WorldWideScience

Sample records for calibration monitoring activities

  1. ASSESSMENT OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY USING WEARABLE MONITORS: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR MONITOR CALIBRATION AND USE IN THE FIELD

    OpenAIRE

    Freedson, Patty; Bowles, Heather R; Troiano, Richard; Haskell, William

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides recommendations for the use of wearable monitors for assessing physical activity. We have provided recommendations for measurement researchers, end users, and developers of activity monitors. We discuss new horizons and future directions in the field of objective measurement of physical activity and present challenges that remain for the future. These recommendations are based on the proceedings from the workshop, “Objective Measurement of Physical Activity: Best Practices...

  2. ASSESSMENT OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY USING WEARABLE MONITORS: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR MONITOR CALIBRATION AND USE IN THE FIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedson, Patty; Bowles, Heather R.; Troiano, Richard; Haskell, William

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides recommendations for the use of wearable monitors for assessing physical activity. We have provided recommendations for measurement researchers, end users, and developers of activity monitors. We discuss new horizons and future directions in the field of objective measurement of physical activity and present challenges that remain for the future. These recommendations are based on the proceedings from the workshop, “Objective Measurement of Physical Activity: Best Practices & Future Direction,” July 20-21, 2009, and also on data and information presented since the workshop. PMID:22157769

  3. Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

    2009-03-12

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma

  4. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes, located in the outer part of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two photomultiplier in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during the data taking, a set of calibration systems is used. The calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator based readout system. Combined information from all systems allows to monitor and equalise the calorimeter r...

  5. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chomont, Arthur Rene; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), located on the outside of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during the data taking, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser and charge injection elements and it allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scin...

  6. Radioactive standards and calibration methods for contamination monitoring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Makoto [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-06-01

    Contamination monitoring in the facilities for handling unsealed radioactive materials is one of the most important procedures for radiation protection as well as radiation dose monitoring. For implementation of the proper contamination monitoring, radiation measuring instruments should not only be suitable to the purpose of monitoring, but also be well calibrated for the objective qualities of measurement. In the calibration of contamination monitoring instruments, quality reference activities need to be used. They are supplied in different such as extended sources, radioactive solutions or radioactive gases. These reference activities must be traceable to the national standards or equivalent standards. On the other hand, the appropriate calibration methods must be applied for each type of contamination monitoring instruments. In this paper, the concepts of calibration for contamination monitoring instruments, reference sources, determination methods of reference quantities and practical calibration methods of contamination monitoring instruments, including the procedures carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and some relevant experimental data. (G.K.)

  7. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). PMT signals are then digitized at 40 MHz and stored on detector and are only transferred off detector once the first level trigger acceptance has been confirmed. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator b...

  8. Calibration and monitoring for crystal calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Ren Yuan

    2005-01-01

    Crystal calorimetry provides excellent energy resolution in high energy and nuclear physics. The light output of heavy crystal scintillators, however, suffers from not negligible damage in radiation environment. A precision calibration and monitoring thus is crucial for maintaining crystal precision in situ. The performance of calibration and monitoring approaches used by BaBar, CLEO and L3 experiments are presented. The design and construction of a laser- based light monitoring system for CMS PWO calorimeter is also discussed.

  9. A self-calibrating radon monitor with statistical discrimination

    CERN Document Server

    Valcov, N

    2002-01-01

    A radon monitor, able to perform the measurement of the radon and its progeny volumic activity, in a gamma-ray or natural radiation background field, was developed. The instrument consists of a 10 l ionization chamber, a high voltage source, an integrating preamplifier, a data acquisition system and a personal computer. A new method for self-calibration of Radon volumic activity measurements, based on the alpha counting with an ionization chamber is also presented.

  10. Calibration and monitoring of the ATLAS Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). PMT signals are then digitized at 40~MHz and stored on detector and are only transferred off detector once the first level trigger acceptance has been confirmed. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator b...

  11. POLAMI: Polarimetric Monitoring of AGN at Millimetre Wavelengths - I. The programme, calibration and calibrator data products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, Iván; Thum, Clemens; Molina, Sol N.; Casadio, Carolina; Wiesemeyer, Helmut; Morris, David; Paubert, Gabriel; Gómez, José L.; Kramer, Carsten

    2018-02-01

    We describe the POLAMI (Polarimetric Monitoring of AGN at Millimetre Wavelengths) programme for the monitoring of all four Stokes parameters of a sample of bright radio-loud active galactic nuclei with the IRAM 30-m telescope at 3.5 and 1.3 mm. The programme started in 2006 October and accumulated, until 2014 August, 2300 observations at 3.5 mm, achieving a median time sampling interval of 22 d for the sample of 37 sources. This first paper explains the source selection, mostly blazars, the observing strategy and data calibration and gives the details of the instrumental polarization corrections. The sensitivity (1σ) reached at 3.5 mm is 0.5 per cent (linear polarization degree), 4.7° (polarization angle), and 0.23 per cent (circular polarization), while the corresponding values at 1.3 mm are 1.7 per cent, 9.9° and 0.72 per cent, respectively. The data quality is demonstrated by the time sequences of our calibrators Mars and Uranus. For the quasar 3C 286, widely used as a linear polarization calibrator, we give improved estimates of its linear polarization, and show for the first time occasional detections of its weak circular polarization, which suggests a small level of variability of the source at millimeter wavelengths.

  12. Calibration of the new Next Generation Radiation Monitors for ESA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdas, Wojtek; Marcinkowski, Radek; Xiao, Hualin

    2017-04-01

    Current and future activities in Space Weather domain utilize large sets of data from measurements conducted by numerous instruments. Thus a predictive power for its forecast as well as a deep understanding of underlying processes and links between them heavily rely on the data quality. The Next Generation Radiation Monitor (NGRM) is a new instrument dedicated for space measurements of radiation environment of electrons, protons and heavy ions. NGRM covers energy ranges from 100 keV to 7 MeV for electrons and from 2 MeV to more than 200 MeV for protons. It was already realized at the development stage of its precursor SREM (ESA Standard Radiation Environment Monitor) that only careful calibrations on-ground will assure full understanding of instrument performance in space and proper unfolding of the raw data to create reliable particle fluxes and spectra in space. We present the NGRM instrument calibration procedure and describe particle tests facilities and methods utilized and applied during characterization process. New data from calibration tests of the first NGRM flight model units will be presented and discussed together with numerical modeling results.

  13. A Review of Sensor Calibration Monitoring for Calibration Interval Extension in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-08-31

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in United Kingdom, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This report presents a state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and online monitoring algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several needs are identified, including the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; accurate determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity. Understanding the degradation of sensors and the impact of this degradation on signals is key to

  14. Calibration Monitoring for Sensor Calibration Interval Extension: Gaps in the Current Science Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-10-09

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. International application of calibration monitoring has shown that sensors may operate for longer periods within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. Online monitoring (OLM) can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of OLM for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This paper summarizes a recent state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and OLM algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several technical needs were identified, including an understanding of the impacts of sensor degradation on measurements for both conventional and emerging sensors; the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

  15. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter time calibration, monitoring and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Davidek, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling device is made of plastic scintillating tiles alternated with iron plates and its response is calibrated to electromagnetic scale by means of several dedicated calibration systems. The accurate time calibration is important for the energy reconstruction, non-collision background removal as well as for specific physics analyses. The initial time calibration with so-called splash events and subsequent fine-tuning with collision data are presented. The monitoring of the time calibration with laser system and physics collision data is discussed as well as the corrections for sudden changes performed still before the recorded data are processed for physics analyses. Finally, the time resolution as measured with jets and isolated muons particles is presented.

  16. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter time calibration, monitoring and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidek, T.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling device is made of plastic scintillating tiles alternated with iron plates and its response is calibrated to electromagnetic scale by means of several dedicated calibration systems. The accurate time calibration is important for the energy reconstruction, non-collision background removal as well as for specific physics analyses. The initial time calibration with so-called splash events and subsequent fine-tuning with collision data are presented. The monitoring of the time calibration with laser system and physics collision data is discussed as well as the corrections for sudden changes performed still before the recorded data are processed for physics analyses. Finally, the time resolution as measured with jets and isolated muons is presented.

  17. Calibration of Community-based Coral Reef Monitoring Protocols ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Zone Conservation and Development Programme (TCZCDP) were tested against SCUBA-based coral reef monitoring (SB-CRM) as practiced by the Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Dar es Salaam. Calibration showed no significant differences in measuring percent cover of live hard corals, sponges, dead corals ...

  18. Calibration of Heat Stress Monitor and its Measurement Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Can

    2017-07-01

    Wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) equation is a heat stress index that gives information for the workers in the industrial areas. WBGT equation is described in ISO Standard 7243 (ISO 7243 in Hot environments—estimation of the heat stress on working man, based on the WBGT index, ISO, Geneva, 1982). WBGT is the result of the combined quantitative effects of the natural wet-bulb temperature, dry-bulb temperature, and air temperature. WBGT is a calculated parameter. WBGT uses input estimates, and heat stress monitor measures these quantities. In this study, the calibration method of a heat stress monitor is described, and the model function for measurement uncertainty is given. Sensitivity coefficients were derived according to GUM. Two-pressure humidity generators were used to generate a controlled environment. Heat stress monitor was calibrated inside of the generator. Two-pressure humidity generator, which is located in Turkish Standard Institution, was used as the reference device. This device is traceable to national standards. Two-pressure humidity generator includes reference temperature Pt-100 sensors. The reference sensor was sheltered with a wet wick for the calibration of natural wet-bulb thermometer. The reference sensor was centred into a black globe that has got 150 mm diameter for the calibration of the black globe thermometer.

  19. Endcap Muon Chamber Calibration and Monitoring Procedures in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Vickey Boeriu, Oana

    2009-01-01

    The cathode strip chamber (CSC) system is one of the three types of muon detectors used in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It consists of 468 chambers, with a total of $\\sim$218k strips and $\\sim$183k wires, placed onto two endcaps. Calibration tests which monitor the system stability, measure configuration constants that will be downloaded to electronics and calculate the calibration constants needed in the offline reconstruction - like crosstalk, gains, noise and connectivity - are performed regularly. The full chain of acquiring, analyzing and applying the calibration constants was successfully tested recently for the first time on the CSC system, using cosmic-ray data recorded during the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC).

  20. Hierarchy of individual calibration levels for heart rate and accelerometry to measure physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brage, Søren; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Combining accelerometry with heart rate (HR) monitoring may improve precision of physical activity measurement. Considerable variation exists in the relationships between physical activity intensity (PAI) and HR and accelerometry, which may be reduced by individual calibration. However, individual...

  1. Calibration of stack monitors for measurement of noble gases in nuclear facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovar, Petr; Dryak, Pavel; Suran, Jiri; Gudelis, Arunas

    2012-09-01

    In nuclear facilities stack monitors are used for the measurement of the volumetric activity of noble gases. Spectrometric measurement is needed because the content of stack effluents is always a mixture of radionuclides. In some nuclear power plants new types of monitors were installed based on HPGe detectors. For efficiency calibration a standard with the radionuclide Xe-127 was developed and calibration curve constructed in the energy range 81 keV-1293 keV. Experiental efficiencies were checked using an MC model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radioactive contamination in monitors received for calibration; Contaminacao em monitores de radiacao recebidos para calibracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Paulo S.; Santos, Gilvan C. dos; Brunelo, Maria Antonieta G.; Paula, Tiago C. de; Pires, Marina A.; Borges, Jose C. [MRA Comercio de Instrumentos Eletronicos Ltda., Jardinopolis, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ensaios e Pesquisas em Metrologia (METROBRAS)

    2013-10-01

    The Calibration Laboratory - LABCAL, from the Research Center for Metrology and Testing - METROBRAS, MRA Comercio de Instrumentos Eletronicos Ltda., began activities in October 2008 and, in August 2009, decided to establish a procedure for monitoring tests, external and internal, of all packages received from customers, containing instruments for calibration. The aim was to investigate possible contamination radioactive on these instruments. On July 2011, this procedure was extended to packagings of personal thermoluminescent dosemeters - TLD, received by the newly created Laboratory Laboratorio de Dosimetria Pessoal - LDP . In the monitoring procedure were used monitors with external probe, type pancake, MRA brand, models GP - 500 and MIR 7028. During the 37 months in which this investigation was conducted, were detected 42 cases of radioactive contamination, with the following characteristics: 1) just one case was personal dosimeter, TLD type; 2) just one case was not from a packing from nuclear medicine service - was from a mining company; 3) contamination occurred on packs and instruments, located and/or widespread; 4) contamination values ranged from slightly above the level of background radiation to about a thousand fold. Although METROBRAS has facilities for decontamination, in most cases, especially those of higher contamination, the procedure followed was to store the contaminated material in a room used for storage of radioactive sources. Periodically, each package and/or instrument was monitored, being released when the radiation level matched the background radiation. Every contamination detected, the client and/or owner of the instrument was informed. The Brazilian National Energy Commission - CNEN, was informed, during your public consultation for reviewing the standard for nuclear medicine services, held in mid-2012, having received from METROBRAS the statistical data available at the time. The high frequency of contamination detected and the high

  3. A Self Calibrating Remote Controllable Water Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, J. E.; Heath, G. L.

    2006-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been asked to support Mountain States Environmental (MSE) by providing an automated remote monitoring system for a treatment process of acid mine discharge from the Susie mine, which is located outside of Rimini near Helena, Montana. The mine, now abandoned, produces water year around that is contaminated with lead, zinc, cadmium and arsenic (Pb, Zn, Cd, and As). MSE is managing a project to install and test a pilot scale treatment system that will operate year around treating the discharge water to remove the metal contaminants of concern. The treatment system employs a combination of lime addition, iron addition, settling chambers, sand filters and polishing to treat the contaminated water. The system requires routine monitoring to ensure that process controls remain functional. The INL is developing a monitoring system capable of self calibrating, with two way communication, in a remote location that will provide physical and chemical water quality measurements throughout the treatment system.

  4. Electronics and Calibration system for the CMS Beam Halo Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Nicolò; Fabbri, Franco L; Finkel, Alexey; Orfanelli, Stella; Loos, R; Montanari, Alessandro; Rusack, R; Stickland, David P

    2014-01-01

    In the context of increasing luminosity of LHC, it will be important to accurately measure the Machine Induced Background. A new monitoring system will be installed in the cavern of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment for measuring the beam background at high radius. This detector is composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators, coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The readout chain of this detector will make use of many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadron Calorimeter electronics, with a dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal will be digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing. The backend electronics will record bunch-by-bunch histograms, which will be published to CMS and the LHC using the newly designed CMS beam instrumentation specific DAQ. A calibration monitoring system has been designed to generate triggered pulses of...

  5. [Conservative calibration of a clearance monitor system for waste material from nuclear medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, Carsten; Geworski, Lilli

    2014-09-01

    Clearance monitor systems are used for gross gamma measurements of waste potentially contaminated with radioactivity. These measurements are to make sure that legal requirements, e.g. clearance criteria according to the german radiation protection ordinance, are met. This means that measurement results may overestimate, but must not underestimate the true values. This paper describes a pragmatic way using a calibrated Cs-137 point source to generate a conservative calibration for the clearance monitor system used in the Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (MHH). The most important nuclides used in nuclear medicine are considered. The measurement result reliably overestimates the true value of the activity present in the waste. The calibration is compliant with the demands for conservativity and traceability to national standards. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Using Automated On-Site Monitoring to Calibrate Empirical Models of Trihalomethanes Concentrations in Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Watts III

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An automated, on-site trihalomethanes concentration data set from a conventional water treatment plant was used to optimize powdered activated carbon and pre-chlorination doses. The trihalomethanes concentration data set was used with commonly monitored water quality parameters to improve an empirical model of trihalomethanes formation. A calibrated model was used to predict trihalomethanes concentrations the following year. The agreement between the models and measurements was evaluated. The original model predicted trihalomethanes concentrations within ~10 μg·L−1 of the measurement. Calibration improved model prediction by a factor of three to five times better than the literature model.

  7. Rapid Analysis, Self-Calibrating Array for Air Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Lara, Liana; Huerta, Ramon; Vergara, Alexander; Muezzinoglua, Mehmet K.

    2012-01-01

    Human space missions have critical needs for monitoring and control for life support systems. These systems have monitoring needs that include feedback for closed loop processes and quality control for environmental factors. Sensors and monitoring technologies assure that the air environment and water supply for the astronaut crew habitat fall within acceptable limits, and that the life support system is functioning properly and efficiently. The longer the flight duration and the more distant the destination, the more critical it becomes to have carefully monitored and automated control systems for life support. Past experiments with the JPL ENose have demonstrated a lifetime of the sensor array, with the software, of around 18 months. The lifetime of the calibration, for some analytes, was as long as 24 months. We are working on a sensor array and new algorithms that will include sensor response time in the analysis. The preliminary array analysis for two analytes shows that the analysis time, of an event, can be dropped from 45 minutes to less than10 minutes and array training time can be cut substantially. We will describe the lifetime testing of an array and show lifetime data on individual sensors. This progress will lead to more rapid identification of analytes, and faster training time of the array.

  8. Electronics and Calibration system for the CMS Beam Halo Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Nicolo

    2014-01-01

    In the context of increasing luminosity of LHC, it will be important to accurately measure the Machine Induced Background. A new monitoring system will be installed in the CMS cavern for measuring the beam background at high radius. This detector is composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators, coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The readout chain of this detector will make use of many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadron Calorimeter electronics, with a dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal will be digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing.The backend electronics will record bunch-by-bunch histograms, which will be published to CMS and the LHC using the newly designed CMS beam instrumentation specific DAQ. A calibration monitoring system has been designed to generate triggered pulses of light to monitor the efficiency of the sys...

  9. Using Automated On-Site Monitoring to Calibrate Empirical Models of Trihalomethanes Concentrations in Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas E. Watts III; Robyn A. Snow; Brown, Aaron W.; J. C. York; Greg Fantom; Paul S. Simone Jr.; Emmert, Gary L.

    2015-01-01

    An automated, on-site trihalomethanes concentration data set from a conventional water treatment plant was used to optimize powdered activated carbon and pre-chlorination doses. The trihalomethanes concentration data set was used with commonly monitored water quality parameters to improve an empirical model of trihalomethanes formation. A calibrated model was used to predict trihalomethanes concentrations the following year. The agreement between the models and measurements was evaluated. The...

  10. A Self-Calibrating Remote Control Chemical Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessica Croft

    2007-06-01

    The Susie Mine, part of the Upper Tenmile Mining Area, is located in Rimini, MT about 15 miles southwest of Helena, MT. The Upper Tenmile Creek Mining Area is an EPA Superfund site with 70 abandoned hard rock mines and several residential yards prioritized for clean up. Water from the Susie mine flows into Tenmile Creek from which the city of Helena draws part of its water supply. MSE Technology Applications in Butte, Montana was contracted by the EPA to build a treatment system for the Susie mine effluent and demonstrate a system capable of treating mine waste water in remote locations. The Idaho National Lab was contracted to design, build and demonstrate a low maintenance self-calibrating monitoring system that would monitor multiple sample points, allow remote two-way communications with the control software and allow access to the collected data through a web site. The Automated Chemical Analysis Monitoring (ACAM) system was installed in December 2006. This thesis documents the overall design of the hardware, control software and website, the data collected while MSE-TA’s system was operational, the data collected after MSE-TA’s system was shut down and suggested improvements to the existing system.

  11. Instruments for calibration and monitoring of the LHCb Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Deplano, C; Lai, A

    2006-01-01

    The subject of this Ph. D. thesis is the study and the development of the instruments needed to monitor and calibrate the Muon Detector of the LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) experiment. LHCb is currently under installation at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and will start to take data during 2007. The experiment will study B mesons decays to achieve a profound understanding of favour physics in the Standard Model framework and to search signs of new physics beyond. Muons can be found in the final states of many B-decays which are sensitive to CP violation. The Muon Detector has the crucial role to identify the muon particles generated by the b-hadron decays through a measurement of their transverse momentum, already at the first trigger level (Level-0). A 95% effciency in events selection is required for the Muon Trigger, which operates at the Level-0. 1380 detectors are used to equip the whole Muon System and the corresponding 122,112 readout channels must be time aligned and monitored with a resol...

  12. Optical relative calibration and stability monitoring for the Auger fluorescence detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramo, Carla; Brack, J.; Caruso, R.; D' Urso, D.; Fazio, D.; Fonte, R.; Gemmeke, H.; Kleifges, M.; Knapik, R.; Insolia, A.; /Catania U.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Menshikov, A.; Miller, W.; Privitera, P.; Rodriguez Martino, J.

    2005-07-01

    The stability of the fluorescence telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory is monitored with the optical relative calibration setup. Optical fibers distribute light pulses to three different diffuser groups within the optical system. The total charge per pulse is measured for each pixel and compared with reference calibration measurements. This allows monitoring the short and long term stability with respect of the relative timing between pixels and the relative gain for each pixel. The designs of the LED calibration unit (LCU) and of the Xenon flash lamp used for relative calibration, are described and their capabilities to monitor the stability of the telescope performances are studied. We report the analysis of relative calibration data recorded during 2004. Fluctuations in the relative calibration constants provide a measure of the stability of the FD.

  13. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  14. Calibration and Monitoring systems of the ATLAS Tile Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    BOUMEDIENE, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated to the calorimeter, there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of their formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, LASER, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. Recent performances of these systems are presented.

  15. Calibration and Monitoring systems of the ATLAS Tile Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    BOUMEDIENE, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated on the calorimeter there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of its formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, LASER and charge injection and minimum bias events produces in proton-proton collisions. In this contribution is given a brief description of the different systems hardware and presented the latest results on their performance, like the determination of the conversion factors, linearity and stability.

  16. Effect of calibration and environmental condition on the performance of direct-reading organic vapor monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Christopher; LeBouf, Ryan; Lee, Larry; Slaven, James; Martin, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The performance of three MIRAN SapphIRe Portable Infrared Ambient Air Analyzers and three Century Portable Toxic Vapor Analyzers equipped with photoionization (PID) and flame ionization (FID) detectors was compared with charcoal tube sampling. Relationships were investigated using two different calibration methods at four cyclohexane concentrations, three temperatures, and four relative humidities. For the first method, the TVA monitors were calibrated with a single concentration of methane for the FID, and isobutylene for the PID. The SapphIRe monitors were zeroed and the monitor's manufacturer-supplied library was used. For the second method, a five-point cyclohexane calibration curve was created for each monitor. Comparison of the monitor results of each calibration method (pooled data) indicated a significant difference between methods (t-test, p PID and FID monitor groups performed better using the first calibration method. The PID monitor group's performance was affected only at the 90% relative humidity (RH) condition. Using the first method, the monitor readings were compared with the charcoal tube average using mixed linear model analyses of variance (ANOVAs) and regression. The ANOVA results showed there was a statistically significant difference among readings from all monitor types (p PID monitor group had a similar correlation when 90% RH was excluded (r² = 0.94) but had a weaker correlation when it was included (r² = 0.58). The operator should take care when using these monitors at high concentrations and the PID monitors at high humidities, consider the variability between units of the same monitor, and conduct performance verification of the monitor being used.

  17. Effect of calibration environment on the performance of direct-reading organic vapor monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBouf, Ryan F; Slaven, James E; Coffey, Christopher C

    2013-05-01

    The performance of two direct-reading organic vapor monitors (monitors) when calibrated at different environmental conditions was compared with charcoal tube results. Three MIRAN SapphIRe portable ambient air analyzers (SAP) and three Century portable toxic vapor analyzers (TVAs) were evaluated. Prior to sampling, the monitors were calibrated per the manufacturer's instructions using methane for the TVA flame ionization detector (FID) and isobutylene for the photoionization detector (PID), whereas the SapphIRe instruments were zeroed and the instrument's manufacturer-supplied library was used. For the first series of tests ("Part 1--Same condition"), the monitors were calibrated under the same environmental conditions as those present during sampling. They were then challenged with four cyclohexane concentrations (30, 150, 300, and 475 ppm) under two extreme environmental conditions: 5 degrees C and 30% relative humidity (RH) (same/cold) and 38 degrees C and 90% RH (same/hot). For the second series of tests ("Part 2--Different condition"), the monitors were calibrated at approximately normal indoor environmental conditions (21 degrees C and 50% RH) and sampled at extreme environmental conditions (different/cold and different/hot). The monitor readings from the two methods were compared with the actual cyclohexane concentration determined from charcoal tubes using ratios and root mean square errors. A number of monitor failures, both below detection limit values in the presence of a known challenge concentration and erroneously high measurements, occurred in each part: same condition 20.7% (149/720) and different condition 42.4% (305/ 720), with a majority of the failures (> 78%) during the hot and humid conditions. All monitors performed best at the same/cold, followed by the same/hot, in terms of closeness to the reference standard method and low within-monitor variability. The ranked choice of monitors for same/cold is PID > SAP > FID; for different/cold FID

  18. Calibration of Community-based Coral Reef Monitoring Protocols ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract—Coral reef monitoring (CRM) has been recognised as an important management tool and has consequently been incorporated in Integrated Coastal. Area Management (ICAM) programmes in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO). Community-based coral reef monitoring (CB-CRM), which uses simplified procedures ...

  19. Using Active Learning for Speeding up Calibration in Simulation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Mucahit; Ergun, Mehmet Ali; Stout, Natasha K; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Craven, Mark; Alagoz, Oguzhan

    2016-07-01

    Most cancer simulation models include unobservable parameters that determine disease onset and tumor growth. These parameters play an important role in matching key outcomes such as cancer incidence and mortality, and their values are typically estimated via a lengthy calibration procedure, which involves evaluating a large number of combinations of parameter values via simulation. The objective of this study is to demonstrate how machine learning approaches can be used to accelerate the calibration process by reducing the number of parameter combinations that are actually evaluated. Active learning is a popular machine learning method that enables a learning algorithm such as artificial neural networks to interactively choose which parameter combinations to evaluate. We developed an active learning algorithm to expedite the calibration process. Our algorithm determines the parameter combinations that are more likely to produce desired outputs and therefore reduces the number of simulation runs performed during calibration. We demonstrate our method using the previously developed University of Wisconsin breast cancer simulation model (UWBCS). In a recent study, calibration of the UWBCS required the evaluation of 378 000 input parameter combinations to build a race-specific model, and only 69 of these combinations produced results that closely matched observed data. By using the active learning algorithm in conjunction with standard calibration methods, we identify all 69 parameter combinations by evaluating only 5620 of the 378 000 combinations. Machine learning methods hold potential in guiding model developers in the selection of more promising parameter combinations and hence speeding up the calibration process. Applying our machine learning algorithm to one model shows that evaluating only 1.49% of all parameter combinations would be sufficient for the calibration. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Web-based assessments of physical activity in youth: considerations for design and scale calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Maurice, Pedro F; Welk, Gregory J

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the design and methods involved in calibrating a Web-based self-report instrument to estimate physical activity behavior. The limitations of self-report measures are well known, but calibration methods enable the reported information to be equated to estimates obtained from objective data. This paper summarizes design considerations for effective development and calibration of physical activity self-report measures. Each of the design considerations is put into context and followed by a practical application based on our ongoing calibration research with a promising online self-report tool called the Youth Activity Profile (YAP). We first describe the overall concept of calibration and how this influences the selection of appropriate self-report tools for this population. We point out the advantages and disadvantages of different monitoring devices since the choice of the criterion measure and the strategies used to minimize error in the measure can dramatically improve the quality of the data. We summarize strategies to ensure quality control in data collection and discuss analytical considerations involved in group- vs individual-level inference. For cross-validation procedures, we describe the advantages of equivalence testing procedures that directly test and quantify agreement. Lastly, we introduce the unique challenges encountered when transitioning from paper to a Web-based tool. The Web offers considerable potential for broad adoption but an iterative calibration approach focused on continued refinement is needed to ensure that estimates are generalizable across individuals, regions, seasons and countries.

  1. NVLAP activities at Department of Defense calibration laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, D.M. [Defense Nuclear Agency, Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    There are 367 active radiological instrument calibration laboratories within the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Each of the four services in DoD manages, operates, and certifies the technical proficiency and competency of those laboratories under their cognizance. Each service has designated secondary calibration laboratories to trace all calibration source standards to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Individual service radiological calibration programs and capabilities, present and future, are described, as well as the measurement quality assurance (MQA) processes for their traceability. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) programs for dosimetry systems are briefly summarized. Planned NVLAP accreditation of secondary laboratories is discussed in the context of current technical challenges and future efforts.

  2. Calibration of Community-based Coral Reef Monitoring Protocols ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Area Management (ICAM) programmes in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO). Community-based coral reef monitoring (CB-CRM) ..... Hatziolos, M. E. (2007) Coral Reefs. Under Rapid Climate Change and Ocean. Acidification. Science 318: 1737-1742. Horrill, J.C., Kalombo H & Makoloweka. S., (2001). Collaborative Reef and.

  3. Portable Gathering System for Monitoring and Online Calibration at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Conde-Muíño, P; Dos Anjos, A; Baines, J T M; Bee, C P; Biglietti, M; Bogaerts, J A C; Boisvert, V; Bosman, M; Caron, B; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cavalli, D; Cervetto, M; Comune, G; De Santo, A; Díaz-Gómez, M; Dosil, M; Ellis, Nick; Emeliyanov, D; Epp, B; Falciano, S; Farilla, A; George, S; Ghete, V M; González, S; Grothe, M; Kabana, S; Khomich, A; Kilvington, G; Konstantinidis, N P; Kootz, A; Lowe, A; Luminari, L; Maeno, T; Masik, J; Di Mattia, A; Meessen, C; Mello, A G; Merino, G; Moore, R; Morettini, P; Negri, A; Nikitin, N V; Nisati, A; Padilla, C; Panikashvili, N; Parodi, F; Pérez-Réale, V; Pinfold, J L; Pinto, P; Qian, Z; Resconi, S; Rosati, S; Sánchez, C; Santamarina-Rios, C; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Segura, E; De Seixas, J M; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Soluk, R A; Stefanidis, E; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Tapprogge, Stefan; Thomas, E; Touchard, F; Venda-Pinto, B; Vercesi, V; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Zobernig, G; Computing In High Energy Physics

    2005-01-01

    During the runtime of any experiment, a central monitoring system that detects problems as soon as they appear has an essential role. In a large experiment, like ATLAS, the online data acquisition system is distributed across the nodes of large farms, each of them running several processes that analyse a fraction of the events. In this architecture, it is necessary to have a central process that collects all the monitoring data from the different nodes, produces full statistics histograms and analyses them. In this paper we present the design of such a system, called the gatherer. It allows to collect any monitoring object, such as histograms, from the farm nodes, from any process in the DAQ, trigger and reconstruction chain. It also adds up the statistics, if required, and processes user defined algorithms in order to analyse the monitoring data. The results are sent to a centralized display, that shows the information online, and to the archiving system, triggering alarms in case of problems. The innovation...

  4. Optimizing active and passive calibration of optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, M.; Czerwinski, F.; Oddershede, L. B.

    2011-04-01

    To obtain quantitative information from optical trapping experiments it is essential to perform a precise force calibration. Therefore, sources of noise should be pinpointed and eliminated. Fourier analysis is routinely used to calibrate optical trapping assays because it is excellent for pinpointing high frequency noise. In addition, Allan variance analysis is particularly useful for quantifying low frequency noise and for predicting the optimal measurement time. We show how to use Allan variance in combination with Fourier analysis for optimal calibration and noise reduction in optical trapping assays. The methods are applied to passive assays, utilizing the thermal motion of a trapped particle, and to active assays where the bead is harmonically driven. The active method must be applied in assays where, for example, the viscoelastic properties of the medium or the size or shape of the trapped object are unknown. For measurement times shorter than the optimal calibration time the noise is larger in active than in the passive assays. For times equal to or longer than the optimal measurement time, though, the noise on passive and active assays is identical. As an example, we show how to quantify the influence on measurement noise of bead size and chamber geometry in active and passive assays.

  5. Value activity monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Alencar Silva, P.

    2013-01-01

    Current value modeling ontologies are grounded on the economic premise that profit sharing is a critical condition to be assessed during the configuration of a value constellation. Such a condition ought to be reinforced through a monitoring mechanism design, since a value model expresses only

  6. Calibration and performance of a real-time gamma-ray spectrometry water monitor using a LaBr3(Ce) detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, E.; Casanovas, R.; Salvadó, M.

    2018-03-01

    A scintillation gamma-ray spectrometry water monitor with a 2″ × 2″ LaBr3(Ce) detector was characterized in this study. This monitor measures gamma-ray spectra of river water. Energy and resolution calibrations were performed experimentally, whereas the detector efficiency was determined using Monte Carlo simulations with EGS5 code system. Values of the minimum detectable activity concentrations for 131I and 137Cs were calculated for different integration times. As an example of the monitor performance after calibration, a radiological increment during a rainfall episode was studied.

  7. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Lin, Guang; Crawford, Susan L.; Konomi, Bledar A.; Braatz, Brett G.; Coble, Jamie B.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the status of ongoing research towards the development of advanced algorithms for online calibration monitoring. The objective of this research is to develop the next generation of online monitoring technologies for sensor calibration interval extension and signal validation in operating and new reactors. These advances are expected to improve the safety and reliability of current and planned nuclear power systems as a result of higher accuracies and increased reliability of sensors used to monitor key parameters. The focus of this report is on documenting the outcomes of the first phase of R&D under this project, which addressed approaches to uncertainty quantification (UQ) in online monitoring that are data-driven, and can therefore adjust estimates of uncertainty as measurement conditions change. Such data-driven approaches to UQ are necessary to address changing plant conditions, for example, as nuclear power plants experience transients, or as next-generation small modular reactors (SMR) operate in load-following conditions.

  8. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Lin, Guang; Crawford, Susan L.; Konomi, Bledar A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

    2014-04-30

    This report describes research towards the development of advanced algorithms for online calibration monitoring. The objective of this research is to develop the next generation of online monitoring technologies for sensor calibration interval extension and signal validation in operating and new reactors. These advances are expected to improve the safety and reliability of current and planned nuclear power systems as a result of higher accuracies and increased reliability of sensors used to monitor key parameters. The focus of this report is on documenting the outcomes of the first phase of R&D under this project, which addressed approaches to uncertainty quantification (UQ) in online monitoring that are data-driven, and can therefore adjust estimates of uncertainty as measurement conditions change. Such data-driven approaches to UQ are necessary to address changing plant conditions, for example, as nuclear power plants experience transients, or as next-generation small modular reactors (SMR) operate in load-following conditions.

  9. Monitoring of the infrastructure and services used to handle and automatically produce Alignment and Calibration conditions at CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Roland; Govi, Giacomo; Franzoni, Giovanni; Di Guida, Salvatore; Pfeiffer, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    The CMS experiment at CERN LHC has a dedicated infrastructure to handle the alignment and calibration data. This infrastructure is composed of several services, which take on various data management tasks required for the consumption of the non-event data (also called as condition data) in the experiment activities. The criticality of these tasks imposes tights requirements for the availability and the reliability of the services executing them. In this scope, a comprehensive monitoring and alarm generating system has been developed. The system has been implemented based on the Nagios open source industry standard for monitoring and alerting services, and monitors the database back-end, the hosting nodes and key heart-beat functionalities for all the services involved. This paper describes the design, implementation and operational experience with the monitoring system developed and deployed at CMS in 2016.

  10. Monitoring and calibration of the ALICE time projection chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Dag Toppe

    The aim of the A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) experiment at CERN is to study the properties of the Quark–Gluon Plasma (QGP). With energies up to 5.5 A T eV for Pb+Pb collisions, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) sets a new benchmark for heavy- ion collisions, and opens the door to a so far unexplored energy domain. A closer look at some of the physics topics of ALICE is given in Chapter 1. ALICE consists of several sub-detectors and other sub-systems. The various sub- detectors are designed for exploring different aspects of the particle production of an heavy-ion collision. Chapter 2 gives some insight into the design. The main tracking detector is the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). It has more than half million read-out channels, divided into 216 Read-out Partitions (RPs). Each RP is a separate Front-End Electronics (FEE) entity, as described in Chapter 3. A complex Detector Control System (DCS) is needed for configuration, monitoring and control. The heart of it on the RP side is a small embedded ...

  11. Calibration of oscillometric non-invasive devices for monitoring blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doh, Il; Lim, Hyun Kyoon; Ahn, Bongyoung

    2015-04-01

    Blood pressure is one of the most important vital signs used to monitor a patient’s medical condition and is widely measured in hospitals and at home. Automatic, non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitoring devices measure systolic and diastolic blood pressures from the analysis of cuff pressure oscillations caused by periodic variations of blood pressure in an artery. Currently, clinical validation by comparing them to the auscultatory reference has been used to verify the performance of NIBP devices. However, there are presently no calibration methods for NIBP devices. Here, we propose an SI-traceable calibration method for oscillometric NIBP devices. The calibration system generates pressure-pulses at pre-determined cuff pressures, and with pre-determined amplitude, to the device-under-test. The uncertainty of each pulse is analyzed and used for the calculation of blood pressure (BP) uncertainty. The maximum uncertainty for systolic and diastolic BP using the newly developed calibration system is (0.74 and 0.60) mmHg (k = 2) depending on the pressure and amplitude of each pulse, as well as the number of pulses applied. The present method can be used for calibration of oscillometric NIBP devices.

  12. Automatic Camera Calibration Using Active Displays of a Virtual Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Tan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Camera calibration plays a critical role in 3D computer vision tasks. The most commonly used calibration method utilizes a planar checkerboard and can be done nearly fully automatically. However, it requires the user to move either the camera or the checkerboard during the capture step. This manual operation is time consuming and makes the calibration results unstable. In order to solve the above problems caused by manual operation, this paper presents a full-automatic camera calibration method using a virtual pattern instead of a physical one. The virtual pattern is actively transformed and displayed on a screen so that the control points of the pattern can be uniformly observed in the camera view. The proposed method estimates the camera parameters from point correspondences between 2D image points and the virtual pattern. The camera and the screen are fixed during the whole process; therefore, the proposed method does not require any manual operations. Performance of the proposed method is evaluated through experiments on both synthetic and real data. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve stable results and its accuracy is comparable to the standard method by Zhang.

  13. Active point out-of-plane ultrasound calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Alexis; Guo, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Haichong K.; Kang, Hyunjae; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Image-guided surgery systems are often used to provide surgeons with informational support. Due to several unique advantages such as ease of use, real-time image acquisition, and no ionizing radiation, ultrasound is a common intraoperative medical imaging modality used in image-guided surgery systems. To perform advanced forms of guidance with ultrasound, such as virtual image overlays or automated robotic actuation, an ultrasound calibration process must be performed. This process recovers the rigid body transformation between a tracked marker attached to the transducer and the ultrasound image. Point-based phantoms are considered to be accurate, but their calibration framework assumes that the point is in the image plane. In this work, we present the use of an active point phantom and a calibration framework that accounts for the elevational uncertainty of the point. Given the lateral and axial position of the point in the ultrasound image, we approximate a circle in the axial-elevational plane with a radius equal to the axial position. The standard approach transforms all of the imaged points to be a single physical point. In our approach, we minimize the distances between the circular subsets of each image, with them ideally intersecting at a single point. We simulated in noiseless and noisy cases, presenting results on out-of-plane estimation errors, calibration estimation errors, and point reconstruction precision. We also performed an experiment using a robot arm as the tracker, resulting in a point reconstruction precision of 0.64mm.

  14. Automatic Camera Calibration Using Active Displays of a Virtual Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lei; Wang, Yaonan; Yu, Hongshan; Zhu, Jiang

    2017-03-27

    Camera calibration plays a critical role in 3D computer vision tasks. The most commonly used calibration method utilizes a planar checkerboard and can be done nearly fully automatically. However, it requires the user to move either the camera or the checkerboard during the capture step. This manual operation is time consuming and makes the calibration results unstable. In order to solve the above problems caused by manual operation, this paper presents a full-automatic camera calibration method using a virtual pattern instead of a physical one. The virtual pattern is actively transformed and displayed on a screen so that the control points of the pattern can be uniformly observed in the camera view. The proposed method estimates the camera parameters from point correspondences between 2D image points and the virtual pattern. The camera and the screen are fixed during the whole process; therefore, the proposed method does not require any manual operations. Performance of the proposed method is evaluated through experiments on both synthetic and real data. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve stable results and its accuracy is comparable to the standard method by Zhang.

  15. The Improved NRL Tropical Cyclone Monitoring System with a Unified Microwave Brightness Temperature Calibration Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The near real-time NRL global tropical cyclone (TC monitoring system based on multiple satellite passive microwave (PMW sensors is improved with a new inter-sensor calibration scheme to correct the biases caused by differences in these sensor’s high frequency channels. Since the PMW sensor 89 GHz channel is used in multiple current and near future operational and research satellites, a unified scheme to calibrate all satellite PMW sensor’s ice scattering channels to a common 89 GHz is created so that their brightness temperatures (TBs will be consistent and permit more accurate manual and automated analyses. In order to develop a physically consistent calibration scheme, cloud resolving model simulations of a squall line system over the west Pacific coast and hurricane Bonnie in the Atlantic Ocean are applied to simulate the views from different PMW sensors. To clarify the complicated TB biases due to the competing nature of scattering and emission effects, a four-cloud based calibration scheme is developed (rain, non-rain, light rain, and cloudy. This new physically consistent inter-sensor calibration scheme is then evaluated with the synthetic TBs of hurricane Bonnie and a squall line as well as observed TCs. Results demonstrate the large TB biases up to 13 K for heavy rain situations before calibration between TMI and AMSR-E are reduced to less than 3 K after calibration. The comparison stats show that the overall bias and RMSE are reduced by 74% and 66% for hurricane Bonnie, and 98% and 85% for squall lines, respectively. For the observed hurricane Igor, the bias and RMSE decrease 41% and 25% respectively. This study demonstrates the importance of TB calibrations between PMW sensors in order to systematically monitor the global TC life cycles in terms of intensity, inner core structure and convective organization. A physics-based calibration scheme on TC’s TB corrections developed in this study is able to significantly reduce the

  16. Calibration of a total body potassium monitor with an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R. D.; Allen, B. J.

    1996-11-01

    An anthropomorphic phantom was used to calibrate a supine geometry sodium iodide total body potassium monitor. Correction factors accommodating variability in subject size were empirically determined. Measurements on 12 males of weight 45 - 96 kg, height 161 - 184 cm and 18 females of weight 48 - 89 kg, height 153 - 175 cm, showed that the images/0031-9155/41/11/015/img5.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> calibration factor images/0031-9155/41/11/015/img6.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> was significantly correlated (r = 0.88, p images/0031-9155/41/11/015/img7.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>, indicating comparable accuracy to images/0031-9155/41/11/015/img8.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>-based calibration procedures. Fat-free mass determined from the potassium measurements of 16 subjects correlated significantly with fat-free mass estimated from skinfold thickness (r = 0.98, p images/0031-9155/41/11/015/img8.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>-based methods of calibrating total body potassium monitors.

  17. Calibration of Passive Samplers for the Monitoring of Pharmaceuticals in Water-Sampling Rate Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Męczykowska, Hanna; Kobylis, Paulina; Stepnowski, Piotr; Caban, Magda

    2017-05-04

    Passive sampling is one of the most efficient methods of monitoring pharmaceuticals in environmental water. The reliability of the process relies on a correctly performed calibration experiment and a well-defined sampling rate (Rs) for target analytes. Therefore, in this review the state-of-the-art methods of passive sampler calibration for the most popular pharmaceuticals: antibiotics, hormones, β-blockers and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), along with the sampling rate variation, were presented. The advantages and difficulties in laboratory and field calibration were pointed out, according to the needs of control of the exact conditions. Sampling rate calculating equations and all the factors affecting the Rs value - temperature, flow, pH, salinity of the donor phase and biofouling - were discussed. Moreover, various calibration parameters gathered from the literature published in the last 16 years, including the device types, were tabled and compared. What is evident is that the sampling rate values for pharmaceuticals are impacted by several factors, whose influence is still unclear and unpredictable, while there is a big gap in experimental data. It appears that the calibration procedure needs to be improved, for example, there is a significant deficiency of PRCs (Performance Reference Compounds) for pharmaceuticals. One of the suggestions is to introduce correction factors for Rs values estimated in laboratory conditions.

  18. An Improved Calibration Method for Hydrazine Monitors for the United States Air Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsah, K

    2003-07-07

    This report documents the results of Phase 1 of the ''Air Force Hydrazine Detector Characterization and Calibration Project''. A method for calibrating model MDA 7100 hydrazine detectors in the United States Air Force (AF) inventory has been developed. The calibration system consists of a Kintek 491 reference gas generation system, a humidifier/mixer system which combines the dry reference hydrazine gas with humidified diluent or carrier gas to generate the required humidified reference for calibrations, and a gas sampling interface. The Kintek reference gas generation system itself is periodically calibrated using an ORNL-constructed coulometric titration system to verify the hydrazine concentration of the sample atmosphere in the interface module. The Kintek reference gas is then used to calibrate the hydrazine monitors. Thus, coulometric titration is only used to periodically assess the performance of the Kintek reference gas generation system, and is not required for hydrazine monitor calibrations. One advantage of using coulometric titration for verifying the concentration of the reference gas is that it is a primary standard (if used for simple solutions), thereby guaranteeing, in principle, that measurements will be traceable to SI units (i.e., to the mole). The effect of humidity of the reference gas was characterized by using the results of concentrations determined by coulometric titration to develop a humidity correction graph for the Kintek 491 reference gas generation system. Using this calibration method, calibration uncertainty has been reduced by 50% compared to the current method used to calibrate hydrazine monitors in the Air Force inventory and calibration time has also been reduced by more than 20%. Significant findings from studies documented in this report are the following: (1) The Kintek 491 reference gas generation system (generator, humidifier and interface module) can be used to calibrate hydrazine detectors. (2) The

  19. Calibration of a He accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-03-01

    The helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for a fast reactor dosimetry. The HAFM measurement system was calibrated using He gas and He implanted samples and the measurement accuracy was confirmed to be less than 5%. Based on the preliminary irradiation test in JOYO, the measured He in the {sup 10}B type HAFM agreed well with the calculated values using the JENDL-3.2 library. (author)

  20. Active learning in camera calibration through vision measurement application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoqin; Guo, Jierong; Wang, Xianchun; Liu, Changqing; Cao, Binfang

    2017-08-01

    Since cameras are increasingly more used in scientific application as well as in the applications requiring precise visual information, effective calibration of such cameras is getting more important. There are many reasons why the measurements of objects are not accurate. The largest reason is that the lens has a distortion. Another detrimental influence on the evaluation accuracy is caused by the perspective distortions in the image. They happen whenever we cannot mount the camera perpendicularly to the objects we want to measure. In overall, it is very important for students to understand how to correct lens distortions, that is camera calibration. If the camera is calibrated, the images are rectificated, and then it is possible to obtain undistorted measurements in world coordinates. This paper presents how the students should develop a sense of active learning for mathematical camera model besides the theoretical scientific basics. The authors will present the theoretical and practical lectures which have the goal of deepening the students understanding of the mathematical models of area scan cameras and building some practical vision measurement process by themselves.

  1. Field calibrations of a low-cost aerosol sensor at a regulatory monitoring site in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstius, D. M.; Pillarisetti, A.; Smith, K. R.; Seto, E.

    2014-04-01

    Health effects attributed to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) now rank it among the risk factors with the highest health burdens in the world, but existing monitoring infrastructure cannot adequately characterize spatial and temporal variability in urban PM2.5 concentrations, nor in human population exposures. The development and evaluation of more portable and affordable monitoring instruments based on low-cost sensors may offer a means to supplement and extend existing infrastructure, increasing the density and coverage of empirical measurements and thereby improving exposure science and control. Here, we report on field calibrations of a custom-built, battery-operated aerosol monitoring instrument we developed using low-cost, off-the-shelf optical aerosol sensors. We calibrated our instruments using 1 h and 24 h PM2.5 data from a class III US EPA Federal Equivalent Method (FEM) PM2.5 β-attenuation monitor in continuous operation at a regulatory monitoring site in Oakland, California. We observed negligible associations with ambient humidity and temperature; linear corrections were sufficient to explain 60% of the variance in 1 h reference PM2.5 data and 72% of the variance in 24 h data. Performance at 1 h integration times was comparable to commercially available optical instruments costing considerably more. These findings warrant further exploration of the circumstances under which this class of aerosol sensors may profitably be deployed to generate improved PM2.5 data sets.

  2. Contamination monitoring activities in Kanupp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, S.S. [Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (Pakistan)

    1997-06-01

    The Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (Kanupp) is a 137 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor, designed and erected by the Canadian General Electric Company as a turn key project. The plant is in operation since it was commissioned in the year 1972. It is located at the Arabian Sea Coast about 15 miles to the west of Karachi. During its more than two decades of operation, the plant has generated about 8 billion units of electricity with an average life time availability factor of 60%. In Kanupp, radioactive contamination may exit due to the release of fission product, activation products etc., which may somehow escape from its confinement and may contaminate surface or other media such as air, water etc. In this paper, following items are described: main aspects of contamination, status of contamination monitoring, need of contamination monitoring, radiation protection activity, instruments, contamination, current status of contamination survey materials and their disposal, and environmental monitoring. (G.K.)

  3. Uterine activity monitoring during labor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, P.C.A.M.; van Rijswijk, S.; van Geijn, H.P.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To summarize the currently available knowledge on (1) the methods to monitor uterine activity (UA); (2) the units to quantify UA; and (3) to assess the importance of abnormal contraction patterns on the condition of the fetus. The need for correct assessment and interpretation of the uterine

  4. GIADA: extended calibration activities before the comet encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accolla, Mario; Sordini, Roberto; Della Corte, Vincenzo; Ferrari, Marco; Rotundi, Alessandra

    2014-05-01

    The Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator - GIADA - is one of the payloads on-board Rosetta Orbiter. Its three detection sub-systems are able to measure the speed, the momentum, the mass, the optical cross section of single cometary grains and the dust flux ejected by the periodic comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko. During the Hibernation phase of the Rosetta mission, we have performed a dedicated extended calibration activity on the GIADA Proto Flight Model (accommodated in a clean room in our laboratory) involving two of three sub-systems constituting GIADA, i.e. the Grain Detection System (GDS) and the Impact Sensor (IS). Our aim is to carry out a new set of response curves for these two subsystems and to correlate them with the calibration curves obtained in 2002 for the GIADA payload onboard the Rosetta spacecraft, in order to improve the interpretation of the forthcoming scientific data. For the extended calibration we have dropped or shot into GIADA PFM a statistically relevant number of grains (i.e. about 1 hundred), acting as cometary dust analogues. We have studied the response of the GDS and IS as a function of grain composition, size and velocity. Different terrestrial materials were selected as cometary analogues according to the more recent knowledge gained through the analyses of Interplanetary Dust Particles and cometary samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 (Stardust mission). Therefore, for each material, we have produced grains with sizes ranging from 20-500 μm in diameter, that were characterized by FESEM and micro IR spectroscopy. Therefore, the grains were shot into GIADA PFM with speed ranging between 1 and 100 ms-1. Indeed, according to the estimation reported in Fink & Rubin (2012), this range is representative of the dust particle velocity expected at the comet scenario and lies within the GIADA velocity sensitivity (i.e. 1-100 ms-1 for GDSand 1-300 ms-1for GDS+IS 1-300 ms-1). The response curves obtained using the data collected

  5. Flume and field-based calibration of surrogate sensors for monitoring bedload transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, L.; Carrillo, R.; Escauriaza, C.; Iroume, A.

    2016-01-01

    Bedload transport assessment is important for geomorphological, engineering, and ecological studies of gravel-bed rivers. Bedload can be monitored at experimental stations that require expensive maintenance or by using portable traps, which allows measuring instantaneous transport rates but at a single point and at high costs and operational risks. The need for continuously measuring bedload intensity and dynamics has therefore increased the use and enhancement of surrogate methods. This paper reports on a set of flume experiments in which a Japanese acoustic pipe and an impact plate have been tested using four well-sorted and three poorly sorted sediment mixtures. Additional data were collected in a glacierized high-gradient Andean stream (Estero Morales) using a portable Bunte-type bedload sampler. Results show that the data provided by the acoustic pipe (which is amplified on 6 channels having different gains) can be calibrated for the grain size and for the intensity of transported sediments coarser than 9 mm (R2 = 0.93 and 0.88, respectively). Even if the flume-based calibration is very robust, upscaling the calibration to field applications is more challenging, and the bedload intensity could be predicted better than the grain size of transported sediments (R2 = 0.61 and 0.43, respectively). The inexpensive impact plate equipped with accelerometer could be calibrated for bedload intensity quite well in the flume but only poorly in the field (R2 = 0.16) and could not provide information on the size of transported sediments.

  6. Calibration Method for IATS and Application in Multi-Target Monitoring Using Coded Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yueyin; Wagner, Andreas; Wunderlich, Thomas; Wasmeier, Peter

    2017-06-01

    The technique of Image Assisted Total Stations (IATS) has been studied for over ten years and is composed of two major parts: one is the calibration procedure which combines the relationship between the camera system and the theodolite system; the other is the automatic target detection on the image by various methods of photogrammetry or computer vision. Several calibration methods have been developed, mostly using prototypes with an add-on camera rigidly mounted on the total station. However, these prototypes are not commercially available. This paper proposes a calibration method based on Leica MS50 which has two built-in cameras each with a resolution of 2560 × 1920 px: an overview camera and a telescope (on-axis) camera. Our work in this paper is based on the on-axis camera which uses the 30-times magnification of the telescope. The calibration consists of 7 parameters to estimate. We use coded targets, which are common tools in photogrammetry for orientation, to detect different targets in IATS images instead of prisms and traditional ATR functions. We test and verify the efficiency and stability of this monitoring method with multi-target.

  7. Cuban-Brazilian comparison of the calibration procedures for surface contamination monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, Gonzalo W.; Garcia, Jose A.T. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones (CPHR), Guanabacoa, Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: gonzalo@cphr.edu.cu; Ramos, Manoel M.O. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: mmoramos@ird.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    The calibration laboratory of the CPHR, Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, is the only laboratory that performs calibrations of radiation protection instruments in Cuba. Recently they started a cooperation project with IAEA, code number CUB3002-01 with the task title 'Assuring and Demonstrating the safety of radioactive Waste Management'. Within the frame of this project they have a compromise to implement the calibration service for surface contamination monitors, for which they received instruments and sources. In 2006 the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI) from the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, IRD/CNEN, was invited to perform a mission to CPHR in order to evaluate the level of implementation of the service trough the insertion of the service in the Quality Assurance System of their laboratory, and perform a comparison exercise to test the calibration method implemented. The results were evaluated by the methodology recommended in the ISO/IEC 43-1 standard. These results show that all values from both laboratories are comparable for most radionuclides except for Cl-36. The preliminary investigation about this situation is presented in the paper. (author)

  8. Calibration of a Non-Linear Beam Position Monitor Electronics by Switching Electrode Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Gasior, M

    2013-01-01

    Button electrode signals from beam position monitors embedded into new LHC collimators will be individually processed with front-end electronics based on compensated diode detectors and digitized with 24-bit audio-range ADCs. This scheme allows sub-micrometre beam orbit resolution to be achieved with simple hardware and no external timing. As the diode detectors only operate in a linear regime with large amplitude signals, offset errors of the electronics cannot be calibrated in the classical way with no input. This paper describes the algorithms developed to calibrate the offset and gain asymmetry of these nonlinear electronic channels. Presented algorithm application examples are based on measurements performed with prototype diode orbit systems installed on the CERN SPS and LHC machines.

  9. Commissioning of an LED calibration and monitoring system for the prototype of a hadronic calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattimena, N.

    2006-12-15

    The anticipated physics program for the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires a highly granular hadronic calorimeter. One option for such a tracking calorimeter is a scintillator-steel sandwich structure placed inside the magnetic coil. The development of hadronic showers will be studied with a physics prototype, in order to improve current models. This prototype, currently being built within the collaboration for a CAlorimeter for the LInear Collider Experiment (CALICE) at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) also serves to test a new semiconductor based photodetector the so called silicon photomultiplier. The calibration of these new photodetectors requires to take into account their nonlinear response.The response function, describing this behaviour, is investigated in this thesis. A calibration and monitoring system, needed to correct for the temperature and voltage dependence of the silicon photomultiplier signals and to observe changes of their response over time, is optimised and tested. (orig.)

  10. Design and Calibration Tests of an Active Sound Intensity Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kletschkowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an active sound intensity probe that can be used for sound source localization in standing wave fields. The probe consists of a sound hard tube that is terminated by a loudspeaker and an integrated pair of microphones. The microphones are used to decompose the standing wave field inside the tube into its incident and reflected part. The latter is cancelled by an adaptive controller that calculates proper driving signals for the loudspeaker. If the open end of the actively controlled tube is placed close to a vibrating surface, the radiated sound intensity can be determined by measuring the cross spectral density between the two microphones. A one-dimensional free field can be realized effectively, as first experiments performed on a simplified test bed have shown. Further tests proved that a prototype of the novel sound intensity probe can be calibrated.

  11. A new neutron monitor with silver activation

    CERN Document Server

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Hohmann, E

    2010-01-01

    A moderator-type neutron monitor has been developed, which registers delayed beta rays from neutron-induced silver activation and which is able to measure dose equivalent in pulsed fields with peak dose rates of several thousand Sv h(-1). The monitor uses four silicon diodes in the centre of a polyethylene moderator, 30 cm in diameter. Two of the diodes are covered by natural silver foils and two of them by tin foils. The latter are used to subtract photon-induced pulses. For registering signals, a pulse height threshold is set at 662 key, which minimizes the effect of Cs-137 and lower energy radiation and - in addition - enhances the detection of beta rays from the shorter half-life silver isotope Ag-110 (25 s) as compared to the longer half-life isotope Ag-108 (144 s). The results of measurements in neutron and photon calibration fields, of MCNPX neutron response calculations and of first measurements in a high-intensity pulsed field at the PSI accelerator are shown. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserv...

  12. Shielding of a room for installation of a calibration service for neutron monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Marcos P.C. de; Estrada, Julio J.S.; Santos, Raphael F.G. dos [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Junior, Wilson F.R.S.; Gomes, Renato G.; Alves, Carlos F.E. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X. da, E-mail: eng.cavaliere@gmail.com, E-mail: jsestrada@bol.com.br, E-mail: renatoguedes@ime.eb.br, E-mail: faelfisica@gmail.com, E-mail: jsestrada@bol.com.br, E-mail: wilsonrebello@gmail.com, E-mail: cfealves@gmail.com, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas (LCR) from Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes (IBRAG/UERJ) is enhancing its metrological laboratory, implementing a set up for neutron monitor calibration. Considering the available space on site, it was decided to carry out the necessary adjustments to attend the regulatory rules for radiation protection. The Monte Carlo approach has been adopted using the MCNPX computer code, several measurements of the ambient dose equivalent were simulated to check if the areas surrounding the calibration room could still be classified as radiation free. In order to decrease the irradiation field, it was also simulated a shielding where a 185 GBq neutron source of {sup 241}Am-Be was inserted into. The dimensions of the simulated irradiator are large enough to guarantee that the individuals occupationally exposed do not have dose above the limit established by Brazilian authority, outside of the beam irradiation. The total ambient dose equivalent calculated using MCNPX shows that 3.8 cm of 5% borated polyethylene or 5.5 cm of concrete gives the necessary shielding to guarantee as radiation free all areas surrounding the calibration room. (author)

  13. A critical comparison of systematic calibration protocols for activated sludge models: a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Gürkan; Van Hulle, Stijn W H; De Pauw, Dirk J W; van Griensven, Ann; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2005-07-01

    Modelling activated sludge systems has gained an increasing momentum after the introduction of activated sludge models (ASMs) in 1987. Application of dynamic models for full-scale systems requires essentially a calibration of the chosen ASM to the case under study. Numerous full-scale model applications have been performed so far which were mostly based on ad hoc approaches and expert knowledge. Further, each modelling study has followed a different calibration approach: e.g. different influent wastewater characterization methods, different kinetic parameter estimation methods, different selection of parameters to be calibrated, different priorities within the calibration steps, etc. In short, there was no standard approach in performing the calibration study, which makes it difficult, if not impossible, to (1) compare different calibrations of ASMs with each other and (2) perform internal quality checks for each calibration study. To address these concerns, systematic calibration protocols have recently been proposed to bring guidance to the modeling of activated sludge systems and in particular to the calibration of full-scale models. In this contribution four existing calibration approaches (BIOMATH, HSG, STOWA and WERF) will be critically discussed using a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis. It will also be assessed in what way these approaches can be further developed in view of further improving the quality of ASM calibration. In this respect, the potential of automating some steps of the calibration procedure by use of mathematical algorithms is highlighted.

