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Sample records for calibrated pressure pulses

  1. Modeling transducer impulse responses for predicting calibrated pressure pulses with the ultrasound simulation program Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    FIELD II is a simulation software capable of predicting the field pressure in front of transducers having any complicated geometry. A calibrated prediction with this program is, however, dependent on an exact voltage-to-surface acceleration impulse response of the transducer. Such impulse response...... is not calculated by FIELD II. This work investigates the usability of combining a one-dimensional multilayer transducer modeling principle with the FIELD II software. Multilayer here refers to a transducer composed of several material layers. Measurements of pressure and current from Pz27 piezoceramic disks...... transducer model and the FIELD II software in combination give good agreement with measurements....

  2. Toward Ubiquitous Blood Pressure Monitoring via Pulse Transit Time: Predictions on Maximum Calibration Period and Acceptable Error Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2017-09-22

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for ubiquitous blood pressure (BP) monitoring. PTT-based systems may require periodic cuff calibrations but can still be useful for hypertension screening by affording numerous, out-of-clinic measurements that can be averaged. The objective was to predict the maximum calibration period that would not compromise accuracy and acceptable error limits in light of measurement averaging for PTT-based systems. Well-known mathematical models and vast BP data were leveraged. Models relating PTT, age, and gender to BP were employed to determine the maximum time period for the PTT-BP calibration curve to change by 12 mmHg for systolic BP could achieve the screening accuracy of the cuff-based approach via measurement averaging. This theoretical study indicates that PTT-based BP monitoring is viable even with periodic calibration and seemingly high measurement errors. The predictions may help guide the implementation, evaluation, and application of PTT-based BP monitoring systems in practice.

  3. Pressures Detector Calibration and Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2156315

    2016-01-01

    This is report of my first and second projects (of 3) in NA61. I did data taking and analysis in order to do calibration of pressure detectors and verified it. I analyzed the data by ROOT software using the C ++ programming language. The first part of my project was determination of calibration factor of pressure sensors. Based on that result, I examined the relation between pressure drop, gas flow rate of in paper filter and its diameter.

  4. Calibration of pressure gauge for Cherenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Saponjic, Nevena

    2013-01-01

    Solartron/Hamilton pressure gauges are used to monitor the gas pressure in the particle beam detectors installed in the experimental areas. Here is description of the test bench for the calibration of these gauges in Labview.

  5. Pressure reciprocity calibration of a MEMS microphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Randall P; Fick, Steven E

    2017-09-01

    This article reports the first use of the pressure reciprocity technique to calibrate a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) microphone. This standardized primary calibration method is conventionally used to calibrate laboratory standard microphones. Results for the pressure reciprocity calibration of a MEMS microphone and two laboratory standard microphones are presented for the frequency range 100-10 000 Hz. Because the amplifier in the MEMS microphone package prevents reciprocal operation, this microphone was used only as a receiver of sound. A description of the procedure is presented along with checks of the measurement results and data regarding the uncertainties of these results.

  6. Probability based calibration of pressure coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Svend Ole; Pedersen, Marie Louise; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    not depend on the type of variable action. A probability based calibration of pressure coefficients have been carried out using pressure measurements on the standard CAARC building modelled on scale of 1:383. The extreme pressures measured on the CAARC building model in the wind tunnel have been fitted...... to Gumbel distributions, and these fits are found to represent the data measured with good accuracy. The pressure distributions found have been used in a calibration of partial factors, which should achieve a certain theoretical target reliability index. For a target annual reliability index of 4...

  7. Pulse pressure and diurnal blood pressure variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren Tang; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Hansen, Klavs Würgler

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In nondiabetic subjects pulse pressure (PP) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and microalbuminuria. Reduced circadian blood pressure (BP) variation is a potential risk factor for the development of diabetic complications. We investigated the association between...... retinopathy, nephropathy, macrovascular disease, PP, and diurnal BP variation in a group of type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: In 80 type 2 diabetic patients we performed 24-h ambulatory BP (AMBP) and fundus photographs. Urinary albumin excretion was evaluated by urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Presence...... or absence of macrovascular disease was assessed by an independent physician. RESULTS: Forty-nine patients had no detectable retinal changes (grade 1), 13 had grade 2 retinopathy, and 18 had more advanced retinopathy (grades 3-6). Compared to patients without retinopathy (grade 1), patients with grades 2...

  8. Evolvable Cryogenics (ECRYO) Pressure Transducer Calibration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Carlos E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the findings of recent activities conducted by Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) In-Space Propulsion Branch and MSFC's Metrology and Calibration Lab to assess the performance of current "state of the art" pressure transducers for use in long duration storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. A brief historical narrative in this paper describes the Evolvable Cryogenics program and the relevance of these activities to the program. This paper also provides a review of three separate test activities performed throughout this effort, including: (1) the calibration of several pressure transducer designs in a liquid nitrogen cryogenic environmental chamber, (2) the calibration of a pressure transducer in a liquid helium Dewar, and (3) the calibration of several pressure transducers at temperatures ranging from 20 to 70 degrees Kelvin (K) using a "cryostat" environmental chamber. These three separate test activities allowed for study of the sensors along a temperature range from 4 to 300 K. The combined data shows that both the slope and intercept of the sensor's calibration curve vary as a function of temperature. This homogeneous function is contrary to the linearly decreasing relationship assumed at the start of this investigation. Consequently, the data demonstrates the need for lookup tables to change the slope and intercept used by any data acquisition system. This ultimately would allow for more accurate pressure measurements at the desired temperature range. This paper concludes with a review of a request for information (RFI) survey conducted amongst different suppliers to determine the availability of current "state of the art" flight-qualified pressure transducers. The survey identifies requirements that are most difficult for the suppliers to meet, most notably the capability to validate the sensor's performance at temperatures below 70 K.

  9. Field mapping of ballistic pressure pulse sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rad Abtin Jamshidi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic pressure pulse sources are used since late 1990s for the extracorporeal treatment of chronic Enthesitis. Newly indications are found in trigger-point-therapy for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In both applications excellent results without relevant side effects were found in clinical trials. The technical principle of pressure pulse source is based on the same techniques used in air guns. A projectile is accelerated by pressurized air and hits the applicator with high kinetic energy. By this a compression wave travels through the material and induces a fast (4..5μs, almost singular pressure pulse of 2..10 MPa, which is followed by an equally short rarefaction phase of about the same amplitude. It is assumed that the pressure pulse accounts for the biomedical effects of the device. The slower inertial motion of the waveguide is damped by elastic stoppers, but still can be measured several micro seconds after the initial pressure pulse. In order to characterize the pressure pulse devices, field mapping is performed on several radial pressure pulse sources using the fiber optic hydrophone and a polyvinylidenfluorid (PVDF piezoelectric hydrophone. It could be shown that the current standard (IEC 61846 is not appropriate for characterization of ballistic pressure pulse sources.

  10. Calibration of oscillometric non-invasive devices for monitoring blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doh, Il; Lim, Hyun Kyoon; Ahn, Bongyoung

    2015-04-01

    Blood pressure is one of the most important vital signs used to monitor a patient’s medical condition and is widely measured in hospitals and at home. Automatic, non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitoring devices measure systolic and diastolic blood pressures from the analysis of cuff pressure oscillations caused by periodic variations of blood pressure in an artery. Currently, clinical validation by comparing them to the auscultatory reference has been used to verify the performance of NIBP devices. However, there are presently no calibration methods for NIBP devices. Here, we propose an SI-traceable calibration method for oscillometric NIBP devices. The calibration system generates pressure-pulses at pre-determined cuff pressures, and with pre-determined amplitude, to the device-under-test. The uncertainty of each pulse is analyzed and used for the calculation of blood pressure (BP) uncertainty. The maximum uncertainty for systolic and diastolic BP using the newly developed calibration system is (0.74 and 0.60) mmHg (k = 2) depending on the pressure and amplitude of each pulse, as well as the number of pulses applied. The present method can be used for calibration of oscillometric NIBP devices.

  11. Calibrated Pulse-Thermography Procedure for Inspecting HDPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Omar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript discusses the application of a pulse-thermography modality to evaluate the integrity of a high-density polyethylene HDPE joint for delamination, in nonintrusive manner. The inspected HDPE structure is a twin-cup shape, molded through extrusion, and the inspection system comprises a high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulse to excite thermal emission; the text calibrates the experiment settings (pulse duration, and detector sampling rate to accommodate HDPE bulks thermal response. The acquired thermal scans are processed through new contrast computation named “self-referencing”, to investigate the joint tensile strength and further map its adhesion interface in real-time. The proposed system (hardware, software combination performance is assessed through an ultrasound C-scan validation and further benchmarked using a standard pulse phase thermography (PPT routine.

  12. Bandpass calibration of a wideband spectrometer using coherent pulse injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Nipanjana; Bray, Justin D.; Roberts, Paul; Ekers, Ron D.

    2017-04-01

    We present a relatively simple time domain method for determining the bandpass response of a system by injecting a nanosecond pulse and capturing the system voltage output. A pulse of sub-nanosecond duration contains all frequency components with nearly constant amplitude up to 1 GHz. Hence, this method can accurately determine the system bandpass response to a broadband signal. In a novel variation on this impulse response method, a train of pulses is coherently accumulated providing precision calibration with a simple system. The basic concept is demonstrated using a pulse generator-accumulator setup realised in a Bedlam board which is a high speed digital signal processing unit. The same system was used at the Parkes radio telescope between 2-13 October 2013 and we demonstrate its powerful diagnostic capability. We also present some initial test data from this experiment.

  13. Calibration of windowless photodiode for extreme ultraviolet pulse energy measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav; Frolov, Oleksandr

    2015-12-10

    For energy measurement of extreme ultraviolet pulses, no universal commercially available device is available. Therefore, a co-axial setup of a vacuum photodiode was developed and tested. First its unsuccessful calibration at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA) is mentioned. Then our own single-wavelength (46.9 nm) calibration procedure is described in detail. It is based on tabulated photoemission efficiency and on measured (1) anode collection efficiency, (2) attenuation of Al filters, and (3) attenuation of measuring cables. Some other relevant attenuating factors are also taken into account.

  14. 40 CFR 1065.315 - Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint... Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.315 Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration. (a) Calibrate instruments for measuring pressure, temperature, and dewpoint upon initial installation. Follow the instrument...

  15. Device for calibration of low pressure gauges development

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitović Ž.D.

    2002-01-01

    Vacuum system set-up is presented and used for calibration of pressure gauges in the region of rough vacuum, from 103 mbar to 10-1 mbar, with dry air. The capacitance manometer is used for the calibration of piezoresistant manometer, oil, mercury and mercury micrometers U manometers. The applicability of the experimental set-up and obtained results for the low pressure gauges calibration in the medium and high vacuum region is approved. It was shown how calibration of some cheaper pressure ga...

  16. Patient Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate Monitoring With an Alert ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure and pulse rate are two of the vital signs of humans and it is imperative that the chronically ill and the elderly patients need to have their blood pressure and pulse rate checked from time to time. This paper describes the use of the Omron 790it blood pressure monitor to check the blood pressure and the pulse ...

  17. Frequency analysis of a step dynamic pressure calibrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In-Mook; Yang, Inseok; Yang, Tae-Heon

    2012-09-01

    A dynamic high pressure standard is becoming more essential in the fields of mobile engines, space science, and especially the area of defense such as long-range missile development. However, a complication arises when a dynamic high pressure sensor is compared with a reference dynamic pressure gauge calibrated in static mode. Also, it is difficult to determine a reference dynamic pressure signal from the calibrator because a dynamic high pressure calibrator generates unnecessary oscillations in a positive-going pressure step method. A dynamic high pressure calibrator, using a quick-opening ball valve, generates a fast step pressure change within 1 ms; however, the calibrator also generates a big impulse force that can lead to a short life-time of the system and to oscillating characteristics in response to the dynamic sensor to be calibrated. In this paper, unnecessary additional resonant frequencies besides those of the step function are characterized using frequency analysis. Accordingly, the main sources of resonance are described. In order to remove unnecessary frequencies, the post processing results, obtained by a filter, are given; also, a method for the modification of the dynamic calibration system is proposed.

  18. Dynamic calibration of piezoelectric transducers for ballistic high-pressure measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkarous Lamine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a dynamic calibration standard for high-amplitude pressure piezoelectric transducers implies the implementation of a system which can provide reference pressure values with known characteristics and uncertainty. The reference pressure must be issued by a sensor, as a part of a measuring chain, with a guaranteed traceability to an international standard. However, this operation has not been completely addressed yet until today and is still calling further investigations. In this paper, we introduce an experimental study carried out in order to contribute to current efforts for the establishment of a reference dynamic calibration method. A suitable practical calibration method based on the calculation of the reference pressure by measurement of the displacement of the piston in contact with an oil-filled cylindrical chamber is presented. This measurement was achieved thanks to a high speed camera and an accelerometer. Both measurements are then compared. In the first way, pressure was generated by impacting the piston with a free falling weight and, in the second way, with strikers of known weights and accelerated to the impact velocities with an air gun. The aim of the experimental setup is to work out a system which may generate known hydraulic pressure pulses with high-accuracy and known uncertainty. Moreover, physical models were also introduced to consolidate the experimental study. The change of striker’s velocities and masses allows tuning the reference pressure pulses with different shapes and, therefore, permits to sweep a wide range of magnitudes and frequencies.

  19. Assessment of the calibration curve for transmittance pulse-oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, A.; Fine, I.; Meglinski, I.

    2011-11-01

    Optical/laser modalities provide a broad variety of practical solutions for clinical diagnostics and therapy in a range from imaging of single cells and molecules to non-invasive biopsy of specific biological tissues and organs tomography. Near-infrared transmittance pulse oximetry with laser diodes is the accepted standard in current clinical practice and widely used for noninvasive monitoring of oxygen saturation in arterial blood hemoglobin. Conceptual design of practical pulse oximetry systems requires careful selection of various technical parameters, including intensity, wavelength, beam size and profile of incident laser radiation, size, numerical aperture of the detector, as well as a clear understanding of how the spatial and temporal structural alterations in biological tissues can be linked with and can be distinguished by variations of these parameters. In current letter utilizing state-of-the-art NVIDEA CUDA technology, a new object oriented programming paradigm and on-line solutions we introduce a computational tool applied for human finger transmittance spectra simulation and assessment of calibration curve for near-infrared transmitted pulseoximetry.

  20. PIEZOELECTRIC WAVEGUIDE SENSOR FOR MEASURING PULSE PRESSURE IN CLOSED LIQUID VOLUMES AT HIGH VOLTAGE ELECTRIC DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Zhekul

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Investigations of the characteristics of pressure waves presuppose the registration of the total profile of the pressure wave at a given point in space. For these purposes, various types of «pressure to the electrical signal» transmitters (sensors are used. Most of the common sensors are unsuitable for measuring the pulse pressure in a closed water volume at high hydrostatic pressures, in particular to study the effect of a powerful high-voltage pulse discharge on increasing the inflow of minerals and drinking water in wells. The purpose of the work was to develop antijamming piezoelectric waveguide sensor for measuring pulse pressure at a close distance from a high-voltage discharge channel in a closed volume of a liquid. Methodology. We have applied the calibration method as used as a secondary standard, the theory of electrical circuits. Results. We have selected the design and the circuit solution of the waveguide pressure sensor. We have developed a waveguide pulse-pressure sensor DTX-1 with a measuring loop. This sensor makes it possible to study the spectral characteristics of pressure waves of high-voltage pulse discharge in closed volumes of liquid at a hydrostatic pressure of up to 20 MPa and a temperature of up to 80 °C. The sensor can be used to study pressure waves with a maximum amplitude value of up to 150 MPa and duration of up to 80 µs. According to the results of the calibration, the sensitivity of the developed sensor DTX-1 with a measuring loop is 0.0346 V/MPa. Originality. We have further developed the theory of designing the waveguide piezoelectric pulse pressure sensors for measuring the pulse pressure at a close distance from a high-voltage discharge channel in a closed fluid volume by controlling the attenuation of the amplitude of the pressure signal. Practical value. We have developed, created, calibrated, used in scientific research waveguide pressure pulse sensors DTX-1. We propose sensors DTX-1 for sale

  1. Pressure prediction model based on artificial neural network optimized by genetic algorithm and its application in quasi-static calibration of piezoelectric high-pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tingwei; Kong, Deren; Jiang, Jian; Shang, Fei; Chen, Jing

    2016-12-01

    This paper applies back propagation neural network (BPNN) optimized by genetic algorithm (GA) for the prediction of pressure generated by a drop-weight device and the quasi-static calibration of piezoelectric high-pressure sensors for the measurement of propellant powder gas pressure. The method can effectively overcome the slow convergence and local minimum problems of BPNN. Based on test data of quasi-static comparison calibration method, a mathematical model between each parameter of drop-weight device and peak pressure and pulse width was established, through which the practical quasi-static calibration without continuously using expensive reference sensors could be realized. Compared with multiple linear regression method, the GA-BPNN model has higher prediction accuracy and stability. The percentages of prediction error of peak pressure and pulse width are less than 0.7% and 0.3%, respectively.

  2. Pulse-based internal calibration of polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Skou, Niels; Christensen, Erik Lintz

    1994-01-01

    Internal calibration greatly diminishes the dependence on calibration target deployment compared to external calibration. Therefore the Electromagnetics Institute (EMI) at the Technical University of Denmark (TUD) has equipped its polarimetric SAR, EMISAR, with several calibration loops and devel......Internal calibration greatly diminishes the dependence on calibration target deployment compared to external calibration. Therefore the Electromagnetics Institute (EMI) at the Technical University of Denmark (TUD) has equipped its polarimetric SAR, EMISAR, with several calibration loops...... and developed a procedure for calibrating the entire system except a few passive components which must be measured in the laboratory. The calibration procedure has great potential as it takes into account the SAR point target response (PTR) unlike most other internal calibration schemes. However, it requires...

  3. Pressure calibration in solid pressure transmitting medium in large volume press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaozhi; Ren, Xiangting; He, Duanwei

    2016-12-01

    The pressure limit in the large-volume-press (LVP) is increasing, but the in situ pressure calibration in LVP is still not a well resolved problem. The variation of the electrical resistance of the manganin with pressure in a hydrostatic condition is well known and is widely used in the pressure calibration in LVP. However, the hydrostatic pressure condition is hard to be maintained for the unavoidable solidification of the pressure transmitting medium (PTM) with pressure increasing. Moreover, our understanding about the relationship between pressure and manganin's resistance in a solid transmitting medium is still limited. Therefore, it is difficult to calibrate higher pressure using manganin. We measured the electrical resistance of manganin under pressure in pyrophyllite, MgO, and NaCl, respectively. The results show a linear relationship between the resistance and pressure in the same PTM with good reproducibility. In addition, the resistance-pressure relationships of manganin in different PTM are obviously different. So the resistance of manganin in a given solid PTM can be satisfactorily used as a pressure gauge only in the same PTM but cannot be used in other pressure media. Our results make it possible to calibrate higher pressure in a solid pressure transmitting medium in LVP.

  4. Extracting oscillometric pulses from the cuff pressure: does it affect the pressures determined by oscillometric blood pressure monitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoore, John N

    2006-10-01

    Oscillometric noninvasive blood pressure measurement devices determine the pressures by analysing the relationship between the pressure in an occluding cuff and low-amplitude pressure pulses (oscillometric pulses) induced in the cuff by the arterial pressure wave. This paper examines the effects on the pulses and oscillometric pulse amplitude envelope of the filters that extract the pulses from the cuff pressure. The cuff pressure and oscillometric pulses extracted by the filter were recorded from a Critikon DINAMAP and a Datex Cardiocap, chosen because of accessibility of the filtered and unfiltered signals. The unfiltered oscillometric pulses were determined by subtracting the cuff pressure from a baseline constructed to represent either the Critikon's step deflation cuff pressure or the Datex's gradual pressure decrease. Waveforms were recorded from a noninvasive blood pressure test simulator and three volunteers. The filter alters the shape of oscillometric pulses causing a shift in the oscillometric pulse amplitude envelope drawn from the filtered pulses compared with that drawn from the unfiltered pulses in human subjects, but not the test simulator. The pulse shape distortion is dependent on the filter characteristics and the oscillometric pulse shape. Further work is required to explore whether this may help explain why simulators with artificial waveforms cannot validate noninvasive blood pressure monitors and why noninvasive blood pressure monitors may not be accurate in all patient groups.

  5. Effect of interval training programme on pulse pressure in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharmacological management of hypertension and may prevent cardiovascular event through the down regulation of PP in hypertension. Key words: Hypertension, Interval exercise, pulse pressure, cardiovascular risk factor, Blood pressure.

  6. Peak expiratory flow rate and Pulse Pressure values during the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the peak expiratory flow rate and pulse pressure during the luteal and menstruation phases of the menstrual cycle. The peak expiratory flow rate and pulse pressure were measured using the Wright's Peak Flow Meter and Mercury Sphygmomanometer respectively. The peak expiratory flow rate and ...

  7. Pulse pressure reduction and cardiovascular protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Stéphane; Tropeano, Anne-Isabelle; Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    Brachial pulse pressure (PP) is now a well-established cardiovascular risk factor. Central rather than peripheral PP should be measured to determine the 'true' haemodynamic effects of antihypertensive agents on target organs. Peripheral PP, measured at the brachial artery, does not reflect central PP (either carotid or ascending aorta), because their determinants are different and pathophysiological conditions and drugs may change central PP without changing peripheral PP. Central PP (i.e. carotid artery or ascending aorta) has shown an independent predictive value for all-cause mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease and in the hypertensive patients of the CAFE study. Antihypertensive treatment has repeatedly demonstrated its ability to prevent cardiovascular events. Whether the effect on cardiovascular events in clinical trials comparing two pharmacological classes or two therapeutic strategies is, at least partly, the result of differential effects on PP remains to be demonstrated. It is therefore of major importance to determine which therapeutic strategies may differentially lower central PP, and in turn reduce cardiovascular events. In clinical practice, lowering PP is often a difficult task, particularly in diabetic hypertensive individuals. In the PARADIS study, we aimed to determine, in a population of hypertensive patients with both type 2 diabetes and PP greater than 60 mmHg, which clinical characteristics predict the fall in PP on treatment and a reduction in cardiovascular events. The reinforcement of therapeutic measures, including a fixed low-dose perindopril/indapamide combination, made possible the effective lowering of PP and cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic hypertensive patients, under conditions of usual care by general practitioners and specialists.

  8. Nuclear reactor pulse calibration using a CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kyle A; Geuther, Jeffrey A; Neihart, James L; Riedel, Todd A; Rojeski, Ronald A; Saddler, Jeffrey L; Schmidt, Aaron J; McGregor, Douglas S

    2012-07-01

    A CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector was used to calibrate nuclear reactor pulses. The standard configuration of the Pockels cell has collimated light passing through an optically transparent CdZnTe crystal located between crossed polarizers. The transmitted light was focused onto an IR sensitive photodiode. Calibrations of reactor pulses were performed using the CdZnTe Pockels cell by measuring the change in the photodiode current, repeated 10 times for each set of reactor pulses, set between 1.00 and 2.50 dollars in 0.50 increments of reactivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ventilator-induced pulse pressure variation in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heskamp, L.; Lansdorp, B.; Hopman, J.; Lemson, J.; Boode, W.P. de

    2016-01-01

    During positive pressure ventilation, arterial pressure variations, like the pulse pressure variation (PPV), are observed in neonates. However, the frequency of the PPV does not always correspond with the respiratory rate. It is hypothesized that PPV is caused by cardiopulmonary interaction, but

  10. Calibrating the Helium Pressurization System for the Space Shuttle Liquid-Hydrogen Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the results from the STS-114 tanking tests and subsequent launch called into question existing thermal and mass models of helium pressurization of the liquid hydrogen tank. This hydrogen tank, which makes up the bottom two-thirds of the External Tank, is pressurized prior to launch to avoid cavitation in the Shuttle Main Engine pumps. At about 2 minutes prior to launch, the main vent valve is closed, and pressurized helium flows into the tank ullage space to achieve set point pressure. As the helium gas cools, its pressure drops, calling for additional helium. Subsequent helium flows are provided in short, timed pulses. The number of pulses is taken as a rough leak indicator. An analysis of thermal models by Marshall Space Flight Center showed considerable uncertainty in the pressure-versus-time behavior of the helium ullage space and the ability to predict the number of pulses normally expected. Kennedy Space Center proposed to calibrate the dime-sized orifice, which together with valves, controls the helium flow quantity (Figure 1). Pressure and temperature sensors were installed to provide upstream and downstream measurements necessary to compute flow rate based on the orifice discharge coefficient. An assessment of flow testing with helium indicated an extremely costly use of this critical resource. In order to reduce costs, we proposed removing the orifices from each Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) and asking Colorado Engineering Experiment Station Inc. (CEESI) to calibrate the flow. CEESI has a high-pressure air flow system with traceable flow meters capable of handling the large flow rates. However, literature research indicated that square-edged orifices of small diameters often exhibit significant hysteresis and nonrepeatability in the vicinity of choked or sonic flow. Fortunately, the MLP orifices behaved relatively well in testing (Figure 2). Using curve fitting of the air-flow data, in conjunction with ASME orifice modeling equations, a

  11. Characterization and calibration of the central arterial pressure waveform obtained from vibrocardiographic signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casacanditella, L.; Cosoli, G.; Casaccia, S.; Rohrbaugh, J. W.; Scalise, L.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2016-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) has been demonstrated to be a non-contact technique with high sensitivity, able to measure the skin vibrations related to cardiac activity. The obtainable mechanical signal (i.e. a velocity signal), VibroCardioGram (VCG), is able to provide significant physiological parameters, such as Heart Rate (HR). In this work, the authors aim to present a non-contact measurement method to obtain the arterial blood pressure signal from the mechanical vibrations assessed by LDV, in a central district of the arterial tree, such as carotid artery. In fact, in this way it is possible to indirectly assess Central Arterial Blood Pressure (CABP), which indicates the hemodynamic load on the heart, so that it is considered an important index predicting the cardiac risk of a subject. The measurement setup involves the use of an oscillometric cuff, to measure peripheral blood pressure at the radial artery level. Diastolic and Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) at radial level were used to calibrate the integrated LDV signal (i.e. a displacement signal). As regard calibration, an exponential mathematical model was adopted to derive the pressure waveform from the displacement of the vessel detected by LDV. Results show an average difference of around 20% between systolic pressure measured at brachial level (i.e. peripheral pressure value) and systolic pressure derived from VCG signal measured over the carotid artery (i.e. central pressure). This is a physiological difference, consistent with the literature about the physiological increase of Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) and Pressure Pulse (PP) at increased distances from the heart. However, this non-contact technique is affected by movement artifacts and by reflection phenomena not related to the studied vessel and so it is necessary to account of such issues in the results.

  12. Blood pressure monitoring during exercise: comparison of pulse transit time and volume clamp methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibmer, Thomas; Denner, Coy; Fischer, Christoph; Schildge, Benedikt; Rüdiger, Stefan; Kropf-Sanchen, Cornelia; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Schumann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    During physical exercise, pulse transit time (PTT), expressed as the interval between ventricular electrical activity and peripheral pulse wave, may provide a surrogate estimate for blood pressure by the use of specific calibration procedures. The objective of this study was to determine systolic blood pressure (SBP) values derived from the PTT method and from an established method of non-invasive continuous blood pressure measurement based on the volume clamp technique, and to compare their agreement with sphygmomanometry during exercise tests. In 18 subjects, electrocardiogram (ECG) and finger-photoplethysmography were continuously recorded during maximal cycle exercise tests. Intermittent and continuous blood pressure measurements were simultaneously taken using automated sphygmomanometry and a Portapres Model-2 device, respectively. PTT was calculated for each ECG R-wave and the corresponding steepest upstroke slope in the photoplethysmogram, and was transformed to a continuous blood pressure estimate using multipoint nonlinear regression calibration based on the individual subject's sphygmomanometer readings. Bland-Altman limits of agreement between PTT-derived SBP estimates and sphygmomanometer values were -24.7 to 24.1 mmHg, and between Portapres and sphygmomanometer SBP values were -42.0 to 70.1 mmHg. For beat-to-beat SBP estimation during exercise, PTT measurement combined with multipoint nonlinear regression calibration based on intermittent sphygmomanometry may be an alternative to volume clamp devices.

  13. Calibration of Diamond As a Raman Spectroscopy Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, S.

    2014-12-01

    In high pressures and high temperatures, the equations of state of reference materials, such as gold, platinum, and sodium chloride, have usually been used for the precise determination of the sample pressure. However, it is difficult to use this technique in laboratory-based experiments, because the synchrotron radiation source is often required. Although the fluorescence of ruby has been commonly used as the pressure sensor in previous laboratory-based experiments, it is impracticable at high temperatures. It is known that the first-order Raman mode of diamond anvil has been considered as a strong candidate because its Raman signal is intense and the diamond is always used as the anvil material. It is the purpose of this study to present the dependences of pressure and temperature on the Raman shift at the culet face of the diamond anvil.Gold powder, which was mixed with NaCl powder, was used as the pressure reference. The high-pressure and high-temperature experiments were performed using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HTDAC). The sample was probed using angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometer system, located at the synchrotron beam line, at the BL10XU of SPring-8. The pressure was determined from the unit cell volume of gold using the equation of state for gold. The pressure and temperature dependences of the Raman shift were investigated [1]. The difference between our and previous studies increased rapidly with increasing pressure at pressures above 50 GPa, which is a fatal uncertainty for the pressure calibration. One possible explanation for this inconsistency is an influence of the stress condition in the sample chamber, because a significant deviatoric stress is accumulated during compression. The stress condition of the DAC experiment on the generated pressure is complicated because of some factors (e.g., the crystallographic orientation, design of the anvil, size of the culet, pressure transmitting medium, gasket material, and

  14. Patient Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate Monitoring With an Alert ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-01

    Dec 1, 2012 ... cuff around your arm and, at a single press of a button, your blood pressure, pulse rate and any cardiac arrhythmias (heart beat irregularities) are calculated. The monitor benefits from Omron's 'IntelliSense' technology [1]. This is a great feature which takes your blood pressure into account and inflates.

  15. Ventilator?induced pulse pressure variation in neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Heskamp, L.; Lansdorp, B.; Hopman, J; Lemson, J.; Boode, W.P. de

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During positive pressure ventilation, arterial pressure variations, like the pulse pressure variation (PPV), are observed in neonates. However, the frequency of the PPV does not always correspond with the respiratory rate. It is hypothesized that PPV is caused by cardiopulmonary interaction, but that this mismatch is related to the low respiratory rate/heart rate ratio. Therefore, the goal of this study is to investigate the relation between PPV and ventilation in neonates. A prospec...

  16. Pulsed pressure treatment for inactivation of escherichia coli and listeria innocua in whole milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzrul, S; Largeteau, A; Demazeau, G [ICMCB, CNRS, Universite Bordeaux 1, site de l' ENSCPB, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, 33608 PESSAC cedex (France); Alpas, H [Food Engineering Department, Middle East Technical University, 06531, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: sbuzrul@metu.edu.tr

    2008-07-15

    E. coli and L. innocua in whole milk were subjected to continuous pressure treatments (300, 350, 400, 450, 500, 550 and 600 MPa) at ambient temperature for 5, 10, 15 and 20 min. These treatments underlined that at moderate pressure values (300, 350 and 400 MPa), increasing the pressurization time from 5 to 20 min did not improve cell death to a great extent. Therefore, pulsed pressure treatments (at 300, 350 and 400 MPa) for 5 min (2.5 min x 2 pulses, 1 min x 5 pulses and 0.5 min x 10 pulses), 10 min (5 min x 2 pulses, 2 min x 5 pulses and 1 min x 10 pulses), 15 min (5 min x 3 pulses, 3 min x 5 pulses and 1.5 min x 10 pulses) and 20 min (10 min x 2 pulses, 5 min x 4 pulses, 4 min x 5 pulses and 2 min x 10 pulses) were applied. As already observed in continuous pressure experiments, in pulsed pressure treatments the inactivation level is improved with increasing pressure level and in addition with the number of applied pulses; however, the effect of pulse number is not additive. Results obtained in this study indicated that pulsed pressure treatments could be used to pasteurize the whole milk at lower pressure values than the continuous pressure treatments. Nevertheless, an optimization appears definetely necessary between the number of pulses and pressure levels to reach the desirable number of log-reduction of microorganisms.

  17. Ozone formation in pulsed SDBD in a wide pressure range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Nudnova, Maryia; mipt Team

    2011-10-01

    Ozone concentration in surface anode-directed DBD for wide pressure range (150 - 1300 torr) was experimentally measured. Voltage and pressure effect were investigated. Reduced electric field was measured for anode-directed and cathode-directed SDBD. E/n values in cathode-directed SDBD is higher than in cathode-directed on 50 percent at atmospheric pressure. E/n value increase leads to decrease the rate of oxygen dissociation and Ozone formation at lower pressures. Radiating region thickness of sliding discharge was measured. Typical thickness of radiating zone is 0.4-1.0 mm within pressure range 220-740 torr. It was shown that high-voltage pulsed nanosecond discharge due to high E/n value produces less Ozone with compare to other discharges. Kinetic model was proposed to describe Ozone formation in the pulsed nanosecond SDBD.

  18. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepa, M. W., E-mail: mkepa@staffmail.ed.ac.uk; Huxley, A. D. [SUPA, Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Ridley, C. J.; Kamenev, K. V. [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe{sub 2}.

  19. Non-Contact Thrust Stand Calibration Method for Repetitively-Pulsed Electric Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrea R.; Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2011-01-01

    A thrust stand calibration technique for use in testing repetitively-pulsed electric thrusters for in-space propulsion has been developed and tested using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand. In the implementation of this technique, current pulses are applied to a solenoidal coil to produce a pulsed magnetic field that acts against the magnetic field produced by a permanent magnet mounted to the thrust stand pendulum arm. The force on the magnet is applied in this non-contact manner, with the entire pulsed force transferred to the pendulum arm through a piezoelectric force transducer to provide a time-accurate force measurement. Modeling of the pendulum arm dynamics reveals that after an initial transient in thrust stand motion the quasisteady average deflection of the thrust stand arm away from the unforced or zero position can be related to the average applied force through a simple linear Hooke s law relationship. Modeling demonstrates that this technique is universally applicable except when the pulsing period is increased to the point where it approaches the period of natural thrust stand motion. Calibration data were obtained using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand previously used for steady-state thrust measurements. Data were obtained for varying impulse bit at constant pulse frequency and for varying pulse frequency. The two data sets exhibit excellent quantitative agreement with each other as the constant relating average deflection and average thrust match within the errors on the linear regression curve fit of the data. Quantitatively, the error on the calibration coefficient is roughly 1% of the coefficient value.

  20. Barrier discharges driven by sub-microsecond pulses at atmospheric pressure: Breakdown manipulation by pulse width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoder, Tomas; Hoeft, Hans; Kettlitz, Manfred; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Brandenburg, Ronny [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, INP Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen-oxygen mixture powered by high voltage pulses of widths between 10 {mu}s and 200 ns were investigated. The development of the microdischarges on rising and falling slopes was recorded by streak and intensified CCD cameras simultaneously. The breakdown on the falling slope strongly depends on the pulse width. As a result of pulse width variation the starting point of ignition changes and positive and negative streamers occur simultaneously in the falling slope. The observed effect is caused by the electric field rearrangement in the gap due to the different positive ion densities related to their gap crossing times.

  1. Blood pressure and pulse rate changes associated with cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study was carried out at the Physiotherapy unit of the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, to observe the effects of continuous cervical traction for 10 minutes on arterial blood pressure and pulse rate. Methods: Forty healthy subjects free of any cardiovascular complications, participated in the study.

  2. Changes in Peak Expiratory Flow Rate, Blood Pressure and Pulse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in Peak Expiratory Flow Rate, Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate Following Ingestion of Increased Coffee Concentrations in Healthy Male Adults. ... It further indicates that, mild doses of coffee confer benefits on airflow in the lungs. While higher doses are also beneficial in improving airflow in the airway, such doses ...

  3. Changes in Peak Expiratory Flow Rate, Blood Pressure and Pulse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the effect of different concentrations of coffee on peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), blood pressure and pulse rate in an attempt to determine some physiological effects of coffee intake. 18 apparently healthy adult males, age range 20 to 30 years, were recruited for the study over a three day period. Varying ...

  4. Precise calibration of few-cycle laser pulses with atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, W. C.; Kielpinski, D.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.

    2017-12-01

    Interaction of atoms and molecules with strong electric fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, particularly in the emerging field of attosecond science. Therefore, understanding the physics underpinning those interactions is of significant interest to the scientific community. One crucial step in this understanding is accurate knowledge of the few-cycle laser field driving the process. Atomic hydrogen (H), the simplest of all atomic species, plays a key role in benchmarking strong-field processes. Its wide-spread use as a testbed for theoretical calculations allows the comparison of approximate theoretical models against nearly-perfect numerical solutions of the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Until recently, relatively little experimental data in atomic H was available for comparison to these models, and was due mostly due to the difficulty in the construction and use of atomic H sources. Here, we review our most recent experimental results from atomic H interaction with few-cycle laser pulses and how they have been used to calibrate important laser pulse parameters such as peak intensity and the carrier-envelope phase (CEP). Quantitative agreement between experimental data and theoretical predictions for atomic H has been obtained at the 10% uncertainty level, allowing for accurate laser calibration intensity at the 1% level. Using this calibration in atomic H, both accurate CEP data and an intensity calibration standard have been obtained Ar, Kr, and Xe; such gases are in common use for strong-field experiments. This calibration standard can be used by any laboratory using few-cycle pulses in the 1014 W cm‑2 intensity regime centered at 800 nm wavelength to accurately calibrate their peak laser intensity to within few-percent precision.

  5. Relationship between Resting Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Pulse Pressure in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Giulliano Destro Christofaro

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: High resting heart rate is considered an important factor for increasing mortality chance in adults. However, it remains unclear whether the observed associations would remain after adjustment for confounders in adolescents. Objectives: To analyze the relationship between resting heart rate, blood pressure and pulse pressure in adolescents of both sexes. Methods: A cross-sectional study with 1231 adolescents (716 girls and 515 boys aged 14-17 years. Heart rate, blood pressure and pulse pressure were evaluated using an oscillometric blood pressure device, validated for this population. Weight and height were measured with an electronic scale and a stadiometer, respectively, and waist circumference with a non-elastic tape. Multivariate analysis using linear regression investigated the relationship between resting heart rate and blood pressure and pulse pressure in boys and girls, controlling for general and abdominal obesity. Results: Higher resting heart rate values were observed in girls (80.1 ± 11.0 beats/min compared to boys (75.9 ± 12.7 beats/min (p ≤ 0.001. Resting heart rate was associated with systolic blood pressure in boys (Beta = 0.15 [0.04; 0.26] and girls (Beta = 0.24 [0.16; 0.33], with diastolic blood pressure in boys (Beta = 0.50 [0.37; 0.64] and girls (Beta = 0.41 [0.30; 0.53], and with pulse pressure in boys (Beta = -0.16 [-0.27; -0.04]. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a relationship between elevated resting heart rate and increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure in both sexes and pulse pressure in boys even after controlling for potential confounders, such as general and abdominal obesity.

  6. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, B M; O' Flynn, B; Mathewson, A, E-mail: brian.mccarthy@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, UCC, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-08-17

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  7. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, B. M.; O'Flynn, B.; Mathewson, A.

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  8. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF PRESSURE PULSING PIPELINE UNPLUGGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servin, M. A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Garfield, J. S. [AEM Consulting, LLC (United States); Golcar, G. R. [AEM Consulting, LLC (United States)

    2012-12-20

    The ability to unplug key waste transfer routes is generally essential for successful tank farms operations. All transfer lines run the risk of plugging but the cross site transfer line poses increased risk due to its longer length. The loss of a transfer route needed to support the waste feed delivery mission impacts the cost and schedule of the Hanford clean up mission. This report addresses the engineering feasibility for two pressure pulse technologies, which are similar in concept, for pipeline unplugging.

  9. Pulse Radiolysis at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, Knud

    1980-01-01

    A cell for pulse radiolytic measurements up to temperatures of 320°C and pressures of 14 MPa is constructed. The activation energy of the reaction OH + Cu2+ is determined to 13.3 kJ × mol−1 (3.2 kcal × mol−1). A preliminary study of the reaction e−aq + e−aq yields an activation energy of 22 k...

  10. Blood pulse wave velocity and pressure sensing via fiber based and free space based optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkis, Talia; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Agdarov, Sergey; Beiderman, Yafim; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-02-01

    Continuous noninvasive measurement of vital bio-signs, such as cardiopulmonary parameters, is an important tool in evaluation of the patient's physiological condition and health monitoring. On the demand of new enabling technologies, some works have been done in continuous monitoring of blood pressure and pulse wave velocity. In this paper, we introduce two techniques for non-contact sensing of vital bio signs. In the first approach the optical sensor is based on single mode in-fibers Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) to detect heartbeat, respiration and pulse wave velocity (PWV). The introduced interferometer is based on a new implanted scheme. It replaces the conventional MZI realized by inserting of discontinuities in the fiber to break the total internal reflection and scatter/collect light. The proposed fiber sensor was successfully incorporated into shirt to produce smart clothing. The measurements obtained from the smart clothing could be obtained in comfortable manner and there is no need to have an initial calibration or a direct contact between the sensor and the skin of the tested individual. In the second concept we show a remote noncontact blood pulse wave velocity and pressure measurement based on tracking the temporal changes of reflected secondary speckle patterns produced in human skin when illuminated by a laser beams. In both concept experimental validation of the proposed schemes is shown and analyzed.

  11. Multivariate Modeling of Body Mass Index, Pulse Pressure, Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure in Chinese Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Dongfeng; Pang, Zengchang

    2015-01-01

    Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure (PP), and body mass index (BMI) are heritable traits in human metabolic health but their common genetic and environmental backgrounds are not well investigated. The aim of this article was to explore the phenotypic and genetic associations among...... PP, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and BMI. The studied sample contained 615 twin pairs (17-84 years) collected in the Qingdao municipality. Univariate and multivariate structural equation models were fitted for assessing the genetic and environmental contributions...

  12. Novel Method for Processing the Dynamic Calibration Signal of Pressure Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongyu; Li, Qiang; Wang, Zhuoran; Yan, Hu

    2015-07-21

    Dynamic calibration is one of the important ways to acquire the dynamic performance parameters of a pressure sensor. This research focuses on the processing method for the output of calibrated pressure sensor, and mainly attempts to solve the problem of extracting the true information of step response under strong interference noise. A dynamic calibration system based on a shock tube is established to excite the time-domain response signal of a calibrated pressure sensor. A key processing on difference modeling is applied for the obtained signal, and several generating sequences are established. A fusion process for the generating sequences is then undertaken, and the true information of the step response of the calibrated pressure sensor can be obtained. Finally, by implementing the common QR decomposition method to deal with the true information, a dynamic model characterizing the dynamic performance of the calibrated pressure sensor is established. A typical pressure sensor was used to perform calibration tests and a frequency-domain experiment for the sensor was also conducted. Results show that the proposed method could effectively filter strong interference noise in the output of the sensor and the corresponding dynamic model could effectively characterize the dynamic performance of the pressure sensor.

  13. Vasodilation increases pulse pressure variation, mimicking hypovolemic status in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauco A Westphal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that pulse pressure respiratory variation (PPV amplification, observed in hypovolemia, can also be observed during sodium nitroprusside (SNP-induced vasodilation. INTRODUCTION: PPV is largely used for early identification of cardiac responsiveness, especially when hypovolemia is suspected. PPV results from respiratory variation in transpulmonary blood flow and reflects the left ventricular preload variations during respiratory cycles. Any factor that decreases left ventricular preload can be associated with PPV amplification, as seen in hypovolemia. METHODS: Ten anesthetized and mechanically ventilated rabbits underwent progressive hypotension by either controlled hemorrhage (Group 1 or intravenous SNP infusion (Group 2. Animals in Group 1 (n = 5 had graded hemorrhage induced at 10% steps until 50% of the total volume was bled. Mean arterial pressure (MAP steps were registered and assumed as pressure targets to be reached in Group 2. Group 2 (n = 5 was subjected to a progressive SNP infusion to reach similar pressure targets as those defined in Group 1. Heart rate (HR, systolic pressure variation (SPV and PPV were measured at each MAP step, and the values were compared between the groups. RESULTS: SPV and PPV were similar between the experimental models in all steps (p > 0.16. SPV increased earlier in Group 2. CONCLUSION: Both pharmacologic vasodilation and graded hemorrhage induced PPV amplification similar to that observed in hypovolemia, reinforcing the idea that amplified arterial pressure variation does not necessarily represent hypovolemic status but rather potential cardiovascular responsiveness to fluid infusion.

  14. Arterial hypertension and pulse pressure in school-age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. M. Nechytailo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Childhood arterial hypertension (AH has become a global problem not only for pediatrics, but also for public health in general. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of arterial hypertension among school-age children and diagnostic value of pulse pressure. Materials and Methods. In total 848 children in 10–17 years of age (mean age – 13.9 ± 0.06 years, 45.4 % boys and 54.6 % girls from urban and rural areas of Chernivtsi region were examined in schools during screening for elevated blood pressure (BP. School-based ambulatory seated BP was measured by oscillometric automated recording devices with the age selection of cuffs. Elevated systolic (SAP or diastolic (DAP pressure was diagnosed in those children with indicators above the 95th percentile of age norms in accordance with the national normative values. In cases of elevated BP the measurements were verificated by aneroid device. Results. It has been established that the frequency of high blood pressure in the examined school students was 25.2 %, including 17.7 % of arterial hypertension (BP above 95 percentile and 7.5 % – pre-hypertension (90–95 percentile. The prevalence of hypertension varied with age subgroups and the highest level was in 16 years of age – 29.9 % with high blood pressure (21.9 % above 95 percentile and 8.0 % between the 90th and 95th percentiles. Increased SAP was combined with an increased DAP in 47.3 % of cases and in the study had a positive correlation with overweight (r = 0.27, p < 0.05 and negative with physical performance (r = -0.21, p < 0.05. The pulse pressure had significant correlations with SAP, AH and overweight and it could be used as additional diagnostic index of AH. Conclusions. The prevalence of elevated BP in our study is higher than in European countries and exceeds 20 % of the child population. The elevated BP in our children has positive correlation with overweight and the negative with physical performance. The

  15. Phase calibration of sonar systems using standard targets and dual-frequency transmission pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islas-Cital, Alan; Atkins, Philip R; Foo, Kae Y; Picó, Ruben

    2011-10-01

    The phase angle component of the complex frequency response of a sonar system operating near transducer resonance is usually distorted. Interpretation and classification of the received sonar signal benefits from the preservation of waveform fidelity over the full bandwidth. A calibration process that measures the phase response in addition to the amplitude response is thus required. This paper describes an extension to the standard-target calibration method to include phase angle, without affecting the experimental apparatus, by using dual-frequency transmission pulses and frequency-domain data processing. This approach reduces the impact of unknown range and sound speed parameters upon phase calibration accuracy, as target phase is determined from the relationship of the two frequency components instead of relying on a local phase reference. Tungsten carbide spheres of various sizes were used to simultaneously calibrate the amplitude and phase response of an active sonar system in a laboratory tank. Experimental measurements of target phase spectra are in good agreement with values predicted from a theoretical model based upon full-wave analysis, over an operating frequency of 50-125 kHz. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  16. Multi-Pulsed High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment of Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sencer Buzrul

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-pulsed high hydrostatic pressure (mpHHP treatment of foods has been investigated for more than two decades. It was reported that the mpHHP treatment, with few exceptions, is more effective than the classical or single-pulsed HHP (spHHP treatment for inactivation of microorganisms in fruit juice, dairy products, liquid whole egg, meat products, and sea foods. Moreover, the mpHHP treatment could be also used to inactivate enzymes in foods and to increase the shelf-life of foods. The effects of the mpHHP treatment of foods are summarized and the differences between the mpHHP and spHHP are also emphasized.

  17. Effect of respiration on Korotkoff sounds and oscillometric cuff pressure pulses during blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dingchang; Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Murray, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Blood pressure (BP) measurement accuracy depends on consistent changes in Korotkoff sounds (KorS) for manual measurement and oscillometric pulses for automated measurement, yet little is known about the direct effect of respiration on these physiological signals. The aim of this research was to quantitatively assess the modulation effect of respiration on Korotkoff sounds and oscillometric pulses. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured manually from 30 healthy subjects (age 41 ± 12 years). Three static cuff pressure conditions were studied for two respiratory rates. Cuff pressure [with oscillometric pulses (OscP)], ECG, chest motion respiration [respiration signal (Resp), from magnetometer] and Korotkoff sounds (KorS, from digital stethoscope) were recorded twice for 20 s. The physiological data were evenly resampled. Respiratory frequency was calculated from Resp (fR), OscP (fO) and KorS (fK) from peak spectral frequency. There was no statistically significant difference between fR and fO or fK. Respiratory modulation was observed in all subjects. OscP amplitude modulation changed significantly between the two respiratory rates (p oscillometric pulse and Korotkoff sound amplitudes from which BP is measured.

