty and to the capability of the calibration procedure to assess the best metrological performances of the system under test.

  17. LHCb : Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run2

    CERN Multimedia

    Tobin, Mark

    2015-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run 2. Data collected at the start of the fill will be processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants will be evaluated for each run. This procedure will improve the quality of the online alignment. For example, the vertex locator is retracted and reinserted for stable beam collisions in each fill to be centred on the primary vertex position in the transverse plane. Consequently its position changes on a fill-by-fill basis. Critically, this new realtime alignment and calibration procedure allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection in the trigger by applying stronger constraints. The online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the RICH detectors at the trigger level. T...

  18. SMAP RADAR Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Chaubel, M. J.; Spencer, M.; Chan, S. F.; Chen, C. W.; Fore, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission launched on Jan 31, 2015. The mission employs L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Immediately following launch, there was a three month instrument checkout period, followed by six months of level 1 (L1) calibration and validation. In this presentation, we will discuss the calibration and validation activities and results for the L1 radar data. Early SMAP radar data were used to check commanded timing parameters, and to work out issues in the low- and high-resolution radar processors. From April 3-13 the radar collected receive only mode data to conduct a survey of RFI sources. Analysis of the RFI environment led to a preferred operating frequency. The RFI survey data were also used to validate noise subtraction and scaling operations in the radar processors. Normal radar operations resumed on April 13. All radar data were examined closely for image quality and calibration issues which led to improvements in the radar data products for the beta release at the end of July. Radar data were used to determine and correct for small biases in the reported spacecraft attitude. Geo-location was validated against coastline positions and the known positions of corner reflectors. Residual errors at the time of the beta release are about 350 m. Intra-swath biases in the high-resolution backscatter images are reduced to less than 0.3 dB for all polarizations. Radiometric cross-calibration with Aquarius was performed using areas of the Amazon rain forest. Cross-calibration was also examined using ocean data from the low-resolution processor and comparing with the Aquarius wind model function. Using all a-priori calibration constants provided good results with co-polarized measurements matching to better than 1 dB, and cross-polarized measurements matching to about 1 dB in the beta release. During the

  19. 12 CFR 611.510 - Approval procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approval procedures. 611.510 Section 611.510 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ORGANIZATION Transfer of Authorities § 611.510 Approval procedures. (a) Upon receipt of approval of a resolution by the Farm Credit...

  20. Calibration of the amplification coefficient in interference microscopy by means of a wavelength standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Peter; Beverage, Jake

    2015-06-01

    We propose an in situ method for establishing the amplification coefficient (height scale) for an interference microscope as an alternative to the traditional step height standard technique for routine calibration. The method begins by determining the properties of the microscope illuminator equipped with a narrow-band spectral filter, using a spectrometer to provide traceability to the 546.074nm 198Hg line. A data acquisition with the interference microscope links this wavelength standard to a calibration of the properties of the optical path length scanning mechanism of the interferometer. A capacitance sensor in the scanner maintains this calibration for subsequent measurements. A targeted k=1 uncertainty of 0.1% is favorable when compared to calibration using physical artifacts, and the calibration procedure is easier to perform and less sensitive to operator error.

  1. Krypton calibration of time projection chambers of the NA61/SHINE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Naskret, Michal

    The NA61/SHINE experiment at CERN is searching for the critical point in phase transition between quark-gluon plasma and hadronic matter. To do so we use the most precise apparatus - Time Projection Chamber. Its main task is to find trajectories of particles created in a relativistic collision. In order to improve efficiency of TPCs, we introduce calibration using radioactive krypton gas. Simulation of events in a TPC cham- ber through a decay of excited krypton atoms gives us a spectrum, which is later fitted to the model spectrum of krypton from a Monte-Carlo simulation. The data obtained in such a way serves us to determine malfunctioning electronics in TPCs. Thanks to the krypton calibration we can create a map of pad by pad gains. In this thesis I will de- scribe in detail the NA61 experimental setup, krypton calibration procedure, calibration algorithm and results for recent calibration runs