  14. A Proxy Calibration Monitoring Technique for the NCAR Airborne W-band Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilling, Robert; Romatschke, Ulrike; Vivekanandan, Jothiram; Ellis, Scott M.

    2017-04-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has recently tested and deployed its new 94 GHz HIAPER Cloud Radar (HCR). HCR is a scanning W-band system, mounted in an under-wing pod on the National Science Foundation/NCAR High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER, a Gulfstream-V). In order to ensure operational accuracy of this radar, the technique of Li, et al. (2005) has been reformulated to provide a simple means of estimating reflectivity bias using routine measurements of the ocean surface scattering. The methodology and formulation for reflectivity bias determination will be described, along with bias determination results from the 2015 Cloud Systems Evolution in the Trades (CSET) experiment. The HCR radar system is subjected to extreme changes in its operational environment that can cause changes in component response that affect radar calibration. While engineering efforts have focused on temperature and pressure stabilization of the wing pod, along with internal vessel and component temperature monitoring, it is recognized that some form of independent and ongoing verification of calibration stability is desired. When available, ocean surface scanning, with an assumed knowledge of ocean surface backscatter cross-section, can provide a useful proxy for this calibration. Therefore, during the CSET experiment, special care was taken to collect ocean scanning data during short episodes of stable flight with no clouds present; scans were coordinated with atmospheric profiling through release of dropsondes, and atmospheric attenuation calculated with the use of those data. Downward looking lidar data are also used to verify cloud and haze conditions during sampling. For HCR in CSET, eighteen usable ocean-scanning cases were found. Several of these were discarded due to cloud/haze issues that prevented accurate determination of atmospheric attenuation. Initial results show that a large (but fairly constant) bias

  15. Comparison and calibration of numerical models from monitoring data of a reinforced concrete highway bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. M. de Andrade

    Full Text Available The last four decades were important for the Brazilian highway system. Financial investments were made so it could expand and many structural solutions for bridges and viaducts were developed. In parallel, there was a significant raise of pathologies in these structures, due to lack of maintenance procedures. Thus, this paper main purpose is to create a short-term monitoring plan in order to check the structural behavior of a curved highway concrete bridge in current use. A bridge was chosen as a case study. A hierarchy of six numerical models is shown, so it can validate the bridge's structural behaviour. The acquired data from the monitoring was compared with the finest models so a calibration could be made.

  16. Calibration of gyro G-sensitivity coefficients with FOG monitoring on precision centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiazhen; Yang, Yanqiang; Li, Baoguo; Liu, Ming

    2017-07-01

    The advantages of mechanical gyros, such as high precision, endurance and reliability, make them widely used as the core parts of inertial navigation systems (INS) utilized in the fields of aeronautics, astronautics and underground exploration. In a high-g environment, the accuracy of gyros is degraded. Therefore, the calibration and compensation of the gyro G-sensitivity coefficients is essential when the INS operates in a high-g environment. A precision centrifuge with a counter-rotating platform is the typical equipment for calibrating the gyro, as it can generate large centripetal acceleration and keep the angular rate close to zero; however, its performance is seriously restricted by the angular perturbation in the high-speed rotating process. To reduce the dependence on the precision of the centrifuge and counter-rotating platform, an effective calibration method for the gyro g-sensitivity coefficients under fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) monitoring is proposed herein. The FOG can efficiently compensate spindle error and improve the anti-interference ability. Harmonic analysis is performed for data processing. Simulations show that the gyro G-sensitivity coefficients can be efficiently estimated to up to 99% of the true value and compensated using a lookup table or fitting method. Repeated tests indicate that the G-sensitivity coefficients can be correctly calibrated when the angular rate accuracy of the precision centrifuge is as low as 0.01%. Verification tests are performed to demonstrate that the attitude errors can be decreased from 0.36° to 0.08° in 200 s. The proposed measuring technology is generally applicable in engineering, as it can reduce the accuracy requirements for the centrifuge and the environment.

  17. Development of a New Calibration Method for an Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, M.; Vandenboer, T.; Murphy, J. G.

    2009-05-01

    Fine atmospheric aerosols play an important role in the atmosphere as they alter the radiative balance of the Earth through direct and indirect climate effects, reduce visibility, participate in acid rain formation and affect human health. The motivation for chemically and temporally resolved measurements of fine aerosol composition has lead to the development of the Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC) system by Dionex/URG. This instrument is capable of simultaneously monitoring fine aerosols (acids and amines. Standard calibration of the AIM-IC is carried out by injecting a series of mixed standards directly onto the ion chromatographs, bypassing the sampling component of the instrument. This results in calculated detection limits on the order of 10-200 pptv for gases and 10-500 of ng/m3 for individual particle constituents when collecting at 3 L/min for 55 minutes. In this work, we present a new method for the calibration of the AIM-IC for both gas and particle collection that enables us to evaluate the entire system from size-selection to detection. This external calibration method is assessed for the gases HNO3(g), SO2(g), and NH3(g), and for particles containing (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, and Na2SO4. Quantitative collection of SO2 is found to require careful optimization of the H2O2 concentration of the denuder liquid, while the replacement of a cyclone with an impactor improves the sampling efficiency of NH3 and HNO3.

  18. Monitoring of the infrastructure and services used to handle and automatically produce Alignment and Calibration conditions at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Sipos, Roland; Franzoni, Giovanni; Di Guida, Salvatore; Pfeiffer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment makes a vast use of alignment and calibration measurements in several crucial workflows in the event selection at the High Level Trigger (HLT), in the processing of the recorded collisions and in the production of simulated events.A suite of services addresses the key requirements for the handling of the alignment and calibration conditions such as recording the status of the experiment and of the ongoing data taking, accepting conditions data updates provided by the detector experts, aggregating and navigating the calibration scenarios, and distributing conditions for consumption by the collaborators. Since a large fraction of such services is critical for the data taking and event filtering in the HLT, a comprehensive monitoring and alarm generating system had to be developed. Such monitoring system has been developed based on the open source industry standard for monitoring and alerting services (Nagios) to monitor the database back-end, the hosting nodes and k...

  19. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Radiometer Subband Calibration and Calibration Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the US National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, Space Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2007). The observatory was launched on Jan 31, 2015. The goal of the SMAP is to measure the global soil moisture and freeze/thaw from space. The L-band radiometer is the passive portion of the spaceborne instrument. It measures all four Stokes antenna temperatures and outputs counts. The Level 1B Brightness Temperature (L1B_TB) science algorithm converts radiometer counts to the Earths surface brightness temperature. The results are reported in the radiometer level 1B data product together with the calibrated antenna temperature (TA) and all of the corrections to the unwanted sources contribution. The calibrated L1B data product are required to satisfy the overall radiometer error budget of 1.3 K needed to meet the soil moisture requirement of 0.04 volumetric fraction uncertainty and the calibration drift requirement of no larger than 0.4 K per month.

  20. Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Radiometer Subband Calibration and Calibration Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the US National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, Space Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2007)]. The observatory was launched on Jan 31, 2015. The goal of the SMAP is to measure the global soil moisture and freeze/thaw from space. The L-band radiometer is the passive portion of the spaceborne instrument. It measures all four Stokes antenna temperatures and outputs counts. The Level 1B Brightness Temperature (L1B_TB) science algorithm converts radiometer counts to the Earths surface brightness temperature. The results are reported in the radiometer level 1B data product together with the calibrated antenna temperature (TA) and all of the corrections to the unwanted sources contribution. The calibrated L1B data product are required to satisfy the overall radiometer error budget of 1.3 K needed to meet the soil moisture requirement of 0.04 volumetric fraction uncertainty and the calibration drift requirement of no larger than 0.4 K per month.

  1. Exercise of laboratory comparison for contamination monitor calibration between LNMRI/IRD and LCR/UERJ - 2016; Exercicio de comparacao laboratorial de calibracao de monitores de contaminacao entre o LNMRI/IRD e LCR/UERJ - 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, T.S. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); David, M., E-mail: tschirn@ird.gov.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    This work was motivated by the need to decide on the best methodology to be applied in the next contamination monitor calibration comparisons with the Brazilian network of calibration radiation monitors. The calibration factor was chosen as a response calibration performed in the four monitors used in this comparison because it does not require the detector area or probe thereby reducing an important variable. It was observed that the variation of the positioning system may have an influence up to 10% in calibration. The results obtained for the calibration factor showed a difference of up to 31.2%. (author)

  2. The Monitoring and Calibration Web Systems for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Data Quality Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sivolella, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Ferreira, F

    2012-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), one of the ATLAS detectors, has four partitions, where each one contains 64 modules and each module has up to 48 PhotoMulTipliers (PMTs), totalizing more than 10,000 electronic channels. The Monitoring and Calibration Web System (MCWS) supports data quality analyses at channels level. This application was developed to assess the detector status and verify its performance, presenting the problematic known channels list from the official database that stores the detector conditions data (COOL). The bad channels list guides the data quality validator during analyses in order to identify new problematic channels. Through the system, it is also possible to update the channels list directly in the COOL database. MCWS generates results, as eta-phi plots and comparative tables with masked channels percentage, which concerns TileCal status, and it is accessible by all ATLAS collaboration. Annually, there is an intervention on LHC (Large Hadronic Collider) when the detector equipments (P...

  3. An optical sensor network for vegetation phenology monitoring and satellite data calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eklundh, L.; Jin, H.; Schubert, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present a network of sites across Fennoscandia for optical sampling of vegetation properties relevant for phenology monitoring and satellite data calibration. The network currently consists of five sites, distributed along an N-S gradient through Sweden and Finland. Two sites are located...... reflected from within the flux footprint of current eddy covariance measurements. Our computations and model simulations demonstrate the validity of using off-nadir sampling, and we show the results from the first year of measurement. NDVI is computed and compared to that of the MODIS instrument on......-board Aqua and Terra satellite platforms. PAR fluxes are partitioned into reflected and absorbed components for the ground and canopy. The measurements demonstrate that the instrumentation provides detailed information about the vegetation phenology and variations in reflectance due to snow cover variations...

  4. Low-emittance tuning of storage rings using normal mode beam position monitor calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wolski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new technique for low-emittance tuning of electron and positron storage rings. This technique is based on calibration of the beam position monitors (BPMs using excitation of the normal modes of the beam motion, and has benefits over conventional methods. It is relatively fast and straightforward to apply, it can be as easily applied to a large ring as to a small ring, and the tuning for low emittance becomes completely insensitive to BPM gain and alignment errors that can be difficult to determine accurately. We discuss the theory behind the technique, present some simulation results illustrating that it is highly effective and robust for low-emittance tuning, and describe the results of some initial experimental tests on the CesrTA storage ring.

  5. Calibration and uncertainty estimation of erythemal radiometers in the argentine ultraviolet monitoring network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cede, Alexander; Luccini, Eduardo; Nuñez, Liliana; Piacentini, Rubén D; Blumthaler, Mario

    2002-10-20

    The erythemal radiometers of the Ultraviolet Monitoring Network of the Argentine Servicio Meteorológico Nacional were calibrated in an extensive in situ campaign from October 1998 to April 1999 with Austrian reference instruments. Methods to correct the influence of the location's horizon and long-term detector changes are applied. The different terms that contribute to the measurement uncertainty are analyzed. The expanded uncertainty is estimated to be +/- 10% at 70 degrees solar zenith angle (SZA) and +/-6% for a SZA of <50 degrees. We observed significant changes for some detectors over hours and days, reaching a maximum diurnal drift of +/-5% at a SZA of 70 degrees and a maximum weekly variation of +/-4%.

  6. Multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography system with automatic self-calibration for long-term monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Hun; Sohal, Harsh; McEwan, Alistair Lee; Woo, Eung Je; Oh, Tong In

    2014-02-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a safe medical imaging technology, requiring no ionizing or heating radiation, as opposed to most other imaging modalities. This has led to a clinical interest in its use for long-term monitoring, possibly at the bedside, for ventilation monitoring, bleeding detection, gastric emptying and epilepsy foci diagnosis. These long-term applications demand auto-calibration and high stability over long time periods. To address this need we have developed a new multi-frequency EIT system called the KHU Mark2.5 with automatic self-calibration and cooperation with other devices via a timing signal for synchronization with other medical instruments. The impedance measurement module (IMM) for flexible configuration as a key component includes an independent constant current source, an independent differential voltmeter, and a current source calibrator, which allows automatic self-calibration of the current source within each IMM. We installed a resistor phantom inside the KHU Mark2.5 EIT system for intra-channel and inter-channel calibrations of all voltmeters in multiple IMMs. We show the deterioration of performance of an EIT system over time and the improvement due to automatic self-calibration. The system is able to maintain SNR of 80 dB for frequencies up to 250 kHz and below 0.5% reciprocity error over continuous operation for 24 hours. Automatic calibration at least every 3 days is shown to maintain SNR above 75 dB and reciprocity error below 0.7% over 7 days at 1 kHz. A clear degradation in performance results with increasing time between automatic calibrations allowing the tailoring of calibration to suit the performance requirements of each application.

  7. Wireless physiological monitoring and ocular tracking: 3D calibration in a fully-immersive virtual health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lelin; Chi, Yu Mike; Edelstein, Eve; Schulze, Jurgen; Gramann, Klaus; Velasquez, Alvaro; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Macagno, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Wireless physiological/neurological monitoring in virtual reality (VR) offers a unique opportunity for unobtrusively quantifying human responses to precisely controlled and readily modulated VR representations of health care environments. Here we present such a wireless, light-weight head-mounted system for measuring electrooculogram (EOG) and electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in human subjects interacting with and navigating in the Calit2 StarCAVE, a five-sided immersive 3-D visualization VR environment. The system can be easily expanded to include other measurements, such as cardiac activity and galvanic skin responses. We demonstrate the capacity of the system to track focus of gaze in 3-D and report a novel calibration procedure for estimating eye movements from responses to the presentation of a set of dynamic visual cues in the StarCAVE. We discuss cyber and clinical applications that include a 3-D cursor for visual navigation in VR interactive environments, and the monitoring of neurological and ocular dysfunction in vision/attention disorders.

  8. Automatic Calibration and Reconstruction for Active Vision Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Beiwei

    2012-01-01

    In this book, the design of two new planar patterns for camera calibration of intrinsic parameters is addressed and a line-based method for distortion correction is suggested. The dynamic calibration of structured light systems, which consist of a camera and a projector is also treated. Also, the 3D Euclidean reconstruction by using the image-to-world transformation is investigated. Lastly, linear calibration algorithms for the catadioptric camera are considered, and the homographic matrix and fundamental matrix are extensively studied. In these methods, analytic solutions are provided for the computational efficiency and redundancy in the data can be easily incorporated to improve reliability of the estimations. This volume will therefore prove valuable and practical tool for researchers and practioners working in image processing and computer vision and related subjects.

  9. Active-passive calibration of optical tweezers in viscoelastic media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Mario; Richardson, Andrew C; S Reihani, S Nader

    2010-01-01

    In order to use optical tweezers as a force measuring tool inside a viscoelastic medium such as the cytoplasm of a living cell, it is crucial to perform an exact force calibration within the complex medium. This is a nontrivial task, as many of the physical characteristics of the medium and probe......, e.g., viscosity, elasticity, shape, and density, are often unknown. Here, we suggest how to calibrate single beam optical tweezers in a complex viscoelastic environment. At the same time, we determine viscoelastic characteristics such as friction retardation spectrum and elastic moduli of the medium...

  10. Dust Impact Monitor DIM onboard Rosetta/Philae: Laboratory Calibration with Impact Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, H.; Ossowski, T.; Seidensticker, K.; Apathy, I.; Fischer, H.-H.; Hirn, A.; Jünemann, M.; Loose, A.; Peter, A.; Sperl, M.

    2011-10-01

    The Rosetta lander spacecraft Philae, which will land on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov- Gerasimenko in late 2014, is equipped with the Dust Impact Monitor instrument (DIM). The DIM sensor, which is part of the SESAME instrument package [Seidensticker et al., 2007], consists of three piezoelectric detectors, each one mounted on the outer side of a cube facing in three orthogonal directions. The total sensor area is approximately 70 cm2. DIM will measure impacts of sub-millimeter and millimeter sized ice and dust particles that are emitted from the nucleus and transported into the cometary coma by the escaping gas flow. A grain-size dependent fraction of the emitted grains is expected to fall back to the nucleus surface due to gravity. DIM will be able to detect both these components, the backfalling particles as well as the grains hitting the detector on direct trajectories from the surface. With DIM we will be able to measure fluxes, impact directions as well as the speed and size of the impacting cometary particles. Two particle acceleration devices for impact calibration experiments are presently available at Max- Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung (MPS), Katlenburg-Lindau: With (a) a dedicated dropping device and (b) a small air gun we can simulate impacts with particles of different materials (steel, glass, ruby, polyethylen, etc.), radii between 0.2 and 1mm and impact speeds up to 2msec-1. We have performed a large number of impact experiments with two flight spare units of the DIM sensor at MPS. We present the results from our impact experiments and discuss their implications for the calibration of the DIM flight instrument.

  11. Cross-Calibration of the Oceansat-2 Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM) with Terra and Aqua MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal, Amit; Brinkmann, Jake; Kumar, A. Senthil; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    The Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM) sensor on-board the Oceansat-2 spacecraft has been operational since its launch in September, 2009. The Oceansat 2 OCM primary design goal is to provide continuity to Oceansat-1 OCM to obtain information regarding various ocean-colour variables. OCM acquires Earth scene measurements in eight multi-spectral bands in the range from 402 to 885 nm. The MODIS sensor on the Terra and Aqua spacecraft has been successfully operating for over a decade collecting measurements of the earth's land, ocean surface and atmosphere. The MODIS spectral bands, designed for land and ocean applications, cover the spectral range from 412 to 869 nm. This study focuses on comparing the radiometric calibration stability of OCM using near-simultaneous TOA measurements with Terra and Aqua MODIS acquired over the Libya 4 target. Same-day scene-pairs from all three sensors (OCM, Terra and Aqua MODIS) between August, 2014 and September, 2015 were chosen for this analysis. On a given day, the OCM overpass is approximately an hour after the Terra overpass and an hour before the Aqua overpass. Due to the orbital differences between Terra and Aqua, MODIS images the Libya 4 site at different scan-angles on a given day. Some of the high-gain ocean bands for MODIS tend to saturate while viewing the bright Libya 4 target, but bands 8-10 (412 nm - 486 nm) provide an unsaturated response and are used for comparison with the spectrally similar OCM bands. All the standard corrections such as bidirectional reflectance factor (BRDF), relative spectral response mismatch, and impact for atmospheric water-vapor are applied to obtain the reflectance differences between OCM and the two MODIS instruments. Furthermore, OCM is used as a transfer radiometer to obtain the calibration differences between Terra and Aqua MODIS reflective solar bands.

  12. Parameter subset selection for the dynamic calibration of activated sludge models (ASMs): experience versus systems analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruano, MV; Ribes, J; de Pauw, DJW

    2007-01-01

    In this work we address the issue of parameter subset selection within the scope of activated sludge model calibration. To this end, we evaluate two approaches: (i) systems analysis and (ii) experience-based approach. The evaluation has been carried out using a dynamic model (ASM2d) calibrated...

  13. Calibration of area monitors for neutrons used in clinical linear accelerators; Calibracao de monitores de area para neutrons usados em aceleradores lineares clinicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, Ana Paula; Pereira, Walsan Wagner; Patrao, Karla C. de Souza; Fonseca, Evaldo S. da, E-mail: asalgado@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Batista, Delano V.S. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work demonstrates the complexity and the necessary cares for the realization of measurements of neutron fields in rooms for radiotherapy treatment containing clinical accelerators. The acquaintance of the technical characteristics of the monitors and the periodic calibration are actions and fundamental procedures to guarantee traceability and the reliability of measurements

  14. Influence of local calibration on the quality of online wet weather discharge monitoring: feedback from five international case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caradot, Nicolas; Sonnenberg, Hauke; Rouault, Pascale; Gruber, Günter; Hofer, Thomas; Torres, Andres; Pesci, Maria; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports about experiences gathered from five online monitoring campaigns in the sewer systems of Berlin (Germany), Graz (Austria), Lyon (France) and Bogota (Colombia) using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectrometers and turbidimeters. Online probes are useful for the measurement of highly dynamic processes, e.g. combined sewer overflows (CSO), storm events, and river impacts. The influence of local calibration on the quality of online chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements of wet weather discharges has been assessed. Results underline the need to establish local calibration functions for both UV-VIS spectrometers and turbidimeters. It is suggested that practitioners calibrate locally their probes using at least 15-20 samples. However, these samples should be collected over several events and cover most of the natural variability of the measured concentration. For this reason, the use of automatic peristaltic samplers in parallel to online monitoring is recommended with short representative sampling campaigns during wet weather discharges. Using reliable calibration functions, COD loads of CSO and storm events can be estimated with a relative uncertainty of approximately 20%. If no local calibration is established, concentrations and loads are estimated with a high error rate, questioning the reliability and meaning of the online measurement. Similar results have been obtained for total suspended solids measurements.

  15. Real-time continuous glucose monitoring shows high accuracy within 6 hours after sensor calibration: a prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Yue

    Full Text Available Accurate and timely glucose monitoring is essential in intensive care units. Real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS has been advocated for many years to improve glycemic management in critically ill patients. In order to determine the effect of calibration time on the accuracy of CGMS, real-time subcutaneous CGMS was used in 18 critically ill patients. CGMS sensor was calibrated with blood glucose measurements by blood gas/glucose analyzer every 12 hours. Venous blood was sampled every 2 to 4 hours, and glucose concentration was measured by standard central laboratory device (CLD and by blood gas/glucose analyzer. With CLD measurement as reference, relative absolute difference (mean±SD in CGMS and blood gas/glucose analyzer were 14.4%±12.2% and 6.5%±6.2%, respectively. The percentage of matched points in Clarke error grid zone A was 74.8% in CGMS, and 98.4% in blood gas/glucose analyzer. The relative absolute difference of CGMS obtained within 6 hours after sensor calibration (8.8%±7.2% was significantly less than that between 6 to 12 hours after calibration (20.1%±13.5%, p<0.0001. The percentage of matched points in Clarke error grid zone A was also significantly higher in data sets within 6 hours after calibration (92.4% versus 57.1%, p<0.0001. In conclusion, real-time subcutaneous CGMS is accurate in glucose monitoring in critically ill patients. CGMS sensor should be calibrated less than 6 hours, no matter what time interval recommended by manufacturer.

  16. RSR Calculator, a tool for the Calibration / Validation activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Durán-Alarcón

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The calibration/validation of remote sensing products is a key step that needs to be done before its use in different kinds of environmental applications and to ensure the success of remote sensing missions. In order to compare the measurements from remote sensors on spacecrafts and airborne platforms with in-situ data, it is necessary to perform a spectral comparison process that takes into account the relative spectral response of the sensors. This technical note presents the RSR Calculator, a new tool to estimate, through numerical convolution, the values corresponding to each spectral range of a given sensor. RSR Calculator is useful for several applications ranging from the convolution of spectral signatures of laboratory or field measurements to the parameter estimation for the calibration of sensors, such as extraterrestrial solar irradiance (ESUN or atmospheric transmissivity (τ per spectral band. RSR Calculator is a useful tool that allows the processing of spectral data and that it can be successfully applied in the calibration/validation remote sensing process of the optical domain.

  17. Toward Ubiquitous Blood Pressure Monitoring via Pulse Transit Time: Predictions on Maximum Calibration Period and Acceptable Error Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2017-09-22

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for ubiquitous blood pressure (BP) monitoring. PTT-based systems may require periodic cuff calibrations but can still be useful for hypertension screening by affording numerous, out-of-clinic measurements that can be averaged. The objective was to predict the maximum calibration period that would not compromise accuracy and acceptable error limits in light of measurement averaging for PTT-based systems. Well-known mathematical models and vast BP data were leveraged. Models relating PTT, age, and gender to BP were employed to determine the maximum time period for the PTT-BP calibration curve to change by 12 mmHg for systolic BP could achieve the screening accuracy of the cuff-based approach via measurement averaging. This theoretical study indicates that PTT-based BP monitoring is viable even with periodic calibration and seemingly high measurement errors. The predictions may help guide the implementation, evaluation, and application of PTT-based BP monitoring systems in practice.

  18. An Optical Sensor Network for Vegetation Phenology Monitoring and Satellite Data Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Heliasz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a network of sites across Fennoscandia for optical sampling of vegetation properties relevant for phenology monitoring and satellite data calibration. The network currently consists of five sites, distributed along an N-S gradient through Sweden and Finland. Two sites are located in coniferous forests, one in a deciduous forest, and two on peatland. The instrumentation consists of dual-beam sensors measuring incoming and reflected red, green, NIR, and PAR fluxes at 10-min intervals, year-round. The sensors are mounted on separate masts or in flux towers in order to capture radiation reflected from within the flux footprint of current eddy covariance measurements. Our computations and model simulations demonstrate the validity of using off-nadir sampling, and we show the results from the first year of measurement. NDVI is computed and compared to that of the MODIS instrument on-board Aqua and Terra satellite platforms. PAR fluxes are partitioned into reflected and absorbed components for the ground and canopy. The measurements demonstrate that the instrumentation provides detailed information about the vegetation phenology and variations in reflectance due to snow cover variations and vegetation development. Valuable information about PAR absorption of ground and canopy is obtained that may be linked to vegetation productivity.

  19. Organ-specific SPECT activity calibration using 3D printed phantoms for molecular radiotherapy dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Andrew P; Tipping, Jill; Cullen, David M; Hamilton, David; Brown, Richard; Flynn, Alex; Oldfield, Christopher; Page, Emma; Price, Emlyn; Smith, Andrew; Snee, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculations for molecular radiotherapy require accurate activity quantification. This is commonly derived from Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging using a calibration factor relating detected counts to known activity in a phantom insert. A series of phantom inserts, based on the mathematical models underlying many clinical dosimetry calculations, have been produced using 3D printing techniques. SPECT/CT data for the phantom inserts has been used to calculate new organ-specific calibration factors for (99m) Tc and (177)Lu. The measured calibration factors are compared to predicted values from calculations using a Gaussian kernel. Measured SPECT calibration factors for 3D printed organs display a clear dependence on organ shape for (99m) Tc and (177)Lu. The observed variation in calibration factor is reproduced using Gaussian kernel-based calculation over two orders of magnitude change in insert volume for (99m) Tc and (177)Lu. These new organ-specific calibration factors show a 24, 11 and 8 % reduction in absorbed dose for the liver, spleen and kidneys, respectively. Non-spherical calibration factors from 3D printed phantom inserts can significantly improve the accuracy of whole organ activity quantification for molecular radiotherapy, providing a crucial step towards individualised activity quantification and patient-specific dosimetry. 3D printed inserts are found to provide a cost effective and efficient way for clinical centres to access more realistic phantom data.

  20. Determining PM2.5 calibration curves for a low-cost particle monitor: common indoor residential aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacunto, Philip J; Klepeis, Neil E; Cheng, Kai-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Jiang, Ruo-Ting; Repace, James L; Ott, Wayne R; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2015-11-01

    Real-time particle monitors are essential for accurately estimating exposure to fine particles indoors. However, many such monitors tend to be prohibitively expensive for some applications, such as a tenant or homeowner curious about the quality of the air in their home. A lower cost version (the Dylos Air Quality Monitor) has recently been introduced, but it requires appropriate calibration to reflect the mass concentration units required for exposure assessment. We conducted a total of 64 experiments with a suite of instruments including a Dylos DC1100, another real-time laser photometer (TSI SidePak™ Model AM-510 Personal Aerosol Monitor), and a gravimetric sampling apparatus to estimate Dylos calibration factors for emissions from 17 different common indoor sources including cigarettes, incense, fried bacon, chicken, and hamburger. Comparison of minute-by-minute data from the Dylos with the gravimetrically calibrated SidePak yielded relationships that enable the conversion of the raw Dylos particle counts less than 2.5 μm (in #/0.01 ft(3)) to estimated PM2.5 mass concentration (e.g. μg m(-3)). The relationship between the exponentially-decaying Dylos particle counts and PM2.5 mass concentration can be described by a theoretically-derived power law with source-specific empirical parameters. A linear relationship (calibration factor) is applicable to fresh or quickly decaying emissions (i.e., before the aerosol has aged and differential decay rates introduce curvature into the relationship). The empirical parameters for the power-law relationships vary greatly both between and within source types, although linear factors appear to have lower uncertainty. The Dylos Air Quality Monitor is likely most useful for providing instantaneous feedback and context on mass particle levels in home and work situations for field-survey or personal awareness applications.

  1. Calibration of Elasto-Magnetic Sensors on In-Service Cable-Stayed Bridges for Stress Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Carlo; Zonta, Daniele; Laasri, Hassan Ait; Glisic, Branko; Wang, Ming

    2018-02-05

    The recent developments in measurement technology have led to the installation of efficient monitoring systems on many bridges and other structures all over the world. Nowadays, more and more structures have been built and instrumented with sensors. However, calibration and installation of sensors remain challenging tasks. In this paper, we use a case study, Adige Bridge, in order to present a low-cost method for the calibration and installation of elasto-magnetic sensors on cable-stayed bridges. Elasto-magnetic sensors enable monitoring of cable stress. The sensor installation took place two years after the bridge construction. The calibration was conducted in two phases: one in the laboratory and the other one on site. In the laboratory, a sensor was built around a segment of cable that was identical to those of the cable-stayed bridge. Then, the sample was subjected to a defined tension force. The sensor response was compared with the applied load. Experimental results showed that the relationship between load and magnetic permeability does not depend on the sensor fabrication process except for an offset. The determination of this offset required in situ calibration after installation. In order to perform the in situ calibration without removing the cables from the bridge, vibration tests were carried out for the estimation of the cables' tensions. At the end of the paper, we show and discuss one year of data from the elasto-magnetic sensors. Calibration results demonstrate the simplicity of the installation of these sensors on existing bridges and new structures.

  2. Active system monitoring applied on wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Parbo, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A concept for active system monitoring (ASM) applied on wind turbines is presented in this paper. The concept is based on an injection of a small periodic auxiliary signal in the system. An investigation of the signature from the auxiliary input in residual (error) signals can then be applied...... for an online monitoring of central parameters/elements of the system. Statistical tests are applied on the residual signals for obtaining a correct monitoring....

  3. Easy-to-use, general, and accurate multi-Kinect calibration and its application to gait monitoring for fall prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staranowicz, Aaron N; Ray, Christopher; Mariottini, Gian-Luca

    2015-01-01

    Falls are the most-common causes of unintentional injury and death in older adults. Many clinics, hospitals, and health-care providers are urgently seeking accurate, low-cost, and easy-to-use technology to predict falls before they happen, e.g., by monitoring the human walking pattern (or "gait"). Despite the wide popularity of Microsoft's Kinect and the plethora of solutions for gait monitoring, no strategy has been proposed to date to allow non-expert users to calibrate the cameras, which is essential to accurately fuse the body motion observed by each camera in a single frame of reference. In this paper, we present a novel multi-Kinect calibration algorithm that has advanced features when compared to existing methods: 1) is easy to use, 2) it can be used in any generic Kinect arrangement, and 3) it provides accurate calibration. Extensive real-world experiments have been conducted to validate our algorithm and to compare its performance against other multi-Kinect calibration approaches, especially to show the improved estimate of gait parameters. Finally, a MATLAB Toolbox has been made publicly available for the entire research community.

  4. Backside calibration potentiometry: ion activity measurements with selective supported liquid membranes by calibrating from the inner side of the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malon, Adam; Bakker, Eric; Pretsch, Ernö

    2007-01-15

    In direct potentiometry, the magnitude of the measured potentials is used to determine the composition of the sample. While this places rather formidable demands on the required reproducibility of the associated potential measurements, typically on the order of microvolts, in vitro clinical analyses of blood samples are today successfully performed with direct potentiometry using ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). Unfortunately, most other analytical situations do not permit the sensor to be recalibrated every few minutes, as in environmental monitoring or in vivo measurements, and direct potentiometry is often bound to fail as an accurate method in these circumstances. This paper introduces a novel direction for potentiometric sensing, termed backside calibration potentiometry. Chemical asymmetries across thin supported liquid ISE membranes are assessed by determining the direction of potential drift upon changing the stirring rate on either side of the membrane. Disappearance of this drift indicates the disappearance of concentration gradients across the membrane and is used to determine the sample composition if the solution composition at the backside of the membrane and the interfering ion concentration in the sample are known. For practical determinations, the concentration of either the primary or the interfering ion is varied in the reference solution until the stirring effect disappears. The procedure is demonstrated with a Ca2+-selective membrane using Ba2+ as the dominant interfering ion. Another example includes the determination of Pb2+ in environmental samples where the pH is adjusted to a known level. At pH 4.0, H+ turns out to be the dominant interfering ion. The practical applicability of the method is shown with different environmental water samples, for which the results obtained with the novel method are compared with those obtained by traditional calibration using standard additions. The limitations of the novel method in terms of accuracy and

  5. A machine learning calibration model using random forests to improve sensor performance for lower-cost air quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Naomi; Presto, Albert A.; Kumar, Sriniwasa P. N.; Gu, Jason; Hauryliuk, Aliaksei; Robinson, Ellis S.; Robinson, Allen L.; Subramanian, R.

    2018-01-01

    Low-cost sensing strategies hold the promise of denser air quality monitoring networks, which could significantly improve our understanding of personal air pollution exposure. Additionally, low-cost air quality sensors could be deployed to areas where limited monitoring exists. However, low-cost sensors are frequently sensitive to environmental conditions and pollutant cross-sensitivities, which have historically been poorly addressed by laboratory calibrations, limiting their utility for monitoring. In this study, we investigated different calibration models for the Real-time Affordable Multi-Pollutant (RAMP) sensor package, which measures CO, NO2, O3, and CO2. We explored three methods: (1) laboratory univariate linear regression, (2) empirical multiple linear regression, and (3) machine-learning-based calibration models using random forests (RF). Calibration models were developed for 16-19 RAMP monitors (varied by pollutant) using training and testing windows spanning August 2016 through February 2017 in Pittsburgh, PA, US. The random forest models matched (CO) or significantly outperformed (NO2, CO2, O3) the other calibration models, and their accuracy and precision were robust over time for testing windows of up to 16 weeks. Following calibration, average mean absolute error on the testing data set from the random forest models was 38 ppb for CO (14 % relative error), 10 ppm for CO2 (2 % relative error), 3.5 ppb for NO2 (29 % relative error), and 3.4 ppb for O3 (15 % relative error), and Pearson r versus the reference monitors exceeded 0.8 for most units. Model performance is explored in detail, including a quantification of model variable importance, accuracy across different concentration ranges, and performance in a range of monitoring contexts including the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and the US EPA Air Sensors Guidebook recommendations of minimum data quality for personal exposure measurement. A key strength of the RF approach is that

  6. Fourth IRMF comparison of calibrations of portable gamma-ray dose- rate monitors 2001-2002 Ionising radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, V E

    2002-01-01

    The Ionising Radiations Metrology Forum (IRMF) organised a fourth comparison of calibrations of gamma-ray dose-rate monitors in which fifteen establishments in the UK participated. The exercise involved the circulation of three gamma-ray monitors for calibration in the fields produced using sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs, sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am and sup 6 sup 0 Co. The instruments used were an Electra with MC 20 probe, a Mini-Instruments Mini-rad 1000 and a Siemens electronic personal dosemeter Mk 2 (EPD). The responses relative to 'true' dose equivalent rate were calculated by the individual participants and submitted to the for analysis along with details of the facilities and fields employed. Details of the estimated uncertainties were also reported. The results are compared and demonstrate generally satisfactory agreement between the participating establishments. However, the participants' treatment of uncertainties needs improvement and demonstrates a need for guidance in this area.

  7. X-ray facility for the ground calibration of the X-ray monitor JEM-X on board INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loffredo, G.; Pelliciari, C.; Frontera, F.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the X-ray facility developed for the calibration of the X-ray monitor JEM-X on board the INTEGRAL satellite. The apparatus allowed the scanning of the detector geometric area with a pencil beam of desired energy over the major part of the passband of the instrument. The monochromatic...... radiation is obtained with the use of a double crystal monochromator at fixed exit. We discuss the facility performance....

  8. Temperature and Humidity Calibration of a Low-Cost Wireless Dust Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojaiji, Hannaneh; Kalantarian, Haik; Bui, Alex A T; King, Christine E; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2017-03-01

    This paper introduces the design, calibration, and validation of a low-cost portable sensor for the real-time measurement of dust particles within the environment. The proposed design consists of low hardware cost and calibration based on temperature and humidity sensing to achieve accurate processing of airborne dust density. Using commercial particulate matter sensors, a highly accurate air quality monitoring sensor was designed and calibrated using real world variations in humidity and temperature for indoor and outdoor applications. Furthermore, to provide a low-cost secure solution for real-time data transfer and monitoring, an onboard Bluetooth module with AES data encryption protocol was implemented. The wireless sensor was tested against a Dylos DC1100 Pro Air Quality Monitor, as well as an Alphasense OPC-N2 optical air quality monitoring sensor for accuracy. The sensor was also tested for reliability by comparing the sensor to an exact copy of itself under indoor and outdoor conditions. It was found that accurate measurements under real-world humid and temperature varying and dynamically changing conditions were achievable using the proposed sensor when compared to the commercially available sensors. In addition to accurate and reliable sensing, this sensor was designed to be wearable and perform real-time data collection and transmission, making it easy to collect and analyze data for air quality monitoring and real-time feedback in remote health monitoring applications. Thus, the proposed device achieves high quality measurements at lower-cost solutions than commercially available wireless sensors for air quality.

  9. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  10. Monitoring by Control Technique - Activated Carbon Adsorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Activated Carbon Adsorber control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  11. 34 CFR 300.120 - Monitoring activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring activities. 300.120 Section 300.120 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION... activities. (a) The SEA must carry out activities to ensure that § 300.114 is implemented by each public...

  12. Self-calibrated active pyrometer for furnace temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woskov, Paul P.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The pyrometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave receiver including a millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement. In an alternative embodiment, a translatable base plate and a visible laser beam allow slow mapping out of interference patterns and obtaining peak values therefor. The invention also includes a waveguide having a replaceable end portion, an insulating refractory sleeve and/or a source of inert gas flow. The pyrometer may be used in conjunction with a waveguide to form a system for temperature measurements in a furnace. The system may employ a chopper or alternatively, be constructed without a chopper. The system may also include an auxiliary reflector for surface emissivity measurements.

  13. Embedded Electro-Optic Sensor Network for the On-Site Calibration and Real-Time Performance Monitoring of Large-Scale Phased Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Kyoung

    2005-01-01

    This final report summarizes the progress during the Phase I SBIR project entitled "Embedded Electro-Optic Sensor Network for the On-Site Calibration and Real-Time Performance Monitoring of Large-Scale Phased Arrays...

  14. Accuracy of Wristband Activity Monitors during Ambulation and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-DE; Kuo, Chang-Chih; Pellegrini, Christine A; Hsu, Miao-Ju

    2016-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of wristband activity monitors on measuring step counts at prescribed speeds on a treadmill and under short bouts of common daily activities. Thirty healthy young adults wore three wristband activity monitors on both wrists while walking or jogging on a treadmill at different speeds (54, 80, 107, and 134 m·min) and performing six different common daily activities for 5 min each. The monitors included the Fitbit Flex, the Garmin Vivofit, and the Jawbone UP. The common daily activity conditions included two sitting activities (playing a tablet computer game and folding laundry), two walking activities (pushing a stroller, carrying a bag), and two stair climbing activities (down and up). Absolute percentage error (APE) scores were computed to examine the accuracy between actual observed steps and monitor-detected steps. Under the treadmill condition, the APE ranged between 1.5% and 9.6%. Accuracy was improved at faster speeds (134 m·min) for all the monitors (APE 33%) when pushing a stroller. Higher APE was observed when worn on the dominant wrist under the common daily activity conditions. The wristband activity monitors examined were more accurate for measuring step counts between 80 and 134 m·min as compared with a slower speed. Accuracy under each common daily activity condition ranged widely between monitors and activity, with less error when worn on the nondominant wrist. These results will help to inform researchers on the use and accuracy of wristband activity monitors for future studies.

  15. Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

  16. Technology of remote monitoring for nuclear activity monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwack, Ehn Ho; Kim, Jong Soo; Yoon, Wan Ki; Park, Sung Sik; Na, Won Woo; An, Jin Soo; Cha, Hong Ryul; Kim, Jung Soo

    2000-05-01

    In a view of safeguards monitoring at nuclear facilities, the monitoring is changing to remote method so that this report is described to remote monitoring(RM) applying on commercial NPP in Korea. To enhance IAEA safeguards efficiency and effectiveness, IAEA is taking into account of remote monitoring system(RMS) and testing as a field trial. IRMP(International Remote Monitoring Project) in participating many nations for development of RMS is proceeding their project such as technical exchange and research etc. In case of our country are carrying out the research relevant RM since acceptance RMS at 7th ROK-IAEA safeguards implementation review meeting. With a view to enhancement the RMS, installation location and element technology of the RM equipment are evaluated in a view of safeguards in Korea LWRs, and proposed a procedure for national inspection application through remote data evaluation from Younggwang-3 NPP. These results are large valuable to use of national inspection at time point extending installation to all Korea PWR NPP. In case of CANDU, neutron, gamma measurement and basic concept of network using optical fiber scintillating detector as remote verification method for dry storage canister are described. Also RM basic design of spent fuel transfer campaign is described that unattended RM without inspector instead of performing in participating together with IAEA and national inspector. The transfer campaign means the spent fuel storage pond to dry storage canister for about two months every year. Therefore, positively participation of IAEA strength safeguards project will be increased transparency for our nuclear activity as well as contributed to national relevant industry.

  17. ActiGraph and Actical physical activity monitors: a peek under the hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Dinesh; Freedson, Patty

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1980s, accelerometer-based activity monitors have been used by researchers to quantify physical activity. The technology of these monitors has continuously evolved. For example, changes have been made to monitor hardware (type of sensor (e.g., piezoelectric, piezoresistive, capacitive)) and output format (counts vs raw signal). Commonly used activity monitors belong to the ActiGraph and the Actical families. This article presents information on several electromechanical aspects of these commonly used activity monitors. The majority of the article focuses on the evolution of the ActiGraph activity monitor by describing the differences among the 7164, the GT1M, and the GT3X models. This is followed by brief descriptions of the influences of device firmware and monitor calibration status. We also describe the Actical, but the discussion is short because this device has not undergone any major changes since it was first introduced. This article may help researchers gain a better understanding of the functioning of activity monitors. For example, a common misconception among physical activity researchers is that the ActiGraph GT1M and GT3X are piezoelectric sensor-based monitors. Thus, this information may also help researchers to describe these monitors more accurately in scientific publications.

  18. Monitoring the On-Orbit Calibration of Terra MODIS Reflective Solar Bands Using Simultaneous Terra MISR Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal, Amit; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wu, Aisheng

    2016-01-01

    On December 18, 2015, the Terra spacecraft completed 16 years of successful operation in space. Terra has five instruments designed to facilitate scientific measurements of the earths land, ocean, and atmosphere. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instruments provide information for the temporal studies of the globe. After providing over 16 years of complementary measurements, a synergistic use of the measurements obtained from these sensors is beneficial for various science products. The 20 reflective solar bands (RSBs) of MODIS are calibrated using a combination of solar diffuser and lunar measurements, supplemented by measurements from pseudoinvariant desert sites. MODIS views the on-board calibrators and the earth via a two-sided scan mirror at three spatial resolutions: 250 m using 40 detectors in bands 1 and 2, 500 m using 20 detectors in bands 3 and 4, and 1000 m using 10 detectors in bands 819 and 26. Simultaneous measurements of the earths surface are acquired in a push-broom fashion by MISR at nine view angles spreading out in the forward and backward directions along the flight path. While the swath width for MISR acquisitions is 360 km, MODIS scans a wider swath of 2330 km via its two-sided scan mirror. The reflectance of the MODIS scan mirror has an angle dependence characterized by the response versus scan angle (RVS). Its on-orbit change is derived using the gain from a combination of on-board and earth-view measurements. The on-orbit RVS for MODIS has experienced a significant change, especially for the short-wavelength bands. The on-orbit RVS change for the short-wavelength bands (bands 3, 8, and 9) at nadir is observed to be greater than 10 over the mission lifetime. Due to absence of a scanning mechanism, MISR can serve as an effective tool to evaluate and monitor the on-orbit performance of the MODIS RVS. Furthermore, it can also monitor the detector and scan

  19. Calibration of a FDS-LC long counter for monitoring the neutron fluence at the HINEG facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bing; Li, Yanan; Mazuga, Mohamed; Li, Taosheng; Wang, Yongfeng; Ji, Xiang; Liu, Chao; Jiang, Jieqiong

    2017-09-01

    A FDS-LC long counter was developed to monitor the neutron fluence at the HINEG facility. The response function and the effective centre of long counter were calculated by using SuperMC code. The calibration of this long counter was performed in Research Facility, China institute of atomic energy. The results of experimental and simulative characterization of the FDS-LC long counter are persented in this paper. The comparison of the measured results with the calculated results shown a good agreement within 5%.

  20. Measurements on Active Cold Loads for Radiometer Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.

    2008-01-01

    Two semi-conductor Active Cold Loads (ACLs) to be used as cold references in spaceborne microwave radiometers have been developed. An X-band frequency was chosen, and the target noise temperature value was in the 50 to 100 K range. The ACLs are characterized in the operating temperature range 0 50...... degrees C, and long term stability is assessed. To this end a Test Bed has been developed. This Test Bed is actually a stable radiometer, and its design is briefly reviewed. The test setup is described, and preliminary test campaign results indicate output temperatures of 77 K and 55 K for the two ACLs...

  1. Measurements on Active Cold Loads for Radiometer Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels; Balling, Jan E.

    2009-01-01

    Two semiconductor active cold loads (ACLs) to be used as cold references in spaceborne microwave radiometers have been developed. An X-band frequency was chosen, and the target noise temperature value was in the 50-100-K range. The ACLs are characterized in the operating temperature range of 0deg......C-50degC, and long-term stability is assessed. To this end, a test bed has been developed. This test bed is actually a stable radiometer, and its design and performance are discussed. The test setup is described, and test campaign results indicate output temperatures of 77 and 56 K for the two ACLs...

  2. Performance Measurements on Active Cold Loads for Radiometer Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.

    2007-01-01

    Two semi-conductor Active Cold Loads (ACLs) to be used as cold references in spaceborne microwave radiometers have been developed. An X-band frequency has been chosen, and the target noise temperature value is in the 50 to 100 K range. The ACLs are to be characterized in the operating temperature...... range 0-50 degrees C, and long term stability must be assessed. To this end a Test Bed has been developed. This Test Bed is actually a stable radiometer, and its design and development is discussed. The test setup is described, and preliminary test campaign results indicate output temperatures of 73 K...

  3. Calibration and field evaluation of the Chemcatcher® passive sampler for monitoring metaldehyde in surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Glenn D; Mills, Graham A; Bakir, Adil; Gravell, Anthony; Schumacher, Melanie; Townsend, Ian; Jones, Lewis; Greenwood, Richard; Knott, Stuart; Fones, Gary R

    2018-03-01

    Metaldehyde is a potent molluscicide. It is the active ingredient in most slug pellets used for crop protection. This polar compound is considered an emerging pollutant. Due to its environmental mobility, metaldehyde is frequently detected at impacted riverine sites, often at concentrations above the EU Drinking Water Directive limit of 0.1µgL-1 for an individual pesticide. This presents a problem when such waters are abstracted for use in the production of potable water supplies, as this chemical is difficult to remove using conventional treatment processes. Understanding the sources, transport and fate of this pollutant in river catchments is therefore important. We developed a new variant of the Chemcatcher® passive sampler for monitoring metaldehyde comprising a Horizon Atlantic™ HLB-L disk as the receiving phase overlaid with a polyethersulphone membrane. The sampler uptake rate (Rs) was measured in semi-static laboratory (Rs = 15.7mLday-1) and in-field (Rs = 17.8mLday-1) calibration experiments. Uptake of metaldehyde was linear over a two-week period, with no measurable lag phase. Field trials (five consecutive 14day periods) using the Chemcatcher® were undertaken in eastern England at three riverine sites (4th September-12th November 2015) known to be impacted by the seasonal agricultural use of metaldehyde. Spot samples of water were collected regularly during the deployments, with concentrations of metaldehyde varying widely (~ 0.03-2.90µgL-1) and often exceeding the regulatory limit. Time weighted average concentrations obtained using the Chemcatcher® increased over the duration of the trial corresponding to increasing stochastic inputs of metaldehyde into the catchment. Monitoring data obtained from these devices gives complementary information to that obtained by the use of infrequent spot sampling procedures. This information can be used to develop risk assessments and catchment management plans and to assess the effectiveness of any mitigation

  4. Anoxic Activated Sludge Monitoring with Combined Nitrate and Titrimetric Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B.; Gernaey, Krist; Vanrolleghem, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental procedure for anoxic activated sludge monitoring with combined nitrate and titrimetric measurements is proposed and evaluated successfully with two known carbon sources, (-)acetate and dextrose. For nitrate measurements an ion-selective nitrate electrode is applied to allow...... for frequent measurements, and thereby the possibility for detailed determination of the denitrification biokinetics. An internal nitrate electrode calibration is implemented in the experiments to avoid the often-encountered electrode drift problem. It was observed that the best experimental design...... was with the carbon source in excess, since excess nitrate provoked nitrite build-up thereby complicating the data interpretation. A conceptual model could quantitatively describe the experimental observations and thus link the experimentally measured proton production with the consumption of electron acceptor...

  5. Beat frequency quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy for fast and calibration-free continuous trace-gas monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongpeng; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Huadan; Yu, Yajun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang; Tittel, Frank K.

    2017-05-01

    Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is a sensitive gas detection technique which requires frequent calibration and has a long response time. Here we report beat frequency (BF) QEPAS that can be used for ultra-sensitive calibration-free trace-gas detection and fast spectral scan applications. The resonance frequency and Q-factor of the quartz tuning fork (QTF) as well as the trace-gas concentration can be obtained simultaneously by detecting the beat frequency signal generated when the transient response signal of the QTF is demodulated at its non-resonance frequency. Hence, BF-QEPAS avoids a calibration process and permits continuous monitoring of a targeted trace gas. Three semiconductor lasers were selected as the excitation source to verify the performance of the BF-QEPAS technique. The BF-QEPAS method is capable of measuring lower trace-gas concentration levels with shorter averaging times as compared to conventional PAS and QEPAS techniques and determines the electrical QTF parameters precisely.

  6. Forest health monitoring 1992 activities plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, S.A.; Barnard, J.E.

    1993-11-01

    Forests, which cover approximately one-third of the United States, are an important part of the U.S. economy, culture, and ecology. In response to legislative mandate and concerns for our environment, several government agencies have been working together to develop a program to monitor the condition of the Nation's forests. The multiagency program is called the Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) program. The report is designed to serve two purposes for FHM. The first is to provide a description of major FHM activities planned for the fiscal year 1992. These activities range from the initial planning stages of field work to the assessment and reporting activities. The second is to provide background information about the FHM program organization, the indicator development process, and other activities within FHM.

  7. Neutron monitoring systems including gamma thermometers and methods of calibrating nuclear instruments using gamma thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Stephan Craig; Meyers, Craig Glenn; Petzen, John Alexander; Foard, Adam Muhling

    2012-08-07

    A method of calibrating a nuclear instrument using a gamma thermometer may include: measuring, in the instrument, local neutron flux; generating, from the instrument, a first signal proportional to the neutron flux; measuring, in the gamma thermometer, local gamma flux; generating, from the gamma thermometer, a second signal proportional to the gamma flux; compensating the second signal; and calibrating a gain of the instrument based on the compensated second signal. Compensating the second signal may include: calculating selected yield fractions for specific groups of delayed gamma sources; calculating time constants for the specific groups; calculating a third signal that corresponds to delayed local gamma flux based on the selected yield fractions and time constants; and calculating the compensated second signal by subtracting the third signal from the second signal. The specific groups may have decay time constants greater than 5.times.10.sup.-1 seconds and less than 5.times.10.sup.5 seconds.

  8. Challenges in application of Active Cold Loads for microwave radiometer calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.; Skou, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Two Active Cold Loads (ACLs) for microwave radiometer calibration, operating at X-band, are evaluated with respect to important stability parameters. Using a stable radiometer system as test bed, absolute levels of 77 K and 55 K are found. This paper identifies and summarizes potential challenges...

  9. Bluetooth wireless monitoring, diagnosis and calibration interface for control system of fuel cell bus in Olympic demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jianfeng; Lin, Xinfan; Xu, Liangfei; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao

    With the worldwide deterioration of the natural environment and the fossil fuel crisis, the possible commercialization of fuel cell vehicles has become a hot topic. In July 2008, Beijing started a clean public transportation plan for the 29th Olympic games. Three fuel cell city buses and 497 other low-emission vehicles are now serving the Olympic core area and Beijing urban areas. The fuel cell buses will operate along a fixed bus line for 1 year as a public demonstration of green energy vehicles. Due to the specialized nature of fuel cell engines and electrified power-train systems, measurement, monitoring and calibration devices are indispensable. Based on the latest Bluetooth wireless technology, a novel Bluetooth universal data interface was developed for the control system of the fuel cell city bus. On this platform, a series of wireless portable control auxiliary systems have been implemented, including wireless calibration, a monitoring system and an in-system programming platform, all of which are ensuring normal operation of the fuel cell buses used in the demonstration.

  10. Evaluation of interspecimen trypsin digestion efficiency prior to multiple reaction monitoring-based absolute protein quantification with native protein calibrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Irene; Smit, Nico P M; Romijn, Fred P H T M; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Deelder, André M; van der Burgt, Yuri E M; Cobbaert, Christa M

    2013-12-06

    Implementation of quantitative clinical chemistry proteomics (qCCP) requires targeted proteomics approaches, usually involving bottom-up multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) with stable-isotope labeled standard (SIS) peptides, to move toward more accurate measurements. Two aspects of qCCP that deserve special attention are (1) proper calibration and (2) the assurance of consistent digestion. Here, we describe the evaluation of tryptic digestion efficiency by monitoring various signature peptides, missed cleavages, and modifications during proteolysis of apolipoprotein A-I and B in normo- and hypertriglyceridemic specimens. Absolute quantification of apolipoprotein A-I and B was performed by LC-MRM-MS with SIS peptide internal standards at two time points (4 and 20 h), using three native protein calibrators. Comparison with an immunoturbidimetric assay revealed recoveries of 99.4 ± 6.5% for apolipoprotein A-I and 102.6 ± 7.2% for apolipoprotein B after 4 h of trypsin digestion. Protein recoveries after 20 h trypsin incubation equaled 95.9 ± 6.9% and 106.0 ± 10.0% for apolipoproteins A-I and B, respectively. In conclusion, the use of metrologically traceable, native protein calibrators looks promising for accurate quantification of apolipoprotein A-I and B. Selection of rapidly formed peptides, that is, with no or minor missed cleavages, and the use of short trypsin incubation times for these efficiently cleaved peptides are likely to further reduce the variability introduced by trypsin digestion and to improve the traceability of test results to reach the desirable analytical performance for clinical chemistry application.

  11. SMOS calibration and validation activities with airborne interferometric radiometer HUT-2D during spring 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kainulainen, J.; Rautiainen, K.; Sievinen, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present calibration and validation activities of European Space Agency’s SMOS mission, which utilize airborne interferomentric L-band radiometer system HUT-2D of the Aalto University. During spring 2010 the instrument was used to measure three SMOS validation target areas, one...... in Denmark and two in Germany. We present these areas shortly, and describe the airborne activities. We show some exemplary measurements of the radiometer system and demonstrate the studies using the data....

  12. TOF-Watch(R) monitor: failure to calculate the train-of-four ratio in the absence of baseline calibration in anaesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Flores, M; Gleed, R D; Basher, K L; Scarlett, J M; Campoy, L; Kopman, A F

    2012-02-01

    TOF-Watch(®) monitors are designed to display train-of-four (TOF) count when neuromuscular block is intense, and to display TOF ratio when it is less intense. In dogs recovering from non-depolarizing neuromuscular block, when all four twitches are easily visible and apparently of similar magnitude, TOF-Watch(®) monitors often display TOF counts and not TOF ratios, as would be expected. We have never encountered this problem when the monitor was calibrated before neuromuscular blocking agent administration. Fourteen healthy female dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy were investigated. Recovery from neuromuscular block was assessed with a calibrated TOF-Watch SX(®) monitor. When the TOF ratio returned to 90%, the TOF-Watch SX(®) was replaced with an uncalibrated TOF-Watch(®) monitor. The output obtained from the uncalibrated TOF-Watch(®) was compared with that of the calibrated device. The median TOF ratio measured by the calibrated TOF-Watch SX(®) unit at recovery was 91 (86-100)% (n=14). The uncalibrated TOF-Watch(®) monitor displayed TOF counts in six dogs [2 (0, 4)] and TOF ratios in the remaining eight dogs [91 (79, 98)%], that is, the uncalibrated device failed to display appropriately >40% of the time. TOF-Watch(®) monitors must be calibrated before neuromuscular blocking agents are administered to dogs. When these devices are not so calibrated, they default to a reference value for twitch magnitude that was defined in healthy adult people. Even though neuromuscular transmission was restored in these dogs, we surmise that they did not achieve the default reference value, causing the monitor to display TOF counts rather than TOF ratios.

  13. Automatization of the Calibration Laboratory for Radiation Monitors of the IRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Tania S.; Ramos, Manoel M.O.; Quaresma, Daniel S. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: tschirn@ird.gov.br; mmoramos@ird.gov.br; dansq@ird.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    This work will present the concluded stages and also the ones that are still in process to reach the full automation of the calibration system. Little by little the laboratory included in its installations the automatization of some of its operations, aiming the safety of the staff and their equipment. The automation makes the installation almost ideal for the radioprotection, that is, makes its exposure as low as possible and the routines more accurate, minimizing attributed the uncertainties and the doses received by the professionals who operated the system manually. Currently, on the operation table there is a control of the position car exists and its speed, the internal TV circuit (of the room, the position of the car and equipment that is going to be calibrated), the control of the registration is done by the Autolab program and the Irradiator Buchler OB85 control with the sources of 137Cs and 60Co.A next stage will be the implantation of the automation project of the positioning of the three used attenuators. (author)

  14. 21 CFR 884.2730 - Home uterine activity monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Home uterine activity monitor. 884.2730 Section... Devices § 884.2730 Home uterine activity monitor. (a) Identification. A home uterine activity monitor... and monitor that receive, process, and display data. This device is intended for use in women with a...