  18. On random pressure pulses in the turbine draft tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuibin, P. A.; Shtork, S. I.; Skripkin, S. G.; Tsoy, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    The flow in the conical part of the hydroturbine draft tube undergoes various instabilities due to deceleration and flow swirling at off-design operation points. In particular, the precessing vortex rope develops at part-load regimes in the draft tube. This rope induces periodical low-frequency pressure oscillations in the draft tube. Interaction of rotational (asynchronous) mode of disturbances with the elbow can bring to strong oscillations in the whole hydrodynamical system. Recent researches on flow structure in the discharge cone in a regime of free runner had revealed that helical-like vortex rope can be unstable itself. Some coils of helix close to each other and reconnection appears with generation of a vortex ring. The vortex ring moves toward the draft tube wall and downstream. The present research is focused on interaction of vortex ring with wall and generation of pressure pulses.

  19. Kinetics of high pressure argon-helium pulsed gas discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, D. J.; Weeks, D. E.

    2017-05-01

    Simulations of a pulsed direct current discharge are performed for a 7% argon in helium mixture at a pressure of 270 Torr using both zero- and one-dimensional models. Kinetics of species relevant to the operation of an optically pumped rare-gas laser are analyzed throughout the pulse duration to identify key reaction pathways. Time dependent densities, electron temperatures, current densities, and reduced electric fields in the positive column are analyzed over a single 20 μs pulse, showing temporal agreement between the two models. Through the use of a robust reaction rate package, radiation trapping is determined to play a key role in reducing A r (1 s5) metastable loss rates through the reaction sequence A r (1 s5)+e-→A r (1 s4)+e- followed by A r (1 s4)→A r +ℏω . Collisions with He are observed to be responsible for A r (2 p9) mixing, with nearly equal rates to A r (2 p10) and A r (2 p8) . Additionally, dissociative recombination of A r2+ is determined to be the dominant electron loss mechanism for the simulated discharge conditions and cavity size.

  20. Quantitative calibration of sound pressure in ultrasonic standing waves using the Schlieren method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; Chen, Hao; Yan, Xu; Qian, Menglu; Cheng, Qian

    2017-08-21

    We investigated the use of the Schlieren method to calibrate the sound pressure in an ultrasonic standing-wave field. Specifically, we derived an equation to calculate the light intensity of the diffraction fringe induced by the standing-wave field. The results indicated that the sound pressure in the standing-wave field relates to the light intensity of the diffraction fringe. Simulations and experiments were conducted to verify the theoretical calculation. We demonstrated that the ratio of the light intensity of different diffraction orders relates to the sound pressure amplitude, allowing the pressure amplitude to be calibrated with the Schlieren method. Therefore, this work presents a non-intrusive calibration method that is particularly suitable for calibrating high-frequency ultrasonic standing-wave fields.

  1. Association of adiposity with pulse pressure amongst gujarati Indian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Wasim A; Patel, Minal; Singh, Sk

    2010-07-01

    The current study was conducted to determine the effect of adiposity on vascular distensibility in Gujarati Indian adolescents as research indicating the pathogenesis of hypertension among overweight and/or obese Indian adolescents is scant and ethnic differences exist in the pathogenesis of hypertension A cross-sectional study was conducted on 488 Gujarati Indian adolescents of 16-19 years age group. Adiposity was assessed in terms of BMI, Body Fat %, Fat Mass, Fat Mass Index and Waist Circumference. Arterial blood pressure was recorded and pulse pressure (PP) was calculated using the standard equation based on the difference between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Pearson's correlation coefficient was determined to find the association between the markers of adiposity and SBP, DBP and PP. A significant positive correlationship was found between adiposity and PP in boys. However, no significant correlationship was found between adiposity and PP in girls. An increase in total as well as visceral adiposity is probably associated with a decrease in vascular distensibility in the Gujarati Indian adolescent boys but not in girls, thus indicating a protective role of female sex hormone estrogen which has been shown earlier to protect the vasculature from atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction which occurs with increase in adiposity.

  2. Association of adiposity with Pulse pressure amongst Gujarati Indian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Wasim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The current study was conducted to determine the effect of adiposity on vascular distensibility in Gujarati Indian adolescents as research indicating the pathogenesis of hypertension among overweight and/or obese Indian adolescents is scant and ethnic differences exist in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 488 Gujarati Indian adolescents of 16-19 years age group. Adiposity was assessed in terms of BMI, Body Fat %, Fat Mass, Fat Mass Index and Waist Circumference. Arterial blood pressure was recorded and pulse pressure (PP was calculated using the standard equation based on the difference between systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP. Pearson′s correlation coefficient was determined to find the association between the markers of adiposity and SBP, DBP and PP. Result: A significant positive correlationship was found between adiposity and PP in boys. However, no significant correlationship was found between adiposity and PP in girls. Conclusion: An increase in total as well as visceral adiposity is probably associated with a decrease in vascular distensibility in the Gujarati Indian adolescent boys but not in girls, thus indicating a protective role of female sex hormone estrogen which has been shown earlier to protect the vasculature from atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction which occurs with increase in adiposity.

  3. Calibration of the modified Electrical Low-Pressure Impactor (ELPI) for use with pressurized pharmaceutical aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotian, Reshma; Peart, Joanne; Bryner, Joan; Byron, Peter R

    2009-03-01

    The modified Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) is currently being used in several laboratories to determine inherent electrostatic charge of pharmaceutical aerosols as a function of their particle size. However, the ELPI appears to underestimate the aerodynamic particle size distributions (aPSDs) of pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs), casting doubt upon the manufacturer's calibration. In the present study, four commercially available pMDIs with a range of aPSDs were used to recalibrate cutoff diameters (d50s) of the ELPI stages using a reference ACI. Particle size analyses were performed in a mensurated ACI and a calibrated modified ELPI (n = 5); stage coating was employed in both instruments. The ACI data were fitted to a lognormal cumulative distribution function by nonlinear regression analysis. Best estimates for mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) for each pMDI were obtained and used in combination with impaction results from the modified ELPI to determine new d50s for each of the ELPI stages by numerical methods. Ventolin HFA was employed to validate the new ELPI d50 values. The curve-fitting procedure produced excellent fits of the ACI data for all the calibration pMDIs, which were well modeled as mono-modal and lognormally distributed. The mean d50s obtained following recalibration of the modified ELPI were found to deviate increasingly from the manufacturer-supplied values as aerodynamic diameter decreased. Ventolin HFA's MMAD determined using the modified ELPI with the manufacturer-supplied d50s was 2.06 +/- 0.08 microm. The MMAD calculated using the recalibrated d50s was 2.63 +/- 0.09 microm, which was statistically indistinguishable (p = 0.0852) from that determined for Ventolin HFA using the ACI (2.73 +/- 0.09 microm). In the absence of a comprehensive recalibration of the ELPI using monodisperse aerosols, the mean d50s for stages 4-12 of ELPI reported offer a practical way of analyzing the a

  4. Blood Pressure Estimation Using Pulse Transit Time From Bioimpedance and Continuous Wave Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxi, Dilpreet; Redout, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2017-04-01

    We have developed and tested a new architecture for pulse transit time (PTT) estimation at the central arteries using electrical bioimpedance, electrocardiogram, and continuous wave radar to estimate cuffless blood pressure. A transmitter and receiver antenna are placed at the sternum to acquire the arterial pulsation at the aortic arch. A four-electrode arrangement across the shoulders acquires arterial pulse across the carotid and subclavian arteries from bioimpedance as well as a bipolar lead I electrocardiogram. The PTT and pulse arrival times (PATs) are measured on six healthy male subjects during exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Using linear regression, the estimated PAT and PTT values are calibrated to the systolic and mean as well as diastolic blood pressure from an oscillometric device. For all subjects, the Pearson correlation coefficients for PAT-SBP and PTT-SBP are -0.66 (p = 0.001) and -0.48 (p = 0.0029), respectively. Correlation coefficients for individual subjects ranged from -0.54 to -0.9 and -0.37 to -0.95, respectively. The proposed system architecture is promising in estimating cuffless arterial blood pressure at the central, proximal arteries, which obey the Moens-Korteweg equation more closely when compared to peripheral arteries. An important advantage of PTT from the carotid and subclavian arteries is that the PTT over the central elastic arteries is measured instead of the peripheral arteries, which potentially reduces the changes in PTT due to vasomotion. Furthermore, the sensors can be completely hidden under a patients clothes, making them more acceptable by the patient for ambulatory monitoring.

  5. Explosive Processes on Cathode while Forming Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge of High Pressure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. Hashimov; R. Mekhtizadeh; А. Bondyakov; Sh. Kazimov

    2012-01-01

    ...) while forming nanosecond pulsed discharge in dense air. Influence of field and air pressure heterogeneity rate in gas gap on size of micro-craters being formed on working cathode surface after pulsed effect has been shown in the paper...

  6. A Method to Determine Diastolic Blood Pressure Based on Pressure Pulse Propagation in the Electronic Palpation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    electronically palpated pulse. This particular patient seems to have arrhythmia, and, because of that, oscillometric blood pressure methods may give...of multiple oscillometric methods for blood pressure measurement in finger�, Proceedings of The First Joint BMES/EMBS Conference Serving Humanity...1 of 4 A METHOD TO DETERMINE DIASTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE BASED ON PRESSURE PULSE PROPAGATION IN THE ELECTRONIC PALPATION METHOD H. S. S

  7. A novel calibration algorithm for five-hole pressure probe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    A particular data set is used for all combinations of pressure normalization techniques and data reduction techniques to find the perfect combination of the pressure normalization technique and data reduction technique. Error analysis is helpful in this regard, where the following parameters are useful in deciding the perfect ...

  8. Effect of pulse pressure on borehole stability during shear swirling flow vibration cementing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The shear swirling flow vibration cementing (SSFVC) technique rotates the downhole eccentric cascade by circulating cementing fluid. It makes the casing eccentrically revolve at high speed around the borehole axis. It produces strong agitation action to the annulus fluid, makes it in the state of shear turbulent flow, and results in the formation of pulse pressure which affects the surrounding rock stress. This study was focused on 1) the calculation of the pulse pressure in an annular turbulent flow field based on the finite volume method, and 2) the analysis of the effect of pulse pressure on borehole stability. On the upside, the pulse pressure is conducive to enhancing the liquidity of the annulus fluid, reducing the fluid gel strength, and preventing the formation of fluid from channeling. But greater pulse pressure may cause lost circulation and even formation fracturing. Therefore, in order to ensure smooth cementing during SSFVC, the effect of pulse pressure should be considered when cementing design. PMID:29145408

  9. Effect of pulse pressure on borehole stability during shear swirling flow vibration cementing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Cui

    Full Text Available The shear swirling flow vibration cementing (SSFVC technique rotates the downhole eccentric cascade by circulating cementing fluid. It makes the casing eccentrically revolve at high speed around the borehole axis. It produces strong agitation action to the annulus fluid, makes it in the state of shear turbulent flow, and results in the formation of pulse pressure which affects the surrounding rock stress. This study was focused on 1 the calculation of the pulse pressure in an annular turbulent flow field based on the finite volume method, and 2 the analysis of the effect of pulse pressure on borehole stability. On the upside, the pulse pressure is conducive to enhancing the liquidity of the annulus fluid, reducing the fluid gel strength, and preventing the formation of fluid from channeling. But greater pulse pressure may cause lost circulation and even formation fracturing. Therefore, in order to ensure smooth cementing during SSFVC, the effect of pulse pressure should be considered when cementing design.

  10. Weighing Scale-Based Pulse Transit Time is a Superior Marker of Blood Pressure than Conventional Pulse Arrival Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephanie L.-O.; Carek, Andrew M.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Ashouri, Hazar; Inan, Omer T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-12-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Most efforts have employed the time delay between ECG and finger photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms as a convenient surrogate of PTT. However, these conventional pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements include the pre-ejection period (PEP) and the time delay through small, muscular arteries and may thus be an unreliable marker of BP. We assessed a bathroom weighing scale-like system for convenient measurement of ballistocardiography and foot PPG waveforms - and thus PTT through larger, more elastic arteries - in terms of its ability to improve tracking of BP in individual subjects. We measured “scale PTT”, conventional PAT, and cuff BP in humans during interventions that increased BP but changed PEP and smooth muscle contraction differently. Scale PTT tracked the diastolic BP changes well, with correlation coefficient of -0.80 ± 0.02 (mean ± SE) and root-mean-squared-error of 7.6 ± 0.5 mmHg after a best-case calibration. Conventional PAT was significantly inferior in tracking these changes, with correlation coefficient of -0.60 ± 0.04 and root-mean-squared-error of 14.6 ± 1.5 mmHg (p < 0.05). Scale PTT also tracked the systolic BP changes better than conventional PAT but not to an acceptable level. With further development, scale PTT may permit reliable, convenient measurement of BP.

  11. Vascular Stiffness and Increased Pulse Pressure in the Aging Cardiovascular System

    OpenAIRE

    Jochen Steppan; Viachaslau Barodka; Berkowitz, Dan E; Daniel Nyhan

    2011-01-01

    Aging leads to a multitude of changes in the cardiovascular system, including systolic hypertension, increased central vascular stiffness, and increased pulse pressure. In this paper we will review the effects of age-associated increased vascular stiffness on systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, augmentation index, and cardiac workload. Additionally we will describe pulse wave velocity as a method to measure vascular stiffness and review the impact of increased vascular stiffness as an in...

  12. A novel calibration algorithm for five-hole pressure probe | Paul ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five-hole pneumatic pressure probes are used to carry out the steady-state measurements of three components of velocity, inflow angles, static and total pressures simultaneously for a point in a flow field. Various calibration algorithms for five-hole probes are studied in this paper as reported in the literature. Authors have ...

  13. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  14. Pyramidal Traceability Hierarchy for Pressure Measurements and Calibrations at NIS- Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. ELTAWIL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure balances are excellent standards for measuring pressure with acceptable uncertainty and they are widely used at the primary pressure laboratories in the world. This study aims to study the propagation of uncertainty from primary standard piston cylinder assembly (PCA up to 500 MPa. The hierarchy of pressure measurements at NIS is based on using large effective area PCA in defining the pressure of 1 MPa. Characterization of primary standard PCA is presented transferring the obtained results to other level pressure standard described. Uncertainty calculation method at each level was studied. Propagation of uncertainty from primary standards through national standards to digital pressure gauges, digital pressure calibrators, pressure sensors and pressure transducers were investigated. Study of the effect of each variable on the uncertainty calculation was discussed.

  15. Energy calibration of CsI(Tl) scintillator in pulse-shape identification technique

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeichikov, V; Golubev, P; Jakobsson, B; Colonna, N

    2003-01-01

    A batch of 16 CsI(Tl) scintillator crystals, supplied by the Bicron Company, has been studied with respect to precise energy calibration in pulse-shape identification technique. The light corresponding to pulse integration within the time interval 1.6-4.5 mu s (long gate) and 0.0-4.5 mu s (extra-long gate) exhibits a power law relation, L(E,Z,A)=a1(Z,A)E sup a sup 2 sup ( sup Z sup , sup A sup ) , for sup 1 sup , sup 2 sup , sup 3 H isotopes in the measured energy range 5-150 MeV. For the time interval 0.0-0.60 mu s (short gate), a significant deviation from the power law relation is observed, for energy greater than approx 30 MeV. The character of the a2(p)-a2(d) and a2(p)-a2(t) correlations for protons, deuterons and tritons, reveals 3 types of crystals in the batch. These subbatches differ in the value of the extracted parameter a2 for protons, and in the value of the spread of a2 for deuterons and tritons. This may be explained by the difference in the energy dependence of the fast decay time component an...

  16. Pulsed Laser TOF Mass Spectrometer for Calibration of Cosmic Dust Analyzer Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, G.; Gupta, Satish C.; Ahrens, Thomas J.; Kossakovski, Dmitri; Beauchamp, J. L.

    1999-06-01

    The time-of-flight mass spectrometer of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) instrument aboard the Cassini spacecraft, is expected to be placed in orbit about Saturn to sample the ring material and satellite impact ejecta. Calibration via impact ionization and irradiation with a pulsed N2 laser (4 ns duration, at 337 nm) is in progress. The laser beam is focused to deliver the 300 μJ per laser pulse onto 33 μm^2. Laser power density ( 10^11 W/cm^2) simulates the impact of particles with various combinations of density and velocities, e.g., 8 Mg/m^3 (Fe) projectile at 23 km/s or 1 Mg/m^3 projectile at 65 km/s. The positive ions and electrons resulting from laser ionization are separated by 680 V between target and grid. Laser ionization produces charge of 4.6 pC (mostly Al^+1) for aluminum alloy and 2.8 pC(Fe^+1) for stainless steel targets. Estimating that each A1^+1 and Fe^+1 ion requires an energy of 5.98 and 7.90 eV/ion implies that 10-5 % of the laser pulse energy produces ions and the present system has a 10 % efficiency of collecting the laser-irradiation induced ions. Employing a multi-channel plate detector in what is an essentially time-of-flight mass spectrometer yields for Al-Mg-Cu alloy and FeNi targets well defined peaks at 24(Mg^+1), 27(A1^+1) and 64(Cu^+1), and, 56(Fe^+1), 58(Ni^+1) and 60(Ni^+1) amu, respectively.

  17. The Relation Between Aortic Pulse Pressure and Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Metin Esen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pulse pressure (PP is a significant marker of cardiovascular morbidity.We investigated the relation between aortic PP and the presence and extent of coronary artery disease (CAD in patients undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography (CAG.Patients and Method: The study group consisted of 550 patients (363 men, 187 women.We evaluated patients in two different groups, PP < 60 mmHg and ≥ 60 mmHg.Results: In univariate analysis gender and presence of hyperlipidemia showed no statistically significant differences between both groups. However, the ratio of patients having diabetes mellitus, hypertension or smoking were significantly higher in ≥ 60 mmHg PP group. The mean age was 55.2 ±11.9 in < 60 mmHg PP group and 61.3±9.3 in the other group (p<0.01. Although systolic blood pressure level was higher in ≥ 60 mmHg PP group (160.4±21.1 vs. 126.4±13.5, p< 0.001, diastolic blood pressure level showed no significant differences between both groups (78.3±13.5 vs. 80.3±10.2, p= 0.32. In the <60 mmHg PP group, the ratio of normal CAG was significantly higher, and also, the critically CAD rate was lower than the other group. In multivariate analysis, smoking [odds ratios (OR 2.344, 95% confidence intervals (CI, 1.416-3.879], male gender (OR 5.858, 95% CI, 3.425-10.019 and PP ≥60 mmHg (OR 25.788, 95% CI, 14.001-47.498 were evaluated as an independent indicators of CAD.Conclusions: In our study, we demonstrate that, aortic PP ≥60 mmHg is related to the risk of critically CAD as an independent factor.

  18. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Cooper

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s−1 and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the global positioning system, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature, these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that although the initial calibration of the measured static and dynamic pressures requires a measured temperature, once calibrated these measured pressures and the measurement of airspeed from the new laser air-motion sensor provide a measurement of temperature that does not depend on any other temperature sensor.

  19. Frequency response calibration of recess-mounted pressure transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolini, M. A.; Lorber, P. F.; Miller, W. T., Jr.; Covino, A. F., Jr.

    1991-03-01

    A technique is described for measuring the frequency response of pressure transducers mounted inside a model, where a narrow pipette leads to an orifice at the surface. An acoustic driver is mounted to a small chamber which has an opening at the opposite end with an O-ring seal to place over the orifice. A 3.18 mm (1/8 inch) reference microphone is mounted to one side of the chamber. The acoustic driver receives an input of white noise, and the transducer and reference microphone outputs are compared to obtain the frequency response of the pressure transducer. Selected results are presented in the form of power spectra for both the transducer and the reference, as well as the amplitude variation and phase shift between the two signals as a function of frequency. The effect of pipette length and the use of this technique for identifying both blocked orifices and faulty transducers are described.

  20. Calibration of an electronic counter and pulse height analyzer for plotting erythrocyte volume spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-03-01

    A simple technique is presented for calibrating an electronic system used in the plotting of erythrocyte volume spectra. The calibration factors, once obtained, apparently remain applicable for some time. Precise estimates of calibration factors appe...

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O’Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile JW; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian’an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hotteng, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco US; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric JG; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d’Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, M Fabiola; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco JC; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; ’t Hoen, Peter AC; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; DeStefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth JF; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci influence systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans 1-3. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N=74,064) and follow-up studies (N=48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P= 2.7×10-8 to P=2.3×10-13) four novel PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2/PDGFRAI, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV, 11q24.3 near ADAMTS-8), two novel MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4, 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) which has recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the novel PP signals, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite to that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings indicate novel genetic mechanisms underlying blood pressure variation, including pathways that may differentially influence SBP and DBP. PMID:21909110

  2. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyring, E.M.

    1993-06-21

    Experiments have been developed for measuring the rates of chemical reactions liquids and in supercritical Co[sub 2]. A pulsed (Q-switch) Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm was the pump beam for laser flash photolysis studies of molybdenum and tungsten hexacarbonyls undergoing ligand displacement reactions by bidentate chelating agents such as 2,2[prime]-bipyridine in toluene. Experiments were carried out at 0.1 to 150 MPa. In the case of molybdenum complexes, the reaction mechanism for thermal ring closure is found from activation volumes to change from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as substituents on the 2,2[prime]-bipyridine ligands become bulkier. In a similar study of more rigid, substituted phenanthroline bidentate ligands it was found that substituent bulkiness had little effect on the thermal ring closure mechanism. Similar high pressure flash photolysis experiments with tungsten hexacarbonyl have also been completed. The concentration dependence of the fluorescence and nonradiative decay quantum yields for cresyl violet in several solvent have been reported as well as stability constants for the complexation of lithium ion by four different crown ethers dissolved in a room temperature molten salt.

  3. Pulse Radiolysis at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, Knud

    1981-01-01

    A set-up enabling pulse radiolysis measurements at high temperatures (up to 320°C) and high pressures (up to 140 bar) has been constructed in collaboration between Risö National Laboratory and Studsvik Energiteknik. The cell has been used for experiments with aqueous solutions with the purpose.......2 kcal.mol−1) and OH+OH (tentatively 8 kJ·mol−1, 1.9 kcal·mol−1) have been determined. The absorption spectrum of the OH radical has been determined up to temperatures of 200°C. The absorption maximum is found at 230 nm at all temperatures. The reaction between Fe2+ and OH radicals has been studied up...... to a temperature of 220°C. An activation energy of 9 kJ·mol−1 (2.2 kcal·mol−1) has been determined and the spectrum of the transient formed in the reaction has been determined at different temperatures....

  4. Using a heterodyne vibrometer in combination with pulse excitation for primary calibration of ultrasonic hydrophones in amplitude and phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Martin; Wilkens, Volker

    2017-08-01

    A high-frequency vibrometer was used with ultrasonic pulse excitation in order to perform a primary hydrophone calibration. This approach enables the simultaneous characterization of the amplitude and phase transfer characteristic of ultrasonic hydrophones. The method allows a high frequency resolution in a considerably short time for the measurement. Furthermore, the uncertainty contributions of this approach were investigated and quantified. A membrane hydrophone was calibrated and the uncertainty budget for this measurement was determined. The calibration results are presented up to 70~\\text{MHz} . The measurement results show good agreement with the results obtained by sinusoidal burst excitation through the use of the vibrometer and by a homodyne laser interferometer, with RMS deviation of approximately 3% -4% in the frequency range from 1 to 60~\\text{MHz} . Further hydrophones were characterized up to 100~\\text{MHz} with this procedure to demonstrate the suitability for very high frequency calibration.

  5. Interlaboratory comparison in the pressure range from 0 to 2 MPa for accredited calibration laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bermanec Lovorka Grgec

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes procedure and results of the interlaboratory comparison that was organised by Croatian national pressure laboratory (HMI/FSB-LPM between eight accredited pressure calibration laboratories. Comparison was performed in the gauge pressure range from 0 to 2 MPa with pressure transducer as transfer standard and using gas as transmitting medium. Basic aim of this comparison was to improve measurement methods and the measurement uncertainties of each participating laboratory. Analysis of the measurement results are given by calculating the deviation, En, normalized with respect to the stated measurement uncertainties.

  6. [Pulse pressure and mean pressure: physiopathology and predictive value of coronary events and ictus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdecchia, P

    2001-11-01

    Increased pulse pressure (PP) reflects an increased stiffness of aorta and other large elastic arteries. These arteries dilate by about 10% during systole and contract owing to elastic return during diastole. As a result, blood flow towards periphery becomes less pulsatile and more continuous. An increased stiffness of aorta and large elastic arteries due to progressively reduced elastic content with aging (atherosclerotic processes) leads to increased systolic blood pressure (BP), because of their reduced distension during systole, and decreased diastolic BP due to their reduced blood content at the beginning of diastole. Several epidemiological studies have shown that PP is the BP component which most closely predicts cardiovascular risk, particularly over 55 years of age. In particular, increased PP is an important predictor of coronary events, while increased mean BP is a more specific predictor of cerebrovascular events.

  7. Radiation pressure calibration and test mass reflectivities for LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsakova, Natalia; Kaune, Brigitte; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes a series of experiments which were carried out during the main operations of LISA Pathfinder. These experiments were performed by modulating the power of the measurement and reference beams. In one series of experiments the beams were sequentially switched on and off. In the other series of experiments the powers of the beams were modulated within 0.1% and 1% of the constant power. These experiments use recordings of the total power measured on the photodiodes to infer the properties of the Optical Metrology System (OMS), such as reflectivities of the test masses and change of the photodiode efficiencies with time. In the first case the powers are back propagated from the different photodiodes to the same place on the optical bench to express the unknown quantities in the measurement with the complimentary photodiode measurements. They are combined in the way that the only unknown left is the test mass reflectivities. The second experiment compared two estimates of the force applied to the test masses due to the radiation pressure that appears because of the beam modulations. One estimate of the force is inferred from the measurements of the powers on the photodiodes and propagation of this measurement to the test masses. The other estimation of the force is done by calculating it from the change in the main scientific output of the instrument - differential displacement of the two test masses.

  8. A practical and reliable method of measuring blood pressure in the neonate by pulse oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbaum, M; Eyal, F G

    1994-10-01

    We investigated the reliability of the plethysmographic waveform of the pulse oximeter to measure systolic blood pressure in sick neonates. Fifty infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, with indwelling arterial catheters placed for their ongoing care, were enrolled. Median gestational age was 31 weeks (range, 24 to 40 weeks), and the mean birth weight was 1711 gm (range, 546 to 3856 gm). Blood pressure was recorded by an oscillometric method as well as from a transducer connected to an arterial catheter. Additionally, pulse oximeter blood pressures were obtained by gradually inflating an appropriately sized blood pressure cuff in increments of 2 to 5 mm Hg, on the same extremity as the oximeter probe, until the waveform just disappeared. The cuff was then rapidly inflated another 20 mm Hg and then gradually deflated in increments of 2 to 5 mm Hg until the waveform reappeared on the oximeter screen display. The pulse oximeter blood pressures were calculated both as the blood pressure noted at disappearance of the pulse oximeter waveform and as the blood pressure noted by the average pulse oximeter blood pressure at the disappearance and reappearance of the waveform. The mean intraarterial systolic blood pressure was 54 mm Hg (range, 36 to 82 mm Hg). Blood pressures obtained by pulse oximetry showed a significantly better correlation with intraarterial measurements in comparison with those obtained by oscillometric instruments. Additionally, the limits of agreement (mean difference +/- 2 SD) between blood pressures obtained by intraarterial measurements and those obtained by pulse oximetry were within a clinically acceptable range as opposed to those obtained by the comparison of intraarterial and oscillometric methods. Measurements of blood pressure in the neonate by means of pulse oximetry waveform analysis are easily obtainable and more accurate than those obtained by the oscillometric method.

  9. Tensile Strength of Water Exposed to Pressure Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2012-01-01

    at an extended water-solid interface by imposing a tensile stress pulse which easily causes cavitation. Next, a compressive pulse of duration ~1 ms and a peak intensity of a few bar is imposed prior to the tensile stress pulse. A dramatic increase of the tensile strength is observed immediately after...... the compressive pulse, but the effect is shortlived. We presume that diffusion of non-condensable gas from the cavitation nuclei into the liquid at compression, and back again later, is responsible for the changes of tensile strength....

  10. Relationship between Resting Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Pulse Pressure in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro; Casonatto, Juliano; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Cucato, Gabriel Grizzo; Dias, Raphael Mendes Ritti

    2017-05-01

    High resting heart rate is considered an important factor for increasing mortality chance in adults. However, it remains unclear whether the observed associations would remain after adjustment for confounders in adolescents. To analyze the relationship between resting heart rate, blood pressure and pulse pressure in adolescents of both sexes. A cross-sectional study with 1231 adolescents (716 girls and 515 boys) aged 14-17 years. Heart rate, blood pressure and pulse pressure were evaluated using an oscillometric blood pressure device, validated for this population. Weight and height were measured with an electronic scale and a stadiometer, respectively, and waist circumference with a non-elastic tape. Multivariate analysis using linear regression investigated the relationship between resting heart rate and blood pressure and pulse pressure in boys and girls, controlling for general and abdominal obesity. Higher resting heart rate values were observed in girls (80.1 ± 11.0 beats/min) compared to boys (75.9 ± 12.7 beats/min) (p ≤ 0.001). Resting heart rate was associated with systolic blood pressure in boys (Beta = 0.15 [0.04; 0.26]) and girls (Beta = 0.24 [0.16; 0.33]), with diastolic blood pressure in boys (Beta = 0.50 [0.37; 0.64]) and girls (Beta = 0.41 [0.30; 0.53]), and with pulse pressure in boys (Beta = -0.16 [-0.27; -0.04]). This study demonstrated a relationship between elevated resting heart rate and increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure in both sexes and pulse pressure in boys even after controlling for potential confounders, such as general and abdominal obesity. A frequência cardíaca de repouso é considerada um importante fator de aumento de mortalidade em adultos. Entretanto, ainda é incerto se as associações observadas permanecem após ajuste para fatores de confusão em adolescentes. Analisar a relação entre frequência cardíaca de repouso, pressão arterial e pressão de pulso em adolescentes dos dois sexos. Estudo transversal

  11. Prediction of systolic blood pressure using peripheral pulse palpation in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, Erica L; Rees, Colleen; Drobatz, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of peripheral pulse palpation to predict systolic blood pressure (SBP) in cats presenting as emergencies. Prospective observational study performed over an 8-month period. University veterinary teaching hospital. One hundred two cats presenting to the emergency service. Eligibility for inclusion in the study included a physical examination and a SBP via Doppler technique performed prior to treatment. None. Femoral and metatarsal pulses were digitally palpated and the quality of the pulses was assessed as either strong, moderate, poor, or absent. A concurrent SBP was also recorded. The median SBP for all cats was 92.5 mm Hg (range, 30-240 mm Hg). Femoral pulse quality was found to strongly correlate with the admission SBP (P cats with either absent or strong pulses was significantly different (P Cats with absent metatarsal and femoral pulses had a median SBP of 30 mm Hg (range, 30-105 mm Hg), whereas cats with strong metatarsal pulses had a median SBP of 135 mm Hg (range, 58-210 mm Hg). Absent metatarsal pulses correctly identified cats with a blood pressure of 75 mm Hg or less 84% the time (area under the curve: 0.89, confidence interval 0.81, 0.97). In cats, peripheral pulse quality assessment by emergency room veterinarians correlates with SBP. With progressive decreases in blood pressure, metatarsal pulses will disappear and it is only with severe hypotension that femoral pulses are absent. An assessment of both dorsal metatarsal pulse and femoral pulse quality during triage may be useful in identifying abnormalities in blood pressure. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  12. Daily changes in oxygen saturation and pulse rate associated with particulate air pollution and barometric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, D W; Pope, C A; Kanner, R E; Martin Villegas, G; Schwartz, J

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked fine particulate air pollution with increases in morbidity and mortality rates from cardiopulmonary complications. Although the underlying biologic mechanisms responsible for this increase remain largely unknown, potential pathways include transient declines in blood oxygenation and changes in pulse rate following exposures to particulate air pollution episodes. This study evaluated potential associations between daily measures of respirable particulate matter (PM) with pulse rate and oxygen saturation of the blood. Pulse rate and oxygen saturation (Spo2) using pulse oximetry were measured daily in 90 elderly subjects living near air pollution monitors during the winter of 1995-96 in Utah Valley. We also evaluated potential associations of oxygen saturation and pulse rate with barometric pressure. Small but statistically significant positive associations between day-to-day changes in Spo2 and barometric pressure were observed. Pulse rate was inversely associated with barometric pressure. Exposure to particulate pollution was not significantly associated with Spo2 except in male participants 80 years of age or older. Increased daily pulse rate, as well as the odds of having a pulse rate 5 or 10 beats per minute (bpm) above normal (normal is defined as the individual's mean pulse rate throughout the study period), were significantly associated with exposure to particulate pollution on the previous 1 to 5 days. The medical or biologic relevance of these increases in pulse rate following exposure to particulate air pollution requires further study.

  13. Automatic algorithm for monitoring systolic pressure variation and difference in pulse pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, Gunther; Fukui, Kimiko; Hartwich, Volker; Schumacher, Peter M; Vogt, Andreas; Hiltebrand, Luzius B; Kurz, Andrea; Fujita, Yoshihisa; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Leibundgut, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Difference in pulse pressure (dPP) reliably predicts fluid responsiveness in patients. We have developed a respiratory variation (RV) monitoring device (RV monitor), which continuously records both airway pressure and arterial blood pressure (ABP). We compared the RV monitor measurements with manual dPP measurements. ABP and airway pressure (PAW) from 24 patients were recorded. Data were fed to the RV monitor to calculate dPP and systolic pressure variation in two different ways: (a) considering both ABP and PAW (RV algorithm) and (b) ABP only (RV(slim) algorithm). Additionally, ABP and PAW were recorded intraoperatively in 10-min intervals for later calculation of dPP by manual assessment. Interobserver variability was determined. Manual dPP assessments were used for comparison with automated measurements. To estimate the importance of the PAW signal, RV(slim) measurements were compared with RV measurements. For the 24 patients, 174 measurements (6-10 per patient) were recorded. Six observers assessed dPP manually in the first 8 patients (10-min interval, 53 measurements); no interobserver variability occurred using a computer-assisted method. Bland-Altman analysis showed acceptable bias and limits of agreement of the 2 automated methods compared with the manual method (RV: -0.33% +/- 8.72% and RV(slim): -1.74% +/- 7.97%). The difference between RV measurements and RV(slim) measurements is small (bias -1.05%, limits of agreement 5.67%). Measurements of the automated device are comparable with measurements obtained by human observers, who use a computer-assisted method. The importance of the PAW signal is questionable.

  14. Influence of calibration protocols for a pressure-sensing walkway on kinetic and temporospatial parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinho, F S; Rahal, S C; Geraldo, B; Justolin, P L T; Teixeira, C R; Lins, F L M L; Monteiro, F O B

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the influence on the kinetic and temporospatial parameters of calibration protocols with point and step techniques for a pressure-sensing walkway. Nine Labrador dogs were used. Two protocols of point calibration technique (C1 and C2) and eight protocols of step calibration technique (C3 to C10) were performed. In C1, weight was added to a stool to match the body mass of each dog. In C2, weight was added to the stool to match a 46.1 kg person. The other eight calibration protocols represented combinations of the following factors: 46.1 kg and 96.1 kg persons, barefoot or wearing sneakers, and stepping onto the platform with one or two feet. The calibration protocols did not affect the temporospatial variables or percentages of body weight (%BW) distribution. Significant differences were found in both PVI (peak vertical force) and VI (vertical impulse) between barefoot versus wearing sneakers, 46.1 kg versus 96.1 kg person, and stepping onto the platform with one foot versus two feet. When comparing C1 with other protocols, significant differences were observed in PVF and VI for both forelimbs and hindlimbs. When comparing C2 with other protocols, significant differences were observed in PVF and VI for both forelimbs and hindlimbs in all protocols. The PVF and VI were influenced by the calibration protocol used, but the %BW distribution and temporospatial parameters were not. Using the same calibration protocol for all dogs within the same group eliminated the variability of the kinetic data caused by the calibration.

  15. Parametric Study of Pulse-Combustor-Driven Ejectors at High-Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungster, Shaye; Paxson, Daniel E.; Perkins, Hugh D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse-combustor configurations developed in recent studies have demonstrated performance levels at high-pressure operating conditions comparable to those observed at atmospheric conditions. However, problems related to the way fuel was being distributed within the pulse combustor were still limiting performance. In the first part of this study, new configurations are investigated computationally aimed at improving the fuel distribution and performance of the pulse-combustor. Subsequent sections investigate the performance of various pulse-combustor driven ejector configurations operating at highpressure conditions, focusing on the effects of fuel equivalence ratio and ejector throat area. The goal is to design pulse-combustor-ejector configurations that maximize pressure gain while achieving a thermal environment acceptable to a turbine, and at the same time maintain acceptable levels of NOx emissions and flow non-uniformities. The computations presented here have demonstrated pressure gains of up to 2.8%.

  16. Estimated Pulse Wave Velocity Calculated from Age and Mean Arterial Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, S. V.; Laurent, Stéphane; Olsen, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    In a recently published paper, Greve et al [J Hypertens 2016;34:1279-1289] investigate whether the estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV), calculated using an equation derived from the relationship between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), age, and blood pressure, predicts...

  17. Use of pulsed-high hydrostatic pressure treatment to decrease patulin in apple juice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsaroglu, M. D.; Bozoglu, F.; Alpas, H.; Largeteau, A.; Demazeau, G.

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed at reducing patulin content of apple juice using a non-thermal method, namely pulsed-high hydrostatic pressure (p-HHP). Commercially available clear apple juice was contaminated artificially with different concentrations of patulin (5, 50 and 100 ppb). Then, the samples were processed 5 min at different pressure treatments (300-500 MPa) in combination with different temperatures (30-50°C) and pulses (6 pulses × 50 s and 2 pulses × 150 s). To compare the impact of pulses, single pulse of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment was also applied with the same pressure/temperature combinations and holding time. Results indicated that pressure treatment in combination with mild heat and pulses reduced the levels of patulin in clear apple juice up to 62.11%. However, reduction rates did not follow a regular pattern. p-HHP was found to be more effective in low patulin concentrations, whereas HHP was more effective for high patulin concentrations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using p-HHP to investigate the reduction of patulin content in apple juice.

  18. Non-invasive measurement of aortic pressure in patients: Comparing pulse wave analysis and applanation tonometry

    OpenAIRE

    Naidu, M.U.R.; C Prabhakar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to validate and compare novel methods to determine aortic blood pressure non-invasively based on Oscillometric Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) measurement using four limb-cuff pressure waveforms and two lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) with a validated tonometric pulse wave analysis system in patients. Materials and Methods: After receiving the consent, in 49 patients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, PWV, and central blood p...

  19. Differing prognostic value of pulse pressure in patients with heart failure with reduced or preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Colette E; Castagno, Davide; Maggioni, Aldo P

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Low pulse pressure is a marker of adverse outcome in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) but the prognostic value of pulse pressure in patients with HF and preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF) is unknown. We examined the prognostic value of pulse pressure......) and 5008 with HF-PEF (828 deaths). Pulse pressure was analysed in quintiles in a multivariable model adjusted for the previously reported Meta-Analysis Global Group in Chronic Heart Failure prognostic variables. Heart failure and reduced ejection fraction patients in the lowest pulse pressure quintile had...

  20. Elevated pulse pressure is associated with hemolysis, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease in sickle cell disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico M Novelli

    Full Text Available A seeming paradox of sickle cell disease is that patients do not suffer from a high prevalence of systemic hypertension in spite of endothelial dysfunction, chronic inflammation and vasculopathy. However, some patients do develop systolic hypertension and increased pulse pressure, an increasingly recognized major cardiovascular risk factor in other populations. Hence, we hypothesized that pulse pressure, unlike other blood pressure parameters, is independently associated with markers of hemolytic anemia and cardiovascular risk in sickle cell disease. We analyzed the correlates of pulse pressure in patients (n  =  661 enrolled in a multicenter international sickle cell trial. Markers of hemolysis were analyzed as independent variables and as a previously validated hemolytic index that includes multiple variables. We found that pulse pressure, not systolic, diastolic or mean arterial pressure, independently correlated with high reticulocyte count (beta  =  2.37, p  =  0.02 and high hemolytic index (beta  =  1.53, p = 0.002 in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease in two multiple linear regression models which include the markers of hemolysis as independent variables or the hemolytic index, respectively. Pulse pressure was also independently associated with elevated serum creatinine (beta  =  3.21, p  =  0.02, and with proteinuria (beta  =  2.52, p  =  0.04. These results from the largest sickle cell disease cohort to date since the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease show that pulse pressure is independently associated with hemolysis, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease. We propose that high pulse pressure may be a risk factor for clinical complications of vascular dysfunction in sickle cell disease. Longitudinal and mechanistic studies should be conducted to confirm these hypotheses.

  1. A method for pressure-pulse suppression in fluid-filled piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Y.W.; Bielick, E.F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Wiedermann, A.H. (IIT Research Inst., Chicago, IL (USA)); Ockert, C.E. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA))

    1989-01-01

    A simple, nondestructive method to suppress pressure pulses in fluid-filled piping was proposed and theoretically analyzed earlier. In this paper, the proposed method is verified experimentally. The results of experiments performed for the range of parameters of practical importance indicated that the attenuation of pressure pulses was in accordance with the theoretical predictions. This paper describes the experimental setup and the test models of the proposed pulse suppression devices and discusses the experimental results. In particular, the measured attenuation factors are presented and compared with the theoretical predictions. 8 ref., 17 fig., 2 tab.

  2. A note on the calibration of pressure-velocity sound intensity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Jaud, Virginie

    2006-01-01

    A pressure-velocity sound intensity probe is a device that combines a pressure microphone with a particle velocity transducer. Various methods of calibrating such sound intensity probes are examined: a far field method that requires an anechoic room, a near field method that involves sound emitted...... from a small hole in a plane baffle, a near field method where the sound is emitted from a hole in a spherical baffle, and a method that involves an impedance tube. The performance of the two near field methods is examined both in an anechoic room and in various ordinary rooms. It is shown that whereas...

  3. Integrated experimental test program on waterhammer pressure pulses and associated structural responses within a feedwater sparger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurkkala, P.; Hoikkanen, J. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the methods and systems as utilized in an integrated experimental thermohydraulic/mechanics analysis test program on waterhammer pressure pulses within a revised feedwater sparger of a Loviisa generation VVER-440-type reactor. This program was carried out in two stages: (1) measurements with a strictly limited set of operating parameters at Loviisa NPP, and (2) measurements with the full set of operating parameters on a test article simulating the revised feedwater sparger. The experiments at Loviisa NPS served as an invaluable source of information on the nature of waterhammer pressure pulses and structural responses. These tests thus helped to set the objectives and formulate the concept for series of tests on a test article to study the water hammer phenomena. The heavily instrumented full size test article of a steam generator feedwater sparger was placed within a pressure vessel simulating the steam generator. The feedwater sparger was subjected to the full range of operating parameters which were to result in waterhammer pressure pulse trains of various magnitudes and duration. Two different designs of revised feedwater sparger were investigated (i.e. `grounded` and `with goose neck`). The following objects were to be met within this program: (1) establish the thermohydraulic parameters that facilitate the occurrence of water hammer pressure pulses, (2) provide a database for further analysis of the pressure pulse phenomena, (3) establish location and severity of these water hammer pressure pulses, (4) establish the structural response due to these pressure pulses, (5) provide input data for structural integrity analysis. (orig.). 3 refs.

  4. Effect of tidal volume, sampling duration, and cardiac contractility on pulse pressure and stroke volume variation during positive-pressure ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Kook; Pinsky, Michael R

    2008-10-01

    Both pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation during intermittent positive-pressure ventilation predict preload responsiveness. However, because ventilatory and cardiac frequencies are not the same, increasing the number of breaths sampled may increase calculated pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation because larger (max) and smaller (min) pulse pressure and stroke volume may occur. Tidal volume and contractility may also alter pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation. We hypothesized that the magnitude of pulse pressure variation would increase with sampling duration, and that both tidal volume and contractility would independently alter pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation. In seven pentobarbital-anesthetized intact dogs arterial and left ventricular pressure (Millar) and left ventricular volume (Leycom) were measured over 8 intermittent positive-pressure ventilation breaths at tidal volume of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mL/kg (f = 20/min, 40% inspiratory time) under baseline, esmolol (2 mg/min), dobutamine infusions (5 microg/kg/min) and following volume loading (500 mL NaCl). Stroke volume variation was calculated using pulse contour method (PiCCO, Pulsion Medical Systems, Munich, Germany) averaged over 12 secs. Pulse pressure variation was calculated as 100 x (PPmax - PPmin)/PPmean and calculated over 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 breaths. Pulse pressure variation increased progressively with increasing sampling duration up to but not exceeding five breaths. The effect on sampling duration was increased by greater tidal volume. Esmolol infusion decreased both pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation as compared with baseline (p variation or stroke volume variation. Sampling duration, tidal volume, and beta-adrenergic blockade differentially alters pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation during intermittent positive-pressure ventilation. Thus, separate validation is required to define threshold

  5. a New Approach of Dynamic Blood Pressure Measurement Based on the Time Domain Analysis of the Pulse Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimei, Su; Wei, Xu; Hui, Yu; Fei, Du; Jicun, Wang; Kexin, Xu

    2009-08-01

    In this study the pulse wave characteristics were used as a new approach to measure the human blood pressure. Based the principle of pulse wave and theory of the elastic vascular, the authors analyzed the characteristic of the pulse waveforms and revealed the characteristics points which could be used to represent the blood pressure. In this investigation the relevant mathematical feature was used to identify the relationship between the blood pressure and pulse wave parameters in a more accurate way. It also provided an experimental basis to carry out continuing non-invasive blood pressure monitoring using the pulse wave method.

  6. Lower blood pressure and smaller pulse pressure in sleeping pill users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Fujiwara, Saeko; Ozono, Ryoji; Yamashita, Hidehisa; Kihara, Yasuki

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the association between sleeping pill use and hypertension or blood pressure (BP) via a cross-sectional analysis. A total of 11,225 subjects (5875 men and 5350 women) underwent health examinations. We compared the proportion of sleeping pill users among hypertension (n = 5099) and normotensive (n = 6126) participants. We analyzed participants with no intake of antihypertensive medication (n = 7788), comparing the proportions with high systolic BP (SBP) ≥140, high diastolic BP (DBP) ≥90, and high pulse pressure (PP) ≥50 mm Hg across 3 subgroups. These groups were classified according to the sleeping pill use [nonuse group (n = 6869); low-frequency-use group, defined as taking sleeping pills ≤2 days per week (n = 344); and high-frequency-use group, defined as taking sleeping pills ≥3 days per week (n = 575)]. In the multivariable-adjusted model, odds of sleeping pill use (odds ratio (OR), 1.14; P < .05) was significantly higher in the hypertensive group compared with the normotensive group. In participants with no intake of antihypertensive medication, odds of high SBP (OR, 0.65; P < .0005), high DBP (OR, 0.58; P < .005), and high PP (OR, 0.77; P < .01) were significantly lower in the high-frequency-use group compared with the nonuse group. Odds of high DBP (OR, 0.59; P < .05) was significantly lower in the low-frequency-use group. Sleeping pills were more frequently required in hypertensive participants than in the normotensive ones. Sleeping pill use may decrease BP and assist in the treatment of high BP in patients with sleep disturbances. PMID:29049222

  7. Pulsed metastable atom source for low vapour-pressure metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Urena, A.; Verdasco Costales, E. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Facultad de Quimica); Saez Rabanos, V. (Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales)

    1990-03-01

    The basic design and most relevant experimental conditions of a pulsed metastable atomic-beam oven are described. The stainless steel oven is suitable for vaporising metals and salts up to around 1400 K producing intense beams of metastable alkaline-earth atoms when pulsed or continuous wave low voltage discharges are used. Several applications using atomic calcium in its {sup 3}P and {sup 1}D electronic state are reported. The beam characterisation and discharge efficiency have been measured by time-of-flight or laser-induced fluorescence techniques. In addition, a method of changing the metastable n{sup 3}P/n{sup 1}D ratio, by raising the oven temperature, is described which looks very promising for the study of electronic selectivity in reactive collision processes. Finally several spectroscopic applications for atomic and molecular beam determinations are reported. (author).