  2. Analysis of Nigeria Research Reactor-1 Thermal Power Calibration Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Arome Agbo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the accuracy of the methods used in calibrating the thermal power of Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1, a low-power miniature neutron source reactor located at the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. The calibration was performed at three different power levels: low power (3.6 kW, half power (15 kW, and full power (30 kW. Two methods were used in the calibration, namely, slope and heat balance methods. The thermal power obtained by the heat balance method at low power, half power, and full power was 3.7 ± 0.2 kW, 15.2 ± 1.2 kW, and 30.7 ± 2.5 kW, respectively. The thermal power obtained by the slope method at half power and full power was 15.8 ± 0.7 kW and 30.2 ± 1.5 kW, respectively. It was observed that the slope method is more accurate with deviations of 4% and 5% for calibrations at half and full power, respectively, although the linear fit (slope method on average temperature-rising rates during the thermal power calibration procedure at low power (3.6 kW is not fitting. As such, the slope method of power calibration is not suitable at lower power for NIRR-1.

  3. TRANSFERENCE LOVE

    OpenAIRE

    Deneanu, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    It is the psychoanalysis’ merit to have discovered one of most common phenomenon that happens in almost all kind of human relations, and that is transference. Psychoanalytic framework did not produce it, but stimulate it. Transference love—one of the most powerful tool used by the analyst to get to understand a pacient’s pattern of falling in love—is an emotional relationship (a conglomeration of affection, tenderness, friendship, erotic and sexual feelings) developed by a pacient for his/her...

  4. Crop physiology calibration in the CLM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bilionis

    2015-04-01

    scalable and adaptive scheme based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC. The model showed significant improvement of crop productivity with the new calibrated parameters. We demonstrate that the calibrated parameters are applicable across alternative years and different sites.

  5. Polarimetric and Interferometric SAR Calibration Verification Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Zyl, J van

    2001-01-01

    It is necessary to calibrate SAR data in order to use the data for science applications. When both polarimetric and interferometric data are collected simultaneously, these SAR data can be used for cross-calibration and verification.

  6. Design and calibration of a scanning tunneling microscope for large machined surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    During the last year the large sample STM has been designed, built and used for the observation of several different samples. Calibration of the scanner for prope dimensional interpretation of surface features has been a chief concern, as well as corrections for non-linear effects such as hysteresis during scans. Several procedures used in calibration and correction of piezoelectric scanners used in the laboratorys STMs are described.

  7. In Search of Easy-to-Use Methods for Calibrating ADCP's for Velocity and Discharge Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, K.; ,

    2002-01-01

    A cost-effective procedure for calibrating acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) in the field was presented. The advantages and disadvantages of various methods which are used for calibrating ADCP were discussed. The proposed method requires the use of differential global positioning system (DGPS) with sub-meter accuracy and standard software for collecting ADCP data. The method involves traversing a long (400-800 meter) course at a constant compass heading and speed, while collecting simultaneous DGPS and ADCP data.

  8. TRACEABILITY OF ON COORDINATE MEASURING MACHINES – CALIBRATION AND PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Savio, Enrico; Bariani, Paolo

    This document is used in connection with three exercises each of 45 minutes duration as a part of the course GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY AND MACHINE TESTING. The exercises concern three aspects of coordinate measurement traceability: 1) Performance verification of a CMM using a ball bar; 2) Calibration...... of an optical coordinate measuring machine; 3) Uncertainty assessment using the ISO 15530-3 “Calibrated workpieces” procedure....

  9. Efficient Stereo Image Geometrical Reconstruction at Arbitrary Camera Settings from a Single Calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2014-01-01

    Camera calibration is central to obtaining a quantitative image-to-physical-space mapping from stereo images acquired in the operating room (OR). A practical challenge for cameras mounted to the operating microscope is maintenance of image calibration as the surgeon’s field-of-view is repeatedly changed (in terms of zoom and focal settings) throughout a procedure. Here, we present an efficient method for sustaining a quantitative image-to-physical space relationship for arbitrary image acquis...