  15. [A monitor of the biomechanical cardiac activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masloboev, Iu P; Okhritskiĭ, A A; Prilutskiĭ, D A; Selishchev, S V

    2004-01-01

    A monitor of the biomechanical cardiac activity is described, which was elaborated on the basis of the accelerometer sensor and sigma-delta ADC for the purpose of registering the ballistocardiograms and seismocardiograms. The device ensures a non-stop signal recording for as long as 8 hours with the data being preserved in an inbuilt memory. Data are fed to the computer through the USB port. An algorithm is suggested for recordings processing by using the neuron-net technologies.

  16. Self-Monitoring of Mood versus Activity by Depressed Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Teresa M.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Self-monitoring activity or mood produced increases in self-reported pleasant activities and decreases in depressed mood, with self-monitoring of activity generally producing slightly better results. (Author)

  17. Acceptance test of an activity meter to be used as reference in a calibration methodology establishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Eduardo L.; Kuahara, Lilian T.; Potiens, Maria da Penha A., E-mail: educorrea1905@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The nuclear medicine is a medical physics area in which radiopharmaceuticals are used in diagnostic procedures. These radioactive elements are administered in the patient and the radiation emitted is detected by an equipment, that makes the body scan, connected to a computer software, and the image is constructed. In order to operate the nuclear medicine service must have calibrated radiation detectors. Thought, it does not exist, in Brazil, an activity meter calibration methodology, which causes many measurement uncertainties. The goal of this study is to present the acceptance test results of an activity meter to be used as reference in a new calibration methodology establishment. It was checked an activity meter Capintec, CRC-25R model, using three control sources ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 57}Co, {sup 133}Ba). The tests were based on the CNEN-NN 3.05 standard, the manufacturer manual, the TRS-454 and the TECDOC 602 and include: physical inspection, chamber voltage, zero adjustment, background response, data check and repeatability. The linearity and geometry tests could not be made, because the laboratory where the activity meter is located is not authorized to receive non-sealed radioactive sources. The equipment has presented a good behavior. All the results are in the range presented by national and international standards and the equipment is now being used in the laboratory and periodically passes through the quality control tests. (author)

  18. In-flight calibration system for the INTEGRAL x-ray monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Barbanera, L.

    1996-01-01

    JEM-X is the x-ray monitor serving the two gamma-ray experiments imager and spectrometer onboard the ESA's INTEGRAL satellite. Due to the intrinsic weakness of the celestial sources in the gamma energy range they will need very long integration times. During these long pointings JEM-X will be able...... of Amptek Cool-X15 X-ray generators. The latter is a novel product, based on a pyroelectric crystal used to generate energetic electrons that produce fluorescence lines by hitting a metallic target. We plan to use the four low intensity radioactive sources for monitoring the four independent anode chains...

  19. Modelling and field application of the Chemcatcher passive sampler calibration data for the monitoring of hydrophobic organic pollutants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrana, Branislav; Mills, Graham A; Kotterman, Michiel; Leonards, Pim; Booij, Kees; Greenwood, Richard

    2007-02-01

    Passive sampling of dissolved pollutants in water has been gaining acceptance for environmental monitoring. Previously, an integrative passive sampler consisting of a C18 Empore disk receiving phase saturated with n-octanol and fitted with low density polyethylene membrane, was developed and calibrated for the measurement of time weighted average (TWA) concentrations of hydrophobic pollutants in water. In this study, the exchange kinetics were modelled to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of the accumulation process and to enable the measurement of TWA concentrations of hydrophobic pollutants in the field. An empirical relationship that enables the calculation of in situ sampling rates of chemicals using performance reference compounds was derived and its application was demonstrated in a field study in which TWA aqueous concentrations estimated from sampler data for target analytes were compared with TWA concentrations obtained from spot samples of water collected regularly during the sampler deployment period.

  20. Airborne Hyperspectral Sensing of Monitoring Harmful Algal Blooms in the Great Lakes Region: System Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekki, John; Anderson, Robert; Avouris, Dulcinea; Becker, RIchard; Churnside, James; Cline, Michael; Demers, James; Leshkevich, George; Liou, Larry; Luvall, Jeffrey; hide

    2017-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) in Lake Erie have been prominent in recent years. The bloom in 2014 reached a severe level causing the State of Ohio to declare a state of emergency. At that time NASA Glenn Research Center was requested by stakeholders to help monitor the blooms in Lake Erie. Glenn conducted flights twice a week in August and September and assembled and distributed the HAB information to the shoreline water resource managers using its hyperspectral imaging sensor (in development since 2006), the S??3 Viking aircraft, and funding resources from the NASA Headquarters Earth Science Division. Since then, the State of Ohio, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have elevated their funding and activities for observing, monitoring, and addressing the root cause of HABs. Also, the communities and stakeholders have persistently requested NASA Glenn??s participation in HAB observation. Abundant field campaigns and sample analyses have been funded by Ohio and NOAA, which provided a great opportunity for NASA to advance science and airborne hyperspectral remote sensing economically. Capitalizing on this opportunity to advance the science of algal blooms and remote sensing, NASA Glenn conducted the Airborne Hyperspectral Observation of harmful algal blooms campaign in 2015 that was, in many respects, twice as large as the 2014 campaign. Focusing mostly on Lake Erie, but also including other small inland lakes and the Ohio River, the campaign was conducted in partnership with a large number of partners specializing in marine science and remote sensing. Airborne hyperspectral observation of HABs holds promise to distinguish potential HABs from nuisance blooms, determine their concentrations, and delineate their movement in an augmented spatial and temporal resolution and under clouds??all of which are excellent complements to satellite observations. Working with collaborators at several Ohio and Michigan

  1. A wearable respiratory monitoring device--the between-days variability of calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyde, C; Mahler, H; Roecker, K; Gollhofer, A

    2015-01-01

    The between-days variability in ascertained gain factors for calibration of a wearable respiratory inductance plethysmograph (RIP) and validity thereof for the repeated use during exercise were examined. Consecutive 5-min periods of standing still, slow running at 8 km·h(-1), fast running at 14 km·h(-1) (male) or 12 km·h(-1) (female) and recovery were repeated by 10 healthy subjects on 5 days. Breath-by-breath data were recorded simultaneously by flow meter and RIP. Gain factors were determined individually for each trial (CALIND) via least square regression. Reliability and variability in gain factors were quantified respectively by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and limits of agreement. Within a predefined error range of ±20% the amount of RIP-derived tidal volumes after CALIND was compared to corresponding amounts when gain factors of the first trial were applied on the following 4 trials (CALFIRST). ICC ranged within 0.96 and 0.98. The variability in gain factors (up to ± 24.06%) was reduced compensatively by their sum. Amounts of breaths within the predefined error range did not differ between CALIND and (CALFIRST) (P>0.32). The between-days variability of gain factors for a wearable RIP-device does not show impaired reliability in further derived tidal volumes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Monitoring of the wavelength calibration lamps for the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascucci, Ilaria; Proffitt, Charles; Ghavamian, Parviz; Sahnow, David; Oliveira, Cristina; Aloisi, Alessandra; Keyes, Tony; Penton, Steven V.

    2010-08-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) are the two optical-UV spectrographs on board the Hubble Space Telescope. To determine the wavelength scale for individual science observations, internal arc lamp spectra accompany most observations of external targets. Here we present a detailed analysis of the changes in the COS and STIS internal lamp fluxes and spectra over time, and also compare our results to pre-launch ground testing, and to laboratory accelerated aging testing of similar lamps. Most of the analysis presented here focuses on the behaviour of the lamps in the far-UV (FUV). We find that the STIS LINE lamp has faded by a factor of ~15 in the very short FUV wavelengths (1150-1200Å) over the 13-year period on which STIS was in space, a much steeper fading than predicted from accelerated aging tests in the laboratory. We also find that all STIS lamps have faded during the period in which the spectrograph was not operational (2004-2009) thus pointing to on-orbit conditions as an additional and important cause of lamp fading. We report that the COS P1 lamp output appears to decline with usage with a similar slope as the LINE and HITM1 lamps on STIS. Finally, we recommend switching from the LINE to the HITM2 lamp for a more efficient wavelength calibration of the STIS settings covering the very short FUV wavelengths.

  3. Calibration and deployment of a fiber-optic sensing system for monitoring debris flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Jer; Chu, Chung-Ray; Tien, Tsung-Mo; Yin, Hsiao-Yuen; Chen, Ping-Sen

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel fiber-optic sensing system, capable of monitoring debris flows or other natural hazards that produce ground vibrations. The proposed sensing system comprises a demodulator (BraggSCOPE, FS5500), which includes a broadband light source and a data logger, a four-port coupler and four Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) accelerometers. Based on field tests, the performance of the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is compared with that of a conventional sensing system that includes a geophone or a microphone. Following confirmation of the reliability of the proposed sensing system, the fiber-optic sensing systems are deployed along the Ai-Yu-Zi and Chu-Shui Creeks in Nautou County of central Taiwan for monitoring debris flows. Sensitivity test of the deployed fiber-optic sensing system along the creek banks is also performed. Analysis results of the seismic data recorded by the systems reveal in detail the frequency characteristics of the artificially generated ground vibrations. Results of this study demonstrate that the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is highly promising for use in monitoring natural disasters that generate ground vibrations.

  4. Generating 3D hyperspectral information with lightweight UAV snapshot cameras for vegetation monitoring: From camera calibration to quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, Helge; Burkart, Andreas; Bolten, Andreas; Bareth, Georg

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a novel method to derive 3D hyperspectral information from lightweight snapshot cameras for unmanned aerial vehicles for vegetation monitoring. Snapshot cameras record an image cube with one spectral and two spatial dimensions with every exposure. First, we describe and apply methods to radiometrically characterize and calibrate these cameras. Then, we introduce our processing chain to derive 3D hyperspectral information from the calibrated image cubes based on structure from motion. The approach includes a novel way for quality assurance of the data which is used to assess the quality of the hyperspectral data for every single pixel in the final data product. The result is a hyperspectral digital surface model as a representation of the surface in 3D space linked with the hyperspectral information emitted and reflected by the objects covered by the surface. In this study we use the hyperspectral camera Cubert UHD 185-Firefly, which collects 125 bands from 450 to 950 nm. The obtained data product has a spatial resolution of approximately 1 cm for the spatial and 21 cm for the hyperspectral information. The radiometric calibration yields good results with less than 1% offset in reflectance compared to an ASD FieldSpec 3 for most of the spectral range. The quality assurance information shows that the radiometric precision is better than 0.13% for the derived data product. We apply the approach to data from a flight campaign in a barley experiment with different varieties during the growth stage heading (BBCH 52 - 59) to demonstrate the feasibility for vegetation monitoring in the context of precision agriculture. The plant parameters retrieved from the data product correspond to in-field measurements of a single date field campaign for plant height (R2 = 0.7), chlorophyll (BGI2, R2 = 0.52), LAI (RDVI, R2 = 0.32) and biomass (RDVI, R2 = 0.29). Our approach can also be applied for other image-frame cameras as long as the individual bands of the

  5. Monitoring active volcanoes: The geochemical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The geochemical surveillance of an active volcano aims to recognize possible signals that are related to changes in volcanic activity. Indeed, as a consequence of the magma rising inside the volcanic "plumbing system" and/or the refilling with new batches of magma, the dissolved volatiles in the magma are progressively released as a function of their relative solubilities. When approaching the surface, these fluids that are discharged during magma degassing can interact with shallow aquifers and/or can be released along the main volcano-tectonic structures. Under these conditions, the following main degassing processes represent strategic sites to be monitored.

    The main purpose of this special volume is to collect papers that cover a wide range of topics in volcanic fluid geochemistry, which include geochemical characterization and geochemical monitoring of active volcanoes using different techniques and at different sites. Moreover, part of this volume has been dedicated to the new geochemistry tools.

  6. In situ calibration of neutron activation system on the large helical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, N.; Nishitani, T.; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Kawase, H.; Tanaka, T.; Li, S. Y.; Yoshihashi, S.; Uritani, A.

    2017-11-01

    In situ calibration of the neutron activation system on the Large Helical Device (LHD) was performed by using an intense 252Cf neutron source. To simulate a ring-shaped neutron source, we installed a railway inside the LHD vacuum vessel and made a train loaded with the 252Cf source run along a typical magnetic axis position. Three activation capsules loaded with thirty pieces of indium foils stacked with total mass of approximately 18 g were prepared. Each capsule was irradiated over 15 h while the train was circulating. The activation response coefficient (9.4 ± 1.2) × 10-8 of 115In(n, n')115mIn reaction obtained from the experiment is in good agreement with results from three-dimensional neutron transport calculations using the Monte Carlo neutron transport simulation code 6. The activation response coefficients of 2.45 MeV birth neutron and secondary 14.1 MeV neutron from deuterium plasma were evaluated from the activation response coefficient obtained in this calibration experiment with results from three-dimensional neutron calculations using the Monte Carlo neutron transport simulation code 6.

  7. Monte Carlo modeling provides accurate calibration factors for radionuclide activity meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagni, F; Cicoria, G; Lucconi, G; Infantino, A; Lodi, F; Marengo, M

    2014-12-01

    Accurate determination of calibration factors for radionuclide activity meters is crucial for quantitative studies and in the optimization step of radiation protection, as these detectors are widespread in radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine facilities. In this work we developed the Monte Carlo model of a widely used activity meter, using the Geant4 simulation toolkit. More precisely the "PENELOPE" EM physics models were employed. The model was validated by means of several certified sources, traceable to primary activity standards, and other sources locally standardized with spectrometry measurements, plus other experimental tests. Great care was taken in order to accurately reproduce the geometrical details of the gas chamber and the activity sources, each of which is different in shape and enclosed in a unique container. Both relative calibration factors and ionization current obtained with simulations were compared against experimental measurements; further tests were carried out, such as the comparison of the relative response of the chamber for a source placed at different positions. The results showed a satisfactory level of accuracy in the energy range of interest, with the discrepancies lower than 4% for all the tested parameters. This shows that an accurate Monte Carlo modeling of this type of detector is feasible using the low-energy physics models embedded in Geant4. The obtained Monte Carlo model establishes a powerful tool for first instance determination of new calibration factors for non-standard radionuclides, for custom containers, when a reference source is not available. Moreover, the model provides an experimental setup for further research and optimization with regards to materials and geometrical details of the measuring setup, such as the ionization chamber itself or the containers configuration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Continuous Activity Monitoring During Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin, E-mail: ohri.nitin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Bodner, William R.; Mehta, Keyur J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Shankar, Viswanathan [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Halmos, Balazs; Haigentz, Missak [Department of Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Rapkin, Bruce [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To perform a prospective trial testing the feasibility and utility of acquiring activity data as a measure of health status during concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ambulatory patients who were planned for treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with curative intent for cancers of the head and neck, lung, or gastrointestinal tract were provided with activity monitors before treatment initiation. Patients were asked to wear the devices continuously throughout the radiation therapy course. Step count data were downloaded weekly during radiation therapy and 2 and 4 weeks after radiation therapy completion. The primary objective was to demonstrate feasibility, defined as collection of step counts for 80% of the days during study subjects' radiation therapy courses. Secondary objectives included establishing step count as a dynamic predictor of unplanned hospitalization risk. Results: Thirty-eight enrolled patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Primary diagnoses included head and neck cancer (n=11), lung cancer (n=13), and a variety of gastrointestinal cancers (n=14). Step data were collected for 1524 of 1613 days (94%) during patients' radiation therapy courses. Fourteen patients were hospitalized during radiation therapy or within 4 weeks of radiation therapy completion. Cox regression modeling demonstrated a significant association between recent step counts (3-day average) and hospitalization risk, with a 38% reduction in the risk of hospitalization for every 1000 steps taken each day (hazard ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.83, P=.002). Inferior quality of life scores and impaired performance status were not associated with increased hospitalization risk. Conclusion: Continuous activity monitoring during concurrent chemoradiotherapy is feasible and well-tolerated. Step counts may serve as powerful, objective, and dynamic indicators of hospitalization risk.

  9. Air quality monitoring: experimental study of in-station automatic calibration; Surveillance de la qualite de l`air: etude experimentale portant sur le calibrage automatique en station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauss, G.; Paillarguest, T.; Walenda, R.; Pesch, P.; Gerboles, M.; Payrissat, M. [Association pour la Surveillance et l`Etude de la Pollution Atmospherique en Alsace, Schiltigheim (France)

    1996-12-31

    The analysis of the polluting gases that are regulated by the European directive (SO{sub 2}, NO/NO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}) is done by automatic analyzers which are regularly calibrated in monitoring stations. The automatic calibration by means of stationary devices, regardless of whether they are integrated into the analyser or not, is only applied in 60% of the stations in the European Union because of the uncertainty about the choice of the device and the costs. For over a year an in-situ study has been undertaken with the aim of testing six automatic calibration devices in the stations of the French network ASSPA and of the German Network UMEG. These devices were different in the type of calibration standard (bottle low concentration, dilution, permeation, titration in gas phase), in the diluting and measuring devices of the flow rate and in the procedure for acquiring the data. The test took into account the degree of automation of the control calibration as well as the automatic correction of the calibration differences and the constraints of the site. The verification of the stability of the tested equipment was guaranteed by a quality assurance programme of ERLAP. The test results have been evaluated in relation to the calibration quality in terms of stability and reliability of the devices and in relation to the investment costs and the running of the station. Of all the tested calibration devices, the diluter-type combined with a ozone generator, which also offers the possibility to run a titration cycle in gas phase, could be the choice likely to satisfy the needs of the stations. The other systems, less complete, give relatively acceptable results where the use of ozone generators for calibration purposes is excluded.

  10. Monitoring and controlling ovarian activity in elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitaram, Chatchote; Brown, Janine L

    2017-12-13

    Both Asian (Elephas maximus) and African (Loxodonta africana) elephants are important keystone, umbrella and flagship species. Paradoxically, world population numbers of both species are declining in many of their natural ranges due mainly to poaching, while over population of elephants in some areas is resulting in serious human-elephant conflict, and modifications of natural habitats that impact biodiversity. Understanding mechanisms of reproductive control is vital to effective population management, and for that reason significant advances have been made in endocrine and ultrasonographic monitoring techniques, particularly in studies of elephants ex situ. However, there remains a need to develop new methods to control ovarian activity, both for enhancing and inhibiting reproduction, to maintain population numbers at levels that ensure species survival and their ability to safely cohabitate with humans and other species. We present an overview of reproductive monitoring methods and how they have contributed to our knowledge of elephant reproductive biology, as well as their application for in situ and ex situ conservation purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neurological activity monitoring based on video inpainting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Sebastian; Seidel, Pascal; Thiermann, Steffen; Paul, Steffen

    2017-07-01

    Inpainting-based compression and reconstruction methodology can be applied to systems with limited resources to enable continuously monitor neurological activity. In this work, an approach based on sparse representations and K-SVD is augmented to a video processing in order to improve the recovery quality. That was mainly achieved by using another direction of spatial correlation and the extraction of cuboids across frames. The implementation of overlapping frames between the recorded data blocks avoids rising errors at the boundaries during the inpainting-based recovery. Controlling the electrode states per frame plays a key role for high data compression and precise recovery. The proposed 3D inpainting approach can compete with common methods like JPEG, JPEG2000 or MPEG-4 in terms of the degree of compression and reconstruction accuracy, which was applied on real measured local field potentials of a human patient.

  12. Development of a Primary Standard for Calibration of [{sup 18}F]FDG Activity Measurement Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capogni, M [ENEA Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti (INMRI), Centro Ricerche Casaccia, I-00060 Rome (Italy); Felice, P De [ENEA Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti (INMRI), Centro Ricerche Casaccia, I-00060 Rome (Italy); Fazio, A [ENEA Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti (INMRI), Centro Ricerche Casaccia, I-00060 Rome (Italy); Simonelli, F [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (JRC), European Commission, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,), Italy; D' Ursi, V [Amersham Health Srl (AH), I-13040 Saluggia (Saint Vincent and the Grenadines), Italy; Pecorale, A [Amersham Health Srl (AH), I-13040 Saluggia (Saint Vincent and the Grenadines), Italy; Giliberti, C [Istituto Superiore per la Prevenzione e la Sicurezza del Lavoro (ISPESL), I-00184 Rome (Italy); Abbas, K [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (JRC), European Commission, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,), Italy

    2006-05-15

    The {sup 18}F national primary standard was developed by the INMRI-ENEA using the 4{pi}{beta} Liquid Scintillation Spectrometry Method with {sup 3}H-Standard Efficiency Tracing. Measurements were performed at JRCIspra under a scientific collaboration between the Institute for Health and Consumer Production, the Amersham Health and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Prevention (ISPESL). The goal of the work was to calibrate, with minimum uncertainty, the INMRI-ENEA transfer standard portable well-type ionisation chamber as well as other JRC-Ispra and Amersham Health reference Ionising Chambers used for FDG activity measurement.

  13. A Review on Intelligent Monitoring and Activity Interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    José Carlos Castillo; Antonio Fernández-Caballero; María Teresa López

    2017-01-01

    This survey paper provides a tour of the various monitoring and activity interpretation frameworks found in the literature. The needs of monitoring and interpretation systems are presented in relation to the area where they have been developed or applied. Their evolution is studied to better understand the characteristics of current systems. After this, the main features of monitoring and activity interpretation systems are defined.

  14. Optics-Only Calibration of a Neural-Net Based Optical NDE Method for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2004-01-01

    A calibration process is presented that uses optical measurements alone to calibrate a neural-net based NDE method. The method itself detects small changes in the vibration mode shapes of structures. The optics-only calibration process confirms previous work that the sensitivity to vibration-amplitude changes can be as small as 10 nanometers. A more practical value in an NDE service laboratory is shown to be 50 nanometers. Both model-generated and experimental calibrations are demonstrated using two implementations of the calibration technique. The implementations are based on previously published demonstrations of the NDE method and an alternative calibration procedure that depends on comparing neural-net and point sensor measurements. The optics-only calibration method, unlike the alternative method, does not require modifications of the structure being tested or the creation of calibration objects. The calibration process can be used to test improvements in the NDE process and to develop a vibration-mode-independence of damagedetection sensitivity. The calibration effort was intended to support NASA s objective to promote safety in the operations of ground test facilities or aviation safety, in general, by allowing the detection of the gradual onset of structural changes and damage.

  15. Modelling and field application of the Chemcatcher passive sampler calibration data for the monitoring of hydrophobic organic pollutants in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrana, Branislav [School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, King Henry Building, King Henry I Street, Portsmouth PO1 2DY (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: branovrana@googlemail.com; Mills, Graham A. [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Kotterman, Michiel [Netherlands Institute for Fisheries Research, P.O. Box 68, Haringkade 1, 1970 AB IJmuiden (Netherlands); Leonards, Pim [Netherlands Institute for Fisheries Research, P.O. Box 68, Haringkade 1, 1970 AB IJmuiden (Netherlands); Booij, Kees [Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, P.O. Box 59, 1790 AB Texel (Netherlands); Greenwood, Richard [School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, King Henry Building, King Henry I Street, Portsmouth PO1 2DY (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15

    Passive sampling of dissolved pollutants in water has been gaining acceptance for environmental monitoring. Previously, an integrative passive sampler consisting of a C{sub 18} Empore[reg] disk receiving phase saturated with n-octanol and fitted with low density polyethylene membrane, was developed and calibrated for the measurement of time weighted average (TWA) concentrations of hydrophobic pollutants in water. In this study, the exchange kinetics were modelled to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of the accumulation process and to enable the measurement of TWA concentrations of hydrophobic pollutants in the field. An empirical relationship that enables the calculation of in situ sampling rates of chemicals using performance reference compounds was derived and its application was demonstrated in a field study in which TWA aqueous concentrations estimated from sampler data for target analytes were compared with TWA concentrations obtained from spot samples of water collected regularly during the sampler deployment period. - The exchange kinetics of hydrophobic organic pollutants between passive sampler and water were modelled to enable the measurement of time weighted average concentrations of pollutants. The applicability of the model was tested in a field study.

  16. Active self-calibration of thoracoscopic images for assisted minimally invasive spinal surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Fantin; Benboujja, Fouzi; Parent, Stefan; Cheriet, Farida

    2010-02-01

    Registration of thoracoscopic images to a preoperative 3D model of the spine is a prerequisite for minimally invasive surgical guidance. We propose an active self-calibration method of thoracoscopic image sequences acquired by an angled monocular endoscope with varying focal length during minimally invasive surgery of the spine. The extrinsic parameters are updated in real time by a motion tracking system while the intrinsic parameters are determined from a set of geometrical primitives extracted from the image of the surgical instrument tracked throughout the thoracoscopic sequence. A particle filter was used for the tracking of the instrument on the image sequence that was preprocessed to detect and correct reflexions due to the light source. The proposed method requires undertaking a pure rotation of the endoscope to update the focal length and exploits the inherent temporal rigid motion of the instrument through consecutive frames. A pure rotation is achievable by undertaking a rotation of the scope cylinder with respect to the head of the camera. Therefore, the surgeon may take full advantage of an angled endoscope by adjusting focus and zoom during surgery. Simulation experiments have assessed the accuracy of the obtained parameters and the optimal number of geometrical primitives required for an active self-calibration of the angled monocular endoscope. Finally, an in vitro experiment demonstrated that 3D reconstruction of rigid structures tracked throughout a monocular thoracoscopic image sequence is feasible and its accuracy is adequate for the registration of thoracoscopic images to a preoperative MRI 3D model of the spine.

  17. How consumer physical activity monitors could transform human physiology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen P; Hall Brown, Tyish S; Collier, Scott R; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-03-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity are well-established risk factors for chronic disease and adverse health outcomes. Thus, there is enormous interest in measuring physical activity in biomedical research. Many consumer physical activity monitors, including Basis Health Tracker, BodyMedia Fit, DirectLife, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit One, Fitbit Zip, Garmin Vivofit, Jawbone UP, MisFit Shine, Nike FuelBand, Polar Loop, Withings Pulse O 2 , and others have accuracies similar to that of research-grade physical activity monitors for measuring steps. This review focuses on the unprecedented opportunities that consumer physical activity monitors offer for human physiology and pathophysiology research because of their ability to measure activity continuously under real-life conditions and because they are already widely used by consumers. We examine current and potential uses of consumer physical activity monitors as a measuring or monitoring device, or as an intervention in strategies to change behavior and predict health outcomes. The accuracy, reliability, reproducibility, and validity of consumer physical activity monitors are reviewed, as are limitations and challenges associated with using these devices in research. Other topics covered include how smartphone apps and platforms, such as the Apple ResearchKit, can be used in conjunction with consumer physical activity monitors for research. Lastly, the future of consumer physical activity monitors and related technology is considered: pattern recognition, integration of sleep monitors, and other biosensors in combination with new forms of information processing. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Calibration of soil moisture flow simulation models aided by the active heated fiber optic distributed temperature sensing AHFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Zubelzu, Sergio; Sobrino, Fernando Fernando; Sánchez, Raúl

    2017-04-01

    Most of the studies dealing with the development of water flow simulation models in soils, are calibrated using experimental data measured by soil probe sensors or tensiometers which locate at specific points in the study area. However since the beginning of the XXI century, the use of Distributed Fiber Optic Temperature Measurement for estimating temperature variation along a cable of fiber optic has been assessed in multiple environmental applications. Recently, its application combined with an active heating pulses technique (AHFO) has been reported as a sensor to estimate soil moisture. This method applies a known amount of heat to the soil and monitors the temperature evolution, which mainly depends on the soil moisture content. Thus, it allows estimations of soil water content every 12.5 cm along the fiber optic cable, as long as 1500 m , with 2 % accuracy , every second. This study presents the calibration of a soil water flow model (developed in Hydrus 2D) with the AHFO technique. The model predicts the distribution of soil water content of a green area irrigated by sprinkler irrigation. Several irrigation events have been evaluated in a green area located at the ETSI Agronómica, Agroalimentaria y Biosistemas in Madrid where an installation of 147 m of fiber optic cable at 15 cm depth is deployed. The Distribute Temperature Sensing unit was a SILIXA ULTIMA SR (Silixa Ltd, UK) and has spatial and temporal resolution of 0.29 m. Data logged in the DTS unit before, during and after the irrigation event were used to calibrate the estimations in the Hydrus 2D model during the infiltration and redistribution of soil water content within the irrigation interval. References: Karandish, F., & Šimůnek, J. (2016). A field-modeling study for assessing temporal variations of soil-water-crop interactions under water-saving irrigation strategies. Agricultural Water Management, 178, 291-303. Li, Y., Šimůnek, J., Jing, L., Zhang, Z., & Ni, L. (2014). Evaluation of

  19. Ahead with Cairo. Monitoring country activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danguilan, M; Wainer, J; Widyantoro, N; Capoor, I; Huq, N; Ashino, Y; Sadasivam, B; Le Thi Nham Tuyet

    1995-04-01

    In the aftermath of the 1994 UN Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo, countries are proceeding with their implementation of the plan of action adopted at the conference. A brief description is given of some actions taken by specific countries toward plan implementation. In the Philippines meetings were held immediately after the conference in October on the implications for the Management, Family Planning, and Nongovernmental Organizations programs. The issues of concern were identified as the need for regular consultative meetings among relevant agencies, consultations with women's groups, and a responsive adolescents program. In Australia the program thrust was to focus on the implications for immigration. Monitoring of the plans of action will be undertaken by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). In Malaysia committees are preparing a program of action suitable for implementation in Malaysia. A regional women's NGO organized a forum on the implications of ICPD for women's reproductive health, women's rights, and empowerment in Malaysia. In Vietnam, press conferences are used to communicate conference results. An NGO translated relevant ICPD materials into Vietnamese. In Indonesia, several ministries convened meetings among donors, NGOs, women's groups, and experts. In India, the government held a national conference. One view was that population issues should be discussed in the context of gender equality and empowerment of women. Another issue was the importance of placing reproductive health in the larger context of health and primary health services. Health personnel at all levels were considered in need of sensitization on gender issues. Problems such as anemia have not been successfully addressed in existing programs. The government agreed to remove in phases target driven programs and the sterilization emphasis. In Bangladesh, a national committee was formed, and NGOs are actively distributing information. In Japan, the Family Planning

  20. Advanced Calibration Source for Planetary and Earth Observing Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiometric calibration is critical to many NASA activities.  At NASA SSC, imaging cameras have been used in-situ to monitor propulsion test stand...

  1. The use of the Sonoran Desert as a pseudo-invariant site for optical sensor cross-calibration and long-term stability monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal, A.; Chander, Gyanesh; Choi, Taeyoung; Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2010-01-01

    The Sonoran Desert is a large, flat, pseudo-invariant site near the United States-Mexico border. It is one of the largest and hottest deserts in North America, with an area of 311,000 square km. This site is particularly suitable for calibration purposes because of its high spatial and spectral uniformity and reasonable temporal stability. This study uses measurements from four different sensors, Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), Aqua MODIS, and Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM), to assess the suitability of this site for long-term stability monitoring and to evaluate the “radiometric calibration differences” between spectrally matching bands of all four sensors. In general, the drift in the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance of each sensor over a span of nine years is within the specified calibration uncertainties. Monthly precipitation measurements of the Sonoran Desert region were obtained from the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN), and their effects on the retrieved TOA reflectances were evaluated. To account for the combined uncertainties in the TOA reflectance due to the surface and atmospheric Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF), a semi-empirical BRDF model has been adopted to monitor and reduce the impact of illumination geometry differences on the retrieved TOA reflectances. To evaluate calibration differences between the MODIS and Landsat sensors, correction for spectral response differences using a hyperspectral sensor is also demonstrated.

  2. Deformation Monitoring of AN Active Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostapchuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of low frequency earthquakes, slow slip events and other deformation phenomena, new for geophysics, change our understanding of how the energy accumulated in the Earth's crust do release. The new geophysical data make one revise the underlying mechanism of geomechanical processes taking place in fault zones. Conditions for generating different slip modes are still unclear. The most vital question is whether a certain slip mode is intrinsic for a fault or may be controlled by external factors. This work presents the results of two and a half year deformation monitoring of a discontinuity in the zone of the Main Sayanskiy Fault. Main Sayanskiy Fault is right-lateral strike-slip fault. Observations were performed in the tunnel of Talaya seismic station (TLY), Irkutsk region, Russia. Measurements were carried out 70 m away from the entrance of the tunnel, the thickness of overlying rock was about 30 m. Inductive sensors of displacement were mounted at the both sides of a discontinuity, which recorded three components of relative fault side displacement with the accuracy of 0.2 mcm. Temperature variation inside the tunnel didn't exceed 0.5oC during the all period of observations. Important information about deformation properties of an active fault was obtained. A pronounced seasonality of deformation characteristics of discontinuity is observed in the investigated segment of rock. A great number of slow slip events with durations from several hours to several weeks were registered. Besides that alterations of fault deformation characteristics before the megathrust earthquake M9.0 Tohoku Oki 11 March 2011 and reaction to the event itself were detected. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant no. 14-17-00719).

  3. Instructional physical activity monitor video in english and spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ActiGraph activity monitor is a widely used method for assessing physical activity. Compliance with study procedures in critical. A common procedure is for the research team to meet with participants and demonstrate how and when to attach and remove the monitor and convey how many wear-days are ...

  4. Chemical Sensor Platform for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Activity and Dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Solovei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-invasive solution for monitoring of the activity and dehydration of organisms is proposed in the work. For this purpose, a wireless standalone chemical sensor platform using two separate measurement techniques has been developed. The first approach for activity monitoring is based on humidity measurement. Our solution uses new humidity sensor based on a nanostructured TiO2 surface for sweat rate monitoring. The second technique is based on monitoring of potassium concentration in urine. High level of potassium concentration denotes clear occurrence of dehydration. Furthermore, a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN was developed for this sensor platform to manage data transfer among devices and the internet. The WBAN coordinator controls the sensor devices and collects and stores the measured data. The collected data is particular to individuals and can be shared with physicians, emergency systems or athletes’ coaches. Long-time monitoring of activity and potassium concentration in urine can help maintain the appropriate water intake of elderly people or athletes and to send warning signals in the case of near dehydration. The created sensor system was calibrated and tested in laboratory and real conditions as well. The measurement results are discussed.

  5. Beat frequency quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy for fast and calibration-free continuous trace-gas monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Hongpeng; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Huadan; Yu, Yajun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang; Tittel, Frank K.

    2017-01-01

    Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is a sensitive gas detection technique which requires frequent calibration and has a long response time. Here we report beat frequency (BF) QEPAS that can be used for ultra-sensitive calibration-free trace-gas detection and fast spectral scan applications. The resonance frequency and Q-factor of the quartz tuning fork (QTF) as well as the trace-gas concentration can be obtained simultaneously by detecting the beat frequency signal generated w...

  6. Monitoring Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: Measuring Coagulant Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attermann, Jorn

    is linear, such that the standardization by the INR system is feasible (substudy 2). • Based on a realistic statistical model, the statistical distribution of INR estimates, given a true INR value, can be adequately described to allow for good estimates of accuracy and precision (substudy 3). In the first...... central aspects of the INR system, such as the inaccuracy of INR estimates based on a given path of calibrations. The main result states that, under weak regularity conditions, log (log (estimated INR)) is approximately normally distributed with mean log (log (true INR)). The variance is a function....... Numerous reports on inconsistent or discrepant INR values suggest that the distributional properties of the INR system are not fully understood. The aim of this Ph.D. thesis was to investigate and describe the INR system in order to provide a basis for the evaluation and comparison of different forms...

  7. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Valerie A. J.; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Allen, Diane D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Methods Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. Results 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. Conclusions These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability. PMID:27124611

  8. Monitoring the NOAA Operational VIIRS RSB and DNB Calibration Stability Using Monthly and Semi-Monthly Deep Convective Clouds Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhui Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS onboard the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS/Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP satellite provide sensor data records for the retrievals of many environment data records. It is critical to monitor the VIIRS long-term calibration stability to ensure quality EDR retrieval. This study investigates the radiometric calibration stability of the NOAA operational SNPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands (RSB and Day-Night-Band (DNB using Deep Convective Clouds (DCC. Monthly and semi-monthly DCC time series for 10 moderate resolution bands (M-bands, M1–M5 and M7–M11, March 2013–September 2015, DNB (March 2013–September 2015, low gain stage, and three imagery resolution bands (I-bands, I1–I3, January 2014–September 2015 were developed and analyzed for long-term radiometric calibration stability monitoring. Monthly DCC time series show that M5 and M7 are generally stable, with a stability of 0.4%. DNB has also been stable since May 2013, after its relative response function update, with a stability of 0.5%. The stabilities of M1–M4 are 0.6%–0.8%. Large fluctuations in M1–M4 DCC reflectance were observed since early 2014, correlated with F-factor (calibration coefficients trend changes during the same period. The stabilities of M8-M11 are from 1.0% to 3.1%, comparable to the natural DCC variability at the shortwave infrared spectrum. DCC mean band ratio time series show that the calibration stabilities of I1–I3 follow closely with M5, M7, and M10. Relative calibration changes were observed in M1/M4 and M5/M7 DCC mean band ratio time series. The DCC time series are generally consistent with results from the VIIRS validation sites and VIIRS/MODIS (the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer simultaneous nadir overpass time series. Semi-monthly DCC time series for RSB M-bands and DNB were compared with monthly DCC time series. The results indicate that semi-monthly DCC

  9. Comparison of - and Mutual Informaton Based Calibration of Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Digital Camera for Deformation Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidalizarandi, M.; Neumann, I.

    2015-12-01

    In the current state-of-the-art, geodetic deformation analysis of natural and artificial objects (e.g. dams, bridges,...) is an ongoing research in both static and kinematic mode and has received considerable interest by researchers and geodetic engineers. In this work, due to increasing the accuracy of geodetic deformation analysis, a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS; here the Zoller+Fröhlich IMAGER 5006) and a high resolution digital camera (Nikon D750) are integrated to complementarily benefit from each other. In order to optimally combine the acquired data of the hybrid sensor system, a highly accurate estimation of the extrinsic calibration parameters between TLS and digital camera is a vital preliminary step. Thus, the calibration of the aforementioned hybrid sensor system can be separated into three single calibrations: calibration of the camera, calibration of the TLS and extrinsic calibration between TLS and digital camera. In this research, we focus on highly accurate estimating extrinsic parameters between fused sensors and target- and targetless (mutual information) based methods are applied. In target-based calibration, different types of observations (image coordinates, TLS measurements and laser tracker measurements for validation) are utilized and variance component estimation is applied to optimally assign adequate weights to the observations. Space resection bundle adjustment based on the collinearity equations is solved using Gauss-Markov and Gauss-Helmert model. Statistical tests are performed to discard outliers and large residuals in the adjustment procedure. At the end, the two aforementioned approaches are compared and advantages and disadvantages of them are investigated and numerical results are presented and discussed.

  10. Conversion of an Alpha CAM Monitor of Victoreen calibrated of factory for plutonium in a measurement monitor of radon in the atmosphere; Conversion de un monitor Alpha CAM de la Victoreen calibrado de fabrica para plutonio en un monitor para medicion de radon en la atmosfera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno y Moreno, A. [Departamento de Apoyo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    It is presented in this work the conversion of a monitor ALPHA CAM of the monitor Victoreen gauged of it manufactures for plutonium in a monitor for radon mensuration in the atmosphere. Those units in that the radon measures are expressed are: peak curies/unit of volume of air to sampling. This way one has to gauge and to supplement the software and the parts that the old one monitor for plutonium. It requires. This task implies: a) To calibrate and to determine the efficiency of the detector of accustomed to state of 1700 mm{sup 2} for alpha particles coming from the radioactive series of the radon. b) to connect in series and to calibrate a flow measurer of air in it lines with the detector. Measures are presented of the ambient air and other places of the the historical area of the city of Puebla obtained with the team Converted ALPHA-CAM. (Author)

  11. Cross-calibration of A.M. constellation sensors for long term monitoring of land surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D.; Chander, G.

    2006-01-01

    Data from multiple sensors must be used together to gain a more complete understanding of land surface processes at a variety of scales. Although higher-level products derived from different sensors (e.g., vegetation cover, albedo, surface temperature) can be validated independently, the degree to which these sensors and their products can be compared to one another is vastly improved if their relative spectro-radiometric responses are known. Most often, sensors are directly calibrated to diffuse solar irradiation or vicariously to ground targets. However, space-based targets are not traceable to metrological standards, and vicarious calibrations are expensive and provide a poor sampling of a sensor's full dynamic range. Cross-calibration of two sensors can augment these methods if certain conditions can be met: (1) the spectral responses are similar, (2) the observations are reasonably concurrent (similar atmospheric & solar illumination conditions), (3) errors due to misregistrations of inhomogeneous surfaces can be minimized (including scale differences), and (4) the viewing geometry is similar (or, some reasonable knowledge of surface bi-directional reflectance distribution functions is available). This study extends on a previous study of Terra/MODIS and Landsat/ETM+ cross calibration by including the Terra/ASTER and EO-1/ALI sensors, exploring the impacts of cross-calibrating sensors when conditions described above are met to some degree but not perfectly. Measures for spectral response differences and methods for cross calibrating such sensors are provided in this study. These instruments are cross calibrated using the Railroad Valley playa in Nevada. Best fit linear coefficients (slope and offset) are provided for ALI-to-MODIS and ETM+-to-MODIS cross calibrations, and root-mean-squared errors (RMSEs) and correlation coefficients are provided to quantify the uncertainty in these relationships. Due to problems with direct calibration of ASTER data, linear

  12. Evaluation of PERSIANN database in the framework of SMOS Calibration/Validation activities over Valencia Anchor Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juglea, S.; Kerr, Y.; Mialon, A.; Lopez-Baeza, E.; Braithwaite, D.; Hsu, K.

    2010-02-01

    Soil moisture is a key parameter for land surface water resource and climate change monitoring. ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission will deliver, as one of its main goals, global fields of surface soil moisture with an accuracy better than 0.04 m3 m-3. SMOS relies on an L-band (1.4 GHz) interferometric radiometer. Within the context of the preparation for this mission over land, the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS) experimental site, in Spain, was selected to be one of the main test sites in Europe for the SMOS Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) activities. This study presents preliminary analysis of PERSIANN in the framework of SMOS Cal/Val activities at the Valencia Anchor Station. The PERSIANN database is an automated system for Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks. The real interest of using the PERSIANN database into the hydrologic applications is mainly with the goal of having access to the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation over a significant area (typically here an area equivalent to a SMOS pixel). The goal of this study is to quantify the gain of using PERSIANN instead of distributing sparse rain gauge measurements. The interest of using satellite rainfall estimates as well as the influence that the precipitation events can induce on the modelling of the water content in the soil was depicted by a comparison between different soil moisture products. Having an accurate estimation of the amount and temporal/spatial distribution of precipitation is a critical issue so as to have a faithful representation of the soil moisture distribution.

  13. Continuous Monitoring of the Jason-l and TOPEX/POSEIDON Ocean Altimetry Missions from Dedicated Calibration Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Bruce; Bonnefond, Pascal; Watson, Christopher; Born, George; Coleman, Richard; Exertier, Pierre; Gill, Stephen; Jan, Gwenaele; Jeansou, Eric; Laurain, Olivier; hide

    2004-01-01

    We present calibration results from Jason-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON overflights of the three dedicated verification sites: 1) a California offshore oil platform (Harvest); 2) the Mediterranean island of Corsica (Cape Senetosa), and 3) the Bass Strait off the coast of Tasmania. The high-accuracy of the Jason-1 measurement system is evident in the results from the dedicated calibration experiments. These experiments do indicate, however, that the Jason-1 sea-surface-height (SSH) measurements are biased high by approximately 12-15 cm. We discuss the implications of geographically correlated errors on the determination of the SSH bias.

  14. Cross-calibration of MODIS with ETM+ and ALI sensors for long-term monitoring of land surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, David; Chander, Gyanesh

    2006-08-01

    Increasingly, data from multiple sensors are used to gain a more complete understanding of land surface processes at a variety of scales. Although higher-level products (e.g., vegetation cover, albedo, surface temperature) derived from different sensors can be validated independently, the degree to which these sensors and their products can be compared to one another is vastly improved if their relative spectroradiometric responses are known. Most often, sensors are directly calibrated to diffuse solar irradiation or vicariously to ground targets. However, space-based targets are not traceable to metrological standards, and vicarious calibrations are expensive and provide a poor sampling of a sensor's full dynamic range. Cross-calibration of two sensors can augment these methods if certain conditions can be met: (1) the spectral responses are similar, (2) the observations are reasonably concurrent (similar atmospheric & solar illumination conditions), (3) errors due to misregistrations of inhomogeneous surfaces can be minimized (including scale differences), and (4) the viewing geometry is similar (or, some reasonable knowledge of surface bi-directional reflectance distribution functions is available). This study explores the impacts of cross-calibrating sensors when such conditions are met to some degree but not perfectly. In order to constrain the range of conditions at some level, the analysis is limited to sensors where cross-calibration studies have been conducted (Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) on Landsat- 7 (L7), Advance Land Imager (ALI) and Hyperion on Earth Observer-1 (EO-1)) and including systems having somewhat dissimilar geometry, spatial resolution & spectral response characteristics but are still part of the so-called "A.M. constellation" (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra platform). Measures for spectral response differences and methods for cross calibrating such sensors are provided in this study. These

  15. Cross-calibration of A.M. constellation for long-term monitoring of land surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, David; Chander, Gyanesh

    2006-12-01

    Data from multiple sensors must be used together to gain a more complete understanding of land surface processes at a variety of scales. Although higher-level products derived from different sensors (e.g., vegetation cover, albedo, surface temperature) can be validated independently, the degree to which these sensors and their products can be compared to one another is vastly improved if their relative spectroradiometric responses are known. Most often, sensors are directly calibrated to diffuse solar irradiation or vicariously to ground targets. However, space-based targets are not traceable to metrological standards, and vicarious calibrations are expensive and provide a poor sampling of a sensor's full dynamic range. Crosscalibration of two sensors can augment these methods if certain conditions can be met: (1) the spectral responses are similar, (2) the observations are reasonably concurrent (similar atmospheric & solar illumination conditions), (3) errors due to misregistrations of inhomogeneous surfaces can be minimized (including scale differences), and (4) the viewing geometry is similar (or, some reasonable knowledge of surface bi-directional reflectance distribution functions is available). This study extends on a previous study of Terra/MODIS and Landsat/ETM+ cross calibration by including the Terra/ASTER and EO-1/ALI sensors, exploring the impacts of cross-calibrating sensors when conditions described above are met to some degree but not perfectly. Measures for spectral response differences and methods for cross calibrating such sensors are provided in this study. These instruments are cross calibrated using the Railroad Valley playa in Nevada. Best fit linear coefficients (slope and offset) are provided for ALIto- MODIS and ETM+-to-MODIS cross calibrations, and root-mean-squared errors (RMSEs) and correlation coefficients are provided to quantify the uncertainty in these relationships. Due to problems with direct calibration of ASTER data, linear fits

  16. An astro-comb calibrated solar telescope to study solar activity and search for the radial velocity signature of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, David; HARPS-N Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We recently demonstrated sub-m/s sensitivity in measuring the radial velocity (RV) between the Earth and Sun using a simple solar telescope feeding the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Italian National Telescope, which is calibrated with a laser frequency comb calibrator optimized for calibrating high resolution spectrographs and referred to as an astro-comb. We are using the solar telescope to characterize the effects of stellar (solar) RV jitter due to activity on the solar surface over the course of many hours every clear day. With the help of solar satellites such as the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we are characterizing the correlation between observed RV and detailed imaging of the solar photosphere. We plan to use these tools to mitigate the effects of stellar jitter with the goal of the detection of Venus from its solar RV signature, thus showing the potential of the RV technique to detect true Earth-twins.

  17. Monitoring on-orbit calibration stability of the Terra MODIS and Landsat 7 ETM+ sensors using pseudo-invariant test sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Xiong, X.(J.); Choi, T.(J.); Angal, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to detect and quantify changes in the Earth's environment depends on sensors that can provide calibrated, consistent measurements of the Earth's surface features through time. A critical step in this process is to put image data from different sensors onto a common radiometric scale. This work focuses on monitoring the long-term on-orbit calibration stability of the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) sensors using the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) reference standard pseudo-invariant test sites (Libya 4, Mauritania 1/2, Algeria 3, Libya 1, and Algeria 5). These sites have been frequently used as radiometric targets because of their relatively stable surface conditions temporally. This study was performed using all cloud-free calibrated images from the Terra MODIS and the L7 ETM+ sensors, acquired from launch to December 2008. Homogeneous regions of interest (ROI) were selected in the calibrated images and the mean target statistics were derived from sensor measurements in terms of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance. For each band pair, a set of fitted coefficients (slope and offset) is provided to monitor the long-term stability over very stable pseudo-invariant test sites. The average percent differences in intercept from the long-term trends obtained from the ETM + TOA reflectance estimates relative to the MODIS for all the CEOS reference standard test sites range from 2.5% to 15%. This gives an estimate of the collective differences due to the Relative Spectral Response (RSR) characteristics of each sensor, bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), spectral signature of the ground target, and atmospheric composition. The lifetime TOA reflectance trends from both sensors over 10 years are extremely stable, changing by no more than 0.4% per year in its TOA reflectance over the CEOS reference standard test sites.

  18. Calibration Transfer Between a Bench Scanning and a Submersible Diode Array Spectrophotometer for In Situ Wastewater Quality Monitoring in Sewer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Rita S; Pinheiro, Helena M; Ferreira, Filipa; Matos, José S; Pinheiro, Alexandre; Lourenço, Nídia D

    2016-03-01

    Online monitoring programs based on spectroscopy have a high application potential for the detection of hazardous wastewater discharges in sewer systems. Wastewater hydraulics poses a challenge for in situ spectroscopy, especially when the system includes storm water connections leading to rapid changes in water depth, velocity, and in the water quality matrix. Thus, there is a need to optimize and fix the location of in situ instruments, limiting their availability for calibration. In this context, the development of calibration models on bench spectrophotometers to estimate wastewater quality parameters from spectra acquired with in situ instruments could be very useful. However, spectra contain information not only from the samples, but also from the spectrophotometer generally invalidating this approach. The use of calibration transfer methods is a promising solution to this problem. In this study, calibration models were developed using interval partial least squares (iPLS), for the estimation of total suspended solids (TSS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in sewage from Ultraviolet-visible spectra acquired in a bench scanning spectrophotometer. The feasibility of calibration transfer to a submersible, diode array equipment, to be subsequently operated in situ, was assessed using three procedures: slope and bias correction (SBC); single wavelength standardization (SWS) on mean spectra; and local centering (LC). The results showed that SBC was the most adequate for the available data, adding insignificant error to the base model estimates. Single wavelength standardization was a close second best, potentially more robust, and independent of the base iPLS model. Local centering was shown to be inadequate for the samples and instruments used. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) L-Band Microwave Radiometer Post-Launch Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Misra, Sidharth; Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Hudson, Derek; Le Vine, David M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Yueh, Simon H.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer is a fully-polarimetric L-band radiometer flown on the SMAP satellite in a 6 AM/ 6 PM sun-synchronous orbit at 685 km altitude. Since April, 2015, the radiometer is under calibration and validation to assess the quality of the radiometer L1B data product. Calibration methods including the SMAP L1B TA2TB (from Antenna Temperature (TA) to the Earth's surface Brightness Temperature (TB)) algorithm and TA forward models are outlined, and validation approaches to calibration stability/quality are described in this paper including future work. Results show that the current radiometer L1B data satisfies its requirements.

  20. DEVELOPMENT ANALYZERS TRANSACTIONS IN MONITORING THE BUSINESS ACTIVITIES OF ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Sovik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article there are marked the features and prerequisites of implementation in food production technologies devoted to monitor business activity in the realtime. The methodical approach to the development of analyzers transactional business processes of the organization is offered, monitoring scheme for one of the basic types of business events in the procurement process is constructed.

  1. Brain Activity Monitoring for Assessing Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Johanna Rodríguez Carrillo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Satisfaction is a dimension of usability for which quantitative metrics cannot be calculated during user interactions. Measurement is subjective and depends on the ability to interpret questionnaires and on the memory of the user. This paper represents an attempt to develop an automatic quantitative metric of satisfaction, developed using a Brain Computer Interface to monitor the mental states (Attention/Meditation of users. Based on these results, we are able to establish a correlation between the state of Attention and the users' level of satisfaction.

  2. Atmospheric Correction and Vicarious Calibration of Oceansat-1 Ocean Color Monitor (OCM) Data in Coastal Case 2 Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    T.; Desa , E.; Mascarenhas, A.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Naik, P.; Nayak S.R. Cross Calibration of IRS-P4 OCM Satellite Sensor. In Proceedings of SPIE, Goa...II vicarious techniques, Appl. Opt. 2001, 40, 6701–6718. Remote Sens. 2012, 4 1739 23. Suresh, T.; Desa , E.; Mascarenhas, A.; Matondkar

  3. Monitoring activities of satellite data processing services in real-time with SDDS Live Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc Nguyen, Minh

    2017-10-01

    This work describes Live Monitor, the monitoring subsystem of SDDS - an automated system for space experiment data processing, storage, and distribution created at SINP MSU. Live Monitor allows operators and developers of satellite data centers to identify errors occurred in data processing quickly and to prevent further consequences caused by the errors. All activities of the whole data processing cycle are illustrated via a web interface in real-time. Notification messages are delivered to responsible people via emails and Telegram messenger service. The flexible monitoring mechanism implemented in Live Monitor allows us to dynamically change and control events being shown on the web interface on our demands. Physicists, whose space weather analysis models are functioning upon satellite data provided by SDDS, can use the developed RESTful API to monitor their own events and deliver customized notification messages by their needs.

  4. Monitoring activities of satellite data processing services in real-time with SDDS Live Monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Nguyen Minh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes Live Monitor, the monitoring subsystem of SDDS – an automated system for space experiment data processing, storage, and distribution created at SINP MSU. Live Monitor allows operators and developers of satellite data centers to identify errors occurred in data processing quickly and to prevent further consequences caused by the errors. All activities of the whole data processing cycle are illustrated via a web interface in real-time. Notification messages are delivered to responsible people via emails and Telegram messenger service. The flexible monitoring mechanism implemented in Live Monitor allows us to dynamically change and control events being shown on the web interface on our demands. Physicists, whose space weather analysis models are functioning upon satellite data provided by SDDS, can use the developed RESTful API to monitor their own events and deliver customized notification messages by their needs.

  5. Active Low Intrusion Hybrid Monitor for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navia, Marlon; Campelo, Jose C; Bonastre, Alberto; Ors, Rafael; Capella, Juan V; Serrano, Juan J

    2015-09-18

    Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN). These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion) or passive (low observability inside the nodes). This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software) monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part) which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software executed in the sensor node. The intrusion on time, code, and energy caused in the sensor nodes by the monitor is evaluated as a function of data size and the interface used. Then different interfaces, commonly available in sensor nodes, are evaluated: serial transmission (USART), serial peripheral interface (SPI), and parallel. The proposed hybrid monitor provides highly detailed information, barely disturbed by the measurement tool (interference), about the behavior of the WSN that may be used to evaluate many properties such as performance, dependability, security, etc. Monitor nodes are self-powered and may be removed after the monitoring campaign to be reused in other campaigns and/or WSNs. No other hardware-independent monitoring platforms with such low interference have been found in the literature.

  6. Active imaging for monitoring and technical diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Piszczek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of currently running work in the field of active imaging. The term active refers to both the image acquisition methods, so-called methods of the spatio-temporal framing and active visualization method applying augmented reality. Also results of application of the HMD and 6DoF modules as well as the experimental laser photography device are given. The device works by methods of spatio-temporal framing and it has been developed at the IOE WAT. In terms of image acquisition - active imaging involves the use of illumination of the observed scene. In the field of information visualization - active imaging directly concerns the issues of interaction human-machine environment. The results show the possibility of using the described techniques, among others, rescue (fire brigade, security of mass events (police or the protection of critical infrastructure as well as broadly understood diagnostic problems. Examples presented in the article show a wide range of possible uses of the methods both in observational techniques and measurement. They are relatively innovative solutions and require elaboration of series of hardware and algorithmic issues. However, already at this stage it is clear that active acquisition and visualization methods indicate a high potential for this type of information solutions.[b]Keywords[/b]: active imaging, augmented reality, digital image processing

  7. [Mechanical and electrical uterine activity. Part I. Contractions monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietek, Jerzy; Sikora, Jerzy; Horoba, Krzysztof; Matonia, Adam; Jezewski, Janusz; Magnucki, Jacek; Kobielska, Lucyna

    2008-11-01

    Correct uterine contraction activity during labour determines physiological fetal delivery and ensures its satisfactory outcome. Contraction activity monitoring may be accomplished by either recording of the mechanical properties of the uterine muscle and/or by measurement of the action potentials produced by the uterus during contraction. In the following paper, the current state of knowledge concerning the methods for assessment and monitoring of the uterine contraction activity was evaluated. The electrophysiological properties of the uterus were given. The mechanical methods of uterine activity monitoring: internal and external tocography were described. The development of the electrohysterography as the method providing the signal comprising complete information on bioelectrical properties of the uterine muscle was presented. The conclusion was that the analysis of the electrohysterogram enables a description of the source of the uterine contraction activity, whereas currently applied mechanical methods merely record the results of this activity.

  8. ON-LINE MONITORING OF I&C TRANSMITTERS AND SENSORS FOR CALIBRATION VERIFICATION AND RESPONSE TIME TESTING WAS SUCCESSFULLY IMPLEMENTED AT ATR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, Phillip A.; O' Hagan, Ryan; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, H. M.

    2017-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has always had a comprehensive procedure to verify the performance of its critical transmitters and sensors, including RTDs, and pressure, level, and flow transmitters. These transmitters and sensors have been periodically tested for response time and calibration verification to ensure accuracy. With implementation of online monitoring techniques at ATR, the calibration verification and response time testing of these transmitters and sensors are verified remotely, automatically, hands off, include more portions of the system, and can be performed at almost any time during process operations. The work was done under a DOE funded SBIR project carried out by AMS. As a result, ATR is now able to save the manpower that has been spent over the years on manual calibration verification and response time testing of its temperature and pressure sensors and refocus those resources towards more equipment reliability needs. More importantly, implementation of OLM will help enhance the overall availability, safety, and efficiency. Together with equipment reliability programs of ATR, the integration of OLM will also help with I&C aging management goals of the Department of Energy and long-time operation of ATR.

  9. Monitoring dressing activity failures through RFID and video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, A; Mehta, P; Rehg, J M; Osmani, V; Mayora, O

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring and evaluation of Activities of Daily Living in general, and dressing activity in particular, is an important indicator in the evaluation of the overall cognitive state of patients. In addition, the effectiveness of therapy in patients with motor impairments caused by a stroke, for example, can be measured through long-term monitoring of dressing activity. However, automatic monitoring of dressing activity has not received significant attention in the current literature. Considering the importance of monitoring dressing activity, the main goal of this work was to investigate the possibility of recognizing dressing activities and automatically identifying common failures exhibited by patients suffering from motor or cognitive impairments. The system developed for this purpose comprised analysis of RFID (radio frequency identification) tracking and computer vision processing. Eleven test subjects, not connected to the research, were recruited and asked to perform the dressing task by choosing any combination of clothes without further assistance. Initially the test subjects performed correct dressing and then they were free to choose from a set of dressing failures identified from the current research literature. The developed system was capable of automatically recognizing common dressing failures. In total, there were four dressing failures observed for upper garments and three failures for lower garments, in addition to recognizing successful dressing. The recognition rate for identified dressing failures was between 80% and 100%. We developed a robust system to monitor the dressing activity. Given the importance of monitoring the dressing activity as an indicator of both cognitive and motor skills the system allows for the possibility of long term tracking and continuous evaluation of the dressing task. Long term monitoring can be used in rehabilitation and cognitive skills evaluation.