  8. Comparative study of pressure- and volume-controlled ventilation on pulse pressure variation in a model of hypovolaemia in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, E B; Otsuki, D A; Fantoni, D T; Bliacheriene, F; Auler, J O C

    2008-05-01

    Dynamic indices represented by systolic pressure variation and pulse pressure variation have been demonstrated to be more accurate than filling pressures in predicting fluid responsiveness. However, the literature is scarce concerning the impact of different ventilatory modes on these indices. We hypothesized that systolic pressure variation or pulse pressure variation could be affected differently by volume-controlled ventilation and pressure-controlled ventilation in an experimental model, during normovolaemia and hypovolaemia. Thirty-two anaesthetized rabbits were randomly allocated into four groups according to ventilatory modality and volaemic status where G1-ConPCV was the pressure-controlled ventilation control group, G2-HemPCV was associated with haemorrhage, G3-ConVCV was the volume-controlled ventilation control group and G4-HemVCV was associated with haemorrhage. In the haemorrhage groups, blood was removed in two stages: 15% of the estimated blood volume withdrawal at M1, and, 30 min later, an additional 15% at M2. Data were submitted to analysis of variance for repeated measures; a value of P ventilation modes. However, when 30% of the estimated blood volume was removed (M2), dynamic parameters became significantly higher in animals under volume-controlled ventilation when compared with those under pressure-controlled ventilation. Under normovolaemia and moderate haemorrhage, dynamic parameters were not influenced by either ventilatory modalities. However, in the second stage of haemorrhage (30%), animals in volume-controlled ventilation presented higher values of systolic pressure variation and pulse pressure variation when compared with those submitted to pressure-controlled ventilation.

  9. Selection and static calibration of the Marsh J1678 pressure gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxendine, Charles R.; Smith, Howard W.

    1993-01-01

    During the experimental testing of the ultralight, it was determined that a pressure gauge would be required to monitor the simulated flight loads. After analyzing several factors, which are indicated in the discussion section of this report, the Marsh J1678 pressure gauge appeared to be the prominent candidate for the task. However, prior to the final selection, the Marsh pressure gauge was calibrated twice by two different techniques. As a result of the calibration, the Marsh gauge was selected as the appropriate measuring device during the structural testing of the ultralight. Although, there are commerical pressure gauges available on the market that would have proven to be more efficient and accurate. However, in order to obtain these characteristics in a gauge, one has to pay the price on the price tag, and this value is an exponential function of the degree of accuracy efficiency, precision, and many other features that may be designed into the gauge. After analyzing the extent of precision and accuracy that would be required, a more expensive gauge wouldn't have proven to be a financial benefit towards the outcome of the experiment.

  10. Central venous pulse pressure analysis using an R-synchronized pressure measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yoshihisa; Hayashi, Daisuke; Wada, Shinya; Yoshioka, Naoki; Yasukawa, Takeshi; Pestel, Gunther

    2006-12-01

    The information derived from central venous catheters is underused. We developed an EKG-R synchronization and averaging system to obtained distinct CVP waveforms and analyzed components of these. Twenty-five paralyzed surgical patients undergoing CVP monitoring under mechanical ventilation were studied. CVP and EKG signals were analyzed employing our system, the mean CVP and CVP at end-diastole during expiration were compared, and CVP waveform components were measured using this system. CVP waveforms were clearly visualized in all patients. They showed the a peak to be 1.8+/- 0.7 mmHg, which was the highest of three peaks, and the x trough to be lower than the y trough (-1.6+/- 0.7 mmHg and -0.9+/- 0.5 mmHg, respectively), with a mean pulse pressure of 3.4 mmHg. The difference between the mean CVP and CVP at end-diastole during expiration was 0.58+/- 0.81 mmHg. The mean CVP can be used as an index of right ventricular preload in patients under mechanical ventilation with regular sinus rhythm. Our newly developed system is useful for clinical monitoring and for education in circulatory physiology.

  11. Acoustic pressure measurement of pulsed ultrasound using acousto-optic diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lecheng; Chen, Shili; Xue, Bin; Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zeng, Zhoumo

    2018-01-01

    Compared with continuous ultrasound wave, pulsed ultrasound has been widely used in ultrasound imaging. The aim of this work is to show the applicability of acousto-optic diffraction on pulsed ultrasound transducer. In this paper, acoustic pressure of two ultrasound transducers is measured based on Raman-Nath diffraction. The frequencies of transducers are 5MHz and 10MHz. The pulse-echo method and simulation data are used to evaluate the results. The results show that the proposed method is capable to measure the absolute sound pressure. We get a sectional view of acoustic pressure using a displacement platform as an auxiliary. Compared with the traditional sound pressure measurement methods, the proposed method is non-invasive with high sensitivity and spatial resolution.

  12. Ejector-Enhanced, Pulsed, Pressure-Gain Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Dougherty, Kevin T.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental combination of an off-the-shelf valved pulsejet combustor and an aerodynamically optimized ejector has shown promise as a prototype of improved combustors for gas turbine engines. Despite their name, the constant pressure combustors heretofore used in gas turbine engines exhibit typical pressure losses ranging from 4 to 8 percent of the total pressures delivered by upstream compressors. In contrast, the present ejector-enhanced pulsejet combustor exhibits a pressure rise of about 3.5 percent at overall enthalpy and temperature ratios compatible with those of modern turbomachines. The modest pressure rise translates to a comparable increase in overall engine efficiency and, consequently, a comparable decrease in specific fuel consumption. The ejector-enhanced pulsejet combustor may also offer potential for reducing the emission of harmful exhaust compounds by making it practical to employ a low-loss rich-burn/quench/lean-burn sequence. Like all prior concepts for pressure-gain combustion, the present concept involves an approximation of constant-volume combustion, which is inherently unsteady (in this case, more specifically, cyclic). The consequent unsteadiness in combustor exit flow is generally regarded as detrimental to the performance of downstream turbomachinery. Among other adverse effects, this unsteadiness tends to detract from the thermodynamic benefits of pressure gain. Therefore, it is desirable in any intermittent combustion process to minimize unsteadiness in the exhaust path.

  13. Validating and calibrating the Nintendo Wii balance board to derive reliable center of pressure measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Julia M; Mancini, Martina; Peterka, Robert J; Hayes, Tamara L; Horak, Fay B

    2014-09-29

    The Nintendo Wii balance board (WBB) has generated significant interest in its application as a postural control measurement device in both the clinical and (basic, clinical, and rehabilitation) research domains. Although the WBB has been proposed as an alternative to the "gold standard" laboratory-grade force plate, additional research is necessary before the WBB can be considered a valid and reliable center of pressure (CoP) measurement device. In this study, we used the WBB and a laboratory-grade AMTI force plate (AFP) to simultaneously measure the CoP displacement of a controlled dynamic load, which has not been done before. A one-dimensional inverted pendulum was displaced at several different displacement angles and load heights to simulate a variety of postural sway amplitudes and frequencies (increase in error as both sway amplitude and frequency increased and a significantly greater error in the mediolateral (ML) (compared to the anteroposterior (AP)) sway direction. There was no difference in error across the 12 WBB's, supporting low inter-device variability. A linear calibration procedure was then implemented to correct the WBB's CoP signals and reduce measurement error. There was a significant effect of calibration on the WBB's CoP signal accuracy, with a significant reduction in CoP measurement error (quantified by root-mean-squared error) from 2-6 mm (before calibration) to 0.5-2 mm (after calibration). WBB-based CoP signal calibration also significantly reduced the percent error in derived (time-domain) CoP sway measures, from -10.5% (before calibration) to -0.05% (after calibration) (percent errors averaged across all sway measures and in both sway directions). In this study, we characterized the WBB's CoP measurement error under controlled, dynamic conditions and implemented a linear calibration procedure for WBB CoP signals that is recommended to reduce CoP measurement error and provide more reliable estimates of time-domain CoP measures. Despite

  14. Spatial calibration via imaging techniques of a novel scanning system for the pulse shape characterisation of position sensitive HPGe detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, N.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Engert, T.; Gerl, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Schaffner, H.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, a novel imaging technique for the spatial calibration of a gamma camera is presented. The latter is aimed for the characterisation of the charge signals of 3D-position sensitive HPGe detectors. The characterisation method itself is based on pulse shape comparison (PSC) technique. The performance of the device is improved by implementing a gamma camera or position sensitive detector (PSD). This PSD consists of a uniform LYSO scintillating crystal optically glued to a crossed-wire position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) from Hamamatsu. The individual multianode readout (IMAR) approach is used to improve its spatial resolution and to enlarge its field of view. A Compton scattering imaging technique is implemented to perform an accurate position calibration of the gamma camera.

  15. Tree shoot bending generates hydraulic pressure pulses: a new long-distance signal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Rosana; Badel, Eric; Peraudeau, Sebastien; Leblanc-Fournier, Nathalie; Beaujard, François; Julien, Jean-Louis; Cochard, Hervé; Moulia, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    When tree stems are mechanically stimulated, a rapid long-distance signal is induced that slows down primary growth. An investigation was carried out to determine whether the signal might be borne by a mechanically induced pressure pulse in the xylem. Coupling xylem flow meters and pressure sensors with a mechanical testing device, the hydraulic effects of mechanical deformation of tree stem and branches were measured. Organs of several tree species were studied, including gymnosperms and angiosperms with different wood densities and anatomies. Bending had a negligible effect on xylem conductivity, even when deformations were sustained or were larger than would be encountered in nature. It was found that bending caused transient variation in the hydraulic pressure within the xylem of branch segments. This local transient increase in pressure in the xylem was rapidly propagated along the vascular system in planta to the upper and lower regions of the stem. It was shown that this hydraulic pulse originates from the apoplast. Water that was mobilized in the hydraulic pulses came from the saturated porous material of the conduits and their walls, suggesting that the poroelastic behaviour of xylem might be a key factor. Although likely to be a generic mechanical response, quantitative differences in the hydraulic pulse were found in different species, possibly related to differences in xylem anatomy. Importantly the hydraulic pulse was proportional to the strained volume, similar to known thigmomorphogenetic responses. It is hypothesized that the hydraulic pulse may be the signal that rapidly transmits mechanobiological information to leaves, roots, and apices.

  16. Cuff-Free Blood Pressure Estimation Using Pulse Transit Time and Heart Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ruiping; Jia, Wenyan; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sclabassi, Robert J.; Sun, Mingui

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that the pulse transit time (PTT), the interval between the peak of the R-wave in electrocardiogram (ECG) and the fingertip photoplethysmogram (PPG), is related to arterial stiffness, and can be used to estimate the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). This phenomenon has been used as the basis to design portable systems for continuously cuff-less blood pressure measurement, benefiting numerous people with heart conditions. However, the PTT-ba...

  17. Pulse pressure monitoring through non-contact cardiac motion detection using 2.45 GHz microwave Doppler radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditya; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    The use of a Continuous Wave (CW) quadrature Doppler radar is proposed here for continuous non-invasive Pulse Pressure monitoring. A correspondence between the variation in systemic pulse and variation in the displacement of the chest due to heart is demonstrated, establishing feasibility for the approach. Arctangent demodulation technique was used to process baseband data from radar measurements on two test subjects, in order to determine the absolute cardiac motion. An Omron digital Blood pressure cuff was used to measure the systolic and diastolic blood pressures from which the pulse pressure was calculated. Correlation between pulse pressure and cardiac motion was observed through changes induced due to different postures of the body.

  18. Dynamic pressure sensor calibration techniques offering expanded bandwidth with increased resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewiski, David

    2015-03-01

    Advancements in the aerospace, defense and energy markets are being made possible by increasingly more sophisticated systems and sub-systems which rely upon critical information to be conveyed from the physical environment being monitored through ever more specialized, extreme environment sensing components. One sensing parameter of particular interest is dynamic pressure measurement. Crossing the boundary of all three markets (i.e. aerospace, defense and energy) is dynamic pressure sensing which is used in research and development of gas turbine technology, and subsequently embedded into a control loop used for long-term monitoring. Applications include quantifying the effects of aircraft boundary layer ingestion into the engine inlet to provide a reliable and robust design. Another application includes optimization of combustor dynamics by "listening" to the acoustic signature so that fuel-to-air mixture can be adjusted in real-time to provide cost operating efficiencies and reduced NOx emissions. With the vast majority of pressure sensors supplied today being calibrated either statically or "quasi" statically, the dynamic response characterization of the frequency dependent sensitivity (i.e. transfer function) of the pressure sensor is noticeably absent. The shock tube has been shown to be an efficient vehicle to provide frequency response of pressure sensors from extremely high frequencies down to 500 Hz. Recent development activity has lowered this starting frequency; thereby augmenting the calibration bandwidth with increased frequency resolution so that as the pressure sensor is used in an actual test application, more understanding of the physical measurement can be ascertained by the end-user.

  19. Hilbert-diagnostics of vortex rings induced in air by a pressure pulse on a hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VA Arbuzov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Formation and evolution of complementary vortical rings induced in air by a pressure pulse on a hole under various boundary conditions are investigated by Hilbert-optics methods and computer modeling. It is experimentally demonstrated that reverse ring-shaped vortices inside the chamber after its depressurization are formed not only in the case with a reduced initial pressure in the chamber as compared with the ambient atmospheric pressure but also in the case with a higher gas pressure in the chamber than the atmospheric pressure. The complementary vortex rings propagating in forward and reverse directions might significantly affect the combustion process in the jets.

  20. Explosive Processes on Cathode while Forming Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge of High Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hashimov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to research of cathode surfaces with different curvature radius (r = 1–8 mm while forming nanosecond pulsed discharge in dense air. Influence of field and air pressure heterogeneity rate in gas gap on size of micro-craters being formed on working cathode surface after pulsed effect has been shown in the paper. The paper reveals a maximum expansion of separate micro-crater size on cathode surface with small curvature radius.

  1. Phylloquinone (vitamin K₁) intake and pulse pressure as a measure of arterial stiffness in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Joan A; Huffman, Fatma G

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among ethnicity/race, lifestyle factors, phylloquinone (vitamin K₁) intake, and arterial pulse pressure in a nationally representative sample of older adults from four ethnic/racial groups: non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, Mexican Americans, and other Hispanics. This was a cross-sectional study of U.S. representative sample with data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2007-2008 and 2009-2010 of adults aged 50 years and older (N = 5296). Vitamin K intake was determined by 24-hour recall. Pulse pressure was calculated as the difference between the averages of systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Compared to White non-Hispanics, the other ethnic/racial groups were more likely to have inadequate vitamin K₁ intake. Inadequate vitamin K₁ intake was an independent predictor of high arterial pulse pressure. This was the first study that compared vitamin K₁ inadequacy with arterial pulse pressure across ethnicities/races in U.S. older adults. These findings suggest that vitamin K screening may be a beneficial marker for the health of older adults.

  2. Calibration of Tests for Time-Dilation in GRB Pulse Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Scargle, J. D.; Cuzzi, Jeffery N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursts are at cosmological distances, then not only their constituent pulses but also the intervals between pulses should be time-dilated. Unlike time-dilation measures of pulse emission, intervals would appear to require less "K-correction" for redshift of narrower temporal structure from higher energy into the band of observation. However, stretching of pulse intervals is intrinsically difficult to measure without incurring a timescale-dependent bias since, as time profiles are stretched, more structure can appear at the limit of resolution. This problem is compounded in dimmer bursts since identification of significant structures is problematic. We have attempted to minimize brightness bias problems by equalizing the signal-to-noise level of all bursts. Then, analyzing wavelet-denoised profiles binned to several resolutions, we identify significant (3 - 4 sigma) fluctuations between pulse structures and interjacent valleys. When bursts are ranked by peak flux, an interval time-dilation signature is evident, but its measure is dependent upon choice of temporal resolution. This result appears to tentatively and qualitatively confirm the work of Davis, who found such a signature using a pulse fitting approach.

  3. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Troyer, G L

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse r...

  4. Ionospheric Response to Solar Wind Pressure Pulses Under Northward IMF Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Liou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancements of aurora and auroral electrojets in response to sudden compression of the magnetosphere by shocks/pressure pulses are well known and have been attributed by some to compression-enhanced magnetic field reconnection. To examine such a view, we analyze a fortuitous event that is comprised of a series of pressure pulses (< 20 min on November 8, 2000. These pressure pulses were preceded by a large, northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF that lasted more than 15 hours such that effects from reconnection can be minimized. Auroral images acquired by ultraviolet imager on board the Polar satellite clearly show intensifications of the aurora that occurred first near local noon and progressively extended from dayside to nightside. The area-integrated global auroral power reached ~30 gigawatts (GW. It is also found that the global auroral power is well correlated with the solar wind dynamic pressure (correlation coefficient r ~0.90, rather than the change in the solar wind dynamic pressure. In-situ measurements of particle data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite indicate that the magnetospheric source for the pressure-enhanced auroras is most likely the central plasma sheet. Other ionospheric parameters such as the auroral electrojet (AE index, magnetic storm index (Sym-H, and the cross polarcap potential drop also show a one-to-one correspondence to the pressure pulses. In one instance the auroral electrojets AE index reached more than 200 nT, the cross polar-cap potential drop (ÎŚpc inferred from the SuperDARN radar network ionospheric plasma convection increased to ~60 kV. The observed increases in the auroral emissions, AE, and polar cap potential were not associated with substorms. Our result strongly suggests that solar wind pressure pulses are an important source of geomagnetic activity during northward IMF periods.

  5. Poor agreement between respiratory variations in pulse oximetry photoplethysmographic waveform amplitude and pulse pressure in intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsverk, Svein Aslak; Hoiseth, Lars O; Kvandal, Per; Hisdal, Jonny; Skare, Oivind; Kirkeboen, Knut A

    2008-11-01

    To identify fluid responsiveness, a correlation between respiratory variations in pulse pressure (DeltaPP) and respiratory variations in pulse oximetry photoplethysmographic waveform amplitude (DeltaPOP) in mechanically ventilated patients has been demonstrated. To evaluate the agreement between the two methods, knowledge about the repeatability of the methods is imperative. However, no such data exist. Based on knowledge of slow oscillation in skin blood flow, the authors hypothesized that the variability of DeltaPOP would be larger than that of DeltaPP when calculations were performed continuously over a long recording period. Respiration, continuous invasive blood pressure, pulse oximetry, and skin microcirculation were recorded in 14 mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients. No intravenous fluid challenges were given, and no other interventions were performed during the measurements. Seventy consecutive comparisons between DeltaPP and DeltaPOP were calculated for each of the 14 patients. For all patients, DeltaPOP was 13.7 +/- 5.8% and DeltaPP was 5.8 +/- 2.6% (P intensive care unit patients. This is in contrast to DeltaPP, which shows a small variability.

  6. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyring, E.M.

    1991-11-25

    A high pressure apparatus constructed for measuring the rates of reactions in liquids under pressures ranging from 1 atm to 2000 atm has been used to measure the complexation kinetics of molybdenum hexacarbonyl reacting with 2,2-bipyridine, 4,4{prime}-dimethyl-2-2{prime}-bipyridine and 4,4{prime}-diphenyl-2-2{prime} bipyridine in toluene. Pentacarbonyl reaction intermediates are created by a 10 nsec flash of frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser light. Measured activation volumes for chelate ligand ring closure indicate a change in mechanism from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as steric hindrance increases. A similar high pressure kinetics study of molybdenum carbonyl complexation by several substituted phenanthrolines is now well advanced that indicates that with the more rigid phenanthroline ligands steric effects from bulky substituents have less effect on the ring closure mechanism than in the case of the bipyridine ligands. An experimental concentration dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield of cresyl violet has been harmonized with previously published contradictory reports. Fluorescence of cresyl violet in various solvents and in micellar systems has also been systematically explored.

  7. Abdominal Obesity Is Characterized by Higher Pulse Pressure: Possible Role of Free Triiodothyronine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni De Pergola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study examined whether obesity is characterized by higher 24 h mean pulse pressure (24 h mean SBP-24 h mean DBP and whether free thyroid hormones (FT3 and FT4 have a relationship with 24 h mean pulse pressure. Methods. A total of 231 euthyroid overweight and obese patients, 103 women and 128 men, aged 18–68 yrs, normotensive ( or with recently developed hypertension (, never treated with antihypertensive drugs, were investigated. Fasting insulin, TSH, FT3, FT4, glucose, and lipid serum concentrations were measured. Waist circumference was measured as an indirect parameter of central fat accumulation. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM was performed. Results. 24 h mean pulse pressure (PP showed a significant positive correlation with BMI (, waist circumference (, and FT3 ( and insulin serum levels (. When a multivariate analysis was performed, and 24 h PP was considered as the dependent variable, and waist circumference, FT3, insulin, male sex, and age as independent parameters, 24 h mean PP maintained a significant association only with waist circumference ( and FT3 levels (. Conclusion. Our results suggest that FT3 per se may contribute to higher pulse pressure in obese subjects.

  8. Blood pressure estimation from pulse wave velocity measured on the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puke, Sawa; Suzuki, Takuji; Nakayama, Kanako; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Minami, Shigenobu

    2013-01-01

    Recently, monitoring of blood pressure fluctuation in the daily life is focused on in the hypertension care area to predict the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease events. In this paper, in order to propose an alternative system to the existed ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) sphygmomanometer, we have developed a prototype of small wearable device consisting of electrocardiogram (ECG) and photopelthysmograph (PPG) sensors. In addition, it was examined whether blood pressure can be estimated based on pulse wave transit time (PWTT) only by attaching that device on the surface of the chest. We indicated that our system could also sense tendency of time-dependent change of blood pressure by measuring pulse of vessel over the sternum while its propagation distance is short.

  9. Non-invasive measurement of the blood pressure pulse using multiple PPGs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, John; Pennington, Gary

    Heart disease, the leading cause of death in the US, may be spotted early on by looking at photoplethysmogram (PPG) data. This experiment explores a new method of continuously monitoring the blood pressure pulse with PPG data. In contrast to the traditional sphygmomanometer (cuff) method, which yields only the systolic and diastolic pressure during measurement, this method tracks the blood pressure pulse wave in a non-invasive continuous manner. This procedure allows for fast, inexpensive, and detailed analysis of the patient's blood pressure implementable on a large scale. We also explore the second derivative of the PPG data. In combination with the above method, the patient's heart risk can be effectively detected. We acknowledge Fisher Endowment Grant support from the Jess and Mildred Fisher College of Science and Mathematics, Towson University.

  10. Role of Pulse Pressure and Geometry of Primary Entry Tear in Acute Type B Dissection Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelukhana, Srikara V; Wang, Yanmin; Berwick, Zachary; Kratzberg, Jarin; Krieger, Joshua; Roeder, Blayne; Cloughs, Rachel E; Hsiao, Albert; Chambers, Sean; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2017-03-01

    The hemodynamic and geometric factors leading to propagation of acute Type B dissections are poorly understood. The objective is to elucidate whether geometric and hemodynamic parameters increase the predilection for aortic dissection propagation. A pulse duplicator set-up was used on porcine aorta with a single entry tear. Mean pressures of 100 and 180 mmHg were used, with pulse pressures ranging from 40 to 200 mmHg. The propagation for varying geometric conditions (%circumference of the entry tear: 15-65%, axial length: 0.5-3.2 cm) were tested for two flap thicknesses (1/3rd and 2/3rd of the thickness of vessel wall, respectively). To assess the effect of pulse and mean pressure on flap dynamics, the %true lumen (TL) cross-sectional area of the entry tear were compared. The % circumference for propagation of thin flap (47 ± 1%) was not significantly different (p = 0.14) from thick flap (44 ± 2%). On the contrary, the axial length of propagation for thin flap (2.57 ± 0.15 cm) was significantly different (p propagation was calculated as 75 ± 9 J/m2 and was fairly uniform across different specimens. Pulse pressure had a significant effect on the flap movement in contrast to mean pressure. Hence, mitigation of pulse pressure and restriction of flap movement may be beneficial in patients with type B acute dissections.

  11. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-09-22

    A laser flash photolysis kinetic study of 2,2{prime}-bipyridine bidentate chelating ligands with one claw in the first coordination sphere of a molybdenum carbonyl complex has been completed at pressures up to 150 MPa. The reaction mechanism for thermal ring closure is found from activation volumes to change from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as substituents on the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands become bulkier. In a similar study of more rigid, substituted phenanthroline bidentate ligands it was found that substituent bulkiness had little effect on the thermal ring closure mechanism. Stability constants for lithium ion complexes with crown ethers in a room temperature molten salt, fluorescence quantum yields for cresyl violet and several other dyes in solution, and the oxidation of alcohols by OsO{sub 4} have also been investigated.

  12. Oscillometric measurement of arterial pulse pressure for patients supported by a rotary blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yih-Choung; Peterson, Anna

    2015-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to evaluate the accuracy of an oscillometric method to measure the arterial pulse pressure from a patient with a rotary ventricular assist device (VAD). This computer model consists of three major components: the cardiovascular system, the HeartMate II VAD, and the operation of an automated cuff. Simulation was performed to mimic failure, recovery, and normal cardiac functions of a patient, supported by the HeartMate II VAD at different levels from minimum to maximum. The oscillating cuff pressure, simulating the air pressure of a deflecting cuff, was obtained from simulation under different conditions to test the accuracy of an oscillometric algorithm in determining the arterial pulse pressure. The algorithm was able to detect the systolic and diastolic arterial pressure with the error within ±2 mmHg in most cases, except the cases when ventricular suction, induced by the VAD, occurred. The results from this study suggested that the oscillometric algorithm is capable to accurately detect the arterial pulse pressure for a rotary VAD patient if the algorithm is properly tuned.

  13. Performance, Calibration and Stability of the Mars InSight Mission Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Don; Banerdt, Bruce; Hurst, Ken; Grinblat, Jonny; murray, alex; Carpenter, Scott

    2017-10-01

    The NASA Mars InSight Discovery Mission is primarily aimed at understanding the seismic environment at Mars and in turn the interior structure of the planet. To this end, it carries a set of very sensitive seismometers to characterize fine ground movements from quakes, impacts and tides. However, to remove atmospheric perturbations that would otherwise corrupt the seismic signals, InSight also carries a pressure sensor of unprecedented sensitivity and frequency response for a Mars mission.The instrument is based on a commercial spacecraft pressure sensor built by the Tavis Corporation. Tavis heritage transducers have provided pressure measurements on several interplanetary missions, starting with a similar application on the Viking Landers. The sensor developed for the Insight mission is their most sensitive device. That same sensitivity was the root of the challenges faced in the design and development for Insight. It uses inductive sensing of a deformable membrane, and includes an internal temperature sensor to compensate for temperature effects in its overall response.The technical requirement on the pressure sensor performance is 0.01(f/0.1)^(-2/3) Pa/sqrt(Hz) between 0.01 and 0.1 Hz, and 0.01 Pa/sqrt(Hz) between 0.1 and 1 Hz. The actual noise spectrum is about 0.01(f/0.3)^(-2/3) Pa/sqrt(Hz) between 0.01 and 1 Hz, and its frequency response (including inlet plumbing) has good response up to about 10 Hz Nyquist (it will be sampled at 20 Hz).Achieving the required sensitivity proved to be a difficult engineering challenge, which necessitated extensive experimentation and prototyping of the electronics design. In addition, a late discovery of the introduction of noise by the signal processing chain into the measurement stream forced a last-minute change in the instrument’s firmware.The flight unit has been calibrated twice, separated by a time span of about 2 years due to the delay in launching the InSight mission. This has the benefit of allowing a direct

  14. Simultaneously Propagating Voltage and Pressure Pulses in Lipid Monolayers of pork brain and synthetic lipids

    CERN Document Server

    Griesbauer, J; Wixforth, A; Schneider, M F

    2012-01-01

    Hydrated interfaces are ubiquitous in biology and appear on all length scales from ions, individual molecules to membranes and cellular networks. In vivo, they comprise a high degree of self-organization and complex entanglement, which limits their experimental accessibility by smearing out the individual phenomenology. The Langmuir technique, however, allows the examination of defined interfaces, whose controllable thermodynamic state enables one to explore the proper state diagrams. Here we demonstrate that voltage and pressure pulses simultaneously propagate along monolayers comprised of either native pork brain or synthetic lipids. The excitation of pulses is conducted by the application of small droplets of acetic acid and monitored subsequently employing timeresolved Wilhelmy plate and Kelvin probe measurements. The isothermal state diagrams of the monolayers for both lateral pressure and surface potential are experimentally recorded, enabling us to predict dynamic voltage pulse amplitudes of 0,1 to 3mV...

  15. Isentropic compression of metals, at multi-megabar pressures, using high explosive pulsed power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, D. G. (Douglas G.); Goforth, J. H. (James H.); King, J. C. (James Carrel); Martinez, E. C. (Ernesto C.); Oona, H. (Hain); Sena, F. C. (Francis C.); Reisman, D. B. (David B.); Cauble, R. C. (Robert C.)

    2001-01-01

    Accurate, ultra-high pressure isentropic equation of state (EOS) data, are required for a variety of applications and materials. Asay reported a new method to obtain these data using pulsed magnetic loading on the Sandia Z-machine. Fast rising current pulses (risetimes from 100 to 30011s) at current densities exceeding many MNcm, create continuous magnetic loading up to a few Mbar. As part of a collaborative effort between the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories we are adapting our high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) methods to obtain isentropic EOS data with the Asay technique. This year we plan to obtain isentropic EOS data for copper and tantalum at pressures up to -2 Mbar; eventually we hope to reach several tens of Mbar. We will describe the design of the HEPP systems and show out attempts to obtain EOS data to date.

  16. Aging, vascular risk, and cognition: blood glucose, pulse pressure, and cognitive performance in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, Cheryl L; Jacobs, Bradley S; Raz, Naftali

    2009-03-01

    Advanced age is associated with decline in many areas of cognition as well as increased frequency of vascular disease. Well-described risk factors for vascular disease, such as diabetes and arterial hypertension, have been linked to cognitive deficits beyond those associated with aging. To examine whether vascular health indices such as fasting blood glucose levels and arterial pulse pressure can predict subtle deficits in age-sensitive abilities, the authors studied 104 healthy adults (ages 18 to 78) without diagnoses of diabetes or hypertension. Whereas results revealed a classic pattern of age-related differences in cognition, preprandial blood glucose level and pulse pressure independently and differentially affected cognitive performance. High-normal blood glucose levels were associated with decreased delayed associative memory, reduced accuracy of working memory processing among women, and slower working memory processing among men. Elevated pulse pressure was associated with slower perceptual-motor processing. Results suggest that blood glucose levels and pulse pressure may be sensitive indicators of cognitive status in healthy adults; however, longitudinal research is needed to determine whether such relatively mild elevations in this select group predict age-related cognitive declines.

  17. Outcome-driven thresholds for ambulatory pulse pressure in 9938 participants recruited from 11 populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Yu-Mei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based thresholds for risk stratification based on pulse pressure (PP) are currently unavailable. To derive outcome-driven thresholds for the 24-hour ambulatory PP, we analyzed 9938 participants randomly recruited from 11 populations (47.3% women). After age stratification (<60 versus ≥60...

  18. Direct injection of high pressure gas : scaling properties of pulsed turbulent jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baert, R.S.G.; Klaassen, A.; Doosje, E.

    2010-01-01

    Existing gasoline DI injection equipment has been modified to generate single hole pulsed gas jets. Injection experiments have been performed at combinations of 3 different pressure ratios (2 of which supercritical) respectively 3 different hole geometries (i.e. length to diameter ratios). Injection

  19. Arterial pressure-based cardiac output in septic patients: different accuracy of pulse contour and uncalibrated pressure waveform devices

    OpenAIRE

    Monnet, Xavier; Anguel, Nadia; Naudin, Brice; Jabot, Julien; Richard, Christian; Teboul, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Introduction We compared the ability of two devices estimating cardiac output from arterial pressure-curve analysis to track the changes in cardiac output measured with transpulmonary thermodilution induced by volume expansion and norepinephrine in sepsis patients. Methods In 80 patients with septic circulatory failure, we administered volume expansion (40 patients) or introduced/increased norepinephrine (40 patients). We measured the pulse contour-derived cardiac index (CI) provided by the P...

  20. Validating and Calibrating the Nintendo Wii Balance Board to Derive Reliable Center of Pressure Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. Leach

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Nintendo Wii balance board (WBB has generated significant interest in its application as a postural control measurement device in both the clinical and (basic, clinical, and rehabilitation research domains. Although the WBB has been proposed as an alternative to the “gold standard” laboratory-grade force plate, additional research is necessary before the WBB can be considered a valid and reliable center of pressure (CoP measurement device. In this study, we used the WBB and a laboratory-grade AMTI force plate (AFP to simultaneously measure the CoP displacement of a controlled dynamic load, which has not been done before. A one-dimensional inverted pendulum was displaced at several different displacement angles and load heights to simulate a variety of postural sway amplitudes and frequencies (<1 Hz. Twelve WBBs were tested to address the issue of inter-device variability. There was a significant effect of sway amplitude, frequency, and direction on the WBB’s CoP measurement error, with an increase in error as both sway amplitude and frequency increased and a significantly greater error in the mediolateral (ML (compared to the anteroposterior (AP sway direction. There was no difference in error across the 12 WBB’s, supporting low inter-device variability. A linear calibration procedure was then implemented to correct the WBB’s CoP signals and reduce measurement error. There was a significant effect of calibration on the WBB’s CoP signal accuracy, with a significant reduction in CoP measurement error (quantified by root-mean-squared error from 2–6 mm (before calibration to 0.5–2 mm (after calibration. WBB-based CoP signal calibration also significantly reduced the percent error in derived (time-domain CoP sway measures, from −10.5% (before calibration to −0.05% (after calibration (percent errors averaged across all sway measures and in both sway directions. In this study, we characterized the WBB’s CoP measurement error

  1. Influence of aerobic exercise training on post-exercise responses of aortic pulse pressure and augmentation pressure in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiko eAkazawa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Central arterial blood pressure (BP is more predictive of future cardiovascular events than is brachial BP because it reflects the BP load imposed on the left ventricle with greater accuracy. However, little is known about the effects of exercise training on central hemodynamic response to acute exercise. The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of an aerobic exercise regimen on the response of aortic BP after a single aerobic exercise in postmenopausal women. Nine healthy postmenopausal women (age: 61 ± 2 years participated in a 12-week aerobic exercise training regimen. Before and after the training, each subjects performed a single bout of cycling at ventilatory thresholds for 30 min. We evaluated the post-exercise aortic BP response, which was estimated via the general transfer function from applanation tonometry. After the initial pre-training aerobic exercise session, aortic BP did not change significantly: however, aortic pulse pressure and augmentation pressure were significantly attenuated after the single aerobic exercise session following the 12-week training regimen. The present study demonstrated that a regular aerobic exercise training regimen induced the post-exercise reduction of aortic pulse pressure and augmentation pressure. Regular aerobic exercise training may enhance post-exercise reduction in aortic BP.

  2. Plotting systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure on a real time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velden, M; Wölk, C

    1990-11-01

    Since a valid non-invasive method for continuously measuring blood pressure is available for the psychophysiological laboratory, a procedure must be found for depicting blood pressure characteristics (systolic, diastolic, pulse pressure) on a real time scale, that is not simply from one heartbeat to the next. Values for blood pressure characteristics are actualized by heartbeats and thus occur at discrete points in time only, quite like values for heart rate. It is being assumed that the conditions for the blood pressure characteristics vary continuously, however, and that a value, actualized by a heartbeat, is representative for a time interval extending halfway before and after the point in time where it occurs. For computing a value for a real time interval it is proposed to weight the blood pressure values according to the amount of time their respective time intervals extend within the real time interval.

  3. Acetylcysteine reduces plasma homocysteine concentration and improves pulse pressure and endothelial function in patients with end-stage renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Rinder, Christiane; Beige, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress, elevated plasma homocysteine concentration, increased pulse pressure, and impaired endothelial function constitute risk factors for increased mortality in patients with end-stage renal failure.......Increased oxidative stress, elevated plasma homocysteine concentration, increased pulse pressure, and impaired endothelial function constitute risk factors for increased mortality in patients with end-stage renal failure....

  4. Spectral analysis of intraocular pressure pulse wave in ocular hypertensive and primary open angle glaucoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija M Bozic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In attempt to find an alternative way to determine conversion from ocular hypertension to primary open angle glaucoma (POAG (besides visual field and optic disc changes, we analyzed intraocular pressure (IOP pulse wave in spectral domain. Aims: The aim of this study was to test the potential differences in spectral content of IOP pulse wave between ocular hypertension and POAG patients, which could indicate conversion. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional study designed to test the differences in the spectral content of pressure pulse wave between nontreated ocular hypertensive and nontreated, freshly diagnosed POAG patients. Methods: The total of 40 eyes of 40 subjects was included: 20 previously untreated ocular hypertensive patients, and 20 previously untreated POAG patients. Continuous IOP measuring gained by dynamic contour tonometry was submitted to fast Fourier transform signal analysis and further statistical data processing. Statistics Analysis Used: Ocular and systemic characteristics of the tested subjects were compared by analysis of variance appropriate for this study design. A P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Higher spectral components of the IOP pulse wave was discerned up to the fifth harmonic in both of the tested groups. No statistically significant differences were found in any of the tested harmonic amplitudes. Conclusions: There are no differences in the spectral content of IOP pulse wave between ocular hypertensive and primary open angle glaucoma patients which could be indicative for conversion.

  5. Nozzle Exit Over-Pressure and Vortex Ring Interaction in a Fully-Pulsed Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Paul S.; Gharib, Morteza

    2002-11-01

    Vortex rings formed by a starting jets will stop entraining circulation and pinch off from their generating or "trailing" jet for sufficiently large piston stroke length to jet diameter ratios (L/D) [Gharib et. al., JFM, 1998]. Recent work by the authors has demonstrated that the leading vortex ring contributes more impulse per unit L/D than does the trailing jet, highlighting the significance of vortex ring pinch off for propulsive applications. The impulse advantage of the leading vortex ring is provided by nozzle exit over-pressure resulting from the acceleration of ambient fluid during ring formation. The present work extends these single-pulse results to a periodic series of starting jets, i.e., a fully-pulsed jet. Measurements were made of the time-averaged thrust of fully-pulsed jets generated using a piston-cylinder mechanism for 2 < L/D < 6 and a range of pulsing frequencies. The results indicate that vortex ring formation provides substantial nozzle exit over-pressure (and hence, thrust benefit) in the pulsed case as well, but the benefit tends to diminish with increasing frequency. Various vortex ring interactions contribute to this trend.

  6. Experimental and numerical analysis of pressure pulses characteristics in a Francis turbine with partial load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yexiang, X; Zhengwei, W; Zongguo, Y; Jin, Z, E-mail: xiaoyex@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering and Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2010-08-15

    This study experimentally and numerically investigates the pressure pulses characteristics and unsteady flow behavior in a Francis turbine with partial load. Unsteady wall pressure measurements with partial load condition are performs to investigate thoroughly pressure fields in the spiral case, runner head cover and straight draft tube dynamically. The unsteady Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the k-{omega}based SST turbulence model were used to model the unsteady flow within the entire flow passage of the Francis turbine. The dominate frequency of the predicted pressure pulses at runner inlet agree with the experimental results in the head cover. The influence of the blade passing frequency causes the simulated peak-to-peak amplitudes in the runner inlet to be larger than in the head cover. The measured and predicted pressure pulses at different positions along the runner are comparable. The predicted pressure fluctuations in the draft tube agree well with the experimental results. However the peak-to-peak amplitudes in the spiral case are not as well predicted so the calculation domain and the inlet boundary conditions need to be improved. At the most unstable operating condition, the pulse in the flow passage are due to the rotor-stator interference (RSI) between the runner and the guide vanes, the blade channel vortex in the runner blade passage and the vortex rope in the draft tube. The unsteady flow patterns in the turbine, including the blade channel vortex in the runner and the helical vortex rope in the draft tube, are classified numerically.

  7. Experimental and numerical analysis of pressure pulses characteristics in a Francis turbine with partial load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yexiang, X.; Zhengwei, W.; Zongguo, Y.; Jin, Z.

    2010-08-01

    This study experimentally and numerically investigates the pressure pulses characteristics and unsteady flow behavior in a Francis turbine with partial load. Unsteady wall pressure measurements with partial load condition are performs to investigate thoroughly pressure fields in the spiral case, runner head cover and straight draft tube dynamically. The unsteady Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the k-ωbased SST turbulence model were used to model the unsteady flow within the entire flow passage of the Francis turbine. The dominate frequency of the predicted pressure pulses at runner inlet agree with the experimental results in the head cover. The influence of the blade passing frequency causes the simulated peak-to-peak amplitudes in the runner inlet to be larger than in the head cover. The measured and predicted pressure pulses at different positions along the runner are comparable. The predicted pressure fluctuations in the draft tube agree well with the experimental results. However the peak-to-peak amplitudes in the spiral case are not as well predicted so the calculation domain and the inlet boundary conditions need to be improved. At the most unstable operating condition, the pulse in the flow passage are due to the rotor-stator interference (RSI) between the runner and the guide vanes, the blade channel vortex in the runner blade passage and the vortex rope in the draft tube. The unsteady flow patterns in the turbine, including the blade channel vortex in the runner and the helical vortex rope in the draft tube, are classified numerically.

  8. Blood pressure, pulse rate, and rhythm measurement using ionic polymer-metal composite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzi, Amid; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Kim, Kwang J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    1999-05-01

    The need for more enhanced blood pressure (BP), pulse rate and rhythm senors has given rise to the possibility of using ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) sensors. In this study we propose to use the IPMC sensors to measure systolic and diastolic BP, pulse rate and rhythm. The proposed IPMC sensors take advantage of the endo-ionic mobility within the polymer- metal composite by converting normal and shear load inputs into an induced voltage output across the thickness of the IPMC sensor. The fabricated IPMC sensors are suitable to be installed on the inner surface of a cuff and, therefore, both systolic and diastolic BP, pulse rate, and rhythm can be measured. An added benefit is the ability of measuring 'pulse rhythm' which give a more amplified look at heart irregularities which a typical pulse rate sensor is unable to show. Our data shows IPMC sensors can produce consistent and reliable BP readings, pulse rate, and rhythm. Typically, a linear relationship between applied maximum load and induced maximum voltage was obtained. This result can be easily translated into good BP reading.

  9. Unconstrained pulse pressure monitoring for health management using hetero-core fiber optic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Michiko; Sonobe, Masako; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a pulse pressure waveform sensor that does not constrain a wearer's daily activity; the sensor uses hetero-core fiber optics. Hetero-core fiber sensors have been found to be sensitive to moderate bending. To detect minute pulse pressure changes from the radial artery at the wrist, we devised a fiber sensor arrangement using three-point bending supports. We analyzed and evaluated the measurement validity using wavelet transformation, which is well-suited for biological signal processing. It was confirmed that the detected pulse waveform had a fundamental mode frequency of around 1.25 Hz over the time-varying waveform. A band-pass filter with a range of frequencies from 0.85 to 1.7 Hz was used to pick up the fundamental mode. In addition, a high-pass filter with 0.85 Hz frequency eliminated arm motion artifacts; consequently, we achieved high signal-to-noise ratio. For unrestricted daily health management, it is desirable that pulse pressure monitoring can be achieved by simply placing a device on the hand without the sensor being noticed. Two types of arrangements were developed and demonstrated in which the pulse sensors were either embedded in a base, such as an armrest, or in a wearable device. A wearable device without cuff pressure using a sensitivity-enhanced fiber sensor was successfully achieved with a sensitivity of 0.07-0.3 dB with a noise floor lower than 0.01 dB for multiple subjects.

  10. Respiratory modulation of oscillometric cuff pressure pulses and Korotkoff sounds during clinical blood pressure measurement in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Diliang; Chen, Fei; Murray, Alan; Zheng, Dingchang

    2016-05-10

    Accurate blood pressure (BP) measurement depends on the reliability of oscillometric cuff pressure pulses (OscP) and Korotkoff sounds (KorS) for automated oscillometric and manual techniques. It has been widely accepted that respiration is one of the main factors affecting BP measurement. However, little is known about how respiration affects the signals from which BP measurement is obtained. The aim was to quantify the modulation effect of respiration on oscillometric pulses and KorS during clinical BP measurement. Systolic and diastolic BPs were measured manually from 40 healthy subjects (from 23 to 65 years old) under normal and regular deep breathing. The following signals were digitally recorded during linear cuff deflation: chest motion from a magnetometer to obtain reference respiration, cuff pressure from an electronic pressure sensor to derive OscP, and KorS from a digital stethoscope. The effects of respiration on both OscP and KorS were determined from changes in their amplitude associated with respiration between systole and diastole. These changes were normalized to the mean signal amplitude of OscP and KorS to derive the respiratory modulation depth. Reference respiration frequency, and the frequencies derived from the amplitude modulation of OscP and KorS were also calculated and compared. Respiratory modulation depth was 14 and 40 % for OscP and KorS respectively under normal breathing condition, with significant increases (both p  0.05) during deep breathing, and for the oscillometric signal during normal breathing (p > 0.05). Our study confirmed and quantified the respiratory modulation effect on the oscillometric pulses and KorS during clinical BP measurement, with increased modulation depth under regular deeper breathing.

  11. Aluminum oxide films deposited in low pressure conditions by reactive pulsed dc magnetron sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Seino, T

    2002-01-01

    The reactive pulsed dc sputtering technique is widely used for the deposition of oxide films. The operating pressure for sputtering is commonly above 0.13 Pa. In this study, however, aluminum oxide (alumina) films were deposited at operating pressures from 0.06 to 0.4 Pa using a sputtering system equipped with a scanning magnetron cathode and a pulsed dc power supply. The pulsed dc power was found to be useful not only to reduce arcing, but also to sustain the discharge at low pressure. The electrical breakdown field, intrinsic stress, O/Al ratio, refractive index, and surface roughness were investigated. Both a low intrinsic stress and an O/Al ratio around the stoichiometry were required to get the film having a high breakdown field. A low operating pressure of 0.1 Pa was found to provide the necessary stress and O/Al ratio targets. A 50-nm-thick alumina film having a maximum breakdown field of 7.4 MV/cm was obtained.

  12. Effect of high-hydrostatic pressure and moderate-intensity pulsed electric field on plum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Parra, J; González-Cebrino, F; Delgado-Adámez, J; Cava, R; Martín-Belloso, O; Élez-Martínez, P; Ramírez, R

    2018-03-01

    Moderate intensity pulse electric fields were applied in plum with the aim to increase bioactive compounds content of the fruit, while high-hydrostatic pressure was applied to preserve the purées. High-hydrostatic pressure treatment was compared with an equivalent thermal treatment. The addition of ascorbic acid during purée manufacture was also evaluated. The main objective of this study was to assess the effects on microorganisms, polyphenoloxidase, color and bioactive compounds of high-hydrostatic pressure, or thermal-processed plum purées made of moderate intensity pulse electric field-treated or no-moderate intensity pulse electric field-treated plums, after processing during storage. The application of moderate intensity pulse electric field to plums slightly increased the levels of anthocyanins and the antioxidant activity of purées. The application of Hydrostatic-high pressure (HHP) increased the levels of bioactive compounds in purées, while the thermal treatment preserved better the color during storage. The addition of ascorbic acid during the manufacture of plum purée was an important factor for the final quality of purées. The color and the bioactive compounds content were better preserved in purées with ascorbic acid. The no inactivation of polyphenoloxidase enzyme with treatments applied in this study affected the stability purées. Probably more intense treatments conditions (high-hydrostatic pressure and thermal treatment) would be necessary to reach better quality and shelf life during storage.

  13. Application of Quasi-Heat-Pulse Solutions for Luikov’s Equations of Heat and Moisture Transfer for Calibrating and Utilizing Thermal Properties Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman

    2014-01-01

    Several years ago the Laplace transform solutions of Luikov’s differential equations were presented for one-dimensional heat and moisture transfer in porous hydroscopic orthotropic materials for the boundary condition of a gradual heat pulse applied to both surfaces of a flat slab. This paper presents calibration methods and data for the K-tester 637 (Lasercomp),...

  14. Measurement correction method for force sensor used in dynamic pressure calibration based on artificial neural network optimized by genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tingwei; Kong, Deren; Shang, Fei; Chen, Jing

    2017-12-01

    We present an optimization algorithm to obtain low-uncertainty dynamic pressure measurements from a force-transducer-based device. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of the methods that are commonly used to measure the propellant powder gas pressure, the applicable scope of dynamic pressure calibration devices, and the shortcomings of the traditional comparison calibration method based on the drop-weight device are firstly analysed in detail. Then, a dynamic calibration method for measuring pressure using a force sensor based on a drop-weight device is introduced. This method can effectively save time when many pressure sensors are calibrated simultaneously and extend the life of expensive reference sensors. However, the force sensor is installed between the drop-weight and the hammerhead by transition pieces through the connection mode of bolt fastening, which causes adverse effects such as additional pretightening and inertia forces. To solve these effects, the influence mechanisms of the pretightening force, the inertia force and other influence factors on the force measurement are theoretically analysed. Then a measurement correction method for the force measurement is proposed based on an artificial neural network optimized by a genetic algorithm. The training and testing data sets are obtained from calibration tests, and the selection criteria for the key parameters of the correction model is discussed. The evaluation results for the test data show that the correction model can effectively improve the force measurement accuracy of the force sensor. Compared with the traditional high-accuracy comparison calibration method, the percentage difference of the impact-force-based measurement is less than 0.6% and the relative uncertainty of the corrected force value is 1.95%, which can meet the requirements of engineering applications.