  10. ONE-STEP AND TWO-STEP CALIBRATION OF A PORTABLE PANORAMIC IMAGE MAPPING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-C. Wang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A Portable Panoramic Image Mapping System (PPIMS is proposed for rapid acquisition of three-dimensional spatial information. By considering the convenience of use, cost, weight of equipment, precision, and power supply, the designed PPIMS is equipped with 6 circularly arranged cameras to capture panoramic images and a GPS receiver for positioning. The motivation for this design is to develop a hand-held Mobile Mapping System (MMS for some difficult accessing areas by vehicle MMS, such as rugged terrains, forest areas, heavily damaged disaster areas, and crowed places etc. This PPIMS is in fact a GPS assisted close-range photogrammetric system. Compared with the traditional close-range photogrammetry, PPIMS can reduce the need of ground control points significantly. Under the condition of knowing the relative geometric relationships of the equipped sensors, the elements of exterior orientation of each captured image can be solved. However, the procedure of a system calibration should be done accurately to determine the relative geometric relationships of multi-cameras and the GPS antenna center, before the PPIMS can be applied for geo-referenced mapping. In this paper, both of one-step and two-step calibration procedures for PPIMS are performed to determine the lever-arm offsets and boresight angles among cameras and GPS. The performance of the one-step and two-step calibration is evaluated through the analysis of the experimental results. The comparison between these two calibration procedures was also conducted. The two-step calibration method outperforms the one-step calibration method in terms of calibration accuracy and operation convenience. We expect that the proposed two-step calibration procedure can also be applied to other platform-based MMSs.

  11. Local Hadron Calibration in Atlas.

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The method of Local Hadron Calibration is used in Atlas as one of two major calibration schemes for hadronic signals like jets and missing transverse energy. Starting from noise suppressed energy clusters a modular chain of classification and corrections steps are applied to distinguish electro-magnetic from hadronic deposits and to compensate invisible energy losses, deposits in dead material and noise threshold related losses. Finally jet-level corrections take care of missing energy due to particles never reaching the calorimeter. The method and its application to single charged and neutral pion simulations as well as di-jet simulations are presented. First comparisons of MinBias simulations and real Atlas data at sqrt(s)=900 GeV are shown.

  12. Optimal Reliability-Based Code Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Kroon, I. B.; Faber, Michael Havbro

    1994-01-01

    Calibration of partial safety factors is considered in general, including classes of structures where no code exists beforehand. The partial safety factors are determined such that the difference between the reliability for the different structures in the class considered and a target reliability...... level is minimized. Code calibration on a decision theoretical basis is also considered and it is shown how target reliability indices can be calibrated. Results from code calibration for rubble mound breakwater designs are shown....

  13. Cross-calibration of interferometric SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Generation of digital elevation models from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data is a well established technique. Achieving a high geometric fidelity calls for a calibration accounting for inaccurate navigation data and system parameters as well as system imperfections. Fully...... automated calibration techniques are preferable, especially for operational mapping. The author presents one such technique, called cross-calibration. Though developed for single-pass interferometry, it may be applicable to multi-pass interferometry, too. Cross-calibration requires stability during mapping...

  14. [Introduction and calibration of the Chinese sun hazemeter network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jin-yuan; Wang, Yue-si; Li, Zhan-qing; Wang, Pu-cai; Wang, Shi-gong; Wen, Tian-xue; Sun, Yang

    2006-09-01

    Much of the current uncertainty in the quantitative assessment of the climate and environment change is due to our lack of knowledge of the aerosol, for which the large-scale sun hazemeter ground-based network directly provides basic data. The data also can revise the results of the satellite remote sensing. Depending on the stations of CERN, the standard network was first built in China. The accurate and reliable hazemeter (LEDs) was uniformly used in the network. The hazemeters were calibrated by Langley plot method and transfer calibration and were uniformly checked. The AODs, which were synchronously retrieved from hazemeters (RSD < 3%) and CEMIL (RSD < 5%), were coherent and comparable. The stability and reliability of the hazemeters and the network was approved.

  15. Improving transferability strategies for debris flow susceptibility assessment: Application to the Saponara and Itala catchments (Messina, Italy)

    KAUST Repository

    Cama, M.