  10. Subharmonic-Aided Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Interstitial Fluid Pressure in Tumors: Calibration and Treatment with Paclitaxel in Breast Cancer Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Forsberg, Anya I; Fox, Traci B; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A; Forsberg, Flemming

    2017-07-01

    Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in rats with breast cancer xenografts was non-invasively estimated using subharmonic-aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) versus an invasive pressure monitor. Moreover, monitoring of IFP changes after chemotherapy was assessed. Eighty-nine rats (calibration n = 25, treatment n = 64) were injected with 5 × 10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Radiofrequency signals were acquired (39 rats successfully imaged) with a Sonix RP scanner (BK Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a linear array (L9-4, transmit/receive: 8/4 MHz) after administration of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA, USA; 180 μL/kg) and compared with readings from an invasive pressure monitor (Stryker, Berkshire, UK). An inverse linear relationship was established between tumor IFP and SHAPE (y = -1.06x + 28.27, r = -0.69, p = 0.01) in the calibration group. Use of this relationship in the treatment group resulted in r = 0.74 (p < 0.05) between measured (pressure monitor) and SHAPE-estimated IFP (average error: 6.24 mmHg). No significant before/after differences were observed with respect to paclitaxel treatment (5 mg/kg, Mayne Pharma, Paramus, NJ, USA) with either method (p ≥ 0.15). Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring Biosensor Activity in Living Cells with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N. Day

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Live-cell microscopy is now routinely used to monitor the activities of the genetically encoded biosensor proteins that are designed to directly measure specific cell signaling events inside cells, tissues, or organisms. Most fluorescent biosensor proteins rely on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET to report conformational changes in the protein that occur in response to signaling events, and this is commonly measured with intensity-based ratiometric imaging methods. An alternative method for monitoring the activities of the FRET-based biosensor proteins is fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM. FLIM measurements are made in the time domain, and are not affected by factors that commonly limit intensity measurements. In this review, we describe the use of the digital frequency domain (FD FLIM method for the analysis of FRET signals. We illustrate the methods necessary for the calibration of the FD FLIM system, and demonstrate the analysis of data obtained from cells expressing “FRET standard” fusion proteins. We then use the FLIM-FRET approach to monitor the changes in activities of two different biosensor proteins in specific regions of single living cells. Importantly, the factors required for the accurate determination and reproducibility of lifetime measurements are described in detail.

  12. Monitoring biosensor activity in living cells with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hum, Julia M; Siegel, Amanda P; Pavalko, Fredrick M; Day, Richard N

    2012-11-07

    Live-cell microscopy is now routinely used to monitor the activities of the genetically encoded biosensor proteins that are designed to directly measure specific cell signaling events inside cells, tissues, or organisms. Most fluorescent biosensor proteins rely on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to report conformational changes in the protein that occur in response to signaling events, and this is commonly measured with intensity-based ratiometric imaging methods. An alternative method for monitoring the activities of the FRET-based biosensor proteins is fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). FLIM measurements are made in the time domain, and are not affected by factors that commonly limit intensity measurements. In this review, we describe the use of the digital frequency domain (FD) FLIM method for the analysis of FRET signals. We illustrate the methods necessary for the calibration of the FD FLIM system, and demonstrate the analysis of data obtained from cells expressing "FRET standard" fusion proteins. We then use the FLIM-FRET approach to monitor the changes in activities of two different biosensor proteins in specific regions of single living cells. Importantly, the factors required for the accurate determination and reproducibility of lifetime measurements are described in detail.

  13. USING CALIBRATED RGB IMAGERY FROM LOW-COST UAVS FOR GRASSLAND MONITORING: CASE STUDY AT THE RENGEN GRASSLAND EXPERIMENT (RGE, GERMANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Lussem

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the spectral response of intensively managed grassland throughout the growing season allows optimizing fertilizer inputs by monitoring plant growth. For example, site-specific fertilizer application as part of precision agriculture (PA management requires information within short time. But, this requires field-based measurements with hyper- or multispectral sensors, which may not be feasible on a day to day farming practice. Exploiting the information of RGB images from consumer grade cameras mounted on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV can offer cost-efficient as well as near-real time analysis of grasslands with high temporal and spatial resolution. The potential of RGB imagery-based vegetation indices (VI from consumer grade cameras mounted on UAVs has been explored recently in several. However, for multitemporal analyses it is desirable to calibrate the digital numbers (DN of RGB-images to physical units. In this study, we explored the comparability of the RGBVI from a consumer grade camera mounted on a low-cost UAV to well established vegetation indices from hyperspectral field measurements for applications in grassland. The study was conducted in 2014 on the Rengen Grassland Experiment (RGE in Germany. Image DN values were calibrated into reflectance by using the Empirical Line Method (Smith & Milton 1999. Depending on sampling date and VI the correlation between the UAV-based RGBVI and VIs such as the NDVI resulted in varying R2 values from no correlation to up to 0.9. These results indicate, that calibrated RGB-based VIs have the potential to support or substitute hyperspectral field measurements to facilitate management decisions on grasslands.

  14. Using Calibrated RGB Imagery from Low-Cost Uavs for Grassland Monitoring: Case Study at the Rengen Grassland Experiment (rge), Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussem, U.; Hollberg, J.; Menne, J.; Schellberg, J.; Bareth, G.

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring the spectral response of intensively managed grassland throughout the growing season allows optimizing fertilizer inputs by monitoring plant growth. For example, site-specific fertilizer application as part of precision agriculture (PA) management requires information within short time. But, this requires field-based measurements with hyper- or multispectral sensors, which may not be feasible on a day to day farming practice. Exploiting the information of RGB images from consumer grade cameras mounted on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) can offer cost-efficient as well as near-real time analysis of grasslands with high temporal and spatial resolution. The potential of RGB imagery-based vegetation indices (VI) from consumer grade cameras mounted on UAVs has been explored recently in several. However, for multitemporal analyses it is desirable to calibrate the digital numbers (DN) of RGB-images to physical units. In this study, we explored the comparability of the RGBVI from a consumer grade camera mounted on a low-cost UAV to well established vegetation indices from hyperspectral field measurements for applications in grassland. The study was conducted in 2014 on the Rengen Grassland Experiment (RGE) in Germany. Image DN values were calibrated into reflectance by using the Empirical Line Method (Smith & Milton 1999). Depending on sampling date and VI the correlation between the UAV-based RGBVI and VIs such as the NDVI resulted in varying R2 values from no correlation to up to 0.9. These results indicate, that calibrated RGB-based VIs have the potential to support or substitute hyperspectral field measurements to facilitate management decisions on grasslands.

  15. 24-h monitoring of calcineurin phosphatase activity in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed-Nielsen, P.B.; Karamperis, N.; Jørgensen, Kaj Anker

    2005-01-01

    remain to be described. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CaN displays circadian variation or sex difference is present in healthy subjects. Twenty subjects had blood samples drawn every 4 h for a 24-h period. CaN activity was determined in whole blood as the release of 32P from...... a phosphorylated peptide. Activity of the 32P was quantitated by liquid scintillation and results converted to units CaN utilizing a calibration curve. We found no circadian variation in CaN activity and no difference between the two sexes. The clinical importance of these findings is that blood samples...... for calcineurin activity can be drawn without taking the exact time of day into consideration, but only considering the time of drug intake Udgivelsesdato: 2005/9...

  16. Active Sensing Based Bolted Structure Health Monitoring Using Piezoceramic Transducers

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, R.L.; Gu, H.; SONG, G.

    2013-01-01

    Bolted structures are commonly used in civil infrastructure. It is important to perform bolt inspection regularly to ensure the safety of structures. Traditional bolt inspection methods are time-consuming; moreover, bulky instruments are needed in these methods. In this paper, a piezoceramic based active sensing approach is developed to perform the health monitoring of bolted structures. Surface-bonded piezoceramic patches are used as health monitoring transducers. Wavelet packet analysis is ...

  17. A radionuclide calibrator based on Cherenkov counting for activity measurements of high-energy pure β¯-emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, C; Thiam, C; Chauvenet, B

    2017-01-01

    Due to their stability and reproducibility, re-entrant pressurized ionization chambers (also called radionuclide calibrators) are widely used for activity measurements in nuclear medicine services as well as in national metrology institutes to maintain reference standards. Generally, these secondary instruments yield accurate activity measurements for γ-emitting radionuclides. Ionization chambers are easy to use and thus well-adapted to guarantee the metrological traceability between national metrology institutes and end-users. However, the reproducibility of calibration factors can be significantly impaired when measuring high-energy pure β¯-emitters such as radiopharmaceuticals based on 90Y. This is because the bremsstrahlung emission contributing to the instrument response is strongly dependent on the geometry of the components surrounding the radioactive solution. The present article describes a new design based on pulse counting to address this problem. It takes advantage of Cherenkov emission resulting from Compton scattering in transparent materials. The interest of Cherenkov counting is to obtain a low-sensitivity detector that enables direct measurements of high-activity solutions (at least up to 10 GBq for 90Y-microspheres in aqueous suspensions used in nuclear medicine). A simple design based on a geometry close to an ionization chamber used at LNHB (Vinten 671 type) is described. The feasibility in terms of detection efficiencies (lower than 10-4 for 90Y solutions) of the new radionuclide calibrator is investigated by Monte Carlo calculations using the Geant4 code. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dashboard applications to monitor experiment activities at sites

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, J; Boehm, M; Casajus, A; Flix, J; Gaidioz, B; Grigoras, C; Kokoszkiewicz, L; Lanciotti, E; Rocha, R; Saiz, P; Santinelli, R; Sidorova, I; Sciabà, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of a distributed computing environment, such as WLCG, monitoring has a key role in order to keep under control activities going on in sites located in different countries and involving people based in many different sites. To be able to cope with such a large scale heterogeneous infrastructure, it is necessary to have monitoring tools providing a complete and reliable view of the overall performance of the sites. Moreover, the structure of a monitoring system critically depends on the object to monitor and on the users it is addressed to. In this article we will describe two different monitoring systems both aimed to monitor activities and services provided in the WLCG framework, but designed in order to meet the requirements of different users: Site Status Board has an overall view of the services available in all the sites supporting an experiment, whereas Siteview provides a complete view of all the activities going on at a site, for all the experiments supported by the site.

  19. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  20. Doses monitoring in radiology: calibration of air kerma-area product (P{sub KA}) meters; Monitoracao de doses em radiologia: a calibracao de medidores do produto kerma-area (P{sub KA})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terini, Ricardo Andrade; Campelo, Maria Carolina de Santana; Almeida Junior, Jose Neres de, E-mail: rterini@pucsp.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC-SP), SP (Brazil); Herdade, Silvio Bruni; Pereira, Marco Aurelio Guedes [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IEE/USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Energia e Ambiente

    2013-11-15

    Materials and methods: different qualities of both incident and transmitted beams were utilized in conditions similar to a clinical setting, analyzing the influence from the reference dosimeter, from the distance between meters, from the filtration and from the average beam energy. Calibrations were performed directly against a standard 30 cm{sup 3} cylindrical chamber or a parallel-plate monitor chamber, and indirectly against the PDC meter. Results: the lowest energy dependence was observed for transmitted beams. The cross calibration between the Diamentor E2 and the PDC meters, and the PDC presented the greatest propagation of uncertainties. Conclusion: the calibration coefficient of the PDC meter showed to be more stable with voltage, while the Diamentor E2 calibration coefficient was more variable. On the other hand, the PDC meter presented greater uncertainty in readings (5.0%) than with the use of the monitor chamber (3.5%) as a reference. (author)

  1. Calibration Systems of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lundberg, O

    2013-01-01

    TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. A multi-faceted calibration system allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. This calibration system is based on signal generation from different sources: a Cs radioactive source, laser light, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. A brief description of the different TileCal calibration systems is given and the latest results on their performance in terms of calibration factors, linearity and stability are presented.

  2. Calibration systems of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lundberg, O; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from the over 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. A multi-faceted calibration system allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. This calibration system is based on signal generation from different sources: a Cs radioactive source, laser light, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. This talk presents a brief description of the different TileCal calibration systems and presents the latest results on their performance in terms of calibration factors...

  3. Calibration of the radiation monitors from DESY and SPring-8 at the quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams using 100 and 300 MeV 7Li(p,n reaction at RCNP in Osaka Japan in November 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leuschner Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At the ring cyclotron facility of the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP Osaka University, Osaka, Japan a series of measurement campaigns had been continued with quasi mono-energetic neutron beams in November 2014. A 7Li target was bombarded with 100 and 300 MeV protons and the generated neutron beams were directed into a long time-of-flight tunnel at 0 and 25 degrees deflection angle with respect to the proton beam. At a distance of 41 m the cross section of the neutron beam was large enough for the illumination of square meter sized objects like extended range rem-counters. The research institutes SPring-8/RIKEN, Japan, and DESY, Germany, participated in this campaign for the calibration of 4 different types of active ambient dose rate monitors: LB 6411, LB 6411-Pb, LB 6419 and LB 6420. The measurements of their responses are reported and compared with the calculated values.

  4. Continuous absolute g monitoring of the mobile LNE-SYRTE Cold Atom Gravimeter - a new tool to calibrate superconducting gravimeters -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlet, Sébastien; Gillot, Pierre; Cheng, Bing; Pereira Dos Santos, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry allows for the realization of a new generation of instruments for inertial sensing based on laser cooled atoms. We have developed an absolute gravimeter (CAG) based on this technic, which can perform continuous gravity measurements at a high cycling rate. This instrument, operating since summer 2009, is the new metrological french standard for gravimetry. The CAG has been designed to be movable, so as to participate to international comparisons and on field measurements. It took part to several comparisons since ICAG'09 and operated in both urban environments and low noise underground facilities. The atom gravimeter operates with a high cycling rate of 3 Hz. Its sensitivity is predominantly limited by ground vibration noise which is rejected thanks to isolation platforms and correlation with other sensors, such as broadband accelerometers or sismometers. These developments allow us to perform continuous gravity measurements, no matter what the sismic conditions are and even in the worst cases such as during earthquakes. At best, a sensitivity of 5.6 μGal at 1 s measurement time has been demonstrated. The long term stability averages down to 0.1 μGal for long term measurements. Presently, the measurement accuracy is 4 μGal, which we plan to reduce to 1 μGal or below. I will present the instrument, the principle of the gravity acceleration measurement and its performances. I will focus on continuous gravity measurements performed over several years and compared with our superconducting gravimeter iGrav signal. This comparison allows us to calibrate the iGrav scale factor and follow its evolution. Especially, we demonstrate that, thanks to the CAG very high cycling rate, a single day gravity measurement allows to calibrate the iGrav scaling factor with a relative uncertainty as good as 4.10-4.

  5. Design and Implementation of an Active Calibration System for Weather Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    according to: 2v cd τ= . (2.1) Figure 1. Illustration of Radar Resolution Cell. [From 1] Schroder’s figure above illustrates and later...follows: 1. Traceability 2. Solar and Celestial Radiative Flux Transfer Methods 3. Radar Calibration Targets 4. Lunar Reflectivity 5...Front Panel files for each, are included after the description of these main VIs. The VIs not described are test components only and not used with

  6. Validity of consumer-based physical activity monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Min; Kim, Youngwon; Welk, Gregory J

    2014-09-01

    Many consumer-based monitors are marketed to provide personal information on the levels of physical activity and daily energy expenditure (EE), but little or no information is available to substantiate their validity. This study aimed to examine the validity of EE estimates from a variety of consumer-based, physical activity monitors under free-living conditions. Sixty (26.4 ± 5.7 yr) healthy males (n = 30) and females (n = 30) wore eight different types of activity monitors simultaneously while completing a 69-min protocol. The monitors included the BodyMedia FIT armband worn on the left arm, the DirectLife monitor around the neck, the Fitbit One, the Fitbit Zip, and the ActiGraph worn on the belt, as well as the Jawbone Up and Basis B1 Band monitor on the wrist. The validity of the EE estimates from each monitor was evaluated relative to criterion values concurrently obtained from a portable metabolic system (i.e., Oxycon Mobile). Differences from criterion measures were expressed as a mean absolute percent error and were evaluated using 95% equivalence testing. For overall group comparisons, the mean absolute percent error values (computed as the average absolute value of the group-level errors) were 9.3%, 10.1%, 10.4%, 12.2%, 12.6%, 12.8%, 13.0%, and 23.5% for the BodyMedia FIT, Fitbit Zip, Fitbit One, Jawbone Up, ActiGraph, DirectLife, NikeFuel Band, and Basis B1 Band, respectively. The results from the equivalence testing showed that the estimates from the BodyMedia FIT, Fitbit Zip, and NikeFuel Band (90% confidence interval = 341.1-359.4) were each within the 10% equivalence zone around the indirect calorimetry estimate. The indicators of the agreement clearly favored the BodyMedia FIT armband, but promising preliminary findings were also observed with the Fitbit Zip.

  7. EMF monitoring-concepts, activities, gaps and options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürrenberger, Gregor; Fröhlich, Jürg; Röösli, Martin; Mattsson, Mats-Olof

    2014-09-11

    Exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) is a cause of concern for many people. The topic will likely remain for the foreseeable future on the scientific and political agenda, since emissions continue to change in characteristics and levels due to new infrastructure deployments, smart environments and novel wireless devices. Until now, systematic and coordinated efforts to monitor EMF exposure are rare. Furthermore, virtually nothing is known about personal exposure levels. This lack of knowledge is detrimental for any evidence-based risk, exposure and health policy, management and communication. The main objective of the paper is to review the current state of EMF exposure monitoring activities in Europe, to comment on the scientific challenges and deficiencies, and to describe appropriate strategies and tools for EMF exposure assessment and monitoring to be used to support epidemiological health research and to help policy makers, administrators, industry and consumer representatives to base their decisions and communication activities on facts and data.

  8. Continuous gravity monitoring of geothermal activity; Renzoku juryoku sokutei ni yoru chinetsu katsudo no monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, M. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    To clarify the geothermal activity in the geothermal fields in New Zealand, gravity monitoring was conducted using SCINTREX automatic gravimeter. The measurements were conducted between the end of January and the beginning of March, 1996. Firstly, continuous monitoring was conducted at the standard point for about ten days, and the tidal components were estimated from the records. After that, continuous monitoring was conducted at Waimangu area for several days. Continuous monitoring was repeated at the standard point, again. At the Waimangu area, three times of changes in the pulse-shape amplitude of 0.01 mgal having a width of several hours were observed. For the SCINTREX gravimeter, the inclination of gravimeter is also recorded in addition to the change of gravity. During the monitoring, the gravimeter was also inclined with the changes of gravity. This inclination was useful not only for the correction of gravity measured, but also for evaluating the ground fluctuation due to the underground pressure source. It is likely that the continuous gravity monitoring is the relatively conventional technique which is effective for prospecting the change of geothermal reservoir. 2 figs.

  9. Leisure Time Activities, Parental Monitoring and Drunkenness in Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomcikova, Zuzana; Veselska, Zuzana; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the association between adolescent drunkenness and participation in risky leisure time activities and parental monitoring. Methods: A sample of 3,694 Slovak elementary school students (mean age 14.5 years; 49.0% males) was assessed for

  10. Applied research of environmental monitoring using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Young Sam; Moon, Jong Hwa; Chung, Young Ju

    1997-08-01

    This technical report is written as a guide book for applied research of environmental monitoring using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The contents are as followings; sampling and sample preparation as a airborne particulate matter, analytical methodologies, data evaluation and interpretation, basic statistical methods of data analysis applied in environmental pollution studies. (author). 23 refs., 7 tabs., 9 figs.

  11. Monitoring of fetal heart rate and uterine activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graatsma, E.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis a renewed monitoring technique for fetal heart rate (FHR) and uterine activity has been investigated. Through non-invasive measurements of electrical signals as recorded from the maternal abdomen, both the fetal-electrocardiogram (fECG) and uterine electrohysterogram (EHG) can be

  12. Calibration plan for the sea and land surface temperature radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David L.; Nightingale, Tim J.; Mortimer, Hugh; Middleton, Kevin; Edeson, Ruben; Cox, Caroline V.; Mutlow, Chris T.; Maddison, Brian J.

    2013-10-01

    The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) to be flown on ESA's Sentinel-3 mission is a multichannel scanning radiometer that will continue the 21-year datasets of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) series. As its name implies, measurements from SLSTR will be used to retrieve global sea surface temperatures to an uncertainty of planning for the on-orbit monitoring and calibration activities to ensure that calibration is maintained. These activities include vicarious calibration techniques that have been developed through previous missions, and the deployment of ship-borne radiometers.

  13. Evaluation of the homogeneity of reference flat sources used in calibration of surface contamination monitors; Avaliacao da homogeneidade das fontes planas de referencia utilizadas na calibracao de monitores de contaminacao de superficie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Junior, I.A.; Xavier, M.; Siqueira, P.T.D.; Potiens, M.P.A., E-mail: iremarjr@ipen.br, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br, E-mail: ptsiquei@ipen.br, E-mail: mppalbu@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to re-evaluate the uniformity of the wide area reference sources of the Calibration Laboratory of Instruments (LCI-IPEN) used in the calibration of surface contamination monitors, according the recommendations of the ISO 8769 standard and the NRPB. In this work used six wide area reference sources of 150 cm{sup 2} of {sup 241}Am, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y and {sup 99}Tc with reference dates between 1996 and 1997 and three sources of 100 cm{sup 2} of {sup 14}C, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co were used with reference dates 2007. Measurements were performed with a radiation monitor of the Thermo, model FH40GX with a pancake probe, model FHZ732GM. We also made several models on paper with the objective of define each measurement position and an aluminum plate with a square hole (6.25 cm{sup 2}) in its center, allowing the passage of the radiation only through the hole. Each wide area reference source was positioned in setup and measurements were performed in order to cover the entire surface of the source. The values of the uniformity obtained partially confirm previous data obtained in another study conducted by LCI-IPEN, showing that some wide area reference sources 150 cm{sup 2} in disagree with ISO 8769. In the former work, just the source of {sup 241}Am (7.3%) was within the range specified by the standard, now have sources of {sup 241}Am (5.7%), {sup 137}Cs (8.8%), {sup 90}Sr+{sup 9}'0Y (8, 8%) and {sup 99}Tc (9.2%) with values within the specified uniformity. The sources of {sup 14}C (53.3%) and {sup 36}Cl (16.6%) were outside the specified. The wide area reference sources of 100 cm{sup 2}, show disagreement in values of uniformity of the sources {sup 14}C (46.7%) and {sup 60}Co (10.4%). The values of the uniformity of the wide area reference sources show that some fonts can not be used in calibrations, because not in accordance with the value of uniformity specified in ISO 8769:2010, this is a conditions

  14. Performance improvement clarification for refrigeration system using active system monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Torben; Niemann, Hans Henrik; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of determining whether a refrigeration plant has the possibility of delivering a better performance of the operation. The controllers are wellknown but detailed knowledge about the underlying dynamics of the refrigeration plant is not available. Thus, the question...... is if it is possible to achieve a better performance by changing the controller parameter. An approach to active system monitoring, based on active fault diagnosis techniques, is employed in order to evaluate changes in the system performance under operation....

  15. Vasomotor Symptoms Monitoring with a Commercial Activity Tracking Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-31

    vasomotor symptoms . The volunteer did not take hormone or nonhormonal formulations7 for the treatment of vasomotor symptoms ... Vasomotor   Symptoms  Monitoring with a Commercial Activity  Tracking Watch  Darrell O. Ricke, PhD Continuous tracking of electrodermal activity...EDA), also known as galvanic skin response (GSR), values with commercial fitness devices for individuals with

  16. Calibration and study of the measurement capabilities of real-time gamma spectrometry equipment developed for the renewal of the network of stations automatic monitoring environmental radiation of the Generalitat of Catalunya; Calibracion y estudio de las capacidades de medida de los equipos de espectrometria gamma en tiempo real desarrollados para la renovacion de la Red de Estaciones Automaticas de vigilancia radiologia ambiental de la Generalitat de Catalunya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casanovas, R.; Prieto, E.; Salvado, M.

    2014-10-01

    The renewal of the automatic environmental radiation surveillance network of the Generalitat of Catalunya has been carried out through the development and implementation of gamma-spectrometry-based equipment. the monitors use scintillation crystals, either Na(TI) or LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) and currently, there are 3 types of equipment water radioactivity monitors, aerosols on a particulate filter monitors and direct measurement monitors. In this paper, we expose the basic features of its operation, the details of their calibration and the minimum detectable activity concentration for some isotopes. (Author)

  17. Calibration of antimony-based electrode for pH monitoring into underground components of nuclear repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Betelu, Stéphanie; Ignatiadis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear waste repositories are being installed in deep excavated rock formations in some places in Europe to isolate and store radioactive waste. In France, Callovo-Oxfordian formation (COx) is potential candidate for nuclear waste repository. It is thus necessary to measure in situ the state of a structure's health during its entire life. The monitoring of the near-field rock and the knowledge of the geochemical transformations can be carried out by a set of sensors for a sustainable managem...

  18. FT-IR/ATR univariate and multivariate calibration models for in situ monitoring of sugars in complex microalgal culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Jean-Michel; Deschênes, Jean-Sébastien; Tremblay, Réjean; Gagnon, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a quick and simple method for the in situ monitoring of sugars in biological cultures. A new technology based on Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR/ATR) spectroscopy in combination with an external light guiding fiber probe was tested, first to build predictive models from solutions of pure sugars, and secondly to use those models to monitor the sugars in the complex culture medium of mixotrophic microalgae. Quantification results from the univariate model were correlated with the total dissolved solids content (R(2)=0.74). A vector normalized multivariate model was used to proportionally quantify the different sugars present in the complex culture medium and showed a predictive accuracy of >90% for sugars representing >20% of the total. This method offers an alternative to conventional sugar monitoring assays and could be used at-line or on-line in commercial scale production systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Calibration of an interfacial force microscope for MEMS metrology : FY08-09 activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, Jack E.; Baker, Michael Sean; Crowson, Douglas A.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Moore, Nathan W.

    2009-10-01

    Progress in MEMS fabrication has enabled a wide variety of force and displacement sensing devices to be constructed. One device under intense development at Sandia is a passive shock switch, described elsewhere (Mitchell 2008). A goal of all MEMS devices, including the shock switch, is to achieve a high degree of reliability. This, in turn, requires systematic methods for validating device performance during each iteration of design. Once a design is finalized, suitable tools are needed to provide quality assurance for manufactured devices. To ensure device performance, measurements on these devices must be traceable to NIST standards. In addition, accurate metrology of MEMS components is needed to validate mechanical models that are used to design devices to accelerate development and meet emerging needs. Progress towards a NIST-traceable calibration method is described for a next-generation, 2D Interfacial Force Microscope (IFM) for applications in MEMS metrology and qualification. Discussed are the results of screening several suitable calibration methods and the known sources of uncertainty in each method.

  20. Assessment of laboratory and daily energy expenditure estimates from consumer multi-sensor physical activity monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Enhad A; Western, Max J; Nightingale, Thomas E; Peacock, Oliver J; Thompson, Dylan

    2017-01-01

    Wearable physical activity monitors are growing in popularity and provide the opportunity for large numbers of the public to self-monitor physical activity behaviours. The latest generation of these devices feature multiple sensors, ostensibly similar or even superior to advanced research instruments. However, little is known about the accuracy of their energy expenditure estimates. Here, we assessed their performance against criterion measurements in both controlled laboratory conditions (simulated activities of daily living and structured exercise) and over a 24 hour period in free-living conditions. Thirty men (n = 15) and women (n = 15) wore three multi-sensor consumer monitors (Microsoft Band, Apple Watch and Fitbit Charge HR), an accelerometry-only device as a comparison (Jawbone UP24) and validated research-grade multi-sensor devices (BodyMedia Core and individually calibrated Actiheart™). During discrete laboratory activities when compared against indirect calorimetry, the Apple Watch performed similarly to criterion measures. The Fitbit Charge HR was less consistent at measurement of discrete activities, but produced similar free-living estimates to the Apple Watch. Both these devices underestimated free-living energy expenditure (-394 kcal/d and -405 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01). The multi-sensor Microsoft Band and accelerometry-only Jawbone UP24 devices underestimated most laboratory activities and substantially underestimated free-living expenditure (-1128 kcal/d and -998 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01). None of the consumer devices were deemed equivalent to the reference method for daily energy expenditure. For all devices, there was a tendency for negative bias with greater daily energy expenditure. No consumer monitors performed as well as the research-grade devices although in some (but not all) cases, estimates were close to criterion measurements. Thus, whilst industry-led innovation has improved the accuracy of consumer monitors, these devices

  1. An overview of existing raptor contaminant monitoring activities in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ramírez, P; Shore, R F; van den Brink, N W; van Hattum, B; Bustnes, J O; Duke, G; Fritsch, C; García-Fernández, A J; Helander, B O; Jaspers, V; Krone, O; Martínez-López, E; Mateo, R; Movalli, P; Sonne, C

    2014-06-01

    Biomonitoring using raptors as sentinels can provide early warning of the potential impacts of contaminants on humans and the environment and also a means of tracking the success of associated mitigation measures. Examples include detection of heavy metal-induced immune system impairment, PCB-induced altered reproductive impacts, and toxicity associated with lead in shot game. Authorisation of such releases and implementation of mitigation is now increasingly delivered through EU-wide directives but there is little established pan-European monitoring to quantify outcomes. We investigated the potential for EU-wide coordinated contaminant monitoring using raptors as sentinels. We did this using a questionnaire to ascertain the current scale of national activity across 44 European countries. According to this survey, there have been 52 different contaminant monitoring schemes with raptors over the last 50years. There were active schemes in 15 (predominantly western European) countries and 23 schemes have been running for >20years; most monitoring was conducted for >5years. Legacy persistent organic compounds (specifically organochlorine insecticides and PCBs), and metals/metalloids were monitored in most of the 15 countries. Fungicides, flame retardants and anticoagulant rodenticides were also relatively frequently monitored (each in at least 6 countries). Common buzzard (Buteo buteo), common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus), golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), white-tailed sea eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla), peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus), tawny owl (Strix aluco) and barn owl (Tyto alba) were most commonly monitored (each in 6-10 countries). Feathers and eggs were most widely analysed although many schemes also analysed body tissues. Our study reveals an existing capability across multiple European countries for contaminant monitoring using raptors. However, coordination between existing schemes and expansion of monitoring into Eastern Europe is needed. This would enable

  2. Validity of Wearable Activity Monitors during Cycling and Resistance Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Benjamin D; Hebert, Edward P; Hollander, Daniel B; Williams, Brian M; Cormier, Corinne L; Naquin, Mildred R; Gillan, Wynn W; Gusew, Emily E; Kraemer, Robert R

    2018-03-01

    The use of wearable activity monitors has seen rapid growth; however, the mode and intensity of exercise could affect the validity of heart rate (HR) and caloric (energy) expenditure (EE) readings. There is a lack of data regarding the validity of wearable activity monitors during graded cycling regimen and a standard resistance exercise. The present study determined the validity of eight monitors for HR compared with an ECG and seven monitors for EE compared with a metabolic analyzer during graded cycling and resistance exercise. Fifty subjects (28 women, 22 men) completed separate trials of graded cycling and three sets of four resistance exercises at a 10-repetition-maximum load. Monitors included the following: Apple Watch Series 2, Fitbit Blaze, Fitbit Charge 2, Polar H7, Polar A360, Garmin Vivosmart HR, TomTom Touch, and Bose SoundSport Pulse (BSP) headphones. HR was recorded after each cycling intensity and after each resistance exercise set. EE was recorded after both protocols. Validity was established as having a mean absolute percent error (MAPE) value of ≤10%. The Polar H7 and BSP were valid during both exercise modes (cycling: MAPE = 6.87%, R = 0.79; resistance exercise: MAPE = 6.31%, R = 0.83). During cycling, the Apple Watch Series 2 revealed the greatest HR validity (MAPE = 4.14%, R = 0.80). The BSP revealed the greatest HR accuracy during resistance exercise (MAPE = 6.24%, R = 0.86). Across all devices, as exercise intensity increased, there was greater underestimation of HR. No device was valid for EE during cycling or resistance exercise. HR from wearable devices differed at different exercise intensities; EE estimates from wearable devices were inaccurate. Wearable devices are not medical devices, and users should be cautious when using these devices for monitoring physiological responses to exercise.

  3. National physical activity surveillance: Users of wearable activity monitors as a potential data source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Omura, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess usage patterns of wearable activity monitors among US adults and how user characteristics might influence physical activity estimates from this type of sample. We analyzed data on 3367 respondents to the 2015 HealthStyles survey, an annual consumer mail panel survey conducted on a nationwide sample. Approximately 1 in 8 respondents (12.5% reported currently using a wearable activity monitor. Current use varied by sex, age, and education level. Use increased with physical activity level from 4.3% for inactive adults to 17.4% for active adults. Overall, 49.9% of all adults met the aerobic physical activity guideline, while this prevalence was 69.5% among current activity monitor users. Our findings suggest that current users of wearable activity monitors are not representative of the overall US population. Estimates of physical activity levels using data from wearable activity monitors users may be an overestimate and therefore data from users alone may have a limited role in physical activity surveillance.

  4. Validity of physical activity monitors in adults participating in free-living activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, S; Hageberg, R; Aandstad, A; Mowinckel, P; Anderssen, S A; Carlsen, K-H; Andersen, L B

    2010-07-01

    For a given subject, time in moderate to very vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) varies substantially among physical activity monitors. In the present study, the primary objective, whether time in MVPA recorded with SenseWear Pro(2) Armband (Armband; BodyMedia, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA), ActiGraph (7164, LLC, Fort Walton Beach, Florida, USA), ikcal (Teltronic AG, Biberist, Switzerland) and ActiReg (PreMed AS, Oslo, Norway) is different compared with indirect calorimetry, was determined. The secondary objective, whether these activity monitors estimate energy expenditure differently compared with indirect calorimetry, was also determined. The activity monitors and a portable oxygen analyser were worn by 14 men and 6 women for 120 min doing a variety of activities of different intensities. Resting metabolic rate was measured with indirect calorimetry. The cutoff points defining moderate, vigorous and very vigorous intensity were three, six and nine times resting metabolic rate. Time in MVPA was overestimated by 2.9% and 2.5% by Armband and ActiGraph, respectively, and was underestimated by 11.6% and 98.7% by ikcal and ActiReg, respectively. ActiReg (p = 0.004) and ActiGraph (p = 0.007) underestimated energy expenditure in MVPA, and all monitors underestimated total energy expenditure (by 5% to 21%). Recorded time in MVPA and energy expenditure varies substantially among physical activity monitors. Thus, when comparing physical activity level among studies, it is essential to know the type of physical activity monitor being used.

  5. Logistics of using the Actiheart physical activity monitors in urban Mexico among 7- to 9-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hannah; Dickinson, Federico; Griffiths, Paula; Bogin, Barry; Varela-Silva, Maria Inês

    2011-01-01

    Logistics of using new measurement devices are important to understand when developing protocols. This paper discusses the logistics of using Actiheart physical activity monitors on children in an urban, tropical environment in a developing country. Actiheart monitoring of 36 children aged 7-9 years old was undertaken for 7 days in the city of Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico. The Actiheart proved fragile for children and difficult to mend in the field. The excessive sweating due to the tropical climate caused poor adherence of the electrode pads, requiring a pad change midway through and extra pads to be provided. Also extra time was needed to be allotted for increased instructions to participants and their mothers and for individual calibration. When collecting objectively measured physical activity data under harsh conditions, the protocol must accommodate local conditions and device limitations and allow increased time with participants to obtain good quality data. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. HYDROGRAV - Hydrological model calibration and terrestrial water storage monitoring from GRACE gravimetry and satellite altimetry, First results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O.B.; Krogh, P.E.; Michailovsky, C.

    2008-01-01

    information in un-gauged regions. A system of GRACE custom designed Mass Concentration blocks (Mascons) have been designed to model time-variable gravity changes for the largest basins in Southern Africa (Zambezi, Okavango, Limpopo and Orange) covering an area of 9 mill km2 with a resolution of 1 by 1.......25 degree. Satellite altimetry have been used to derive high resolution point-wise river height in some of the un-gauged rivers in the region by using dedicated retracking to recovers nearly un-interrupted time series over these rivers. First result from the HYDROGRAV project analyzing GRACE derived mass...... change from 2002 to 2008 along with in-situ gravity time-lapse observations and radar altimetry monitoring of surface water for the southern Africa river basins will be presented....

  7. Energy monitoring system based on human activity in the workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Nur Hanim; Husain, Mohd Nor; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abdul; Othman, Mohd Azlishah; Malek, Fareq

    2015-05-01

    Human behaviors always related to day routine activities in a smart house directly give the significant factor to manage energy usage in human life. An Addition that, the factor will contribute to the best efficiency of the system. This paper will focus on the monitoring efficiency based on duration time in office hours around 8am until 5pm which depend on human behavior at working place. Besides that, the correlation coefficient method is used to show the relation between energy consumption and energy saving based on the total hours of time energy spent. In future, the percentages of energy monitoring system usage will be increase to manage energy saving based on human behaviors. This scenario will help to see the human activity in the workplace in order to get the energy saving and support world green environment.

  8. Design considerations for neutron activation and neutron source strength monitors for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jassby, D.L.; LeMunyan, G.; Roquemore, A.L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Walker, C. [ITER Joint Central Team, Garching (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will require highly accurate measurements of fusion power production in time, space, and energy. Spectrometers in the neutron camera could do it all, but experience has taught us that multiple methods with redundancy and complementary uncertainties are needed. Previously, conceptual designs have been presented for time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron source strength monitors, both of which will be important parts of the integrated suite of neutron diagnostics for this purpose. The primary goals of the neutron activation system are: to maintain a robust relative measure of fusion energy production with stability and wide dynamic range; to enable an accurate absolute calibration of fusion power using neutronic techniques as successfully demonstrated on JET and TFTR; and to provide a flexible system for materials testing. The greatest difficulty is that the irradiation locations need to be close to plasma with a wide field of view. The routing of the pneumatic system is difficult because of minimum radius of curvature requirements and because of the careful need for containment of the tritium and activated air. The neutron source strength system needs to provide real-time source strength vs. time with {approximately}1 ms resolution and wide dynamic range in a robust and reliable manner with the capability to be absolutely calibrated by in-situ neutron sources as done on TFTR, JT-60U, and JET. In this paper a more detailed look at the expected neutron flux field around ITER is folded into a more complete design of the fission chamber system.

  9. Validity of Consumer-Based Physical Activity Monitors for Specific Activity Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M Benjamin; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Dickin, D Clark; Montoye, Alexander H K

    2016-08-01

    Consumer-based physical activity (PA) monitors are popular for individual tracking of PA variables. However, current research has not examined how these monitors track energy expenditure (EE) and steps in distinct activities. This study examined the accuracy of the Fitbits One, Zip, and Flex and Jawbone UP24 for estimating EE and steps for specific activities and activity categories. Thirty subjects completed a structured protocol consisting of three sedentary, four household, and four ambulatory/exercise activities. All subjects began by lying on a bed for 10 min; 10 other activities were performed for 5 min each. Indirect calorimetry (COSMED) and researcher-counted steps were criterion measures for EE and step counts, respectively. The Omron HJ-720IT pedometer was used as a comparison of step count accuracy. EE and steps were compared with criterion measures using the Friedman repeated-measures nonparametric test and mean absolute percent error (MAPE). All PA monitors predicted EE within 8% of COSMED for sedentary activity but overestimated EE by 16%-40% during ambulatory activity. All monitors except the Fitbit Flex (within 8% of criterion) underestimated EE by 27%-34% during household activity. EE predictions were accompanied with MAPE >10%. For household activity, the Fitbit Flex estimated steps within 10% of researcher-counted steps; all other monitors underestimated steps by 35%-64%. All monitors estimated steps within 4% of researcher-counted steps and displayed MAPE EE and steps during cycling. Consumer-based PA monitors should be used cautiously for estimating EE, although they provide accurate measures of steps for structured ambulatory activity, similar to validated pedometers.

  10. Active Geophysical Monitoring in Oil and Gas Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakulin, A.; Calvert, R.

    2005-12-01

    Effective reservoir management is a Holy Grail of the oil and gas industry. Quest for new technologies is never ending but most often they increase effectiveness and decrease the costs. None of the newcomers proved to be a silver bullet in such a key metric of the industry as average oil recovery factor. This factor is still around 30 %, meaning that 70 % of hydrocarbon reserves are left in the ground in places where we already have expensive infrastructure (platforms, wells) to extract them. Main reason for this inefficiency is our inability to address realistic reservoir complexity. Most of the time we fail to properly characterize our reservoirs before production. As a matter of fact, one of the most important parameters -- permeability -- can not be mapped from remote geophysical methods. Therefore we always start production blind even though reservoir state before production is the simplest one. Once first oil is produced, we greatly complicate the things and quickly become unable to estimate the state and condition of the reservoir (fluid, pressures, faults etc) or oilfield hardware (wells, platforms, pumps) to make a sound next decision in the chain of reservoir management. Our modeling capabilities are such that if we know true state of the things - we can make incredibly accurate predictions and make extremely efficient decisions. Thus the bottleneck is our inability to properly describe the state of the reservoirs in real time. Industry is starting to recognize active monitoring as an answer to this critical issue. We will highlight industry strides in active geophysical monitoring from well to reservoir scale. It is worth noting that when one says ``monitoring" production technologists think of measuring pressures at the wellhead or at the pump, reservoir engineers think of measuring extracted volumes and pressures, while geophysicist may think of change in elastic properties. We prefer to think of monitoring as to measuring those parameters of the

  11. Site Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    This Site Calibration report is describing the results of a measured site calibration for a site in Denmark. The calibration is carried out by DTU Wind Energy in accordance with Ref.[3] and Ref.[4]. The measurement period is given. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance...... measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio between the wind speed at the center of the turbine hub and at the met mast. The wind speed at the turbine is measured by a temporary mast placed at the foundation for the turbine. The site and measurement equipment...

  12. Calibration uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Anglov, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Methods recommended by the International Standardization Organisation and Eurachem are not satisfactory for the correct estimation of calibration uncertainty. A novel approach is introduced and tested on actual calibration data for the determination of Pb by ICP-AES. The improved calibration...... uncertainty was verified from independent measurements of the same sample by demonstrating statistical control of analytical results and the absence of bias. The proposed method takes into account uncertainties of the measurement, as well as of the amount of calibrant. It is applicable to all types...

  13. Energy cost in children assessed by multisensor activity monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Daniel; Slinde, Frode; Larsson, Sven; Hulthén, Lena

    2009-03-01

    The SenseWear Pro2 Armband (SWA; BodyMedia, Inc., Pittsburg, PA), the Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA; Minisun LLC, Fresno, CA), and the ActiReg (AR; PreMed AS, Oslo, Norway) were compared with indirect calorimetry to determine the ability of these devices to assess energy cost in children during resting and different physical activities. Fourteen children, 11-13 yr old, wore the SWA, the IDEEA, and the AR during resting, sitting, stationary bicycling, jumping on a trampoline, playing basketball, stair walking, and walking/running along a 50-m track. The Oxycon Mobile portable metabolic system (VIASYS Healthcare, Conshohocken, PA) was used as the criterion method for energy cost. For resting and sitting, the three activity monitors showed comparable results, but none of them accurately assessed energy cost for stationary bicycling, jumping on a trampoline, or playing basketball. The IDEEA was the only activity monitor that accurately assessed energy cost for stair walking. Also, the IDEEA showed a close estimate of energy cost across the walking and the running intensities, whereas the SWA accurately assessed energy cost for slow to normal walking but showed increased underestimation of energy cost with increasing speed. The AR overestimated energy cost during walking and during slow running but did not respond to increasing running speed. To be able to capture children's physical activity, all three activity monitors need to be further developed. Overall, the IDEEA showed the highest ability to assess energy cost in this study, but SWA may be more feasible for use in children under free-living conditions.

  14. Electroluminescent TCC, C3dg and fB/Bb epitope assays for profiling complement cascade activation in vitro using an activated complement serum calibration standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vuuren, B Jansen; Bergseth, G; Mollnes, T E; Shaw, A M

    2014-01-15

    Electroluminescent assays for epitopes on the complement components C3dg, terminal complement complex (TCC) and factor B/Bb (fB/Bb) have been developed with capture and detection antibodies to produce detection limits C3dg=91±9ng/mL, TCC=3±0.1ng/mL and fB=55.7±0.1ng/mL. The assay performance was assessed against a series of zymosan and heat aggregated IgG (HAIgG) in vitro activations of complement using a calibrated activated complement serum (ACS) as calibration standard. The ACS standard was stable within 20% accuracy over a 6-month period with freeze-thaw cycles as required. Differential activation of the complement cascade was observed for TCC showing a pseudo-first order formation half-life of 3.5h after activation with zymosan. The C3dg activation fragment indicates a 10% total activation for both activation agents. The kinetic-epitope analysis for fB indicates that the capture epitope is on the fB/Bb protein fragment which can then become covered by the formation of C3bBb or C3bBbP complexes during the time course of the cascade. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  16. Limited Activity Monitoring in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Shic, Frederick; Bradshaw, Jessica; Klin, Ami; Scassellati, Brian; Chawarska, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    This study used eye-tracking to examine how 20-month old toddlers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (N=28), typical development (TD) (N=34), and non-autistic developmental delays (DD) (N=16) monitored the activities occurring in a context of an adult-child play interaction. Toddlers with ASD, in comparison to control groups, showed less attention to the activities of others and focused more on background objects (e.g. toys). In addition, while all groups spent the same time overall looking ...

  17. Calibration of a prompt gamma in vivo neutron activation facility for direct measurement of total body protein in intensive care patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, S.; Plank, L.D.; Hill, G.L. (Auckland Univ. Hospital (New Zealand). Dept. of Surgery)

    1993-12-01

    The Auckland in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility has been calibrated for direct measurement of protein and chlorine in intensive care patients without reliance on hydrogen as an internal standard. These patients often present with massive fluid overload and the technique using hydrogen as an internal standard may be invalidated. Eight variable anthropomorphic phantoms containing physiological amounts of the major body elements were constructed from commercially available flexible polythene tubes and used for calibration. (author).

  18. Combining EEG and MEG for the reconstruction of epileptic activity using a calibrated realistic volume conductor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Aydin

    Full Text Available To increase the reliability for the non-invasive determination of the irritative zone in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis, we introduce here a new experimental and methodological source analysis pipeline that combines the complementary information in EEG and MEG, and apply it to data from a patient, suffering from refractory focal epilepsy. Skull conductivity parameters in a six compartment finite element head model with brain anisotropy, constructed from individual MRI data, are estimated in a calibration procedure using somatosensory evoked potential (SEP and field (SEF data. These data are measured in a single run before acquisition of further runs of spontaneous epileptic activity. Our results show that even for single interictal spikes, volume conduction effects dominate over noise and need to be taken into account for accurate source analysis. While cerebrospinal fluid and brain anisotropy influence both modalities, only EEG is sensitive to skull conductivity and conductivity calibration significantly reduces the difference in especially depth localization of both modalities, emphasizing its importance for combining EEG and MEG source analysis. On the other hand, localization differences which are due to the distinct sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG persist. In case of a moderate error in skull conductivity, combined source analysis results can still profit from the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG to accurately determine location, orientation and strength of the underlying sources. On the other side, significant errors in skull modeling are reflected in EEG reconstruction errors and could reduce the goodness of fit to combined datasets. For combined EEG and MEG source analysis, we therefore recommend calibrating skull conductivity using additionally acquired SEP/SEF data.

  19. Combining EEG and MEG for the reconstruction of epileptic activity using a calibrated realistic volume conductor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ümit; Vorwerk, Johannes; Küpper, Philipp; Heers, Marcel; Kugel, Harald; Galka, Andreas; Hamid, Laith; Wellmer, Jörg; Kellinghaus, Christoph; Rampp, Stefan; Wolters, Carsten Hermann

    2014-01-01

    To increase the reliability for the non-invasive determination of the irritative zone in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis, we introduce here a new experimental and methodological source analysis pipeline that combines the complementary information in EEG and MEG, and apply it to data from a patient, suffering from refractory focal epilepsy. Skull conductivity parameters in a six compartment finite element head model with brain anisotropy, constructed from individual MRI data, are estimated in a calibration procedure using somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and field (SEF) data. These data are measured in a single run before acquisition of further runs of spontaneous epileptic activity. Our results show that even for single interictal spikes, volume conduction effects dominate over noise and need to be taken into account for accurate source analysis. While cerebrospinal fluid and brain anisotropy influence both modalities, only EEG is sensitive to skull conductivity and conductivity calibration significantly reduces the difference in especially depth localization of both modalities, emphasizing its importance for combining EEG and MEG source analysis. On the other hand, localization differences which are due to the distinct sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG persist. In case of a moderate error in skull conductivity, combined source analysis results can still profit from the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG to accurately determine location, orientation and strength of the underlying sources. On the other side, significant errors in skull modeling are reflected in EEG reconstruction errors and could reduce the goodness of fit to combined datasets. For combined EEG and MEG source analysis, we therefore recommend calibrating skull conductivity using additionally acquired SEP/SEF data.

  20. Combining EEG and MEG for the Reconstruction of Epileptic Activity Using a Calibrated Realistic Volume Conductor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ümit; Vorwerk, Johannes; Küpper, Philipp; Heers, Marcel; Kugel, Harald; Galka, Andreas; Hamid, Laith; Wellmer, Jörg; Kellinghaus, Christoph; Rampp, Stefan; Wolters, Carsten Hermann

    2014-01-01

    To increase the reliability for the non-invasive determination of the irritative zone in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis, we introduce here a new experimental and methodological source analysis pipeline that combines the complementary information in EEG and MEG, and apply it to data from a patient, suffering from refractory focal epilepsy. Skull conductivity parameters in a six compartment finite element head model with brain anisotropy, constructed from individual MRI data, are estimated in a calibration procedure using somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and field (SEF) data. These data are measured in a single run before acquisition of further runs of spontaneous epileptic activity. Our results show that even for single interictal spikes, volume conduction effects dominate over noise and need to be taken into account for accurate source analysis. While cerebrospinal fluid and brain anisotropy influence both modalities, only EEG is sensitive to skull conductivity and conductivity calibration significantly reduces the difference in especially depth localization of both modalities, emphasizing its importance for combining EEG and MEG source analysis. On the other hand, localization differences which are due to the distinct sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG persist. In case of a moderate error in skull conductivity, combined source analysis results can still profit from the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG to accurately determine location, orientation and strength of the underlying sources. On the other side, significant errors in skull modeling are reflected in EEG reconstruction errors and could reduce the goodness of fit to combined datasets. For combined EEG and MEG source analysis, we therefore recommend calibrating skull conductivity using additionally acquired SEP/SEF data. PMID:24671208

  1. Advanced Performance Modeling with Combined Passive and Active Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovrolis, Constantine [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sim, Alex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-04-15

    To improve the efficiency of resource utilization and scheduling of scientific data transfers on high-speed networks, the "Advanced Performance Modeling with combined passive and active monitoring" (APM) project investigates and models a general-purpose, reusable and expandable network performance estimation framework. The predictive estimation model and the framework will be helpful in optimizing the performance and utilization of networks as well as sharing resources with predictable performance for scientific collaborations, especially in data intensive applications. Our prediction model utilizes historical network performance information from various network activity logs as well as live streaming measurements from network peering devices. Historical network performance information is used without putting extra load on the resources by active measurement collection. Performance measurements collected by active probing is used judiciously for improving the accuracy of predictions.

  2. Precision monitoring and calibration of the high-voltage for the KATRIN experiment; Praezisionsueberwachung und Kalibration der Hochspannung fuer das KATRIN-Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuemmler, T.

    2007-11-12

    The goal of the KATRIN(KArlsruhe TRIritium Neutrino) Experiment is to directly determine the neutrino rest mass from the kinematics of the tritium-{beta}-decay. KATRIN uses the high resolution and luminosity of a spectrometer following the MAC-E filter principle. Based on the experience of the successful predecessor experiments in Mainz and Troisk and the improved experimental technology, KATRIN aims to reach a sensitivity on the neutrino mass of 0.2 eV/c{sup 2} (90% C.L.). One of the few systematic uncertainties that have to be reduced to meet this goal is the uncertainty of measuring and monitoring the potential of the electrostatic filter of the spectrometer. In tritium measurement mode voltages of about U{sub 0} =-18.6 kV have to be permanently monitored with a maximum uncertainty of 3.3 ppm ({approx} 61mV at U{sub 0}), in order not to add more than {delta}m{sup 2}{sub {nu}{sub ec}}{sup 4} {<=} 0.0075 eV{sup 2} to the total systematic uncertainty. The goal of this work is to build a new precision high voltage divider in cooperation with PTB Braunschweig that reaches an uncertainty of about 1 ppm at voltages up to 35 kV. The divider is based on a new type of precision resistors, which have been screened with respect to their warm up drift and their temperature coefficient at the ppm level. By combining 100 of the best matching samples, the mutual warm up effect could be reduced to a computed value of <0.02 ppm. The precision resistors are mounted in a shielded and temperature stabilized vessel under N{sub 2} gas. The properties of both installed low voltage outputs with the ratios 1972:1 and 3944:1 have been repeatedly calibrated with about one year time difference at the DC high voltage laboratory (division 2.31) of PTB. The performance of the new divider in real measurements has been tested with the prototype of the new condensed {sup 83m}Kr calibration source (CKrS) [Ost08] at the Mainz spectrometer. Detailed stability investigations of the energy of the {sup

  3. GPI Calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.

    2017-09-01

    "The Gemini Planet Imager requires a large set of Calibrations. These can be split into two major sets, one set associated with each observation and one set related to biweekly calibrations. The observation set is to optimize the correction of miscroshifts in the IFU spectra and the latter set is for correction of detector and instrument cosmetics."

  4. AAL Middleware Infrastructure for Green Bed Activity Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Palumbo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a service-oriented middleware platform for ambient assisted living and its use in two different bed activity services: bedsore prevention and sleeping monitoring. A detailed description of the middleware platform, its elements and interfaces, as well as a service that is able to classify some typical user's positions in the bed is presented. Wireless sensor networks are supposed to be widely deployed in indoor settings and on people's bodies in tomorrow's pervasive computing environments. The key idea of this work is to leverage their presence by collecting the received signal strength measured among fixed general-purpose wireless sensor devices, deployed in the environment, and wearable ones. The RSS measurements are used to classify a set of user's positions in the bed, monitoring the activities of the user, and thus supporting the bedsores and the sleep monitoring issues. Moreover, the proposed services are able to decrease the energy consumption by exploiting the context information coming from the proposed middleware.

  5. ECAL Energy Flow Calibration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    My talk will be covering my work as a whole over the course of the semester. The focus will be on using energy flow calibration in ECAL to check the precision of the corrections made by the light monitoring system used to account for transparency loss within ECAL crystals due to radiation damage over time.

  6. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhen, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dean, T.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  7. Monitoring single protease activities on triple-helical collagen molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzar, Raj; Froberg, James; Srivastava, D. K.; Choi, Yongki

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a particular family of proteases, play a pivotal role in degrading the extracellular matrix (ECM). It has been known for more than 40 years that MMPs are closely involved in multiple human cancers during cell growth, invasion, and metastasis. However, the mechanisms of MMP activity are far from being understood. Here, we monitored enzymatic processing of MMPs with two complementary approaches, atomic force microscopy and nanocircuits measurements. AFM measurements demonstrated that incubation of collagen monomers with MMPs resulted in a single position cleavage, producing 3/4 and 1/4 collagen fragments. From electronic monitoring of single MMP nanocircuit measurements, we were able to capture a single cleavage event with a rate of 0.012 Hz, which were in good agreement with fluorescence assay measurements. This work was supported financially by the NIGMS/NIH (P30GM103332-02) and ND NASA EPSCoR RID Grant.

  8. Design considerations in an active medical product safety monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Joshua J; Fireman, Bruce; Ryan, Patrick B; Maclure, Malcolm; Gerhard, Tobias; Toh, Sengwee; Rassen, Jeremy A; Nelson, Jennifer C; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Active medical product monitoring systems, such as the Sentinel System, will utilize electronic healthcare data captured during routine health care. Safety signals that arise from these data may be spurious because of chance or bias, particularly confounding bias, given the observational nature of the data. Applying appropriate monitoring designs can filter out many false-positive and false-negative associations from the outset. Designs can be classified by whether they produce estimates based on between-person or within-person comparisons. In deciding which approach is more suitable for a given monitoring scenario, stakeholders must consider the characteristics of the monitored product, characteristics of the health outcome of interest (HOI), and characteristics of the potential link between these. Specifically, three factors drive design decisions: (i) strength of within-person and between-person confounding; (ii) whether circumstances exist that may predispose to misclassification of exposure or misclassification of the timing of the HOI; and (iii) whether the exposure of interest is predominantly transient or sustained. Additional design considerations include whether to focus on new users, the availability of appropriate active comparators, the presence of an exposure time trend, and the measure of association of interest. When the key assumptions of self-controlled designs are fulfilled (i.e., lack of within-person, time-varying confounding; abrupt HOI onset; and transient exposure), within-person comparisons are preferred because they inherently avoid confounding by fixed factors. The cohort approach generally is preferred in other situations and particularly when timing of exposure or outcome is uncertain because cohort approaches are less vulnerable to biases resulting from misclassification. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Long term continuous radon monitoring in a seismically active area

    CERN Document Server

    Piersanti, A; Galli, G

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a long term, continuous radon monitoring experiment started in April 2010 in a seismically active area, affected during the 2010-2013 data acquisition time window by an intense micro seismic activity and by several small seismic events. We employed both correlation and cross-correlation analyses in order to investigate possible relationship existing between the collected radon data, seismic events and meteorological parameters. Our results do not support the feasibility of a robust one-to-one association between the small magnitude earthquakes characterizing the local seismic activity and single radon measurement anomalies, but evidence significant correlation patterns between the spatio-temporal variations of seismic moment release and soil radon emanations, the latter being anyway dominantly modulated by meteorological parameters variations.

  10. Generic System for Remote Testing and Calibration of Measuring Instruments: Security Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčević, M.; Hegeduš, H.; Golub, M.

    2010-01-01

    Testing and calibration of laboratory instruments and reference standards is a routine activity and is a resource and time consuming process. Since many of the modern instruments include some communication interfaces, it is possible to create a remote calibration system. This approach addresses a wide range of possible applications and permits to drive a number of different devices. On the other hand, remote calibration process involves a number of security issues due to recommendations specified in standard ISO/IEC 17025, since it is not under total control of the calibration laboratory personnel who will sign the calibration certificate. This approach implies that the traceability and integrity of the calibration process directly depends on the collected measurement data. The reliable and secure remote control and monitoring of instruments is a crucial aspect of internet-enabled calibration procedure.