  15. Korotkoff sound versus oscillometric cuff sphygmomanometers: comparison between auscultatory and DynaPulse blood pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chio, Shiu-Shin; Urbina, Elaine M; Lapointe, Jeffery; Tsai, Jeffrey; Berenson, Gerald S

    2011-01-01

    Listening to Korotkoff sounds (K-sounds) to determine systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) has been the standard for noninvasive BP measurement in medical practices for nearly 100 years. It is the essential tool used for evaluation and assessment of patients with hypertension and risks of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) by physicians and nurses despite limited understanding of the nature of K-sounds. Analyzing cuff oscillometric signals to obtain BP has been the foundation of most digital BP monitors available today. DynaPulse is an oscillometric digital BP monitor that records and analyzes subtle changes of pulse waveforms during the course of a BP measurement while cuff pressure slowly decreases from above systolic to below diastolic. This study compares systolic and diastolic readings obtained by K-sound method following the Bogalusa Heart Study protocol and BP measured by DynaPulse (DP2000A) monitor, in order to better understand the nature and difference between K-sound and oscillometric methods. Analysis of means and differences is applied to BP data collected from 803 subjects examined in the Bogalusa Heart Study. The results indicated: 1) DynaPulse systolic was 9 mm Hg higher (P oscillometric and K-sound BP measurements is important for clinic BP screening and self-BP monitoring, as well as future research to improve hypertension and CVD managements. Copyright © 2011 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Relations between diabetes, blood pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity in haemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Christian Daugaard; Kjærgaard, Krista Dybtved; Dzeko, Mirela

    Diabetes (DM) is common in haemodialysis (HD) patients and affects both blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness. Carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) reflects the stiffness of the aorta and is regarded as a strong risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) mortality in HD patients. However, PWV...... (HD) and 32 HD patients with DM (HD+DM). The SphygmoCor system was used for estimation of PWV. HD-duration, age, gender and BP medication were similar in the two groups. Mean DM-duration was 23±11 years and 25(78%) had type 2 DM. HD+DM had higher BMI (26±5 vs. 29±5 kg/m2, p=0.02), systolic BP (142......±20 vs. 152±21 mmHg, p=0.02) and pulse pressure (65±17 vs. 80±18 mmHg, p

  17. Blood pressure and pulse wave velocity as metrics for evaluating pathologic ageing of the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Peter M; Khalili, Payam; Franklin, Stanley S

    2014-02-01

    The influence of chronological ageing on the components of the cardiovascular system is of fundamental importance for understanding how hemodynamics change and the cardiovascular risk increases with age, the most important risk marker. An increase in peripheral vascular resistance associated with increased stiffness of central elastic arteries represents hallmarks of this ageing effect on the vasculature, referred to as early vascular ageing (EVA). In clinical practice, it translates into increased brachial and central systolic blood pressure and corresponding pulse pressure in subjects above 50 years of age, as well as increased carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (c-f PWV)--a marker of arterial stiffness. A c-f PWV value ≥ 10 m/s is threshold for increased risk according. Improved lifestyle and control of risk factors via appropriate drug therapy are of importance in providing vascular protection related to EVA. One target group might be members of risk families including subjects with early onset cardiovascular disease.

  18. Cascading pulse tubes on a large diaphragm pressure wave generator to increase liquefaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughley, A.; Meier, J.; Nation, M.; Reynolds, H.; Boyle, C.; Tanchon, J.

    2017-12-01

    Fabrum Solutions, in collaboration with Absolut System and Callaghan Innovation, produce a range of large pulse tube cryocoolers based on metal diaphragm pressure wave generator technology (DPWG). The largest cryocooler consists of three in-line pulse tubes working in parallel on a 1000 cm3 swept volume DPWG. It has demonstrated 1280 W of refrigeration at 77 K, from 24 kW of input power and was subsequently incorporated into a liquefaction plant to produce liquid nitrogen for an industrial customer. The pulse tubes on the large cryocooler each produced 426 W of refrigeration at 77 K. However, pulse tubes can produce more refrigeration with higher efficiency at higher temperatures. This paper presents the results from experiments to increase overall liquefaction throughput by operating one or more pulse tubes at a higher temperature to pre-cool the incoming gas. The experiments showed that the effective cooling increased to 1500 W resulting in an increase in liquefaction rate from 13 to 16 l/hour.

  19. Towards Ubiquitous Blood Pressure Monitoring via Pulse Transit Time: Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Inan, Omer T.; Mestha, Lalit K.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Töreyin, Hakan; Kyal, Survi

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous blood pressure (BP) monitoring is needed to improve hypertension detection and control and is becoming feasible due to recent technological advances such as in wearable sensing. Pulse transit time (PTT) represents a well-known, potential approach for ubiquitous BP monitoring. The goal of this review is to facilitate the achievement of reliable, ubiquitous BP monitoring via PTT. We explain the conventional BP measurement methods and their limitations; present models to summarize the...

  20. Aging, Vascular Risk and Cognition: Blood Glucose, Pulse Pressure, and Cognitive Performance in Healthy Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Dahle, Cheryl L.; Jacobs, Bradley S.; Raz, Naftali

    2009-01-01

    Advanced age is associated with decline in many areas of cognition as well as increased frequency of vascular disease. Well-described risk factors for vascular disease such as diabetes and arterial hypertension have been linked to cognitive deficits beyond those associated with aging. To examine whether vascular health indices such as fasting blood glucose levels and arterial pulse pressure can predict subtle deficits in age-sensitive abilities, we studied 104 healthy adults (age 18 to 78 yea...

  1. Pulsed Supersonic Beams from High Pressure Source: Simulation Results and Experimental Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Even

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed beams, originating from a high pressure, fast acting valve equipped with a shaped nozzle, can now be generated at high repetition rates and with moderate vacuum pumping speeds. The high intensity beams are discussed, together with the skimmer requirements that must be met in order to propagate the skimmed beams in a high-vacuum environment without significant disruption of the beam or substantial increases in beam temperature.

  2. Compensation for the Effects of Ambient Conditions on the Calibration of Multi-Capillary Pressure Drop Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colard S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette draw resistance and filter pressure drop (PD are both major physical parameters for the tobacco industry. Therefore these parameters must be measured reliably. For these measurements, specific equipment calibrated with PD transfer standards is used. Each transfer standard must have a known and stable PD value, such standards usually being composed of several capillary tubes associated in parallel. However, PD values are modified by ambient conditions during calibration of such standards, i.e. by temperature and relative humidity (RH of air, and atmospheric pressure. In order to reduce the influence of these ambient factors, a simplified model was developed for compensating the effects of ambient conditions on the calibration of multi-capillary PD standards.

  3. Central blood pressure assessment using 24-hour brachial pulse wave analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muiesan ML

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Lorenza Muiesan, Massimo Salvetti, Fabio Bertacchini, Claudia Agabiti-Rosei, Giulia Maruelli, Efrem Colonetti, Anna Paini Clinica Medica, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy Abstract: This review describes the use of central blood pressure (BP measurements during ambulatory monitoring, using noninvasive devices. The principles of measuring central BP by applanation tonometry and by oscillometry are reported, and information on device validation studies is described. The pathophysiological basis for the differences between brachial and aortic pressure is discussed. The currently available methods for central aortic pressure measurement are relatively accurate, and their use has important clinical implications, such as improving diagnostic and prognostic stratification of hypertension and providing a more accurate assessment of the effect of treatment on BP. Keywords: aortic blood pressure measurements, ambulatory monitoring, pulse wave analysis

  4. A Novel Interpretation for Arterial Pulse Pressure Amplification in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Alfonso

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial pressure waves have been described in one dimension using several approaches, such as lumped (Windkessel or distributed (using Navier-Stokes equations models. An alternative approach consists of modeling blood pressure waves using a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV equation and representing pressure waves as combinations of solitons. This model captures many key features of wave propagation in the systemic network and, in particular, pulse pressure amplification (PPA, which is a mechanical biomarker of cardiovascular risk. The main objective of this work is to compare the propagation dynamics described by a KdV equation in a human-like arterial tree using acquired pressure waves. Furthermore, we analyzed the ability of our model to reproduce induced elastic changes in PPA due to different pathological conditions. To this end, numerical simulations were performed using acquired central pressure signals from different subject groups (young, adults, and hypertensive as input and then comparing the output of the model with measured radial artery pressure waveforms. Pathological conditions were modeled as changes in arterial elasticity (E. Numerical results showed that the model was able to propagate acquired pressure waveforms and to reproduce PPA variations as a consequence of elastic changes. Calculated elasticity for each group was in accordance with the existing literature.

  5. Evaluation of a new arterial pressure-based cardiac output device requiring no external calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amann Matthias

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several techniques have been discussed as alternatives to the intermittent bolus thermodilution cardiac output (COPAC measurement by the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC. However, these techniques usually require a central venous line, an additional catheter, or a special calibration procedure. A new arterial pressure-based cardiac output (COAP device (FloTrac™, Vigileo™; Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA only requires access to the radial or femoral artery using a standard arterial catheter and does not need an external calibration. We validated this technique in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU using COPAC as the method of reference. Methods We studied 20 critically ill patients, aged 16 to 74 years (mean, 55.5 ± 18.8 years, who required both arterial and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring. COPAC measurements were performed at least every 4 hours and calculated as the average of 3 measurements, while COAP values were taken immediately at the end of bolus determinations. Accuracy of measurements was assessed by calculating the bias and limits of agreement using the method described by Bland and Altman. Results A total of 164 coupled measurements were obtained. Absolute values of COPAC ranged from 2.80 to 10.80 l/min (mean 5.93 ± 1.55 l/min. The bias and limits of agreement between COPAC and COAP for unequal numbers of replicates was 0.02 ± 2.92 l/min. The percentage error between COPAC and COAP was 49.3%. The bias between percentage changes in COPAC (ΔCOPAC and percentage changes in COAP (ΔCOAP for consecutive measurements was -0.70% ± 32.28%. COPAC and COAP showed a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.58 (p PAC and ΔCOAP was 0.46 (p Conclusion Although the COAP algorithm shows a minimal bias with COPAC over a wide range of values in an inhomogeneous group of critically ill patients, the scattering of the data remains relative wide. Therefore, the used algorithm (V 1.03 failed to

  6. Polydiagnostic calibration performed on a low pressure surface wave sustained argon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, N de; Iordanova, E I; Van Veldhuizen, E M; Mullen, J J A M van der [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Palomares, J M [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Cordoba, Campus de Rabanales, ed. C-2, 14071 Cordoba (Spain)], E-mail: j.j.a.m.v.d.Mullen@tue.nl

    2008-10-21

    The electron density and electron temperature of a low pressure surface wave sustained argon plasma have been determined using passive and active (laser) spectroscopic methods simultaneously. In this way the validity of the various techniques is established while the plasma properties are determined more precisely. The electron density, n{sub e}, is determined with Thomson scattering (TS), absolute continuum measurements, Stark broadening and an extrapolation of the atomic state distribution function (ASDF). The electron temperature, T{sub e}, is obtained using TS and absolute line intensity (ALI) measurements combined with a collisional-radiative (CR) model for argon. At an argon pressure of 15 mbar, the n{sub e} values obtained with TS and Stark broadening agree with each other within the error bars and are equal to (4 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, whereas the n{sub e} value (2 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} obtained from the continuum is about 30% lower. This suggests that the used formula and cross-section values for the continuum method have to be reconsidered. The electron density determined by means of extrapolation of the ASDF to the continuum is too high ({approx}10{sup 20} m{sup -3}). This is most probably related to the fact that the plasma is strongly ionizing so that the extrapolation method is not justified. At 15 mbar, the T{sub e} values obtained with TS are equal to 13 400 {+-} 1100 K while the ALI/CR-model yields an electron temperature that is about 10% lower. It can be concluded that the passive results are in good or fair agreement with the active results. Therefore, the calibrated passive methods can be applied to other plasmas in a similar regime for which active diagnostic techniques cannot be used.

  7. Cuff-Free Blood Pressure Estimation Using Pulse Transit Time and Heart Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruiping; Jia, Wenyan; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sclabassi, Robert J; Sun, Mingui

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that the pulse transit time (PTT), the interval between the peak of the R-wave in electrocardiogram (ECG) and the fingertip photoplethysmogram (PPG), is related to arterial stiffness, and can be used to estimate the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). This phenomenon has been used as the basis to design portable systems for continuously cuff-less blood pressure measurement, benefiting numerous people with heart conditions. However, the PTT-based blood pressure estimation may not be sufficiently accurate because the regulation of blood pressure within the human body is a complex, multivariate physiological process. Considering the negative feedback mechanism in the blood pressure control, we introduce the heart rate (HR) and the blood pressure estimate in the previous step to obtain the current estimate. We validate this method using a clinical database. Our results show that the PTT, HR and previous estimate reduce the estimated error significantly when compared to the conventional PTT estimation approach (p<0.05).

  8. Social support and loneliness in college students: effects on pulse pressure reactivity to acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Aoife; Hughes, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Socially supportive relationships at university may buffer against psychological stress in students, particularly in those experiencing loneliness. To examine the relation of social support at university and loneliness with pulse pressure (PP) reactivity to acute psychological stress in a sample of first-year undergraduate students. Sixty-five female, adolescent, first-year university students. Pulse pressure (PP) was calculated as the arithmetic difference between systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, which were measured during a resting baseline and during a stressful reading task. The difference between baseline and reading task PP represents PP reactivity. The Social Support at University Scale (SSUS) was used to assess social support availability in university, and the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale was used to assess loneliness. Hierarchical linear regression was used to examine main and interactive effects of SSUS and loneliness on PP change scores, and simple slopes were computed to assist in the interpretation of interaction effects. Social support at university was associated with lower PP reactivity in students reporting medium (t = -2.03, p = .04) or high levels of loneliness (t = -2.93, p = .004), but not in those reporting low levels of loneliness (t = -0.20, p = .83). Psychosocial interventions designed to increase social support available at university, and targeted at students experiencing loneliness may buffer against the harmful effects of acute stressors in lonely first-year students.

  9. Tubular Cardiac Tissues Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Pulse Pressure In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seta, Hiroyoshi; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Sekine, Hidekazu; Yamazaki, Kenji; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiac cells provide the possibility to fabricate cardiac tissues for transplantation. However, it remains unclear human bioengineered cardiac tissues function as a functional pump in vivo. Human iPS cells induced to cardiomyocytes in suspension were cultured on temperature-responsive dishes to fabricate cardiac cell sheets. Two pairs of triple-layered sheets were transplanted to wrap around the inferior vena cava (IVC) of nude rats. At 4 weeks after transplantation, inner pressure changes in the IVC were synchronized with electrical activations of the graft. Under 80 pulses per minute electrical stimulation, the inner pressure changes at 8 weeks increased to 9.1 ± 3.2 mmHg, which were accompanied by increases in the baseline inner pressure of the IVC. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that 0.5-mm-thick cardiac troponin T-positive cardiac tissues, which contained abundant human mitochondria, were clearly engrafted lamellar around the IVC and surrounded by von Willebrand factor-positive capillary vessels. The mRNA expression of several contractile proteins in cardiac tissues at 8 weeks in vivo was significantly upregulated compared with those at 4 weeks. We succeeded in generating pulse pressure by tubular human cardiac tissues in vivo. This technology might lead to the development of a bioengineered heart assist pump. PMID:28358136

  10. Calibration of sap flow estimated by the compensation heat pulse method in olive, plum and orange trees: relationships with xylem anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J E; Durán, P J; Palomo, M J; Diaz-Espejo, A; Chamorro, V; Girón, I F

    2006-06-01

    The compensation heat pulse method is widely used to estimate sap flow in conducting organs of woody plants. Being an invasive technique, calibration is crucial to derive correction factors for accurately estimating the sap flow value from the measured heat pulse velocity. We compared the results of excision and perfusion calibration experiments made with mature olive (Olea europaea L. 'Manzanilla de Sevilla'), plum (Prunus domestica L. 'Songal') and orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck. 'Cadenero') trees. The calibration experiments were designed according to current knowledge on the application of the technique and the analysis of measured heat pulse velocities. Data on xylem characteristics were obtained from the experimental trees and related to the results of the calibration experiments. The most accurate sap flow values were obtained by assuming a wound width of 2.0 mm for olive and 2.4 mm for plum and orange. Although the three possible methods of integrating the sap velocity profiles produced similar results for all three species, the best results were obtained by calculating sap flow as the weighted sum of the product of sap velocity and the associated sapwood area across the four sensors of the heat-pulse-velocity probes. Anatomical observations showed that the xylem of the studied species can be considered thermally homogeneous. Vessel lumen diameter in orange trees was about twice that in the olive and plum, but vessel density was less than half. Total vessel lumen area per transverse section of xylem tissue was greater in plum than in the other species. These and other anatomical and hydraulic differences may account for the different calibration results obtained for each species.

  11. Pulse Pressure Variation Adjusted by Respiratory Changes in Pleural Pressure, Rather Than by Tidal Volume, Reliably Predicts Fluid Responsiveness in Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wei, Lu-qing; Li, Guo-qiang; Yu, Xin; Li, Guo-feng; Li, Yu-ming

    2016-02-01

    1) To evaluate the ability of pulse pressure variation adjusted by respiratory changes in pleural pressure to predict fluid responsiveness compared with pulse pressure variation alone. 2) To identify factors explaining the poor performance of pulse pressure variation in acute respiratory distress syndrome. Prospective study. Forty-bed university hospital general ICU. Ninety-six mechanically ventilated acute respiratory distress syndrome patients requiring fluid challenge. Fluid challenge, 500 mL saline over 20 minutes. Before fluid challenge, esophageal pressure was measured at the end-inspiratory and end-expiratory occlusions. Change in pleural pressure was calculated as the difference between esophageal pressure measured at end-inspiratory and end-expiratory occlusions. Hemodynamic measurements were obtained before and after the fluid challenge. Patients were ventilated with tidal volume 7.0 ± 0.8 mL/kg predicted body weight. The fluids increased cardiac output by greater than 15% in 52 patients (responders). Adjusting pulse pressure variation for changes in pleural pressure (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.94 [0.88-0.98]) and the ratio of chest wall elastance to total respiratory system elastance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.93 [0.88-0.98]) predicted fluid responsiveness better than pulse pressure variation (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.78 [0.69-0.86]; all p variation/changes in pleural pressure values (1.94-2.1) in 3.1% of patients for whom fluid responsiveness could not be predicted reliably. On logistic regression analysis, two independent factors affected the correct classification of fluid responsiveness at a 12% pulse pressure variation cutoff: tidal volume (adjusted odds ratio 1.57/50 mL; 95% CI, 1.05-2.34; p = 0.027) and chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance (adjusted odds ratio, 2.035/0.1 unit; 95% CI, 1.36-3.06; p = 0.001). In patients with chest wall

  12. Evaluation and calibration of a pulsed neutron method for total hydrogen determination in mineral and concrete samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennun, L.; Santibanez, M. [Universidad de Concepcion, Laboratorio de Fisica Aplicada, Departamento de Fisica, P.O. Box 160c, Concepcion (Chile); Gomez, J. [Holcim (Costa Rica) S.A, Alajuela (Costa Rica); Santisteban, J.R. [Centro Atomico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, Bariloche Rio Negro (Argentina)

    2011-11-15

    We studied the feasibility of a nondestructive method to determine hydrogen concentrations in concrete and mineral samples. The amount of total hydrogen in the sample is directly related to the proportion of water included in the paste preparation; and also considers all subsequent processes which can add or remove hydrogen in a real sample (like rain, evaporation, etc.). The hydrogen proportion is a critical variable in the curing concrete process; its excess or deficiency impacts negatively in the quality of the final product. The proposed technique is based on a pulsed neutron source and the technical support of the time of flight, which allow discriminating epithermal neutrons interacting with hydrogen (inelastic scattering) from the elastic and quasi-isotropic scattering produced by other kinds of atoms. The method was externally calibrated in limestone rocks fragments (CaCO{sub 3}-main material used in cement fabrication) and in steel, allowing an easy retrieval of the required information. The technique's simplicity may facilitate the development of a mobile measuring device in order to make determinations ''in situ.'' In this paper, we describe the foundations of the proposed method and various analysis results. (orig.)

  13. Arterial compliance in patients with cirrhosis: stroke volume-pulse pressure ratio as simplified index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, S; Bendtsen, F; Christensen, E

    2001-01-01

    /PP on one side and age, sex, body weight, portal pressure, systemic hemodynamics, biochemical variables, and severity of disease on the other. In the multiple-regression analysis, sex, age, mean arterial blood pressure, systemic vascular resistance, and biochemical variables were significant independent......Arterial function may be altered in patients with cirrhosis. We determined compliance of the arterial tree (C(1)) in relation to systemic and splanchnic hemodynamic derangement and clinical variables. C(1) and the stroke volume-pulse pressure index (SV/PP) were significantly higher (+62% and +40......%, respectively; P close correlation between C(1) and SV/PP was found in both cirrhotic patients (r = 0.86, P

  14. Nanosecond pulsed laser nanostructuring of Au thin films: Comparison between irradiation at low and atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Aké, C., E-mail: citlali.sanchez@ccadet.unam.mx [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, C. U., Delegación Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F. (Mexico); Canales-Ramos, A. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, C. U., Delegación Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F. (Mexico); García-Fernández, T. [Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México (UACM), Prolongación San Isidro 151, Col. San Lorenzo Tezonco, México D.F., C.P. 09790 (Mexico); Villagrán-Muniz, M. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, C. U., Delegación Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Background pressure plays an important role in NPs formation and its characteristics. • The NPs diameter and their size dispersion are smaller when irradiating in vacuum. • The plasmon resonance shifts ∼15 nm to higher frequencies when irradiating in vacuum. • Film partial ablation cannot be neglected for thickness in the range 40–80 nm. • In situ optical techniques monitor the timescale of the process and ablation dynamics. - Abstract: Au thin films with tens of nm in thickness deposited on glass substrates were irradiated with nanosecond UV (355 nm) laser pulses at atmospheric pressure and in vacuum conditions (∼600 and 10{sup −5} Torr). We studied the effect of the laser fluence (200–400 mJ/cm{sup 2}), thickness of the starting film (∼40–80 nm) and surrounding pressure on the partial ablation/evaporation of the films and the morphology of the produced nanoparticles (NPs). The dynamics of NPs formation was studied by measuring in real time the transmission of the samples upon continuous-wave laser exposure, and by means of probe beam deflection technique. The ejection of material from the film as a result of the irradiation was confirmed by time-resolved shadowgraphy technique. Experiments show that the NPs diameter and their size distribution are smaller when the irradiation is performed in vacuum regardless the laser fluence and thickness of the started film. It is also shown that the plasmon band shifts to higher frequencies with lower background pressure. The optical measurements show that the films melt and ablate during the laser pulse, but the transmission of the irradiated areas continues changing during tens of microseconds due to ejection of material and solidification of the remaining gold. Our results indicate that partial ablation cannot be neglected in nanostructuration by ns-pulsed irradiation of thin films when their thickness is in the studied range.

  15. Pulse Combustor Driven Pressure Gain Combustion for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel

    2017-02-01

    The gas turbine engine is an essential component of the global energy infrastructure which accounts for a significant portion of the total fossil fuel consumption in transportation and electric power generation sectors. For this reason there is significant interest in further increasing the efficiency and reducing the pollutant emissions of these devices. Conventional approaches to this goal, which include increasing the compression ratio, turbine inlet temperature, and turbine/compressor efficiency, have brought modern gas turbine engines near the limits of what may be achieved with the conventionally applied Brayton cycle. If a significant future step increase in gas turbine efficiency is to be realized some deviation from this convention is necessary. The pressure gain gas turbine concept is a well established new combustion technology that promises to provide a dramatic increase in gas turbine efficiency by replacing the isobaric heat addition process found in conventional technology with an isochoric process. The thermodynamic benefit of even a small increase in stagnation pressure across a gas turbine combustor translates to a significant increase in cycle efficiency. To date there have been a variety of methods proposed for achieving stagnation pressure gains across a gas turbine combustor and these concepts have seen a broad spectrum of levels of success. The following chapter provides an introduction to one of the proposed pressure gain methods that may be most easily realized in a practical application. This approach, known as pulse combustor driven pressure gain combustion, utilizes an acoustically resonant pulse combustor to approximate isochoric heat release and thus produce a rise in stagnation pressure.

  16. The effects of pulse pressure from seismic water gun technology on Northern Pike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jackson A.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Wilmoth, Siri K.; Wagner, Tristany L.; Shields, Patrick A; Fox, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of sound pressure pulses generated from a water gun for controlling invasive Northern Pike Esox lucius. Pulse pressures from two sizes of water guns were evaluated for their effects on individual fish placed at a predetermined random distance. Fish mortality from a 5,620.8-cm3 water gun (peak pressure source level = 252 dB referenced to 1 μP at 1 m) was assessed every 24 h for 168 h, and damage (intact, hematoma, or rupture) to the gas bladder, kidney, and liver was recorded. The experiment was replicated with a 1,966.4-cm3 water gun (peak pressure source level = 244 dB referenced to 1 μP at 1 m), but fish were euthanized immediately. The peak sound pressure level (SPLpeak), peak-to-peak sound pressure level (SPLp-p), and frequency spectrums were recorded, and the cumulative sound exposure level (SELcum) was subsequently calculated. The SPLpeak, SPLp-p, and SELcum were correlated, and values varied significantly by treatment group for both guns. Mortality increased and organ damage was greater with decreasing distance to the water gun. Mortality (31%) by 168 h was only observed for Northern Pike exhibiting the highest degree of organ damage. Mortality at 72 h and 168 h postexposure was associated with increasing SELcum above 195 dB. The minimum SELcum calculated for gas bladder rupture was 199 dB recorded at 9 m from the 5,620.8-cm3 water gun and 194 dB recorded at 6 m from the 1,966.4-cm3water gun. Among Northern Pike that were exposed to the large water gun, 100% of fish exposed at 3 and 6 m had ruptured gas bladders, and 86% exposed at 9 m had ruptured gas bladders. Among fish that were exposed to pulse pressures from the smaller water gun, 78% exhibited gas bladder rupture. Results from these initial controlled experiments underscore the potential of water guns as a tool for controlling Northern Pike.

  17. Estimated Pulse Wave Velocity Calculated from Age and Mean Arterial Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, S. V.; Laurent, Stéphane; Olsen, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    In a recently published paper, Greve et al [J Hypertens 2016;34:1279-1289] investigate whether the estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV), calculated using an equation derived from the relationship between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), age, and blood pressure, predicts...... cardiovascular disease (CVD) as good as the measured cfPWV. Because ePWV predicts CVD as good as cfPWV, some might wonder whether ePWV could be replaced by cfPWV, which is a time-consuming measurement requiring an expensive apparatus. This question is addressed in this mini-review. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel...

  18. Nonlinear response of plates subjected to inplane and lateral pressure pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The nonlinear response of a rectangular plate exposed to a far-field sonic boom disturbance is studied. The plate is subjected to both lateral and in-plane disturbances. The lateral disturbance is in the form of an N-shaped pressure pulse, and the in-plane disturbance is represented by a sinusoidal pulse. The equations of motion are reduced to a set of nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations using Galerkin's method. These equations are solved numerically using Hamming's (1959) modified predictor-corrector integration method. The effects of in-plane boundary conditions and in-plane inertia are investigated. The nonlinear results, when compared to the linear theory, serve to delineate the realm of validity of the linear theory.

  19. Echocardiographic assessment of hypertensive changes in elderly patients with isolated systolic hypertension and its correlation with pulse pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhangi A Kanitkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Isolated systolic hypertension (ISH is increasingly recognized as a cardiovascular risk factor. Increase in pulse pressure is a powerful independent predictor of cardiovascular events. Aims: To study the hypertensive changes by 2D echocardiography in elderly patients with ISH and to compare the hypertensive effects in patients with pulse pressure between 50-70 mmHg and >70 mmHg. Settings and Design: This observational case series study was conducted over a period of 2 years (2009-2011 at a tertiary care hospital in Pune. Materials and Methods: Seventy-six newly diagnosed cases of ISH among the geriatric population over 60 years of age who attended the medicine and geriatric outpatient departments (OPDs were studied for the hypertensive changes on 2D echocardiography and Doppler. Inclusion criteria were patients ≥ 60 years of age having systolic blood pressure (SBP >140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP ͳ90 mmHg. The patients were divided into two groups according to pulse pressure (50-70 mmHg and >70 mmHg. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH, diastolic dysfunction, and systolic dysfunction were evaluated on 2D echocardiography and correlated with the pulse pressure. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square, Odds Ratio (OR with 95% Confidence Intervals (CI were done using SPSS. Results: Out of 76 patients, 48 patients (63.1% had diastolic dysfunction, 46 patients (60.5% had LVH, and 36 patients (47.4% had systolic dysfunction on 2D echo. Patients with pulse pressure >70 mmHg showed increased incidence of LVH (75.6% than those with pulse pressure 50-70 mmHg and (46.2% respectively. There was no significant change in incidence of systolic dysfunction in the two groups. Conclusions: Incidence of LVH and diastolic dysfunction was more in ISH. Incidence of LVH and diastolic dysfunction was found to be more in patients with wide pulse pressure.

  20. Nanosecond-timescale high-pressure gas discharge in a microwave pulse compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Krasik, Yakov

    2016-09-01

    The results of experimental and numerical studies of the microwave plasma discharge initiated by a nanosecond laser pulse are presented. The discharge is ignited in the pressurized gas filling the switch, which opens the charged resonant cavity, so that the accumulated microwave energy is rapidly released into a load. Fast-framing optical imaging showed that the plasma in the switch appears as filaments expanding along the RF electric field. The temporal evolution of the plasma density was derived from time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. With increasing microwave energy in the cavity, the plasma appears earlier in time after the laser beam enters the switch and its density rises more steeply reaching values which exceed 1016 cm-3 at a gas pressure of 2 .105 Pa. Numerical simulations were conducted using the gas conductivity model of plasma and representation of discharge origin by setting initial population of seed electrons treated by PIC algorithm. The results showed good agreement with the experiments and explained how the self-consistent dynamics of the plasma and RF fields determines the quality of microwave output pulses. In addition, the dynamics of the microwave energy absorption in the discharge plasma was studied. It was shown that at a high pressure, even with an unlimited rate of ionization, a significant portion of the stored energy, 20%, is lost. This work was partially supported by the BSF Grant No. 2012038.

  1. Association of longer QT interval with arterial waveform and lower pulse pressure amplification: the Nagahama Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabara, Yasuharu; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Setoh, Kazuya; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Terao, Chikashi; Igase, Michiya; Yamada, Ryo; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Miki, Tetsuro; Nakayama, Takeo; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2013-08-01

    Central systolic blood pressure (cSBP) has been postulated to correlate closely with cardiovascular risk. Identifying factors associated with cSBP is therefore important. Prolonged QT interval is known to be associated with cardiovascular outcomes and might also be associated with the arterial waveform and cSBP. We investigated the possible associations between electrocardiogram wave interval and cSBP in general population samples. Brachial blood pressure and radial arterial waveform were measured simultaneously. Augmentation index (AIx) was calculated from the radial waveform as the ratio of the height of the late systolic peak to that of the first peak. cSBP was defined as the absolute pressure of the late systolic peak. In the first panel (n = 8,085), QT interval was strongly association with AIx (r = 0.330; P blood pressure, heart rate, and pulse wave velocity, multivariable analysis with adjustment for these covariables nevertheless identified longer corrected QT interval as an independent determinant of increased AIx and smaller pulse pressure amplification (PPa; brachial SBP minus cSBP) (β = -0.066; P < 0.001). This association was replicated in the independent second panel (n = 1,412) (β = -0.105; P < 0.001). In contrast, QRS interval was positively associated with PPa (β = 0.056; P < 0.001). Longer QT interval and short QRS duration were significantly associated with arterial waveform and PPa. Our results provide a clue to the elucidation of unidentified mechanisms of the increased cardiovascular outcome and mortality risks in subjects with longer QT interval.

  2. High pulse pressure and metabolic syndrome are associated with proteinuria in young adult women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity and metabolic syndrome play causative roles in the increasing prevalence of proteinuria in the general population. However, in young adult women the clinical significance of incidentally discovered proteinuria and its association with metabolic syndrome are unclear. We investigated the prevalence and risk factors for proteinuria in this population. Methods A total of 10,385 women aged 20 to 39 years who underwent health screenings were surveyed. Each patient was tested for proteinuria with a dipstick (−, ±, 1+, 2+, or 3+), and proteinuria was defined as 1+ or greater. Persistent proteinuria was established by confirming proteinuria in a subsequent test. Metabolic syndrome was defined in accordance with the updated National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for Asia. Results The mean age was 28.9 ± 5.5 years, and the prevalence of persistent proteinuria was 1.0%. Among these subjects with persistent proteinuria, obesity and metabolic syndrome were found in 10.4% and 5.2%, respectively. Metabolic syndrome, as well as its components of hypertension, hyperglycemia, central obesity, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and high triglyceride levels, was closely related to the presence of proteinuria. In addition, a wide pulse pressure of ≥40 mmHg was another independent risk factor for proteinuria [odds ratio (OR) 3.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03–11.91)]. This had an additive effect on metabolic syndrome in terms of predicting proteinuria. Even in subjects without metabolic syndrome, the influence of an increased pulse pressure was consistent (OR 2.75, 95% CI 1.03–8.61). Conclusions Specific attention to proteinuria may be necessary in asymptomatic young women aged 20 to 39 years if they have metabolic syndrome or a wide pulse pressure. PMID:23433013

  3. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duten, X.; Redolfi, M.; Aggadi, N.; Vega, A.; Hassouni, K.

    2011-10-01

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  4. Maternal Pulse Pressure and the Risk of Postepidural Complications: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappen, Justin R; Myers, Stephen A; Bolen, Norman; Mercer, Brian M; Chien, Edward K S

    2017-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that increasing the intravenous fluid bolus volume at the time of epidural placement in women with narrow pulse pressure would reduce postepidural fetal heart rate (FHR) abnormalities, hypotension, and resuscitative obstetric interventions. We performed a single-center randomized controlled trial. Eligible participants were normotensive with a nonanomalous singleton gestation at or after 35 weeks and with a narrow pulse pressure (less than 45 mm Hg) on admission. Enrolled patients remained eligible for randomization at epidural request if they were within 6 hours of admission and the FHR remained category 1. Patients were allocated to a 500-mL (institutional standard) or 1,500-mL intravenous fluid bolus at epidural placement. A reference group with admission pulse pressure 50 mm Hg or greater was also evaluated. The primary outcome was a category 2 or 3 FHR pattern within 60 minutes after the epidural test dose. Evaluated secondary outcomes included maternal hypotension and composite resuscitative interventions to correct FHR abnormalities or hypotension. We calculated that 276 women (138/group) would provide 80% power to detect a relative 50% reduction in the occurrence of the primary outcome from 27% in the 500-mL group to 13.5% in the 1,500-mL group (two-sided α=0.05). From October 2015 to November 2016, 276 women were allocated to receive a 500-mL (n=139) or 1,500-mL (n=137) fluid bolus. One hundred thirty-eight women were evaluated in the reference group. Demographic, obstetric, and labor characteristics were similar between groups. The 1,500-mL group had significantly fewer postepidural FHR abnormalities (38.0% compared with 51.8%, relative risk 0.73, 95% CI 0.56-0.96, P=.02). Maternal systolic hypotension (10.2% compared with 34.5%, relative risk 0.30, 95% CI 0.17-0.51, Phypotension, and reduces the need for resuscitative interventions. Admission pulse pressure may be used to individualize intrapartum fluid management at the time of

  5. Pulse pressure, left ventricular function and cardiovascular events during antihypertensive treatment (the LIFE study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdts, Eva; Franklin, Stanley; Rieck, Ashild

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pulse pressure (PP) has been related to risk of cardiovascular events in hypertension. However, less is known about modification of this risk marker during antihypertensive treatment in patients with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. Methods. Associations of in-treatment PP with LV......, Framingham risk score and study treatment allocation. Conclusion. During systematic antihypertensive treatment in hypertensive patients with electrocardiographic LV hypertrophy, lower in-treatment PP was associated with lower in-treatment LV function and cardiac output as well as higher rate...

  6. Effect of pulsed discharge on the ignition of pulse modulated radio frequency glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shenjie; Guo, Ying; Han, Qianhan; Bao, Yun; Zhang, Jing; Shi, J. J.

    2018-01-01

    A pulsed discharge is introduced between two sequential pulse-modulated radio frequency glow discharges in atmospheric helium. The dependence of radio frequency discharge ignition on pulsed discharge intensity is investigated experimentally with the pulse voltage amplitudes of 650, 850, and 1250 V. The discharge characteristics and dynamics are studied in terms of voltage and current waveforms, and spatial-temporal evolution of optical emission. With the elevated pulsed discharge intensity of two orders of magnitude, the ignition of radio frequency discharge is enhanced by reducing the ignition time and achieving the stable operation with a double-hump spatial profile. The ignition time of radio frequency discharge is estimated to be 2.0 μs, 1.5 μs, and 1.0 μs with the pulse voltage amplitudes of 650, 850, and 1250 V, respectively, which is also demonstrated by the spatial-temporal evolution of optical emission at 706 and 777 nm.

  7. Plasma density enhancement in atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier discharges by high-voltage nanosecond pulse in the pulse-on period: a PIC simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Chaofeng; Sun, Jizhong; Wang, Dezhen

    2010-02-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) plus Monte Carlo collision simulation is employed to investigate how a sustainable atmospheric pressure single dielectric-barrier discharge responds to a high-voltage nanosecond pulse (HVNP) further applied to the metal electrode. The results show that the HVNP can significantly increase the plasma density in the pulse-on period. The ion-induced secondary electrons can give rise to avalanche ionization in the positive sheath, which widens the discharge region and enhances the plasma density drastically. However, the plasma density stops increasing as the applied pulse lasts over certain time; therefore, lengthening the pulse duration alone cannot improve the discharge efficiency further. Physical reasons for these phenomena are then discussed.

  8. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S.; Pei, X.; Hasnain, Q.; Nie, L.; Lu, X.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6 mm discharge gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using dry air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-Streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBD. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and discharge develops in streamer, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initial electron density by pre-ionization may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also found that the dependence of homogeneity upon PRF is a non-monotonic one.

  9. A volume pulsed corona formed during nanosecond pulsed periodic discharge of negative polarity in narrow gaps with airflow at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepekhin, N. M.; Priseko, Yu. S.; Puresev, N. I.; Filippov, V. G.

    2014-06-01

    A volume mode of spatially homogeneous nanosecond pulsed-periodic corona discharge of negative polarity has been obtained using an edge-to-edge electrode geometry in narrow gaps with airflow at atmospheric pressure and natural humidity. The parameters of discharge are estimated, and a factor limiting the power deposited in discharge is determined.

  10. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sizhe; Lu, Xinpei

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6mm gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using synthetic air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the DBD mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBDs. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave, due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and DBD develops in streamer instead, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initiatory electron density by pre-ionization methods may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also find that the dependence of uniformity upon PRF is non-monotonic.

  11. Pulse pressure variation as a guide for volume expansion in dogs undergoing orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni, Denise T; Ida, Keila K; Gimenes, André M; Mantovani, Matheus M; Castro, Jacqueline R; Patrício, Geni C F; Ambrósio, Aline M; Otsuki, Denise A

    2017-07-01

    To investigate whether pulse pressure variation (PPV) can predict fluid responsiveness in healthy dogs during clinical surgery. Prospective clinical study. Thirty-three isoflurane-anesthetized dogs with arterial hypotension during orthopedic surgery. Fluid challenge with lactated Ringer's solution (15 mL kg -1 in 15 minutes) was administered in mechanically ventilated dogs (tidal volume 10 mL kg -1 ) with hypotension [mean arterial pressure (MAP) dogs, resulting in a decrease in PPV (p dogs. The increase in CO was correlated with the decrease in PPV (r = -0.65; p dogs, PPV predicted fluid responsiveness to volume expansion, and MAP and CVP did not show such applicability. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An internally consistent pressure calibration of geobarometers applicable to the Earth’s upper mantle using in situ XRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Christopher; Rosenthal, Anja; Myhill, Robert; Crichton, Wilson A.; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin; Frost, Daniel J.

    2018-02-01

    We have performed an experimental cross calibration of a suite of mineral equilibria within mantle rock bulk compositions that are commonly used in geobarometry to determine the equilibration depths of upper mantle assemblages. Multiple barometers were compared simultaneously in experimental runs, where the pressure was determined using in-situ measurements of the unit cell volumes of MgO, NaCl, Re and h-BN between 3.6 and 10.4 GPa, and 1250 and 1500 °C. The experiments were performed in a large volume press (LVPs) in combination with synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Noble metal capsules drilled with multiple sample chambers were loaded with a range of bulk compositions representative of peridotite, eclogite and pyroxenite lithologies. By this approach, we simultaneously calibrated the geobarometers applicable to different mantle lithologies under identical and well determined pressure and temperature conditions. We identified discrepancies between the calculated and experimental pressures for which we propose simple linear or constant correction factors to some of the previously published barometric equations. As a result, we establish internally-consistent cross-calibrations for a number of garnet-orthopyroxene, garnet-clinopyroxene, Ca-Tschermaks-in-clinopyroxene and majorite geobarometers.

  13. Tunable time-reversal cavity for high-pressure ultrasonic pulses generation: A tradeoff between transmission and time compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2012-08-01

    This Letter presents a time reversal cavity that has both a high reverberation time and a good transmission factor. A multiple scattering medium has been embedded inside a fluid-filled reverberating cavity. This allows creating smart ultrasonic sources able to generate very high pressure pulses at the focus outside the cavity with large steering capabilities. Experiments demonstrate a 25 dB gain in pressure at the focus. This concept will enable us to convert conventional ultrasonic imaging probes driven by low power electronics into high power probes for therapeutic applications requiring high pressure focused pulses, such as histotripsy or lithotripsy.

  14. Perceived Control Predicts Pulse Pressure in African American Men: The Baltimore Study of Black Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, LaBarron K; Sims Wright, Regina; Aiken-Morgan, Adrienne T; Gamaldo, Alyssa; Edwards, Christopher L; Whitfield, Keith E

    2015-08-07

    Poorer health profiles among African American men throughout the life course evince greater rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and significantly earlier mortality compared with other groups. Despite growing emphasis on identifying how psychosocial factors influence disparate disease risk, little of this research has focused intently on African American men. Using hierarchical linear regression, we explored the additive influence of stress, depression, and perceived control on pulse pressure, an established marker of CVD risk, in a sample (N = 153) of African American men (mean age = 66.73 ± 9.29) from the Baltimore Study of Black Aging (BSBA). After accounting for age and health status indicators, perceived control emerged as a significant predictor of pulse pressure. These findings suggest that greater belief in one's own efficacy is a protective factor for cardiovascular health among African American men. Future research should examine whether enhancing perceived control can have an appreciable impact on the immense CVD burden in this and other at-risk populations.

  15. Lower blood pressure and smaller pulse pressure in sleeping pill users: A large-scale cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Fujiwara, Saeko; Ozono, Ryoji; Yamashita, Hidehisa; Kihara, Yasuki

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between sleeping pill use and hypertension or blood pressure (BP) via a cross-sectional analysis.A total of 11,225 subjects (5875 men and 5350 women) underwent health examinations. We compared the proportion of sleeping pill users among hypertension (n = 5099) and normotensive (n = 6126) participants. We analyzed participants with no intake of antihypertensive medication (n = 7788), comparing the proportions with high systolic BP (SBP) ≥140, high diastolic BP (DBP) ≥90, and high pulse pressure (PP) ≥50 mm Hg across 3 subgroups. These groups were classified according to the sleeping pill use [nonuse group (n = 6869); low-frequency-use group, defined as taking sleeping pills ≤2 days per week (n = 344); and high-frequency-use group, defined as taking sleeping pills ≥3 days per week (n = 575)].In the multivariable-adjusted model, odds of sleeping pill use (odds ratio (OR), 1.14; P Sleeping pills were more frequently required in hypertensive participants than in the normotensive ones. Sleeping pill use may decrease BP and assist in the treatment of high BP in patients with sleep disturbances.

  16. Effect of the arteriovenous access for hemodialysis on subendocardial viability ratio, pulse pressure and hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizinho, Ricardo Senos; Santos, Catarina; Lucas, Carlos; Adragão, Teresa; Barata, José Diogo

    2014-10-01

    In some patients the potential benefits of the arteriovenous (AV) access over catheter for hemodialysis seem to be outweighed by global cardiovascular status deterioration. We prospectively evaluated 44 pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients submitted to vascular access creation during a follow-up of 25 ± 9 months. We performed pulse wave analysis and biochemical assessment before and 2 months after AV access construction, and we registered premature vascular access thrombosis, and all-cause and cardiovascular hospitalizations throughout follow-up. We found a statistically significant decrease in the subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR) and pulse pressure (PP) parameters after AV access creation while brain natriuretic peptide significantly increased. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified SEVR ≤113 % evaluated 2 months after vascular access construction as the best cutoff value for predicting all-cause and cardiovascular hospitalizations. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that a SEVR ≤113 % was associated with all-cause (p = 0.010) and cardiovascular (p = 0.029) hospitalizations; Cox regression analysis verified a 4.9-fold higher risk of all-cause hospitalization in patients with SEVR ≤113 % (p = 0.005). To our best knowledge, this report indicates, for the first time, that despite the decrease in PP parameters, the creation of a vascular access for hemodialysis was also associated with a reduction of SEVR which predicted a worse clinical outcome. We argue that the decrease of pulse pressure after arteriovenous construction may reflect a new hemodynamic set-point after vascular access creation and may not indicate a protective cardiovascular effect.

  17. Implantable reflectance pulse transit time blood pressure sensor with oximetry capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, J.; Gehrke, R.; Theodor, M.; Bingger, P.; Förster, K.; Heilmann, C.; Beyersdorf, F.; Zappe, H.; Seifert, A.

    2010-04-01

    We present a novel implantable multi-wavelength reflectance sensor for the measurement of blood pressure with pulse transit time (PTT). Continuous long-term monitoring of blood pressure and arterial oxygen saturation is vital for medical diagnostics and the ensuing therapy of cardiovascular diseases. Conventional cuff-based blood pressure monitors do not provide continuous data and put severe constraints on the patients' daily lives. An implantable sensor would eliminate such problems. The new biocompatible sensor is placed subcutaneously on blood perfused tissue. The PTT is calculated by photoplethysmograms and the ECG-signal, that is recorded with intracorporal electrodes. In addition, the sensor detects the arterial oxygen saturation. An ensuing spectralphotometric analysis of the light intensity changes delivers data on the concentration of dysfunctional hemoglobin derivatives. Experimental measurements showed a clear correlation between the estimated PTT and the systolic blood pressure reference. These initial results demonstrate the potential of the sensor as part of an fully implantable sensor system for the longterm-monitoring of cardiovascular parameters.

  18. Nickel Nanoparticles Production using Pulsed Laser Ablation under Pressurized CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardis, Mardiansyah; Takada, Noriharu; Machmudah, Siti; Diono, Wahyu; Kanda, Hideki; Sasaki, Koichi; Goto, Motonobu

    2014-10-01

    We used nickel (Ni) plate as a target and irradiated pulse laser ablation with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm under pressurized CO2. The Ni plate was ablated at various pressure (5-15 MPa), temperature (15-80°), and irradiation time (3-30 min). The method successfully generated Ni nanoparticles in various shape and size. Generated Ni nanoparticles collected on a Si wafer and the ablated Ni plate were analyzed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM). With changing pressure and temperature, the structures of Ni nanoparticles also changed. The shape of generated particles is sphere-like structure with diameter around 10--100 nm. Also it was observed that a network structure of smaller particles was fabricated. The mechanism of nanoparticles fabrication could be explained as follows. Ablated nickel plate melted during the ablation process and larger particles formed, then ejected smaller spherical nanoparticles, which formed nanoclusters attached on the large particles. This morphology of particles was also observed for gold and silver nanoparticles with same condition. Further, the optical emission intensity from ablation plasma and the volume of the ablated crater were also examined under pressurized CO2.