    2017-03-30

    Debris flows can be described as rapid gravity-induced mass movements controlled by topography that are usually triggered as a consequence of storm rainfalls. One of the problems when dealing with debris flow recognition is that the eroded surface is usually very shallow and it can be masked by vegetation or fast weathering as early as one-two years after a landslide has occurred. For this reason, even areas that are highly susceptible to debris flow might suffer of a lack of reliable landslide inventories. However, these inventories are necessary for susceptibility assessment. Model transferability, which is based on calibrating a susceptibility model in a training area in order to predict the distribution of debris flows in a target area, might provide an efficient solution to dealing with this limit. However, when applying a transferability procedure, a key point is the optimal selection of the predictors to be included for calibrating the model in the source area. In this paper, the issue of optimal factor selection is analysed by comparing the predictive performances obtained following three different factor selection criteria. The study includes: i) a test of the similarity between the source and the target areas; ii) the calibration of the susceptibility model in the (training) source area, using different criteria for the selection of the predictors; iii) the validation of the models, both at the source (self-validation, through random partition) and at the target (transferring, through spatial partition) areas. The debris flow susceptibility is evaluated here using binary logistic regression through a R-scripted based procedure.Two separate study areas were selected in the Messina province (southern Italy) in its Ionian (Itala catchment) and Tyrrhenian sides (Saponara catchment), each hit by a severe debris flow event (in 2009 and 2011, respectively).The investigation attested that the best fitting model in the calibration areas resulted poorly performing

  16. Improving transferability strategies for debris flow susceptibility assessment: Application to the Saponara and Itala catchments (Messina, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cama, M.; Lombardo, L.; Conoscenti, C.; Rotigliano, E.

    2017-07-01

    Debris flows can be described as rapid gravity-induced mass movements controlled by topography that are usually triggered as a consequence of storm rainfalls. One of the problems when dealing with debris flow recognition is that the eroded surface is usually very shallow and it can be masked by vegetation or fast weathering as early as one-two years after a landslide has occurred. For this reason, even areas that are highly susceptible to debris flow might suffer of a lack of reliable landslide inventories. However, these inventories are necessary for susceptibility assessment. Model transferability, which is based on calibrating a susceptibility model in a training area in order to predict the distribution of debris flows in a target area, might provide an efficient solution to dealing with this limit. However, when applying a transferability procedure, a key point is the optimal selection of the predictors to be included for calibrating the model in the source area. In this paper, the issue of optimal factor selection is analysed by comparing the predictive performances obtained following three different factor selection criteria. The study includes: i) a test of the similarity between the source and the target areas; ii) the calibration of the susceptibility model in the (training) source area, using different criteria for the selection of the predictors; iii) the validation of the models, both at the source (self-validation, through random partition) and at the target (transferring, through spatial partition) areas. The debris flow susceptibility is evaluated here using binary logistic regression through a R-scripted based procedure. Two separate study areas were selected in the Messina province (southern Italy) in its Ionian (Itala catchment) and Tyrrhenian sides (Saponara catchment), each hit by a severe debris flow event (in 2009 and 2011, respectively). The investigation attested that the best fitting model in the calibration areas resulted poorly

  17. Calibrating thermal behavior of electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2016-05-31

    A method includes determining a relationship between indirect thermal data for a processor and a measured temperature associated with the processor, during a calibration process, obtaining the indirect thermal data for the processor during actual operation of the processor, and determining an actual significant temperature associated with the processor during the actual operation using the indirect thermal data for the processor during actual operation of the processor and the relationship.

  18. Vascular Access Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Vascular Access Procedures A vascular access procedure inserts a flexible, ... the limitations of Vascular Access Procedures? What are Vascular Access Procedures? A vascular access procedure involves the insertion ...

  19. Model Calibration in Watershed Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Koray K.; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Sorooshian, Soroosh

    2009-01-01

    Hydrologic models use relatively simple mathematical equations to conceptualize and aggregate the complex, spatially distributed, and highly interrelated water, energy, and vegetation processes in a watershed. A consequence of process aggregation is that the model parameters often do not represent directly measurable entities and must, therefore, be estimated using measurements of the system inputs and outputs. During this process, known as model calibration, the parameters are adjusted so that the behavior of the model approximates, as closely and consistently as possible, the observed response of the hydrologic system over some historical period of time. This Chapter reviews the current state-of-the-art of model calibration in watershed hydrology with special emphasis on our own contributions in the last few decades. We discuss the historical background that has led to current perspectives, and review different approaches for manual and automatic single- and multi-objective parameter estimation. In particular, we highlight the recent developments in the calibration of distributed hydrologic models using parameter dimensionality reduction sampling, parameter regularization and parallel computing.

  20. Transfer Timing

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    sim present Simulation Presentation Interactive Media Element This IME is used in the Computer Communications and Networks class offered in the Graduate School of Operations and Information Sciences. This introductory computer networking course provides the theory and principles of networking and communications protocols. This IME is used to help students understand data transfer options. CS3502 Computer Communications and Networks