  11. Passive and Active Sensing Technologies for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Richard

    A combination of passive and active sensing technologies is proposed as a structural health monitoring solution for several applications. Passive sensing is differentiated from active sensing in that with the former, no energy is intentionally imparted into the structure under test; sensors are deployed in a pure detection mode for collecting data mined for structural health monitoring purposes. In this thesis, passive sensing using embedded fiber Bragg grating optical strain gages was used to detect varying degrees of impact damage using two different classes of features drawn from traditional spectral analysis and auto-regressive time series modeling. The two feature classes were compared in detail through receiver operating curve performance analysis. The passive detection problem was then augmented with an active sensing system using ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs). This thesis considered two main challenges associated with UGW SHM including in-situ wave propagation property determination and thermal corruption of data. Regarding determination of wave propagation properties, of which dispersion characteristics are the most important, a new dispersion curve extraction method called sparse wavenumber analysis (SWA) was experimentally validated. Also, because UGWs are extremely sensitive to ambient temperature changes on the structure, it significantly affects the wave propagation properties by causing large errors in the residual error in the processing of the UGWs from an array. This thesis presented a novel method that compensates for uniform temperature change by considering the magnitude and phase of the signal separately and applying a scalable transformation.

  12. Behavioural Changes among University Students Examined Using Physical Activity Monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kimiko

    2017-01-01

    We examined the relationship between a physical activity monitor, which measures physical activities and health behavioural factors, and behavioural changes in 70 first-year university students who consented to participate among 80 students (recovery rate, 87.5%). We evaluated Pearson's correlation coefficients using the Mann-Whitney U-test for changes in health behavioural factors and self-efficacy and performed binomial logistic regression analysis with health behavioural factors and self-efficacy as dependent variables and life improvement effects as explanatory variables. The analysis revealed a positive correlation among five items of expectations of life improvement, health behavioural factors and self-efficacy. The score of "health behaviour and expectations of life improvement effects" was higher than those of health behavioural factors and self-efficacy. Binomial logistic regression analysis revealed that self-efficacy is related to health behavioural factors, health behaviour and expectations of life improvement effects. Using the physical activity monitor to confirm behavioural science theory, health behavioural factors, self-efficacy and health behaviour are found to be effective for young adults to motivate themselves to maintain healthy behaviours.

  13. Validity of physical activity monitors in adults participating in free-living activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, S; Hageberg, R; Aandstad, A

    2010-01-01

    Background For a given subject, time in moderate to very vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) varies substantially among physical activity monitors. Objective In the present study, the primary objective, whether time in MVPA recorded with SenseWear Pro(2) Armband (Armband; BodyMedia, Pitts...

  14. Activity monitor intervention to promote physical activity of physicians-in-training: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndike, Anne N; Mills, Sarah; Sonnenberg, Lillian; Palakshappa, Deepak; Gao, Tian; Pau, Cindy T; Regan, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Physicians are expected to serve as role models for healthy lifestyles, but long work hours reduce time for healthy behaviors. A hospital-based physical activity intervention could improve physician health and increase counseling about exercise. We conducted a two-phase intervention among 104 medical residents at a large hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Phase 1 was a 6-week randomized controlled trial comparing daily steps of residents assigned to an activity monitor displaying feedback about steps and energy consumed (intervention) or to a blinded monitor (control). Phase 2 immediately followed and was a 6-week non-randomized team steps competition in which all participants wore monitors with feedback. Phase 1 outcomes were: 1) median steps/day and 2) proportion of days activity monitor worn. The Phase 2 outcome was mean steps/day on days monitor worn (≥500 steps/day). Physiologic measurements were collected at baseline and study end. Median steps/day were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Mean steps were compared using repeated measures regression analyses. In Phase 1, intervention and control groups had similar activity (6369 vs. 6063 steps/day, p = 0.16) and compliance with wearing the monitor (77% vs. 77% of days, p = 0.73). In Phase 2 (team competition), residents recorded more steps/day than during Phase 1 (CONTROL: 7,971 vs. 7,567, p = 0.002; 7,832 vs. 7,739, p = 0.13). Mean compliance with wearing the activity monitor decreased for both groups during Phase 2 compared to Phase 1 (60% vs. 77%, pmonitor intervention did not have a major impact on activity or health, the high participation rates of busy residents and modest changes in steps, blood pressure, and HDL suggest that more intensive hospital-based wellness programs have potential for promoting healthier lifestyles among physicians. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01287208.

  15. Monitoring rice farming activities in the Mekong Delta region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S. T.; Chen, C. F.; Chen, C. R.; Chiang, S. H.; Chang, L. Y.; Khin, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Half of the world's population depends on rice for survival. Rice agriculture thus plays an important role in the developing world's economy. Vietnam is one of the largest rice producers and suppliers on earth and more than 80% of the exported rice was produced from the Mekong Delta region, which is situated in the southwestern Vietnam and encompasses approximately 40,000 km2. Changes in climate conditions could likely trigger the increase of insect populations and rice diseases, causing the potential loss of rice yields. Monitoring rice-farming activities through crop phenology detection can provide policymakers with timely strategies to mitigate possible impacts on the potential yield as well as rice grain exports to ensure food security for the region. The main objective of this study is to develop a logistic-based algorithm to investigate rice sowing and harvesting activities from the multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Landsat fusion data. We processed the data for two main cropping seasons (i.e., winter-spring and summer-autumn seasons) through a three-step procedure: (1) MODIS-Landsat data fusion, (2) construction of the time-series enhanced vegetation index 2 (EVI2) data, (3) rice crop phenology detection. The EVI2 data derived from the fusion results between MODIS and Landsat data were compared with that of Landsat data indicated close correlation between the two datasets (R2 = 0.93). The time-series EVI2 data were processed using the double logistic method to detect the progress of sowing and harvesting activities in the region. The comparisons between the estimated sowing and harvesting dates and the field survey data revealed the root mean squared error (RMSE) values of 8.4 and 5.5 days for the winter-spring crop and 9.4 and 12.8 days for the summer-autumn crop, respectively. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the double logistic-based algorithm for rice crop monitoring from temporal MODIS-Landsat fusion data

  16. Monitoring Active Volcanos Using Aerial Images and the Orthoview Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Marsella

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In volcanic areas, where it can be difficult to perform direct surveys, digital photogrammetry techniques are rarely adopted for routine volcano monitoring. Nevertheless, they have remarkable potentialities for observing active volcanic features (e.g., fissures, lava flows and the connected deformation processes. The ability to obtain accurate quantitative data of definite accuracy in short time spans makes digital photogrammetry a suitable method for controlling the evolution of rapidly changing large-area volcanic phenomena. The systematic acquisition of airborne photogrammetric datasets can be adopted for implementing a more effective procedure aimed at long-term volcano monitoring and hazard assessment. In addition, during the volcanic crisis, the frequent acquisition of oblique digital images from helicopter allows for quasi-real-time monitoring to support mitigation actions by civil protection. These images are commonly used to update existing maps through a photo-interpretation approach that provide data of unknown accuracy. This work presents a scientific tool (Orthoview that implements a straightforward photogrammetric approach to generate digital orthophotos from single-view oblique images provided that at least four Ground Control Points (GCP and current Digital Elevation Models (DEM are available. The influence of the view geometry, of sparse and not-signalized GCP and DEM inaccuracies is analyzed for evaluating the performance of the developed tool in comparison with other remote sensing techniques. Results obtained with datasets from Etna and Stromboli volcanoes demonstrate that 2D features measured on the produced orthophotos can reach sub-meter-level accuracy.

  17. Calibration and validation of the Physical Activity Barrier Scale for persons who are blind or visually impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Miyoung; Zhu, Weimo; Ackley-Holbrook, Elizabeth; Brower, Diana G; McMurray, Bryan

    2014-07-01

    It is critical to employ accurate measures when assessing physical activity (PA) barriers in any subpopulation, yet existing measures are not appropriate for persons with blindness or visual impairment (PBVI) due to a lack of validity or reliability evidence. To develop and calibrate a PA barrier scale for PBVI. An expert panel (n = 3) and 18 PBVI were recruited to establish content validity for a PA barriers subscale; 160 PBVI (96 females) completed the scale along with the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities for calibration. To establish construct-related validity evidence, Confirmative factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch analysis were applied. To investigate internal consistency and reliability, Cronbach's alpha and the reliability coefficient (R) were employed, respectively. Following CFA and Rasch analyses, five items were eliminated due to misfits; reliability coefficients were unchanged upon deletion of these items. The barriers perceived by PBVI to have the most negative impact on PA included "lack of self-discipline" (logit = 1.40) and "lack of motivation" (logit = 1.27). "Too many stairs in the exercise facility" (logit = -1.49) was perceived to have the least impact. The newly-developed scale was found to be a valid and reliable tool for evaluating PA barriers in PBVI. To enhance promotion of health-producing levels of PA in PBVI, practitioners should consider applying this new tool as a precursor to programs aimed at improving PA participation in this group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Supermassive Black Holes in Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Calibration of the Black Hole Mass-Velocity Dispersion Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onken, Christopher A.; Ferrarese, Laura; Merritt, David

    2004-01-01

    We calibrate reverberation-based black hole masses in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by using the correlation between black hole mass, M, and bulge/spheroid stellar velocity dispersion, sigma. We use new measurements of sigma for 6 AGNs and published velocity dispersions for 10 others......, in conjunction with improved reverberation mapping results, to determine the scaling factor required to bring reverberation-based black hole masses into agreement with the quiescent galaxy M-sigma relationship. The scatter in the AGN black hole masses is found to be less than a factor of 3. The current...

  19. Status of Terra MODIS Operation, Calibration, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, X.; Wenny, B.; Wu, A.; Angal, A.; Geng, X.; Chen, H.; Dodd, J.; Link, D.; Madhavan, S.; Chen, N.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Since launch in December 1999, Terra MODIS has successfully operated for nearly 15 years, making continuous observations. Data products derived from MODIS observations have significantly contributed to a wide range of studies of key geophysical parameters of the earth's eco-system of land, ocean, and atmosphere, and their changes over time. The quality of MODIS data products relies on the dedicated effort to monitor and sustain instrument health and operation, to calibrate and update sensor parameters and properties, and to improve calibration algorithms. MODIS observations are made in 36 spectral bands, covering wavelengths from visible to long-wave infrared. The reflective solar bands (1-19 and 26) are primarily calibrated by a solar diffuser (SD) panel and regularly scheduled lunar observations. The thermal emissive bands (20-25 and 27- 36) calibration is referenced to an on-board blackbody (BB) source. On-orbit changes in the sensor spectral and spatial characteristics are monitored by a spectroradiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). This paper provides an overview of Terra MODIS on-orbit operation and calibration activities and implementation strategies. It presents and summarizes sensor on-orbit performance using nearly 15 years of data from its telemetry, on-board calibrators, and lunar observations. Also discussed in this paper are changes in sensor characteristics, corrections applied to maintain MODIS level 1B (L1B) data quality, and efforts for future improvements.

  20. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-03-08

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (NM) impedance technique are sighted and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency EIM impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acoustic-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  1. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-02-29

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  2. Actively lubricated bearings applied as calibrated shakers to aid parameter identification in rotordynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Ilmar; Cerda Varela, Alejandro Javier

    2013-01-01

    The servo valve input signal and the radial injection pressure are the two main parameters responsible for dynamically modifying the journal oil film pressure and generating active fluid film forces in controllable fluid film bearings. Such fluid film forces, resulting from a strong coupling betw...

  3. Monitoring the Continuum Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei with the SARA 0.9-m Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumstay, K. S.; Morrill, A. L.

    1995-12-01

    CCD images of seven active galactic nuclei were obtained during the period July 7-11 1995 with the 0.9-m telescope operated at Kitt Peak by the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA). Six of these objects (Mrk 335, Mrk 590, NGC 4151, NGC 5548, Mrk 817, and Mrk 509) are Seyfert galaxies; the seventh is the broad-line radio galaxy 3C-390.3. The objects were selected from the sample of eleven active galactic nuclei whose emission spectra are routinely monitored with the Ohio State University 1.8-m telescope in Flagstaff, Arizona. These observations mark the beginning of a continuing program to use the SARA observing facility to monitor the continuum emission from these eleven AGNs. Data from this program will be applied to efforts to place constraints on the sizes and geometries of the AGN broad-line regions by the method of reverberation mapping. The BVRI images were obtained with an Axiom 2048x2048 zero-defect CCD array. The observing run was hampered by frequent scattered clouds, limiting the accuracy with which magnitudes could be calibrated. However, the wide field (9.38x9.38 arcmin) of the CCD array encompasses several comparison stars in each object field, and permits differential photometry to be performed even under relatively poor sky conditions. Partial support of this work by the National Science Foundation, through the Research Experience for Undergraduates Program, and by the Valdosta State University Center on Faculty Development and Instructional Improvement, is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Passive and Active Monitoring on a High Performance Research Network.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Warren

    2001-05-01

    The bold network challenges described in ''Internet End-to-end Performance Monitoring for the High Energy and Nuclear Physics Community'' presented at PAM 2000 have been tackled by the intrepid administrators and engineers providing the network services. After less than a year, the BaBar collaboration has collected almost 100 million particle collision events in a database approaching 165TB (Tera=10{sup 12}). Around 20TB has been exported via the Internet to the BaBar regional center at IN2P3 in Lyon, France, for processing and around 40 TB of simulated events have been imported to SLAC from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An unforseen challenge has arisen due to recent events and highlighted security concerns at DoE funded labs. New rules and regulations suggest it is only a matter of time before many active performance measurements may not be possible between many sites. Yet, at the same time, the importance of understanding every aspect of the network and eradicating packet loss for high throughput data transfers has become apparent. Work at SLAC to employ passive monitoring using netflow and OC3MON is underway and techniques to supplement and possibly replace the active measurements are being considered. This paper will detail the special needs and traffic characterization of a remarkable research project, and how the networking hurdles have been resolved (or not!) to achieve the required high data throughput. Results from active and passive measurements will be compared, and methods for achieving high throughput and the effect on the network will be assessed along with tools that directly measure throughput and applications used to actually transfer data.

  5. Activity monitor intervention to promote physical activity of physicians-in-training: randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne N Thorndike

    Full Text Available Physicians are expected to serve as role models for healthy lifestyles, but long work hours reduce time for healthy behaviors. A hospital-based physical activity intervention could improve physician health and increase counseling about exercise.We conducted a two-phase intervention among 104 medical residents at a large hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Phase 1 was a 6-week randomized controlled trial comparing daily steps of residents assigned to an activity monitor displaying feedback about steps and energy consumed (intervention or to a blinded monitor (control. Phase 2 immediately followed and was a 6-week non-randomized team steps competition in which all participants wore monitors with feedback. Phase 1 outcomes were: 1 median steps/day and 2 proportion of days activity monitor worn. The Phase 2 outcome was mean steps/day on days monitor worn (≥500 steps/day. Physiologic measurements were collected at baseline and study end. Median steps/day were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Mean steps were compared using repeated measures regression analyses.In Phase 1, intervention and control groups had similar activity (6369 vs. 6063 steps/day, p = 0.16 and compliance with wearing the monitor (77% vs. 77% of days, p = 0.73. In Phase 2 (team competition, residents recorded more steps/day than during Phase 1 (CONTROL: 7,971 vs. 7,567, p = 0.002;7,832 vs. 7,739, p = 0.13. Mean compliance with wearing the activity monitor decreased for both groups during Phase 2 compared to Phase 1 (60% vs. 77%, p<0.001. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased (p = 0.004 and HDL cholesterol increased (p<0.001 among all participants at end of study compared to baseline.Although the activity monitor intervention did not have a major impact on activity or health, the high participation rates of busy residents and modest changes in steps, blood pressure, and HDL suggest that more intensive hospital-based wellness programs have potential for

  6. The calibration of read-out-streak photometry in the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor and the construction of a bright-source catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, M. J.; Chan, N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Talavera, A.; Yershov, V.; Kennedy, T.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Hancock, B.; Smith, P. J.; Carter, M.

    2017-04-01

    The dynamic range of the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (XMM-OM) is limited at the bright end by coincidence loss, the superposition of multiple photons in the individual frames recorded from its micro-channel-plate (MCP) intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. One way to overcome this limitation is to use photons that arrive during the frame transfer of the CCD, forming vertical read-out streaks for bright sources. We calibrate these read-out streaks for photometry of bright sources observed with XMM-OM. The bright-source limit for read-out-streak photometry is set by the recharge time of the MCPs. For XMM-OM, we find that the MCP recharge time is 5.5 × 10-4 s. We determine that the effective bright limits for read-out-streak photometry with XMM-OM are approximately 1.5 mag brighter than the bright-source limits for normal aperture photometry in full-frame images. This translates into bright-source limits in Vega magnitudes of UVW2=7.1, UVM2=8.0, UVW1=9.4, U=10.5, B=11.5, V=10.2, and White=12.5 for data taken early in the mission. The limits brighten by up to 0.2 mag, depending on filter, over the course of the mission as the detector ages. The method is demonstrated by deriving UVW1 photometry for the symbiotic nova RR Telescopii, and the new photometry is used to constrain the e-folding time of its decaying ultraviolet (UV) emission. Using the read-out-streak method, we obtain photometry for 50 per cent of the missing UV source measurements in version 2.1 of the XMM-Newton Serendipitous UV Source Survey catalogue.

  7. Drought monitoring with soil moisture active passive (SMAP) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashok; Vu, Tue; Veettil, Anoop Valiya; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-09-01

    Recent launch of space-borne systems to estimate surface soil moisture may expand the capability to map soil moisture deficit and drought with global coverage. In this study, we use Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil moisture geophysical retrieval products from passive L-band radiometer to evaluate its applicability to forming agricultural drought indices. Agricultural drought is quantified using the Soil Water Deficit Index (SWDI) based on SMAP and soil properties (field capacity and available water content) information. The soil properties are computed using pedo-transfer function with soil characteristics derived from Harmonized World Soil Database. The SMAP soil moisture product needs to be rescaled to be compatible with the soil parameters derived from the in situ stations. In most locations, the rescaled SMAP information captured the dynamics of in situ soil moisture well and shows the expected lag between accumulations of precipitation and delayed increased in surface soil moisture. However, the SMAP soil moisture itself does not reveal the drought information. Therefore, the SMAP based SWDI (SMAP_SWDI) was computed to improve agriculture drought monitoring by using the latest soil moisture retrieval satellite technology. The formulation of SWDI does not depend on longer data and it will overcome the limited (short) length of SMAP data for agricultural drought studies. The SMAP_SWDI is further compared with in situ Atmospheric Water Deficit (AWD) Index. The comparison shows close agreement between SMAP_SWDI and AWD in drought monitoring over Contiguous United States (CONUS), especially in terms of drought characteristics. The SMAP_SWDI was used to construct drought maps for CONUS and compared with well-known drought indices, such as, AWD, Palmer Z-Index, sc-PDSI and SPEI. Overall the SMAP_SWDI is an effective agricultural drought indicator and it provides continuity and introduces new spatial mapping capability for drought monitoring. As an

  8. Important limitations in the modeling of activated sludge : biased calibration of the hydrolysis process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Insel, G.; Gul, Ö.K.; Orhon, D.

    2002-01-01

    ), provides the majority of the required experimental database. However, currently used procedures still involve a number of basic and practical problems. Model evaluation of the OUR data may generate a distorted image of the processes involved. Hydrolysis is the most important, yet the most vulnerable...... process as far as the experimental assessment of accurate kinetic parameters is concerned. This study intends to provide an overview of major experimental limitations in the modeling of activated sludge, with emphasis on the appropriate experimental design for the assessment of the hydrolysis rate....

  9. Validation and calibration of the activPAL™ for estimating METs and physical activity in 4-6 year olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Xanne; Cliff, Dylan P; Reilly, John J; Hinkley, Trina; Jones, Rachel A; Batterham, Marijka; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Søren; Okely, Anthony D

    2014-11-01

    Examine the predictive validity of the activPAL™ metabolic equivalents equation, develop an activPAL™ threshold value to define moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activities, and examine the classification accuracy of the developed moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activities threshold value in 4- to 6-year-old children. A sample of forty 4- to 6-year-old children from the Illawarra region in New South Wales, Australia were included in data analysis. Participants completed a ∼ 150-min room calorimeter protocol involving age-appropriate sedentary behaviors, light-intensity physical activities and moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activities. activPAL™ accelerometer counts were collected over 15s epochs. Energy expenditure measured by room calorimetry and direct observation were used as the criterion measure. Predicted metabolic equivalents were calculated using the activPAL™ metabolic equivalents equation (activPAL™ software version 5.8.0). Predictive validity was evaluated using dependent-samples t-tests. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups to develop and cross-validate an intensity threshold for moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activities. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activities threshold. The classification accuracy of the developed threshold was cross-validated using sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristic-curve. The activPAL™ metabolic equivalents equation significantly overestimated metabolic equivalents during sedentary behaviors and significantly underestimated metabolic equivalents for light-intensity physical activities, moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activities and total metabolic equivalents compared to measured metabolic equivalents (all Pintensity physical activities. The current activPAL™ metabolic equivalents equation requires further development before it can be

  10. Nanosensors for a Monitoring System in Intelligent and Active Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Fuertes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical wireless nanosensor network (WNSN system that gives information about the food packaging condition is proposed. The protection effectiveness is estimated by measuring many factors, such as the existence of microorganisms, bacteria, gases, and contaminants. This study is focused on the detection of an antimicrobial agent (AA attached on a polymer forming an active integrated package. All monitoring technologies for food conservation are analyzed. Nanobiosensor nanomachine (NM, which converts biological or chemical signals into electrical signals, is used. A mathematical model, which describes the constituent’s emigration from the package to food, is programmed in MatLab software. The results show three nanobiosensors forming a WNSN. The nanobiosensors are able to carry out the average concentration for different spots in the package. This monitoring system shows reading percentages in three degrees and different colors: excellent (green, good (cyan, and lacking (red. To confirm the utility of the model, different simulations are performed. Using the WNSNs, results of AA existing in food package (FP through time were successfully obtained.

  11. Site calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Georgieva Yankova, Ginka

    The report describes site calibration measurements carried out on a site in Denmark. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio...... between the wind speed at the center of the turbine hub and at the met mast. The wind speed at the turbine is measured by a temporary mast placed at the foundation for the turbine. The site and measurement equipment is detailed described in [2]. The possible measurement sector for power performance...... according to [1] is also described in [2] and no results from the site calibration have shown any necessary exclusion from this sector. All parts of the sensors and the measurement system have been installed by DTU....

  12. 25 CFR 170.702 - What activities may the Secretary review and monitor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What activities may the Secretary review and monitor? 170.702 Section 170.702 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN... review and monitor? The Secretary reviews and monitors the performance of construction activities under...

  13. Embedded Electro-Optic Sensor Network for the On-Site Calibration and Real-Time Performance Monitoring of Large-Scale Phased Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Kyoung

    2005-01-01

    ... (the Electro-optic Sensor Network, or ESN) for the performance evaluation of phased antenna arrays at the end of their development/production cycle, and furthermore, for onsite test and calibration of deployed large-scale phased arrays...

  14. Active Learning Framework for Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xin

    2016-05-16

    Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring (NILM) is a set of techniques that estimate the electricity usage of individual appliances from power measurements taken at a limited number of locations in a building. One of the key challenges in NILM is having too much data without class labels yet being unable to label the data manually for cost or time constraints. This paper presents an active learning framework that helps existing NILM techniques to overcome this challenge. Active learning is an advanced machine learning method that interactively queries a user for the class label information. Unlike most existing NILM systems that heuristically request user inputs, the proposed method only needs minimally sufficient information from a user to build a compact and yet highly representative load signature library. Initial results indicate the proposed method can reduce the user inputs by up to 90% while still achieving similar disaggregation performance compared to a heuristic method. Thus, the proposed method can substantially reduce the burden on the user, improve the performance of a NILM system with limited user inputs, and overcome the key market barriers to the wide adoption of NILM technologies.

  15. A novel multivariate approach using science-based calibration for direct coating thickness determination in real-time NIR process monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möltgen, C-V; Herdling, T; Reich, G

    2013-11-01

    This study demonstrates an approach, using science-based calibration (SBC), for direct coating thickness determination on heart-shaped tablets in real-time. Near-Infrared (NIR) spectra were collected during four full industrial pan coating operations. The tablets were coated with a thin hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) film up to a film thickness of 28 μm. The application of SBC permits the calibration of the NIR spectral data without using costly determined reference values. This is due to the fact that SBC combines classical methods to estimate the coating signal and statistical methods for the noise estimation. The approach enabled the use of NIR for the measurement of the film thickness increase from around 8 to 28 μm of four independent batches in real-time. The developed model provided a spectroscopic limit of detection for the coating thickness of 0.64 ± 0.03 μm root-mean square (RMS). In the commonly used statistical methods for calibration, such as Partial Least Squares (PLS), sufficiently varying reference values are needed for calibration. For thin non-functional coatings this is a challenge because the quality of the model depends on the accuracy of the selected calibration standards. The obvious and simple approach of SBC eliminates many of the problems associated with the conventional statistical methods and offers an alternative for multivariate calibration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeted Proteomics Approaches To Monitor Microbial Activity In Basalt Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszczynski, A. J.; Paidisetti, R.

    2007-12-01

    Microorganisms play a major role in biogeochemical cycles of the Earth. Information regarding microbial community composition can be very useful for environmental monitoring since the short generation times of microorganisms allows them to respond rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Microbial mediated attenuation of toxic chemicals offers great potential for the restoration of contaminated environments in an ecologically acceptable manner. Current knowledge regarding the structure and functional activities of microbial communities is limited, but more information is being acquired every day through many genomic- and proteomic- based methods. As of today, only a small fraction of the Earth's microorganisms has been cultured, and so most of the information regarding the biodegradation and therapeutic potentials of these uncultured microorganisms remains unknown. Sequence analysis of DNA and/or RNA has been used for identifying specific microorganisms, to study the community composition, and to monitor gene expression providing limited information about metabolic state of given microbial system. Proteomic studies can reveal information regarding the real-time metabolic state of the microbial communities thereby aiding in understanding their interaction with the environment. In research described here the involvement of microbial communities in the degradation of anthropogenic contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE) was studied using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The co- metabolic degradation of TCE in the groundwater of the Snake River Plain Aquifer at the Test Area North (TAN) site of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was monitored by the characterization of peptide sequences of enzymes such as methane monooxygenases (MMOs). MMOs, expressed by methanotrophic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of methane and non-specific co-metabolic oxidation of TCE. We developed a time- course cell lysis method to release proteins from complex microbial

  17. Cadence Feedback With ECE PEDO to Monitor Physical Activity Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardic, Fusun; Göcer, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the monitoring capabilities of the equipment for clever exercise pedometer (ECE PEDO) that provides audible feedback when the person exceeds the upper and lower limits of the target step numbers per minute and to compare step counts with Yamax SW-200 (YX200) as the criterion pedometer. A total of 30 adult volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were classified as normal weight (n = 10), overweight (n = 10), and obese (n = 10). After the submaximal exercise test on a treadmill, the moderate intensity for walking was determined by using YX200 pedometer and then the number of steps taken in a minute was measured. Lower and upper limits of steps per minute (cadence) were recorded in ECE PEDO providing audible feedback when the person's walking speed gets out of the limits. Volunteers walked for 30 minutes in the individual step count range by attaching the ECE PEDO and YX200 pedometer on both sides of the waist belt in the same session. Step counts of the volunteers were recorded. Wilcoxon, Spearman correlation, and Bland–Altman analyses were performed to show the relationship and agreement between the results of 2 devices. Subjects took an average of 3511 ± 426 and 3493 ± 399 steps during 30 minutes with ECE PEDO and criterion pedometer, respectively. About 3500 steps taken by ECE PEDO reflected that this pedometer has capability of identifying steps per minute to meet moderate intensity of physical activity. There was a strong correlation between step counts of both devices (P PEDO and YX200 pedometer in the Bland–Altman analysis. Although both devices showed a strong similarity in counting steps, the ECE PEDO provides monitoring of intensity such that a person can walk in a specified time with a desired speed. PMID:26962822

  18. A bioluminescent caspase-1 activity assay rapidly monitors inflammasome activation in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Martha; Moehring, Danielle; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Núñez, Gabriel; Callaway, Justin; Ting, Jenny; Scurria, Mike; Ugo, Tim; Bernad, Laurent; Cali, James; Lazar, Dan

    2017-08-01

    Inflammasomes are protein complexes induced by diverse inflammatory stimuli that activate caspase-1, resulting in the processing and release of cytokines, IL-1β and IL-18, and pyroptosis, an immunogenic form of cell death. To provide a homogeneous method for detecting caspase-1 activity, we developed a bioluminescent, plate-based assay that combines a substrate, Z-WEHD-aminoluciferin, with a thermostable luciferase in an optimized lytic reagent added directly to cultured cells. Assay specificity for caspase-1 is conferred by inclusion of a proteasome inhibitor in the lytic reagent and by use of a caspase-1 inhibitor to confirm activity. This approach enables a specific and rapid determination of caspase-1 activation. Caspase-1 activity is stable in the reagent thereby providing assay convenience and flexibility. Using this assay system, caspase-1 activation has been determined in THP-1 cells following treatment with α-hemolysin, LPS, nigericin, gramicidin, MSU, R848, Pam3CSK4, and flagellin. Caspase-1 activation has also been demonstrated in treated J774A.1 mouse macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from mice, as well as in human primary monocytes. Caspase-1 activity was not detected in treated BMDMs derived from Casp1-/- mice, further confirming the specificity of the assay. Caspase-1 activity can be measured directly in cultured cells using the lytic reagent, or caspase-1 activity released into medium can be monitored by assay of transferred supernatant. The caspase-1 assay can be multiplexed with other assays to monitor additional parameters from the same cells, such as IL-1β release or cell death. The caspase-1 assay in combination with a sensitive real-time monitor of cell death allows one to accurately establish pyroptosis. This assay system provides a rapid, convenient, and flexible method to specifically and quantitatively monitor caspase-1 activation in cells in a plate-based format. This will allow a more efficient and effective

  19. Reliability and validity of the Mywellness Key physical activity monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieverdes JC

    2013-01-01

    of physical activity.Keywords: physical activity, accelerometer, health monitor

  20. Comparison of active and passive sampling strategies for the monitoring of pesticide contamination in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assoumani, Azziz; Margoum, Christelle; Guillemain, Céline; Coquery, Marina

    2014-05-01

    constants (Rs). Each constant links the mass of the a target contaminant accumulated in the sampler to its concentration in water. At the end of the field application, the Rs are used to calculate the TWA concentration of each target contaminant with the final mass of the contaminants accumulated in the sampler. Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction (SBSE) is a solvent free sample preparation technique dedicated to the analysis of moderately hydrophobic to hydrophobic compounds in liquid and gas samples. It is composed of a magnet enclosed in a glass tube coated with a thick film of polydimethysiloxane (PDMS). We recently developed the in situ application of SBSE as a passive sampling technique (herein named "Passive SBSE") for the monitoring of agricultural pesticides. The aim of this study is to perform the calibration of the passive SBSE in the laboratory, and to apply and compare this technique to active sampling strategies for the monitoring of 16 relatively hydrophobic to hydrophobic pesticides in streams, during 2 1-month sampling campaigns. Time-weighted averaged concentrations of the target pesticides obtained from passive SBSE were compared to the target pesticide concentrations of grab samples, and time-related and flow-dependent samples of the streams. Results showed passive SBSE as an efficient alternative to conventional active sampling strategies.

  1. A System for Monitoring Posture and Physical Activity Using Accelerometers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathie, M

    2001-01-01

    .... We describe a novel system for objectively and continuously monitoring movement, suitable for patients with chronic diseases including congestive heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease...

  2. Development of a Self-calibrating Dissolved Oxygen Microsensor Array for the Monitoring and Control of Plant Growth in a Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Soo; Brown, Christopher S.; Nagle, H. Troy

    2004-01-01

    Plant experiments in space will require active nutrient delivery concepts in which water and nutrients are replenished on a continuous basis for long-term growth. The goal of this study is to develop a novel microsensor array to provide information on the dissolved oxygen environment in the plant root zone for the optimum control of plant cultivation systems in the space environment. Control of water and oxygen is limited by the current state-of-the-art in sensor technology. Two capabilities of the new microsensor array were tested. First, a novel in situ self-diagnosis/self-calibration capability for the microsensor was explored by dynamically controlling the oxygen microenvironment in close proximity to an amperometric dissolved oxygen microsensors. A pair of integrated electrochemical actuator electrodes provided the microenvironments based on water electrolysis. Miniaturized thin film dissolved oxygen microsensors on a flexible polyimide (Kapton(Registered Trademark)? substrate were fabricated and their performances were tested. Secondly, measurements of dissolved oxygen in two representative plant growth systems were made, which had not been performed previously due to lack of proper sensing technology. The responses of the oxygen microsensor array on a flexible polymer substrate properly reflected the oxygen contents on the surface of a porous tube nutrient delivery system and within a particulate substrate system. Additionally, we demonstrated the feasibility of using a 4-point thin film microprobe for water contents measurements for both plant growth systems. mechanical flexibility, and self-diagnosis. The proposed technology is anticipated to provide a reliable sensor feedback plant growth nutrient delivery systems in both terrestrial environment and the microgravity environment during long term space missions. The unique features of the sensor include small size and volume, multiple-point sensing,

  3. Monitoring activities in the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network in 2000 and 2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzakker BG van; LLO

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LML in Dutch) is one of the responsibilities of the Air Research Laboratory of the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment. The main objectives of the LML are to monitor ambient air quality, facilitate implementation of air quality

  4. Active Wireless System for Structural Health Monitoring Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Ricardo; Pérez, Alberto; García-Diéguez, Marta; Zapico-Valle, José Luis

    2017-12-11

    The use of wireless sensors in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has increased significantly in the last years. Piezoelectric-based lead zirconium titanate (PZT) sensors have been on the rise in SHM due to their superior sensing abilities. They are applicable in different technologies such as electromechanical impedance (EMI)-based SHM. This work develops a flexible wireless smart sensor (WSS) framework based on the EMI method using active sensors for full-scale and autonomous SHM. In contrast to passive sensors, the self-sensing properties of the PZTs allow interrogating with or exciting a structure when desired. The system integrates the necessary software and hardware within a service-oriented architecture approach able to provide in a modular way the services suitable to satisfy the key requirements of a WSS. The framework developed in this work has been validated on different experimental applications. Initially, the reliability of the EMI method when carried out with the proposed wireless sensor system is evaluated by comparison with the wireless counterpart. Afterwards, the performance of the system is evaluated in terms of software stability and reliability of functioning.

  5. Active Wireless System for Structural Health Monitoring Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Perera

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of wireless sensors in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM has increased significantly in the last years. Piezoelectric-based lead zirconium titanate (PZT sensors have been on the rise in SHM due to their superior sensing abilities. They are applicable in different technologies such as electromechanical impedance (EMI-based SHM. This work develops a flexible wireless smart sensor (WSS framework based on the EMI method using active sensors for full-scale and autonomous SHM. In contrast to passive sensors, the self-sensing properties of the PZTs allow interrogating with or exciting a structure when desired. The system integrates the necessary software and hardware within a service-oriented architecture approach able to provide in a modular way the services suitable to satisfy the key requirements of a WSS. The framework developed in this work has been validated on different experimental applications. Initially, the reliability of the EMI method when carried out with the proposed wireless sensor system is evaluated by comparison with the wireless counterpart. Afterwards, the performance of the system is evaluated in terms of software stability and reliability of functioning.

  6. Laser activated nanothermolysis of leukemia cells monitored by photothermal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Shnip, Alexander; Zheltov, George; Potapnev, Michail; Savitsky, Valeriy; Klimovich, Olga; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    We are developing new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies for leukemia based on selective targeting of leukemia cells with gold nanoparticles and thermomechanical destruction of the tumor cells with laser-induced microbubbles. Clusters of spherical gold nanoparticles that have strong optical absorption of laser pulses at 532 nm served as nucleation sites of vapor microbubbles. The nanoparticles were targeted selectively to leukemia cells using leukemia-specific surface receptors and a set of two monoclonal antibodies. Application of a primary myeloid-specific antibody to tumor cells followed by targeting the cells with 30-nm nanoparticles conjugated with a secondary antibody (IgG) resulted in formation of nanoparticulate clusters due to aggregation of IgGs. Formation of clusters resulted in substantial decrease of the damage threshold for target cells. The results encourage development of Laser Activated Nanothermolysis as a Cell Elimination Therapy (LANCET) for leukemia. The proposed technology can be applied separately or in combination with chemotherapy for killing leukemia cells without damage to other blood cells. Potential applications include initial reduction of concentration of leukemia cells in blood prior to chemotherapy and treatment of residual tumor cells after the chemotherapy. Laser-induced bubbles in individual cells and cell damage were monitored by analyzing profile of photothermal response signals over the entire cell after irradiation with a single 10-ns long laser pulse. Photothermal microscopy was utilized for imaging formation of microbubbles around nanoparticulate clusters.

  7. Soil moisture from active microwave data for monitoring and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubkova, M.; Bartsch, A.; Wagner, W.

    2008-12-01

    Soil moisture content impacts land surface energy dynamics, regional runoff dynamics and vegetation productivity. Coarse to medium resolution data from active microwave instruments onboard satellites which are currently in space are able to provide such valuable information for operational use. Scatterometer (ERS, Metop ASCAT) can be applied on regional to global scale. ScanSAR systems are suitable for regional to continental monitoring and for the investigation of scaling issues. The original soil moisture derivation approach which was developed for scatterometer data (Wagner et al. 1999) has been transferred to ScanSAR data as the most important product of the ESA Tiger innovator project SHARE (Soil moisture for hydrometeorological application in the Southern African Development Community, www.ipf.tuwien.ac.at/radar/share). The aim of this project was to provide soil moisture maps on a dynamic basis, freely accessible to user communities. Due to the successful implementation this service has been extended to other regions. Data from the ENVISAT ASAR instrument operating in Global Mode (1km resolution) have been used not only over the southern African subcontinent, but also over entire Australia and within other regional studies (e.g. Oklahoma, US; Lena Delta, Russia; central and eastern Europe). These time series in conjunction with the operational meteorological satellite Metop ASCAT provide a valuable tool for identification of soil moisture anomalies which relate to drought and flooding. Currently more than 250 registered users make use the free datasets provided by the Institute of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing at Vienna University of Technology. Most recent results from validation activities, scaling analyses and modeling will be presented.

  8. Evaluation of the minimum detectable activity of whole-body and thyroid counters of the in vivo monitoring laboratory of IPEN/CNEN-SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, L.R.; Xavier, M.; Kakoi, A.A.Y.; Silva Junior, I.A.; Cardoso, J.C.S., E-mail: dossantos.lucasrodrigues@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Quality assurance in whole-body measurement includes quality control with procedure descriptions, detector calibrations, instrument control and evaluation internally or by outside persons. The In Vivo Monitoring Laboratory of IPEN/CNEN-SP (LMIV) provides a direct way activity measure of internally incorporated radionuclides in occupationally exposed workers. LMIV has two NaI(Tl) of 8x4'' and 2x2'' to perform the monitoring of whole-body and thyroid, respectively. The acquisition and analysis software was Genie2000 3.2, Canberra. The system calibration was carried out with Eu-152, Am-241 and Co-60 sources positioned within Alderson Research Labs. anthropomorphic phantom. Minimum detectable activity (MDA) and critical level (Lc) values for nuclides of interest were determined, since these values are an indication of the sensitivity of the detection system. The background counts were obtained from the first monitoring of some workers, blank measurements. The concepts adopted in the HPS N13.30 Standard and proposed in ISO documents for standardization were used for activity measurements. (author)

  9. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... August 30, 1999 Other Monitoring Requirements § 62.15275 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  10. Calibration approach and plan for the sea and land surface temperature radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David L.; Nightingale, Tim J.; Mortimer, Hugh; Middleton, Kevin; Edeson, Ruben; Cox, Caroline V.; Mutlow, Chris T.; Maddison, Brian J.; Coppo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The sea and land surface temperature radiometer (SLSTR) to be flown on the European Space Agency's (ESA) Sentinel-3 mission is a multichannel scanning radiometer that will continue the 21 year dataset of the along-track scanning radiometer (ATSR) series. As its name implies, measurements from SLSTR will be used to retrieve global sea surface temperatures to an uncertainty of planning for the on-orbit monitoring and calibration activities to ensure that the calibration is maintained. These activities include vicarious calibration techniques that have been developed through previous missions and the deployment of ship-borne radiometers.

  11. Step detection and activity recognition accuracy of seven physical activity monitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio A Storm

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the seven following commercially available activity monitors in terms of step count detection accuracy: Movemonitor (Mc Roberts, Up (Jawbone, One (Fitbit, ActivPAL (PAL Technologies Ltd., Nike+ Fuelband (Nike Inc., Tractivity (Kineteks Corp. and Sensewear Armband Mini (Bodymedia. Sixteen healthy adults consented to take part in the study. The experimental protocol included walking along an indoor straight walkway, descending and ascending 24 steps, free outdoor walking and free indoor walking. These tasks were repeated at three self-selected walking speeds. Angular velocity signals collected at both shanks using two wireless inertial measurement units (OPAL, ADPM Inc were used as a reference for the step count, computed using previously validated algorithms. Step detection accuracy was assessed using the mean absolute percentage error computed for each sensor. The Movemonitor and the ActivPAL were also tested within a nine-minute activity recognition protocol, during which the participants performed a set of complex tasks. Posture classifications were obtained from the two monitors and expressed as a percentage of the total task duration. The Movemonitor, One, ActivPAL, Nike+ Fuelband and Sensewear Armband Mini underestimated the number of steps in all the observed walking speeds, whereas the Tractivity significantly overestimated step count. The Movemonitor was the best performing sensor, with an error lower than 2% at all speeds and the smallest error obtained in the outdoor walking. The activity recognition protocol showed that the Movemonitor performed best in the walking recognition, but had difficulty in discriminating between standing and sitting. Results of this study can be used to inform choice of a monitor for specific applications.

  12. Step detection and activity recognition accuracy of seven physical activity monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Fabio A; Heller, Ben W; Mazzà, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the seven following commercially available activity monitors in terms of step count detection accuracy: Movemonitor (Mc Roberts), Up (Jawbone), One (Fitbit), ActivPAL (PAL Technologies Ltd.), Nike+ Fuelband (Nike Inc.), Tractivity (Kineteks Corp.) and Sensewear Armband Mini (Bodymedia). Sixteen healthy adults consented to take part in the study. The experimental protocol included walking along an indoor straight walkway, descending and ascending 24 steps, free outdoor walking and free indoor walking. These tasks were repeated at three self-selected walking speeds. Angular velocity signals collected at both shanks using two wireless inertial measurement units (OPAL, ADPM Inc) were used as a reference for the step count, computed using previously validated algorithms. Step detection accuracy was assessed using the mean absolute percentage error computed for each sensor. The Movemonitor and the ActivPAL were also tested within a nine-minute activity recognition protocol, during which the participants performed a set of complex tasks. Posture classifications were obtained from the two monitors and expressed as a percentage of the total task duration. The Movemonitor, One, ActivPAL, Nike+ Fuelband and Sensewear Armband Mini underestimated the number of steps in all the observed walking speeds, whereas the Tractivity significantly overestimated step count. The Movemonitor was the best performing sensor, with an error lower than 2% at all speeds and the smallest error obtained in the outdoor walking. The activity recognition protocol showed that the Movemonitor performed best in the walking recognition, but had difficulty in discriminating between standing and sitting. Results of this study can be used to inform choice of a monitor for specific applications.

  13. Ambulatory Monitoring of Activities and Motor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwartjes, D.G.M.; Zwartjes - de Klerk, D.G.M; Zwartjes, Daphne G.M.; Heida, Tjitske; van Vugt, Jeroen P.P.; Geelen, J.A.G.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2010-01-01

    Ambulatory monitoring of motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD) can improve our therapeutic strategies, especially in patients with motor fluctuations. Previously published monitors usually assess only one or a few basic aspects of the cardinal motor symptoms in a laboratory setting. We

  14. Adolescents' leisure activities, parental monitoring and cigarette smoking--a cross-sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guo, Hui; Reeder, Anthony I; McGee, Rob; Darling, Helen

    2011-01-01

    .... Tobacco smoking is an important, potentially modifiable health determinant, so understanding associations between adolescent leisure activities, parental monitoring, demographic factors and daily...

  15. Individual Self-monitoring &Peer-monitoring In One Classroom in Writing Activities: Who Is at Disadvantage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Zare Toofan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Writing is an important experience through which we are able to share ideas, arouse feelings, persuade and convince other people (white & Arndt, 1991. It is important to view writing not solely as the product of an individual, but as a cognitive, social and cultural act. Writing is an act that takes place within a context, that accomplishes a particular purpose and that is appropriately shaped for its intended audience (Hamplyones & Condon, 1989. Here, the present research considers the significance effects of two important independent variables self-monitoring and peer-monitoring in writing activities on Iranian EFL learners. In this research it was supposed to study new effects of two Meta cognitive strategies self-monitoring and peer-monitoring on 173 male and female learners' writing activities whose age ranged between the age 16-27, and they had a composing description writing paragraph as pre & post test in the same conditions. Although many studies have been conducted on the effects of self-monitoring with a variety of students across a variety of settings (Amato-Zech, Hoff, & Doepke, 2006 Cooper et al., 2007, Dunlap, Dunlap, Koegel, & Koegel 1991. But goal of this study was to increase the participant’s on-task behavior in self & peer-monitoring (E. Johnson, 2007, Self &Peer-monitoring added. Although both of them were useful for providing challengeable students, and became useful for prosocial life, but self-monitoring helped them to become awareness of their weaknesses and strengths to increase positive way of the quality and quantity of their learning in written task, and peer-monitoring occurred when the students achieved recognition level to evaluate the other peers' behavior, and it was obviously understood that it needed more training time to arrive at the level of recognition of each others' behavior.

  16. Applications of MODIS Fluorescent Line Height Measurements to Monitor Water Quality Trends and Algal Bloom Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andrew; Moreno-Mardinan, Max; Ryan, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in satellite and airborne remote sensing, such as improvements in sensor and algorithm calibrations, processing techniques and atmospheric correction procedures have provided for increased coverage of remote-sensing, ocean-color products for coastal regions. In particular, for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensor calibration updates, improved aerosol retrievals and new aerosol models has led to improved atmospheric correction algorithms for turbid waters and have improved the retrieval of ocean color in coastal waters. This has opened the way for studying ocean phenomena and processes at finer spatial scales, such as the interactions at the land-sea interface, trends in coastal water quality and algal blooms. Human population growth and changes in coastal management practices have brought about significant changes in the concentrations of organic and inorganic, particulate and dissolved substances entering the coastal ocean. There is increasing concern that these inputs have led to declines in water quality and have increase local concentrations of phytoplankton, which cause harmful algal blooms. In two case studies we present MODIS observations of fluorescence line height (FLH) to 1) assess trends in water quality for Tampa Bay, Florida and 2) illustrate seasonal and annual variability of algal bloom activity in Monterey Bay, California as well as document estuarine/riverine plume induced red tide events. In a comprehensive analysis of long term (2003-2011) in situ monitoring data and satellite imagery from Tampa Bay we assess the validity of the MODIS FLH product against chlorophyll-a and a suite of water quality parameters taken in a variety of conditions throughout a large optically complex estuarine system. A systematic analysis of sampling sites throughout the bay is undertaken to understand how the relationship between FLH and in situ chlorophyll-a responds to varying conditions and to develop a near decadal trend in

  17. Validity and Usability of Physical Activity Monitoring in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    OpenAIRE

    Tobias Boeselt; Marc Spielmanns; Christoph Nell; Jan Hendrik Storre; Wolfram Windisch; Lena Magerhans; Bjoern Beutel; Klaus Kenn; Timm Greulich; Peter Alter; Claus Vogelmeier; Andreas Rembert Koczulla

    2016-01-01

    Background A large proportion of COPD patients do not achieve the recommended level of physical activity. It is suggested that feedback on the level of activity by using an activity monitoring device (PAM) increases awareness and may stimulate patients to increase their physical activity in daily life. Our objective was to assess the validity and usability of a simple and low-cost physical activity monitor (Polar A300?) when compared with the validated and established Bodymedia-SenseWear? (SW...

  18. Continuous monitoring of dissolved gases with membrane inlet mass spectrometry to fingerprint river biochemical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautier, Camille; Chatton, Eliot; Abbott, Benjamin; Harjung, Astrid; Labasque, Thierry; Guillou, Aurélie; Pannard, Alexandrine; Piscart, Christophe; Laverman, Anniet; Kolbe, Tamara; Massé, Stéphanie; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Thomas, Zahra; Aquilina, Luc; Pinay, Gilles

    2017-04-01

    Water quality in rivers results from biogeochemical processes in contributing hydrological compartments (soils, aquifers, hyporheic and riparian zones) and biochemical activity in the river network itself. Consequently, chemical fluxes fluctuate on multiple spatial and temporal scales, leading eventually to complex concentration signals in rivers. We characterized these fluctuations with innovative continuous monitoring of dissolved gases, to quantify transport and reaction processes occurring in different hydrological compartments. We performed stream-scale experiments in two headwater streams in Brittany, France. Factorial injections of inorganic nitrogen (NH4NO3), inorganic phosphate (P2O5) and multiple sources of labile carbon (acetate, tryptophan) were implemented in the two streams. We used a new field application of membrane inlet mass spectrometry to continuously monitor dissolved gases for multiple day-night periods (Chatton et al., 2016). Quantified gases included He, O2, N2, CO2, CH4, N2O, and 15N of dissolved N2 and N2O. We calibrated and assessed the methodology with well-established complementary techniques including gas chromatography and high-frequency water quality sensors. Wet chemistry and radon analysis complemented the study. The analyses provided several methodological and ecological insights and demonstrated that high frequency variations linked to background noise can be efficiently determined and filtered to derive effective fluxes. From a more fundamental point of view, the tested stream segments were fully characterized with extensive sampling of riverbeds and laboratory experiments, allowing scaling of point-level microbial and invertebrate diversity and activity on in-stream processing. This innovative technology allows fully-controlled in-situ experiments providing rich information with a high signal to noise ratio. We present the integrated nutrient demand and uptake and discuss limiting processes and elements at the reach and

  19. Mercury Calibration System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  20. Minimum Wear Duration for the activPAL Professional Activity Monitor in Adolescent Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Kieran P; Purtill, Helen; Harrington, Deirdre M; Hislop, Jane F; Reilly, John J; Donnelly, Alan E

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to determine the minimum number of days of monitoring required to reliably predict sitting/lying time, standing time, light intensity physical activity (LIPA), moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) and steps in adolescent females. 195 adolescent females (mean age = 15.7 years; SD = 0.9) participated in the study. Participants wore the activPAL activity monitor for a seven day protocol. The amount of time spent sitting/lying, standing, in LIPA and in MVPA and the number of steps per day were quantified. Spearman-Brown Prophecy formulae were used to predict the number of days of data required to achieve an intraclass correlation coefficient of both 0.7 and 0.8. For the percentage of the waking day spent sitting/lying, standing, in LIPA and in MVPA, a minimum of 9 days of accelerometer recording is required to achieve a reliability of ≥ 0.7, while a minimum of 15 days is required to achieve a reliability of ≥ 0.8. For steps, a minimum of 12 days of recording is required to achieve a reliability of ≥ 0.7, with 21 days to achieve a reliability of ≥ 0.8. Future research in adolescent females should collect a minimum of 9 days of accelerometer data to reliably estimate sitting/lying time, standing time, LIPA and MVPA, while 12 days is required to reliably estimate steps.

  1. GRID based Thermal Images Processing for volcanic activity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiagli, S.; Coco, S.; Drago, L.; Laudani, A.,; Lodato, L.; Pollicino, G.; Torrisi, O.

    2009-04-01

    Since 2001, the Catania Section of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) has been running the video stations recording the volcanic activity of Mount Etna, Stromboli and the Fossa Crater of Vulcano island. The video signals of 11 video cameras (seven operating in the visible band and four in infrared) are sent in real time to INGV Control Centre where they are visualized on monitors and archived on a dedicated NAS storage. The video surveillance of the Sicilian volcanoes, situated near to densely populated areas, helps the volcanologists providing the Civil Protection authorities with updates in real time on the on-going volcanic activity. In particular, five video cameras are operating on Mt. Etna and they record the volcano from the south and east sides 24 hours a day. During emergencies, mobile video stations may also be used to better film the most important phases of the activity. Single shots are published on the Catania Section intranet and internet websites. On June 2006 a A 40 thermal camera was installed in Vulcano La Fossa Crater. The location was in the internal and opposite crater flank (S1), 400 m distant from the fumarole field. The first two-year of data on temperature distribution frequency were recorded with this new methodology of acquisition, and automatically elaborated by software at INGV Catania Section. In fact a dedicated software developed in IDL, denominated Volcano Thermo Analysis (VTA), was appositely developed in order to extract a set of important features, able to characterize with a good approssimation the volcanic activity. In particular the program first load and opportunely convert the thermal images, then according to the Region Of Interest (ROI) and the temperature ranges defined by the user provide to automatic spatial and statistic analysis. In addition the VTA is able to analysis all the temporal series of images available in order to achieve the time-event analysis and the dynamic of the volcanic

  2. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  3. An overview of Suomi NPP VIIRS calibration maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James J.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Barnes, Robert A.; Patt, Frederick S.; Sun, Junqiang; Chiang, Kwofu

    2012-09-01

    The first Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was successfully launched on-board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) spacecraft on October 28, 2011. Suomi NPP VIIRS observations are made in 22 spectral bands, from the visible (VIS) to the long-wave infrared (LWIR), and are used to produce 22 Environmental Data Records (EDRs) with a broad range of scientific applications. The quality of these VIIRS EDRs strongly depends on the quality of its calibrated and geo-located Sensor Date Records (SDRs). Built with a strong heritage to the NASA's EOS MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, the VIIRS is calibrated on-orbit using a similar set of on-board calibrators (OBC), including a solar diffuser (SD) and solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) system for the reflective solar bands (RSB) and a blackbody (BB) for the thermal emissive bands (TEB). Onorbit maneuvers of the SNPP spacecraft provide additional calibration and characterization data from the VIIRS instrument which cannot be obtained pre-launch and are required to produce the highest quality SDRs. These include multiorbit yaw maneuvers for the characterization of SD and SDSM screen transmission, quasi-monthly roll maneuvers to acquire lunar observations to track sensor degradation in the visible through shortwave infrared, and a driven pitch-over maneuver to acquire multiple scans of deep space to determine TEB response versus scan angle (RVS). This paper provides an overview of these three SNPP calibration maneuvers. Discussions are focused on their potential calibration and science benefits, pre-launch planning activities, and on-orbit scheduling and implementation strategies. Results from calibration maneuvers performed during the Intensive Calibration and Validation (ICV) period for the VIIRS sensor are illustrated. Also presented in this paper are lessons learned regarding the implementation of calibration spacecraft maneuvers on follow

  4. Behavior Change Techniques Implemented in Electronic Lifestyle Activity Monitors: A Systematic Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Zakkoyya H; Mayrsohn, Brian G; Rowland, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Background Electronic activity monitors (such as those manufactured by Fitbit, Jawbone, and Nike) improve on standard pedometers by providing automated feedback and interactive behavior change tools via mobile device or personal computer. These monitors are commercially popular and show promise for use in public health interventions. However, little is known about the content of their feedback applications and how individual monitors may differ from one another. Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the behavior change techniques implemented in commercially available electronic activity monitors. Methods Electronic activity monitors (N=13) were systematically identified and tested by 3 trained coders for at least 1 week each. All monitors measured lifestyle physical activity and provided feedback via an app (computer or mobile). Coding was based on a hierarchical list of 93 behavior change techniques. Further coding of potentially effective techniques and adherence to theory-based recommendations were based on findings from meta-analyses and meta-regressions in the research literature. Results All monitors provided tools for self-monitoring, feedback, and environmental change by definition. The next most prevalent techniques (13 out of 13 monitors) were goal-setting and emphasizing discrepancy between current and goal behavior. Review of behavioral goals, social support, social comparison, prompts/cues, rewards, and a focus on past success were found in more than half of the systems. The monitors included a range of 5-10 of 14 total techniques identified from the research literature as potentially effective. Most of the monitors included goal-setting, self-monitoring, and feedback content that closely matched recommendations from social cognitive theory. Conclusions Electronic activity monitors contain a wide range of behavior change techniques typically used in clinical behavioral interventions. Thus, the monitors may represent a medium by which

  5. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of... to Treat Life-threatening and Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.87 Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials. For drugs covered under this section, the Commissioner and other...

  6. Continuous CWB GPS Array in Taiwan and Applications to Monitoring Seismic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzay-Chyn Shin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available GPS observations have revealed important information for studying active tectonics and plate motion and are a useful tool for monitoring crustal deformation. The CWB continuous GPS array consists of approximately 150 stations with dense spatial coverage throughout Taiwan and can be used not only to monitor crustal deformation and seismic activity, but also to analyze the earthquake precursors in Taiwan.

  7. MOBY, A Radiometric Buoy for Performance Monitoring and Vicarious Calibration of Satellite Ocean Color Sensors: Measurement and Data Analysis Protocols. Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Dennis K.; Yarbrough, Mark A.; Feinholz, Mike; Flora, Stephanie; Broenkow, William; Kim, Yong Sung; Johnson, B. Carol; Brown, Steven W.; Yuen, Marilyn; Mueller, James L.

    2003-01-01

    The Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY) is the centerpiece of the primary ocean measurement site for calibration of satellite ocean color sensors based on independent in situ measurements. Since late 1996, the time series of normalized water-leaving radiances L(sub WN)(lambda) determined from the array of radiometric sensors attached to MOBY are the primary basis for the on-orbit calibrations of the USA Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), the Japanese Ocean Color and Temperature Sensor (OCTS), the French Polarization Detection Environmental Radiometer (POLDER), the German Modular Optoelectronic Scanner on the Indian Research Satellite (IRS1-MOS), and the USA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). The MOBY vicarious calibration L(sub WN)(lambda) reference is an essential element in the international effort to develop a global, multi-year time series of consistently calibrated ocean color products using data from a wide variety of independent satellite sensors. A longstanding goal of the SeaWiFS and MODIS (Ocean) Science Teams is to determine satellite-derived L(sub WN)(labda) with a relative combined standard uncertainty of 5 %. Other satellite ocean color projects and the Sensor Intercomparison for Marine Biology and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) project have also adopted this goal, at least implicitly. Because water-leaving radiance contributes at most 10 % of the total radiance measured by a satellite sensor above the atmosphere, a 5 % uncertainty in L(sub WN)(lambda) implies a 0.5 % uncertainty in the above-atmosphere radiance measurements. This level of uncertainty can only be approached using vicarious-calibration approaches as described below. In practice, this means that the satellite radiance responsivity is adjusted to achieve the best agreement, in a least-squares sense, for the L(sub WN)(lambda) results determined using the satellite and the independent optical sensors (e.g. MOBY). The end result of this approach is to

  8. Calibrating Legal Judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Schauer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to study the notion and essence of legal judgments calibration the possibilities of using it in the lawenforcement activity to explore the expenses and advantages of using it. Methods dialectic approach to the cognition of social phenomena which enables to analyze them in historical development and functioning in the context of the integrity of objective and subjective factors it determined the choice of the following research methods formallegal comparative legal sociological methods of cognitive psychology and philosophy. Results In ordinary life people who assess other peoplersaquos judgments typically take into account the other judgments of those they are assessing in order to calibrate the judgment presently being assessed. The restaurant and hotel rating website TripAdvisor is exemplary because it facilitates calibration by providing access to a raterrsaquos previous ratings. Such information allows a user to see whether a particular rating comes from a rater who is enthusiastic about every place she patronizes or instead from someone who is incessantly hard to please. And even when less systematized as in assessing a letter of recommendation or college transcript calibration by recourse to the decisional history of those whose judgments are being assessed is ubiquitous. Yet despite the ubiquity and utility of such calibration the legal system seems perversely to reject it. Appellate courts do not openly adjust their standard of review based on the previous judgments of the judge whose decision they are reviewing nor do judges in reviewing legislative or administrative decisions magistrates in evaluating search warrant representations or jurors in assessing witness perception. In most legal domains calibration by reference to the prior decisions of the reviewee is invisible either because it does not exist or because reviewing bodies are unwilling to admit using what they in fact know and employ. Scientific novelty for the first

  9. Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease and Diabetes Blood Glucose Monitoring Insulin Injection Resources Mental Health and Diabetes Healthy Holiday Eating Lifestyle Resources Improve Medication Taking Spanish Language Resources AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors ...