  19. Pulse Pressure and Risk for Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Atherothrombosis: From the REACH Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Senthil; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Elbez, Yedid; Sorbets, Emmanuel; Feldman, Laurent J; Eagle, Kim A; Ohman, E Magnus; Blacher, Jacques; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2016-02-02

    Pulse pressure (PP) provides valuable prognostic information in specific populations, but few studies have assessed its value on cardiovascular outcomes in a broad, worldwide population. The aim of this study was to determine whether PP is associated with major adverse cardiovascular outcomes, independently of mean arterial pressure. Participants from the international REACH (Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health) registry, which evaluates subjects with clinical atherothrombotic disease or risk factors for its development, were examined. Those with incomplete 4-year follow-up or PP data (final n = 45,087) were excluded. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine the association between PP and cardiovascular outcomes, including cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, all myocardial infarction, all stroke, cardiovascular hospitalization, and a combined outcome. PP was analyzed as a continuous and categorical (i.e., by quartile) variable. The mean age of the cohort was 68 ± 10 years, 35% were women, and 81% were treated for hypertension. The mean blood pressure was 138 ± 19/79 ± 11 mm Hg, rendering a mean PP of 49 ± 16 mm Hg. On univariate analysis, increasing PP quartile was associated with worse outcomes (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). After adjusting for sex, age, current smoking status, history of hypercholesterolemia, history of diabetes, aspirin use, statin use, blood pressure medication use, and mean arterial pressure, PP quartile was still associated with all outcomes except all stroke and cardiovascular death (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). Analysis of PP as a continuous variable yielded similar results. In an international cohort of high-risk subjects, PP, a readily available hemodynamic parameter, is associated with multiple adverse cardiovascular outcomes and provides prognostic utility beyond that of mean arterial pressure. Copyright © 2016 American College of

  20. Effect of Pulse Shaping on Subharmonic Aided Pressure Estimation In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ipshita; Eisenbrey, John; Stanczak, Maria; Sridharan, Anush; Dave, Jaydev K; Liu, Ji-Bin; Hazard, Christopher; Wang, Xinghua; Wang, Ping; Li, Huiwen; Wallace, Kirk; Forsberg, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    Subharmonic imaging (SHI) is a technique that uses the nonlinear oscillations of microbubbles when exposed to ultrasound at high pressures transmitting at the fundamental frequency ie, fo and receiving at half the transmit frequency (ie, fo /2). Subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) is based on the inverse relationship between the subharmonic amplitude of the microbubbles and the ambient pressure change. Eight waveforms with different envelopes were optimized with respect to acoustic power at which the SHAPE study is most sensitive. The study was run with four input transmit cycles, first in vitro and then in vivo in three canines to select the waveform that achieved the best sensitivity for detecting changes in portal pressures using SHAPE. A Logiq 9 scanner with a 4C curvi-linear array was used to acquire 2.5 MHz radio-frequency data. Scanning was performed in dual imaging mode with B-mode imaging at 4 MHz and a SHI contrast mode transmitting at 2.5 MHz and receiving at 1.25 MHz. Sonazoid, which is a lipid stabilized gas filled bubble of perfluorobutane, was used as the contrast agent in this study. A linear decrease in subharmonic amplitude with increased pressure was observed for all waveforms (r from -0.77 to -0.93; P < .001) in vitro. There was a significantly higher correlation of the SHAPE gradient with changing pressures for the broadband pulses as compared to the narrowband pulses in both in vitro and in vivo results. The highest correlation was achieved with a Gaussian windowed binomial filtered square wave with an r-value of -0.95. One of the three canines was eliminated for technical reasons, while the other two produced very similar results to those obtained in vitro (r from -0.72 to -0.98; P <.01). The most consistent in vivo results were achieved with the Gaussian windowed binomial filtered square wave (r = -0.95 and -0.96). Using this waveform is an improvement to the existing SHAPE technique (where a square wave was used) and

  1. Calibration of blood pressure data after replacement of the standard mercury sphygmomanometer by an oscillometric device and concurrent change of cuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Hannelore K; Ellert, Ute; Thamm, Michael; Adler, Carolin

    2015-02-01

    Oscillometric blood pressure (BP) measurement devices are increasingly replacing standard mercury sphygmomanometers and generalizability of validation studies to other environments, for example, national survey environments, is assumed. We compared BP measurements according to two highly standardized German national survey BP protocols: a standard mercury sphygmomanometer and an oscillometric device, Datascope Accutorr Plus, each with specific manufacturer-provided cuffs and cuff-selection rules. A sample of 105 adults were subjected to alternate same-arm BP measurements according to the principles of the International Protocol revision 2010 for the validation of BP-measuring devices in adults of the European Society of Hypertension. In all, 315 BP measurement pairs were obtained. The mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were higher by the standard mercury old protocol and increased with BP, age, and pulse pressure, and were associated with the ratios of the cuff width to the arm circumference. The mean systolic difference (datascope new protocol-standard mercury old protocol) in participants with old protocol: for SBP<120 was -3.5 ± 4.9 mmHg (n=162), for SBP 120-139 (n=108) was -6.4 ± 5.8 mmHg, and for SBP ≥ 140 (n=45) was -11.9 ± 7.2 mmHg. For DBP<80/80-89/≥ 90 in 230/67/18 participants, the differences were -1.9 ± 5.0/-6.8 ± 5.9/-7.6 ± 5.2 mmHg. A calibration formula for SBP derived from linear regression modeling includes SBP, sex, age, pulse pressure, and the difference in the cuff-width to arm-circumference ratios for the two devices (for DBP without age). Our study suggests that even in a highly standardized national survey environment, reported agreement from validation studies may not be replicable and comparisons in the specific clinical or research setting can be useful before replacing the mercury device completely.

  2. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, David,; Lacoste, Deanna,; Laux, C.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and interelectrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. In particular, the experimental conditions necessary for the glow regime of NRP discharges have been determine...

  3. Optical Properties Dependence with Gas Pressure in AlN Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J A; Riascos, H [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira, Grupo plasma Laser y Aplicaciones A.A 097 (Colombia); Caicedo, J C [Grupo pelIculas delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Cabrera, G; Yate, L, E-mail: jcaicedoangulo@gmail.com [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    AlN films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using an Nd: YAG laser ({lambda} = 1064 nm). The films were deposited in a nitrogen atmosphere as working gas; the target was an aluminum high purity (99.99%). The films were deposited with a laser fluence of 7 J/cm2 for 10 minutes on silicon (100) substrates. The substrate temperature was 300 deg. C and the working pressure was varied from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr. The thickness measured by profilometer was 150 nm for all films. The crystallinity was observed via XRD pattern, the morphology and composition of the films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), respectively. The optical reflectance spectra and color coordinates of the films were obtained by optical spectral reflectometry technique in the range of 400 cm-1- 900 cm-1 by an Ocean Optics 2000 spectrophotometer. In this work, a clear dependence of the reflectance, dominant wavelength and color purity was found in terms of the applied pressure to the AlN films. A reduction in reflectance of about 55% when the pressure was increased from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr was observed. This paper deals with the formation of AlN thin films as promising materials for the integration of SAW devices on Si substrates due to their good piezoelectric properties and the possibility of deposition at low temperature compatible with the manufacturing of Si integrated circuits.

  4. Optical Properties Dependence with Gas Pressure in AlN Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, J. A.; Riascos, H.; Caicedo, J. C.; Cabrera, G.; Yate, L.

    2011-01-01

    AlN films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using an Nd: YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm). The films were deposited in a nitrogen atmosphere as working gas; the target was an aluminum high purity (99.99%). The films were deposited with a laser fluence of 7 J/cm2 for 10 minutes on silicon (100) substrates. The substrate temperature was 300 °C and the working pressure was varied from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr. The thickness measured by profilometer was 150 nm for all films. The crystallinity was observed via XRD pattern, the morphology and composition of the films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), respectively. The optical reflectance spectra and color coordinates of the films were obtained by optical spectral reflectometry technique in the range of 400 cm-1- 900 cm-1 by an Ocean Optics 2000 spectrophotometer. In this work, a clear dependence of the reflectance, dominant wavelength and color purity was found in terms of the applied pressure to the AlN films. A reduction in reflectance of about 55% when the pressure was increased from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr was observed. This paper deals with the formation of AlN thin films as promising materials for the integration of SAW devices on Si substrates due to their good piezoelectric properties and the possibility of deposition at low temperature compatible with the manufacturing of Si integrated circuits.

  5. Very High Pressure Single Pulse Shock Tube Studies of Aromatic Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brezinsky, K.

    2006-11-28

    The principal focus of this research program is aimed at understanding the oxidation and pyrolysis chemistry of primary aromatic molecules and radicals with the goal of developing a comprehensive kinetic model at conditions that are relevant to practical combustion devices. A very high pressure single pulse shock tube is used to obtain experimental data over a wide pressure range in the high pressure regime, 5-1000 bars, at pre-flame temperatures for fuel pyrolysis and oxidation over a broad spectrum of equivalence ratios. Stable species sampled from the shock tube are analyzed using standard chromatographic techniques using GC/MS-PDD and GC/TCD-FID. Experimental data from the HPST (stable species profiles) and data from other laboratories (if available) are simulated using kinetic models (if available) to develop a comprehensive model that can describe aromatics oxidation and pyrolysis over a wide range of experimental conditions. The shock tube has been heated (1000C) recently to minimize effects due to condensation of aromatic, polycyclic and other heavy species. Work during this grant period has focused on 7 main areas summarized in the final technical report.

  6. Short-term effects of air temperature on blood pressure and pulse pressure in potentially susceptible individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzinger, Stefanie; Hampel, Regina; Breitner, Susanne; Rückerl, Regina; Kraus, Ute; Cyrys, Josef; Geruschkat, Uta; Peters, Annette; Schneider, Alexandra

    2014-09-01

    Only few epidemiological studies have investigated the association between air temperature and blood pressure (BP) or pulse pressure (PP), with inconsistent findings. We examined whether short-term changes in air temperature were associated with changes in BP or PP in three different populations. Between March 2007 and December 2008, 371 systolic and diastolic BP measurements were collected in 30 individuals with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), 30 persons with impaired glucose tolerance and 42 healthy individuals without a metabolic disorder from Augsburg, Germany. Hourly means of ambient meteorological data were obtained from a fixed measurement station. Personal temperature measurements were conducted using data loggers. Temperature effects were evaluated using additive mixed models adjusting for time trend and relative humidity. Decreases in air temperature were associated with an increase in systolic BP, diastolic BP and PP in individuals with T2D. For example, a 1°C decrease in ambient temperature was associated with an immediate increase in systolic BP of 1.0 mmHg (95%-confidence interval: [0.5;1.4]mmHg). Effects of personally measured air temperature were similar. Temperature effects were modified by age, body mass index, gender, antihypertensive medication and whereabouts, such as being indoors. We observed associations between decreases in air temperature and increases in BP as well as PP in persons with T2D indicating that these people might be potentially more susceptible to changes in air temperature. Our findings may provide a hypothesis for a mechanism between air temperature decreases and short-term increases of cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Arterial pressure-based cardiac output in septic patients: different accuracy of pulse contour and uncalibrated pressure waveform devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, Xavier; Anguel, Nadia; Naudin, Brice; Jabot, Julien; Richard, Christian; Teboul, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    We compared the ability of two devices estimating cardiac output from arterial pressure-curve analysis to track the changes in cardiac output measured with transpulmonary thermodilution induced by volume expansion and norepinephrine in sepsis patients. In 80 patients with septic circulatory failure, we administered volume expansion (40 patients) or introduced/increased norepinephrine (40 patients). We measured the pulse contour-derived cardiac index (CI) provided by the PiCCO device (CIpc), the arterial pressure waveform-derived CI provided by the Vigileo device (CIpw), and the transpulmonary thermodilution CI (CItd) before and after therapeutic interventions. The changes in CIpc accurately tracked the changes in CItd induced by volume expansion (bias, -0.20 +/- 0.63 L/min/m2) as well as by norepinephrine (bias, -0.05 +/- 0.74 L/min/m2). The changes in CIpc accurately detected an increase in CItd >or= 15% induced by volume expansion and norepinephrine introduction/increase (area under ROC curves, 0.878 (0.736 to 0.960) and 0.924 (0.795 to 0.983), respectively; P or= 15% induced by volume expansion and norepinephrine introduction/increase (area under ROC curves, 0.564 (0.398 to 0.720) and 0.541 (0.377 to 0.700, respectively, both not significantly different from versus 0.500). The CIpc was reliable and accurate for assessing the CI changes induced by volume expansion and norepinephrine. By contrast, the CIpw poorly tracked the trends in CI induced by those therapeutic interventions.

  8. Association of pulse pressure with new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larstorp, Anne Cecilie K; Ariansen, Inger; Gjesdal, Knut

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have found pulse pressure (PP), a marker of arterial stiffness, to be an independent predictor of atrial fibrillation (AF) in general and hypertensive populations. We examined whether PP predicted new-onset AF in comparison with other blood pressure components in the Losartan......, and Framingham Risk Score; sex, race, and treatment allocation; and in-treatment heart rate and Cornell product. PP was the strongest single blood pressure predictor of new-onset AF determined by the decrease in the -2 Log likelihood statistic, in comparison with systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure......, and mean arterial pressure. When evaluated in the same model, the predictive effect of systolic and diastolic blood pressures together was similar to that of PP. In this population of patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy, PP was the strongest single blood pressure predictor of new...

  9. Contribution of dynamic calibration to the measurement accuracy of a pressure plate system throughout the stance phase in sound horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterlinck, Maarten; Pille, Frederik; Sonneveld, Danse C; Oomen, Annemiek M; Gasthuys, Frank; Back, Willem

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical force curve of a pressure plate (PP) using dynamic calibration with a force plate (FP) in six sound Warmblood horses. The animals were walked and trotted over a combined PP-FP system sampling at 250 Hz. Five valid measurements of each forelimb were collected. The recalibration factor (RF), the ratio between the calibrated and raw PP data, was evaluated in each timeframe throughout the stance phase. Following dynamic calibration, the vertical force curve of the PP demonstrated a characteristic biphasic pattern at the walk and typical spikes at the beginning and end of stance at the trot. Both at walk and trot, the RF was considerably higher and more variable in the first 5% of stance (i.e. the impact phase) and during the final 20% of stance (i.e. the breakover phase), whereas between these phases (i.e. in the support phase), the RF was lower and remained relatively constant. These findings were confirmed by plotting the RF as a function of the vertical force and the RF in the loading part of the vertical force curve was lower than in the unloading part of the curve. Without dynamic calibration with a FP, the accuracy of the PP appears suboptimal, especially at the impact and breakover phases. However, the accuracy of the PP was relatively high and constant during the support phase, and higher loading was not associated with increasing deviation. It is therefore essential to optimise PP calibration, as this may downsize systematic measuring errors. However, in a clinical setting, where a stand-alone PP is used to objectively quantify locomotor symmetry, these errors can be readily eliminated by evaluating left:right symmetry ratios. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges in Air at Atmospheric Pressure -- Experiment and Theory of Regime Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and inter-electrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. Notably, there is a minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime that increases with decreasing gas temperature. A theory is developed to describe the Corona-to-Glow (C-G) and Glow-to-Spark (G-S) transitions for NRP discharges. The C-G transition is shown to depend on the Avalanche-to-Streamer Transition (AST) as well as the electric field strength in the positive column. The G-S transition is due to the thermal ionization instability. The minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime can be understood by considering that the applied voltage of the AST must be lower than that of the thermal ionization instability. This is a previously unknown criterion for generating glow discharges, as it does not correspond to the Paschen minimum or to the Meek-Raether criterion.

  11. EFFECTS OF PERMANENT PACEMAKER ON THE PULSE PRESSURE IN PATIENTS IN EARLY POST-IMPLANTATION PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pochinska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of pulse pressure (PP and patients migration between PP classes in 220 patients (110 men and 110 women in average age (70 ± 9 years in the early period after pacemaker implantation (3-5 days in VVI/VVIR, DDD/DDDR, CRT-P/D pacing modes with atrioventricular block, bundle brunch block, sick sinus node syndrome, permanent bradysystolic form of atrial fibrillation and dilated cardiomyopathy were studied. The results showed that the implantation of the pacemaker helps to normalize PP in 79 % of patients with the prevalence in class III due to reducing of PP in II, IV and V classes in the VVI, DDD, DDDR pacing mode, and there is no significant effect of it on the migration of patients in PP classes in VVIR and CRT mode. Saving in 21 % of patients II, IV and V class of PP after pacemaker implantation shows the necessity in complement drug therapy.

  12. Toward Ubiquitous Blood Pressure Monitoring via Pulse Transit Time: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Inan, Omer T; Mestha, Lalit K; Kim, Chang-Sei; Töreyin, Hakan; Kyal, Survi

    2015-08-01

    Ubiquitous blood pressure (BP) monitoring is needed to improve hypertension detection and control and is becoming feasible due to recent technological advances such as in wearable sensing. Pulse transit time (PTT) represents a well-known potential approach for ubiquitous BP monitoring. The goal of this review is to facilitate the achievement of reliable ubiquitous BP monitoring via PTT. We explain the conventional BP measurement methods and their limitations; present models to summarize the theory of the PTT-BP relationship; outline the approach while pinpointing the key challenges; overview the previous work toward putting the theory to practice; make suggestions for best practice and future research; and discuss realistic expectations for the approach.

  13. Towards Ubiquitous Blood Pressure Monitoring via Pulse Transit Time: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jin-Oh; Inan, Omer T.; Mestha, Lalit K.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Töreyin, Hakan; Kyal, Survi

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous blood pressure (BP) monitoring is needed to improve hypertension detection and control and is becoming feasible due to recent technological advances such as in wearable sensing. Pulse transit time (PTT) represents a well-known, potential approach for ubiquitous BP monitoring. The goal of this review is to facilitate the achievement of reliable, ubiquitous BP monitoring via PTT. We explain the conventional BP measurement methods and their limitations; present models to summarize the theory of the PTT-BP relationship; outline the approach while pinpointing the key challenges; overview the previous work towards putting the theory to practice; make suggestions for best practice and future research; and discuss realistic expectations for the approach. PMID:26057530

  14. Respiratory pulse pressure variation fails to predict fluid responsiveness in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhal, Karim; Ehrmann, Stephan; Benzekri-Lefèvre, Dalila; Runge, Isabelle; Legras, Annick; Dequin, Pierre-François; Mercier, Emmanuelle; Wolff, Michel; Régnier, Bernard; Boulain, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Fluid responsiveness prediction is of utmost interest during acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the performance of respiratory pulse pressure variation (ΔRESPPP) has scarcely been reported. In patients with ARDS, the pathophysiology of ΔRESPPP may differ from that of healthy lungs because of low tidal volume (Vt), high respiratory rate, decreased lung and sometimes chest wall compliance, which increase alveolar and/or pleural pressure. We aimed to assess ΔRESPPP in a large ARDS population. Our study population of nonarrhythmic ARDS patients without inspiratory effort were considered responders if their cardiac output increased by >10% after 500-ml volume expansion. Among the 65 included patients (26 responders), the area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) for ΔRESPPP was 0.75 (95% confidence interval (CI95): 0.62 to 0.85), and a best cutoff of 5% yielded positive and negative likelihood ratios of 4.8 (CI95: 3.6 to 6.2) and 0.32 (CI95: 0.1 to 0.8), respectively. Adjusting ΔRESPPP for Vt, airway driving pressure or respiratory variations in pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (ΔPAOP), a surrogate for pleural pressure variations, in 33 Swan-Ganz catheter carriers did not markedly improve its predictive performance. In patients with ΔPAOP above its median value (4 mmHg), AUC for ΔRESPPP was 1 (CI95: 0.73 to 1) as compared with 0.79 (CI95: 0.52 to 0.94) otherwise (P = 0.07). A 300-ml volume expansion induced a ≥ 2 mmHg increase of central venous pressure, suggesting a change in cardiac preload, in 40 patients, but none of the 28 of 40 nonresponders responded to an additional 200-ml volume expansion. During protective mechanical ventilation for early ARDS, partly because of insufficient changes in pleural pressure, ΔRESPPP performance was poor. Careful fluid challenges may be a safe alternative.

  15. Technical communication: respiratory variation in pulse pressure and plethysmographic waveforms: intraoperative applicability in a North American academic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Sinead; Rinehart, Joseph; Vakharia, Shermeen; Cannesson, Maxime

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic variables are the best predictors of fluid responsiveness in patients under general anesthesia and mechanical ventilation; namely, respiratory variations in pulse pressure and in the plethysmographic waveform. However, these variables have potential limitations. Our aim was to evaluate their intraoperative applicability. We extracted clinical data from all anesthesia procedures performed at our institution in 2009 and identified the number of cases that presented predetermined conditions of application. Among the 12,308 procedures, 39% met the criteria for the noninvasive monitoring of variations in the plethysmographic waveform of which 23% had arterial lines and met the criteria for the invasive monitoring of variations in pulse pressure.

  16. Subharmonic-Aided Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Interstitial Fluid Pressure in Tumors: Calibration and Treatment with Paclitaxel in Breast Cancer Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Forsberg, Anya I; Fox, Traci B; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A; Forsberg, Flemming

    2017-07-01

    Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in rats with breast cancer xenografts was non-invasively estimated using subharmonic-aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) versus an invasive pressure monitor. Moreover, monitoring of IFP changes after chemotherapy was assessed. Eighty-nine rats (calibration n = 25, treatment n = 64) were injected with 5 × 10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Radiofrequency signals were acquired (39 rats successfully imaged) with a Sonix RP scanner (BK Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a linear array (L9-4, transmit/receive: 8/4 MHz) after administration of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA, USA; 180 μL/kg) and compared with readings from an invasive pressure monitor (Stryker, Berkshire, UK). An inverse linear relationship was established between tumor IFP and SHAPE (y = -1.06x + 28.27, r = -0.69, p = 0.01) in the calibration group. Use of this relationship in the treatment group resulted in r = 0.74 (p < 0.05) between measured (pressure monitor) and SHAPE-estimated IFP (average error: 6.24 mmHg). No significant before/after differences were observed with respect to paclitaxel treatment (5 mg/kg, Mayne Pharma, Paramus, NJ, USA) with either method (p ≥ 0.15). Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pulse Pressure Is Useful for Determining the Choice of Antihypertensive Drugs in Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2014-05-01

    To assess the efficacy of various classes of antihypertensive drugs in postmenopausal women with hypertension using pulse pressure (PP) as an index. Selected women were required to be naturally menopausal for at least 1 year but not more than 5 years past their menstrual period. Exclusion criteria were a history of preeclampsia or eclampsia, a severe illness such as myocardial infarction or stroke within 6 months, the use of estrogens or progestins within 3 months, proteinuric nephropathy, and surgically induced menopause. There were 114 women who participated in this study after having given informed consent. These women were diagnosed as having hypertension based on an office blood pressure >140/90 mm Hg as well as a self-measured blood pressure at home >130/85 mm Hg. If both levels of blood pressure were not fulfilled, the patients were excluded. All antihypertensive medications were withdrawn 6 weeks before the initiation of the study. The patients were randomly assigned in equal numbers to the following groups: (1) combination therapy with losartan (angiotensin receptor blocker) 50 mg daily + trichlormethiazide (diuretic) 2 mg twice a week, and (2) combination therapy with cilnidipine (calcium channel blocker) 5 mg + arotinolol (αβ-blocker) 10 mg daily. The patients were retrospectively divided into three groups according to their PP at the start of the study: Group I (n = 24), >65 mm Hg; Group II (n = 58), 65-45 mm Hg, and Group III (n = 32), arotinolol resulted in a greater reduction in the systolic blood pressure than the combination therapy with losartan + trichlormethiazide (from 169/88 ± 2/5 to 133/73 ± 2/5 mm Hg vs. from 169/88 ± 2/5 to 149/66 ± 2/5 mm Hg, p < 0.05). On the other hand, in Group III, losartan + trichlormethiazide decreased diastolic as well as systolic blood pressures (from 152/106 ± 2/2 to 123/78 ± 1/1 mm Hg vs. from 149/107 ± 2/2 to 129/84 ± 2/1 mm Hg, p < 0.05). In Group II, there were no differences between the two

  18. STRONG SOLAR WIND DYNAMIC PRESSURE PULSES: INTERPLANETARY SOURCES AND THEIR IMPACTS ON GEOSYNCHRONOUS MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang; Wang, Yi [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Xie, Yanqiong [College of Meteorology and Oceanography, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China); Xu, Xiaojun, E-mail: pbzuo@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn [Space Science Institute, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macao (China)

    2015-10-20

    In this investigation, we first present a statistical result of the interplanetary sources of very strong solar wind dynamic pressure pulses (DPPs) detected by WIND during solar cycle 23. It is found that the vast majority of strong DPPs reside within solar wind disturbances. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears to be no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here, we study both the decompression effects of very strong negative DPPs and the compression from strong positive DPPs on GMFs at different magnetic local time sectors. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on the dayside near dawn and near dusk on the nightside, are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of the events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, the GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that under certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Here, we find that a stronger pressure enhancement may have a higher probability of producing the exceptional depression of GMF at the midnight region. Statistically, both the decompression effect of strong negative DPPs and the compression effect of strong positive DPPs depend on the magnetic local time, which are stronger at the noon sector.

  19. Association of Pulse Pressure with Serum TNF-α and Neutrophil Count in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriko Yamada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Elevated pulse pressure (PP has been reported to be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes in elderly patients with hypertension. Methods. Cross-sectional relationships of PP with known risk factors for type 2 diabetes and inflammatory markers were examined in 150 elderly community-dwelling women, 79 women (52.7% of whom had hypertension. Results. Systolic blood pressure (standardized β, 0.775, log tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, standardized β, 0.110, age (standardized β, 0.140, and neutrophil count (standardized β, 0.114 emerged as determinants of PP independent of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, monocyte count, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, HDL-cholesterol, and adiponectin (R2 = 0.772. Conclusions. The present studies have demonstrated an independent association of higher PP with higher TNF-α, a marker of insulin resistance, and neutrophil count in community-living elderly women and suggest that insulin resistance and chronic low-grade inflammation may in part be responsible for the association between high PP and incident type 2 diabetes found in elderly patients with hypertension.

  20. Fabrication of gold and silver nanoparticles with pulsed laser ablation under pressurized CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machmudah, Siti; Wahyudiono; Takada, Noriharu; Kanda, Hideki; Sasaki, Koichi; Goto, Motonobu

    2013-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has become a promising method for the synthesis of nanoclusters for photonics, electronics and medicine. In this work PLA in pressurized CO2 has been applied for fabrication of gold and silver nanoparticles. Laser ablation was performed with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm under various pressures (0.1-20 MPa), temperatures (40-80 °C) of CO2 medium and ablation times (1500-9000 s). On the basis of the experimental result, it follows that structures of gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles were significantly affected by the changes in CO2 density. The structures of gold and silver nanoparticles also changed with an increase of ablation time. From a field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the fabricated gold nano-structured particles on silicon wafer, it was seen that a network structure of smaller gold particles was fabricated. A similar morphology of particles fabricated from silver plate was observed. Silver particles contain nanoparticles with large-varied diameter ranging from 5 nm to 1.2 μm. The mechanism of nanoparticles fabrication could be observed as follows. Bigger gold/silver particles melted during the ablation process and then ejected smaller spherical nanoparticles, which formed nanoclusters attached on the molten particles.

  1. Assessing intravascular volume by difference in pulse pressure in pigs submitted to graded hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, Gunther J; Hiltebrand, Luzius B; Fukui, Kimiko; Cohen, Delphine; Hager, Helmut; Kurz, Andrea M

    2006-10-01

    We assessed changes in intravascular volume monitored by difference in pulse pressure (dPP%) after stepwise hemorrhage in an experimental pig model. Six pigs (23-25 kg) were anesthetized (isoflurane 1.5 vol%) and mechanically ventilated to keep end-tidal CO2 (etCO2) at 35 mmHg. A PA-catheter and an arterial catheter were placed via femoral access. During and after surgery, animals received lactated Ringer's solution as long as they were considered volume responders (dPP>13%). Then animals were allowed to stabilize from the induction of anesthesia and insertion of catheters for 30 min. After stabilization, baseline measurements were taken. Five percent of blood volume was withdrawn, followed by another 5%, and then in 10%-increments until death from exsanguination occurred. After withdrawal of 5% of blood volume, all pigs were considered volume responders (dPP>13%); dPP rose significantly from 6.1+/-3.3% to 19.4+/-4.2%. The regression analysis of stepwise hemorrhage revealed a linear relation between blood loss (hemorrhage in %) and dPP (y=0.99*x+14; R2=0.7764; P<.0001). In addition, dPP was the only parameter that changed significantly between baseline and a blood loss of 5% (P<0.01), whereas cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate, MAP, central venous pressure, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, and systemic vascular resistance, respectively, remained unchanged. We conclude that in an experimental hypovolemic pig model, dPP correlates well with blood loss.

  2. Effect of Inflammation on the Relationship of Pulse Pressure and Mortality in Haemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasish Banerjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The effect of hypertension on mortality in haemodialysis patients is controversial and can be confounded by non-traditional risk factors like systemic inflammation. This study examined the effect of systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, and pulse pressure (PP on mortality in haemodialysis patients, separately with and without markers of systemic inflammation. Methods:Data from the United States Renal Data System were analysed for 9,862 patients receiving haemodialysis on December 31, 1993, followed through May 2005. Results: In Cox regression analysis, increased age, diabetes, low albumin, high white blood count, low cholesterol, low haemoglobin, high phosphate, low DBP, and cardiovascular comorbidity were associated with high mortality, but SBP was not. Elevated PP adjusted for SBP, age, diabetes, haemoglobin, albumin, cholesterol, calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and white blood count was associated with higher mortality [adjusted hazard ratio, PP 1.006 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.002–1.010; SBP 0.993 (95% CI 0.990–0.996]. In dual models, PP adjusted for SBP then DBP was associated with higher mortality [PP 1.029 (95% CI 1.027–1.032; SBP 0.981 (95% CI 0.979–0.983; PP 1.010 (95% CI 1.008–1.011; DBP 0.981 (95% CI 0.979–0.983]. Increasing PP deciles >70 mm Hg were associated with increasing mortality in the absence of markers of systemic inflammation (white blood count >10 × 109/l, albumin Conclusion: PP was a better indicator of adverse outcome than DBP or SBP. Inflammation-associated injury may mask the effect of PP on mortality in haemodialysis patients.

  3. Transition between trickle flow and pulse flow in a cocurrent gas-liquid trickle-bed reactor at elevated pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wammes, W.J.A.; Mechielsen, S.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of reactor pressure in the range of 0.2–2.0 MPa on the transition between the trickle-flow and the pulse-flow regime has been investigated for the non-foaming water—nitrogen and aqueous 40% ethyleneglycol—nitrogen systems. Most models and flow charts which are all based on atmospheric

  4. Electrical breakdown and optical emission properties of high pressure pulsed RF gas discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, S.R.; Hurst, G.S. [Pellissippi International, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)]|[Consultec Scientific, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Gibson, W.A. [Pellissippi International, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Turner, J.E.; Hamm, R.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wright, H.A. [Consultec Scientific, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    A fundamentally new technique for the measurement of the number of subexcitation electrons produced by the passage of ionizing radiation through a gas has ben developed by us during the past few years. The new detector is based on the digital characterization of the electrons in the particle track produced by the ionizing radiation where the charged particle track is registered by measuring the number of electrons found in given subvolumes of the gas in the ionization chamber. The track is thus characterized by a set of integers in each volume clement, from which parameters such as the track length and energy can be measured. We have specifically developed this technique for use in the field of microdosimetry, where the study of the fluctuations in the energy deposition in the charged particle track on the order of the molecular to cellular dimensions is important in understanding the chemical and biological effects of ionizing radiation. If the charged particle is a recoil nucleus produced by a neutron interaction, the energy deposited and the linear energy transfer can be inferred from this information, allowing the detector to act as neutron spectrometer. In this paper the experimental apparatus used to make these measurements and the optical and pulsed RF electric field optimization we have performed are described. Images of particle tracks produced by {alpha} and {beta} particles, and recoil protons from the interaction of high energy neutrons with hydrogenous materials, are also presented to illustrate the sensitivity and track imaging resolution. The quality of the information gained from the detector is a very sensitive function of the gas mixture constituents, purities and pressures used in the chamber, along with the magnitude, duration, and frequency of the pulsed RF electric field.

  5. Flow Control Under Low-Pressure Turbine Conditions Using Pulsed Jets: Experimental Data Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is the final report of research performed under an NRA/Cooperative Interagency Agreement, and includes a supplemental CD-ROM with detailed data. It is complemented by NASA/CR-2012-217416 and NASA/CR-2012-217417 which include a Ph.D. Dissertation and an M.S. thesis respectively, performed under this contract. In this study the effects of unsteady wakes and flow control using vortex generator jets (VGJs) were studied experimentally and computationally on the flow over the L1A low pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. The experimental facility was a six passage linear cascade in a low speed wind tunnel at the U.S. Naval Academy. In parallel, computational work using the commercial code FLUENT (ANSYS, Inc.) was performed at Cleveland State University, using Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) methods. In the first phase of the work, the baseline flow was documented under steady inflow conditions without flow control. URANS calculations were done using a variety of turbulence models. In the second phase of the work, flow control was added using steady and pulsed vortex generator jets. The VGJs successfully suppressed separation and reduced aerodynamic losses. Pulsed operation was more effective and mass flow requirements are very low. Numerical simulations of the VGJs cases showed that URANS failed to capture the effect of the jets. LES results were generally better. In the third phase, effects of unsteady wakes were studied. Computations with URANS and LES captured the wake effect and generally predicted separation and reattachment to match the experiments. Quantitatively the results were mixed. In the final phase of the study, wakes and VGJs were combined and synchronized using various timing schemes. The timing of the jets with respect to the wakes had some effect, but in general once the disturbance frequency was high enough to control separation, the timing was not very important. This is the supplemental CD-ROM

  6. Flow Control Under Low-Pressure Turbine Conditions Using Pulsed Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is the final report of research performed under an NRA/Cooperative Interagency Agreement, and includes a supplemental CD-ROM with detailed data. It is complemented by NASA/CR-2012-217416 and NASA/CR-2012-217417 which include a Ph.D. Dissertation and an M.S. thesis respectively, performed under this contract. In this study the effects of unsteady wakes and flow control using vortex generator jets (VGJs) were studied experimentally and computationally on the flow over the L1A low pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. The experimental facility was a six passage linear cascade in a low speed wind tunnel at the U.S. Naval Academy. In parallel, computational work using the commercial code FLUENT (ANSYS, Inc.) was performed at Cleveland State University, using Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) methods. In the first phase of the work, the baseline flow was documented under steady inflow conditions without flow control. URANS calculations were done using a variety of turbulence models. In the second phase of the work, flow control was added using steady and pulsed vortex generator jets. The VGJs successfully suppressed separation and reduced aerodynamic losses. Pulsed operation was more effective and mass flow requirements are very low. Numerical simulations of the VGJs cases showed that URANS failed to capture the effect of the jets. LES results were generally better. In the third phase, effects of unsteady wakes were studied. Computations with URANS and LES captured the wake effect and generally predicted separation and reattachment to match the experiments. Quantitatively the results were mixed. In the final phase of the study, wakes and VGJs were combined and synchronized using various timing schemes. The timing of the jets with respect to the wakes had some effect, but in general once the disturbance frequency was high enough to control separation, the timing was not very important.

  7. Pulse pressure and nocturnal fall in blood pressure are predictors of vascular, cardiac and renal target organ damage in hypertensive patients (LOD-RISK study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ortiz, Luis; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Martín-Moreiras, Javier; González-Elena, Luis J; Recio-Rodriguez, Jose I; Castaño-Sánchez, Yolanda; Grandes, Gonzalo; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2009-08-01

    To analyse the relationship between various parameters derived from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and vascular, cardiac and renal target organ damage. A cross-sectional, descriptive study. It included 353 patients with short-term or recently diagnosed hypertension. ABPM, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), Cornell voltage-duration product (Cornell VDP), glomerular filtration rate and albumin/creatinine ratio to assess vascular, cardiac and renal damage. Two hundred and twenty-three patients (63.2%) were males, aged 56.12+/-11.21 years. The nocturnal fall in blood pressure was 11.33+/-8.41, with a dipper pattern in 49.0% (173), nondipper in 30.3% (107), extreme dipper in 12.7% (45) and riser in 7.9% (28). The IMT was lower in the extreme dipper (0.716+/-0.096 mm) and better in the riser pattern (0.794+/-0.122 mm) (P<0.05). The Cornell VDP and albumin/creatinine ratio were higher in the riser pattern (1818.94+/-1798.63 mm/ms and 140.78+/-366.38 mg/g, respectively) than in the other patterns. In the multivariate analysis after adjusting for age, sex and antihypertensive treatment, with IMT as dependent variable the 24-h pulse pressure (beta = 0.003), with Cornell VDP the rest pulse pressure (beta = 12.04), and with the albumin/creatinine ratio the percentage of nocturnal fall in systolic blood pressure (beta = -3.59), the rest heart rate (beta = 1.83) and the standard deviation of 24-h systolic blood pressure (beta = 5.30) remain within the equation. The estimated pulse pressure with ABPM is a predictor of vascular and cardiac organ damage. The nocturnal fall and the standard deviation in 24-h systolic blood pressure measured with the ABPM is a predictor of renal damage.

  8. Assessing endothelial function and providing calibrated UFMD data using a blood pressure cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Jonathan S.

    2017-08-22

    Methods and apparatus are provided for assessing endothelial function in a mammal. In certain embodiments the methods involve using a cuff to apply pressure to an artery in a subject to determine a plurality of baseline values for a parameter related to endothelial function as a function of applied pressure (P.sub.m); b) applying a stimulus to the subject; and applying external pressure P.sub.m to the artery to determine a plurality of stimulus-effected values for the parameter related to endothelial function as a function of applied pressure (P.sub.m); where the baseline values are determined from measurements made when said mammal is not substantially effected by said stimulus and differences in said baseline values and said stimulus-effected values provide a measure of endothelial function in said mammal.

  9. Calibration of the Total and Static Pressure Transducers in the DSTO Transonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Division Defence Science and Technology Organisation DSTO-TN-0960 ABSTRACT The total and static pressure of the DSTO Transonic Wind Tunnel ( TWT ...system of the DSTO Transonic Wind Tunnel ( TWT ), the transducers used for measuring the total and static pressure in the tunnel test section have...of the TWT . Two adjustment parameters (for span and zero corrections) are estimated using a least squares regression algorithm, and then used to

  10. Fiber Bragg grating sensors written by femtosecond laser pulses in micro-structured fiber for downhole pressure monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.-Y.; Van Roosbroeck, J.; Bueno Martinez, A.; Geernaert, T.; Berghmans, F.; Caucheteur, C.; Van Hoe, B.; Lindner, E.; Vlekken, J.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that femtosecond laser pulse written fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) fabricated in specialty highly birefringent micro-structured optical fiber (MSF) can be used for high pressure and high temperature monitoring in downhole applications. The design of the micro-structure allows encoding the pressure information into the spectral separation between the two Bragg peaks reflected by the obtained MS-FBG. We obtained a differential pressure sensitivity of 3.30 pm/bar over a pressure range from atmospheric up to 1400 bar and at temperatures between 40 °C and 290 °C. Owing to the negligible differential pressure-temperature cross-sensitivity of 6.06E-3 bar/°C, the proposed MSFBG sensor is an ideal candidate for pressure monitoring in the presence of high temperature transients.

  11. Calibrated vapor generator source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  12. Use of antihypertension agents for the suppression of arterial pulse pressure waveforms in patients with intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Carole L; Wilkinson, Ian B; Kirkpatrick, Peter J

    2006-04-01

    Patients with intracranial aneurysms tend toward raised blood pressure and abnormal pulse pressure profiles. The authors have investigated the influence of three antihypertension agents on blood pressure and pulse pressure waveforms in patients with known intracranial aneurysms, with a view to assessing the potential benefits of longterm antihypertension therapy on the progression of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Nineteen patients with a mean age of 56 years (range 38-76 years) were recruited for this study. All patients had confirmed intracranial aneurysms. A double-blind, randomized, crossover study was performed using perindopril, irbesartan, isosorbide mononitrate, and a placebo. Blood pressure and pulse pressure waveforms were assessed at the end of each 4-week treatment period. Perindopril and irbesartan were well tolerated. For all measured parameters except heart rate (p = 0.03), no significant difference between baseline and placebo was identified. Each drug when compared with placebo reduced peripheral arterial blood pressure. Perindopril significantly decreased mean blood pressure by 10 mm Hg (p = 0.004), irbesartan by 9 mm Hg (p = 0.004), and isosorbide mononitrate by 13 mm Hg (p = 0.005). The administration of each drug effected a significant reduction in the carotid artery augmentation index (AIX) compared with baseline values (perindopril p = 0.01, irbesartan p = 0.0002, and isosorbide mononitrate p = 0.03). There was also a significant difference in the AIX between irbesartan and the placebo (p = 0.05). Compared with the placebo, there was a significant difference in AIX (adjusted for heart rate) following the administration of irbesartan (p = 0.003) and isosorbide mononitrate (p = 0.01), but not with perindopril (p = 0.17). Irbesartan appears to be the most effective treatment for the combined suppression of blood pressure and AIX in patients with intracranial aneurysms and has a high degree of patient tolerance.

  13. Monounsaturated fatty acid, carbohydrate intake, and diabetes status are associated with arterial pulse pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Joan A; Huffman, Fatma G

    2011-11-16

    Diabetes is a global epidemic. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most prevalent consequences of diabetes. Nutrition is considered a modifiable risk factor for CVD, particularly for individuals with diabetes; albeit, there is little consensus on the role of carbohydrates, proteins and fats for arterial health for persons with or without diabetes. In this study, we examined the association of macronutrients with arterial pulse pressure (APP), a surrogate measure of arterial health by diabetes status and race. Participants were 892 Mexican Americans (MA), 1059 Black, non-Hispanics (BNH) and 2473 White, non-Hispanics (WNH) with and without diabetes of a weighted sample from the National Nutrition and Health Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2008. The cross-sectional analysis was performed with IBM-SPSS version 18 with the complex sample analysis module. The two-year sample weight for the sub-sample with laboratory values was applied to reduce bias and approximate a nationally, representative sample. Arterial stiffness was assessed by arterial pulse pressure (APP). APP was higher for MA [B = 0.063 (95% CI 0.015 to 0.111), p = 0.013] and BNH [B = 0.044 (95% CI 0.006 to 0.082), p = 0.018] than WNH, controlling for diabetes, age, gender, body mass index (BMI), fiber intake, energy intake (Kcal) and smoking. A two-way interaction of diabetes by carbohydrate intake (grams) was inversely associated with APP [B = -1.18 (95% CI -0.178 to -0.058), p = 0.001], controlling for race, age, gender, BMI, Kcal and smoking. BNH with diabetes who consumed more mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) than WNH with diabetes had lower APP [B = -0.112 (95%CI-0.179 to -0.045), p = 0.003] adjusting for saturated fatty acids, Kcal, age, gender, BMI and smoking. Higher MUFA and carbohydrate intake for persons with diabetes reflecting lower APP may be due to replacement of saturated fats with CHO and MUFA. The associations of APP with diabetes, race and dietary intake need to be confirmed

  14. Monounsaturated fatty acid, carbohydrate intake, and diabetes status are associated with arterial pulse pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaccaro Joan A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a global epidemic. Cardiovascular disease (CVD is one of the most prevalent consequences of diabetes. Nutrition is considered a modifiable risk factor for CVD, particularly for individuals with diabetes; albeit, there is little consensus on the role of carbohydrates, proteins and fats for arterial health for persons with or without diabetes. In this study, we examined the association of macronutrients with arterial pulse pressure (APP, a surrogate measure of arterial health by diabetes status and race. Methods Participants were 892 Mexican Americans (MA, 1059 Black, non-Hispanics (BNH and 2473 White, non-Hispanics (WNH with and without diabetes of a weighted sample from the National Nutrition and Health Examination Survey (NHANES 2007-2008. The cross-sectional analysis was performed with IBM-SPSS version 18 with the complex sample analysis module. The two-year sample weight for the sub-sample with laboratory values was applied to reduce bias and approximate a nationally, representative sample. Arterial stiffness was assessed by arterial pulse pressure (APP. Results APP was higher for MA [B = 0.063 (95% CI 0.015 to 0.111, p = 0.013] and BNH [B = 0.044 (95% CI 0.006 to 0.082, p = 0.018] than WNH, controlling for diabetes, age, gender, body mass index (BMI, fiber intake, energy intake (Kcal and smoking. A two-way interaction of diabetes by carbohydrate intake (grams was inversely associated with APP [B = -1.18 (95% CI -0.178 to -0.058, p = 0.001], controlling for race, age, gender, BMI, Kcal and smoking. BNH with diabetes who consumed more mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA than WNH with diabetes had lower APP [B = -0.112 (95%CI-0.179 to -0.045, p = 0.003] adjusting for saturated fatty acids, Kcal, age, gender, BMI and smoking. Conclusion Higher MUFA and carbohydrate intake for persons with diabetes reflecting lower APP may be due to replacement of saturated fats with CHO and MUFA. The associations of APP with

  15. PULSE WAVE VELOCITY AND CENTRAL AORTIC PRESSURE IN OBESE CHILDREN ACCORDING TO THE NON-INVASIVE ARTERIOGRAPHY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kozhevnikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents information value of non-invasive arteriography, which reveals early signs of cardiovascular pathology formation in children, using a large number of trials in children. The authors examined predictors of cardiovascular catastrophes’ development, confirmed in adults: aortic wall’s stiffness, central aortic pressure and pulse pressure – that have not been sufficiently studied in children yet. The article shows that the high-technology method of non-invasive arteriography allows revealing changes of these parameters in children on the preclinical stage. It also shows their correlation with body mass index, fatty hepatosis, direct correlation of weight gain with connection of pulse wave velocity and central blood pressure and importance of follow-up evaluation of these parameters. Heterogeneity of the group of obese children in terms of these parameters is a premise for development of individual approach to control and prevention of cardiovascular complications’ development risk in childhood.

  16. Pulse arrival time measurement with coffee provocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmaniemi, Teemu; Rajala, Satu; Lindholm, Harri; Taipalus, Tapio

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of coffee intake in pulse arrival time (PAT) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) measured with electrocardiogram (ECG) from arms and photoplethysmogram (PPG) from fingertip. In addition, correlation of PWV with blood pressure (BP) is analyzed. 30 healthy participants were recruited to two measurement sessions, one arranged before and another one after the coffee intake. During each session, ECG and PPG were measured continuously for six minutes and PAT values calculated from ECG R-peak to the maximum of the first derivative of the PPG pulse. In addition, blood pressure was measured twice during each session with cuff based method. Coffee intake had statistically significant influence on both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but not on PAT or PWV. Correlation between systolic blood pressure and PWV was 0.44. Individual calibration, additional derivatives of ECG and PPG such as heart rate, pulse pressure, or waveform characteristics could improve the correlation.

  17. A 100-KV, 2-KA, 2.5-Microsecs Pulser for Developing and Calibrating Long-Pulse Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    measured properties at 10kHz: Type Step-up-ratio Magnetizing Inductance Leakage Inductance Secondary Capacitance Voltage Rating 2 winding dual...Mail Stop P939 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 Abstract The development of voltage and current probes [I] for measuring an electron beam’s current...Axis Radiographic Hydro- Test ( DARHT ) Facility will initially deliver a 2-J..Ls-long electron beam pulse at 2 kA and 20 MeV to a pulse kicker. In

  18. Telomere Length and Pulse Pressure in Newly Diagnosed, Antipsychotic-Naive Patients With Nonaffective Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Bernardo, Miguel; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Griffith, Jeffrey K.; Parellada, Eduard; Esmatjes, Enric; Conget, Ignacio; Nguyen, Linh; George, Varghese; Stöppler, Hubert; Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Recent studies suggest that in addition to factors such as treatment side effects, suicide, and poor health habits, people with schizophrenia may have an increased risk of diabetes prior to antipsychotic treatment. Diabetes is associated with an increased pulse pressure (PP) and a shortened telomere. We tested the hypothesis that prior to antipsychotic treatment, schizophrenia and related disorders are associated with a shortened telomere, as well as an increased PP. Methods: Telomere content (which is highly correlated with telomere length) and PP were measured in newly diagnosed, antipsychotic-naive patients with schizophrenia and related disorders on first clinical contact and in matched control subjects. Both groups were also administered an oral glucose tolerance test. Results: Compared with control subjects, the patients with psychosis had decreased telomere content and an increased PP. As previously reported, they also had increased glucose concentrations at 2 hours. These differences could not be attributed to differences in age, ethnicity, smoking, gender, body mass index, neighborhood of residence, socioeconomic status, aerobic conditioning, or an increased cortisol concentration in the psychotic subjects. Discussion: These results suggest that prior to antipsychotic use, nonaffective psychosis is associated with reduced telomere content and increased PP, indices that have been linked to an increased risk of diabetes and hypertension. PMID:19279086

  19. Arterial pulse pressure variation suitability in critical care: A French national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Mahjoub, Yazine; Boisselier, Clément; Tavernier, Benoît; Dupont, Hervé; Leone, Marc; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Fellahi, Jean-Luc

    2015-02-01

    Arterial pulse pressure variation (PPV) has been used as an accurate index to predict fluid responsiveness. However, many confounding factors have been recently described. The aims of this study were to assess the conditions of applicability of PPV in intensive care units (ICU). A one-day French national survey. A form assessing the suitability of PPV was completed by practitioners for each critically-ill patient included on a set day. Four hundred and sixty-five patients were included in 36 ICUs. A regular sinus rhythm was noted in 408 (88%) patients and the presence of an arterial line in 324 (70%) patients. One hundred and twenty-seven (27%) patients were mechanically ventilated without spontaneous breathing. Only six patients (1.3%) had no confounding factors modifying the threshold value of the PPV. The incidence of ICU patients in whom PPV was suitable and without confounding factors were respectively 18% and 1.3% in this one-day French national survey. Copyright © 2015 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Heritability and whole genome linkage of pulse pressure in Chinese twin pairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Wengjie; Zhang, Dongfeng; Pang, Zengchang

    2012-01-01

    with a heritability estimate of 0.45. Genome-wide non-parametric linkage analysis identified three significant linkage peaks on chromosome 11 (lod score 4.06 at 30.5 cM), chromosome 12 (lod score 3.97 at 100.7 cM), and chromosome 18 (lod score 4.01 at 70.7 cM) with the last two peaks closely overlapping with linkage...... to the phenotype. We report results on our heritability and linkage study conducted on the Chinese population in mainland China where cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are becoming the leading cause of death. A total of 630 pairs of middle-aged Chinese twins were collected for heritability analysis, from...... which 63 dizygotic twin pairs were randomly selected for genome-wide linkage analysis using Affymetrix 6.0 SNP array. Regression analysis reconfirmed the significant effects of age, sex, and BMI on pulse pressure. Comparison of twin models suggested the parsimonious AE model as the best model...

  1. Pressure and stress waves in a spallation neutron source mercury target generated by high-power proton pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Futakawa, M; Conrad, H; Stechemesser, H

    2000-01-01

    The international ASTE collaboration has performed a first series of measurements on a spallation neutron source target at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) in Brookhaven. The dynamic response of a liquid mercury target hit by high-power proton pulses of about 40 ns duration has been measured by a laser Doppler technique and compared with finite elements calculations using the ABAQUS code. It is shown that the calculation can describe the experimental results for at least the time interval up to 100 mu s after the pulse injection. Furthermore, it has been observed that piezoelectric pressure transducers cannot be applied in the high gamma-radiation field of a spallation target.

  2. Temporally resolved diagnosis of an atmospheric-pressure pulse-modulated argon surface wave plasma by optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe; Zhang, Jialiang; Liu, Dongping

    2018-01-01

    A pulse-modulated argon surface wave plasma generated at atmospheric pressure is characterized by means of temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The temporal evolution of the gas temperature, the electron temperature and density, the radiative species of atomic Ar, and the molecular band of OH(A) and N2(C) are investigated experimentally by altering the instantaneous power, pulse repetitive frequency, and duty ratio. We focused on the physical phenomena occurring at the onset of the time-on period and after the power interruption at the start of the time-off period. Meanwhile, the results are discussed qualitatively for an in-depth insight of its dynamic evolution.

  3. GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDY META-ANALYSIS REVEALS TRANS-ETHNIC REPLICATION OF MEAN ARTERIAL AND PULSE PRESSURE LOCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Tanika N.; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Edwards, Todd L.; Kim, Young Jin; Chen, Peng; Li, Huaixing; Wu, Ying; Yang, Chi-Fan; Zhang, Yonghong; Gu, Dongfeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Gao, Yu-Tang; Go, Min Jin; Teo, Yik Ying; Lu, Ling; Lee, Nanette R.; Chang, Li-Ching; Peng, Hao; Zhao, Qi; Nakashima, Eitaro; Kita, Yoshikuni; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kim, Nam Hee; Tai, E Shyong; Wang, Yiqin; Adair, Linda S.; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Zhang, Shihiu; Li, Changwei; Nabika, Toru; Umemura, Satoshi; Cai, Qiuyin; Cho, Yoon Shin; Wong, Tien Yin; Zhu, Jingwen; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gao, Xin; Hixson, James E.; Cai, Hui; Lee, Juyoung; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Han, Bok-Ghee; Wang, Aili; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Mohlke, Karen; Lin, Xu; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Lee, Jong-Young; Zheng, Wei; Tetsuro, Miki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure among 26,600 East Asian participants (stage-1) followed by replication study of up to 28,783 participants (stage-2). For novel loci, statistical significance was determined by a P<5.0×10−8 in joint analysis of stage-1 and stage-2 data. For loci reported by the previous mean arterial and pulse pressure genome-wide association study meta-analysis in Europeans, evidence of trans-ethnic replication was determined by consistency in effect direction and a Bonferroni-corrected P<1.4×10−3. No novel loci were identified by the current study. Five independent mean arterial pressure variants demonstrated robust evidence for trans-ethnic replication including rs17249754 at ATP2B1 (P=7.5×10−15), rs2681492 at ATP2B1 (P=3.4×10−7), rs11191593 at NT5C2 (1.1×10−6), rs3824755 at CYP17A1 (P=1.2×10−6), and rs13149993 at FGF5 (P=2.4×10−4). Two additional variants showed suggestive evidence of trans-ethnic replication (consistency in effect direction and P<0.05), including rs319690 at MAP4 (P=0.014) and rs1173771 at NPR3 (P=0.018). For pulse pressure, robust evidence of replication was identified for 2 independent variants, including rs17249754 at ATP2B1 (P=1.2×10−5) and rs11191593 at NT5C2 (P=1.1×10−3), with suggestive evidence of replication among an additional 2 variants including rs3824755 at CYP17A1 (P=6.1×10−3) and rs2681492 at ATP2B1 (P=9.0×10−3). Replicated variants demonstrated consistency in effect sizes between East Asian and European samples, with effect size differences ranging from 0.03 to 0.24 mmHg for mean arterial pressure and from 0.03 to 0.21 mmHg for pulse pressure. In conclusion, we present the first evidence of trans-ethnic replication of several mean arterial and pulse pressure loci in an East Asian population. PMID:24001895

  4. Coherent pulse interrogation system for fiber Bragg grating sensing of strain and pressure in dynamic extremes of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, George; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor; Mielke, Chuck H; Azad, Abul; Marshall, Bruce; La Lone, Brandon M; Henson, Bryan; Smilowitz, Laura

    2015-06-01

    A 100 MHz fiber Bragg grating (FBG) interrogation system is described and applied to strain and pressure sensing. The approach relies on coherent pulse illumination of the FBG sensor with a broadband short pulse from a femtosecond modelocked erbium fiber laser. After interrogation of the FBG sensor, a long multi-kilometer run of single mode fiber is used for chromatic dispersion to temporally stretch the spectral components of the reflected pulse from the FBG sensor. Dynamic strain or pressure induced spectral shifts in the FBG sensor are detected as a pulsed time domain waveform shift after encoding by the chromatic dispersive line. Signals are recorded using a single 35 GHz photodetector and a 50 G Samples per second, 25 GHz bandwidth, digitizing oscilloscope. Application of this approach to high-speed strain sensing in magnetic materials in pulsed magnetic fields to ~150 T is demonstrated. The FBG wavelength shifts are used to study magnetic field driven magnetostriction effects in LaCoO3. A sub-microsecond temporal shift in the FBG sensor wavelength attached to the sample under first order phase change appears as a fractional length change (strain: ΔL/L-4) in the material. A second application used FBG sensing of pressure dynamics to nearly 2 GPa in the thermal ignition of the high explosive PBX-9501 is also demonstrated. Both applications demonstrate the use of this FBG interrogation system in dynamical extreme conditions that would otherwise not be possible using traditional FBG interrogation approaches that are deemed too slow to resolve such events.

  5. Controlled production of atomic oxygen and nitrogen in a pulsed radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedrick, J.; Schröter, S.; Niemi, K.; Wijaikhum, A.; Wagenaars, E.; de Oliveira, N.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.; O’Connell, D.; Gans, T.

    2017-11-01

    Radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas are efficient sources for the production of reactive species at ambient pressure and close to room temperature. Pulsing the radio-frequency power input provides additional control over species production and gas temperature. Here, we demonstrate the controlled production of highly reactive atomic oxygen and nitrogen in a pulsed radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) atmospheric-pressure plasma, operated with a small 0.1 % air-like admixture (N2 /O2 at 4:1 ) through variations in the duty cycle. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and nitrogen are determined through vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy using the DESIRS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron coupled with a high resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer. The neutral-gas temperature is measured using nitrogen molecular optical emission spectroscopy. For a fixed applied-voltage amplitude (234 V), varying the pulse duty cycle from 10% to 100% at a fixed 10 kHz pulse frequency enables us to regulate the densities of atomic oxygen and nitrogen over the ranges of (0.18+/-0.03) –(3.7+/-0.1)× 1020 m-3 and (0.2+/-0.06) –(4.4+/-0.8) × 1019 m-3 , respectively. The corresponding 11 K increase in the neutral-gas temperature with increased duty cycle, up to a maximum of (314+/-4) K, is relatively small. This additional degree of control, achieved through regulation of the pulse duty cycle and time-averaged power, could be of particular interest for prospective biomedical applications.

  6. Calibration of nylon organic chemical integrative samplers and sentinel samplers for quantitative measurement of pulsed aquatic exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shane A; Belden, Jason B

    2016-06-03

    Environmental exposures often occur through short, pulsed events; therefore, the ability to accurately measure these toxicologically-relevant concentrations is important. Three different integrative passive sampler configurations were evaluated under different flow and pulsed exposure conditions for the measurement of current-use pesticides (n=19), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (n=10), and personal care products (n=5) spanning a broad range of hydrophobicities (log Kow 1.5-7.6). Two modified POCIS-style samplers were investigated using macroporous nylon mesh membranes (35μm pores) and two different sorbent materials (i.e. Oasis HLB and Dowex Optipore L-493). A recently developed design, the Sentinel Sampler (ABS Materials), utilizing Osorb media enclosed within stainless steel mesh (145μm pores), was also investigated. Relatively high sampling rates (Rs) were achieved for all sampler configurations during the short eight-day exposure (4300-27mL/d). Under flow conditions, median Rs were approximately 5-10 times higher for POCIS-style samplers and 27 times higher for Sentinel Samplers, as compared to static conditions. The ability of samplers to rapidly measure hydrophobic contaminants may be a trade off with increased flow dependence. Analyte accumulation was integrative under pulsed and continuous exposures for POCIS-style samplers with mean difference between treatments of 11% and 33%; however, accumulation into Sentinel Samplers was more variable. Collectively, results show that reducing membrane limitations allows for rapid, integrative accumulation of a broad range of analytes even under pulsed exposures. As such, these sampler designs may be suitable for monitoring environmental substances that have short aquatic half-lives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of candesartan in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on inflammatory parameters and their relationship to pulse pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakamoto Masaya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs are reported to provide direct protection to many organs by controlling inflammation and decreasing oxidant stress in patients without arteriosclerosis. This study aimed to evaluate (1 whether an ARB (candesartan decreases values for inflammatory parameters in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of long duration accompanied by arteriosclerosis and (2 whether there any predictors of which patients would receive the benefits of organ protection by candesartan. Methods We administered candesartan therapy (12 mg daily for 6 months and evaluated whether there was improvement in serum inflammatory parameters high molecular weight adiponectin (HMW-ADN, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 in serum and urinary-8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (U-8-OHdG. We then analyzed the relationship between the degree of lowering of blood pressure and inflammatory factors and the relationship between pulse pressure and inflammatory factors. Finally, we analyzed predictive factors in patients who received the protective benefit of candesartan. Results After 6 months of treatment, significant improvements from baseline values were observed in all patients in HMW-ADN and PAI-1 but not in Hs-CRP, VCAM-1 and U-8-OHdG. Multilinear regression analysis was performed to determine which factors could best predict changes in HMW-ADN and PAI-1. Changes in blood pressure were not significant predictors of changes in metabolic factors in all patients. We found that the group with baseline pulse pressure Conclusions Candesartan improved inflammatory parameters (HMW-ADN and PAI-1 in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of long duration independent of blood pressure changes. Patients with pulse pressure Trial registration UMIN000007921

  8. Effects of candesartan in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on inflammatory parameters and their relationship to pulse pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takeshi; Iuchi, Hiroyuki; Isaka, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Noriko; Kayama, Yosuke; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Michihiro; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2012-10-03

    Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are reported to provide direct protection to many organs by controlling inflammation and decreasing oxidant stress in patients without arteriosclerosis. This study aimed to evaluate (1) whether an ARB (candesartan) decreases values for inflammatory parameters in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of long duration accompanied by arteriosclerosis and (2) whether there any predictors of which patients would receive the benefits of organ protection by candesartan. We administered candesartan therapy (12 mg daily) for 6 months and evaluated whether there was improvement in serum inflammatory parameters high molecular weight adiponectin (HMW-ADN), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), highly sensitive C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in serum and urinary-8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (U-8-OHdG). We then analyzed the relationship between the degree of lowering of blood pressure and inflammatory factors and the relationship between pulse pressure and inflammatory factors. Finally, we analyzed predictive factors in patients who received the protective benefit of candesartan. After 6 months of treatment, significant improvements from baseline values were observed in all patients in HMW-ADN and PAI-1 but not in Hs-CRP, VCAM-1 and U-8-OHdG. Multilinear regression analysis was performed to determine which factors could best predict changes in HMW-ADN and PAI-1. Changes in blood pressure were not significant predictors of changes in metabolic factors in all patients. We found that the group with baseline pulse pressure Candesartan improved inflammatory parameters (HMW-ADN and PAI-1) in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of long duration independent of blood pressure changes. Patients with pulse pressure candesartan. UMIN000007921.

  9. Nitriding molybdenum: Effects of duration and fill gas pressure when using 100-Hz pulse DC discharge technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhlaq, U.; R., Ahmad; Shafiq, M.; Saleem, S.; S. Shah, M.; Hussain, T.; A. Khan, I.; K., Abbas; S. Abbas, M.

    2014-10-01

    Molybdenum is nitrided by a 100-Hz pulsed DC glow discharge technique for various time durations and fill gas pressures to study the effects on the surface properties of molybdenum. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used for the structural and morphological analysis of the nitrided layers. Vickers' microhardness tester is utilized to investigate surface microhardness. Phase analysis shows the formation of more molybdenum nitride molecules for longer nitriding durations at fill gas pressures of 2 mbar and 3 mbar (1 bar = 105 Pa). A considerable increase in surface microhardness (approximately by a factor of 2) is observed for longer duration (10 h) and 2-mbar pressure. Longer duration (10 h) and 2-mbar fill gas pressure favors the formation of homogeneous, smooth, hard layers by the incorporation of more nitrogen.

  10. Significantly Reduced Blood Pressure Measurement Variability for Both Normotensive and Hypertensive Subjects: Effect of Polynomial Curve Fitting of Oscillometric Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fangwei; Chen, Fei; Zhu, Mingping; Chen, Aiqing; Zheng, Dingchang

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to compare within-subject blood pressure (BP) variabilities from different measurement techniques. Cuff pressures from three repeated BP measurements were obtained from 30 normotensive and 30 hypertensive subjects. Automatic BPs were determined from the pulses with normalised peak amplitude larger than a threshold (0.5 for SBP, 0.7 for DBP, and 1.0 for MAP). They were also determined from cuff pressures associated with the above thresholds on a fitted curve polynomial curve of the oscillometric pulse peaks. Finally, the standard deviation (SD) of three repeats and its coefficient of variability (CV) were compared between the two automatic techniques. For the normotensive group, polynomial curve fitting significantly reduced SD of repeats from 3.6 to 2.5 mmHg for SBP and from 3.7 to 2.1 mmHg for MAP and reduced CV from 3.0% to 2.2% for SBP and from 4.3% to 2.4% for MAP (all P oscillometric pulses had the ability to reduce automatic BP measurement variability.

  11. 24-hour central aortic systolic pressure and 24-hour central pulse pressure are related to diabetic complications in type 1 diabetes - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Simone; Lajer, Maria Stenkil; Hansen, Tine Willum

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive measurements of 24 hour ambulatory central aortic systolic pressure (24 h-CASP) and central pulse pressure (24 h-CPP) are now feasible. We evaluate the relationship between 24 h central blood pressure and diabetes-related complications in patients with type 1 diabetes.......17-2.68) and 3.72 (1.85-7.47) and autonomic dysfunction: 3.25 (1.65-6.41), 1.64 (1.12-2.39) and 2.89 (1.54-5.42). CONCLUSIONS: 24 h-CASP and 24 h-CPP was higher in patients vs. controls and increased with diabetic complications independently of covariates. Furthermore, 24 h-CASP was stronger associated....... METHODS: The study was cross-sectional, including 715 subjects: 86 controls (C), 69 patients with short diabetes duration (diabetes (≥ 10 years) and normoalbuminuria (LN), 163...

  12. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Sangrey, Robert L [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL; Shea, Thomas J [ORNL; Hasegawa, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Kogawa, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Naoe, Dr. Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Farny, Dr. Caleb H. [Boston University; Kaminsky, Andrew L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  13. The effect of clinical experience, judgment task difficulty and time pressure on nurses’ confidence calibration in a high fidelity clinical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Huiqin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Misplaced or poorly calibrated confidence in healthcare professionals’ judgments compromises the quality of health care. Using higher fidelity clinical simulations to elicit clinicians’ confidence 'calibration' (i.e. overconfidence or underconfidence in more realistic settings is a promising but underutilized tactic. In this study we examine nurses’ calibration of confidence with judgment accuracy for critical event risk assessment judgments in a high fidelity simulated clinical environment. The study also explores the effects of clinical experience, task difficulty and time pressure on the relationship between confidence and accuracy. Methods 63 student and 34 experienced nurses made dichotomous risk assessments on 25 scenarios simulated in a high fidelity clinical environment. Each nurse also assigned a score (0–100 reflecting the level of confidence in their judgments. Scenarios were derived from real patient cases and classified as easy or difficult judgment tasks. Nurses made half of their judgments under time pressure. Confidence calibration statistics were calculated and calibration curves generated. Results Nurse students were underconfident (mean over/underconfidence score −1.05 and experienced nurses overconfident (mean over/underconfidence score 6.56, P = 0.01. No significant differences in calibration and resolution were found between the two groups (P = 0.80 and P = 0.51, respectively. There was a significant interaction between time pressure and task difficulty on confidence (P = 0.008; time pressure increased confidence in easy cases but reduced confidence in difficult cases. Time pressure had no effect on confidence or accuracy. Judgment task difficulty impacted significantly on nurses’ judgmental accuracy and confidence. A 'hard-easy' effect was observed: nurses were overconfident in difficult judgments and underconfident in easy judgments. Conclusion Nurses were poorly calibrated

  14. Numerical and analytical assessment of the influence of blood flow through arterial perforators on the pulse pressure shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieniak, Marcin; Piechna, Adam; Cieślicki, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Most of the existing models of cardiovascular system do not take into account the leakage of blood through a number of small vessels branching the main arterial trunks and called perforators. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate their influence on the pulse pressure waveform. Linearized, 1D computer model of a minute part of the cardiovascular system has been designed and series of simulations with and without leakage have been conducted. Blood flow in a single segment of the arterial system and pressure in vascular nodes were described by the two first order partial differential equations. A set of boundary conditions on both ends of a single vascular segment and at nodal point have been formulated. To solve the linear set of above equations, a numerical method of characteristic has been used. It was shown that the leakage reduces reflection from the peripheral resistance. The simulations have also shown a decrease of the average pressure value with increase of leakage and modification of the pulse pressure waveform. All these effects depended strongly on the assumed leakage value and practically died out when its value was reduced to about 10% of the main flow.

  15. Intraocular pressure and ocular pulse amplitude using dynamic contour tonometry and contact lens tonometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grus Franz-H

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The new Ocular Dynamic Contour Tonometer (DCT, investigational device supplied by SMT (Swiss Microtechnology AG, Switzerland allows simultaneous recording of intraocular pressure (IOP and ocular pulse amplitude (OPA. It was the aim of this study to compare the IOP results of this new device with Goldmann tonometry. Furthermore, IOP and OPA measured with the new slitlamp-mounted DCT were compared to the IOP and OPA measured with the hand-held SmartLens®, a gonioscopic contact lens tonometer (ODC Ophthalmic Development Company AG, Switzerland. Methods Nineteen healthy subjects were included in this study. IOP was determined by three consecutive measurements with each of the DCT, SmartLens®, and Goldmann tonometer. Furthermore, OPA was measured three times consecutively by DCT and SmartLens®. Results No difference (P = 0.09 was found between the IOP values by means of DCT (mean: 16.6 mm Hg, median: 15.33 mm Hg, SD: +/- 4.04 mm Hg and Goldmann tonometry (mean: 16.17 mm Hg, median: 15.33 mm Hg, SD: +/- 4.03 mm Hg. The IOP values of SmartLens® (mean: 20.25 mm Hg, median: 19.00 mm Hg, SD: +/- 4.96 mm Hg were significantly higher (P = 0.0008 both from Goldmann tonometry and DCT. The OPA values of the DCT (mean: 3.08 mm Hg, SD: +/- 0.92 mm Hg were significantly lower (P = 0.0003 than those obtained by SmartLens® (mean: 3.92 mm Hg, SD: +/- 0.83 mm Hg. Conclusions DCT was equivalent to Goldmann applanation tonometry in measurement of IOP in a small group of normal subjects. In contrast, SmartLens® (contact lens tonometry gave IOP readings that were significantly higher compared with Goldmann applanation tonometer readings. Both devices, DCT and SmartLens® provide the measurement of OPA which could be helpful e.g. for the management of glaucoma.

  16. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery’s Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Shin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery’s pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. Methods and analysis: This study is a prospective, si

  17. Stroke volume variation compared with pulse pressure variation and cardiac index changes for prediction of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa Aly Soliman

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Baseline stroke volume variation ⩾8.15% predicted fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with acute circulatory failure. The study also confirmed the ability of pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness.

  18. Comparing equivalent thermal, high pressure and pulsed electric field processes for mild pasteurization of orange juice. Part I: Impact on overall quality attributes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, R.A.H.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Knol, J.J.; Quataert, M.C.J.; Vervoort, L.; Plancken, van der I.; Hendrickx, M.E.; Matser, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Mild heat pasteurization, high pressure processing (HP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing of freshly squeezed orange juice were comparatively evaluated examining their impact on microbial load and quality parameters immediately after processing and during two months of storage. Microbial

  19. Digital signal processing of the wideband external pulse recorded during cuff deflation: a new way to measure blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeol, Joe W; Ryu, Yeong S; Blank, Seymour G

    2006-01-01

    Aa new method of measuring blood pressure (BP) is presented. This technique involves automatic analysis of the wideband external pulse (WEP) recorded by a pressure sensor positioned over the brachial artery during standard BP cuff deflation. Three distinct components of this "K" or "WEP" signal can be defined: K1, K2, and K3 [1]. Each component has a different shape and "appearance/disappearance property. K1 is a low frequency inaudible signal present with cuff pressure above systolic. The K2 signal appears at SP and disappears at Dp (K2-algorithm) and can be used to measure BP. Using this property, the "K2-algorithm" has been shown to be more accurate than the auscultatory technique [1]. To implement an automatic measurement using the K2-algorithm, signal processing techniques are applied to K signals.

  20. Preparation of TiO sub 2 nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation: Ambient pressure dependence of crystallization

    CERN Document Server

    Matsubara, M; Yamaki, T; Itoh, H; Abe, H

    2003-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) with a KrF excimer laser was used to prepare fine particles of titanium dioxide (TiO sub 2). The ablation in an atmosphere of Ar and O sub 2 (5:5) at total pressures of >= 1 Torr led to the formation of TiO sub 2 nanoparticles composed of anatase and rutile structures without any suboxides. The weight fraction of the rutile/anatase crystalline phases was dependent on the pressure of the Ar/O sub 2 gas. The TiO sub 2 nanoparticles had a spherical shape and their size, ranging from 10 and 14 nm, also appeared to be dependent on the ambient pressure. (author)

  1. The effect of positively chirped laser pulse on energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosoughian, H.; Sarri, G.; Borghesi, M.; Hajiesmaeilbaigi, F.; Afarideh, H.

    2017-10-01

    Proton energy enhancement in a combinational radiation pressure and bubble regime by applying a positively chirped laser pulse has been studied using a series of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. In this regime, the proton injection in the half-first period of an excited plasma wave in an under-dense plasma plays the main role in the acceleration process. Moreover, exciting as high as large-amplitude plasma waves can significantly increase the conversion efficiency of laser energy into kinetic energy of the trapped protons. Here, the utilization of the positively chirped laser pulse is proposed as an effective approach to excite the higher amplitude wake in the combinational regime. Our studies indicate that in the positively chirped combinational regime, the plasma wake with approximately two-fold enhancement is produced that results in the generation of the proton bunch with the narrower energy spread and also the peak enhancement by a factor of two, compared with the un-chirped one. This improvement in proton energy reveals that the chirped laser pulse can be introduced as a tool to tune the energy of generated protons in the combinational radiation pressure and bubble regime.

  2. Effect of filtration velocity and filtration pressure drop on the bag-cleaning performance of a pulse-jet baghouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.J.; Tsai, M.L.; Lu, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    In this study the filtration velocity and filtration pressure drop at the beginning of bag cleaning were used as experimental parameters to evaluate the bag-cleaning performance of a pulse-jet baghouse. The effective residual pressure loss was used to indicate the cleaning performance after bag cleaning. Two different test dusts, fly ash and limestone, were used. The critical cleaning indices under different operation conditions for bag cleaning were also investigated. A critical average pulse overpressure was found to exist beyond which bag-cleaning performance did not improve much. It was found the filter's final filtration resistance is an important parameter to decide whether a Venturi is necessary for a good bag-cleaning performance or not. Use of a Venturi was found to increase the average pulse overpressure for a system with a filter's final resistance coefficient greater than about 500 Pa{center{underscore}dot}s/cm. However, no Venturi is recommended when the filter's final resistance coefficient is smaller than 500 Pa{center{underscore}dot}s/cm.

  3. Pulsed electron beam propagation in gases under pressure of 6.6 kPa in drift tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kholodnaya, G.E., E-mail: galina_holodnaya@mail.ru; Sazonov, R.V.; Ponomarev, D.V.; Remnev, G.E.; Poloskov, A.V.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of pulsed electron beam transport propagated in a drift tube filled with different gases (He, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, Ar, SF{sub 6}, and CO{sub 2}). The total pressure in the drift tube was 6.6 kPa. The experiments were carried out using a TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The electron beam was propagated in the drift tube composed of two sections equipped with reverse current shunts. Under a pressure of 6.6 kPa, the maximum value of the electron beam charge closed on the walls of the drift tube was recorded when the beam was propagated in hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The minimum value of the electron beam charge closed on the walls of the drift tube was recorded for sulfur hexafluoride. The visualization of the pulsed electron beam energy losses onto the walls of the drift chamber was carried out using radiation-sensitive film.

  4. Bullet-shaped ionization front of plasma jet plumes driven by microwave pulses at atmospheric gas pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaoquan; Xia, Guangqing; Zou, Changlin; Liu, Xiaodong; Feng, Deren; Li, Ping; Hu, Yelin; Stepanova, Olga; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Ionization waves (propagating bullet-shaped plasma) are always present in atmospheric-pressure plasma jets generated by a pulsed DC power supply or low-frequency voltages. Nevertheless, whether these ionization waves exist for pulsed microwave plasma jets remains unclear. In this paper, a coaxial transmission line resonator driven by microwave pulses is capable of generating atmospheric pressure plasma jet plumes. Depending on the discharges, these plasma jet plumes exhibit distinctive characteristics, such as bullet-shaped ionization fronts for argon plasma and ball-shaped for helium plasma. Fast images show argon plasma plumes generating several small branches but only one dominant ionization front travels more distance along the jet axis. Both ionization-wave images and electromagnetic simulation results indicate that the bullet-shaped ionization front forms a plasma jet plume immediately. The dominant ionization wave is resonantly excited by the local enhanced electric field, which originates from the local net charge of the streamer plus surface plasmon polariton located at the open end of the resonator.

  5. Calibration of measured center of pressure of a new stairway design for kinetic analysis of stair climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, B; Growney, E S; Schultz, F M; An, K N

    1996-12-01

    A stairway that allows the collection of kinetic data is essential for biomechanical studies on stair climbing. There is a need to validate the measured center of pressure (COP) on the surface of a stair in order to verify the accuracy of the calculation of joint kinetics. The purpose of this study was to validate a new stairway design for kinetic analysis of stair climbing through a calibration and error analysis of the COP obtained from this system. The new stairway design allows the collection of kinetic data for multiple steps without any constraint to foot placement. Known vertical forces were applied to known locations on the surface of each stair and each force plate. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the distribution pattern of the error in the measured COP. It was found that the error in the COP was a function of location on the stair or force plate. The magnitude of the vertical force had no significant effect on the error in the measured COP. The distribution pattern of the error in the measured COP on the force plates used in this study matched the results in the literature. A healthy female subject was used as a subject in a stair climbing test. The error in the measured COP had a significant effect on the calculated joint resultant moments, especially the abduction-adduction and internal-external rotation moment. The correction of these errors should make the kinetic calculation in stair climbing more accurate.

  6. Sphygmomanometrically determined pulse pressure is a powerful independent predictor of recurrent events after myocardial infarction in patients with impaired left ventricular function. SAVE investigators. Survival and Ventricular Enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, G F; Moyé, L A; Braunwald, E; Rouleau, J L; Bernstein, V; Geltman, E M; Flaker, G C; Pfeffer, M A

    1997-12-16

    There is increasing evidence of a link between conduit vessel stiffness and cardiovascular events, although the association has never been tested in a large post-myocardial infarction patient population. We evaluated the relationship between baseline pulse pressure, measured by sphygmomanometry 3 to 16 days after myocardial infarction, and subsequent adverse clinical events in the 2231 patients enrolled in the SAVE Trial. Increased pulse pressure was associated with increased age, left ventricular ejection fraction, female sex, history of prior infarction, diabetes, and hypertension and use of digoxin and calcium channel blockers. Over a 42-month period, there were 503 deaths, 422 cardiovascular deaths, and 303 myocardial infarctions. Pulse pressure was significantly related to each of these end points as a univariate predictor. In a multivariate analysis, pulse pressure remained a significant predictor of total mortality (relative risk, 1.08 per 10 mm Hg increment in pulse pressure; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.17; Pmyocardial infarction (relative risk, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.23; Pmyocardial infarction, diabetes, or hypertension; and treatment with beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, digoxin, aspirin, or thrombolytic therapy. These data provide strong evidence for a link between pulse pressure, which is related to conduit vessel stiffness, and subsequent cardiovascular events after myocardial infarction in patients with left ventricular dysfunction.

  7. Computational study of the afterglow in single and sequential pulsing of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. I.; Bradley, J. W.

    2015-10-01

    The spatial distribution of charged species in the afterglow of a helium plasma jet impinging atmospheric air has been computed using a 2D axisymmetric fluid model. The model is solved for two consecutive pulse periods of a rectangular voltage waveform (duration of 60 ns) and for two different frequencies (25 and 50 kHz). The most abundant ionic species in the afterglow are found to be \\text{O}2+ and \\text{O}2- with their concentrations increasing by about an order of magnitude (up to about 1018 m-3 and 1017 m-3 respectively) in the initial 1 μs. In the first pulse, these species form a halo around the diffusing He+ and electron rich central channel, the shape of the former being strongly correlated with the shape of He-air mixing layer computed using a hydrodynamic model. In the next pulse, this general configuration is also observed; however \\text{O}2+ is more concentrated on the axis of the jet, this being due to influence of residual electrons in the central channel. For \\text{O}2- there is little difference in their spatial distribution compared to the initial pulse. For higher frequency pulsing, the higher concentration of residual electrons lowers the necessary ignition electric field reducing the concentrations (by 25%) of charged species in a period of the applied waveform. This work provides new information on the concentration and distribution of ionic species generated by atmospheric-pressure capillary discharges of interest to those developing such sources for range of applications, particularly in the field of plasma medicine.

  8. The flip-over effect in pulsed laser deposition: Is it relevant at high background gas pressures?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda-G-P, Alejandro [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Schneider, Christof W., E-mail: christof.schneider@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Döbeli, Max [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The flip-over effect in PLD is observed up to high deposition pressures. • Consistent congruent transfer of the target composition is generally not correct. • The choice of deposition pressure can change the film composition strongly. • Large compositional changes appear at high off-axis angles and large spot sizes. - Abstract: In pulsed laser deposition the use of a rectangular or elliptical beam spot with a non 1:1 aspect ratio leads to the so called flip-over effect. Here, the longest dimension of the laser spot results in the shortest direction of plasma plume expansion. This effect has been mainly reported for vacuum depositions of single element targets and is particularly noticeable when the aspect ratio of the beam spot is large. We investigate the flip-over effect in vacuum and at three relevant background-gas pressures for pulsed laser deposition using a La{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3} target by measuring the thickness dependence of the deposited material as a function of angle. The film thicknesses and compositions are determined by Rutherford backscattering and argon is used to reduce the influence of additional chemical reactions in the plasma. The results show the prevalence of the flip-over effect for all pressures except for the highest, i.e. 1 × 10{sup −1} mbar, where the film thickness is constant for all angles. The composition profiles show noticeable compositional variations of up to 30% with respect to the target material depending on the background gas pressure, the angular location, and the laser spot dimensions.

  9. Significantly Reduced Blood Pressure Measurement Variability for Both Normotensive and Hypertensive Subjects: Effect of Polynomial Curve Fitting of Oscillometric Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangwei Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare within-subject blood pressure (BP variabilities from different measurement techniques. Cuff pressures from three repeated BP measurements were obtained from 30 normotensive and 30 hypertensive subjects. Automatic BPs were determined from the pulses with normalised peak amplitude larger than a threshold (0.5 for SBP, 0.7 for DBP, and 1.0 for MAP. They were also determined from cuff pressures associated with the above thresholds on a fitted curve polynomial curve of the oscillometric pulse peaks. Finally, the standard deviation (SD of three repeats and its coefficient of variability (CV were compared between the two automatic techniques. For the normotensive group, polynomial curve fitting significantly reduced SD of repeats from 3.6 to 2.5 mmHg for SBP and from 3.7 to 2.1 mmHg for MAP and reduced CV from 3.0% to 2.2% for SBP and from 4.3% to 2.4% for MAP (all P<0.01. For the hypertensive group, SD of repeats decreased from 6.5 to 5.5 mmHg for SBP and from 6.7 to 4.2 mmHg for MAP, and CV decreased from 4.2% to 3.6% for SBP and from 5.8% to 3.8% for MAP (all P<0.05. In conclusion, polynomial curve fitting of oscillometric pulses had the ability to reduce automatic BP measurement variability.

  10. Repeatability of central aortic blood pressures measured non-invasively using radial artery applanation tonometry and peripheral pulse wave analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crilly, Mike; Coch, Christoph; Bruce, Margaret; Clark, Hazel; Williams, David

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the repeatability of radial pulse wave analysis (PWA) in measuring central systolic and diastolic blood pressures (cSBP/cDBP), pulse pressure (cPP), augmentation pressure (cAP) and pulse pressure amplification (PPA). After 15 min supine rest, 20 ambulant patients (aged 27-82 years; four female) underwent four SphygmoCor PWA measurements on a single occasion. Two nurses independently undertook two measurements in alternate order, blind to their colleague's measurements. Analysis was by Bland-Altman limits of agreement (LOA). Heart rate and brachial blood pressure (BP) were stable during assessment. Based on the average of two PWA measurements between-observer differences (LOA, mean difference +/- 2SD) were small (cSBP 1.5 +/- 10.9 mmHg; cDBP 0.4 +/- 5.2 mmHg; cAP 0.5 +/- 4.5 mmHg; cPP 1.1 +/- 10.5 mmHg; PPA -0.5% +/- 5.6%). Between-observer differences were much greater for single/initial PWA measurement (cSBP 3.6 +/- 15.9 mmHg; cDBP 2.8 +/- 8.8 mmHg; cAP 0.7 +/- 5.8 mmHg; cPP 0.8 +/- 13.6 mmHg; PPA -1.2 +/- 9.4%). Within-observer LOA were very similar for both nurse A (cSBP -4.2 +/- 14.1 mmHg; cDBP -4.6 +/- 13.1 mmHg; cAP -0.4 +/- 4.4 mmHg; cPP 0.5 +/- 11.0 mmHg; PPA 0.7% +/- 9.0%) and nurse B (cSBP 0.0 +/- 12.1 mmHg; cDBP 0.2 +/- 8.5 mmHg; cAP -0.1 +/- 4.4 mmHg; cPP -0.2 +/- 11.9 mmHg; PPA -0.7% +/- 10.6%). Non-invasive assessment of central aortic pressures using PWA on a single occasion is highly repeatable in ambulant patients even when used by relatively inexperienced staff.

  11. Cylinder Pressure-based Combustion Control with Multi-pulse Fuel Injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, X.; Wang, S.; Jager, B. de; Willems, F.P.T.

    2015-01-01

    With an increased number of fuel injection pulses, the control problem in diesel engines becomes complex. Consisting of multiple single-input single-output (SISO) controllers, the conventional control strategy shows unsatisfactory dynamic performance in tracking combustion load and phase reference

  12. A method for extracting respiratory frequency during blood pressure measurement, from oscillometric cuff pressure pulses and Korotkoff sounds recorded during the measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diliang Chen; Fei Chen; Murray, Alan; Dingchang Zheng

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory frequency is an important physiological feature commonly used to assess health. However, the current measurements involve dedicated devices which not only increase the medical cost but also make health monitoring inconvenient. Earlier studies have shown that respiratory frequency could be extracted from electrocardiography (ECG) signal, but little was done to assess the possibility of extracting respiratory frequency from oscillometric cuff pressure pulses (OscP) or Korotkoff sounds (KorS), which are normally used for measuring blood pressure and more easily accessible than the ECG signal. This study presented a method to extract respiratory frequency from OscP and KorS during clinical blood pressure measurement. The method was evaluated with clinical data collected from 15 healthy participants, and its measurement accuracy was compared with a reference respiratory rate obtained with a magnetometer. Experimental results showed small non-significant mean absolute bias (0.019 Hz for OscP and 0.024 Hz for KorS) and high correlation (0.7 for both OscP and KorS) between the reference respiratory frequency and respiratory frequency extracted from OscP or KorS, indicating the high reliability of extracting respiratory frequency from OscP and KorS during normal blood pressure measurement.

  13. Method for detecting and distinguishing between specific types of environmental radiation using a high pressure ionization chamber with pulse-mode readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2017-12-19

    An environmental radiation detector for detecting and distinguishing between all types of environmental radiation, including photons, charged particles, and neutrons. A large volume high pressure ionization chamber (HPIC) includes BF.sub.3 gas at a specific concentration to render the radiation detector sensitive to the reactions of neutron capture in Boron-10 isotope. A pulse-mode readout is connected to the ionization chamber capable of measuring both the height and the width of the pulse. The heavy charged products of the neutron capture reaction deposit significant characteristic energy of the reaction in the immediate vicinity of the reaction in the gas, producing a signal with a pulse height proportional to the reaction energy, and a narrow pulse width corresponding to the essentially pointlike energy deposition in the gas. Readout of the pulse height and the pulse width parameters of the signals enables distinguishing between the different types of environmental radiation, such as gamma (x-rays), cosmic muons, and neutrons.

  14. Pressure waves in liquid mercury target from pulsed heat loads and the possible way controlling their effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, L.; Skala, K. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villingen (Switzerland)

    1996-06-01

    In ESS project liquid metals are selected as the main target for the pulsed spallation neutron source. Since the very high instantaneous energy is deposited on the heavy molten target in a very short period time, pressure waves are generated. They travel through the liquid and cause high stress in the container. Also, additional stress should be considered in the wall which is the result of direct heating of the target window. These dynamic processes were simulated with computational codes with the static response being analized first. The total resulting dynamic wall stress has been found to have exceeded the design stress for the selected container material. Adding a small amount of gas bubbles in the liquid could be a possible way to reduce the pressure waves.

  15. Pulse-wave encephalopathy: a comparative study of the hydrodynamics of leukoaraiosis and normal-pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, G.A. [Department of Medical Imaging, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle (Australia)

    2002-09-01

    There is a strong association between the occurrence of leukoaraiosis and normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Venous compression secondary to alterations in craniospinal compliance is implicated in the pathogenesis of NPH, and venous pathology has also been implicated in leukoaraiosis. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the blood-flow and fluid-pulsatility characteristics of these conditions. I initially studied 18 subjects without pathology, with MRI flow-quantification studies of the cerebral arteries and veins, to define the range of normality. The main study involved 10 patients with idiopathic dementia but no leukoaraiosis who served as controls, 50 with idiopathic dementia with varying degrees of leukoaraiosis and 18 with NPH. I compared blood-flow volumes, vascular pulse-wave amplitudes and velocities. There was no significant difference in blood flow across the dementia patients. In patients with moderate leukoaraiosis, arterial pulsatility was 69%, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsation 104%, sagittal sinus pulsatility 48% and cortical vein pulsatility 34% higher than in demented patients without leukoaraiosis. Patients with NPH showed similar results with arterial pulsatility increased by 56% and sagittal sinus pulsatility by 70%. By contrast, the NPH patients' CSF pulse was 42% and the pulse wave delay at the sagittal sinus 50% less than in moderate leukoaraiosis. Thus, leukoaraiosis and NPH share increased arterial and sinus pulsatility. In leukoaraiosis cortical vein compliance is initially increased but in severe leukoaraiosis and NPH it is reduced. (orig.)

  16. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-05-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and interelectrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. In particular, the experimental conditions necessary for the glow regime of NRP discharges have been determined, with the notable result that there exists a minimum and maximum gap distance for its existence at a given ambient gas temperature. The minimum gap distance increases with decreasing gas temperature, whereas the maximum does not vary appreciably. To explain the experimental results, an analytical model is developed to explain the corona-to-glow (C-G) and glow-to-spark (G-S) transitions. The C-G transition is analyzed in terms of the avalanche-to-streamer transition and the breakdown field during the conduction phase following the establishment of a conducting channel across the discharge gap. The G-S transition is determined by the thermal ionization instability, and we show analytically that this transition occurs at a certain reduced electric field for the NRP discharges studied here. This model shows that the electrode geometry plays an important role in the existence of the NRP glow regime at a given gas temperature. We derive a criterion for the existence of the NRP glow regime as a function of the ambient gas temperature, pulse repetition frequency, electrode radius of curvature, and interelectrode gap distance.

  17. Continuous Monitoring of Cerebrovascular Reactivity Using Pulse Waveform of Intracranial Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aries, M.J.H.; Czosnyka, Marek; Budohoski, Karol P.; Kolias, Angelos G.; Radolovich, Danila K.; Lavinio, Andrea; Pickard, John D.; Smielewski, Peter

    Guidelines for the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) call for the development of accurate methods for assessment of the relationship between cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and cerebral autoregulation and to determine the influence of quantitative indices of pressure autoregulation on

  18. Testing of a one dimensional model for Field II calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Field II is a program for simulating ultrasound transducer fields. It is capable of calculating the emitted and pulse-echoed fields for both pulsed and continuous wave transducers. To make it fully calibrated a model of the transducer’s electro-mechanical impulse response must be included. We...... examine an adapted one dimensional transducer model originally proposed by Willatzen [9] to calibrate Field II. This model is modified to calculate the required impulse responses needed by Field II for a calibrated field pressure and external circuit current calculation. The testing has been performed...... to the calibrated Field II program for 1, 4, and 10 cycle excitations. Two parameter sets were applied for modeling, one real valued Pz27 parameter set, manufacturer supplied, and one complex valued parameter set found in literature, Alguer´o et al. [11]. The latter implicitly accounts for attenuation. Results show...

  19. Flow Reactor Studies with Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure and Higher

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Reactor Experiments: • Experiments on the oxidation of C1-C7 alkanes with and without plasma assisted reaction performed for T = 300 – 1250 K and P = 1...online) and Gas Chromatography (offline) Inlet Outlet Experimental Facility – cont’d • FTIR (online) connected to exhaust stream of reactor...molecule/pulse Major Species + Minor Species Oxygen + Excited Species C1-C7 Alkanes Plasma Assisted Oxidation Fourth Annual Review Meeting of

  20. Pulse pressure variation does not reflect stroke volume variation in mechanically ventilated rats with lipopolysaccharide-induced pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherpanath, Thomas G V; Smeding, Lonneke; Lagrand, Wim K; Hirsch, Alexander; Schultz, Marcus J; Groeneveld, Johan A B

    2014-01-01

    1. The present study examined the relationship between centrally measured stroke volume variation (SVV) and peripherally derived pulse pressure variation (PPV) in the setting of increased total arterial compliance (CA rt ). 2. Ten male Wistar rats were anaesthetized, paralysed and mechanically ventilated before being randomized to receive intrapulmonary lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or no LPS. Pulse pressure (PP) was derived from the left carotid artery, whereas stroke volume (SV) was measured directly in the left ventricle. Values of SVV and PPV were calculated over three breaths. Balloon inflation of a catheter positioned in the inferior vena cava was used, for a maximum of 30 s, to decrease preload while the SVV and PPV measurements were repeated. Values of CA rt were calculated as SV/PP. 3. Intrapulmonary LPS increased CA rt and SV. Values of SVV and PPV increased in both LPS-treated and untreated rats during balloon inflation. There was a correlation between SVV and PPV in untreated rats before (r = 0.55; P = 0.005) and during (r = 0.69; P mechanically ventilated rats. Our data caution against their interchangeability in human sepsis. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. The relationship between anemia and pulse pressure and hypertension: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Gwang Seok; Kim, Yu Jeong; Hwang, Eun Young; Park, Chang Eun; Park, Jong

    2018-01-10

    The present study was conducted to assess the relationship between anemia and pulse pressure (PP) and hypertension (HTN). Data from 16,060 adults (aged ≥20 years) in the fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012) were analyzed. Several key findings were identified. First, after adjusting for related variables, the odds ratio (OR) of anemia (hemoglobin 61 mmHg; OR, 1.517; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.270-1.812). Second, after adjusting for related variables (except body mass index [BMI] and waist measurement [WM]), the OR of anemia, with a normal blood pressure group as a reference, was significant for the HTN group (systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg or use of HTN medications; OR, 0.835; 95% CI, 0.709-0.983). However, when further adjusted for BMI and WM, anemia was not associated with HTN (OR, 0.884; 95% CI, 0.750-1.042). In conclusion, anemia was positively associated with high PP, but was not associated with HTN.