  10. Embedded Ultrasonic Transducers for Active and Passive Concrete Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernst Niederleithinger

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed new transducers for ultrasonic transmission, which can be embedded right into concrete, are now used for non-destructive permanent monitoring of concrete. They can be installed during construction or thereafter. Large volumes of concrete can be monitored for changes of material properties by a limited number of transducers. The transducer design, the main properties as well as installation procedures are presented. It is shown that compressional waves with a central frequency of 62 kHz are mainly generated around the transducer’s axis. The transducer can be used as a transmitter or receiver. Application examples demonstrate that the transducers can be used to monitor concrete conditions parameters (stress, temperature, … as well as damages in an early state or the detection of acoustic events (e.g., crack opening. Besides application in civil engineering our setups can also be used for model studies in geosciences.

  11. Spectral and Radiometric Calibration using Tunable Lasers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration —  SIRCUS-based calibration relies on a set of monitoring radiometers and tunable laser sources to provide an absolute radiometric calibration that can approach...

  12. Relationship between balance and physical activity measured by an activity monitor in elderly COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwakura M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Masahiro Iwakura,1,2 Kazuki Okura,2 Kazuyuki Shibata,1,2 Atsuyoshi Kawagoshi,2 Keiyu Sugawara,2 Hitomi Takahashi,2 Takanobu Shioya1 1Department of Rehabilitation, Akita City Hospital, 2Department of Physical Therapy, Akita University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Akita, Japan Background: Little is known regarding the relationship between balance impairments and physical activity in COPD. There has been no study investigating the relationship between balance and objectively measured physical activity. Here we investigated the association between balance and physical activity measured by an activity monitor in elderly COPD patients. Materials and methods: Twenty-two outpatients with COPD (mean age, 72±7 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 53%±21% predicted and 13 age-matched healthy control subjects (mean age, 72±6 years participated in the study. We assessed all 35 subjects’ balance (one-leg standing test [OLST] times, Short Physical Performance Battery total scores, standing balance test scores, 4 m gait speed, and five-times sit-to-stand test [5STST] and physical activity (daily steps and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day [MV-PA]. Possible confounders were assessed in the COPD group. The between-group differences in balance test scores and physical activity were analyzed. A correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis were conducted in the COPD group. Results: The COPD patients exhibited significant reductions in OLST times (P=0.033, Short Physical Performance Battery scores (P=0.013, 4 m gait speed (P<0.001, five-times sit-to-stand times (P=0.002, daily steps (P=0.003, and MV-PA (P=0.022 compared to the controls; the exception was the standing balance test scores. The correlation and multivariate regression analyses revealed significant independent associations between OLST times and daily steps (P<0.001 and between OLST times and MV-PA (P=0.014 in the COPD group after adjusting for

  13. Results of the marine biota monitoring during drilling activity on Campos Basin, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petta, Claudia Brigagao de; Bastos, Fabio; Danielski, Monica; Ferreira, Mariana; Gama, Mariana; Coelho, Ana Paula Athanazio; Maia, Decio [Aecom do Brasil Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Project (PMA) aims to report environmental changes arising from drilling activity, in relation to the marine fauna. This project can also help in the monitoring of accidental spills. Since the professionals spend six hours of the day monitoring the ocean around the rigs, they can locate and identify oil stains, notify the responsible onboard, and also help in the monitoring of the oil stain. Such Project has been developed onboard a drilling unit working in Campos Basin. The results presented here were collected during the drilling activity in Bijupira and Salema fields, by Shell Brasil Petroleo Ltda, from July 13th to October 8th, 2011.

  14. Second-order calibration applied to quantification of two active components of Schisandra chinensis in complex matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hua Zhang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM against various diseases urges more low cost, speed and sensitive analytical methods for investigating the phamacology of TCM and providing a theoretical basis for clinical use. The potential of second-order calibration method was validated for the quantification of two effective ingredients of Schisandra chinensis in human plasma using spectrofluorimetry. The results obtained in the present study demonstrate the advantages of this strategy for multi-target determination in complex matrices. Although the spectra of the analytes are similar and a large number of interferences also exist, second-order calibration method could predict the accurate concentrations together with reasonable resolution of spectral profiles for analytes of interest owing to its ‘second-order advantage’. Moreover, the method presented in this work allows one to simply experimental procedure as well as reduces the use of harmful chemical solvents. Keywords: Traditional Chinese medicine, Second-order calibration, Schizandrol A, Schizandrin B, Self-weighted alternating normalized residue fitting (SWANRF algorithm, Alternating normalization-weighted error (ANWE algorithm.

  15. ATLAS off-Grid sites (Tier-3) monitoring. From local fabric monitoring to global overview of the VO computing activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Artem; Oleynik, Danila; Belov, Sergey; Andreeva, Julia; Kadochnikov, Ivan

    2012-12-01

    ATLAS is an LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiment at the CERN particle physics laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland. The ATLAS Computing model embraces the Grid paradigm and originally included three levels of computing centers, in order to handle data volumes of multiple petabytes per year. With the formation of small computing centers, usually based at universities, the model was expanded to include them as Tier-3 sites. Tier-3 centers comprise a range of architectures and many do not possess Grid middleware, thus, monitoring of storage usage and analysis software is not possible for the typical Tier-3 site system administrator, similarly, Tier-3 site activity is not available for the virtual organization of the experiment. In this paper an ATLAS off-Grid site-monitoring software suite is presented. The software suite enables monitoring of sites not covered by the ATLAS Distributed Computing software.

  16. Advanced active health monitoring system of liquid rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Xinlin P.; Wu, Zhanjun; Beard, Shawn; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2008-11-01

    An advanced SMART TAPE system has been developed for real-time in-situ monitoring and long term tracking of structural integrity of pressure vessels in liquid rocket engines. The practical implementation of the structural health monitoring (SHM) system including distributed sensor network, portable diagnostic hardware and dedicated data analysis software is addressed based on the harsh operating environment. Extensive tests were conducted on a simulated large booster LOX-H2 engine propellant duct to evaluate the survivability and functionality of the system under the operating conditions of typical liquid rocket engines such as cryogenic temperature, vibration loads. The test results demonstrated that the developed SHM system could survive the combined cryogenic temperature and vibration environments and effectively detect cracks as small as 2 mm.

  17. Activity Monitors Help Users Get Optimum Sun Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Goddard scientist Shahid Aslam was investigating alternative methods for measuring extreme ultraviolet radiation on the Solar Dynamics Observatory when he hit upon semiconductors that measured wavelengths pertinent to human health. As a result, he and a partner established College Park, Maryland-based Sensor Sensor LLC and developed UVA+B SunFriend, a wrist monitor that lets people know when they've received their optimal amounts of sunlight for the day.

  18. Monitoring the driver's activity using 3D information

    OpenAIRE

    Peláez Coronado, Gustavo Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Driver supervision is crucial in safety systems for the driver. It is important to monitor the driver to understand his necessities, patterns of movements and behaviour under determined circumstances. The availability of an accurate tool to supervise the driver’s behaviour allows multiple objectives to be achieved such as the detection of drowsiness (analysing the head movements and blinking pattern) and distraction (estimating where the driver is looking by studying the head and eyes positio...

  19. Ambulatory measurement of knee motion and physical activity: preliminary evaluation of a smart activity monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malchau Henrik

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a paucity of devices available for continuous, long-term monitoring of human joint motion. Non-invasive, inexpensive devices capable of recording human activity and joint motion have many applications for medical research. Such a device could be used to quantify range of motion outside the gait laboratory. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of the modified Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA in measuring knee flexion angles, to detect different physical activities, and to quantify how often healthy subjects use deep knee flexion in the ambulatory setting. Methods We compared Biomotion Laboratory (BML "gold standard" data to simultaneous IDEEA measures of knee motion and gait, step up/down, and stair descent in 5 healthy subjects. In addition, we used a series of choreographed physical activities outside the BML to confirm the IDEEA's ability to accurately measure 7 commonly-performed physical activities. Subjects then continued data collection during ordinary activities outside the gait laboratory. Results Pooled correlations between the BML and IDEEA knee flexion angles were .97 +/- .03 for step up/down, .98 +/- .02 for stair descent, and .98 +/- .01 for gait. In the BML protocol, the IDEEA accurately identified gait, but was less accurate in identifying step up/down and stair descent. During sampling outside the BML, the IDEEA accurately detected walking, running, stair ascent, stair descent, standing, lying, and sitting. On average, subjects flexed their knees >120° for 0.17% of their data collection periods outside the BML. Conclusion The modified IDEEA system is a useful clinical tool for evaluating knee motion and multiple physical activities in the ambulatory setting. These five healthy subjects rarely flexed their knees >120°.

  20. Calibration of a Species-Specific Spectral Vegetation Index for Leaf Area Index (LAI Monitoring: Example with MODIS Reflectance Time-Series on Eucalyptus Plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerric le Maire

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The leaf area index (LAI is a key characteristic of forest ecosystems. Estimations of LAI from satellite images generally rely on spectral vegetation indices (SVIs or radiative transfer model (RTM inversions. We have developed a new and precise method suitable for practical application, consisting of building a species-specific SVI that is best-suited to both sensor and vegetation characteristics. Such an SVI requires calibration on a large number of representative vegetation conditions. We developed a two-step approach: (1 estimation of LAI on a subset of satellite data through RTM inversion; and (2 the calibration of a vegetation index on these estimated LAI. We applied this methodology to Eucalyptus plantations which have highly variable LAI in time and space. Previous results showed that an RTM inversion of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS near-infrared and red reflectance allowed good retrieval performance (R2 = 0.80, RMSE = 0.41, but was computationally difficult. Here, the RTM results were used to calibrate a dedicated vegetation index (called “EucVI” which gave similar LAI retrieval results but in a simpler way. The R2 of the regression between measured and EucVI-simulated LAI values on a validation dataset was 0.68, and the RMSE was 0.49. The additional use of stand age and day of year in the SVI equation slightly increased the performance of the index (R2 = 0.77 and RMSE = 0.41. This simple index opens the way to an easily applicable retrieval of Eucalyptus LAI from MODIS data, which could be used in an operational way.

  1. Computerized Cognitive Training Restores Neural Activity within the Reality Monitoring Network in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, Karuna; Luks, Tracy L; Fisher, Melissa; Simpson, Gregory V; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Vinogradov, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients suffer from severe cognitive deficits, such as impaired reality monitoring. Reality monitoring is the ability to distinguish the source of internal experiences from outside reality. During reality monitoring tasks, schizophrenia patients make errors identifying “I made it up” items, and even during accurate performance, they show abnormally low activation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a region that supports self-referential cognition. We administered 80 hours ...

  2. Research Experience for Teachers at NRAO-Green Bank: Calibration of Data from the Green Bank Telescope and Classroom Activities in Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. H.; Maddalena, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    The NSF-funded "Research Experience for Teachers" project provides teachers an opportunity to work on a current scientific or engineering research project. This paper will present the results of research conducted with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) as well as classroom activities that will use GBT data. In order to determine the accuracy of the calibration of receivers on cm-wave radio telescopes, engineers must periodically determine the equivalent temperature of a receiver's calibration noise diode. The traditional methods utilize hot-cold loads and usually achieve an accuracy of no better than 5%, have a very coarse frequency resolution, and require days of labor. Using observations with the GBT of standard astronomical flux calibrators, we measured the noise diode temperatures for four receivers that cover 1 to 10 GHz. By comparing the detected power from the calibrators to that generated by the noise diodes we were able to determine the temperature of the noise diodes to an accuracy of 1% with very good frequency resolution (1 MHz). The astronomically determined values agree, with few exceptions, to the less accurate values generated by the receiver engineer. In contrast to the methods employed by engineers, the astronomical determinations took only a few hours. Using data collected from the GBT and the NRAO 140-foot telescope, high-school students at Breck School in Golden Valley, MN will use the Hands-On Universe (HOU) software to analyze fits files containing data from a 100 square-degree region of the Orion Nebula. Instead of always relying on optical images from personal observations or the HOU groups at Lawrence Hall of Science or Yerkes, students can now use radio images. Comparing radio images with those derived at optical wavelengths should prove enlightening for students, many of whom have misconceptions concerning radio astronomy.

  3. Calibration and validation of an activated sludge model for greenhouse gases no. 1 (ASMG1): prediction of temperature-dependent N₂O emission dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lisha; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    An activated sludge model for greenhouse gases no. 1 was calibrated with data from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) without control systems and validated with data from three similar plants equipped with control systems. Special about the calibration/validation approach adopted in this paper is that the data are obtained from simulations with a mathematical model that is widely accepted to describe effluent quality and operating costs of actual WWTPs, the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2). The calibration also aimed at fitting the model to typical observed nitrous oxide (N₂O) emission data, i.e., a yearly average of 0.5% of the influent total nitrogen load emitted as N₂O-N. Model validation was performed by challenging the model in configurations with different control strategies. The kinetic term describing the dissolved oxygen effect on the denitrification by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was modified into a Haldane term. Both original and Haldane-modified models passed calibration and validation. Even though their yearly averaged values were similar, the two models presented different dynamic N₂O emissions under cold temperature conditions and control. Therefore, data collected in such situations can potentially permit model discrimination. Observed seasonal trends in N₂O emissions are simulated well with both original and Haldane-modified models. A mechanistic explanation based on the temperature-dependent interaction between heterotrophic and autotrophic N₂O pathways was provided. Finally, while adding the AOB denitrification pathway to a model with only heterotrophic N₂O production showed little impact on effluent quality and operating cost criteria, it clearly affected N2O emission productions.

  4. Scoring with the Berlin MRI method for assessment of spinal inflammatory activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a calibration exercise among rheumatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Loreto; Sellas, Agusti; Rodríguez-Lozano, Carlos; Juanola, Xavier; García Llorente, José Francisco; Fernández Sueiro, José Luis; Linares, Luis Francisco; de Castro, M Carmen; Moreno, Mireia; Zarco, Pedro; Ariza, Rafael; Baraliakos, Xenofon; de Miguel, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    To test the reliability of the Berlin MRI scoring method and the effect of a calibration exercise on the score's reliability among untrained readers in MRI examinations of patients with established ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Eleven rheumatologists read blinded images of 20 AS patients before and after a two-day workshop on the Berlin MRI scoring method. Reliability (intra- and inter-reader) and concordance with the expert (all measured by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)) were compared before and after 2 weeks of the training. Feasibility in terms of time and difficulty was also measured. The mean Berlin score increased from (mean ± standard deviation) 5.04 ± 6.41 before to 6.40±7.08 after the calibration exercise (p<0.01). Inter-reader ICC decreased from 0.83 (95% CI: 0.75-0.93) to 0.78 (95% CI: 0.66-0.90), and intra-reader ICC from 0.89 (95% CI: 0.84-0.94) to 0.87 (95% CI: 0.82-0.92). Agreement with an experienced reader improved after the calibration exercise, with ICC = 0.59 (95% CI 0.45-0.76) before vs. ICC = 0.65 (95% CI 0.50-0.80) after training. The Berlin method is a reliable scoring method for assessment of spinal inflammatory activity by using MRI in patients with AS, even in the hands of inexperienced readers. A calibration exercise can improve feasibility and sensitivity of the scoring method.

  5. Calibration exercise for the Community Aquatic Monitoring Program (CAMP) nutrient analyses: establishing variability between filtered and unfiltered water samples and two analytical laboratories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thériault, M.-H; Courtenay, S.C

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Community Aquatic Monitoring Program (CAMP) unfiltered water samples were collected between 2006 and 2008 and analyzed for dissolved inorganic nutrients (i.e., nitrate + nitrite (NO3 + NO2...

  6. Causes and consequences of timing errors associated with global positioning system collar accelerometer activity monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam J. Gaylord; Dana M. Sanchez

    2014-01-01

    Direct behavioral observations of multiple free-ranging animals over long periods of time and large geographic areas is prohibitively difficult. However, recent improvements in technology, such as Global Positioning System (GPS) collars equipped with motion-sensitive activity monitors, create the potential to remotely monitor animal behavior. Accelerometer-equipped...

  7. Active monitoring as cognitive control of grinders design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flizikowski, Jozef B.; Mrozinski, Adam; Tomporowski, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    A general monitoring methodology applicable to plastics recyclates grinding processes development for energy engineering, has been presented in this work. The method includes two beings: mathematical aiding an invention and working of a novelty. The common set is composed of characteristics, structure, relationships of knowledge about states and transformations, effectiveness and progress of the devices and machinery engineering, e.g. breaking up in the energy-materials recycling process. This innovations theory is identified by the valuation, estimation, testing and creative archiving the elaborated character and structure of the invention and grinders construction development.

  8. Calibration of pressure gauge for Cherenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Saponjic, Nevena

    2013-01-01

    Solartron/Hamilton pressure gauges are used to monitor the gas pressure in the particle beam detectors installed in the experimental areas. Here is description of the test bench for the calibration of these gauges in Labview.

  9. Armband activity monitor data do not correlate with reported pain scores in patients receiving vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Justin G; Vine, Roanna L; McDonald, Jennifer S; Novotny, Paul J; Kallmes, David F

    2017-09-01

    Prior research on the efficacy of vertebroplasty has focused primarily on subjective, patient-reported outcomes. To apply an armband activity monitor (SenseWear by BodyMedia Inc, USA) to patients presenting for consideration for vertebroplasty and to determine the correlation between patient-reported outcomes and quantitative activity metrics at baseline and 30 days after presentation. Nineteen patients were enrolled (15 receiving vertebroplasty, 4 not receiving vertebroplasty). Patients reported their average pain over the past 24 hours and completed the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire at baseline and 30 days. Patients wore the SenseWear Armband activity monitor for a median of 4 days at baseline and at the 30-day time period to assess steps, metabolic equivalents expended, sedentary activity time, moderate activity time, sleep efficiency, and total sleep time. Pain and disability scores were correlated with activity monitor metrics using linear regression analysis. Changes in reported average pain in the past 24 hours and disability scores were not significantly different between vertebroplasty and non-vertebroplasty groups (p>0.05). Changes in activity monitor data were not significantly different between the vertebroplasty and non-vertebroplasty groups (p>0.05). None of the correlations between the reported pain or disability scores and the activity monitor data were significant. Activity monitors can be used to objectively record changes in activity following vertebroplasty procedures. Patient-reported pain or disability scores do not correlate with activity monitor-measured activity or sleep metrics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Active Layer Monitoring, Arctic and Subarctic Canada, Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project involves measuring regional and site variability in maximum annual active layer development and vertical surface movement over permafrost, and...

  11. Nanosensor system for monitoring brain activity and drowsiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Varadan, Vijay K.; Harbaugh, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Detection of drowsiness in drivers to avoid on-road collisions and accidents is one of the most important applications that can be implemented to avert loss of life and property caused by accidents. A statistical report indicates that drowsy driving is equally harmful as driving under influence of alcohol. This report also indicates that drowsy driving is the third most influencing factor for accidents and 30% of the commercial vehicle accidents are caused because of drowsy driving. With a motivation to avoid accidents caused by drowsy driving, this paper proposes a technique of correlating EEG and EOG signals to detect drowsiness. Feature extracts of EEG and blink variability from EOG is correlated to detect the sleepiness/drowsiness of a driver. Moreover, to implement a more pragmatic approach towards continuous monitoring, a wireless real time monitoring approach has been incorporated using textile based nanosensors. Thereby, acquired bio potential signals are transmitted through GSM communication module to the receiver continuously. In addition to this, all the incorporated electronics are equipped in a flexible headband which can be worn by the driver. With this flexible headband approach, any intrusiveness that may be experienced by other cumbersome hardware is effectively mitigated. With the continuous transmission of data from the head band, the signals are processed on the receiver side to determine the condition of the driver. Early warning of driver's drowsiness will be displayed in the dashboard of the vehicle as well as alertness voice and sound alarm will be sent via the vehicle radio.

  12. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina

    2016-05-02

    This poster presents the development, implementation, and operation of the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL) Longwave (LW) system at the Southern Great Plains Radiometric Calibration Facility for the calibration of pyrgeometers that provide traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group.

  13. A Context-Aware Adaptive Feedback System for Activity Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Akker, Harm; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Jones, Valerie M.

    2011-01-01

    An active lifestyle is an important factor in the prevention of deconditioning and many negative secondary effects in chronic diseases (e.g. COPD). A number of studies have been conducted with the aim of gaining insight into the daily activity patterns of these patients. Current research is

  14. Interactive multimodal ambulatory monitoring to investigate the association between physical activity and affect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich W. Ebner-Priemer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a wealth of evidence that physical activity has positive effects on psychological health, a large proportion of people are inactive. Data regarding counts, steps, and movement patterns are limited in their ability to explain why people remain inactive. We propose that multimodal ambulatory monitoring, which combines the assessment of physical activity with the assessment of psychological variables, helps to elucidate real world physical activity. Whereas physical activity can be monitored continuously, psychological variables can only be assessed at discrete intervals, such as every hour. Moreover, the assessment of psychological variables must be linked to the activity of interest. For example, if an inactive and overweight person is physically active once a week, psychological variables should be assessed during this episode. Linking the assessment of psychological variables to episodes of an activity of interest can be achieved with interactive monitoring. The primary aim of our interactive multimodal ambulatory monitoring approach was to intentionally increase the number of e-diary assessments during active episodes.We developed and tested an interactive monitoring algorithm that continuously monitors physical activity in everyday life. When predefined thresholds are surpassed, the algorithm triggers a signal for participants to answer questions in their electronic diary.Using data from 70 participants wearing an accelerative device for 24 hours each, we found that our algorithm quadrupled the frequency of e-diary assessments during the activity episodes of interest compared to random sampling. Multimodal interactive ambulatory monitoring appears to be a promising approach to enhancing our understanding of real world physical activity and movement.

  15. Active Power Distribution Network Security Monitoring System Based on PDMiner Platform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    CHANG Cheng

    2017-01-01

    ...,using the data mining technology and distributed parallel computing method,establishing an active distribution network security monitoring system model based on PDMiner large data mining platform...

  16. Quantification of coagulation factor XIII activity by a thio-NADH based assay using factor XIII immuno-depleted plasma as a diluent for calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Andreas; Stephan, Sina; Christ, Gerlinde; Pechmann, Lena; Duwe, Christa; Fischer, Bodo; Hahn, Martin; Althaus, Harald; Ehm, Matthias; Schwarz, Herbert; Vitzthum, Frank

    2010-12-01

    Accurate determination of factor XIII (FXIII) activity is crucial for replacement therapy. FXIII activity is typically determined using a coupled enzymatic reaction that measures nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydride (NADH) consumption at 340 nm. Here, we describe the development of a prototype for a novel FXIII activity assay for detection at 405 nm by replacing NADH with thio-NADH, and the application of FXIII immuno-depleted plasma as a diluent for calibration. Performance data show up to two-fold lower susceptibility of the prototype assay to interferences from hemolyzed, icteric, and lipemic samples when compared to a NADH assay format. In addition, the use of FXIII immuno-depleted plasma as diluent for calibration improved recovery almost two-fold in the lower measurement range. The novel prototype assay correlates well with a conventional assay (r=0.98, y=0.99·x+2.17% FXIII, n=173). The described prototype assay has the potential to (a) increase trueness of measurement of low levels of FXIII, (b) improve robustness due to reduction from interferences, and (c) can be used on a broad range of coagulation instruments due to its detection at 405 nm.

  17. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements § 60.1330 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three...

  18. Validity of activity monitors in health and chronic disease : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Remoortel, Hans; Giavedoni, Santiago; Raste, Yogini; Burtin, Chris; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Gimeno-Santos, Elena; Langer, Daniel; Glendenning, Alastair; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Peterson, Barry T; Wilson, Frederick; Mann, Bridget; Rabinovich, Roberto; Puhan, Milo A; Troosters, Thierry; de Jong, Corina

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of physical activity in healthy populations and in those with chronic diseases is challenging. The aim of this systematic review was to identify whether available activity monitors (AM) have been appropriately validated for use in assessing physical activity in these groups. Following

  19. Simultaneous validation of five activity monitors for use in adult populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C; Carson, B P; Dowd, K P; Donnelly, A E

    2017-12-01

    Numerous cut-points exist to measure physical activity by accelerometry. The ability to compare accelerometer findings from different devices from different locations may be advantageous to researchers. This study aimed to develop and validate cut-points for 1.5, 3, and 6 METs in five activity monitors simultaneously. Fifty-six participants (mean age=39.9 [±11.5] years) performed six activities while wearing a CosMED K4b2 and five activity monitors: activPAL3 Micro, activPAL, ActiGraph GT1M, ActiGraph wGT3X-BT, and GENEActiv. Receiver operating characteristic curves and analysis were used to develop and validate cut-points for the vertical axis counts (all activity monitors) and sum of the vector magnitude (ActiGraph wGT3X-BT and GENEActiv) for 15 second (all devices) and 60 second (ActiGraph devices) epochs. A random coefficients statistical model was used to derive MET predictive equations for all activity monitors. Bland-Altman plots examined the variability in device error. No 1.5 MET cut-points were developed for the activPAL devices. All developed cut-points had high levels of sensitivity and specificity. When cross-validated in an independent group, high levels of sensitivity and specificity remained (≥77.4%, monitor and intensity dependent). The mean bias based on the Bland-Altman plots ranged from -0.03 METs to 0.35 METs (monitor dependent). This is the first study to develop and validate cut-points for five activity monitors simultaneously with high levels of sensitivity and specificity (≥77.4%). This is potentially a step toward cross-comparison/harmonization of data; however, further validation in a free-living environment is warranted. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) Program Network, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CALM network includes 168 active sites in both hemispheres with 15 participating countries. This network represents the only coordinated and standardized program...

  1. Contamination monitoring in radiation protection activities in Myanmar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thin, K.T.; Htoon, S. [Yangon Univ. (Myanmar). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    The radioactive contamination in rainwater, seawater, air, milk powder and other eatables were measured with low level counter assembly. The measured activities are found to be very low and well within the maximum permissible level. (author)

  2. Ultrafast chiroptical spectroscopy: Monitoring optical activity in quick time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanju Rhee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical activity spectroscopy provides rich structural information of biologically important molecules in condensed phases. However, a few intrinsic problems of conventional method based on electric field intensity measurement scheme prohibited its extension to time domain technique. We have recently developed new types of optical activity spectroscopic methods capable of measuring chiroptical signals with femtosecond pulses. It is believed that these novel approaches will be applied to a variety of ultrafast chiroptical studies.

  3. Monitoring leptin activity using the chicken leptin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Gideon; Yosefi, Sera; Ronin, Ana; Einat, Paz; Rosenblum, Charles I; Denver, Robert J; Friedman-Einat, Miriam

    2008-05-01

    We report on the construction of a leptin bioassay based on the activation of chicken leptin receptor in cultured cells. A human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cell line, stably transfected with the full-length cDNA of chicken leptin receptor together with a STAT3-responsive reporter gene specifically responded to recombinant human and Xenopus leptins. The observed higher sensitivity of chicken leptin receptor to the former is in agreement with the degree of sequence similarity among these species (about 60 and 38% identical amino acids between humans and chickens, and between humans and Xenopus respectively). The specific activation of signal transduction through the chicken leptin receptor, shown here for the first time, suggests that the transition of Gln269 (implicated in the Gln-to-Pro Zucker fatty mutation in rats) to Glu in chickens does not impair its activity. Analysis of leptin-like activity in human serum samples of obese and lean subjects coincided well with leptin levels determined by RIA. Serum samples of pre- and post partum cows showed a tight correlation with the degree of adiposity. However, specific activation of the chicken leptin receptor in this assay was not observed with serum samples from broiler or layer chickens (representing fat and lean phenotypes respectively) or with those from turkey. Similar leptin receptor activation profiles were observed with cells transfected with human leptin receptor. Further work is needed to determine whether the lack of leptin-like activity in the chicken serum samples is due to a lack of leptin in this species or simply to a serum level of leptin that is below the detection threshold.

  4. Do activity monitors increase physical activity in adults with overweight or obesity? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marco van Brussel; Thea J.M. Kooiman; Herman J. de Vries; Miriam W. Ittersum; Dr. Martijn de Groot

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically assess contemporary knowledge regarding behavioral physical activity interventions including an activity monitor (BPAI+) in adults with overweight or obesity. Methods: PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, CENTRAL and PEDro were searched for eligible full text

  5. Do activity monitors increase physical activity in adults with overweight or obesity? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Herman J.; Kooiman, Thea J M; van Ittersum, Miriam W.; van Brussel, Marco|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481962X; de Groot, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically assess contemporary knowledge regarding behavioral physical activity interventions including an activity monitor (BPAI+) in adults with overweight or obesity. Methods: PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, CENTRAL, and PEDro were searched for eligible full-text

  6. Student training for promoting collaborative agency: the monitoring activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cunha Jr., Fernando Rezende da

    This study aims at understanding how student training contributes to the success and sustainability of a school intervention project and how collaborative agency emerges from that process among students and teachers. All activities developed in the intervention were based on Cultural Historical

  7. Monitoring active filters under automotive aging scenarios with embedded instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan, J.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2012-01-01

    In automotive mixed-signal SoCs, the analogue/mixed-signal front-ends are of particular interest with regard to dependability. Because of the many electrical disturbances at the front-end, often (active) filters are being used. Due to the harsh environments, in some cases, degradation of these

  8. Monitoring Affect States during Effortful Problem Solving Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, Sidney K.; Lehman, Blair; Person, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    We explored the affective states that students experienced during effortful problem solving activities. We conducted a study where 41 students solved difficult analytical reasoning problems from the Law School Admission Test. Students viewed videos of their faces and screen captures and judged their emotions from a set of 14 states (basic…

  9. Monitoring Social Media: Students Satisfaction with University Administration Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkin, Andrey Petrovich; Rassolov, Ilya Mihajlovich; Novikov, Andrey Vadimovich

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents an original method of identifying satisfaction of students with the activities of their university administration based on studying the content of comments on the social networks. The analysis of student opinions revealed areas of concern and priority areas in the work of the university administration. The paper characterizes…

  10. Monitoring activity in neural circuits with genetically encoded indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Joseph Broussard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in genetically encoded indicators of neural activity (GINAs have greatly advanced the field of systems neuroscience. As they are encoded by DNA, GINAs can be targeted to genetically defined cellular populations. Combined with fluorescence microscopy, most notably multi-photon imaging, GINAs allow chronic simultaneous optical recordings from large populations of neurons or glial cells in awake, behaving mammals, particularly rodents. This large-scale recording of neural activity at multiple temporal and spatial scales has greatly advanced our understanding of the dynamics of neural circuitry underlying behavior—a critical first step toward understanding the complexities of brain function, such as sensorimotor integration and learning.Here, we summarize the recent development and applications of the major classes of GINAs. In particular, we take an in-depth look at the design of available GINA families with a particular focus on genetically encoded calcium indicators, sensors probing synaptic activity, and genetically encoded voltage indicators. Using the family of the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP as an example, we review established sensor optimization pipelines. We also discuss practical considerations for end users of GINAs about experimental methods including approaches for gene delivery, imaging system requirements, and data analysis techniques. With the growing toolbox of GINAs and with new microscopy techniques pushing beyond their current limits, the age of light can finally achieve the goal of broad and dense sampling of neuronal activity across time and brain structures to obtain a dynamic picture of brain function.

  11. Subsidence monitoring network: an Italian example aimed at a sustainable hydrocarbon E&P activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacome, M. C.; Miandro, R.; Vettorel, M.; Roncari, G.

    2015-11-01

    According to the Italian law in order to start-up any new hydrocarbon exploitation activity, an Environmental Impact Assessment study has to be presented, including a monitoring plan, addressed to foresee, measure and analyze in real time any possible impact of the project on the coastal areas and on those ones in the close inland located. The occurrence of subsidence, that could partly be related to hydrocarbon production, both on-shore and off-shore, can generate great concern in those areas where its occurrence may have impacts on the local environment. ENI, following the international scientific community recommendations on the matter, since the beginning of 90's years, implemented a cutting-edge monitoring network, with the aim to prevent, mitigate and control geodynamics phenomena generated in the activity areas, with a particular attention to conservation and protection of environmental and territorial equilibrium, taking care of what is known as "sustainable development". The current ENI implemented monitoring surveys can be divided as: - Shallow monitoring: spirit levelling surveys, continuous GPS surveys in permanent stations, SAR surveys, assestimeter subsurface compaction monitoring, ground water level monitoring, LiDAR surveys, bathymetrical surveys. - Deep monitoring: reservoir deep compaction trough radioactive markers, reservoir static (bottom hole) pressure monitoring. All the information, gathered through the monitoring network, allow: 1. to verify if the produced subsidence is evolving accordingly with the simulated forecast. 2. to provide data to revise and adjust the prediction compaction models 3. to put in place the remedial actions if the impact exceeds the threshold magnitude originally agreed among the involved parties. ENI monitoring plan to measure and monitor the subsidence process, during field production and also after the field closure, is therefore intended to support a sustainable field development and an acceptable exploitation

  12. Physical activity and sedentary behavior following pediatric burns - a preliminary investigation using objective activity monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, Moniek; Mouton, Leonora J; Disseldorp, Laurien M; Niemeijer, Anuschka S; van Brussel, Marco; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K

    2018-01-01

    Adequate levels of regular physical activity (PA) are crucial for health and well-being. Pediatric burn injuries can have major physiological consequences in both the short and long term. The question is whether these consequences affect post burn PA levels. This study therefore aimed to describe PA and sedentary behavior (SB) in children and adolescents 1-5 years after burn injury. Daily PA and SB were monitored in 20 children and adolescents (12 boys and 8 girls, aged 6-17 years, with burns covering 10-37% of total body surface area, 1-5 years post burn) for 1 week using the ActiGraph GTX3+ accelerometer. Activity counts were categorized into SB, light PA, moderate PA, vigorous PA, moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and total PA. Outcomes were compared with non-burned reference values and PA levels recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). The participants spent about 5.1 h per day on total PA and 7.4 h on SB. Most of the active time (~ 83%) was categorized as light PA. Thirty-five percent of the group, especially the young boys, spent on average ≥ 60 min on MVPA per day. The boys, although with large interindividual differences, spent more time on MVPA than the girls ( p  < .005). Older age was associated with less PA time, while more time was spent sedentary. No trends were found indicating an effect of burn characteristics, time post burn, or length of hospital stay, and no differences were found with non-burned peers. Duration and intensity of PA and SB in children and adolescents 1-5 years after burn injury were similar to non-burned peers. However, only 35% of the group met the WHO physical activity recommendation. Given the increased long term risk for physical conditions following pediatric burns, physical activity should be encouraged in this vulnerable population. The study is registered in the National Academic Research and Collaborations Information System of the Netherlands (OND1348800).

  13. Phosphate-Modified Nucleotides for Monitoring Enzyme Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, Susanne; Marx, Andreas; Hacker, Stephan M

    2017-04-01

    Nucleotides modified at the terminal phosphate position have been proven to be interesting entities to study the activity of a variety of different protein classes. In this chapter, we present various types of modifications that were attached as reporter molecules to the phosphate chain of nucleotides and briefly describe the chemical reactions that are frequently used to synthesize them. Furthermore, we discuss a variety of applications of these molecules. Kinase activity, for instance, was studied by transfer of a phosphate modified with a reporter group to the target proteins. This allows not only studying the activity of kinases, but also identifying their target proteins. Moreover, kinases can also be directly labeled with a reporter at a conserved lysine using acyl-phosphate probes. Another important application for phosphate-modified nucleotides is the study of RNA and DNA polymerases. In this context, single-molecule sequencing is made possible using detection in zero-mode waveguides, nanopores or by a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based mechanism between the polymerase and a fluorophore-labeled nucleotide. Additionally, fluorogenic nucleotides that utilize an intramolecular interaction between a fluorophore and the nucleobase or an intramolecular FRET effect have been successfully developed to study a variety of different enzymes. Finally, also some novel techniques applying electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based detection of nucleotide cleavage or the detection of the cleavage of fluorophosphates are discussed. Taken together, nucleotides modified at the terminal phosphate position have been applied to study the activity of a large diversity of proteins and are valuable tools to enhance the knowledge of biological systems.

  14. Non-Contact Cardiac Activity Monitoring using Pulsed Laser Vibrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Chia WANG; Sudhir TRIVEDI; Susan KUTCHER; Ponciano RODRIGUEZ; Feng JIN; V. SWAMINATHAN; Frank WALTERS; Narasimha S. PRASAD

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the detection of detailed human cardiac mechanical activity in a remote, non-contacting, and non-ionizing manner using a pulsed laser vibrometer. The highly sensitive pulsed laser vibrometer allows the detection of the temporally-phased mechanical events occurring in individual cardiac cycles even from the surface of clothing-covered extremities of the subjects. Fine structures of the detected cardiac traces are identified with their meanings assigned and corrobo...

  15. High Accuracy Human Activity Monitoring using Neural network

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Annapurna; Lee, Young-Dong; Chung, Wan-Young

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the designing of a neural network for the classification of Human activity. A Triaxial accelerometer sensor, housed in a chest worn sensor unit, has been used for capturing the acceleration of the movements associated. All the three axis acceleration data were collected at a base station PC via a CC2420 2.4GHz ISM band radio (zigbee wireless compliant), processed and classified using MATLAB. A neural network approach for classification was used with an eye on theoretical a...

  16. ELISA detection of multixenobiotic resistance transporter induction in indigenous freshwater Chironomidae larvae (Diptera): A biomarker calibration step for in situ monitoring of xenobiotic exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, X.; Saez, G.; Thiery, A. [Equipe ' Biomarqueurs and Bioindicateurs Environnementaux' , UMR-CNRS 6116 IMEP, Universite de Provence, 3 Place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille cedex 3 (France); Clot-Faybesse, O.; Guiraudie-Capraz, G. [' Neurobiologie Integrative et Adaptative' -UMR 6149, Universite de Provence, 3 Place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille cedex 3 (France); Bienboire-Frosini, C. [' Neurobiologie Integrative et Adaptative' -UMR 6149, Universite de Provence, 3 Place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille cedex 3 (France); Pherosynthese, Le Rieu Neuf, 84490 St Saturnin d' Apt (France); Martin, C. [Equipe ' Biomarqueurs and Bioindicateurs Environnementaux' , UMR-CNRS 6116 IMEP, UAPV, 33 rue Louis Pasteur, 84000 Avignon (France); De Jong, L. [Equipe ' Biomarqueurs and Bioindicateurs Environnementaux' , UMR-CNRS 6116 IMEP, Universite de Provence, 3 Place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille cedex 3 (France)], E-mail: laetitia.moreau@univ-provence.fr

    2008-06-15

    A new simple and sensitive method to distinguish chemically polluted from unpolluted situations in freshwater ecosystems is reported. For this purpose, Chironomus gr thumni larvae were collected from a polluted urban river downstream a sewage treatment plant. For the first time, ELISA assay was used to semi-quantify the multixenobiotic resistance transporters (MXR) in these small pertinent bioindicators. The use of samples immediately fixed in the field gives a delay to isolate larvae and allows multi-sampling along a longitudinal transect in a river at a given time. Results exhibit an induction of MXR proteins in larvae from the polluted river and a deinduction in larvae maintained 11 days in unpolluted water. They show new evidences to use midge larvae in biomonitoring environmental programs. They answer to first biomarker calibration steps for the ongoing development of MXR transporters as a detection tool of xenobiotic impacts on bioindicator invertebrates in their freshwater habitats. - Semi-quantification of midge larval MXR transporters by ELISA is a simple and sensitive method to detect chemically polluted situations in running freshwaters.

  17. (60)Co in cast steel matrix: A European interlaboratory comparison for the characterisation of new activity standards for calibration of gamma-ray spectrometers in metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzika, Faidra; Burda, Oleksiy; Hult, Mikael; Arnold, Dirk; Marroyo, Belén Caro; Dryák, Pavel; Fazio, Aldo; Ferreux, Laurent; García-Toraño, Eduardo; Javornik, Andrej; Klemola, Seppo; Luca, Aurelian; Moser, Hannah; Nečemer, Marijan; Peyrés, Virginia; Reis, Mario; Silva, Lidia; Šolc, Jaroslav; Svec, Anton; Tyminski, Zbigniew; Vodenik, Branko; Wätjen, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Two series of activity standards of (60)Co in cast steel matrix, developed for the calibration of gamma-ray spectrometry systems in the metallurgical sector, were characterised using a European interlaboratory comparison among twelve National Metrology Institutes and one international organisation. The first standard, consisting of 14 disc shaped samples, was cast from steel contaminated during production ("originally"), and the second, consisting of 15 similar discs, from artificially-contaminated ("spiked") steel. The reference activity concentrations of (60)Co in the cast steel standards were (1.077±0.019) Bqg(-1) on 1 January 2013 12h00 UT and (1.483±0.022) Bqg(-1) on 1 June 2013 12h00 UT, respectively. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Testing the applicability of rapid on-site enzymatic activity detection for surface water monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Philipp; Vogl, Wolfgang; Juri, Koschelnik; Markus, Epp; Maximilian, Lackner; Markus, Oismüller; Monika, Kumpan; Peter, Strauss; Regina, Sommer; Gabriela, Ryzinska-Paier; Farnleitner Andreas, H.; Matthias, Zessner

    2015-04-01

    On-site detection of enzymatic activities has been suggested as a rapid surrogate for microbiological pollution monitoring of water resources (e.g. using glucuronidases, galactosidases, esterases). Due to the possible short measuring intervals enzymatic methods have high potential as near-real time water quality monitoring tools. This presentation describes results from a long termed field test. For twelve months, two ColiMinder devices (Vienna Water Monitoring, Austria) for on-site determination of enzymatic activity were tested for stream water monitoring at the experimental catchment HOAL (Hydrological Open Air Laboratory, Center for Water Resource Systems, Vienna University of Technology). The devices were overall able to follow and reflect the diverse hydrological and microbiological conditions of the monitored stream during the test period. Continuous data in high temporal resolution captured the course of enzymatic activity in stream water during diverse rainfall events. The method also proofed sensitive enough to determine diurnal fluctuations of enzymatic activity in stream water during dry periods. The method was able to capture a seasonal trend of enzymatic activity in stream water that matches the results gained from Colilert18 analysis for E. coli and coliform bacteria of monthly grab samples. Furthermore the comparison of ColiMinder data with measurements gained at the same test site with devices using the same method but having different construction design (BACTcontrol, microLAN) showed consistent measuring results. Comparative analysis showed significant differences between measured enzymatic activity (modified fishman units and pmol/min/100ml) and cultivation based analyses (most probable number, colony forming unit). Methods of enzymatic activity measures are capable to detect ideally the enzymatic activity caused by all active target bacteria members, including VBNC (viable but nonculturable) while cultivation based methods cannot detect VBNC

  19. ATLAS off-Grid sites (Tier 3) monitoring. From local fabric monitoring to global overview of the VO computing activities

    CERN Document Server

    PETROSYAN, A; The ATLAS collaboration; BELOV, S; ANDREEVA, J; KADOCHNIKOV, I

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is a particle physics experiment on Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The experiment produces petabytes of data every year. The ATLAS Computing model embraces the Grid paradigm and originally included three levels of computing centres to be able to operate such large volume of data. With the formation of small computing centres, usually based at universities, the model was expanded to include them as Tier3 sites. The experiment supplies all necessary software to operate typical Grid-site, but Tier3 sites do not support Grid services of the experiment or support them partially. Tier3 centres comprise a range of architectures and many do not possess Grid middleware, thus, monitoring of storage and analysis software used on Tier2 sites becomes unavailable for Tier3 site system administrator and, also, Tier3 sites activity becomes unavailable for virtual organization of the experiment. In this paper we present ATLAS off-Grid sites monitoring software suite, which enables monitoring on sites, which are not unde...

  20. Organisational and Methodical Grounds of Financial Monitoring of Business Activity of an Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydorenko-Melnyk Ganna M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses organisational and methodical grounds of financial monitoring of business activity of an enterprise, which is presented as a complex of measures of organisational, methodical and managerial nature. It justifies urgency and practical significance of introduction of the system of financial monitoring as a basic element of the system of financial management of business activity under modern economic conditions. It considers the essence and purpose of financial monitoring of business activity, presents its principles and formulates tasks. It offers methodical provision of the process of monitoring focusing on the study of essential characteristics of business activity of an enterprise. It states that introduction of the financial monitoring of business activity allows understanding of the state of an object or situation, identification of the reason of the detected deviations from the planned (forecasted results and establishment of a base for development of applied recommendations on a relevant adjustment, which results in increase of efficiency of the financial and economic activity of an enterprise and availability of prerequisites of sustainable development.

  1. Physical activity monitoring in patients with intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauret, G J; Fokkenrood, H J P; Bendermacher, B L; Scheltinga, M R M; Teijink, J A W

    2014-06-01

    Reduced physical activity (PA) is associated with a higher mortality rate and more rapid functional decline in patients with intermittent claudication (IC). The newest generation of accelerometers can assess both direction and intensity of activities three-dimensionally and may also adequately calculate energy expenditure in daily life. The aim of this study was to quantify daily PA level and energy expenditure of newly diagnosed patients with IC and healthy controls. PA outcomes are compared with contemporary public health physical activity guidelines. Before initiating treatment, 94 patients with newly diagnosed IC and 36 healthy controls were instructed to wear a tri-axial seismic accelerometer for 1 week. Daily PA levels (in metabolic equivalents, METs) were compared with the ACSM/AHA public health PA minimum recommendations (≥64 METs·min·day, in bouts of ≥10 minutes). A subgroup analysis assessed the effect of functional impairment on daily PA levels. Data from 56 IC patients and 27 healthy controls were available for analysis. Patients with IC demonstrated significantly lower mean daily PA levels (±SD) than controls (387 ± 198 METs·min vs. 500 ± 156 METs·min, p = .02). This difference was solely attributable to a subgroup of IC patients with the largest functional impairment (WIQ-score guidelines compared with 74% of the healthy controls (p = .01). More than half of patients with IC do not meet recommended standards of PA. Considering the serious health risks associated with low PA levels, these findings underscore the need for more awareness to improve physical exercise in patients with IC. Copyright © 2014 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-Contact Cardiac Activity Monitoring using Pulsed Laser Vibrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chia WANG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate experimentally the detection of detailed human cardiac mechanical activity in a remote, non-contacting, and non-ionizing manner using a pulsed laser vibrometer. The highly sensitive pulsed laser vibrometer allows the detection of the temporally-phased mechanical events occurring in individual cardiac cycles even from the surface of clothing-covered extremities of the subjects. Fine structures of the detected cardiac traces are identified with their meanings assigned and corroborated using accelerometer and electrocardiogram measurements obtained concurrently with the pulsed laser vibrometer studies.

  3. Prescribing of Electronic Activity Monitors in Cardiometabolic Diseases: Qualitative Interview-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macé, Sandrine; Oppert, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    Background The prevalence of noncommunicable diseases, including those such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, so-called cardiometabolic diseases, is high and is increasing worldwide. Strong evidence supports the role of physical activity in management of these diseases. There is general consensus that mHealth technology, including electronic activity monitors, can potentially increase physical activity in patients, but their use in clinical settings remains limited. Practitioners’ requirements when prescribing electronic activity monitors have been poorly described. Objective The aims of this qualitative study were (1) to explore how specialist physicians prescribe electronic activity monitors to patients presenting with cardiometabolic conditions, and (2) to better understand their motivation for and barriers to prescribing such monitors. Methods We conducted qualitative semistructured interviews in March to May 2016 with 11 senior physicians from a public university hospital in France with expertise in management of cardiometabolic diseases (type 1 and type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia). Interviews lasted 45 to 60 minutes and were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using directed content analysis. We report our findings following the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research (COREQ) checklist. Results Most physicians we interviewed had never prescribed electronic activity monitors, whereas they frequently prescribed blood glucose or blood pressure self-monitoring devices. Reasons for nonprescription included lack of interest in the data collected, lack of evidence for data accuracy, concern about work overload possibly resulting from automatic data transfer, and risk of patients becoming addicted to data. Physicians expected future marketing of easy-to-use monitors that will accurately measure physical activity duration and intensity and provide understandable motivating feedback

  4. Application of an optimized flow cytometry-based quantification of Platelet Activation (PACT): Monitoring platelet activation in platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicken, Cécile H; Roest, Mark; Henskens, Yvonne M C; de Laat, Bas; Huskens, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that flow cytometry is a reliable test to quantify platelet function in stored platelet concentrates (PC). It is thought that flow cytometry is laborious and hence expensive. We have optimized the flow cytometry-based quantification of agonist induced platelet activation (PACT) to a labor, time and more cost-efficient test. Currently the quality of PCs is only monitored by visual inspection, because available assays are unreliable or too laborious for use in a clinical transfusion laboratory. Therefore, the PACT was applied to monitor PC activation during storage. The optimized PACT was used to monitor 5 PCs during 10 days of storage. In brief, optimized PACT uses a ready-to-use reaction mix, which is stable at -20°C. When needed, a test strip is thawed and platelet activation is initiated by mixing PC with PACT. PACT was based on the following agonists: adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen-related peptide (CRP) and thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP-6). Platelet activation was measured as P-selectin expression. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) was performed as a reference. Both PACT and LTA showed platelet function decline during 10-day storage after stimulation with ADP and collagen/CRP; furthermore, PACT showed decreasing TRAP-induced activation. Major differences between the two tests are that PACT is able to measure the status of platelets in the absence of agonists, and it can differentiate between the number of activated platelets and the amount of activation, whereas LTA only measures aggregation in response to an agonist. Also, PACT is more time-efficient compared to LTA and allows high-throughput analysis. PACT is an optimized platelet function test that can be used to monitor the activation of PCs. PACT has the same accuracy as LTA with regard to monitoring PCs, but it is superior to both LTA and conventional flow cytometry based tests with regard to labor-, time- and cost efficiency.

  5. An Index (PC) Aimed at Monitoring the (P)olar (C)ap for Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — PC is an index for magnetic activity in the (P)olar (C)ap. It is based on data from a single nearpole station, and aimed to monitor the polar cap magnetic activity...

  6. Wearable monitors criterion validity for energy expenditure in sedentary and light activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florez-Pregonero Alberto

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: None of the WMs tested in this study were equivalent with the criterion measure (VO2 in estimating sedentary-to-light activities; however, the activPAL had greater overall accuracy in measuring SB and LPA than did the ActiGraph and SenseWear 2 monitors.

  7. An activity monitoring system for elderly care using generative and discriminative models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kasteren, T.L.M.; Englebienne, G.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    An activity monitoring system allows many applications to assist in care giving for elderly in their homes. In this paper we present a wireless sensor network for unintrusive observations in the home and show the potential of generative and discriminative models for recognizing activities from such

  8. MCNPx computational estimation of the calibration factor of an In vivo counter for {sup 18}F-FDG activity incorporated in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo M, B.; Ferreira F, T. C.; Duarte V, K.; Da Silva, T. A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Ribeiro de C, T. P., E-mail: bmm@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    In previous work, the computational modeling of the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear in vivo counter for estimation of {sup 18}F-FGD activity incorporated into workers brains was validated. Here, we studied the calibration factor (Cf) for seven distinct voxelized computational phantoms including the reference models from ICRP 110. Computational simulations were also carried out to study the effect of increasing the distance between the detector and the brain up to 100 cm. The degree of correlation among geometric and anatomical parameters of the computational models and the calibration factors were also evaluated. The morphological diversity of the computational phantoms resulted Cf variations greater than 38% (39.8 ± 0.2 to 64.6 ± 0.5 Bq.CPS{sup -1}). Despite the variations, Cf has been reduced by the increasing distance, although the remarkable decrease in counting efficiency makes prohibitive this geometry. These findings suggest that head anatomic parameters can be used to improve Cf estimation. (Author)

  9. Individual differences in epistemic motivation and brain conflict monitoring activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossowska, Małgorzata; Czarnek, Gabriela; Wronka, Eligiusz; Wyczesany, Miroslaw; Bukowski, Marcin

    2014-06-06

    It is well documented that motivation toward closure (NFC), defined as a desire for a quick and unambiguous answer to a question and an aversion to uncertainty, is linked to more structured, rigid, and persistent cognitive styles. However, the neurocognitive correlates of NFC have never been tested. Thus, using event-related potentials, we examined the hypothesis that NFC is associated with the neurocognitive process for detecting discrepancies between response tendencies and higher level intentions. We found that greater NFC is associated with lower conflict-related anterior cingulate activity, suggesting lower sensitivity to cues for altering a habitual response pattern and lower sensitivity to committing errors. This study provides evidence that high NFC acts as a bulwark against anxiety-producing uncertainty and minimizes the experience of error. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Active System for Electromagnetic Perturbation Monitoring in Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoi, Adrian Marian; Helerea, Elena

    Nowadays electromagnetic environment is rapidly expanding in frequency domain and wireless services extend in terms of covered area. European electromagnetic compatibility regulations refer to limit values regarding emissions, as well as procedures for determining susceptibility of the vehicle. Approval procedure for a series of cars is based on determining emissions/immunity level for a few vehicles picked randomly from the entire series, supposing that entire vehicle series is compliant. During immunity assessment, the vehicle is not subjected to real perturbation sources, but exposed to electric/magnetic fields generated by laboratory equipment. Since current approach takes into account only partially real situation regarding perturbation sources, this paper proposes an active system for determining electromagnetic parameters of vehicle's environment, that implements a logical diagram for measurement, satisfying the imposed requirements. This new and original solution is useful for EMC assessment of hybrid and electrical vehicles.

  11. Monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids by using ZnS(Ag) scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanato, L.; Cester, D.; Filippi, D.; Lunardon, M.; Mistura, G.; Moretto, S.; Viesti, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy ' Galileo Galilei' , University of Padova, (Italy); Badocco, D.; Pastore, P.; Romanini, F. [Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    In this work the possibility of monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids using EJ-444 was investigated. Specific tests were carried out to determine the change of the detector properties in water tests. Possible protecting coating is also proposed and tested. Alpha/beta real-time monitoring in liquids is a goal of the EU project TAWARA{sub R}TM. (authors)

  12. ATLAS off-Grid sites (Tier 3) monitoring. From local fabric monitoring to global overview of the VO computing activities

    CERN Document Server

    PETROSYAN, A; The ATLAS collaboration; BELOV, S; ANDREEVA, J; KADOCHNIKOV, I

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing activities have so far concentrated in the "central" part of the experiment computing system, namely the first 3 tiers (the CERN Tier0, 10 Tier1 centers and over 60 Tier2 sites). Many ATLAS Institutes and National Communities have deployed (or intend to) deploy Tier-3 facilities. Tier-3 centers consist of non-pledged resources, which are usually dedicated to data analysis tasks by the geographically close or local scientific groups, and which usually comprise a range of architectures without Grid middleware. Therefore a substantial part of the ATLAS monitoring tools which make use of Grid middleware, cannot be used for a large fraction of Tier3 sites. The presentation will describe the T3mon project, which aims to develop a software suite for monitoring the Tier3 sites, both from the perspective of the local site administrator and that of the ATLAS VO, thereby enabling the global view of the contribution from Tier3 sites to the ATLAS computing activities. Special attention in p...

  13. Calibration of response and remission cut-points on the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition for monitoring seasonal affective disorder treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Gloria M; Rohan, Kelly J; Langenberg, Patricia; Snitker, Soren; Postolache, Teodor T

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to define treatment response and remission cut-point scores for the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) when used to monitor seasonal affective disorder (SAD) treatment. Data from two published randomized clinical trials for SAD were utilized to complete a ROC analysis to define response and remission thresholds for the BDI-II. The Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-Seasonal Affective Disorder Version (SIGH-SAD) was used as a reference standard. Data from the two trials included BDI-II and SIGH-SAD scores for patients at baseline, 6 weeks (post-treatment), and 1 year (next winter). BDI-II score of ≤ 9 was the derived criterion for remission of SAD, and BDI-II score decrease of 50% from baseline was the criterion for treatment response. Study participants were primarily female (94%) and Caucasian (80%) so demographic diversity of the sample was limited. This study validated BDI-II scores compared to the SIGH-SAD reference standard. The BDI-II has greater potential for widespread use by clinicians than the SIGH-SAD to monitor SAD patients because it is a brief self-report instrument that can be conveniently administered in the waiting room. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid kinetic BRET measurements to monitor G protein activation by GPCR and non-GPCR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziarz, Marcin; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2017-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are central hubs of signal transduction whose activity is controlled by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as well as by a complex network of regulatory proteins. Recently, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based assays have been used to monitor real-time activation of heterotrimeric G proteins in cells. Here we describe the use of a previously established BRET assay to monitor G protein activation upon GPCR stimulation and its adaptation to measure G protein activation by non-GPCR proteins, such as by cytoplasmic guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) like GIV/Girdin. The BRET assay monitors the release of free Gβγ from Gα-Gβγ heterotrimers as a readout of G protein activation, which is readily observable upon agonist stimulation of GPCRs. To control the signal input for non-GPCR activators, we describe the use of a chemically induced dimerization strategy to promote rapid membrane translocation of proteins containing the Gα-binding and -activating (GBA) motif found in some nonreceptor GEFs. The assay described here allows the kinetic measurement of G protein activation with subsecond temporal resolution and to compare the levels of activation induced by GPCR agonists vs those induced by the membrane recruitment of nonreceptor G protein signaling activators. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of geometry calibration in the determination of gamma emitters in active carbon filters; Influencia de la geometria de calibracion en la determinacion de emisores gamma en filtros de carbon activo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurado Tarrago, M.; Tent Petrus, J.

    2013-07-01

    Testing laboratories participate in external quality controls. For these controls are useful it is necessary to eliminate factors that can introduce sources of variability in the results. A factor to consider in this paper as a source of variability is the calibration geometry chosen for the correct quantification of the activity concentrations. This work contains the results of the intercomparison exercise and from them analysed the effect of the geometry of calibration used in the quantification of activity concentrations present in the activated carbon filter. (Author)

  16. Intercomparison and calibration of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, A M D

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish a working standard for intercomparison and calibration of dose calibrators used in most of nuclear medicine facilities for the determination of the activity of radionuclides administered to patients in specific examinations or therapeutic procedures. A commercial dose calibrator, a set of standard radioactive sources, and syringes, vials and ampoules with radionuclide solutions used in nuclear medicine were utilized in this work. The commercial dose calibrator was calibrated for radionuclide solutions used in nuclear medicine. Simple instrument tests, such as linearity response and variation response with the source volume at a constant source activity concentration were performed. This instrument may be used as a reference system for intercomparison and calibration of other activity meters, as a method of quality control of dose calibrators utilized in nuclear medicine facilities.