  2. Non-invasive measurements of pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation in anesthetized patients using the Nexfin blood pressure monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stens, Jurre; Oeben, Jeroen; Van Dusseldorp, Ab A; Boer, Christa

    2016-10-01

    Nexfin beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure monitoring enables continuous assessment of hemodynamic indices like cardiac index (CI), pulse pressure variation (PPV) and stroke volume variation (SVV) in the perioperative setting. In this study we investigated whether Nexfin adequately reflects alterations in these hemodynamic parameters during a provoked fluid shift in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated patients. The study included 54 patients undergoing non-thoracic surgery with positive pressure mechanical ventilation. The provoked fluid shift comprised 15° Trendelenburg positioning, and fluid responsiveness was defined as a concomitant increase in stroke volume (SV) >10 %. Nexfin blood pressure measurements were performed during supine steady state, Trendelenburg and supine repositioning. Hemodynamic parameters included arterial blood pressure (MAP), CI, PPV and SVV. Trendelenburg positioning did not affect MAP or CI, but induced a decrease in PPV and SVV by 3.3 ± 2.8 and 3.4 ± 2.7 %, respectively. PPV and SVV returned back to baseline values after repositioning of the patient to baseline. Bland-Altman analysis of SVV and PPV showed a bias of -0.3 ± 3.0 % with limits of agreement ranging from -5.6 to 6.2 %. The SVV was more superior in predicting fluid responsiveness (AUC 0.728) than the PVV (AUC 0.636), respectively. The median bias between PPV and SVV was different for patients younger [-1.5 % (-3 to 0)] or older [+2 % (0-4.75)] than 55 years (P < 0.001), while there were no gender differences in the bias between PPV and SVV. The Nexfin monitor adequately reflects alterations in PPV and SVV during a provoked fluid shift, but the level of agreement between PPV and SVV was low. The SVV tended to be superior over PPV or Eadyn in predicting fluid responsiveness in our population.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid pulse pressure and craniospinal dynamics : a theoretical, clinical and experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.J. Avezaat (Cees); J.H.M. van Eijndhoven (Johannes Hubertus Marcellianus)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractSince the introduction of continuous recording of intracranial pressure (ICP) in neurosurgical practice (Guillaume and Janny, 1951; Lundberg, 1960) this method has greatly contributed to clinical research in the field of intracranial hypertension. Numerous publications have enriched the

  4. Effect of carvedilol on pulse pressure and left ventricular hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats with adriamycin nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Dijana; Jovovic, Djurdjica; Mihailovic-Stanojevic, Nevena; Miloradovic, Zoran; Naumovic, Radomir; Dimitrijevic, Jovan; Maksic, Nebojsa; Djukanovic, Ljubica

    2009-09-01

    Recent studies indicated pulse pressure as a risk factor for left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure and stroke as well as chronic renal failure progression. The present study examined the effects of carvedilol and its combination with captopril on blood pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy, kidney vascular changes and kidney function in spontaneously hypertensive rats with adriamycin nephropathy. Four groups of 20 SHR each were involved: (1) control group: SHR; (2) ADR group: SHR treated with ADR (2mg/kg i.v. twice in 20 days); (3) ADR-C group: SHR treated with ADR and carvedilol (30 mg/kg/day) and (4) ADR-CC group: SHR treated with ADR and carvedilol (30 mg/kg/day) and captopril (60 mg/kg/day). Systolic-, diastolic- and mean-pressures and pulse pressure were determined at weeks 6 and 12 after the second ADR injection; and body weight, creatinine clearance and proteinuria at weeks -3, 6 and 12. The rats were sacrificed at week 6 or 12, the weights of the left and right ventricles and kidneys measured and the kidney vascular index was calculated as described by Bader and Mayer. Both carvedilol alone and combined with captopril significantly reduced systemic blood pressure but the effect of the latter was more pronounced and registered from week 4 till the end of the study. Carvedilol and its combination with captopril significantly decreased SBP, DBP and MAP. They also decreased PP, prevented the development of LVH, and renal vascular changes and slowed the progression of chronic renal failure and these effects were stronger in the ADR-CC group than in the ADR-C group. The antihypertensive drugs failed to prevent proteinuria in ADR SHR. Significant positive correlations were found between PP (but not SBP, DBP and MAP) and both proteinuria and Ccr in all groups of rats. In conclusion, carvedilol alone, but more strongly in combination with captopril, significantly reduced blood pressure, PP, LVH, renal blood vessel changes and

  5. Prenatal exposure to dexamethasone in the mouse alters cardiac growth patterns and increases pulse pressure in aged male offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee O'Sullivan

    Full Text Available Exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids during development can result in later cardiovascular and renal disease in sheep and rats. Although prenatal glucocorticoid exposure is associated with impaired renal development, less is known about effects on the developing heart. This study aimed to examine the effects of a short-term exposure to dexamethasone (60 hours from embryonic day 12.5 on the developing mouse heart, and cardiovascular function in adult male offspring. Dexamethasone (DEX exposed fetuses were growth restricted compared to saline treated controls (SAL at E14.5, but there was no difference between groups at E17.5. Heart weights of the DEX fetuses also tended to be smaller at E14.5, but not different at E17.5. Cardiac AT1aR, Bax, and IGF-1 mRNA expression was significantly increased by DEX compared to SAL at E17.5. In 12-month-old offspring DEX exposure caused an increase in basal blood pressure of ~3 mmHg. In addition, DEX exposed mice had a widened pulse pressure compared to SAL. DEX exposed males at 12 months had an approximate 25% reduction in nephron number compared to SAL, but no difference in cardiomyocyte number. Exposure to DEX in utero appears to adversely impact on nephrogenesis and heart growth but is not associated with a cardiomyocyte deficit in male mice in adulthood, possibly due to compensatory growth of the myocardium following the initial insult. However, the widened pulse pressure may be indicative of altered vascular compliance.

  6. Output Pressure and Pulse-Echo Characteristics of CMUTs as Function of Plate Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Søren Elmin; Hansen, Jesper Mark Fly; Engholm, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    of 5MHz and a pull-in voltage of 200V are obtained using finite element analysis. Hydrophone and plane reflector measurements are used to assess the acoustic performance. Increasing the plate thickness from 2μm to 15μm decreases the pulse-echo bandwidth from >100% to 30%. A maximum in both peak...... of a CMUT it is possible to optimize its acoustic performance for medical imaging applications, including visualization of deeper structures in the body, as well as nonlinear imaging such as tissue harmonic imaging....

  7. Direct measurement of acoustic intensity: Application to the identification of pressure pulse sources in ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiecassagnet, A.; Bockhoff, M.; Lambert, J. M.

    1981-10-01

    Application of sound intensity measurements in order to study acoustic problems in hydraulic or gas ducts was investigated. Theory demonstrates that it is possible to completely characterize a quasi-stationary plane wave in a duct. The acoustic pressure at two points in a duct and the phase difference between the two signals are measured. For broadband noise, the phase difference is found by simultaneous determination of the Fourier transforms of the pressure signals. With these three values, (a) a measure of the vector intensity which characterizes the global energy flux in a section and especially its direction, (b) the progressive wave rate that is the root of the relation between the pressure minima and maxima, and (c) the distance between the measurement point and the reflector which is the cause of the quasi-stationary wave are obtained. Experiments with pure tones and broadband noise in a Kundt tube and in two hydraulic circuits of different dimensions confirm the method.

  8. Impact of extracorporeal blood flow rate on blood pressure, pulse rate and cardiac output during haemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Philip Andreas; Mace, Maria Lerche; Soja, Anne Merete Boas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: If blood pressure (BP) falls during haemodialysis (HD) [intradialytic hypotension (IDH)] a common clinical practice is to reduce the extracorporeal blood flow rate (EBFR). Consequently the efficacy of the HD (Kt/V) is reduced. However, only very limited knowledge on the effect......L/min diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, PR and CO remained unchanged. CONCLUSION: Our study does not show any consistent trend in BP changes by a reduction in EBFR. Reduction in EBFR if BP falls during IDH is thus not supported. However, none of the patients experienced IDH. Further studies are required...... to evaluate the impact of changes in EBFR on BP during IDH....

  9. Evaluation of the knowledge base of French intensivists and anaesthesiologists as concerns the interpretation of respiratory arterial pulse pressure variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Dechanet, Fabien; du Cheyron, Damien; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Fellahi, Jean-Luc

    2015-02-01

    The aims of the study were to assess the knowledge of intensivists and/or anaesthesiologists concerning respiratory arterial pulse pressure variation (PPV) and to define the criteria used to indicate a fluid challenge. A prospective observational study. Intensivists and anaesthesiologists from one region of France were evaluated for their knowledge about the prerequisites (continuous arterial pressure monitoring, regular sinus rhythm, mechanical ventilation without spontaneous breathing) and confounding factors shifting the threshold value of PPV (low tidal volume, decreased pulmonary compliance, low heart rate/respiratory rate ratio, right ventricular dysfunction, and/or intra-abdominal hypertension) using clinical vignettes. Criteria used by physicians to indicate a fluid challenge were also collected. One hundred and forty-five physicians were included in the study. Among them, 87 (60%) knew prerequisites but none of them had full knowledge of all confounding factors. Criteria used to perform a fluid challenge were mainly PPV and the passive leg-raising test for the residents and PPV, blood pressure, oliguria and hydric balance for the qualified physicians. PPV was widely employed to indicate a fluid challenge and 60% of the physicians knew the prerequisites. However, the physicians did not correctly interpret all confounding factors. Copyright © 2015 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Ignition and afterglow dynamics of a high pressure nanosecond pulsed helium micro-discharge: II. Rydberg molecules kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Emile A. D.; Schregel, Christian-Georg; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss the experimental results presented in Schregel et al (2016 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 25 054003) on a high pressure micro-discharge operated in helium and driven by nanosecond voltage pulses. A simple global plasma chemistry model is developed to describe the ions, excited atomic and molecular species dynamics in the ignition and early afterglow regimes. The existing experimental data on high pressure helium kinetics is reviewed and critically discussed. It is highlighted that several inconsistencies in the branching ratio of neutral assisted associative and dissociative processes currently exist in the literature and need further clarification. The model allows to pinpoint the mechanisms responsible for the large amounts of Rydberg molecules produced in the discharge and for the helium triplet metastable state in the afterglow. The main losses of electrons are also identified. The fast quenching of excited He (n  >  3) states appears to be a significant source of Rydberg molecules which has been previously neglected. The plasma model finally draws a simplified, but still accurate description of high pressure helium discharges based on available experimental data for ion and neutral helium species.

  11. The Changes in Pulse Pressure Variation or Stroke Volume Variation After a "Tidal Volume Challenge" Reliably Predict Fluid Responsiveness During Low Tidal Volume Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatra, Sheila Nainan; Prabu, Natesh R; Divatia, Jigeeshu Vasishtha; Monnet, Xavier; Kulkarni, Atul Prabhakar; Teboul, Jean-Louis

    2017-03-01

    Stroke volume variation and pulse pressure variation do not reliably predict fluid responsiveness during low tidal volume ventilation. We hypothesized that with transient increase in tidal volume from 6 to 8 mL/kg predicted body weight, that is, "tidal volume challenge," the changes in pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation will predict fluid responsiveness. Prospective, single-arm study. Medical-surgical ICU in a university hospital. Adult patients with acute circulatory failure, having continuous cardiac output monitoring, and receiving controlled low tidal volume ventilation. The pulse pressure variation, stroke volume variation, and cardiac index were recorded at tidal volume 6 mL/kg predicted body weight and 1 minute after the "tidal volume challenge." The tidal volume was reduced back to 6 mL/kg predicted body weight, and a fluid bolus was given to identify fluid responders (increase in cardiac index > 15%). The end-expiratory occlusion test was performed at tidal volumes 6 and 8 mL/kg predicted body weight and after reducing tidal volume back to 6 mL/kg predicted body weight. Thirty measurements were obtained in 20 patients. The absolute change in pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation after increasing tidal volume from 6 to 8 mL/kg predicted body weight predicted fluid responsiveness with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (with 95% CIs) being 0.99 (0.98-1.00) and 0.97 (0.92-1.00), respectively. The best cutoff values of the absolute change in pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation after increasing tidal volume from 6 to 8 mL/kg predicted body weight were 3.5% and 2.5%, respectively. The pulse pressure variation, stroke volume variation, central venous pressure, and end-expiratory occlusion test obtained during tidal volume 6 mL/kg predicted body weight did not predict fluid responsiveness. The changes in pulse pressure variation or stroke volume variation obtained by

  12. Comparison of noninvasive pulse transit time estimates as markers of blood pressure using invasive pulse transit time measurements as a reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingwu; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-05-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) measured as the time delay between invasive proximal and distal blood pressure (BP) or flow waveforms (invasive PTT [I-PTT]) tightly correlates with BP PTT estimated as the time delay between noninvasive proximal and distal arterial waveforms could therefore permit cuff-less BP monitoring. A popular noninvasive PTT estimate for this application is the time delay between ECG and photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms (pulse arrival time [PAT]). Another estimate is the time delay between proximal and distal PPG waveforms (PPG-PTT). PAT and PPG-PTT were assessed as markers of BP over a wide physiologic range using I-PTT as a reference. Waveforms for determining I-PTT, PAT, and PPG-PTT through central arteries were measured from swine during baseline conditions and infusions of various hemodynamic drugs. Diastolic, mean, and systolic BP varied widely in each subject (group average (mean ± SE) standard deviation between 25 ± 2 and 36 ± 2 mmHg). I-PTT correlated well with all BP levels (group average R(2) values between 0.86 ± 0.03 and 0.91 ± 0.03). PPG-PTT also correlated well with all BP levels (group average R(2) values between 0.81 ± 0.03 and 0.85 ± 0.02), and its R(2) values were not significantly different from those of I-PTT PAT correlated best with systolic BP (group average R(2) value of 0.70 ± 0.04), but its R(2) values for all BP levels were significantly lower than those of I-PTT (P < 0.005) and PPG-PTT (P < 0.02). The pre-ejection period component of PAT was responsible for its inferior correlation with BP In sum, PPG-PTT was not different from I-PTT and superior to the popular PAT as a marker of BP. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  13. Blood pressure and pulse rate of apparently healthy adults on land ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The study compared cardiovascular parameters of apparently healthy adults in erect standing posture on land and whilst immersed in water at rest. Methods: One hundred and ninety-three apparently healthy adults were purposively recruited to participate in the study. An electronic blood pressure monitor was ...

  14. High-efficiency generation of pulsed Lyman-α radiation by resonant laser wave mixing in low pressure Kr-Ar mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Louchev, Oleg A; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-04

    We report an experimental generation of ns pulsed 121.568 nm Lyman-α radiation by the resonant nonlinear four-wave mixing of 212.556 nm and 845.015 nm radiation pulses providing a high conversion efficiency 1.7x10-3 with the output pulse energy 3.6 μJ achieved using a low pressure Kr-Ar mixture. Theoretical analysis shows that this efficiency is achieved due to the advantage of using (i) the high input laser intensities in combination with (ii) the low gas pressure allowing us to avoid the onset of full-scale discharge in the laser focus. In particular, under our experimental conditions the main mechanism of photoionization caused by the resonant 2-photon 212.556 nm radiation excitation of Kr atoms followed by the 1-photon ionization leads to ≈17% loss of Kr atoms and efficiency loss only by the end of the pulse. The energy of free electrons, generated by 212.556 nm radiation via (2 + 1)-photon ionization and accelerated mainly by 845.015 nm radiation, remains during the pulse below the level sufficient for the onset of full-scale discharge by the electron avalanche. Our analysis also suggests that ≈30-fold increase of 845.015 nm pulse energy can allow one to scale up the L-α radiation pulse energy towards the level of ≈100 μJ.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of plasmonic nanostructured gold on flexible transparent polymers at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Ronán; Hughes, Cian; Bagga, Komal; Stalcup, Apryll; Vázquez, Mercedes; Brabazon, Dermot

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we outline a novel technique for the deposition of nanostructured thin films utilizing a modified form of pulsed laser deposition (PLD). We demonstrate confined atmospheric PLD (CAP) for the deposition of gold on cyclic olefin polymer substrates. The deposition process is a simplified form of conventional PLD, with deposition conducted under atmospheric conditions and the substrate and target in close proximity. It was found that this confinement results in the deposition of nanostructured thin films on the substrate. Infrared spectroscopy showed no significant change of polymer surface chemistry as a result of the deposition process, and optical spectroscopy revealed plasmonic behavior of the resulting thin film. The effect of laser fluence on the deposition process was also examined with more uniform films deposited at higher fluences.

  16. Condensation of ablation plumes in the irradiation of metals by high-intensity nanosecond laser pulses at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozadaev, K V [A.N. Sevchenko Institute of Applied Physical Problems, Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2016-01-31

    The Anisimov–Luk'yanchuk model is adapted for describing the condensation of vapour-plasma plumes produced in the irradiation of metal targets by high-intensity (10{sup 8} – 10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}) nanosecond (10 – 100 ns) pulses at atmospheric pressure. The resultant data suggest that the initial stages of the development of metal ablation plumes correspond with a high degree of accuracy to the Zel'dovich–Raizer theory of dynamic condensation; however, at the stage of the ablation plume decay, the liquid-droplet phase is formed primarily by coalescence of 'nuclei'. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  17. Flexible reduced graphene oxide supercapacitor fabricated using a nitrogen dc-pulse atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Han; Kuok, Fei-Hong; Liao, Chen-Yu; Wan, Ting-Hao; Chen, Chieh-Wen; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Cheng, I.-Chun; Chen, Jian-Zhang

    2017-02-01

    We use a nitrogen dc-pulse atmospheric-pressure plasma jet to fabricate a flexible reduced graphene oxide (rGO) supercapacitor with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/sulfuric acid (H2SO4) gel electrolyte. An areal capacitance of 47.03 mF · cm-2 (evaluated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) under a potential scan rate of 2 mV · s-1) is achieved. The supercapacitor can be operated without apparent degradation under bending with a bending radius of 0.55 cm. After a 1000 cycle CV stability test, the capacitance retention rate is 100% when flat and is 98.6% under bending (bending radius  =  0.55 cm), indicating promising stability of the APPJ-processed flexible supercapacitor.

  18. Pulse pressure is not an independent predictor of outcome in type 2 diabetes patients with chronic kidney disease and anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, S; Claggett, B; Hansen, T W

    2015-01-01

    Pulse pressure (PP) remains an elusive cardiovascular risk factor with inconsistent findings. We clarified the prognostic value in patients with type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and anemia in the Trial to Reduce cardiovascular Events with Aranesp (darbepoetin alfa) Therapy. In 4038...... type 2 diabetes patients, darbepoetin alfa treatment did not affect the primary outcome. Risk related to PP at randomization was evaluated in a multivariable model including age, gender, kidney function, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other conventional risk factors. End points were myocardial.......52). Adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) per one quartile increase in PP were 1.06 (0.99-1.26) for MI, 0.96 (0.83-1.11) for stroke, 1.01 (0.94-1.09) for ESRD and 1.01 (0.96-1.07) for CVD composite. Results were similar in continuous analyses of PP (per 10 mm Hg). In patients with type 2 diabetes...

  19. Ocular pulse amplitude as a dynamic parameter and its relationship with 24-h intraocular pressure and blood pressure in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jeon; Lee, Kyoung Sub; Lee, Jong Rak; Na, Jung Hwa; Choi, Jaewan; Han, Seungbong; Kook, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    Abnormal ocular blood flow (OBF) has been suspected as one of the underlying mechanisms of glaucoma. The ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) is considered a possible surrogate parameter for ocular blood flow (OBF) measurement and has been studied in its association with glaucoma. Although there have been several studies that reported various ocular and systemic factors in association with OPA, all of these studies were based on a single measurement of these factors as well as OPA. The purpose of this study was to determine the 24-h (h) dynamic variability and any associations between OPA and intraocular pressure (IOP) and blood pressure (BP) variables using 24-h data collected from untreated patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). One hundred and forty-four patients with NTG were consecutively enrolled. All patients underwent 24-h monitoring of IOP, OPA, and BP variables. A cosinor model was used to describe the patterns and statistical significance of the 24-h OPA rhythm, as well as the IOP and BP variables. Associations between 24-h OPA data, IOP and BP variables, and ocular and demographic factors were also assessed using the generalized estimating equation. Over the course of 24-h, OPA (p = 0.007) demonstrated significant dynamic diurnal rhythms that were similar to the other dynamic variables (all p parameter that demonstrates a 24-h short-time fluctuation in NTG patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Transient radon signals driven by fluid pressure pulse, micro-crack closure, and failure during granite deformation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Frédéric; Schubnel, Alexandre; Pili, Éric

    2017-09-01

    In seismically active fault zones, various crustal fluids including gases are released at the surface. Radon-222, a radioactive gas naturally produced in rocks, is used in volcanic and tectonic contexts to illuminate crustal deformation or earthquake mechanisms. At some locations, intriguing radon signals have been recorded before, during, or after tectonic events, but such observations remain controversial, mainly because physical characterization of potential radon anomalies from the upper crust is lacking. Here we conducted several month-long deformation experiments under controlled dry upper crustal conditions with a triaxial cell to continuously monitor radon emission from crustal rocks affected by three main effects: a fluid pressure pulse, micro-crack closure, and differential stress increase to macroscopic failure. We found that these effects are systematically associated with a variety of radon signals that can be explained using a first-order advective model of radon transport. First, connection to a source of deep fluid pressure (a fluid pressure pulse) is associated with a large transient radon emission increase (factor of 3-7) compared with the background level. We reason that peak amplitude is governed by the accumulation time and the radon source term, and that peak duration is controlled by radioactive decay, permeability, and advective losses of radon. Second, increasing isostatic compression is first accompanied by an increase in radon emission followed by a decrease beyond a critical pressure representing the depth below which crack closure hampers radon emission (150-250 MPa, ca. 5.5-9.5 km depth in our experiments). Third, the increase of differential stress, and associated shear and volumetric deformation, systematically triggers significant radon peaks (ca. 25-350% above background level) before macroscopic failure, by connecting isolated cracks, which dramatically enhances permeability. The detection of transient radon signals before rupture

  1. Response of the Jovian thermosphere to a transient `pulse' in solar wind pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, J. N.; Achilleos, N.; Guio, P.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the Jovian thermosphere with regard to magnetosphere–ionosphere coupling is often neglected in magnetospheric physics. We present the first study to investigate the response of the Jovian thermosphere to transient variations in solar wind dynamic pressure, using an azimuthally symmetric global circulation model coupled to a simple magnetosphere and fixed auroral conductivity model. In our simulations, the Jovian magnetosphere encounters a solar wind shock or rarefaction regi...

  2. Multi-parameter brain tissue microsensor and interface systems: calibration, reliability and user experiences of pressure and temperature sensors in the setting of neurointensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Charmaine; Wang, Li; Neoh, Boon Kwee; Goh, Hok Liok; Zu, Mya Myint; Aung, Phyo Wai; Yeo, Tseng Tsai

    2014-10-01

    The objective was to investigate sensor measurement uncertainty for intracerebral probes inserted during neurosurgery and remaining in situ during neurocritical care. This describes a prospective observational study of two sensor types and including performance of the complete sensor-bedside monitoring and readout system. Sensors from 16 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) were obtained at the time of removal from the brain. When tested, 40% of sensors achieved the manufacturer temperature specification of 0.1 °C. Pressure sensors calibration differed from the manufacturers at all test pressures in 8/20 sensors. The largest pressure measurement error was in the intraparenchymal triple sensor. Measurement uncertainty is not influenced by duration in situ. User experiences reveal problems with sensor 'handling', alarms and firmware. Rigorous investigation of the performance of intracerebral sensors in the laboratory and at the bedside has established measurement uncertainty in the 'real world' setting of neurocritical care.

  3. Predictive value of pulse pressure variation for fluid responsiveness in septic patients using lung-protective ventilation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, F G R; Bafi, A T; Nascente, A P M; Assunção, M; Mazza, B; Azevedo, L C P; Machado, F R

    2013-03-01

    The applicability of pulse pressure variation (ΔPP) to predict fluid responsiveness using lung-protective ventilation strategies is uncertain in clinical practice. We designed this study to evaluate the accuracy of this parameter in predicting the fluid responsiveness of septic patients ventilated with low tidal volumes (TV) (6 ml kg(-1)). Forty patients after the resuscitation phase of severe sepsis and septic shock who were mechanically ventilated with 6 ml kg(-1) were included. The ΔPP was obtained automatically at baseline and after a standardized fluid challenge (7 ml kg(-1)). Patients whose cardiac output increased by more than 15% were considered fluid responders. The predictive values of ΔPP and static variables [right atrial pressure (RAP) and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP)] were evaluated through a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Thirty-four patients had characteristics consistent with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome and were ventilated with high levels of PEEP [median (inter-quartile range) 10.0 (10.0-13.5)]. Nineteen patients were considered fluid responders. The RAP and PAOP significantly increased, and ΔPP significantly decreased after volume expansion. The ΔPP performance [ROC curve area: 0.91 (0.82-1.0)] was better than that of the RAP [ROC curve area: 0.73 (0.59-0.90)] and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure [ROC curve area: 0.58 (0.40-0.76)]. The ROC curve analysis revealed that the best cut-off for ΔPP was 6.5%, with a sensitivity of 0.89, specificity of 0.90, positive predictive value of 0.89, and negative predictive value of 0.90. Automatized ΔPP accurately predicted fluid responsiveness in septic patients ventilated with low TV.

  4. Evaluation of the effect of systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure on cognitive function: the Women's Health and Aging Study II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Yasar

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP and pulse pressure (PP in midlife is associated with increased risk for cognitive impairment later in life. There is mixed evidence regarding the effects of late life elevated SBP or PP on cognitive function, and limited information on the role of female gender.Effects of SBPand PPon cognitive abilities at baseline and over a 9-year period were evaluated in 337 non-demented community-dwelling female participants over age 70 in the Women's Health and Aging Study II using logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Participants aged 76-80 years with SBP≥160 mmHg or PP≥84 mmHg showed increased incidence of impairment on Trail Making Test-Part B (TMT, Part B, a measure of executive function, over time when compared to the control group that included participants with normal and pre-hypertensive SBP (<120 and 120-139 mmHg or participants with low PP (<68 mmHg (HR = 5.05 [95%CI = 1.42, 18.04], [HR = 5.12 [95%CI = 1.11; 23.62], respectively. Participants aged 70-75 years with PP≥71 mmHg had at least a two-fold higher incidence of impairment on HVLT-I, a measure of verbal learning, over time when compared to participants with low PP (<68 mmHg (HR = 2.44 [95%CI = 1.11, 5.39].Our data suggest that elevated SBP or PP in older non-demented women increases risk for late-life cognitive impairment and that PP could be used when assessing the risk for impairment in cognitive abilities. These results warrant further, larger studies to evaluate possible effects of elevated blood pressure in normal cognitive aging.

  5. Pulse Pressure magnifies the effect of COMTVal158Met on 15 Year Episodic Memory Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninni ePersson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether a physiological marker of cardiovascular health, pulse pres­sure (PP, and age magnified the effect of the functional COMT Val158Met (rs4680 pol­ymor­phism on 15-year cognitive trajectories (episodic memory [EM], visuospatial ability, and se­man­tic memory using data from 1585 non-demented adults from the Betula study. A mul­tiple-group growth model was specified to gauge individual differences in change. The allelic variants showed negligible differences across the cognitive markers in average trends. The older portion of the sample selectively age-magnified the effects of Val158Met on EM changes, resulting in greater decline in Val compared to homozygote Met carriers. This effect was attenuated by sta­tistical control for PP. Further, PP mod­erated the effects of COMT on 15-year EM trajectories, resulting in greater decline in Val carriers, even after accounting for the confounding effects of sex, education, cardiovascular diseases (dia­betes, stroke, and hypertension, and chronological age, controlled for practice gains. The effect was still present after excluding individuals with a history of cardiovascular diseases. The effects of cognitive change were not moderated by any other covariates. This report underscores the importance of addressing synergistic effects in nor­mal cognitive aging, as the addition thereof may even place healthy individuals at greater risk for memory decline.

  6. Pulsed Phase Lock Loop Device for Monitoring Intracranial Pressure During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Macias, Brandon R.; Yost, William T.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an ultrasonic device to monitor ICP waveforms non-invasively from cranial diameter oscillations using a NASA-developed pulsed phase lock loop (PPLL) technique. The purpose of this study was to attempt to validate the PPLL device for reliable recordings of ICP waveforms and analysis of ICP dynamics in vivo. METHODS: PPLL outputs were recorded in patients during invasive ICP monitoring at UCSD Medical Center (n=10). RESULTS: An averaged linear regression coefficient between ICP and PPLL waveform data during one cardiac cycle in all patients is 0.88 +/- 0.02 (mean +/- SE). Coherence function analysis indicated that ICP and PPLL waveforms have high correlation in the lst, 2nd, and 3rd harmonic waves associated with a cardiac cycle. CONCLUSIONS: PPLL outputs represent ICP waveforms in both frequency and time domains. PPLL technology enables in vivo evaluation of ICP dynamics non-invasively, and can acquire continuous ICP waveforms during spaceflight because of compactness and non-invasive nature.

  7. Probing of Fast Chemical Dynamics at High Pressures and Temperatures using Pulsed Laser Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-17

    The Journal of Chemical Physics , (08 2011): 1. doi: 10.1063/1.3626860 13.00 23.00 20.00 18.00 17.00 16.00 15.00 24.00 38.00 08/30/2011 08/30/2011...diagram, The Journal of Chemical Physics , (05 2011): 1. doi: 10.1063/1.3574009 Andrew Kung, Alexander F. Goncharov, Chang sheng Zha, Peter Eng...Wendy L. Mao. Compressional, temporal, and compositional behavior of H2-O2 compound formed by high pressure x-ray irradiation, The

  8. Endothelial dysfunction, ambulatory pulse pressure and albuminuria are associated in Type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren Tang; Jeppesen, Peter; Frederiksen, Christian Alcaraz

    2007-01-01

    examined. We examined the relation between PP, markers of endothelial activation and albuminuria in Type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: In 46 Type 2 diabetic patients and 19 non-diabetic subjects, we performed 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (AMBP) monitoring. Urinary albumin excretion rate was measured......: Increased PP is associated with endothelial activation and albuminuria in Type 2 diabetic patients. Thus, endothelial dysfunction may represent a pathophysiological link between an elevated PP and microvascular complications in these subjects. Prospective studies are needed to further elucidate...

  9. Swept-Ramp Detonation Initiation Performance in a High-Pressure Pulse Detonation Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    e. N2 Tank – OPEN 26. Cooling Water Pump a. Test Cell #3 Knife Switch – ON b. Knife Switch Breaker Handle – ON c. Water Tank – CHECK (full and...Test Cell #2 Ball Valve – CLOSED b. Water Tank Isolation Valve – CLOSED c. Knife Switch Breaker Handle – OFF d. Test Cell #3 Knife Switch – OFF 21...December 2009. 68 [12] Kistler Instrument Corporation, Type 603B1 Miniature , High Frequency, Charge Output Pressure Sensor Data Sheet, 2003. 69

  10. Pulse pressure tracking from adolescence to young adulthood: contributions to vascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Xavier; Santos, Diana A; Ornelas, Rui; Fernhall, Bo; Santa-Clara, Helena; Sardinha, Luís B

    2018-02-01

    We examined whether exposure to high PP in adolescence predicts carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and stiffness indices at young adulthood. Seventy-nine participants had their brachial systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood (DBP) pressures taken at the age of 15-16 years and later at young adulthood (29-31 years). Carotid IMT, distensibility and stiffness index β were measured at young adulthood. Linear and logistical regression analysis were performed. PP at adolescence and at young adulthood predicted vascular health independently of sex, body mass index, and mean arterial pressure, explaining up to 37% of the variance. When analyzing its single constituents, at adolescence DBP was more predictive of vascular health, whereas DBP and SBP were equally important at young adulthood. Adolescents with high PP were at risk for increased carotid IMT (OR: 4.04-4.09), even if PP decreased at young adulthood. Young adults with high PP were at risk for increased stiffness regardless of adolescence PP (OR: 4.64-7.35). PP at adolescence and young adulthood may be a better predictor of early pathological changes in carotid artery structure and stiffness. Whereas carotid IMT in young adults appears to be influenced by PP at adolescence, carotid stiffness depends primarily on current PP.

  11. Physical Kinetics of Electrons in a High-Voltage Pulsed High-Pressure Discharge with Cylindrical Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, V. Yu.; Kozyrev, A. V.; Semeniuk, N. S.

    2017-12-01

    Results of theoretical modeling of the phenomenon of a high-voltage discharge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure are presented, based on a consistent kinetic theory of the electrons. A mathematical model of a nonstationary high-pressure discharge has been constructed for the first time, based on a description of the electron component from first principles. The physical kinetics of the electrons are described with the help of the Boltzmann kinematic equation for the electron distribution function over momenta with only ionization and elastic collisions taken into account. A detailed spatiotemporal picture of a nonstationary discharge with runaway electrons under conditions of coaxial geometry of the gas diode is presented. The model describes in a self-consistent way both the process of formation of the runaway electron flux in the discharge and the influence of this flux on the rate of ionization processes in the gas. Total energy spectra of the electron flux incident on the anode are calculated. The obtained parameters of the current pulse of the beam of fast electrons correlate well with the known experimental data.

  12. Source duration of stress and water-pressure induced seismicity derived from experimental analysis of P wave pulse width in granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, K.

    2013-12-01

    Pulse widths of P waves in granite, measured in the laboratory, were analyzed to investigate source durations of rupture processes for water-pressure induced and stress-induced microseismicity. Much evidence suggests that fluids in the subsurface are intimately linked to faulting processes. Studies of seismicity induced by water injection are thus important for understanding the trigger mechanisms of earthquakes as well as for engineering applications such as hydraulic fracturing of rocks at depth for petroleum extraction. Determining the cause of seismic events is very important in seismology and engineering; however, water-pressure induced seismic events are difficult to distinguish from those induced by purely tectonic stress. To investigate this problem, we analyzed the waveforms of acoustic emissions (AEs) produced in the laboratory by both water-pressure induced and stress-induced microseismicity. We used a cylinder (50 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length) of medium-grained granite. We applied a differential stress of about 70% of fracture strength, to the rock sample under 40 MPa confining pressure and held it constant throughout the experiment. When the primary creep stage and acoustic emissions (AEs) caused by the initial loading had ceased, we injected distilled water into the bottom end of the sample at a constant pressure of 17 MPa until macroscopic fracture occurred. We analysed AE waveforms produced by stress-induced AEs which occurred before the water-injection and by water-pressure induced AEs which occurred after the water-injection. Pulse widths were measured from the waveform traces plotted from the digital data. To investigate the source duration of the rupture process, we estimated the pulse width at the source and normalized by event magnitude to obtain a scaled pulse width at the source. After the effects of event size and hypocentral distance were removed from observed pulse widths, the ratio of the scaled source durations of water-pressure

  13. Effect of the shapes of the oscillometric pulse amplitude envelopes and their characteristic ratios on the differences between auscultatory and oscillometric blood pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoore, John N; Vacher, Emilie; Murray, Ian C; Mieke, Stephan; King, Susan T; Smith, Fiona E; Murray, Alan

    2007-10-01

    Oscillometric noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP) devices determine pressure by analysing the oscillometric waveform using empirical algorithms. Many algorithms analyse the waveform by calculating the systolic and diastolic characteristic ratios, which are the amplitudes of the oscillometric pulses in the cuff at, respectively, the systolic and diastolic pressures, divided by the peak pulse amplitude. A database of oscillometric waveforms was used to study the influences of the characteristic ratios on the differences between auscultatory and oscillometric measurements. Two hundred and forty-three oscillometric waveforms and simultaneous auscultatory blood pressures were recorded from 124 patients at cuff deflation rates of 2-3 mmHg/s. A simulator regenerated the waveforms, which were presented to two NIBP devices, the Omron HEM-907 [OMRON Europe B.V. (OMCE), Hoofddorp, The Netherlands] and the GE ProCare 400 (GE Healthcare, Tampa, Florida, USA). For each waveform, the paired systolic and paired diastolic pressure differences between device measurements and auscultatory reference pressures were calculated. The systolic and diastolic characteristic ratios, corresponding to the reference auscultatory pressures of each oscillometric waveform stored in the simulator, were calculated. The paired differences between NIBP measured and auscultatory reference pressures were compared with the characteristic ratios. The mean and standard deviations of the systolic and diastolic characteristic ratios were 0.49 (0.11) and 0.72 (0.12), respectively. The systolic pressures recorded by both devices were lower (negative paired pressure difference) than the corresponding auscultatory pressures at low systolic characteristic ratios, but higher than the corresponding auscultatory pressures at high systolic pressures. Conversely, the differences between the paired diastolic pressure differences were higher at low diastolic characteristic ratios, compared with those at high diastolic

  14. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  15. Noninvasive LV pressure estimation using subharmonic emissions from microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Raichlen, Joel S; Liu, Ji-Bin; McDonald, Maureen E; Dickie, Kris; Wang, Shumin; Leung, Corina; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    To develop a new noninvasive approach to quantify left ventricular (LV) pressures using subharmonic emissions from microbubbles, an ultrasound scanner was used in pulse inversion grayscale mode; unprocessed radiofrequency data were obtained with pulsed wave Doppler from the aorta and/or LV during Sonazoid infusion. Subharmonic data (in dB) were extracted and processed. Calibration factor (mm Hg/dB) from the aortic pressure was used to estimate LV pressures. Errors ranged from 0.19 to 2.50 mm Hg when estimating pressures using the aortic calibration factor, and were higher (0.64 to 8.98 mm Hg) using a mean aortic calibration factor. Subharmonic emissions from ultrasound contrast agents have the potential to noninvasively monitor LV pressures. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of a smartphone app (Capstesia) for measuring pulse pressure variation: agreement between two methods: A Cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrachina, Borja; Cobos, Raquel; Mardones, Noemi; Castañeda, Angel; Vinuesa, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    Less invasive and noninvasive methods are emerging for haemodynamic monitoring. Among them is Capstesia, a smartphone app that, from photographs of a patient monitor showing invasive arterial pressure, estimates advanced haemodynamic variables after digitising and analysing the pressure curves. The aim of this study was to compare the level of agreement between the analysis of the signals obtained from the patient monitor and a photograph of the same images using the Capstesia app. Cross-sectional study. Araba University hospital (Txagorritxu), Vitoria-Gasteiz, Alava, Spain, from January to February 2015. Twenty patients (229 images) who had an arterial catheter (radial or femoral artery) inserted for haemodynamic monitoring. Snapshots obtained from the patient monitor and a photograph of these same snapshots using the Capstesia application were assessed with the same software (MATLAB, Mathworks, Natick, Massachusetats, USA) for evaluating the level of concordance of the following variables: pulse pressure variation (PPV), cardiac output (CO) and maximum slope of the pressure curve (dP/dt). Comparison was made using interclass correlation coefficients with corresponding 95% confidence intervals, and Bland-Altman plots with the corresponding percentages of error. (PPV). Secondary outcome: CO and maximum slope of the pressure curve [dP/dt]. The interclass correlation coefficients for PPV, CO and max dP/dt were 0.991 (95% confidence interval 0.988 to 0.993), 0.966 (95% confidence interval 0.956 to 0.974) and 0.962 (95% confidence interval 0.950 to 0.970), respectively. In the Bland-Altman analysis, bias and limits of agreement of PPV were (0.50% ± 1.42) resulting in a percentage of error of 20% for PPV. For CO they were 0.19 ± 0.341, with a 13.8% of error. Finally bias and limits of agreement for max dP/dt were 1.33 ± 77.71, resulting in an error of 14.20% CONCLUSIONS: Photograph of the screenshots obtained with the Capstesia app show a good concordance

  17. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Maik Pflugradt; Kai Geissdoerfer; Matthias Goernig; Reinhold Orglmeister

    2017-01-01

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depen...

  18. A fast multimodal ectopic beat detection method applied for blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity measurements in wearable sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Pflugradt, Maik; Geißdörfer, Kai; Görnig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depen...

  19. Comparing equivalent thermal, high pressure and pulsed electric field processes for mild pasteurization of orange juice: Part II: Impact on specific chemical and biochemical quality parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, L.; Plancken, van der I.; Grauwet, T.; Timmermans, R.A.H.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.E.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of thermal, high pressure (HP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing for mild pasteurization of orange juice was compared on a fair basis, using processing conditions leading to an equivalent degree of microbial inactivation. Examining the effect on specific chemical and biochemical

  20. Applicability of Pulse Pressure Variation during Unstable Hemodynamic Events in the Intensive Care Unit: A Five-Day Prospective Multicenter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Delannoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulse pressure variation can predict fluid responsiveness in strict applicability conditions. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical applicability of pulse pressure variation during episodes of patient hemodynamic instability in the intensive care unit. We conducted a five-day, seven-center prospective study that included patients presenting with an unstable hemodynamic event. The six predefined inclusion criteria for pulse pressure variation applicability were as follows: mechanical ventilation, tidal volume >7 mL/kg, sinus rhythm, no spontaneous breath, heart rate/respiratory rate ratio >3.6, absence of right ventricular dysfunction, or severe valvulopathy. Seventy-three patients presented at least one unstable hemodynamic event, with a total of 163 unstable hemodynamic events. The six predefined criteria for the applicability of pulse pressure variation were completely present in only 7% of these. This data indicates that PPV should only be used alongside a strong understanding of the relevant physiology and applicability criteria. Although these exclusion criteria appear to be profound, they likely represent an absolute contraindication of use for only a minority of critical care patients.

  1. Beat-to-beat tracking of systolic blood pressure using noninvasive pulse transit time during anesthesia induction in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hoon; Song, Jun-Gol; Park, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jung-Won; Park, Yong-Seok; Hwang, Gyu-Sam

    2013-01-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) has been reported to show good agreement with arterial blood pressure (BP) in awake humans. We evaluated whether noninvasive beat-to-beat PTT accurately correlated with invasively measured continuous arterial BP during anesthesia induction in hypertensive patients. Twenty-three hypertensive patients who were scheduled for kidney transplant were enrolled. Radial arterial BP, electrocardiogram, and finger pulse oximetric plethysmography were simultaneously recorded. PTT was measured as the time interval from the R-wave peak on the electrocardiogram to the maximal upslope of the photoplethysmogram. Relationships between beat-to-beat PTT and BP were evaluated by correlation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. During anesthesia induction, changes in PTT were directly proportional to changes in BP: when BP decreased, PTT lengthened, and vice versa. The inverse of PTT demonstrated significantly better correlation with systolic BP than with mean BP (r = 0.81 ± 0.11 vs r = 0.72 ± 0.17; P < 0.001) or diastolic BP (r = 0.81 ± 0.11 vs r = 0.52 ± 0.24; P < 0.001). The inverse of PTT was more highly correlated with decreasing than with increasing changes in systolic BP (r = 0.83 ± 0.12 vs r = 0.68 ± 0.20; P = 0.001). The ROC curve analysis revealed that a 15% increase in PTT during anesthesia induction could detect a ≥30% decrease in systolic BP, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.85. Beat-to-beat PTT was fairly well correlated with invasive systolic BP and could predict a reduction in systolic BP during anesthesia induction. Beat-to-beat PTT may show potential as a useful noninvasive index of systolic BP when invasive BP is unavailable in high-risk hypertensive patients.

  2. Pulse transit time and blood pressure changes following auditory-evoked subcortical arousal and waking of infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Barbara C; Tan, Evan; Taylor, Barry J

    2007-07-01

    To establish a normal range of data in 3-month-old infants in relation to changes in cardiovascular measurements, with particular reference to pulse transit time (PTT), following subcortical arousals and awakenings from sleep. Prospective study. Sleep laboratory, Dunedin Hospital Twenty healthy infants aged 9-12 weeks. Nap studies were performed using a standard polysomnographic setup with the addition of a Portapres blood pressure (BP) cuff (wrist application) and a piezoelectric sensor on the foot. PTT was measured from the ECG-R waveform to the arrival of the pulse peripherally. Infants were exposed to white noise from 50 to 100 dB at 10 dB intervals within REM and NREM sleep. Awakening thresholds were higher (P = 0.01) in NREM (>90 dB) than REM sleep (mean +/- SD; 74.3 +/- 9.4dB). Subcortical thresholds were always 10 dB below waking thresholds. Following awakening, there was an immediate increase in HR, SBP, and DBP of 21%, 14%, and 17%, respectively, and a 13% decrease in PTT returning to baseline within 25-30 seconds. PTT at baseline measured 140 +/- 11 and 139 +/- 9 msec in NREM and REM sleep, respectively, and decreased approximately 20 msec with waking. PTT changes were negatively correlated with heart rate (HR) but not BP, although a trend was evident. At 3 months of age, infants provoked to arouse from sleep showed PTT changes that inversely mimicked BP trends, suggesting that PTT could be useful in infant studies as a marker for autonomic perturbations that occur during sleep in both clinical and research settings.

  3. On the motion of dayside auroras caused by a solar wind pressure pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kozlovsky

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Global ultraviolet auroral images from the IMAGE satellite were used to investigate the dynamics of the dayside auroral oval responding to a sudden impulse (SI in the solar wind pressure. At the same time, the TV all-sky camera and the EISCAT radar on Svalbard (in the pre-noon sector allowed for detailed investigation of the auroral forms and the ionospheric plasma flow. After the SI, new discrete auroral forms appeared in the poleward part of the auroral oval so that the middle of the dayside oval moved poleward from about 70° to about 73° of the AACGM latitude. This poleward shift first occurred in the 15 MLT sector, then similar shifts were observed in the MLT sectors located more westerly, and eventually the shift was seen in the 6 MLT sector. Thus, the auroral disturbance "propagated" westward (from 15 MLT to 6 MLT at an apparent speed of the order of 7km/s. This motion of the middle of the auroral oval was caused by the redistribution of the luminosity within the oval and was not associated with the corresponding motion of the poleward boundary of the oval. The SI was followed by an increase in the northward plasma convection velocity. Individual auroral forms showed poleward progressions with velocities close to the velocity of the northward plasma convection. The observations indicate firstly a pressure disturbance propagation through the magnetosphere at a velocity of the order of 200km/s which is essentially slower than the velocity of the fast Alfvén (magnetosonic wave, and secondly a potential (curl-free electric field generation behind the front of the propagating disturbance, causing the motion of the auroras. We suggest a physical explanation for the slow propagation of the disturbance through the magnetosphere and a model for the electric field generation. Predictions of the model are supported by the global convection maps produced by the SuperDARN HF radars. Finally, the interchange instability and the eigenmode toroidal

  4. The added value of cardiac index and pulse pressure variation monitoring to mean arterial pressure-guided volume therapy in moderate-risk abdominal surgery (COGUIDE): a pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stens, J; Hering, J-P; van der Hoeven, C W P; Boom, A; Traast, H S; Garmers, L E; Loer, S A; Boer, C

    2017-09-01

    There is disagreement regarding the benefits of goal-directed therapy in moderate-risk abdominal surgery. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the addition of non-invasive cardiac index and pulse pressure variation monitoring to mean arterial pressure-based goal-directed therapy would reduce the incidence of postoperative complications in patients having moderate-risk abdominal surgery. In this pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial, we randomly allocated 244 patients by envelope drawing in a 1:1 fashion, stratified per centre. All patients had mean arterial pressure, cardiac index and pulse pressure variation measured continuously. In one group, healthcare professionals were blinded to cardiac index and pulse pressure variation values and were asked to guide haemodynamic therapy only based on mean arterial pressure (control group). In the second group, cardiac index and pulse pressure variation values were displayed and kept within target ranges following a pre-defined algorithm (CI-PPV group). The primary endpoint was the incidence of postoperative complications within 30 days. One hundred and seventy-five patients were eligible for final analysis. Overall complication rates were similar (42/94 (44.7%) vs. 38/81 (46.9%) in the control and CI-PPV groups, respectively; p = 0.95). The CI-PPV group had lower mean (SD) pulse pressure variation values (9.5 (2.0)% vs. 11.9 (4.6)%; p = 0.003) and higher mean (SD) cardiac indices (2.76 (0.62) l min-1 .m-2 vs. 2.53 (0.66) l min-1 .m-2 ; p = 0.004) than the control group. In moderate-risk abdominal surgery, we observed no additional value of cardiac index and pulse pressure variation-guided haemodynamic therapy to mean arterial pressure-guided volume therapy with regard to postoperative complications. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Noninvasive measurements of intramuscular pressure using pulsed phase-locked loop ultrasound for detecting compartment syndromes: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemann, John M; Ueno, Toshiaki; Leek, Bryan T; Yost, William T; Schwartz, Alexandra K; Hargens, Alan R

    2006-07-01

    To develop a human model for compartment tamponade and test the efficacy of ultrasonic pulsed phase-locked loop (PPLL) fascial displacement waveform analysis for noninvasive measurement of intramuscular pressure (IMP). Human subject experiment. University Level 1 trauma center. Nine male and 1 female volunteers (age 20 to 59),3 male acute compartment syndrome (ACS) patients (age 31 to 38). Thigh tourniquet was inflated in a stepwise fashion from 40 to 100 mm Hg to increase IMP transiently in volunteers. Invasive IMP by slit catheter and PPLL fascial displacement waveform in volunteers with model ACS and patients with ACS. In the model compartment tamponade group, thigh cuff occlusion increased IMP in the anterior compartment from a mean of 12.1 mm Hg (SE = 1.5) to a mean of 27.4 mm Hg (SE = 2.4, N = 8, P displacement waveform as measured by PPLL increased from a resting mean of 1.12 (SE = 0.07) to a mean of 1.85 (SE = 0.18) under the same protocol (N = 6, P = 0.001). Combined data with compartment syndrome patients revealed linear correlation between IMP and PPLL with an R value of 0.8887. Subarterial thigh cuff pressure causes a significant and transient increase in IMP, serving as a model for anterior compartment tamponade. PPLL is able to detect fascial displacement waveforms corresponding to arterial pulsation and furthermore distinguishes between normal and elevated IMP. There is a linear correlation between PPLL measurements and invasive IMP. The PPLL shows potential utility as a device for noninvasive measurement of IMP for detecting compartment syndromes.

  6. Dry Electrodes for ECG and Pulse Transit Time for Blood Pressure: A Wearable Sensor and Smartphone Communication Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyamkumar, Prashanth

    -invasive, cuff-less Blood pressure estimation based on Pulse Transit Time with multiple synchronized sensor nodes, is implemented with e-nanoflex and the results are discussed.