  17. Validity of physical activity monitors during daily life in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Roberto A; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Raste, Yogini; Langer, Daniel; Van Remoortel, Hans; Giavedoni, Santiago; Burtin, Chris; Regueiro, Eloisa M G; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Polkey, Michael I; Wilson, Frederick J; Macnee, William; Westerterp, Klaas R; Troosters, Thierry

    2013-11-01

    Symptoms during physical activity and physical inactivity are hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our aim was to evaluate the validity and usability of six activity monitors in patients with COPD against the doubly labelled water (DLW) indirect calorimetry method. 80 COPD patients (mean ± sd age 68 ± 6 years and forced expiratory volume in 1 s 57 ± 19% predicted) recruited in four centres each wore simultaneously three or four out of six commercially available monitors validated in chronic conditions for 14 consecutive days. A priori validity criteria were defined. These included the ability to explain total energy expenditure (TEE) variance through multiple regression analysis, using TEE as the dependent variable with total body water (TBW) plus several physical activity monitor outputs as independent variables; and correlation with activity energy expenditure (AEE) measured by DLW. The Actigraph GT3X (Actigraph LLC, Pensacola, FL, USA), and DynaPort MoveMonitor (McRoberts BV, The Hague, the Netherlands) best explained the majority of the TEE variance not explained by TBW (53% and 70%, respectively) and showed the most significant correlations with AEE (r=0.71, pactivity monitors for research or for clinical use in patients with chronic diseases such as COPD.

  18. Experimentally calibrated computational chemistry of tryptophan hydroxylase: Trans influence, hydrogen-bonding, and 18-electron rule govern O-2-activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Lærke Tvedebrink; Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Boesen, Jane

    2010-01-01

    a two-state scenario involving Ohis and Pglu is possible. A structure of the activated deoxy state which is high-spin implies that the valence electron count has been lowered from 18 to 16 (glutamate becomes bidentate), giving a “green light” that invites O2-binding. Our mechanism of oxygen activation...

  19. Comparison of hip and low back worn Axivity AX3 and GT3X+ activity monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønd, Jan Christian; Arvidsson, Daniel; Møller, Niels Christian

    For accurate estimates of average PA, specific PA intensity levels, or individual PA behavior, continuous long-term monitoring is needed. However, poor wear compliance is not unusual with activity monitors worn around the waist using an elastic belt and contributes to significant loss of data......) and scaled adult cut points from Freedson et al. (2) was used to estimate the relative time spent in sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous intensity levels. Sleep time was manually excluded from the analysis based on subjects' logs. Autocalibration of accelerometer data for free-living physical activity...

  20. Assessing Human Activity in Elderly People Using Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, José M; Ureña, Jesús; Hernández, Álvaro; Gualda, David

    2017-02-11

    The ageing of the population, and their increasing wish of living independently, are motivating the development of welfare and healthcare models. Existing approaches based on the direct heath-monitoring using body sensor networks (BSN) are precise and accurate. Nonetheless, their intrusiveness causes non-acceptance. New approaches seek the indirect monitoring through monitoring activities of daily living (ADLs), which proves to be a suitable solution. ADL monitoring systems use many heterogeneous sensors, are less intrusive, and are less expensive than BSN, however, the deployment and maintenance of wireless sensor networks (WSN) prevent them from a widespread acceptance. In this work, a novel technique to monitor the human activity, based on non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM), is presented. The proposal uses only smart meter data, which leads to minimum intrusiveness and a potential massive deployment at minimal cost. This could be the key to develop sustainable healthcare models for smart homes, capable of complying with the elderly people' demands. This study also uses the Dempster-Shafer theory to provide a daily score of normality with regard to the regular behavior. This approach has been evaluated using real datasets and, additionally, a benchmarking against a Gaussian mixture model approach is presented.

  1. Assessing Human Activity in Elderly People Using Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Alcalá

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ageing of the population, and their increasing wish of living independently, are motivating the development of welfare and healthcare models. Existing approaches based on the direct heath-monitoring using body sensor networks (BSN are precise and accurate. Nonetheless, their intrusiveness causes non-acceptance. New approaches seek the indirect monitoring through monitoring activities of daily living (ADLs, which proves to be a suitable solution. ADL monitoring systems use many heterogeneous sensors, are less intrusive, and are less expensive than BSN, however, the deployment and maintenance of wireless sensor networks (WSN prevent them from a widespread acceptance. In this work, a novel technique to monitor the human activity, based on non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM, is presented. The proposal uses only smart meter data, which leads to minimum intrusiveness and a potential massive deployment at minimal cost. This could be the key to develop sustainable healthcare models for smart homes, capable of complying with the elderly people’ demands. This study also uses the Dempster-Shafer theory to provide a daily score of normality with regard to the regular behavior. This approach has been evaluated using real datasets and, additionally, a benchmarking against a Gaussian mixture model approach is presented.

  2. Calibration and Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter During the LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Cerda Alberich, Leonor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic sampling calorimeter of ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). TileCal uses iron absorbers and scintillators as active material and it covers the central region |η| < 1.7. Jointly with the other calorimeters it is designed for measurements of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. It also assists in muon identification. TileCal is regularly monitored and calibrated by several different calibration systems: a Cs radioactive source that illuminates the scintillating tiles directly, a laser light system to directly test the PMT response, and a charge injection system (CIS) for the front-end electronics. These calibrations systems, in conjunction with data collected during proton-proton collisions, provide extensive monitoring of the instrument and a means for equalizing the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal propagation. The performance of the calorimeter has been established with cosmic ray muons and the large sa...

  3. Active Microwave Satellite Data for High Latitude Pan-Boreal/ Arctic Permafrost Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, A.; Naeimi, V.; Park, S.-E.; Sabel, D.

    2009-11-01

    Circumpolar permafrost monitoring is currently largely based on in-situ measurements and modelling. The capabilities of satellite data with respect to operational monitoring need to be assessed. Within the ESA DUE Permafrost project a wide range of EO datasets will be explored and integrated in an information system with extensive involvement of the permafrost research community. This comprises pan-boreal/arctic to local scale products. This paper discusses the potential of active microwave satellite products (scatterometer and SAR) for permafrost modeling and monitoring on pan-boreal/arctic scale. This includes soil moisture and freeze/thaw. Water in the soil impacts the ground thermal regime. The currently available Metop ASCAT (C-band) data also allow the identification of long term surface wetness anomalies based on ERS as well as the detection of frozen ground status. The possibilities of MetOp ASCAT and ENVISAT ASAR Global Monitoring Mode for the latter application are explored in this paper.

  4. CERN Radiation Protection (RP) calibration facilities

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082069; Macián-Juan, Rafael

    Radiation protection calibration facilities are essential to ensure the correct operation of radiation protection instrumentation. Calibrations are performed in specific radiation fields according to the type of instrument to be calibrated: neutrons, photons, X-rays, beta and alpha particles. Some of the instruments are also tested in mixed radiation fields as often encountered close to high-energy particle accelerators. Moreover, calibration facilities are of great importance to evaluate the performance of prototype detectors; testing and measuring the response of a prototype detector to well-known and -characterized radiation fields contributes to improving and optimizing its design and capabilities. The CERN Radiation Protection group is in charge of performing the regular calibrations of all CERN radiation protection devices; these include operational and passive dosimeters, neutron and photon survey-meters, and fixed radiation detectors to monitor the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), inside CERN accelera...

  5. Synthesis Polarimetry Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moellenbrock, George

    2017-10-01

    Synthesis instrumental polarization calibration fundamentals for both linear (ALMA) and circular (EVLA) feed bases are reviewed, with special attention to the calibration heuristics supported in CASA. Practical problems affecting modern instruments are also discussed.

  6. Online Data Conversion for the LHCb Active Radiation Monitor System (ARMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Farrugia, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Active radiation monitors are distributed in and around the LHCb experiment in order to monitor the evolution of radiation dose and 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence. The active monitors are connected to an online network and their raw voltage measurement can be read out via WinCC panels. However, the raw voltage measurements must be corrected before conversion into correct dose or fluence. Previous work by [1] included a signal correction algorithm that corrects the values offline. The aim of this work is to understand how the signal correction algorithm works, archive previously corrected values into a new database system that will be integrated to a WinCC graphical interface and modify the algorithm so that it may process new values online while using less time and computing resources.

  7. Validity of Different Activity Monitors to Count Steps in an Inpatient Rehabilitation Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treacy, Daniel; Hassett, Leanne; Schurr, Karl; Chagpar, Sakina; Paul, Serene S; Sherrington, Catherine

    2017-05-01

    Commonly used activity monitors have been shown to be accurate in counting steps in active people; however, further validation is needed in slower walking populations. To determine the validity of activity monitors for measuring step counts in rehabilitation inpatients compared with visually observed step counts. To explore the influence of gait parameters, activity monitor position, and use of walkers on activity monitor accuracy. One hundred and sixty-six inpatients admitted to a rehabilitation unit with an average walking speed of 0.4 m/s (SD 0.2) wore 16 activity monitors (7 different devices in different positions) simultaneously during 6-minute and 6-m walks. The number of steps taken during the tests was also counted by a physical therapist. Gait parameters were assessed using the GAITRite system. To analyze the influence of different gait parameters, the percentage accuracy for each monitor was graphed against various gait parameters for each activity monitor. The StepWatch, Fitbit One worn on the ankle and the ActivPAL showed excellent agreement with observed step count (ICC 2,1 0.98; 0.92; 0.78 respectively). Other devices (Fitbit Charge, Fitbit One worn on hip, G-Sensor, Garmin Vivofit, Actigraph) showed poor agreement with the observed step count (ICC 2,1 0.12-0.40). Percentage agreement with observed step count was highest for the StepWatch (mean 98%). The StepWatch and the Fitbit One worn on the ankle maintained accuracy in individuals who walked more slowly and with shorter strides but other devices were less accurate in these individuals. There were small numbers of participants for some gait parameters. The StepWatch showed the highest accuracy and closest agreement with observed step count. This device can be confidently used by researchers for accurate measurement of step counts in inpatient rehabilitation in individuals who walk slowly. If immediate feedback is desired, the Fitbit One when worn on the ankle would be the best choice for this

  8. Characterization of a multi-user indoor positioning system based on low cost depth vision (Kinect) for monitoring human activity in a smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevrin, Loïc; Noury, Norbert; Abouchi, Nacer; Jumel, Fabrice; Massot, Bertrand; Saraydaryan, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of systems use indoor positioning for many scenarios such as asset tracking, health care, games, manufacturing, logistics, shopping, and security. Many technologies are available and the use of depth cameras is becoming more and more attractive as this kind of device becomes affordable and easy to handle. This paper contributes to the effort of creating an indoor positioning system based on low cost depth cameras (Kinect). A method is proposed to optimize the calibration of the depth cameras, to describe the multi-camera data fusion and to specify a global positioning projection to maintain the compatibility with outdoor positioning systems. The monitoring of the people trajectories at home is intended for the early detection of a shift in daily activities which highlights disabilities and loss of autonomy. This system is meant to improve homecare health management at home for a better end of life at a sustainable cost for the community.

  9. Pattern of active and inactive sequences of diabetes self-monitoring in mobile phone and paper diary users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhye, Nikhil S; Jing Wang

    2015-01-01

    In a pilot randomized controlled trial involving overweight or obese participants with type 2 diabetes, we find that smartphone users have sharply higher adherence to self-monitoring of diet, physical activity, blood glucose, and body weight, as compared to paper diary users. By characterizing the pattern of adherence with the probability of continuation of active and inactive sequences of self-monitoring, we find that smartphone users have longer active sequences of self-monitoring of all four behaviors that were being monitored. Smartphone users are also quicker to resume self-monitoring of diet and physical activity after a lapse in self-monitoring, whereas paper diary users have shorter inactive sequences for monitoring blood glucose and body weight. The findings are informative for data collection methodology in this burgeoning area of research.

  10. Quantitative impedimetric NPY-receptor activation monitoring and signal pathway profiling in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Kamp, Verena; Lindner, Ricco; Jahnke, Heinz-Georg; Krinke, Dana; Kostelnik, Katja B; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Robitzki, Andrea A

    2015-05-15

    Label-free and non-invasive monitoring of receptor activation and identification of the involved signal pathways in living cells is an ongoing analytic challenge and a great opportunity for biosensoric systems. In this context, we developed an impedance spectroscopy-based system for the activation monitoring of NPY-receptors in living cells. Using an optimized interdigital electrode array for sensitive detection of cellular alterations, we were able for the first time to quantitatively detect the NPY-receptor activation directly without a secondary or enhancer reaction like cAMP-stimulation by forskolin. More strikingly, we could show that the impedimetric based NPY-receptor activation monitoring is not restricted to the Y1-receptor but also possible for the Y2- and Y5-receptor. Furthermore, we could monitor the NPY-receptor activation in different cell lines that natively express NPY-receptors and proof the specificity of the observed impedimetric effect by agonist/antagonist studies in recombinant NPY-receptor expressing cell lines. To clarify the nature of the observed impedimetric effect we performed an equivalent circuit analysis as well as analyzed the role of cell morphology and receptor internalization. Finally, an antagonist based extensive molecular signal pathway analysis revealed small alterations of the actin cytoskeleton as well as the inhibition of at least L-type calcium channels as major reasons for the observed NPY-induced impedance increase. Taken together, our novel impedance spectroscopy based NPY-receptor activation monitoring system offers the opportunity to identify signal pathways as well as for novel versatile agonist/antagonist screening systems for identification of novel therapeutics in the field of obesity and cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Validity and reliability of meusurements obtained with an "activity monitor" in people with and without a transtibial amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussmann, Hans B.J.; Reuvekamp, Petra J.; Veltink, Petrus H.; Martens, Wim L.J.; Stam, Henk J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, the validity and reliability of measurements obtained with an "Activity Monitor" (AM) were examined. The instrument is designed to monitor ambulatory activity by use of accelerometer signals, and it detects several activities associated with mobility (standing, sitting, lying,

  12. Activity Learning as a Foundation for Security Monitoring in Smart Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamyn Dahmen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Smart environment technology has matured to the point where it is regularly used in everyday homes as well as research labs. With this maturation of the technology, we can consider using smart homes as a practical mechanism for improving home security. In this paper, we introduce an activity-aware approach to security monitoring and threat detection in smart homes. We describe our approach using the CASAS smart home framework and activity learning algorithms. By monitoring for activity-based anomalies we can detect possible threats and take appropriate action. We evaluate our proposed method using data collected in CASAS smart homes and demonstrate the partnership between activity-aware smart homes and biometric devices in the context of the CASAS on-campus smart apartment testbed.

  13. Activity Learning as a Foundation for Security Monitoring in Smart Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Jessamyn; Thomas, Brian L.; Cook, Diane J.; Wang, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    Smart environment technology has matured to the point where it is regularly used in everyday homes as well as research labs. With this maturation of the technology, we can consider using smart homes as a practical mechanism for improving home security. In this paper, we introduce an activity-aware approach to security monitoring and threat detection in smart homes. We describe our approach using the CASAS smart home framework and activity learning algorithms. By monitoring for activity-based anomalies we can detect possible threats and take appropriate action. We evaluate our proposed method using data collected in CASAS smart homes and demonstrate the partnership between activity-aware smart homes and biometric devices in the context of the CASAS on-campus smart apartment testbed. PMID:28362342

  14. Activity Learning as a Foundation for Security Monitoring in Smart Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Jessamyn; Thomas, Brian L; Cook, Diane J; Wang, Xiaobo

    2017-03-31

    Smart environment technology has matured to the point where it is regularly used in everyday homes as well as research labs. With this maturation of the technology, we can consider using smart homes as a practical mechanism for improving home security. In this paper, we introduce an activity-aware approach to security monitoring and threat detection in smart homes. We describe our approach using the CASAS smart home framework and activity learning algorithms. By monitoring for activity-based anomalies we can detect possible threats and take appropriate action. We evaluate our proposed method using data collected in CASAS smart homes and demonstrate the partnership between activity-aware smart homes and biometric devices in the context of the CASAS on-campus smart apartment testbed.

  15. Monitoring Ion Activities In and Around Cells Using Ion-Selective Liquid-Membrane Microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Parker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining the effective concentration (i.e., activity of ions in and around living cells is important to our understanding of the contribution of those ions to cellular function. Moreover, monitoring changes in ion activities in and around cells is informative about the actions of the transporters and/or channels operating in the cell membrane. The activity of an ion can be measured using a glass microelectrode that includes in its tip a liquid-membrane doped with an ion-selective ionophore. Because these electrodes can be fabricated with tip diameters that are less than 1 μm, they can be used to impale single cells in order to monitor the activities of intracellular ions. This review summarizes the history, theory, and practice of ion-selective microelectrode use and brings together a number of classic and recent examples of their usefulness in the realm of physiological study.

  16. Measuring physical activity in older adults: calibrating cut-points for the MotionWatch 8©.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn J Landry

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Given the world’s aging population, the staggering economic impact of dementia, the lack of effective treatments, and the fact a cure for dementia is likely many years away – there is an urgent need to develop interventions to prevent or at least delay dementia’s progression. Thus, lifestyle approaches to promote healthy aging are an important line of scientific inquiry. Good sleep quality and physical activity (PA are pillars of healthy aging, and as such, are an increasing focus for intervention studies aimed at promoting health and cognitive function in older adults. However, PA and sleep quality are difficult constructs to evaluate empirically. Wrist-worn actigraphy (WWA is currently accepted as a valid objective measure of sleep quality. The MotionWatch 8© (MW8 is the latest WWA, replacing the discontinued Actiwatch 4 and Actiwatch 7. In the current study, concurrent measurement of WWA and indirect calorimetry was performed during 10 different activities of daily living for 23 healthy older adults (aged 57-80 years to determine cut-points for sedentary and moderate-vigorous PA – using receiver operating characteristic curves – with the cut-point for light activity being the boundaries between sedentary and moderate-vigorous PA. In addition, simultaneous multi-unit reliability was determined for the MW8 using inter-class correlations. The current study is the first to validate MW8 activity count cut-points – for sedentary, light, and moderate to vigorous PA – specifically for use with healthy older adults. These cut-points provide important context for better interpretation of MW8 activity counts, and a greater understanding of what these counts mean in terms of PA. Hence, our results validate another level of analysis for researchers using the MW8 in studies aiming to examine PA and sleep quality concurrently in older adults.

  17. IDEA Fiscal Monitoring and Support Activities 2011-2012 Quick Reference Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Resource Center Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This Quick Reference Document is being distributed by the Regional Resource Center Program ARRA/Fiscal Priority Team to provide RRCP state liaisons and other (Technical Assistance) TA providers with a summary of critical fiscal monitoring and support activities they may be involved in during calendar years 2011 and 2012. Like other documents in…

  18. Interrupt-Based Step-Counting to Extend Battery Life in an Activity Monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Young Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most activity monitors use an accelerometer and gyroscope sensors to characterize the wearer’s physical activity. The monitor measures the motion by polling an accelerometer or gyroscope sensor or both every 20–30 ms and frequent polling affects the battery life of a wearable device. One of the key features of a commercial daily-activity monitoring device is longer battery life so that the user can keep track of his or her activity for a week or so without recharging the battery of the monitoring device. Many low-power approaches for a step-counting system use either a polling-based algorithm or an interrupt-based algorithm. In this paper, we propose a novel approach that uses the tap interrupt of an accelerometer to count steps while consuming low power. We compared the accuracy of step counting and measured system-level power consumption to a periodic sensor-reading algorithm. Our tap interrupt approach shows a battery lifetime that is 175% longer than that of a 30 ms polling method without gyroscope. The battery lifetime can be extended up to 863% with a gyroscope by putting both the processor and the gyroscope into sleep state during the majority of operation time.

  19. Physical Activity Monitoring: Gadgets and Uses. Article #6 in a 6-Part Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Derrick

    2010-01-01

    An early 15th century drawing by Leonardo da Vinci depicted a device that used gears and a pendulum that moved in synchronization with the wearer as he or she walked. This is believed to be the early origins of today's physical activity monitoring devices. Today's devices have vastly expanded on da Vinci's ancient concept with a myriad of options…

  20. Activity-based learner-models for Learner Monitoring and Recommendations in Moodle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florian, Beatriz; Glahn, Christian; Drachsler, Hendrik; Specht, Marcus; Fabregat, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Florian, B., Glahn, C., Drachsler, H., Specht, M., & Fabregat, R. (2011). Activity-based learner-models for Learner Monitoring and Recommendations in Moodle. In C. D. Kloos, D. Gillet, R. M. Crespo Carcía, F. Wild, & M. Wolpers (Eds.), Towards Ubiquitous Learning: 6th European Conference on

  1. Novel Use of a Noninvasive Hemodynamic Monitor in a Personalized, Active Learning Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, Jonathan K.; He, Jianghua; Ballew, Angela T.; Orr, Walter N.; Flynn, Brigid C.

    2017-01-01

    The present study furthered the concept of simulation-based medical education by applying a personalized active learning component. We tested this novel approach utilizing a noninvasive hemodynamic monitor with the capability to measure and display in real time numerous hemodynamic parameters in the exercising participant. Changes in medical…

  2. Impact of Middle School Student Energy Monitoring Activities on Climate Change Beliefs and Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald

    2018-01-01

    The Going Green! Middle Schoolers Out to Save the World project aims to direct middle school students' enthusiasm for hands-on activities toward interest in science and other STEM areas while guiding them to solve real-world problems. Students in this project are taught by their teachers to use energy monitoring equipment to audit standby power…

  3. Quality assurance project plan for ground water monitoring activities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPP) applies specifically to the field activities and laboratory analysis performed for all RCRA groundwater projects conducted by Hanford Technical Services. This QAPP is generic in approach and shall be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual groundwater monitoring plans.

  4. Adolescent Substance Use with Friends: Moderating and Mediating Effects of Parental Monitoring and Peer Activity Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesner, Jeff; Poulin, Francois; Dishion, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of using substances with friends on future individual use was examined in the context of parental monitoring rules and the ecology of peer activities. A 1-year longitudinal study design included a combined sample of North Italian and French Canadian adolescents (N = 285, 53% girls, M = 14.25 years). Data analyses were conducted using…

  5. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  6. Mars Exploration Rover Navigation Camera in-flight calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, J.M.; Bell, J.F.; Johnson, J. R.; Joseph, J.; Wolff, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The Navigation Camera (Navcam) instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) spacecraft provide support for both tactical operations as well as scientific observations where color information is not necessary: large-scale morphology, atmospheric monitoring including cloud observations and dust devil movies, and context imaging for both the thermal emission spectrometer and the in situ instruments on the Instrument Deployment Device. The Navcams are a panchromatic stereoscopic imaging system built using identical charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors and nearly identical electronics boards as the other cameras on the MER spacecraft. Previous calibration efforts were primarily focused on providing a detailed geometric calibration in line with the principal function of the Navcams, to provide data for the MER navigation team. This paper provides a detailed description of a new Navcam calibration pipeline developed to provide an absolute radiometric calibration that we estimate to have an absolute accuracy of 10% and a relative precision of 2.5%. Our calibration pipeline includes steps to model and remove the bias offset, the dark current charge that accumulates in both the active and readout regions of the CCD, and the shutter smear. It also corrects pixel-to-pixel responsivity variations using flat-field images, and converts from raw instrument-corrected digital number values per second to units of radiance (W m-2 nm-1 sr-1), or to radiance factor (I/F). We also describe here the initial results of two applications where radiance-calibrated Navcam data provide unique information for surface photometric and atmospheric aerosol studies. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Measurement of the response-ratio of an ionization chamber filled with dry air to that filled with P-10 gas in the calibration of gas monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Akira; Kawada, Yasushi; Hino, Yoshio

    2017-11-13

    We developed a new method to determine the response ratio of an ionization chamber (Ohkura ionization chamber: type I-4096 01/06) filled with dry air to that filled with P-10 gas. The response-ratio was obtained by comparing the output currents of the ionization chamber after introduction of radioactive gasses of identical activities contained in two small vessels. The obtained ratio was 0.690 ± 0.003, which agreed with the results obtained by other methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Validity and Usability of Physical Activity Monitoring in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeselt, Tobias; Spielmanns, Marc; Nell, Christoph; Storre, Jan Hendrik; Windisch, Wolfram; Magerhans, Lena; Beutel, Bjoern; Kenn, Klaus; Greulich, Timm; Alter, Peter; Vogelmeier, Claus; Koczulla, Andreas Rembert

    2016-01-01

    A large proportion of COPD patients do not achieve the recommended level of physical activity. It is suggested that feedback on the level of activity by using an activity monitoring device (PAM) increases awareness and may stimulate patients to increase their physical activity in daily life. Our objective was to assess the validity and usability of a simple and low-cost physical activity monitor (Polar A300™) when compared with the validated and established Bodymedia-SenseWear™ (SWA) device. To assess the diagnostic equivalent, two different PAM devices were used in parallel in 20 COPD patients GOLD I to IV during 3 consecutive days of daily life. Both systems were compared in terms of steps, calories burned, daily activity time and metabolic equivalents using linear regression analysis and Bland-Altman plots. Practical usability was examined by a 16-item-questionnaire. High correlations of both devices were observed with regard to the sensed step count (r = 0.96; p < 0.01) and calories burned (r = 0.74; p < 0.01), and a lower correlation of daily activity (r = 0.25; p < 0.01) was found. Data analysis over 3 days showed that 90% of the steps (95% CI -4223 to 1887), 100% of the calories (95% CI -2798 to 1887), 90% of the daily activity data (95% CI -12.32, 4065) and 95% of the MET (95% CI -3.11 to 2.75) were within the limits of agreement. A favorable usability (system-, information- and interface quality) of the A300™ device was shown (p < 0.01). The A300™ device with easy practical usability was shown not to be inferior for assessment of physical activity time, step count and calorie consumption in COPD patients when compared with the SWA. It is suggested to consider widespread available devices as commonly used for monitoring recreational sporting activities also in patients for assessment of physical activity in daily life.

  9. Automated locomotor activity monitoring as a quality control assay for mass-reared tephritid flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominiak, Bernard C; Fanson, Benjamin G; Collins, Samuel R; Taylor, Phillip W

    2014-02-01

    The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) requires vast numbers of consistently high quality insects to be produced over long periods. Quality control (QC) procedures are critical to effective SIT, both providing quality assurance and warning of operational deficiencies. We here present a potential new QC assay for mass rearing of Queensland fruit flies (Bactrocera tryoni Froggatt) for SIT; locomotor activity monitoring. We investigated whether automated locomotor activity monitors (LAMs) that simply detect how often a fly passes an infrared sensor in a glass tube might provide similar insights but with much greater economy. Activity levels were generally lower for females than for males, and declined over five days in the monitor for both sexes. Female activity levels were not affected by irradiation, but males irradiated at 60 or 70 Gy had reduced activity levels compared with unirradiated controls. We also found some evidence that mild heat shock of pupae results in adults with reduced activity. LAM offers a convenient, effective and economical assay to probe such changes. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Considerations when using the activPAL monitor in field-based research with adult populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte L. Edwardson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that high levels of sedentary behavior (sitting or lying with low energy expenditure are adversely associated with health. A key factor in improving our understanding of the impact of sedentary behavior (and patterns of sedentary time accumulation on health is the use of objective measurement tools that collect date and time-stamped activity information. One such tool is the activPAL monitor. This thigh-worn device uses accelerometer-derived information about thigh position to determine the start and end of each period spent sitting/lying, standing, and stepping, as well as stepping speed, step counts, and postural transitions. The activPAL is increasingly being used within field-based research for its ability to measure sitting/lying via posture. We summarise key issues to consider when using the activPAL in physical activity and sedentary behavior field-based research with adult populations. It is intended that the findings and discussion points be informative for researchers who are currently using activPAL monitors or are intending to use them. Pre-data collection decisions, monitor preparation and distribution, data collection considerations, and manual and automated data processing possibilities are presented using examples from current literature and experiences from 2 research groups from the UK and Australia.

  11. Optical calibration of SNO +

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leming, Edward; SNO+ Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Situated 2 km underground in Sudbury, Northern Ontario, the SNO + detector consists of an acrylic sphere 12 m in diameter containing 780 tons of target mass, surrounded by approximately 9,500 PMTs. For SNO, this target mass was heavy water, however the change to SNO + is defined by the change of this target mass to a novel scintillator. With the lower energy threshold, low intrinsic radioactivity levels and the best shielding against muons and cosmogenic activation of all existing neutrino experiments, SNO + will be sensitive to exciting new physics. The experiment will be studying solar, reactor, super nova and geo-neutrinos, though the main purpose of SNO + is the search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of Te-130. To meet the requirements imposed by the physics on detector performance, a detailed optical calibration is needed. Source deployment must be kept to a minimum and eliminated if possible, in order to meet the stringent radiopurity requirements. This led to the development of the Embedded LED/laser Light Injection Entity (ELLIE) system. This talk provides a summary of the upgrades to from SNO to SNO +, discussing the requirements on and methods of optical calibration, focusing on the deployed laserball and ELLIE system.

  12. Devices for Self-Monitoring Sedentary Time or Physical Activity: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, James P; Loveday, Adam; Pearson, Natalie; Edwardson, Charlotte; Yates, Thomas; Biddle, Stuart J H; Esliger, Dale W

    2016-05-04

    It is well documented that meeting the guideline levels (150 minutes per week) of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (PA) is protective against chronic disease. Conversely, emerging evidence indicates the deleterious effects of prolonged sitting. Therefore, there is a need to change both behaviors. Self-monitoring of behavior is one of the most robust behavior-change techniques available. The growing number of technologies in the consumer electronics sector provides a unique opportunity for individuals to self-monitor their behavior. The aim of this study is to review the characteristics and measurement properties of currently available self-monitoring devices for sedentary time and/or PA. To identify technologies, four scientific databases were systematically searched using key terms related to behavior, measurement, and population. Articles published through October 2015 were identified. To identify technologies from the consumer electronic sector, systematic searches of three Internet search engines were also performed through to October 1, 2015. The initial database searches identified 46 devices and the Internet search engines identified 100 devices yielding a total of 146 technologies. Of these, 64 were further removed because they were currently unavailable for purchase or there was no evidence that they were designed for, had been used in, or could readily be modified for self-monitoring purposes. The remaining 82 technologies were included in this review (73 devices self-monitored PA, 9 devices self-monitored sedentary time). Of the 82 devices included, this review identified no published articles in which these devices were used for the purpose of self-monitoring PA and/or sedentary behavior; however, a number of technologies were found via Internet searches that matched the criteria for self-monitoring and provided immediate feedback on PA (ActiGraph Link, Microsoft Band, and Garmin Vivofit) and sedentary time (activPAL VT, the Lumo Back, and Darma

  13. Performance standard for dose Calibrator

    CERN Document Server

    Darmawati, S

    2002-01-01

    Dose calibrator is an instrument used in hospitals to determine the activity of radionuclide for nuclear medicine purposes. International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has published IEC 1303:1994 standard that can be used as guidance to test the performance of the instrument. This paper briefly describes content of the document,as well as explains the assessment that had been carried out to test the instrument accuracy in Indonesia through intercomparison measurement.Its is suggested that hospitals acquire a medical physicist to perform the test for its dose calibrator. The need for performance standard in the form of Indonesia Standard is also touched.

  14. NIST display colorimeter calibration facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven W.; Ohno, Yoshihiro

    2003-07-01

    A facility has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to provide calibration services for color-measuring instruments to address the need for improving and certifying the measurement uncertainties of this type of instrument. While NIST has active programs in photometry, flat panel display metrology, and color and appearance measurements, these are the first services offered by NIST tailored to color-measuring instruments for displays. An overview of the facility, the calibration approach, and associated uncertainties are presented. Details of a new tunable colorimetric source and the development of new transfer standard instruments are discussed.

  15. Calibration of Geodetic Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bajtala

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of metrology and security systems of unification, correctness and standard reproducibilities belong to the preferred requirements of theory and technical practice in geodesy. Requirements on the control and verification of measured instruments and equipments increase and the importance and up-to-date of calibration get into the foreground. Calibration possibilities of length-scales (of electronic rangefinders and angle-scales (of horizontal circles of geodetic instruments. Calibration of electronic rangefinders on the linear comparative baseline in terrain. Primary standard of planar angle – optical traverse and its exploitation for calibration of the horizontal circles of theodolites. The calibration equipment of the Institute of Slovak Metrology in Bratislava. The Calibration process and results from the calibration of horizontal circles of selected geodetic instruments.

  16. Monitoring activities of daily living based on wearable wireless body sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kańtoch, E; Augustyniak, P; Markiewicz, M; Prusak, D

    2014-01-01

    With recent advances in microprocessor chip technology, wireless communication, and biomedical engineering it is possible to develop miniaturized ubiquitous health monitoring devices that are capable of recording physiological and movement signals during daily life activities. The aim of the research is to implement and test the prototype of health monitoring system. The system consists of the body central unit with Bluetooth module and wearable sensors: the custom-designed ECG sensor, the temperature sensor, the skin humidity sensor and accelerometers placed on the human body or integrated with clothes and a network gateway to forward data to a remote medical server. The system includes custom-designed transmission protocol and remote web-based graphical user interface for remote real time data analysis. Experimental results for a group of humans who performed various activities (eg. working, running, etc.) showed maximum 5% absolute error compared to certified medical devices. The results are promising and indicate that developed wireless wearable monitoring system faces challenges of multi-sensor human health monitoring during performing daily activities and opens new opportunities in developing novel healthcare services.

  17. Computerized cognitive training restores neural activity within the reality monitoring network in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Karuna; Luks, Tracy L; Fisher, Melissa; Simpson, Gregory V; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Vinogradov, Sophia

    2012-02-23

    Schizophrenia patients suffer from severe cognitive deficits, such as impaired reality monitoring. Reality monitoring is the ability to distinguish the source of internal experiences from outside reality. During reality monitoring tasks, schizophrenia patients make errors identifying "I made it up" items, and even during accurate performance, they show abnormally low activation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a region that supports self-referential cognition. We administered 80 hr of computerized training of cognitive processes to schizophrenia patients and found improvement in reality monitoring that correlated with increased mPFC activity. In contrast, patients in a computer games control condition did not show any behavioral or neural improvements. Notably, recovery in mPFC activity after training was associated with improved social functioning 6 months later. These findings demonstrate that a serious behavioral deficit in schizophrenia, and its underlying neural dysfunction, can be improved by well-designed computerized cognitive training, resulting in better quality of life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. How calibration and reference spectra affect the accuracy of absolute soft X-ray solar irradiance measured by the SDO/EVE/ESP during high solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didkovsky, Leonid; Wieman, Seth; Woods, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The Extreme ultraviolet Spectrophotometer (ESP), one of the channels of SDO's Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE), measures solar irradiance in several EUV and soft x-ray (SXR) bands isolated using thin-film filters and a transmission diffraction grating, and includes a quad-diode detector positioned at the grating zeroth-order to observe in a wavelength band from about 0.1 to 7.0 nm. The quad diode signal also includes some contribution from shorter wavelength in the grating's first-order and the ratio of zeroth-order to first-order signal depends on both source geometry, and spectral distribution. For example, radiometric calibration of the ESP zeroth-order at the NIST SURF BL-2 with a near-parallel beam provides a different zeroth-to-first-order ratio than modeled for solar observations. The relative influence of "uncalibrated" first-order irradiance during solar observations is a function of the solar spectral irradiance and the locations of large Active Regions or solar flares. We discuss how the "uncalibrated" first-order "solar" component and the use of variable solar reference spectra affect determination of absolute SXR irradiance which currently may be significantly overestimated during high solar activity.

  19. Accelerometry-based monitoring of daily physical activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, M; Twilt, M; Andersen, L B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may cause functional impairment, reduced participation in physical activity (PA) and, over time, physical deconditioning. The aim of this study was to objectively monitor daily free-living PA in 10-16-year-old children with JIA using accelerometry...... with regard to disease activity and physical variables and to compare the data with those from healthy age- and gender-matched controls.Method: Patients underwent an evaluation of disease activity, functional ability, physical capacity, and pain. Accelerometer monitoring was assessed using the GT1M Acti......Graph. Normative data from two major studies on PA in Danish schoolchildren were used for comparison.Results: Data of accelerometry were available for 61 JIA patients and 2055 healthy controls. Of the JIA patients, 57% showed below-average values of maximal physical capacity (fitness level). JIA patients showed...

  20. Monitoring attack and flight activity of Xylosandrus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae): the influence of temperature on activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding, Michael E; Ranger, Christopher M; Oliver, Jason B; Schultz, Peter B

    2013-08-01

    Wood-boring ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), including Xylosandrus spp., are key pests in ornamental nurseries. Knowledge of their activity in spring is important for nursery growers to effectively time their protective sprays. We measured the reliability of ethanol-baited bottle traps for monitoring emergence of overwintered Xylosandrus spp. in ornamental nurseries. Detection of initial flight activity by traps was compared with initial attacks on ethanol-injected trap trees. To develop tools for forecasting Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) activity, the relationships between temperature and their attack and flight activity were examined, and the bloom sequence of ornamental plants was examined as phenological indicators of X. germanus emergence in Ohio. Captures of X. germanus coincided with attacks on trap trees on seven of eight occasions over 2 yr in four nurseries. Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motshulsky) were detected in only one nursery and captures coincided with attacks each year. There was a strong relationship between maximum daily temperatures 20 and 21degrees C and X. germanus attack and flight activity. No attack or flight activity were detected in a monitoring period unless there were 1 or 2 d of at least 20 degrees C. Emergence of X. germanus always began after and within 6 d of full bloom on Cornelian cherry dogwood, and usually after and within 4 d of first bloom on Norway maple and full bloom on border forsythia. The traps or phenological indicators can be used by growers to monitor emergence of X. germanus to time their initial protective sprays. The relationship between X. germanus activity and temperature can be used by growers to make decisions on timing subsequent treatments.

  1. Aspects of the SMOS Pre-launch Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    A synthetic aperture radiometer system, SMOS, is under development for launch in 2007. The synthetic aperture concept requires calibration activities of novel nature in addition to traditional radiometer calibration exercises. Especially very accurate antenna pattern measurements are an issue....

  2. Multisensor fusion for atrial and ventricular activity detection in coronary care monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, A I; Carrault, G; Mora, F; Thoraval, L; Passariello, G; Schleich, J M

    1999-10-01

    Information management for critical care monitoring is still a very difficult task. Medical staff is often overwhelmed by the amount of data provided by the increased number of specific monitoring devices and instrumentation, and the lack of an effective automated system. Specifically, a basic task such as arrhythmia detection still produce an important amount of undesirable alarms, due in part to the mechanistic approach of current monitoring systems. In this work, multisensor and multisource data fusion schemes to improve atrial and ventricular activity detection in critical care environments are presented. Applications of these schemes are quantitatively evaluated and compared with current methods, showing the potential advantages of data fusion techniques for event detection in noise corrupted signals.

  3. Calibration of the hydraulic model of a full-scale activated sludge plant; Calibracion hidraulica a escala real de un reactor de lodos activados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fall, Cheikh [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Loaiza-Navia, Jimmy [Servicios de Agua y Drenaje de Monterrey (Mexico)

    2008-04-15

    When planning to simulate a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) with the activated sludge model number 1 (ASM1), one of the first requirements is to determine the hydraulic model of the reactor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hydrodynamic regime of the aeration tank of a municipal WWTP by using a rhodamine tracer test and the Aquasim simulation software. A pre-simulation was performed in order to quantify the appropriate colorant mass, set up a sampling plan and evaluate the anticipated visual impact of the tracer test in the river receiving the treated effluents. A tracer test and dynamic flow measurements were carried out, the results of which served to establish and calibrate the hydraulic model. The evaluated tank was physically built as a plug-flow reactor subdivided in 7 compartments, but the study revealed that it is best represented by a model with 5 virtual mixed reactors in series. Through the study, the approach of using a WWTP simulator for hydraulics calibration was shown to be a powerful and flexible tool for designing a tracer test and for identifying adequate tank-in-series models of full-scale activated sludge aeration tanks. [Spanish] Cuando se planea simular una planta de tratamiento con base en el modelo numero 1 de lodos activados (ASM1), uno de los primeros requisitos es determinar el modelo hidraulico del reactor. En este trabajo se estudio el regimen hidrodinamico del tanque de accion de una planta de tratamiento de aguas residuales municipales (PTAR), utilizando una prueba de trazador con rodamina y un programa de simulacion (Aquasim). Se realizo una prueba de trazador con el experimento, lo que permitio determinar la cantidad requerida de trazador, fijar los intervalos de muestreo y limitar el impacto visual anticipado del colorante sobre el rio que recibe el efluente tratado. Se llevaron a cabo la prueba de trazador y la medicion de los perfiles dinamicos de caudales, cuyos resultados sirvieron para establecer y calibrar el

  4. Proton therapy treatment monitoring with in-beam PET: Investigating space and time activity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombal, L.; Barbosa, D.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M. G.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cristoforetti, L.; Guerra, A. Del; Fracchiolla, F.; Morrocchi, M.; Sportelli, G.; Righetto, R.; Schwarz, M.; Topi, A.; Rosso, V.

    2017-07-01

    In this study the possibility of retrieving composition information in proton therapy with a planar in-beam PET scanner is investigated. The analysis focuses both on spatial activity distributions and time dependence of the recorded signal. The experimental data taking was performed at the Trento Proton Therapy Center (IT) by irradiating three different phantoms. We show that different phantom compositions reflect into different activity profile shapes. We demonstrate that the analysis of the event rate can provide significant information on the phantom elemental composition, suggesting that elemental analysis could be used along with activity profile analysis to achieve a more accurate treatment monitoring.

  5. Deriving a GPS Monitoring Time Recommendation for Physical Activity Studies of Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Katelyn M; Howard, Annie Green; Emch, Michael; Rodríguez, Daniel A; Rosamond, Wayne D; Evenson, Kelly R

    2017-05-01

    Determining locations of physical activity (PA) is important for surveillance and intervention development, yet recommendations for using location recording tools like global positioning system (GPS) units are lacking. Specifically, no recommendation exists for the number of days study participants should wear a GPS to reliably estimate PA time spent in locations. This study used data from participants (N = 224, age = 18-85 yr) in five states who concurrently wore an ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer and a Qstarz BT-Q1000X GPS for three consecutive weeks to construct monitoring day recommendations through variance partitioning methods. PA bouts ≥10 min were constructed from accelerometer counts, and the location of GPS points was determined using a hand-coding protocol. Monitoring day recommendations varied by the type of location (e.g., participant homes vs parks) and the intensity of PA bouts considered (low and medium cut point moderate to vigorous PA [MVPA] bouts or high cut point vigorous PA [VPA] bouts). In general, minutes of all PA intensities spent in a given location could be measured with ≥80% reliability using 1-3 d of GPS monitoring for fitness facilities, schools, and footpaths. MVPA bout minutes in parks and roads required longer monitoring periods of 5-12 d. PA in homes and commercial areas required >19 d of monitoring. Twelve days of monitoring was found to reliably estimate minutes in both low and medium threshold MVPA as well as VPA bouts for many important built environment locations that can be targeted to increase PA at the population level. Minutes of PA in the home environment and commercial locations may be best assessed through other means given the lengthy estimated monitoring time required.

  6. Time-motion analysis of research nurse activities in a lung transplant home monitoring study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Ruth; VanWormer, Arin; Lindgren, Bruce; MacMahon, Kathleen; Robiner, William; Finkelstein, Stanley

    2011-09-01

    The emergence and subsequent integration of new technologies precipitate changes in roles and work lives of nurses. The nurses' work with home monitoring technologies within a spirometry-based program that transmits pulmonary function data after lung transplantation has characteristics that are distinct from other types of direct patient care. Nurses' changing roles in such programs after transplantation have not been well described. To describe a time-motion study of 2 research nurses in the context of a home-spirometry study to monitor patients' pulmonary status after lung transplantation. A detailed list of research nurses' 67 routine work-related activities was developed and validated to monitor and record activities of research home monitoring nurses. Two weeks of observations were completed; recordings of a second observer established reliability of observations. In 48.8 hours of observation, 610 tasks related to monitoring of 45 patients were recorded. Task time ranged from brief seconds (eg, data review) to 39 minutes (eg, clinic visits). Between-observer intraclass correlation (r = 0.96) reflected high agreement in observations of the duration of activities. Agreement for category of activity was strong (kappa = 0.82), with high levels of agreement (96%). Computer tasks were the most frequent (118 tasks/week) and most time-intensive activities. Nurses' face-to-face interactions with health professionals were equally time intensive (both 267 minutes/week), but not as frequent. Data review tasks were the second most frequent (49/week), although less time-intensive (47 minutes/week). Findings reveal patterns of effort and time expenditure in nurses' evolving roles in home monitoring of the health status of patients after lung transplantation. These findings highlight the centrality and importance of well-developed data management, computer skills, and interprofessional communication skills of nurses who perform responsibilities in this emerging role in

  7. Longitudinal noninvasive monitoring of transcription factor activation in cardiovascular regulatory nuclei using bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeffrey R; Infanger, David W; Braga, Valdir A; Zhang, Yulong; Sharma, Ram V; Engelhardt, John F; Davisson, Robin L

    2008-04-22

    The ability to monitor transcription factor (TF) activation in the central nervous system (CNS) has the potential to provide novel information regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying a wide range of neurobiological processes. However, traditional biochemical assays limit the mapping of TF activity to select time points. In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has emerged as an attractive technology for visualizing internal molecular events in the same animal over time. Here, we evaluated the utility of BLI, in combination with virally mediated delivery of reporter constructs to cardiovascular nuclei, for monitoring of TF activity in these discrete brain regions. Following viral gene transfer of NF-kappaB-driven luciferase reporter to the subfornical organ (SFO), BLI enabled daily measurements of baseline TF activity in the same animal for 1 mo. Importantly, systemic endotoxin, a stimulator of NF-kappaB activity, induced dramatic and dose-dependent increases in NF-kappaB-dependent bioluminescence in the SFO up to 30 days after gene transfer. Cotreatment with a dominant-negative IkappaBalpha mutant significantly prevented endotoxin-dependent NF-kappaB activation, confirming the specificity of the bioluminescence signal. NF-kappaB-dependent luminescence signals were also stable and inducible 1 mo following delivery of luciferase reporter construct to the paraventricular nucleus or rostral ventrolateral medulla. Lastly, using targeted adenoviral delivery of an AP-1 responsive luciferase reporter, we showed similar baseline and endotoxin-induced AP-1 activity in these same brain regions as with NF-kappaB reporters. These results demonstrate that BLI, in combination with virally mediated gene transfer, is a powerful method for longitudinal monitoring and quantification of TF activity in targeted CNS nuclei in vivo.

  8. Studies on calibration and validation of data provided by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment GOME on ERS-2 (CAVEAT). Final report; Studie zur Kalibrierung und Validation von Daten des Global Ozone Monitoring Experiments GOME auf ERS-2 (CAVEAT). Endbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, J.P.; Kuenzi, K.; Ladstaetter-Weissenmayer, A.; Langer, J. [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Umweltphysik; Neuber, R.; Eisinger, M. [Alfred-Wegener-Institut fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Potsdam (Germany)

    2000-04-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) was launched on 21 April 1995 as one of six scientific instruments on board the second European remote sensing satellite (ERS-2) of the ESA. The investigations presented here aimed at assessing and improving the accuracy of the GOME measurements of sun-standardized and absolute radiation density and the derived data products. For this purpose, the GOME data were compared with measurements pf terrestrial, airborne and satellite-borne systems. For scientific reasons, the measurements will focus on the medium and high latitudes of both hemispheres, although equatorial regions were investigated as well. In the first stage, operational data products of GOME were validated, i.e. radiation measurements (spectra, level1 product) and trace gas column densities (level2 product). [German] Am 21. April 1995 wurde das Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) als eines von insgesamt sechs wissenschaftlichen Instrumenten an Bord des zweiten europaeischen Fernerkundungssatelliten (ERS-2) der ESA ins All gebracht. Das Ziel dieses Vorhabens ist es, die Genauigkeit der von GOME durchgefuehrten Messungen von sonnennormierter und absoluter Strahlungsdichte sowie der aus ihnen abgeleiteten Datenprodukte zu bewerten und zu verbessern. Dazu sollten die GOME-Daten mit Messungen von boden-, flugzeug- und satellitengestuetzten Systemen verglichen werden. Aus wissenschaftlichen Gruenden wird der Schwerpunkt auf Messungen bei mittleren und hohen Breitengraden in beiden Hemisphaeren liegen. Jedoch wurden im Laufe des Projektzeitraumes auch Regionen in Aequatornaehe untersucht. Im ersten Schritt sollen operationelle Datenprodukte von GOME validiert werden. Dieses sind Strahlungsmessungen (Spektren, Level1-Produkt) und Spurengas-Saeulendichten (Level2-Produkt). (orig.)

  9. Using Fiberless, Wearable fNIRS to Monitor Brain Activity in Real-world Cognitive Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinti, Paola; Aichelburg, Clarisse; Lind, Frida; Power, Sarah; Swingler, Elizabeth; Merla, Arcangelo; Hamilton, Antonia; Gilbert, Sam; Burgess, Paul; Tachtsidis, Ilias

    2015-12-02

    Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a neuroimaging technique that uses near-infrared light to monitor brain activity. Based on neurovascular coupling, fNIRS is able to measure the haemoglobin concentration changes secondary to neuronal activity. Compared to other neuroimaging techniques, fNIRS represents a good compromise in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. Moreover, it is portable, lightweight, less sensitive to motion artifacts and does not impose significant physical restraints. It is therefore appropriate to monitor a wide range of cognitive tasks (e.g., auditory, gait analysis, social interaction) and different age populations (e.g., new-borns, adults, elderly people). The recent development of fiberless fNIRS devices has opened the way to new applications in neuroscience research. This represents a unique opportunity to study functional activity during real-world tests, which can be more sensitive and accurate in assessing cognitive function and dysfunction than lab-based tests. This study explored the use of fiberless fNIRS to monitor brain activity during a real-world prospective memory task. This protocol is performed outside the lab and brain haemoglobin concentration changes are continuously measured over the prefrontal cortex while the subject walks around in order to accomplish several different tasks.

  10. Memory monitoring performance and PFC activity are associated with 5-HTTLPR genotype in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Jennifer; Beevers, Christopher G.; McGeary, John E.; Schnyer, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Older adults show extensive variability in cognitive performance, including episodic memory. A portion of this variability could potentially be explained by genetic factors. Recent literature shows that the neurotransmitter serotonin plays an important role in memory processes, as enhancements of brain serotonin have led to memory improvement. Here, we have begun to explore genetic contributions to the performance and underlying brain activity associated with source memory monitoring. Using a source recognition memory task during fMRI scanning, this study offers evidence that older adults who carry a short allele (S-car) of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) in the SLC6A4 gene show specific deficits in source memory monitoring relative to older adults who are homozygous for the long allele (LL). These deficits are accompanied by less neural activity in regions of prefrontal cortex that have been shown to support accurate memory monitoring. Moreover, while the older adult LL group’s behavioral performance does not differ from younger adults, their brain activation reveals evidence of compensatory activation that likely supports their higher performance level. These results provide preliminary evidence that the long-allele homozygous profile is cognitively beneficial to older adults, particularly for memory functioning. PMID:22705442

  11. Initial field evaluation of the Harvard active ozone sampler for personal ozone monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyh, A S; Roberts, P T; Lurmann, F W; Schoell, B M; Avol, E L

    1999-01-01

    Assessing personal exposure to ozone has only been feasible recently with the introduction of passive ozone samplers. These devices are easy to use, but changes in air velocity across their collection surfaces can affect performance. The Harvard active ozone sampler (AS) was developed in response to problems with the passive methods. This active sampler has been tested extensively as a microenvironmental sampler. To test for personal sampling, 40 children attending summer day-camp in Riverside, California wore the active ozone sampler for approximately 2.6 h on July 19 and 21, 1994, when ozone concentrations were about 100 ppb and 140 ppb, respectively. The children spent 94-100% of the sampling period outside, staying within a well-defined area while participating in normal camp activities. Ambient ozone concentrations across this area were monitored by two UV photometric ozone monitors. The active sampler was worn in a small backpack that was also equipped with a passive ozone sampler. Device precision, reported as the percent difference between duplicate pairs of samplers, was +/- 3.7% and +/- 4.2% for the active and passive samplers, respectively. The active sampler measured, on average, 94.5 +/- 8.2% of the ambient ozone while the passive samplers measured, on average, 124.5 +/- 18.8%. The samplers were worn successfully for the entire sampling period by all participating children.

  12. Development of a real time activity monitoring Android application utilizing SmartStep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Nagaraj; Melanson, Edward; Sazonov, Edward

    2016-08-01

    Footwear based activity monitoring systems are becoming popular in academic research as well as consumer industry segments. In our previous work, we had presented developmental aspects of an insole based activity and gait monitoring system-SmartStep, which is a socially acceptable, fully wireless and versatile insole. The present work describes the development of an Android application that captures the SmartStep data wirelessly over Bluetooth Low energy (BLE), computes features on the received data, runs activity classification algorithms and provides real time feedback. The development of activity classification methods was based on the the data from a human study involving 4 participants. Participants were asked to perform activities of sitting, standing, walking, and cycling while they wore SmartStep insole system. Multinomial Logistic Discrimination (MLD) was utilized in the development of machine learning model for activity prediction. The resulting classification model was implemented in an Android Smartphone. The Android application was benchmarked for power consumption and CPU loading. Leave one out cross validation resulted in average accuracy of 96.9% during model training phase. The Android application for real time activity classification was tested on a human subject wearing SmartStep resulting in testing accuracy of 95.4%.

  13. Efficient Active Sensing with Categorized Further Explorations for a Home Behavior-Monitoring Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwei Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile robotics is a potential solution to home behavior monitoring for the elderly. For a mobile robot in the real world, there are several types of uncertainties for its perceptions, such as the ambiguity between a target object and the surrounding objects and occlusions by furniture. The problem could be more serious for a home behavior-monitoring system, which aims to accurately recognize the activity of a target person, in spite of these uncertainties. It detects irregularities and categorizes situations requiring further explorations, which strategically maximize the information needed for activity recognition while minimizing the costs. Two schemes of active sensing, based on two irregularity detections, namely, heuristic-based and template-matching-based irregularity detections, were implemented and examined for body contour-based activity recognition. Their time cost and accuracy in activity recognition were evaluated through experiments in both a controlled scenario and a home living scenario. Experiment results showed that the categorized further explorations guided the robot system to sense the target person actively. As a result, with the proposed approach, the robot system has achieved higher accuracy of activity recognition.

  14. Monitoring activities of teenagers to comprehend their habits: study protocol for a mixed-methods cohort study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bélanger, Mathieu; Caissie, Isabelle; Beauchamp, Jacinthe; O'Loughlin, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine; Mancuso, Michelina

    2013-01-01

    .... The Monitoring Activities of Teenagers to Comprehend their Habits (MATCH) study is a prospective cohort study that uses quantitative and qualitative methods to develop new knowledge on the sustainability of specific physical activities...

  15. Flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator in wearable self-powered active sensor for respiration and healthcare monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Zhang, S.; Jin, Y. M.; Ouyang, H.; Zou, Y.; Wang, X. X.; Xie, L. X.; Li, Z.

    2017-06-01

    A wearable self-powered active sensor for respiration and healthcare monitoring was fabricated based on a flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator. An electrospinning poly(vinylidene fluoride) thin film on silicone substrate was polarized to fabricate the flexible nanogenerator and its electrical property was measured. When periodically stretched by a linear motor, the flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator generated an output open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current of up to 1.5 V and 400 nA, respectively. Through integration with an elastic bandage, a wearable self-powered sensor was fabricated and used to monitor human respiration, subtle muscle movement, and voice recognition. As respiration proceeded, the electrical output signals of the sensor corresponded to the signals measured by a physiological signal recording system with good reliability and feasibility. This self-powered, wearable active sensor has significant potential for applications in pulmonary function evaluation, respiratory monitoring, and detection of gesture and vocal cord vibration for the personal healthcare monitoring of disabled or paralyzed patients.

  16. Wearable strain sensors based on thin graphite films for human activity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takanari; Kihara, Yusuke; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi

    2017-12-01

    Wearable health-monitoring devices have attracted increasing attention in disease diagnosis and health assessment. In many cases, such devices have been prepared by complicated multistep procedures which result in the waste of materials and require expensive facilities. In this study, we focused on pyrolytic graphite sheet (PGS), which is a low-cost, simple, and flexible material, used as wearable devices for monitoring human activity. We investigated wearable devices based on PGSs for the observation of elbow and finger motions. The thin graphite films were fabricated by cutting small films from PGSs. The wearable devices were then made from the thin graphite films assembled on a commercially available rubber glove. The human motions could be observed using the wearable devices. Therefore, these results suggested that the wearable devices based on thin graphite films may broaden their application in cost-effective wearable electronics for the observation of human activity.

  17. Computerized monitoring of physical activity and sleep in postoperative abdominal surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, T; Kjaersgaard, M; Bernhard, A

    1999-01-01

    : The study included twelve hospitalized patients after major abdominal surgery studied on day 2 to 4 after operation and twelve unhospitalized healthy volunteers. Measurements were performed for 24 consecutive hours. The actigraphy measurements were compared with self-reported activity- and sleep......OBJECTIVE: Assessment of early postoperative activity is important in the documentation of improvements of peri-operative care. This study was designed to validate computerized activity-based monitoring of physical activity and sleep (actigraphy) in patients after abdominal surgery. METHODS.......15). In both study groups, all correlation coefficients between actigraphy measurements and self-reported activity data were statistically significant (r, values for patients 0.4 to 0.8 and volunteers 0.6 to 0.9). A higher mean agreement between automated actigraphy sleep detection and self-reported sleep...

  18. Accelerometry-based monitoring of daily physical activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgaard, M; Twilt, M; Andersen, L B; Herlin, T

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may cause functional impairment, reduced participation in physical activity (PA) and, over time, physical deconditioning. The aim of this study was to objectively monitor daily free-living PA in 10-16-year-old children with JIA using accelerometry with regard to disease activity and physical variables and to compare the data with those from healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Patients underwent an evaluation of disease activity, functional ability, physical capacity, and pain. Accelerometer monitoring was assessed using the GT1M ActiGraph. Normative data from two major studies on PA in Danish schoolchildren were used for comparison. Data of accelerometry were available for 61 JIA patients and 2055 healthy controls. Of the JIA patients, 57% showed below-average values of maximal physical capacity (fitness level). JIA patients showed low disease activity and pain and were physically well functioning. Accelerometer counts were lower in JIA patients than in controls. Accelerometer measurements were negatively correlated with disease activity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and number of joints with swelling and/or limited range of motion (ROM). No correlation was found between PA and pain scores, functional ability, and hypermobility. Patients with involvement of ankles or hips demonstrated significantly lower levels of PA. Children with JIA are less physically active and have lower physical capacity and fitness than their age- and gender-matched healthy peers despite good disease control. The involvement of hips or ankles is associated with lower PA.

  19. Ambulatory activity monitoring: Progress in measurement of activity, posture, and specific motion patterns in daily life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); U.W. Ebner-Priemer (Ulrich); J. Fahrenberg (Jochen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBehavior is central to psychology in almost any definition. Although observable activity is a core aspect of behavior, assessment strategies have tended to focus on emotional, cognitive, or physiological responses. When physical activity is assessed, it is done so mostly with

  20. Design of a wearable physical activity monitoring system using mobile phones and accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intille, Stephen S; Albinali, Fahd; Mota, Selene; Kuris, Benjamin; Botana, Pilar; Haskell, William L

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the motivation for, and overarching design of, an open-source hardware and software system to enable population-scale, longitudinal measurement of physical activity and sedentary behavior using common mobile phones. The "Wockets" data collection system permits researchers to collect raw motion data from participants who wear multiple small, comfortable sensors for 24 hours per day, including during sleep, and monitor data collection remotely.

  1. Exploring the Use of Activity Patterns for Smart Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Karen Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-10

    The world is at an inflection point where our ability to collect data now far outpaces our ability to make use of it. LANL has a number of efforts to help us pull more meaningful insights out of our data and target resources to where they will be most impactful. We are exploring an approach to recognizing activity patterns across disparate data streams for a more holistic view of nuclear facility monitoring.

  2. Comparison of Raw Acceleration from the GENEA and ActiGraph™ GT3X+ Activity Monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh John

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare raw acceleration output of the ActiGraph™ GT3X+ and GENEA activity monitors. Methods: A GT3X+ and GENEA were oscillated in an orbital shaker at frequencies ranging from 0.7 to 4.0 Hz (ten 2-min trials/frequency on a fixed radius of 5.08 cm. Additionally, 10 participants (age = 23.8 ± 5.4 years wore the GT3X+ and GENEA on the dominant wrist and performed treadmill walking (2.0 and 3.5 mph and running (5.5 and 7.5 mph and simulated free-living activities (computer work, cleaning a room, vacuuming and throwing a ball for 2-min each. A linear mixed model was used to compare the mean triaxial vector magnitude (VM from the GT3X+ and GENEA at each oscillation frequency. For the human testing protocol, random forest machine-learning technique was used to develop two models using frequency domain (FD and time domain (TD features for each monitor. We compared activity type recognition accuracy between the GT3X+ and GENEA when the prediction model was fit using one monitor and then applied to the other. Z-statistics were used to compare the proportion of accurate predictions from the GT3X+ and GENEA for each model. Results: GENEA produced significantly higher (p < 0.05, 3.5 to 6.2% mean VM than GT3X+ at all frequencies during shaker testing. Training the model using TD input features on the GENEA and applied to GT3X+ data yielded significantly lower (p < 0.05 prediction accuracy. Prediction accuracy was not compromised when interchangeably using FD models between monitors. Conclusions: It may be inappropriate to apply a model developed on the GENEA to predict activity type using GT3X+ data when input features are TD attributes of raw acceleration.

  3. Nonlinear Structural Health Monitoring of the Responsive Space Satellite Systems Using Magneto Elastic Active Sensors (MEAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    honeycomb and realistic satellite panels, are provided. Nonlinear SHM methodologies using MEAS are considered and its use for acousto-elastic...highlighted. Examples of MEAS-enabled SHM testing in aerospace structures of simple and complex geometry, such a honeycomb and realistic satellite panels...Monitoring of the Responsive Space Satellite Systems using Magneto Elastic Active Sensors (MEAS) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  4. Site Calibration, FGW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    This Site Calibration report is describing the results of a measured site calibration for a site in Denmark. The calibration is carried out by DTU Wind Energy in accordance with Ref.[3] and Ref.[4]. The measurement period is given. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance...... measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio between the wind speed at the center of the turbine hub and at the met mast. The wind speed at the turbine is measured by a temporary mast placed at the foundation for the turbine. The site and measurement equipment...

  5. Model-based design and experimental verification of a monitoring concept for an active-active electromechanical aileron actuation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola, David; Thielecke, Frank

    2017-09-01

    Electromechanical actuators have become a key technology for the onset of power-by-wire flight control systems in the next generation of commercial aircraft. The design of robust control and monitoring functions for these devices capable to mitigate the effects of safety-critical faults is essential in order to achieve the required level of fault tolerance. A primary flight control system comprising two electromechanical actuators nominally operating in active-active mode is considered. A set of five signal-based monitoring functions are designed using a detailed model of the system under consideration which includes non-linear parasitic effects, measurement and data acquisition effects, and actuator faults. Robust detection thresholds are determined based on the analysis of parametric and input uncertainties. The designed monitoring functions are verified experimentally and by simulation through the injection of faults in the validated model and in a test-rig suited to the actuation system under consideration, respectively. They guarantee a robust and efficient fault detection and isolation with a low risk of false alarms, additionally enabling the correct reconfiguration of the system for an enhanced operational availability. In 98% of the performed experiments and simulations, the correct faults were detected and confirmed within the time objectives set.

  6. A daily living activity remote monitoring system for solitary elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Hiromichi; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Matsuoka, Shingo; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Caldwell, W Morton

    2011-01-01

    A daily living activity remote monitoring system has been developed for supporting solitary elderly people. The monitoring system consists of a tri-axis accelerometer, six low-power active filters, a low-power 8-bit microcontroller (MC), a 1GB SD memory card (SDMC) and a 2.4 GHz low transmitting power mobile phone (PHS). The tri-axis accelerometer attached to the subject's chest can simultaneously measure dynamic and static acceleration forces produced by heart sound, respiration, posture and behavior. The heart rate, respiration rate, activity, posture and behavior are detected from the dynamic and static acceleration forces. These data are stored in the SD. The MC sends the data to the server computer every hour. The server computer stores the data and makes a graphic chart from the data. When the caregiver calls from his/her mobile phone to the server computer, the server computer sends the graphical chart via the PHS. The caregiver's mobile phone displays the chart to the monitor graphically.

  7. Sensor Monitoring of Physical Activity to Improve Glucose Management in Diabetic Patients: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Ding

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic individuals need to tightly control their blood glucose concentration. Several methods have been developed for this purpose, such as the finger-prick or continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMs. However, these methods present the disadvantage of being invasive. Moreover, CGMs have limited accuracy, notably to detect hypoglycemia. It is also known that physical exercise, and even daily activity, disrupt glucose dynamics and can generate problems with blood glucose regulation during and after exercise. In order to deal with these challenges, devices for monitoring patients’ physical activity are currently under development. This review focuses on non-invasive sensors using physiological parameters related to physical exercise that were used to improve glucose monitoring in type 1 diabetes (T1DM patients. These devices are promising for diabetes management. Indeed they permit to estimate glucose concentration either based solely on physical activity parameters or in conjunction with CGM or non-invasive CGM (NI-CGM systems. In these last cases, the vital signals are used to modulate glucose estimations provided by the CGM and NI-CGM devices. Finally, this review indicates possible limitations of these new biosensors and outlines directions for future technologic developments.

  8. Genetically encoded optical sensors for monitoring of intracellular chloride and chloride-selective channel activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bregestovski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This review briefly discusses the main approaches for monitoring chloride (Cl−, the most abundant physiological anion. Noninvasive monitoring of intracellular Cl− ([Cl−]i is a challenging task owing to two main difficulties: (i the low transmembrane ratio for Cl−, approximately 10:1; and (ii the small driving force for Cl−, as the Cl− reversal potential (ECl is usually close to the resting potential of the cells. Thus, for reliable monitoring of intracellular Cl−, one has to use highly sensitive probes. From several methods for intracellular Cl− analysis, genetically encoded chloride indicators represent the most promising tools. Recent achievements in the development of genetically encoded chloride probes are based on the fact that yellow fluorescent protein (YFP exhibits Cl−-sensitivity. YFP-based probes have been successfully used for quantitative analysis of Cl− transport in different cells and for high-throughput screening of modulators of Cl−-selective channels. Development of a ratiometric genetically encoded probe, Clomeleon, has provided a tool for noninvasive estimation of intracellular Cl− concentrations. While the sensitivity of this protein to Cl− is low (EC50 about 160 mM, it has been successfully used for monitoring intracellular Cl− in different cell types. Recently a CFP–YFP-based probe with a relatively high sensitivity to Cl− (EC50 about 30 mM has been developed. This construct, termed Cl-Sensor, allows ratiometric monitoring using the fluorescence excitation ratio. Of particular interest are genetically encoded probes for monitoring of ion channel distribution and activity. A new molecular probe has been constructed by introducing into the cytoplasmic domain of the Cl−-selective glycine receptor (GlyR channel the CFP–YFP-based Cl-Sensor. This construct, termed BioSensor-GlyR, has been successfully expressed in cell lines. The new genetically encoded chloride probes offer means of screening

  9. Marsis Calibration Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, R.; Safaeinili, A.; Kofman, W.; Picardi, G.

    MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding) is the first of a new generation of radio sounders. MARSIS will be flown on the ESA Mars Express spacecraft. It will arrive at Mars in early 2004 for a two-year mission. MAR- SIS is the result of an international collaboration between NASA, the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and European Space Agency (ESA), is designed to sense planets in- terior to a depth of up to 5 km. MARSISS main objective is to search for water if it exists in liquid form under the surface. It will also attempt to map and characterize the subsurface geological structure of Mars, which is hidden under a layer of surface dust. In addition to its subsurface exploration goals, MARSIS will study the ionosphere of Mars providing the most extensive amount of data on Martian ionosphere to date. One of the main challenges of MARSIS is the calibration of the sounder instrument. The main objective of MARSIS is to probe the subsurface of Mars using low fre- quency radio waves and provide science data related to the electromagnetic behavior of the surface and subsurface. However, the sounder data is impacted by the instru- ment response and other environmental factors such as the ionosphere, Mars magnetic field and surface clutter. Removal from the scientific data of these effects will involve testing on the ground before flight and data acquisition after Mars orbit insertion. Re- moval of the effects of surface clutter will use avail-able digital terrain maps of Mars provided by the MGS Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) team. This talk will highlight the calibration activities for MARSIS.

  10. HPS instrument calibration laboratory accreditation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, F.X; Eisenhower, E.H.; Swinth, K.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an accurate overview of the development and structure of the program established by the Health Physics Society (HPS) for accrediting instrument calibration laboratories relative to their ability to accurately calibrate portable health physics instrumentation. The purpose of the program is to provide radiation protection professionals more meaningful direct and indirect access to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) national standards, thus introducing a means for improving the uniformity, accuracy, and quality of ionizing radiation field measurements. The process is designed to recognize and document the continuing capability of each accredited laboratory to accurately perform instrument calibration. There is no intent to monitor the laboratory to the extent that each calibration can be guaranteed by the program; this responsibility rests solely with the accredited laboratory.

  11. Adolescents' leisure activities, parental monitoring and cigarette smoking--a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui; Reeder, Anthony I; McGee, Rob; Darling, Helen

    2011-06-06

    Adolescent participation in leisure activities is developmentally beneficial, but certain activities may increase health compromising behaviours, such as tobacco smoking. A limited range of leisure activities has been studied, with little research on out-of-school settings where parental supervision is a potential protective factor. Tobacco smoking is an important, potentially modifiable health determinant, so understanding associations between adolescent leisure activities, parental monitoring, demographic factors and daily smoking may inform preventive strategies. These associations are reported for a New Zealand adolescent sample. Randomly selected schools (n = 145) participated in the 2006 Youth In-depth Survey, a national, biennial study of Year 10 students (predominantly 14-15 years). School classes were randomly selected and students completed a self-report questionnaire in class time. Adjustment for clustering at the school level was included in all analyses. Since parental monitoring and demographic variables potentially confound relations between adolescent leisure activities and smoking, variables were screened before multivariable modelling. Given prior indications of demographic differences, gender and ethnic specific regression models were built. Overall, 8.5% of the 3,161 students were daily smokers, including more females (10.5%) than males (6.5%). In gender and ethnic specific multivariate analysis of associations with daily smoking (adjusted for age, school socioeconomic decile rating, leisure activities and ethnicity or gender, respectively), parental monitoring exhibited a consistently protective, dose response effect, although less strongly among Māori. Attending a place of worship and going to the movies were protective for non-Māori, as was watching sports, whereas playing team sport was protective for all, except males. Attending a skate park was a risk factor for females and Māori which demonstrated a strong dose response effect. There

  12. Adolescents' leisure activities, parental monitoring and cigarette smoking - a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darling Helen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent participation in leisure activities is developmentally beneficial, but certain activities may increase health compromising behaviours, such as tobacco smoking. A limited range of leisure activities has been studied, with little research on out-of-school settings where parental supervision is a potential protective factor. Tobacco smoking is an important, potentially modifiable health determinant, so understanding associations between adolescent leisure activities, parental monitoring, demographic factors and daily smoking may inform preventive strategies. These associations are reported for a New Zealand adolescent sample. Methods Randomly selected schools (n = 145 participated in the 2006 Youth In-depth Survey, a national, biennial study of Year 10 students (predominantly 14-15 years. School classes were randomly selected and students completed a self-report questionnaire in class time. Adjustment for clustering at the school level was included in all analyses. Since parental monitoring and demographic variables potentially confound relations between adolescent leisure activities and smoking, variables were screened before multivariable modelling. Given prior indications of demographic differences, gender and ethnic specific regression models were built. Results and Discussion Overall, 8.5% of the 3,161 students were daily smokers, including more females (10.5% than males (6.5%. In gender and ethnic specific multivariate analysis of associations with daily smoking (adjusted for age, school socioeconomic decile rating, leisure activities and ethnicity or gender, respectively, parental monitoring exhibited a consistently protective, dose response effect, although less strongly among Māori. Attending a place of worship and going to the movies were protective for non-Māori, as was watching sports, whereas playing team sport was protective for all, except males. Attending a skate park was a risk factor for females

  13. A review of the developments of radioxenon detectors for nuclear explosion monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivels, Ciara B.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Theodore W.; Kalinowski, Martin B.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2017-09-27

    Developments in radioxenon monitoring since the implementation of the International Monitoring System are reviewed with emphasis on the most current technologies to improve detector sensitivity and resolution. The nuclear detectors reviewed include combinations of plastic and NaI(Tl) detectors, high purity germanium detectors, silicon detectors, and phoswich detectors. The minimum detectable activity and calibration methods for the various detectors are also discussed.

  14. Validity and Usability of Physical Activity Monitoring in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Boeselt

    Full Text Available A large proportion of COPD patients do not achieve the recommended level of physical activity. It is suggested that feedback on the level of activity by using an activity monitoring device (PAM increases awareness and may stimulate patients to increase their physical activity in daily life. Our objective was to assess the validity and usability of a simple and low-cost physical activity monitor (Polar A300™ when compared with the validated and established Bodymedia-SenseWear™ (SWA device.To assess the diagnostic equivalent, two different PAM devices were used in parallel in 20 COPD patients GOLD I to IV during 3 consecutive days of daily life. Both systems were compared in terms of steps, calories burned, daily activity time and metabolic equivalents using linear regression analysis and Bland-Altman plots. Practical usability was examined by a 16-item-questionnaire.High correlations of both devices were observed with regard to the sensed step count (r = 0.96; p < 0.01 and calories burned (r = 0.74; p < 0.01, and a lower correlation of daily activity (r = 0.25; p < 0.01 was found. Data analysis over 3 days showed that 90% of the steps (95% CI -4223 to 1887, 100% of the calories (95% CI -2798 to 1887, 90% of the daily activity data (95% CI -12.32, 4065 and 95% of the MET (95% CI -3.11 to 2.75 were within the limits of agreement. A favorable usability (system-, information- and interface quality of the A300™ device was shown (p < 0.01.The A300™ device with easy practical usability was shown not to be inferior for assessment of physical activity time, step count and calorie consumption in COPD patients when compared with the SWA. It is suggested to consider widespread available devices as commonly used for monitoring recreational sporting activities also in patients for assessment of physical activity in daily life.

  15. On the prospects of cross-calibrating the Cherenkov Telescope Array with an airborne calibration platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Anthony M.

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology have made UAVs an attractive possibility as an airborne calibration platform for astronomical facilities. This is especially true for arrays of telescopes spread over a large area such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). In this paper, the feasibility of using UAVs to calibrate CTA is investigated. Assuming a UAV at 1km altitude above CTA, operating on astronomically clear nights with stratified, low atmospheric dust content, appropriate thermal protection for the calibration light source and an onboard photodiode to monitor its absolute light intensity, inter-calibration of CTA's telescopes of the same size class is found to be achievable with a 6 - 8 % uncertainty. For cross-calibration of different telescope size classes, a systematic uncertainty of 8 - 10 % is found to be achievable. Importantly, equipping the UAV with a multi-wavelength calibration light source affords us the ability to monitor the wavelength-dependent degradation of CTA telescopes' optical system, allowing us to not only maintain this 6 - 10 % uncertainty after the first few years of telescope deployment, but also to accurately account for the effect of multi-wavelength degradation on the cross-calibration of CTA by other techniques, namely with images of air showers and local muons. A UAV-based system thus provides CTA with several independent and complementary methods of cross-calibrating the optical throughput of individual telescopes. Furthermore, housing environmental sensors on the UAV system allows us to not only minimise the systematic uncertainty associated with the atmospheric transmission of the calibration signal, it also allows us to map the dust content above CTA as well as monitor the temperature, humidity and pressure profiles of the first kilometre of atmosphere above CTA with each UAV flight.

  16. Chronic monitoring of lower urinary tract activity via a sacral dorsal root ganglia interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurram, Abeer; Ross, Shani E.; Sperry, Zachariah J.; Ouyang, Aileen; Stephan, Christopher; Jiman, Ahmad A.; Bruns, Tim M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Our goal is to develop an interface that integrates chronic monitoring of lower urinary tract (LUT) activity with stimulation of peripheral pathways. Approach. Penetrating microelectrodes were implanted in sacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult male felines. Peripheral electrodes were placed on or in the pudendal nerve, bladder neck and near the external urethral sphincter. Supra-pubic bladder catheters were implanted for saline infusion and pressure monitoring. Electrode and catheter leads were enclosed in an external housing on the back. Neural signals from microelectrodes and bladder pressure of sedated or awake-behaving felines were recorded under various test conditions in weekly sessions. Electrodes were also stimulated to drive activity. Main results. LUT single- and multi-unit activity was recorded for 4-11 weeks in four felines. As many as 18 unique bladder pressure single-units were identified in each experiment. Some channels consistently recorded bladder afferent activity for up to 41 d, and we tracked individual single-units for up to 23 d continuously. Distension-evoked and stimulation-driven (DRG and pudendal) bladder emptying was observed, during which LUT sensory activity was recorded. Significance. This chronic implant animal model allows for behavioral studies of LUT neurophysiology and will allow for continued development of a closed-loop neuroprosthesis for bladder control.

  17. The Pediatric SmartShoe: Wearable Sensor System for Ambulatory Monitoring of Physical Activity and Gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Nagaraj; Zhang, Ting; Uswatte, Gitendra; Taub, Edward; Barman, Joydip; McKay, Staci; Taylor, Andrea; Morris, David M; Griffin, Angi; Sazonov, Edward S

    2018-02-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of nonprogressive neuro-developmental conditions occurring in early childhood that causes movement disorders and physical disability. Measuring activity levels and gait patterns is an important aspect of CP rehabilitation programs. Traditionally, such programs utilize commercially available laboratory systems, which cannot to be utilized in community living. In this study, a novel, shoe-based, wearable sensor system (pediatric SmartShoe) was tested on 11 healthy children and 10 children with CP to validate its use for monitoring of physical activity and gait. Novel data processing techniques were developed to remove the effect of orthotics on the sensor signals. Machine learning models were developed to automatically classify the activities of daily living. The temporal gait parameters estimated from the SmartShoe data were compared against reference measurements on a GAITRite mat. A leave-one-out cross-validation method indicated a 95.3% average accuracy of activity classification (for sitting, standing, and walking) for children with CP and 96.2% for healthy children. Average relative errors in gait parameter estimation (gait cycle, stance, swing, and step time, % single support time on both lower extremities, along with cadence) ranged from 0.2% to 6.4% (standard deviation range = 1.4%-9.9%). These results suggest that the pediatric SmartShoe can accurately measure physical activity and gait of children with CP and can potentially be used for ambulatory monitoring.

  18. APCAL1: Beam Position Monitor Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Early, R.A.

    1979-12-01

    APCAL1 is an applications program operational on the PEP MODCOMP IV computer for the purpose of converting beam position monitor (BPM) button voltage readings to x,y coordinates. Calibration information and the BPM readings are read from the MODCOMP IV data base. Corresponding x,y coordinates are written in the data base for use by other programs. APCAL1 is normally activated by another program but can be activated by a touch panel for checkout purposes.

  19. False Alarm Reduction in BSN-Based Cardiac Monitoring Using Signal Quality and Activity Type Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanatorn Tanantong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available False alarms in cardiac monitoring affect the quality of medical care, impacting on both patients and healthcare providers. In continuous cardiac monitoring using wireless Body Sensor Networks (BSNs, the quality of ECG signals can be deteriorated owing to several factors, e.g., noises, low battery power, and network transmission problems, often resulting in high false alarm rates. In addition, body movements occurring from activities of daily living (ADLs can also create false alarms. This paper presents a two-phase framework for false arrhythmia alarm reduction in continuous cardiac monitoring, using signals from an ECG sensor and a 3D accelerometer. In the first phase, classification models constructed using machine learning algorithms are used for labeling input signals. ECG signals are labeled with heartbeat types and signal quality levels, while 3D acceleration signals are labeled with ADL types. In the second phase, a rule-based expert system is used for combining classification results in order to determine whether arrhythmia alarms should be accepted or suppressed. The proposed framework was validated on datasets acquired using BSNs and the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. For the BSN dataset, acceleration and ECG signals were collected from 10 young and 10 elderly subjects while they were performing ADLs. The framework reduced the false alarm rate from 9.58% to 1.43% in our experimental study, showing that it can potentially assist physicians in diagnosing a vast amount of data acquired from wireless sensors and enhance the performance of continuous cardiac monitoring.

  20. International Collaboration on Building Local Technical Capacities for Monitoring Volcanic Activity at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Chigna, G.; Morales, H.; Waite, G. P.; Oommen, T.; Lechner, H. N.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a frequently active and potentially dangerous volcano situated in the Guatemalan volcanic arc. It is also a National Park and a major touristic attraction, constituting an important economic resource for local municipality and the nearby communities. Recent eruptions have caused fatalities and extensive damage to nearby communities, highlighting the need for risk management and loss reduction from the volcanic activity. Volcanic monitoring at Pacaya is done by the Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), instrumentally through one short period seismic station, and visually by the Parque Nacional Volcan de Pacaya y Laguna de Calderas (PNVPLC) personnel. We carry out a project to increase the local technical capacities for monitoring volcanic activity at Pacaya. Funding for the project comes from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists through the Geoscientists Without Borders program. Three seismic and continuous GPS stations will be installed at locations within 5 km from the main vent at Pacaya, and one webcam will aid in the visual monitoring tasks. Local educational and outreach components of the project include technical workshops on data monitoring use, and short thesis projects with the San Carlos University in Guatemala. A small permanent exhibit at the PNVPLC museum or visitor center, focusing on the volcano's history, hazards and resources, will also be established as part of the project. The strategy to involve a diverse group of local collaborators in Guatemala aims to increase the chances for long term sustainability of the project, and relies not only on transferring technology but also the "know-how" to make that technology useful. Although not a primary research project, it builds on a relationship of years of joint research projects at Pacaya between the participants, and could be a model of how to increase the broader impacts of such long term collaboration partnerships.

  1. Studies on dosimetric tests applying source irradiation force of Cs-137 for using in chambers for calibration and TLD type dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Laila Lorena X. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Goias (PUC-GO), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica, Fisica, Quimica e Engenharia de Alimentos; Barbosa, Rugles Cesar, E-mail: rbarbosa@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil). Laboratorio de Radioprotecao; Correa, Rosangela S., E-mail: rcorrea@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil). Laboratorio de Imagens e Dosimetria

    2011-07-01

    The West Central region of Brazil does not have a basic infrastructure for research, development, training programs, and personnel dosimetry education. All of them applied to environmental, industrial and medical uses. Service deployment for irradiance of TLD, via {sup 137}Cs irradiator J. L. SHEPHERD model 28-8A (444 activity GBq) in CRCN-CO, it is necessary to introduce procedures for calibration of the radiator and other procedures related to dosimetry and calibration. Such procedures should be repeated periodically, as necessary to introduce techniques that make the service of the CRCN-CO a template, and that meet all standards requirements for radioprotection and operation of dosimetry and calibration. The objective of this work was to evaluate the radiation field of Cs-137, and the automatic system which systematizes the calibration procedures attached to a system control target for the radiator/calibration of monitors, and portable dosimeters. (author)

  2. Calibration set up for load cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T. V. Govinda; Venkatesh, C. S.; Shivashankar, N.

    1989-05-01

    The planning, designing, fabrication, and calibration of 30, 50, and 100 ton tension load cells and 30 ton shear load cells are described. The tension load cells are for monitoring the force developed by earth moving vehicles and the shear load cells are for monitoring the load that tipplers unload form platform to ground. The shear load cells were incorporated into a rotary wagon tippler.

  3. POSSIBILITIES OF USING THE SENSEWEAR MOBILE MONITOR IN THE ASSESSMENT OF THE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Włodarek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the presented case study analysis was to present the possibilities of using the SenseWear PRO3 Armband mobile monitor in the assessment of physical activities. During the measurement, the SenseWear PRO3 Armband recorded the following parameters: total energy expenditure [kcal], average METs (for the whole analyzed period [-], number of steps [-], active energy expenditure [kcal], lying down duration [min], sleep duration [min], sedentary physical activity duration [min], physical activity duration [min], including moderate physical activity duration [min], vigorous physical activity duration [min] and very vigorous physical activity duration [min]. The results for chosen participant were analyzed – in various periods of time (for the 24 on-body hours sessions of wearing the SenseWear PRO3 Armband and the whole session, as well as for basic and broaden analysis. The graphical reports from the session were also presented. It was concluded that the SenseWear PRO3 Armband device is a valuable tool in everyday medical practice to specify the physical activity of individuals and to verify their declarations. For users, the SenseWear PRO3 Armband device is easy to handle, while measurement is not onerous and does not disturb typical activities.

  4. Static and dynamic calibration of radar data for hydrological use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Wood

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The HYREX dense raingauge network over the Brue catchment in Somerset, England is used to explore the accuracy of calibrated (raingauge-adjusted weather radar data. Calibration is restricted to the use of any single gauge within the catchment so as to simulate the conditions in a typical rainfall monitoring network. Combination of a single gauge and a radar estimate is used to obtain calibrated radar estimates, with the 'calibration factor' varying dynamically from one time-frame to the next. Comparing this dynamic calibration with a static (long-term calibration factor indicates the distance from a gauge over which the dynamic calibration is useful. A tapered calibration factor is implemented which behaves in the same way as the raw dynamic calibration at short distances, tending towards the static calibration factor at larger distances. This hybrid approach outperforms raingauge, uncalibrated radar, and statically-calibrated radar estimates of rainfall for the majority of raingauges in the catchment. The results provide valuable guidance on the density of raingauge network to employ in combination with a weather radar for flood estimation and forecasting. Keywords: radar, raingauge, calibration, rainfall, accuracy

  5. Smartphone-Based Patients' Activity Recognition by Using a Self-Learning Scheme for Medical Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junqi; Zhou, Xi; Sun, Yunchuan; Ping, Gong; Zhao, Guoxing; Li, Zhuorong

    2016-06-01

    Smartphone based activity recognition has recently received remarkable attention in various applications of mobile health such as safety monitoring, fitness tracking, and disease prediction. To achieve more accurate and simplified medical monitoring, this paper proposes a self-learning scheme for patients' activity recognition, in which a patient only needs to carry an ordinary smartphone that contains common motion sensors. After the real-time data collection though this smartphone, we preprocess the data using coordinate system transformation to eliminate phone orientation influence. A set of robust and effective features are then extracted from the preprocessed data. Because a patient may inevitably perform various unpredictable activities that have no apriori knowledge in the training dataset, we propose a self-learning activity recognition scheme. The scheme determines whether there are apriori training samples and labeled categories in training pools that well match with unpredictable activity data. If not, it automatically assembles these unpredictable samples into different clusters and gives them new category labels. These clustered samples combined with the acquired new category labels are then merged into the training dataset to reinforce recognition ability of the self-learning model. In experiments, we evaluate our scheme using the data collected from two postoperative patient volunteers, including six labeled daily activities as the initial apriori categories in the training pool. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed self-learning scheme for activity recognition works very well for most cases. When there exist several types of unseen activities without any apriori information, the accuracy reaches above 80 % after the self-learning process converges.

  6. Instrument calibration architecture of Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, T.; Bhan, R.; Putrevu, D.; Mehrotra, P.; Nandy, P. S.; Shukla, S. D.; Rao, C. V. N.; Dave, D. B.; Desai, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT-1) payload system is configured to perform self-calibration of transmit and receive paths before and after imaging sessions through a special instrument calibration technique. Instrument calibration architecture of RISAT-1 supported ground verification and validation of payload including active array antenna. During on-ground validation of 126 beams of active array antenna which needed precise calibration of boresight pointing, a unique method called "collimation coefficient error estimation" was utilized. This method of antenna calibration was supported by special hardware and software calibration architecture of RISAT-1. This paper concentrates on RISAT-1 hardware and software architecture which supports in-orbit and on-ground instrument calibration. Efforts are also put here to highlight use of special calibration scheme of RISAT-1 instrument to evaluate system response during ground verification and validation.

  7. Site Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Vesth, Allan

    This report describes the site calibration carried out at Østerild, during a given period. The site calibration was performed with two Windcube WLS7 (v1) lidars at ten measurements heights. The lidar is not a sensor approved by the current version of the IEC 61400-12-1 [1] and therefore the site...

  8. TWSTFT Link Calibration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302...and Bauch A (2014) THE EUROPEAN TW CALIBRATION CAMPAIGN 2014 IN THE SCOPE OF GALILEO (TGVF- FOC), An opportunity to update, TW link calibrations in

  9. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Villanueva, Héctor

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and correspondi...

  10. Immune System Model Calibration by Genetic Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Presbitero, A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.; Mancini, E.; Brands, R.; Sloot, P.

    2016-01-01

    We aim to develop a mathematical model of the human immune system for advanced individualized healthcare where medication plan is fine-tuned to fit a patient's conditions through monitored biochemical processes. One of the challenges is calibrating model parameters to satisfy existing experimental

  11. Standardized phenology monitoring methods to track plant and animal activity for science and resource management applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Ellen G.; Gerst, Katharine L.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Tierney, Geraldine L.; Crimmins, Theresa M.; Enquist, Carolyn A.F.; Guertin, Patricia; Rosemartin, Alyssa H.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2014-01-01

    Phenology offers critical insights into the responses of species to climate change; shifts in species’ phenologies can result in disruptions to the ecosystem processes and services upon which human livelihood depends. To better detect such shifts, scientists need long-term phenological records covering many taxa and across a broad geographic distribution. To date, phenological observation efforts across the USA have been geographically limited and have used different methods, making comparisons across sites and species difficult. To facilitate coordinated cross-site, cross-species, and geographically extensive phenological monitoring across the nation, the USA National Phenology Network has developed in situ monitoring protocols standardized across taxonomic groups and ecosystem types for terrestrial, freshwater, and marine plant and animal taxa. The protocols include elements that allow enhanced detection and description of phenological responses, including assessment of phenological “status”, or the ability to track presence–absence of a particular phenophase, as well as standards for documenting the degree to which phenological activity is expressed in terms of intensity or abundance. Data collected by this method can be integrated with historical phenology data sets, enabling the development of databases for spatial and temporal assessment of changes in status and trends of disparate organisms. To build a common, spatially, and temporally extensive multi-taxa phenological data set available for a variety of research and science applications, we encourage scientists, resources managers, and others conducting ecological monitoring or research to consider utilization of these standardized protocols for tracking the seasonal activity of plants and animals.

  12. POST-LAUNCHING MONITORING ACTIVITIES FOR NEW TRANSACTIONAL BANKING PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO SMES (CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuca Simona-Mihaela

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The current paper has the aim to provide guidelines for post-launching monitoring activities and steps related to new transactional banking products addressed to SMEs. While the pre-launching activities have the purpose of accurately defining the objectives, assumptions and estimations, the purpose of the post-launching plan is to identify: if the final objectives of a product launching have been met, on one hand, to analyze results in the sense of identifying an efficient action plan in order to overcome the lack of results (if case, but most important, to identify opportunities for optimizing the products and for communicating properly the value proposition. This paper also presents schemes for monitoring the results from a business case and for motivating the sales force, as an essential step in increasing the sales. Therefore, alternatives of incentive campaigns are presented, as sustainable campaigns with to purpose to achieve an expected success rate. As an additional support guideline for the sales force, some scenarios and post-sales actions are presented, together with an example of portfolio analysis considering potential per client. Considering the methods and details presented in the current paper, one can identify the importance and find out how to monitor the results after launching a new transactional product addressed to SMEs, can understand and design an incentive scheme and also define actions to be taken in order to increase revenues from a newly launched transactional product.

  13. Active landslide monitoring using remote sensing data, GPS measurements and cameras on board UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Kavoura, Katerina; Depountis, Nikolaos; Argyropoulos, Nikolaos; Koukouvelas, Ioannis; Sabatakakis, Nikolaos

    2015-10-01

    An active landslide can be monitored using many different methods: Classical geotechnical measurements like inclinometer, topographical survey measurements with total stations or GPS and photogrammetric techniques using airphotos or high resolution satellite images. As the cost of the aerial photo campaign and the acquisition of very high resolution satellite data is quite expensive the use of cameras on board UAV could be an identical solution. Small UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) have started their development as expensive toys but they currently became a very valuable tool in remote sensing monitoring of small areas. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a cheap but effective solution for an active landslide monitoring. We present the first experimental results of the synergistic use of UAV, GPS measurements and remote sensing data. A six-rotor aircraft with a total weight of 6 kg carrying two small cameras has been used. Very accurate digital airphotos, high accuracy DSM, DGPS measurements and the data captured from the UAV are combined and the results are presented in the current study.

  14. Standardized phenology monitoring methods to track plant and animal activity for science and resource management applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Ellen G.; Gerst, Katharine L.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Tierney, Geraldine L.; Crimmins, Theresa M.; Enquist, Carolyn A. F.; Guertin, Patricia; Rosemartin, Alyssa H.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2014-05-01

    Phenology offers critical insights into the responses of species to climate change; shifts in species' phenologies can result in disruptions to the ecosystem processes and services upon which human livelihood depends. To better detect such shifts, scientists need long-term phenological records covering many taxa and across a broad geographic distribution. To date, phenological observation efforts across the USA have been geographically limited and have used different methods, making comparisons across sites and species difficult. To facilitate coordinated cross-site, cross-species, and geographically extensive phenological monitoring across the nation, the USA National Phenology Network has developed in situ monitoring protocols standardized across taxonomic groups and ecosystem types for terrestrial, freshwater, and marine plant and animal taxa. The protocols include elements that allow enhanced detection and description of phenological responses, including assessment of phenological "status", or the ability to track presence-absence of a particular phenophase, as well as standards for documenting the degree to which phenological activity is expressed in terms of intensity or abundance. Data collected by this method can be integrated with historical phenology data sets, enabling the development of databases for spatial and temporal assessment of changes in status and trends of disparate organisms. To build a common, spatially, and temporally extensive multi-taxa phenological data set available for a variety of research and science applications, we encourage scientists, resources managers, and others conducting ecological monitoring or research to consider utilization of these standardized protocols for tracking the seasonal activity of plants and animals.

  15. Monitoring and descriptive analysis of radon in relation to seismic activity of Northern Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilani, Zeeshan; Mehmood, Tahir; Alam, Aftab; Awais, Muhammad; Iqbal, Talat

    2017-06-01

    Earthquakes are one of the major causes of natural disasters and its forecasting is challenging task. Some precursory phenomenon exists in theory in relation to earthquakes occurrence. The emission of radioactive gas named 'radon' before the earthquakes is a potential earthquake precursory candidate. The study aims to monitor and to analyze the radon in relation to seismic activity in Northern Pakistan. For this purpose RTM-2200 has been used to monitor the changes in radon concentration from August 01, 2014 to January 31, 2015 in Northern Pakistan. Significant temporal variations has been observed in radon concentration. The bivariate analysis of radon with other variables manifests its positive relationship with air pressure and relative humidity and negative relationship with temperature. 2σ upper control limit on monthly basis are computed for detection of anomalous trends in the data. Overall increasing trend is detected in radon concentration. Five earthquakes from August 01, 2014 to January 31, 2015 have been selected from earthquake catalogue, depending upon their magnitude and distance from monitoring station and out of which radon concentration can be associated with only two earthquakes correlated with tectonic effect of radon concentration. Both of events have same magnitude 5.5 and occurred on September 13 and October 14, 2014 respectively. Very large variations have been observed in radon for the last two months of the study period, which may be occurred due to some other geological and environmental changes, but are not related to the earthquake activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Standardized phenology monitoring methods to track plant and animal activity for science and resource management applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Ellen G; Gerst, Katharine L; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J; Tierney, Geraldine L; Crimmins, Theresa M; Enquist, Carolyn A F; Guertin, Patricia; Rosemartin, Alyssa H; Schwartz, Mark D; Thomas, Kathryn A; Weltzin, Jake F

    2014-05-01

    Phenology offers critical insights into the responses of species to climate change; shifts in species' phenologies can result in disruptions to the ecosystem processes and services upon which human livelihood depends. To better detect such shifts, scientists need long-term phenological records covering many taxa and across a broad geographic distribution. To date, phenological observation efforts across the USA have been geographically limited and have used different methods, making comparisons across sites and species difficult. To facilitate coordinated cross-site, cross-species, and geographically extensive phenological monitoring across the nation, the USA National Phenology Network has developed in situ monitoring protocols standardized across taxonomic groups and ecosystem types for terrestrial, freshwater, and marine plant and animal taxa. The protocols include elements that allow enhanced detection and description of phenological responses, including assessment of phenological "status", or the ability to track presence-absence of a particular phenophase, as well as standards for documenting the degree to which phenological activity is expressed in terms of intensity or abundance. Data collected by this method can be integrated with historical phenology data sets, enabling the development of databases for spatial and temporal assessment of changes in status and trends of disparate organisms. To build a common, spatially, and temporally extensive multi-taxa phenological data set available for a variety of research and science applications, we encourage scientists, resources managers, and others conducting ecological monitoring or research to consider utilization of these standardized protocols for tracking the seasonal activity of plants and animals.

  17. Calibration biases in logical reasoning tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Macbeth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this contribution is to present an experimental study about calibration in deductive reasoning tasks. Calibration is defi ned as the empirical convergence or divergence between the objective and the subjective success. The underconfi dence bias is understood as the dominance of the former over the latter. The hypothesis of this study states that the form of the propositions presented in the experiment is critical for calibration phenomena. Affi rmative and negative propositions are distinguished in their cognitive processing. Results suggests that monotonous compound propositions are prone to underconfi dence. An heuristic approach to this phenomenon is proposed. The activation of a monotony heuristic would produce an illusion of simplicity that generates the calibration bias. These evidence is analysed in the context of the metacognitive modeling of calibration phenomena.

  18. Physical activity and sedentary behavior following pediatric burns - a preliminary investigation using objective activity monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Moniek; Mouton, Leonora J; Disseldorp, Laurien M; Niemeijer, Anuschka S; van Brussel, Marco; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K

    2018-01-01

    Background: Adequate levels of regular physical activity (PA) are crucial for health and well-being. Pediatric burn injuries can have major physiological consequences in both the short and long term. The question is whether these consequences affect post burn PA levels. This study therefore aimed to

  19. Long-Term Monitoring of 'Active Asteroid' P/2016 G1 (PANSTARRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Dave Gerald; Jewitt, David; Rich, Robert Michael

    2017-10-01

    We present updated results of repeated monitoring of ‘Active Asteroid’ P/2016 G1 (PANSTARRS) using the 0.7-m, f/3.2 Jeanne Rich Telescope at the Jay Baum Rich Observatory in Frazier Park, CA, as well as the Keck 10-m telescope equipped with the LRIS instrument. The ‘Active Asteroids’ are a strange and newly discovered class of small bodies in the Solar System that have the orbital and dynamical properties of asteroids and also the physical properties of comets; for example, ejection of dust and volatile materials. P/2016 G1 (PANSTARRS) was detected in 2016 April by R. Weryk and R. Wainscoat using the 1.8-m PANSTARRS1 telescope and appears to exhibit activity potentially due to catastrophic impact of the main body (Moreno et al. 2016). In this work, we have monitored P/2016 G1 (PANSTARRS) from the months of April to August 2016 to better understand the mechanism and drivers of activity in this Solar System small body and detect changes in the appearance form which to form a more complete picture of this object.

  20. Robot-assisted motor activation monitored by time-domain optical brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, O.; Wabnitz, H.; Schmid, S.; Steingräber, R.; Schmidt, H.; Krüger, J.; Macdonald, R.

    2011-07-01

    Robot-assisted motor rehabilitation proved to be an effective supplement to conventional hand-to-hand therapy in stroke patients. In order to analyze and understand motor learning and performance during rehabilitation it is desirable to develop a monitor to provide objective measures of the corresponding brain activity at the rehabilitation progress. We used a portable time-domain near-infrared reflectometer to monitor the hemodynamic brain response to distal upper extremity activities. Four healthy volunteers performed two different robot-assisted wrist/forearm movements, flexion-extension and pronation-supination in comparison with an unassisted squeeze ball exercise. A special headgear with four optical measurement positions to include parts of the pre- and postcentral gyrus provided a good overlap with the expected activation areas. Data analysis based on variance of time-of-flight distributions of photons through tissue was chosen to provide a suitable representation of intracerebral signals. In all subjects several of the four detection channels showed a response. In some cases indications were found of differences in localization of the activated areas for the various tasks.

  1. A Combined sEMG and Accelerometer System for Monitoring Functional Activity in Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Serge H.; Cheng, M. Samuel; Chang, Shey-Sheen; Moore, John; De Luca, Gianluca; Nawab, S. Hamid; De Luca, Carlo J.

    2010-01-01

    Remote monitoring of physical activity using body-worn sensors provides an alternative to assessment of functional independence by subjective, paper-based questionnaires. This study investigated the classification accuracy of a combined surface electromyographic (sEMG) and accelerometer (ACC) sensor system for monitoring activities of daily living in patients with stroke. sEMG and ACC data (eight channels each) were recorded from 10 hemiparetic patients while they carried out a sequence of 11 activities of daily living (identification tasks), and 10 activities used to evaluate misclassification errors (nonidentification tasks). The sEMG and ACC sensor data were analyzed using a multilayered neural network and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system to identify the minimal sensor configuration needed to accurately classify the identification tasks, with a minimal number of misclassifications from the nonidentification tasks. The results demonstrated that the highest sensitivity and specificity for the identification tasks was achieved using a subset of four ACC sensors and adjacent sEMG sensors located on both upper arms, one forearm, and one thigh, respectively. This configuration resulted in a mean sensitivity of 95.0%, and a mean specificity of 99.7% for the identification tasks, and a mean misclassification error of system for automatic recognition of motor tasks used to assess functional independence in patients with stroke. PMID:20051332

  2. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Z.

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  3. Monitoring and Analyzing of Circadian and Ultradian Locomotor Activity Based on Raspberry-Pi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Pasquali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new device based on the Raspberry-Pi to monitor the locomotion of Arctic marine invertebrates and to analyze chronobiologic data has been made, tested and deployed. The device uses infrared sensors to monitor and record the locomotor activity of the animals, which is later analyzed. The software package consists of two separate scripts: the first designed to manage the acquisition and the evolution of the experiment, the second designed to generate actograms and perform various analyses to detect periodicity in the data (e.g., Fourier power spectra, chi-squared periodograms, and Lomb–Scargle periodograms. The data acquisition hardware and the software has been previously tested during an Arctic mission with an arctic marine invertebrate.

  4. Automatized Photometric Monitoring of Active Galactic Nuclei with the 46cm Telescope of the Wise Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo Nuñez, Francisco; Chelouche, Doron; Kaspi, Shai; Niv, Saar

    2017-09-01

    We present the first results of an ongoing variability monitoring program of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using the 46 cm telescope of the Wise Observatory in Israel. The telescope has a field of view of 1.25^\\circ × 0.84^\\circ and is specially equipped with five narrowband filters at 4300, 5200, 5700, 6200, and 7000 Å to perform photometric reverberation mapping studies of the central engine of AGNs. The program aims to observe a sample of 27 AGNs (V time delay measurements obtained in previous works. We describe the autonomous operation of the telescope together with the fully automatic pipeline used to achieve high-performance unassisted observations, data reduction, and light curves extraction using different photometric methods. The science verification data presented here demonstrates the performance of the monitoring program in particular for efficiently photometric reverberation mapping of AGNs with additional capabilities to carry out complementary studies of other transient and variable phenomena such as variable stars studies.

  5. The upgraded calibration system for the scintillator-PMT Tile Hadronic Calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at CERN/LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Dhiman; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy in highest energy proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) located on the outside of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each read out by two PMTs in parallel. A multi-component calibration system is employed to calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during data taking. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser and charge injection elements and it allows to monitor and ...

  6. The Upgraded Calibration System for the Scintillator-PMT Tile Hadronic Calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at CERN/LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Dhiman; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy in highest energy proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) located on the outside of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each read out by two PMTs in parallel. A multi-component calibration system is employed to calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during data taking. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser and charge injection elements and it allows to monitor and ...

  7. Solar activity monitoring and forecasting capabilities at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Gallagher

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The availability of full-disk, high-resolution Ha images from Big Bear Solar Observatory (USA, Kanzelhöhe Solar Observatory (Austria, and Yunnan Astronomical Observatory (China allows for the continual monitoring of solar activity with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Typically, this Global Ha Network (GHN provides almost uninterrupted Ha images with a cadence of 1 min and an image scale of 1'' per pixel.  Every hour, GHN images are transferred to the web-based BBSO Active Region Monitor (ARM; www.bbso.njit.edu/arm, which includes the most recent EUV, continuum, and magnetogram data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, together with magnetograms from the Global Oscillation Network Group. ARM also includes a variety of active region properties from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Space Environment Center, such as up-to-date active region positions, GOES 5-min X-ray data, and flare identification. Stokes I, V, Q, and U images are available from the recently operational BBSO Digital Vector Magnetograph and the Vector Magnetograph at the Huairou Solar Observing Station of Beijing Observatory. Vector magnetograms provide complete information on the photospheric magnetic field, and allow for magnetic flux gradients, electric currents, and shear forces to be calculated: these measurements are extremely sensitive to conditions resulting in flaring activity. Furthermore, we have developed a Flare Prediction System which estimates the probability for each region to produce C-, M-, or X-class flares based on nearly eight years of NOAA data from cycle 22. This, in addition to BBSO’s daily solar activity reports, has proven a useful resource for activity forecasting.Key words. Solar physics, astronomy and astrophysics (flares and mass ejections; instruments and techniques; photosphere and chromosphere

  8. Solar activity monitoring and forecasting capabilities at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Gallagher

    Full Text Available The availability of full-disk, high-resolution Ha images from Big Bear Solar Observatory (USA, Kanzelhöhe Solar Observatory (Austria, and Yunnan Astronomical Observatory (China allows for the continual monitoring of solar activity with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Typically, this Global Ha Network (GHN provides almost uninterrupted Ha images with a cadence of 1 min and an image scale of 1'' per pixel. 

    Every hour, GHN images are transferred to the web-based BBSO Active Region Monitor (ARM; www.bbso.njit.edu/arm, which includes the most recent EUV, continuum, and magnetogram data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, together with magnetograms from the Global Oscillation Network Group. ARM also includes a variety of active region properties from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Space Environment Center, such as up-to-date active region positions, GOES 5-min X-ray data, and flare identification. Stokes I, V, Q, and U images are available from the recently operational BBSO Digital Vector Magnetograph and the Vector Magnetograph at the Huairou Solar Observing Station of Beijing Observatory. Vector magnetograms provide complete information on the photospheric magnetic field, and allow for magnetic flux gradients, electric currents, and shear forces to be calculated: these measurements are extremely sensitive to conditions resulting in flaring activity. Furthermore, we have developed a Flare Prediction System which estimates the probability for each region to produce C-, M-, or X-class flares based on nearly eight years of NOAA data from cycle 22. This, in addition to BBSO’s daily solar activity reports, has proven a useful resource for activity forecasting.

    Key words. Solar physics, astronomy and astrophysics (flares and mass ejections; instruments and techniques

  9. Kinetics of Hydrogen Radical Reactions with Toluene Including Chemical Activation Theory Employing System-Specific Quantum RRK Theory Calibrated by Variational Transition State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-03-02

    Pressure-dependent reactions are ubiquitous in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. We employ a new calibration procedure for quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (QRRK) unimolecular rate theory within a chemical activation mechanism to calculate the pressure-falloff effect of a radical association with an aromatic ring. The new theoretical framework is applied to the reaction of H with toluene, which is a prototypical reaction in the combustion chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons present in most fuels. Both the hydrogen abstraction reactions and the hydrogen addition reactions are calculated. Our system-specific (SS) QRRK approach is adjusted with SS parameters to agree with multistructural canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (MS-CVT/SCT) at the high-pressure limit. The new method avoids the need for the usual empirical estimations of the QRRK parameters, and it eliminates the need for variational transition state theory calculations as a function of energy, although in this first application we do validate the falloff curves by comparing SS-QRRK results without tunneling to multistructural microcanonical variational transition state theory (MS-μVT) rate constants without tunneling. At low temperatures, the two approaches agree well with each other, but at high temperatures, SS-QRRK tends to overestimate falloff slightly. We also show that the variational effect is important in computing the energy-resolved rate constants. Multiple-structure anharmonicity, torsional-potential anharmonicity, and high-frequency-mode vibrational anharmonicity are all included in the rate computations, and torsional anharmonicity effects on the density of states are investigated. Branching fractions, which are both temperature- and pressure-dependent (and for which only limited data is available from experiment), are predicted as a function of pressure.

  10. Gentamicin in vitro activity and tentative gentamicin interpretation criteria for the CLSI and calibrated dichotomous sensitivity disc diffusion methods for Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Manju; Singh, Vikram; Philipova, Ivva; Bhargava, Aradhana; Chandra Joshi, Naveen; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    XDR Neisseria gonorrhoeae imposes the threat of untreatable gonorrhoea. Gentamicin is considered for future treatment; however, no interpretation criteria for the CLSI and calibrated dichotomous sensitivity (CDS) disc diffusion (DD) techniques are available for N. gonorrhoeae. We investigated the in vitro gentamicin activity by MIC and DD methods, proposed DD breakpoints and determined DD ranges for 10 international quality control (QC) strains. Gentamicin susceptibility of 333 N. gonorrhoeae isolates, including 323 clinical isolates and 10 QC strains, was determined. MIC determination (Etest) and DD methods (CLSI and CDS) were performed. The relationship between MIC, inhibition zone diameter and annular radius was determined by linear regression analysis and the correlation coefficient (r) was calculated. Gentamicin MICs for the QC strains were within published ranges. Of the 323 clinical isolates, according to published breakpoints 75.9%, 23.5% and 0.6% were susceptible, intermediately susceptible and resistant, respectively. Based on error minimization with MICs of ≤4, 8-16 and ≥32 mg/L, breakpoints proposed are susceptible ≥16 mm, intermediately susceptible 13-15 mm and resistant ≤12 mm for the CLSI method and susceptible ≥6 mm, less susceptible 3-5 mm and resistant ≤2 mm for the CDS technique. Low resistance to gentamicin was identified and gentamicin might be a future treatment option for gonorrhoea. Tentative gentamicin zone breakpoints were defined for two DD methods and QC ranges for 10 international reference strains were established. Our findings suggest that in resource-poor settings where MIC testing is not a feasible option, the DD methods can be used to indicate gentamicin resistance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ing, analysis of archaeology and art works, determination of radioactive and hazardous materials, environmental monitoring, space exploration, military explosive detection and biomedical studies. Quantitative LIBS analysis is conventionally performed using calibration-based meth- od in which calibration curves of emission ...

  12. GRS vs. OMS Calibration in LISA Pathfinder Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshksar, Neda; Ferraioli, Luigi; Mance, Davor; ten Pierick, Jan; Zweifel, Peter; Giardini, Domenico; ">LISA Pathfinder colaboration, monitored the relative calibration between the two measurements during the mission science phase. The trend sensitivity of the relative calibration has been computed for different physical parameters, such as temperature, magnetic field, test mass bias voltage and current.

  13. Insights on the structure and activity of Lusi mud edifice from land gravity monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Guillaume; Husein, Alwi; Karyono, Karyono; Hadi, Soffian; Prasetyo, Hardi; Lupi, Matteo; Obermann, Anne; Mazzini, Adriano; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    The Lusi mud eruption in East Java, Indonesia, active since May 2006, is a sedimentary-hosted hydrothermal system (SHHS) fed by magmatic fluids connected to the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex. The aims of the present study are to investigate changes in the local gravity field to obtain new insight into: 1) the evolution of the collapse structure ten years after its inception, 2) provide new insights on the thickening of the mud edifice for constraints on 3D numerical models, and 3) the pulsating phases characterizing the Lusi activity, which result in temporal density variations of the mudflow inside the active conduit. To investigate the structure of the mud edifice, we conducted a gravity spatial mapping over an area of 56 km2 with 390 new gravity stations. To investigate the density changes happening over time, we conducted several continuous gravity monitoring. We present results from gravity measurement collected during field campaigns in June and August 2016, and augmented by passive seismic and environmental parameter monitoring. We calculated for a reference density of 2,670 kg m-3 a new Bouguer anomaly map, which shows significant changes in the local gravity field in comparison to the previously published 2006-gravity map. In the west and south part of the edifice, maximum gravity decreases (-1 mGal) characterize the collapse of part of the edifice. In the southeast and east of the central area of flooded mud breccia, the gravity field increases locally (+1 mGal) along the limit defined by a previous study on the surface deformation of the mud edifice. The 3D model supports the hypothesis of a locally pinched volume of either mud, sediment, or mix of both between the subsiding volume and the uplifting volume of mud. The continuous gravity monitoring experiments were located at 320 and 380m away from the central area of a mud breccia flooded region. Over time, residual gravity variations reach up to 0.020 mGal in amplitude and occur at wavelengths

  14. A Review of Accelerometry-Based Wearable Motion Detectors for Physical Activity Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Chang Yang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of physical activity are indicative of one’s mobility level, latent chronic diseases and aging process. Accelerometers have been widely accepted as useful and practical sensors for wearable devices to measure and assess physical activity. This paper reviews the development of wearable accelerometry-based motion detectors. The principle of accelerometry measurement, sensor properties and sensor placements are first introduced. Various research using accelerometry-based wearable motion detectors for physical activity monitoring and assessment, including posture and movement classification, estimation of energy expenditure, fall detection and balance control evaluation, are also reviewed. Finally this paper reviews and compares existing commercial products to provide a comprehensive outlook of current development status and possible emerging technologies.

  15. Transcranial Doppler: a non-invasive tool for monitoring brain activity in virtual reality therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Beatriz; Parkhutik, Vera; Alcañiz, Mario; Tembl, Jose; Naranjo, Valery

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we propose the use of Transcranial Doppler Monitoring (TCD) as a tool to measure brain activity during the exposure to Virtual Environments (VE) used in clinical therapy sessions. The technique is non-invasive, and can be easily integrated with Virtual Reality (VR) settings. Moreover, it provides a high temporal resolution, which grants the possibility to analyze changes in brain activity during the evolution of a clinical session and to correlate them with specific events that may occur in the VE. We have performed two studies combining TCD with VR. Results of these studies show that it is feasible to use this technique in combination with VR settings designed for virtual therapy. It was observed that immersion and navigation modifications in the VE generated changes in brain activity that can be detected using TCD.

  16. Active Power Distribution Network Security Monitoring System Based on PDMiner Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHANG Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Active distribution network system has the characteristics of complex structure,high DG permeability,large load fluctuation,strict control requirements. The data information of operation has the characteristics of high volume,high speed,diversity and value. For active distribution network data processing, according to the theory of cloud calculation,using the data mining technology and distributed parallel computing method,establishing an active distribution network security monitoring system model based on PDMiner large data mining platform. The processing of historical data and real time fault data are studied respectively. Research results show that the system by processing of historical data for risk zoning,development planning,operation state evaluation,by processing of fault data for fault analysis and processing,providing the basis for the distribution network security. The result of the system is verified by the simulation example.

  17. The Study on Work Load Calibration by Using Step Test and Ergometer Test Was Carried Out in Order to Find the Best Way 10 Calibrate the Data Measurement and to Predict Human Work Load by Using Heart Rate Data. This Study Was Conducted on Four Male Subjects. But the Data Analysis Has Just Been Done to Three Subjects Due One of the Subject Was Insufficient Performance. the Sport Tester PE3000 Heart Rate Monitor is Used for Measuring the Heart Rate Data Which Will Be Useful for Predicting the Work

    OpenAIRE

    Herodian, Sam; Kastaman, Roni

    1998-01-01

    The study on Work Load Calibration by using Step Test and Ergometer test was carried out in order to find the best way 10 calibrate the data measurement and to predict human work load by using heart rate data. This study was conducted on four male subjects. but the data analysis has just been done to three subjects due one of the subject was insufficient performance. The sport tester PE3000 heart rate monitor is used for measuring the heart rate data which will be useful for predicting the wo...

  18. Processing circadian data collected from the Drosophila Activity Monitoring (DAM) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffenberger, Cory; Lear, Bridget C; Keegan, Kevin P; Allada, Ravi

    2010-11-01

    Adult behavioral assays have been used with great success in Drosophila melanogaster to identify circadian rhythm genes. In particular, the locomotor activity assay can identify altered behavior patterns over the course of several days in small populations, or even individual flies. Generally, circadian behavior is assayed during a period of 12 h light:12 h dark cycling (LD entrainment) followed by conditions of constant darkness (DD). LD activity profiles provide a qualitative image of daily activity bouts, and the data can be used to quantitatively assess the phase and/or amplitude of particular bouts. Additional activity assessments made from entrained flies that have been shifted to constant darkness can provide insight into the state of internal clocks and the ability of these clocks to drive rhythmic outputs. Typical LD DD runs assess both free-running rhythmicity and period length with χ2 periodogram (P'gram) analysis. This protocol describes the use of ClockLab (a MATLAB-based program) and the Counting Macro (an Excel-based program) to analyze circadian locomotor activity data collected using the Drosophila Activity Monitoring (DAM) System from TriKinetics. Specific procedures are described to analyze free-running rhythmicity and period length for individual flies, and assess group activity plots during both entrainment and constant conditions.

  19. Processing sleep data created with the Drosophila Activity Monitoring (DAM) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffenberger, Cory; Lear, Bridget C; Keegan, Kevin P; Allada, Ravi

    2010-11-01

    Adult behavioral assays have been used with great success in Drosophila melanogaster to identify circadian rhythm genes. In particular, the locomotor activity assay can identify altered behavior patterns over the course of several days in small populations, or even individual flies. Sleep is a highly conserved behavior that is required for optimal performance and, in many cases, life of an organism. Drosophila demonstrate a behavioral state that shows traits consistent with sleep: periods of relative behavioral immobility that coincide with an increased arousal threshold after ~5 min of inactivity, regulated by circadian and homeostatic mechanisms. However, because flies do not produce brain waves recordable by electroencephalography, sleep researchers use behavior-based paradigms to infer when a fly is asleep, as opposed to awake but immobile. Data on Drosophila activity can be collected using an automated monitoring system to provide insight into sleep duration, consolidation, and latency, as well as sleep deprivation and rebound. This protocol details the use of Counting Macro, an Excel-based program, to process data created with the Drosophila Activity Monitoring (DAM) System from TriKinetics for sleep analyses. Specifically, it