  7. Impact of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and ankle-brachial blood pressure index on mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Tokuyuki; Ono, Kumeo; Tsuchida, Akiyasu; Kawai, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiko; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Koyanagi, Hikaru; Noguchi, Toshiharu; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Sekihara, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Yukiyasu; Kanai, Hideo; Ishida, Hideki; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2005-10-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABPI) are markers for atherosclerosis, and each predicts mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis. However, there have been no studies in the past that compared head-to-head the clinical validity of these 2 parameters. Compared with conventional aortic PWV, brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) is considered simple and thereby easily applicable to clinical use. To clarify the relationship between baPWV and ABPI and assess their prognostic values, we analyzed 785 hemodialysis patients with a mean age of 60.2 +/- 12.5 (SD) years for whom ABPI and baPWV at baseline had been measured simultaneously and who were followed up for 33.8 +/- 10.8 months. Of 785 patients, 131 deaths were recorded. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, all-cause mortality was progressively and significantly greater from the lowest quartile of baPWV onward (log-rank test, 41.8; P hemodialysis patients. However, baPWV was useful to pick a high-risk population in patients with ABPI greater than 0.9. Thus, screening hemodialysis patients by means of baPWV and ABPI provides complementary information in identifying a high-risk population.

  8. Luminance and efficacy improvement of low-pressure xenon pulsed fluorescent lamps by using an auxiliary external electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Masafumi; Okamoto, Masahiro; Takeda, Masashi; Motomura, Hideki

    2007-07-01

    As the environmental awareness of people becomes stronger, the demand for mercury-free light sources also becomes stronger. The authors have been keeping their interest in developing mercury-free discharge lamps, especially in low-pressure xenon as the most promising UV sources to substitute mercury. In this paper the authors report the effect of auxiliary external electrode (AEE) on the pulsed xenon fluorescent lamps. In this research two types of structures are used. One is the standard type, which has one anode and one cathode inside the lamp. The other is the double anode type, which has two anodes and one cathode inside the lamp. By using the AEE the luminance and the efficacy are improved simultaneously. The luminance is improved by about 129% for the standard structure type and 20% for the double anode type. The efficacy is improved by 60% for the standard type and by 63% for the double anode type. We call this effect/method the Jinno Motomura effect/method (JM-effect/method). Regarding the result of the xenon metastable atom distribution, measured by LIF, this effect is attributed to the plasma potential control and enlargement of the positive column by AEE.

  9. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Contrasting characteristics of sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air and atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J. L.; Liu, D. X.; Iza, F.; Rong, M. Z.; Kong, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Glow discharges in air are often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for numerous chamber-free applications. This is due to the ubiquitous presence of air and the perceived abundance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in air plasmas. In this paper, sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air plasmas are shown to produce a low concentration of excited oxygen atoms but an abundance of excited nitrogen species, UV photons and ozone molecules. This contrasts sharply with the efficient production of excited oxygen atoms in comparable helium-oxygen discharges. Relevant reaction chemistry analysed with a global model suggests that collisional excitation of O2 by helium metastables is significantly more efficient than electron dissociative excitation of O2, electron excitation of O and ion-ion recombination. These results suggest different practical uses of the two oxygen-containing atmospheric discharges, with air plasmas being well suited for nitrogen and UV based chemistry and He-O2 plasmas for excited atomic oxygen based chemistry.

  10. Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briestenský Miloš

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The EU-TecNet monitoring network uses customized three-dimensional extensometers to record transient deformations across individual faults. This paper presents the first results from two newly established monitoring points in the Balkan Mountains in Bulgaria. The data from Saeva Dupka, recorded across an EEN-WWS striking fault, show sinistral strike-slip along the fault and subsidence of the southern block. Much of the subsidence occurred around the time of the distal MW = 5.6 Pernik Earthquake. An important transient deformation event, which began in autumn 2012, was reflected by significant compression and following extension, across the monitored fault. The data from Bacho Kiro, recorded across a NE–SW striking fault, show sinistral strike-slip along the fault and subsidence of the north-western block. The same important deformation event was reflected by changes in the strike-slip, dip-slip, and horizontal opening/closing trends. These results have been compared to data from other monitoring points in the Western Carpathians, External Dinarides, and Tian Shan. Many of the sites show evidence of simultaneous displacement anomalies and this observation is interpreted as a reflection of the plate-wide propagation of a tectonic pressure pulse towards the end of 2012.

  11. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure. Final technical report, April 1, 1990--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyring, E.M.

    1993-06-21

    Experiments have been developed for measuring the rates of chemical reactions liquids and in supercritical Co{sub 2}. A pulsed (Q-switch) Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm was the pump beam for laser flash photolysis studies of molybdenum and tungsten hexacarbonyls undergoing ligand displacement reactions by bidentate chelating agents such as 2,2{prime}-bipyridine in toluene. Experiments were carried out at 0.1 to 150 MPa. In the case of molybdenum complexes, the reaction mechanism for thermal ring closure is found from activation volumes to change from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as substituents on the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands become bulkier. In a similar study of more rigid, substituted phenanthroline bidentate ligands it was found that substituent bulkiness had little effect on the thermal ring closure mechanism. Similar high pressure flash photolysis experiments with tungsten hexacarbonyl have also been completed. The concentration dependence of the fluorescence and nonradiative decay quantum yields for cresyl violet in several solvent have been reported as well as stability constants for the complexation of lithium ion by four different crown ethers dissolved in a room temperature molten salt.

  12. Consumer perception of the use of high-pressure processing and pulsed electric field technologies in food production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henriette Boel; Sonne, Anne-Mette; Grunert, Klaus G; Banati, Diana; Pollák-Tóth, Annamária; Lakner, Zoltán; Olsen, Nina Veflen; Zontar, Tanja Pajk; Peterman, Marjana

    2009-02-01

    The success of new food processing technologies is highly dependent on consumers' acceptance. The purpose of this paper is to study consumers' perceptions of two new processing technologies and food products produced by means of these novel technologies. To accomplish this, a qualitative study on consumer attitudes towards high-pressure processing (HPP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing of food was carried out. In all 97 adults between 20 and 71 years of age participated in 12 focus groups conducted in Slovenia, Hungary, Serbia, Slovakia, Norway and Denmark using a common guideline. Participants were introduced to the HPP and PEF technologies and then to the effect of the two new technologies on two specific product categories: juice and baby food. The transcribed data was content analysed and the coded data was transformed into diagrams using UCINET 5 and NETDRAW. The results show that consumers perceived the main advantages of HPP and PEF products to be the products' naturalness, improved taste and their high nutritional value, whereas the main disadvantage was the lack of information about the PEF and HPP products. The results of the participants' evaluation of the PEF and HPP processes showed that environmental friendliness and the more natural products were seen as the main advantages, while they were concerned about body and health, the higher price of the products, the lack of information about the technologies and a general scepticism. The study also shows that North European participants were a bit more sceptical towards PEF and HPP products than the East European participants.

  13. Luminance and efficacy improvement of low-pressure xenon pulsed fluorescent lamps by using an auxiliary external electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinno, Masafumi; Okamoto, Masahiro; Takeda, Masashi; Motomura, Hideki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ehime University, 3, Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, 790-8577 (Japan)

    2007-07-07

    As the environmental awareness of people becomes stronger, the demand for mercury-free light sources also becomes stronger. The authors have been keeping their interest in developing mercury-free discharge lamps, especially in low-pressure xenon as the most promising UV sources to substitute mercury. In this paper the authors report the effect of auxiliary external electrode (AEE) on the pulsed xenon fluorescent lamps. In this research two types of structures are used. One is the standard type, which has one anode and one cathode inside the lamp. The other is the double anode type, which has two anodes and one cathode inside the lamp. By using the AEE the luminance and the efficacy are improved simultaneously. The luminance is improved by about 129% for the standard structure type and 20% for the double anode type. The efficacy is improved by 60% for the standard type and by 63% for the double anode type. We call this effect/method the Jinno-Motomura effect/method (JM-effect/method). Regarding the result of the xenon metastable atom distribution, measured by LIF, this effect is attributed to the plasma potential control and enlargement of the positive column by AEE.

  14. Analysis of epidural pressure pulse wave (EDP-PW) and common carotid blood velocity (CBFV) in acute intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, M; Tokutomi, T; Kawaba, T; Nakashima, H; Kuramoto, S

    1986-06-01

    The changes in the two consistent components of epidural pressure pulse wave (EDP-PW), P1 and P2 waves, and mean velocity of common carotid blood flow (CBFV) were studied in 21 patients with acute intracranial hypertension to investigate the origin of th the amplitude change in these components. The amplitudes of P2 wave increased progressively with the rise of EDP, but those of P1 wave remained nearly invariable at EDP of more than 20-30 mmHg which is incompatible with the changes in CBFV. Jugular vein compression caused in rapid rise of EDP and a proportionate increase in the magnitudes of both waves. Hyperventilation and mannitol administration caused a disproportionate reduction in the amplitudes of P2 wave with a fall of EDP. But mannitol at high EDP (more than 40 mmHg) caused a mild fall of EDP and some increase in the amplitudes of P2 wave. These results indicate that the variations in the amplitudes of P1 wave reflect the changes in vascular resistance of the large intracranial conductive arteries, while those of P2 wave result from the changes in the volume of the cerebral bulk. The increase in the amplitudes of P2 wave induced by mannitol at high EDP may suggest a defective autoregulation of the cerebral vessels.

  15. Calibration-free sensor for pressure and H2O concentration in headspace of sterile vial using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tingdong; Gao, Guangzhen; Liu, Ying

    2013-11-10

    Tunable diode laser absorption measurements of pressure and H2O concentration in the headspace of vials using a distributed-feedback (DFB) diode laser near 1.4 μm are reported. A H2O line located near 7161.41 cm(-1) is selected based on its strong absorption strength and isolation from interference of neighboring transitions. Direct absorption spectra of H2O are obtained for the measurement path as well as the reference path by scanning the laser wavelength. The pressure and H2O vapor concentration in the headspace of a vial are inferred from a differential absorption signal, which is the difference between the measured and the referenced absorbance spectra. This sensor is calibration-free and no purge gas is needed. The demonstrated capability would enable measurements of pressure and H2O concentration in the headspace of vials within 2.21% and 2.86%, respectively. A precision of 1.02 Torr and 390 ppm is found for the pressure and H2O concentration, respectively. A set of measurements for commercial freeze-dried products are also performed to illustrate the usefulness of this sensor.

  16. High pulse pressure is related to risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese middle-aged females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Bingyuan; Wang, Chongjian; Li, Linlin; Ren, Yongcheng; Zhang, Hongyan; Yang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Yang; Han, Chengyi; Zhou, Junmei; Luo, Xinping; Hu, Dongsheng

    2016-10-01

    To examine the association of risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with high pulse pressure (PP) by sex. We performed a prospective cohort study of 12,272 eligible participants (4664 males and 7608 females) without diabetes at baseline. Participants were classified as having normal PP (20-60mmHg) and high PP (>60mmHg) at baseline. The analysis was further stratified by sex, quartiles of age and high PP categories. During 6years of follow-up, T2DM developed in 775 participants and the incidence was 10.57/1000person-years. With PP 70 to 76mmHg, the multivariable adjusted hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval) for incident T2DM in females was 1.722 (1.093-2.714) after adjustment for baseline age, smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity level and family history of T2DM, and 1.634 (1.037-2.575) after adjustment for the above factors and body mass index, waist circumference, blood lipid levels and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) category. After stratification by quartiles of age, for females aged 52 to 59, the multivariable adjusted HRs (95% CI) for high PP as compared to normal PP were 2.263 (1.517-3.377) and 2.140 (1.426-3.210) in different models. During follow-up, levels of FPG, fasting plasma insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) were higher in females with higher than normal PP group, but β-cell function was impaired in the high PP group (P<0.05). High PP may be related to incident T2DM among female in China, especially women 52 to 59years old. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Attenuation of systolic blood pressure and pulse transit time hysteresis during exercise and recovery in cardiovascular patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Yan, Bryan P; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Poon, Carmen C Y

    2014-02-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is a cardiovascular parameter of emerging interest due to its potential to estimate blood pressure (BP) continuously and without a cuff. Both linear and nonlinear equations have been used in the estimation of BP based on PTT. This study, however, demonstrates that there is a hysteresis phenomenon between BP and PTT during and after dynamic exercise. A total of 46 subjects including 16 healthy subjects, 13 subjects with one or more cardiovascular risk factors, and 17 patients with cardiovascular disease underwent graded exercise stress test. PTT was measured from electrocardiogram and photoplethysmogram of the left index finger of the subject, i.e., a pathway that includes predominately aorta, brachial, and radial arteries. The results of this study showed that, for the same systolic BP (SBP), PTT measured during exercise was significantly larger than PTT measured during recovery for all subject groups. This hysteresis was further quantified as both normalized area bounded by the SBP-PTT relationship (AreaN) and SBP difference at PTT during peak exercise plus 20 ms (ΔSBP20). Significant attenuation of both AreaN (p cardiovascular patients compared with healthy subjects, independent of resting BP. Since the SBP-PTT relationship are determined by the mechanical properties of arterial wall, which is predominately mediated by the sympathetic nervous system through altered vascular smooth muscle (VSM) tone during exercise, results of this study are consistent with the previous findings of autonomic nervous dysfunction in cardiovascular patients. We further conclude that VSM tone has a nonnegligible influence on the BP-PTT relationship and thus should be considered in the PTT-based BP estimation.

  18. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  19. Method of optical self-mixing for pulse wave transit time in comparison with other methods and correlation with blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigas, Kalju; Lass, Jaanus; Kattai, Rain; Karai, Deniss; Kaik, Juri

    2004-07-01

    This paper is a part of research to develop convenient method for continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure by non-invasive and non-oscillometric way. A simple optical method, using self-mixing in a diode laser, is used for detection of skin surface vibrations near the artery. These vibrations, which can reveal the pulsate propagation of blood pressure waves along the vasculature, are used for pulse wave registration. The registration of the Pulse Wave Transit Time (PWTT) is based on computing the time delay in different regions of the human body using an ECG as a reference signal. In this study, the comparison of method of optical self-mixing with other methods as photoplethysmographic (PPG) and bioimpedance (BI) for PWTT is done. Also correlation of PWTT, obtained with different methods, with arterial blood pressure is calculated. In our study, we used a group of volunteers (34 persons) who made the bicycle exercise test. The test consisted of cycling sessions of increasing workloads during which the HR changed from 60 to 180 beats per minute. In addition, a blood pressure (NIBP) was registered with standard sphygmomanometer once per minute during the test and all NIBP measurement values were synchronized to other signals to find exact time moments where the systolic blood pressure was detected (Korotkoff sounds starting point). Computer later interpolated the blood pressure signal in order to get individual value for every heart cycle. The other signals were measured continuously during all tests. At the end of every session, a recovery period was included until person's NIBP and heart rate (HR) normalized. As a result of our study it turned out that time intervals that were calculated from plethysmographic (PPG) waveforms were in the best correlation with systolic blood pressure. The diastolic pressure does not correlate with any of the parameters representing PWTT. The pulse wave signals measured by laser and piezoelectric transducer are very similar

  20. Effect of pressure pulses at the interface valve on the stability of second dimension columns in online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talus, Eric S; Witt, Klaus E; Stoll, Dwight R

    2015-01-23

    Users of online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LCxLC) frequently acknowledge that the mechanical instability of HPLC columns installed in these systems, particularly in the second dimension, is a significant impediment to its use. Such instability is not surprising given the strenuous operating environment to which these columns are subjected, including the large number (thousands per day) of fast and large pressure pulses resulting from interface valve switches (on the timescale of tens of milliseconds) associated with very fast second dimension separations. There appear to be no published reports of systematic studies of the relationship between second dimension column lifetime and any of these variables. In this study we focused on the relationship between the lifetimes of commercially available columns and the pressure pulses observed at the inlet of the second dimension column that occur during the switching of the valve that interfaces the two dimensions of a LCxLC system. We find that the magnitude of the pressure drop at the inlet of the second dimension column during the valve switch, which may vary between 10 and 95% of the column inlet pressure, is dependent on valve switching speed and design, and has a dramatic impact on column lifetime. In the worst case, columns fail within the first few hours of use in an LCxLC system. In the best case, using a valve that exhibits much smaller pressure pulses, the same columns exhibit much improved lifetimes and have been used continuously under LCxLC conditions for several days with no degradation in performance. This result represents a first step in understanding the factors that affect second dimension column lifetime, and will significantly improve the usability of the LCxLC technique in general. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fast intraslab fluid-flow events linked to pulses of high pore fluid pressure at the subducted plate interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taetz, Stephan; John, Timm; Bröcker, Michael; Spandler, Carl; Stracke, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    A better understanding of the subduction zone fluid cycle and its chemical-mechanical feedback requires in-depth knowledge about how fluids flow within and out of descending slabs. Relicts of fluid-flow systems in exhumed rocks of fossil subduction zones allow for identification of the general relationships between dehydration reactions, fluid pathway formation, the dimensions and timescales of distinct fluid flow events; all of which are required for quantitative models for fluid-induced subduction zone processes. Two types of garnet-quartz-phengite veins can be distinguished in an eclogite-facies mélange block from the Pouébo Eclogite Mélange, New Caledonia. These veins record synmetamorphic internal fluid release by mineral breakdown reactions (type I veins), and infiltration of an external fluid (type II veins) with the associated formation of a reaction selvage. The dehydration and fluid migration documented by the type I veins likely occurred on a timescale of 105-106 years, based on average subduction rates and metamorphic conditions required for mineral dehydration and fluid flow. The timeframe of fluid-rock interaction between the external fluid and the wall-rock of the type II veins is quantified using a continuous bulk-rock Li-diffusion profile perpendicular to a vein and its metasomatic selvage. Differences in Li concentration between the internal and external fluid reservoirs resulted in a distinct diffusion profile (decreasing Li concentration and increasing δ7 Li) as the reaction front propagated into the host rock. Li-chronometric constraints indicate that the timescales of fluid-rock interaction associated with type II vein formation are on the order of 1 to 4 months (0.150-0.08+0.14 years). The short-lived, pulse-like character of this process is consistent with the notion that fluid flow caused by oceanic crust dehydration at the blueschist-to-eclogite transition contributes to or even dominates episodic pore fluid pressure increases at the

  2. Percentiles for central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity in children and adolescents recorded with an oscillometric device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmenhorst, Julia; Hulpke-Wette, Martin; Barta, Christiane; Dalla Pozza, Robert; Springer, Stephan; Oberhoffer, Renate

    2015-01-01

    In adults with arterial hypertension, measuring arterial stiffness by pulse wave velocity (PWV) can determine the extent of cardiovascular subclinical organ damage. PWV has independent predictive value for cardiovascular events, but there are currently no recommendations for measuring PWV in children. In addition, central systolic blood pressure (cSBP) strongly reflects vascular changes. The aim of this study was to establish percentiles for cSBP and PWV in children and adolescents to evaluate and classify altered vascular function in youths. We measured PWV and cSBP with an oscillometric device with inbuilt ARCSolver-algorithm (estimated by using the brachial waveform) and calculated smoothed reference percentiles for 1445 children and young adults (49.5% female; 13.41 ± 2.80 years, range 8-22 years; PWV 4.67 ± 0.34 m/s; cSBP 100.7 ± 8.9 mmHg) using the LMS-method based on age and height. PWV and cSBP increased with age and height, but slightly differently for girls and boys, possibly reflecting different growth patterns. Between 8 and 21 years, PWV increased from 4.29 ± 0.32 to 4.98 ± 0.33 m/s in girls and from 4.27 ± 0.18 to 5.22 ± 0.46 m/s in boys. While girls showed a minor increase in cSBP (91.2 ± 7.5 to 109.1 ± 8.6 mmHg), the cSBP in boys ranged from 90.0 ± 5.8 to 110.5 ± 9.6 mmHg with a more pronounced increase between 14 and 17 years. These percentiles for PWV and cSBP can help define arterial stiffness in youths and contribute to risk stratification for cardiovascular disease. For example, in children with prehypertension or isolated systolic hypertension, PWV and cSBP can provide additional information about the function of the vascular system, thereby strengthening intervention strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of oxygen pressure and aging on LaAlO3 films grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrTiO3 substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Jihwey

    2014-02-24

    The crystal structures of LaAlO3 films grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrTiO3 substrates at oxygen pressure of 10−3 millibars or 10−5 millibars, where kinetics of ablated species hardly depend on oxygen background pressure, are compared. Our results show that the interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 is sharper when the oxygen pressure is lower. Over time, the formation of various crystalline phases is observed while the crystalline thickness of the LaAlO3 layer remains unchanged. X-ray scattering as well as atomic force microscopy measurements indicate three-dimensional growth of such phases, which appear to be fed from an amorphous capping layer present in as-grown samples.

  4. Raman spectroscopic measurements of CO2 density: Experimental calibration with high-pressure optical cell (HPOC) and fused silica capillary capsule (FSCC) with application to fluid inclusion observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Chou, I-Ming; Hu, W.; Burruss, Robert; Sun, Q.; Song, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful method for the determination of CO2 densities in fluid inclusions, especially for those with small size and/or low fluid density. The relationship between CO2 Fermi diad split (Δ, cm−1) and CO2 density (ρ, g/cm3) has been documented by several previous studies. However, significant discrepancies exist among these studies mainly because of inconsistent calibration procedures and lack of measurements for CO2fluids having densities between 0.21 and 0.75 g/cm3, where liquid and vapor phases coexist near room temperature.In this study, a high-pressure optical cell and fused silica capillary capsules were used to prepare pure CO2 samples with densities between 0.0472 and 1.0060 g/cm3. The measured CO2 Fermi diad splits were calibrated with two well established Raman bands of benzonitrile at 1192.6 and 1598.9 cm−1. The relationship between the CO2 Fermi diad split and density can be represented by: ρ = 47513.64243 − 1374.824414 × Δ + 13.25586152 × Δ2 − 0.04258891551 × Δ3(r2 = 0.99835, σ = 0.0253 g/cm3), and this relationship was tested by synthetic fluid inclusions and natural CO2-rich fluid inclusions. The effects of temperature and the presence of H2O and CH4 on this relationship were also examined.

  5. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of a solid in water: Effect of hydrostatic pressure on laser induced plasma, cavitation bubble and emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Claros, M.; Dell'Aglio, M.; Gaudiuso, R.; Santagata, A.; De Giacomo, A.; Fortes, F. J.; Laserna, J. J.

    2017-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the development of sensors use in exploration of the deep ocean. Techniques for the chemical analysis of submerged solids are of special interest, as they show promise for subsea mining applications where a rapid sorting of materials found in the sea bottom would improve efficiency. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) has demonstrated potential for this application thanks to its unique capability of providing the atomic composition of submerged solids. Here we present a study on the parameters that affect the spectral response of metallic targets in an oceanic pressure environment. Following laser excitation of the solid, the plasma persistence and the cavitation bubble size are considerably reduced as the hydrostatic pressure increases. These effects are of particular concern in dual pulse excitation as reported here, where a careful choice of the interpulse timing is required. Shadowgraphic images of the plasma demonstrate that cavitation bubbles are formed early after the plasma onset and that the effect of hydrostatic pressure is negligible during the early stage of plasma expansion. Contrarily to what is observed at atmospheric pressure, emission spectra observed at high pressures are characterized by self-absorbed atomic lines on continuum radiation resulting from strong radiative recombination in the electron-rich confined environment. This effect is much less evident with ionic lines due to the much higher energy of the levels involved and ionization energy of ions, as well as to the lower extent of absorption effects occurring in the inner part of the plasma, where ionized species are more abundant. As a result of the smaller shorter-lived cavitation bubble, the LIBS intensity enhancement resulting from dual pulse excitation is reduced when the applied pressure increases.

  6. Relative enhancement of near-UV emission from a pulsed low-pressure mercury discharge lamp, using a rare gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitsinelis, S [High Temperature Science Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7HF (United Kingdom); Devonshire, R [High Temperature Science Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7HF (United Kingdom); Jinno, M [High Temperature Science Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7HF (United Kingdom); Loo, K H [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Stone, D A [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Tozer, R C [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-21

    In this paper, we explain the physical reasons for the enhancement of near-UV and visible emissions from a low-pressure mercury-argon discharge under pulse drive conditions. The conditions of operation that maximize the enhancement of near-UV and visible radiation, including the effect of the buffer gas, are investigated. We show that for a pulsed discharge, electron-ion recombination followed by cascade radiative transitions is the process responsible for most of the 365 nm emission and that argon with a small admixture of krypton is the buffer gas composition that leads to maximum radiative emission due to near-resonant energy transfers to mercury high-lying levels.

  7. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugradt, Maik; Geissdoerfer, Kai; Goernig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2017-01-14

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations' vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway.

  8. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Pflugradt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG. Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations’ vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway.

  9. Effect modification by vitamin D receptor genetic polymorphisms in the association between cumulative lead exposure and pulse pressure: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhun, Min A; Hu, Howard; Schwartz, Joel; Weisskopf, Marc G; Nie, Linda H; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel S; Park, Sung Kyun

    2015-01-13

    Although the association between lead and cardiovascular disease is well established, potential mechanisms are still poorly understood. Calcium metabolism plays a role in lead toxicity and thus, vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms have been suggested to modulate the association between lead and health outcomes. We investigated effect modification by VDR genetic polymorphisms in the association between cumulative lead exposure and pulse pressure, a marker of arterial stiffness. We examined 727 participants (3,100 observations from follow-ups from 1991 to 2011) from the Normative Aging Study (NAS), a longitudinal study of aging. Tibia and patella bone lead levels were measured using K-x-ray fluorescence. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the VDR gene, Bsm1, Taq1, Apa1, and Fok1, were genotyped. Linear mixed effects models with random intercepts were implemented to take into account repeated measurements. Adjusting for potential confounders, pulse pressure was 2.5 mmHg (95% CI: 0.4-4.7) and 1.9 mmHg (95% CI: 0.1-3.8) greater per interquartile range (IQR) increase in tibia lead (15 μg/g) and patella lead (20 μg/g), respectively, in those with at least one minor frequency allele in Bsm1 compared with those with major frequency allele homozygotes. The observed interaction effect between bone lead and the Bsm1 genotype persists over time during the follow-up. Similar results were observed in effect modification by Taq1. This study suggests that subjects with the minor frequency alleles of VDR Bsm1 or Taq1 may be more susceptible to cumulative lead exposure-related elevated pulse pressure.

  10. Ambulatory Pulse Wave Velocity Is a Stronger Predictor of Cardiovascular Events and All-Cause Mortality Than Office and Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafidis, Pantelis A; Loutradis, Charalampos; Karpetas, Antonios; Tzanis, Georgios; Piperidou, Alexia; Koutroumpas, Georgios; Raptis, Vasilios; Syrgkanis, Christos; Liakopoulos, Vasilios; Efstratiadis, Georgios; London, Gérard; Zoccali, Carmine

    2017-07-01

    Arterial stiffness and augmentation of aortic blood pressure (BP) measured in office are known cardiovascular risk factors in hemodialysis patients. This study examines the prognostic significance of ambulatory brachial BP, central BP, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and heart rate-adjusted augmentation index [AIx(75)] in this population. A total of 170 hemodialysis patients underwent 48-hour ambulatory monitoring with Mobil-O-Graph-NG during a standard interdialytic interval and followed-up for 28.1±11.2 months. The primary end point was a combination of all-cause death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and nonfatal stroke. Secondary end points included: (1) all-cause mortality; (2) cardiovascular mortality; and (3) a combination of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, resuscitation after cardiac arrest, coronary revascularization, or hospitalization for heart failure. During follow-up, 37(21.8%) patients died and 46(27.1%) had cardiovascular events. Cumulative freedom from primary end point was similar for quartiles of predialysis-systolic BP (SBP), 48-hour peripheral-SBP, and central-SBP, but was progressively longer for increasing quartiles for 48-hour peripheral-diastolic BP and central-diastolic BP and shorter for increasing quartiles of 48-hour central pulse pressure (83.7%, 71.4%, 69.0%, 62.8% [log-rank P=0.024]), PWV (93.0%, 81.0%, 57.1%, 55.8% [log-rank Pambulatory PWV and AIx(75). In multivariate analysis, 48-hour PWV was the only vascular parameter independently associated with the primary end point (hazard ratios, 1.579; 95% confidence intervals, 1.187-2.102). Ambulatory PWV, AIx(75), and central pulse pressure are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality, whereas office and ambulatory SBP are not. These findings further support that arterial stiffness is the prominent cardiovascular risk factor in hemodialysis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Thermal regime of self-heated hollow cathode in a low-pressure high-current pulsed-periodic discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, N. V.; Emlin, D. R.

    2017-11-01

    We have studied the thermal regime of a self-heated hollow cathode in combined low-current (1-5 A) dc discharge and high-current (up to 100 A) pulsed-periodic discharge and the influence of the pulsed parameters on the current-voltage characteristic of the high-current discharge. It has been shown that, after the application of a voltage pulse (200-500 V), the discharge current attains its peak value and is stabilized over a time of 100 μs. The discharge voltage in the quasi-stationary discharge stage exceeds the continuous discharge voltage at the same current by many times and depends on the mean value of the current in the discharge gap. The interpretation of the form of the I-V characteristics of the pulsed discharge is based on the dynamics of heating and cooling of the cathode surface layer and on the variations in the integral temperature of the cathode.

  12. Characterization of chemical contaminants and their spectral properties from an atmospheric pressure ns-pulsed microdischarge in neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillerud, Colin H.; Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Moorman, Mathew; Yee, B. T.; Anderson, John; Pfeifer, Nathaniel B.; Hedberg, E. L.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2017-03-01

    Portable applications of microdischarges, such as the remediation of gaseous wastes or the destruction of volatile organic compounds, will mandate operation in the presence of contaminant species. This paper examines the temporal evolution of microdischarge optical and ultraviolet emissions during pulsed operation by experimental methods. By varying the pulse length of a microdischarge initiated in a 4-hole silicon microcavity array operating in a 655 Torr ambient primarily composed of Ne, we were able to measure the emission growth rates for different contaminant species native to the discharge environment as a function of pulse length. It was found that emission from hydrogen and oxygen impurities demonstrated similar rates of change, while emissions from molecular and atomic nitrogen, measured at 337.1 and 120 nm, respectively, exhibited the lowest rate of change. We conclude that it is likely that O2 undergoes the same resonant energy transfer process between rare gas excimers that has been shown for H2. Further, efficient resonant processes were found to be favored during ignition and extinction phases of the pulse, while emission at the 337.1 nm line from N2 was favored during the intermediate stage of the plasma. In addition to the experimental results, a zero-dimensional analysis is also presented to further understand the nature of the microdischarge.

  13. What does control debris-flow channel-bed erosion? A LiDAR-based change detection compared to velocity, momentum and pressure derived from a calibrated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Andreas; Krautblatter, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Erosion capacity and bedrock incision of debris flows are poorly understood. Here we present a unique study of a recent debris-flow event (06/2015) in the Allgaeu Alps (Germany). More than 50 terrestrial laser scan positions (TLS) of a mountain torrent (1.2 km) have been used to detect geomorphic change by comparing the new elevation model to an airborne laser scan (ALS) performed in 2007. It shows that the debris flow incised up to 4 m into the channel-bed, resulting in an erosion volume of 9.700 ± 1.600 m3 and a deposition volume of 1.200 ± 300 m3 in the channel. Errors were considered by a spatial variable threshold based on the point density of the ALS and TLS as well as the slopes of the DEMs. A numerical single-phase model (RAMMS Debris Flow) was carefully calibrated with detailed field data. The derived velocity, pressure and momentum of the model were compared to the geomorphic change. It shows that all three parameters explain erosion by more than 50 %. The results contribute to better define the possibilities and limitations of a combined TLS and ALS analysis for geomorphic change detection in complex terrain. The explanation of the erosion capacity with simulated parameters of a debris flow might be revolutionary for upcoming predictions of potential future debris-flow volumes.

  14. Gating of water channels (aquaporins) in cortical cells of young corn roots by mechanical stimuli (pressure pulses): effects of ABA and of HgCl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xianchong; Steudle, Ernst; Hartung, Wolfram

    2004-02-01

    Hydraulic properties (half-time of water exchange, T1/2, and hydraulic conductivity, Lp; T1/2 approximately 1/Lp) of individual cells in the cortex of young corn roots were measured using a cell pressure probe for up to 6 h to avoid variations between cells. When pulses of turgor pressure of different size were imposed, T1/2 (Lp) responded differently depending on the size. Pulses of smaller than 0.1 MPa, which induced a small proportional water flow, caused no changes in T1/2 (Lp). Medium-sized pulses of between 0.1 and 0.2 MPa caused an increase in T1/2 (decrease in Lp) by a factor of 4 to 23. The effects caused by medium-sized pulses were reversible within 5-20 min. When larger pulses of more than 0.2 MPa were employed, changes were not reversible within 1-3 h, but could be reversed within 30 min in the presence of 500 nM of the stress hormone ABA. Cells with a short T1/2 responded to the aquaporin blocker mercuric chloride (HgCl2). The treatment had no effect on cells which exhibited long T1/2 following a mechanical inhibition by the large-pulse treatment. Step decreases in pressure resulted in the same inhibition as step increases. Hence, the treatment did not cause a stretch-inhibition of water channels and was independent of the directions of both pressure changes and water flows induced by them. It is concluded that inhibition is caused by the absolute value of intensities of water flow within the channels, which increased in proportion to the size of step changes in pressure. Probable mechanisms by which the mechanical stimuli are perceived are (i) the input of kinetic energy to the channel constriction (NPA motif of aquaporin) which may cause a conformational change of the channel protein (energy-input model) or (ii) the creation of tensions at the constriction analogous to Bernoulli's principle for macroscopic pores (cohesion-tension model). Estimated rates of water flow within the pores were a few hundred micro m s-1, which is too small to create

  15. Comparison calibration of piezoresistive microphones for acoustic power measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Stockermans, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A calibration of two Endevco piezoresistive microphones was carried out under static and dynamics pressures. The dynamic pressure calibrations were done by comparison with a B&K condenser microphone. The calibration was carried out in a small closed volume in air and helium. In helium, the codes volume was pressurized to atmospheric pressure and then 10 Atm. The dynamic calibration would determine the "flatness" of the calibration ...

  16. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on structural and optical properties of pulsed laser deposited CaBi4Ti4O15 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emani, Sivanagi Reddy; Raju, K. C. James

    2017-03-01

    The influence of oxygen partial pressure (OPP) on the structural and optical properties of CaBi4Ti4O15 (CBTi) thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition have been investigated in the range of 0.1 mbar to 7.8 × 10-3 mbar. The structural properties show all the films are polycystlline in nature with orthorombic structure. The optical transmission of the films is in the range of 60-90%. A slight shift in transmission threshold towards higher wavelength region with an increase in O2 pressure reveals the systematic reduction in the optical band gap energy (3.69 to 3.59 eV) of the films. Raman studies confirm the phase formation and presence of stresses in the films. It is suggested that the OPP played a key role in controlling crystallinity, morphology, chemical composition and optical properties in CBTi thin films.

  17. Central pulse pressure is a determinant of heart and brain remodeling in the elderly: a quantitative MRI and PET pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Antoine; van der Gucht, Axel; Guedj, Eric; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Hossu, Gabriela; Mandry, Damien; Morel, Olivier; Perrin, Mathieu; Fay, Renaud; Benetos, Athanase; Joly, Laure

    2015-07-01

    The sustained elevation of blood pressure (BP) and especially of central pulse pressure (cPP) leads to heart and brain damage. This pilot study was aimed to precise the relationships between peripheral and central BP levels, and the remodeling of heart and brain as objectively quantified by cardiac MRI and brain F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET imaging in the elderly. Twenty-eight apparently healthy elderly individuals (66-85 years old, 14 women) were prospectively recruited and allocated into two half groups, one with and one without hypertension, and all were referred for the quantitative determinations of peripheral and central BP using applanation tonometry, indexed left ventricular mass (per m of body surface area) using cardiac MRI, and brain metabolism with a voxel-based analysis of FDG-PET images adjusted for age and sex. Indexed left ventricular mass, reflecting cardiac remodeling, was correlated with the overall pressure variables involving both peripheral and central levels of systolic and pulse pressure (all P ≤ 0.001). By contrast, brain metabolism was significantly correlated with only cPP (P < 0.02). A cPP of at least 50  mmHg was associated with both a lower metabolism in frontal areas (P = 0.005) and a higher indexed left ventricular mass (P = 0.03). This pilot study suggests that, when quantified by MRI and PET imaging, left ventricular mass and brain metabolism of elderly individuals are related to the cPP and to the 50  mmHg threshold, corresponding to what has previously been documented for the risk of cardiovascular event.

  18. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery's Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-Young; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Ku, Boncho; Bae, Jang Han; Un, Min-Ho; Kim, Jaeuk U; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery's pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. This study is a prospective, single-arm, exploratory clinical study. A total of 25 healthy participants, without regard to gender, in their twenties will be recruited by physicians. Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The participants will receive acupuncture once at ST36 on both sides. The radial arterial pulse waves will be measured on the left arm of the subjects by using an applicable pulse tonometric device (KIOM-PAS). On the right arm (appearing twice), electrocardiogram (ECG), photoplethysmogram (PPG), respiration and cardiac output (CO) signals, will be measured using a physiological data acquisition system (Biopac module), while the velocity of blood flow, and the diameter and the depth of the blood vessel will be measured using an ultrasonogram machine on the right arm (appearing twice). All measurements will be conducted before, during, and after acupuncture. The primary outcome will be the spectral energy at high frequencies above 10 Hz (SE10-30Hz) calculated from the KIOM-PAS device signal. Secondary outcomes will be various variables obtained from the KIOM-PAS device, ECG, PPG, impedance cardiography modules, and an ultrasonogram machine. The results of this trial will provide information regarding the physiological and the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying acupuncture stimulation and clinical evidence for the influence of acupuncture on the pressure pulse wave in the radial artery. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Kyung Hee University's Oriental Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (KOMCIRB-150818-HR-030). The study findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. This

  19. Effect of modest salt reduction on blood pressure, urinary albumin, and pulse wave velocity in white, black, and Asian mild hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng J; Marciniak, Maciej; Visagie, Elisabeth; Markandu, Nirmala D; Anand, Vidya; Dalton, R Neil; MacGregor, Graham A

    2009-09-01

    A reduction in salt intake lowers blood pressure. However, most previous trials were in whites with few in blacks and Asians. Salt reduction may also reduce other cardiovascular risk factors (eg, urinary albumin excretion, arterial stiffness). However, few well-controlled trials have studied these effects. We carried out a randomized double-blind crossover trial of salt restriction with slow sodium or placebo, each for 6 weeks, in 71 whites, 69 blacks, and 29 Asians with untreated mildly raised blood pressure. From slow sodium to placebo, urinary sodium was reduced from 165+/-58 (+/-SD) to 110+/-49 mmol/24 hours (9.7 to 6.5 g/d salt). With this reduction in salt intake, there was a significant decrease in blood pressure from 146+/-13/91+/-8 to 141+/-12/88+/-9 mm Hg (P<0.001), urinary albumin from 10.2 (IQR: 6.8 to 18.9) to 9.1 (6.6 to 14.0) mg/24 hours (P<0.001), albumin/creatinine ratio from 0.81 (0.47 to 1.43) to 0.66 (0.44 to 1.22) mg/mmol (P<0.001), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity from 11.5+/-2.3 to 11.1+/-1.9 m/s (P<0.01). Subgroup analysis showed that the reductions in blood pressure and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio were significant in all groups, and the decrease in pulse wave velocity was significant in blacks only. These results demonstrate that a modest reduction in salt intake, approximately the amount of the current public health recommendations, causes significant falls in blood pressure in all 3 ethnic groups. Furthermore, it reduces urinary albumin and improves large artery compliance. Although both could be attributable to the falls in blood pressure, they may carry additional benefits on reducing cardiovascular disease above that obtained from the blood pressure falls alone.

  20. Pulsed water jet generated by pulse multiplication

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvorský, R.; Sitek, Libor; Sochor, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2016), s. 959-967 ISSN 1330-3651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : high-pressure pulses * pulse intensifier * pulsed water jet * water hammer effect Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2016 http://hrcak.srce.hr/163752?lang=en

  1. Effects of pranayama on galvanic skin resistance (GSR, pulse, blood pressure in prehypertensive patients (JNC 7 who are not on treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhodi Dinesh K , Bhagat Sagar B , Karan Thakkar , Peshattiwar Aishwarya V, Arati Purnaye , Sarika Paradkar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Psychological stress, in this era of urbanization, has become a part and parcel of our lives and has lead to serious problem affecting different life situation and carries a wide range of health related disorders. Aims & Objective: To observe the effects of Pranayama on GSR. Pulse rate and blood pressure. Material & Method: This was an open labeled, prospective, uncontrolled, single centered, single arm, comparative, clinical intervention study conducted in the Department of Pharmacology, Grant Govt. Medical College, Mumbai, over a period of two months period August-September 2009 on 15 Prehypertensive subjects. Results: A total of 15 subjects who were Borderline hypertensive / Pre-Hypertensive, according to the JNC VII Classification, were enrolled in the study. Of which 10 were male and 5 were females, all in the age group of 22-35 yrs with a BMI of 19.63 – 30.11 with an average of 24.80. No significant change was seen when baseline GSR reading was compared with 15th day reading, but on 30th day significant change observed. When the baseline value of pulse was compared with that of the 15th and 30th day, a good positive change was seen in resting pulse. Similarly, BP recording also showed a good positive effect when baseline value was compared with that 15th and 30th day. Conclusion: The study concludes that practicing Pranayama on a regular basis increases the parasympathetic tone and blunts the sympathetic tone of the body. This has shown good beneficial effects on the Pulse, BP and GSR.

  2. Site Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    This Site Calibration report is describing the results of a measured site calibration for a site in Denmark. The calibration is carried out by DTU Wind Energy in accordance with Ref.[3] and Ref.[4]. The measurement period is given. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance...... measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio between the wind speed at the center of the turbine hub and at the met mast. The wind speed at the turbine is measured by a temporary mast placed at the foundation for the turbine. The site and measurement equipment...

  3. Calibration uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Anglov, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Methods recommended by the International Standardization Organisation and Eurachem are not satisfactory for the correct estimation of calibration uncertainty. A novel approach is introduced and tested on actual calibration data for the determination of Pb by ICP-AES. The improved calibration...... uncertainty was verified from independent measurements of the same sample by demonstrating statistical control of analytical results and the absence of bias. The proposed method takes into account uncertainties of the measurement, as well as of the amount of calibrant. It is applicable to all types...

  4. Enhanced oxygen dissociation in a propagating constricted discharge formed in a self-pulsing atmospheric pressure microplasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Daniel; Burhenn, Sebastian; Kirchheim, Dennis; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker

    2013-11-01

    We report on the propagation of a constricted discharge feature in a repetitively self-pulsing microplasma jet operated in helium with a 0.075 vol% molecular oxygen admixture in ambient air environment. The constricted discharge is about 1 mm in width and repetitively ignites at the point of smallest electrode distance in a wedge-shaped electrode configuration, propagates through the discharge channel towards the nozzle, extinguishes, and re-ignites at the inlet at frequencies in the kHz range. It co-exists with a homogeneous, volume-dominated low temperature (T ⋍ 300 K) α-mode glow. Time-resolved measurements of nitrogen molecule C-state and nitrogen molecule ion B-state emission bands reveal an increase of the rotational temperature within the constricted discharge to about 600 K within 50 µs. Its propagation velocity was determined by phase-resolved diagnostics to be similar to the gas velocity, in the order of 40 m s-1. Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy synchronized to the self-pulsing reveals spatial regions of increased oxygen atom densities co-propagating with the constricted discharge feature. The generated oxygen pulse density is about ten times higher than in the co-existing homogeneous α-mode. Densities reach about 1.5 × 1016 cm-3 at average temperatures of 450 K at the nozzle. This enhanced dissociation of about 80% is attributed to the continuous interaction of the constricted discharge to the co-propagating gas volume.

  5. A Description of a New Continuous Physiologic Index in TBI using the Correlation Between Pulse Amplitude of ICP and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick Adam; Donnelly, Joseph; Menon, David; Smieleweski, Peter; Hutchinson, Peter John; Czosnyka, Marek

    2017-12-06

    To describe a new continuous index of physiologic measurement in a TBI population, the moving correlation coefficient between intracranial pressure (ICP) pulse amplitude (AMP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which we refer to as RAC. We use patient examples of sustained intracranial hypertension, systemic arterial hypotension and plateau waves, as well as the retrospective analysis of 358 non-decompressive craniectomy (DC) traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with high frequency ICP and ABP data, to explore the relationships of this new index, RAC, with AMP, ICP, CPP, RAP, pressure reactivity index (PRx) and pulse amplitude index (PAx). We compared the RAC-CPP relationship to that observed between CPP and both PRx and PAx. RAC displays temporal responsiveness to sustained increased ICP, arterial hypotension and plateau waves, with positive values found during episodes of high ICP and low CPP. Analysis of AMP versus CPP and AMP versus ICP relationships in data from the entire non-DC cohort, show lower breakpoints for AMP/CPP at CPP= 40 mm Hg; and upper breakpoints for AMP/ICP at ICP=50 to 60 mm Hg. RAC trends to positive values with increasing ICP, particularly with ICP values above the peak in AMP (ICP>50 mm Hg), though it's interpretation requires concomitant interpretation of AMP, RAP and PRx/PAx to determine contributions of compliance and cerebrovascular responsiveness to the changes seen in RAC. There is a parabolic relationship between RAC vs. CPP, with trends towards positive RAC values near (and beyond) limits for low and high CPPs, suggesting that RAC may be used in the determination of optimum CPP (CPPopt). RAC appears to carry information regarding both: cerebrovascular responsiveness and cerebral compliance. This contributes to RAC's uniqueness and complex interpretation. Further prospective clinical studies of RAC in CPP optimum estimation and outcome prediction in TBI are required.

  6. Continuous-Flow Inlet Systems for Low Pressure Curie-Point Pyrolysis. Introduction of Pulse-Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Carlsen, Lars

    1984-01-01

    With emphasis on a constant reactant flow, a series of inlet systems for gas-phase Curie-point pyrolysis—mass spectrometry experiments have been studied. Inlet systems for the handling of gaseous, liquid and oligomeric (solid) samples have been designed and their performances evaluated. The princ......With emphasis on a constant reactant flow, a series of inlet systems for gas-phase Curie-point pyrolysis—mass spectrometry experiments have been studied. Inlet systems for the handling of gaseous, liquid and oligomeric (solid) samples have been designed and their performances evaluated....... The principle of pulse-pyrolysis is introduced and its applicability to kinetic studies outlined....

  7. Experimental and modeling study of the oxidation of acetaldehyde in an atmospheric-pressure pulsed corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, C.; Touchard, S.; Vega-Gonzalez, A.; Redolfi, M.; Bonnin, X.; Hassouni, K.; Duten, X.

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports the results obtained for the degradation of acetaldehyde by an atmospheric plasma corona discharge working in a pulsed regime. It was shown that a few hundred ppm of acetaldehyde diluted in a pure N2 gas flow can be removed up to 80% by a discharge fed with an electric power lower than 1 W. Under the same conditions, adding up to 5% of O2 allowed the removal of up to 95% of the initial acetaldehyde. The main identified end products were CO2, CO and methanol. A quasi-homogeneous zero-dimensional chemical model was developed to investigate the respective efficiency of the discharge and post-discharge periods in the global removal of the pollutant. The identified main pathways of acetaldehyde degradation were quenching of N2 metastable states during plasma pulses and oxidation by O and OH radicals during the post-discharge. This latter contribution increased with input power because of ozone accumulation in the gas mixture acting as an additional oxygen reservoir.

  8. GPI Calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.

    2017-09-01

    "The Gemini Planet Imager requires a large set of Calibrations. These can be split into two major sets, one set associated with each observation and one set related to biweekly calibrations. The observation set is to optimize the correction of miscroshifts in the IFU spectra and the latter set is for correction of detector and instrument cosmetics."

  9. Dual factor pulse pressure: body mass index and outcome in type 2 diabetic subjects on maintenance  hemodialysis. A longitudinal study 2003–2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Foucan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Lydia Foucan1,2, Kheira Hue3, Jocelyn Inamo1, Jacqueline Deloumeaux1,2, Anne Blanchet-Deverly, et al1Research group Clinical Epidemiology and Medicine of the University of Antilles and Guyane, French West Indies; 2Department of Medical Information and Public Health; 3Nephrology and hemodialysis Unit; 4Cardiology Unit, CHU of Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe, French West Indies; 5Hemodialysis Unit, Clinic of Choisy Sainte Anne, Guadeloupe, French West IndiesBackground: Inverse associations between risk factors and mortality have been reported in epidemiological studies of patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD.Objective: The aim of this prospective study was to estimate the effect of the dual variable pulse pressure (PP – body mass index (BMI on cardiovascular (CV events and death in type 2 diabetic (T2D subjects on MHD in a Caribbean population.Methods: Eighty Afro-Caribbean T2D patients on MHD were studied prospectively from 2003 to 2006. Proportional-hazard modeling was used.Results: Of all, 23.8% had a high PP (PP ≥ 75th percentile, 76.3% had BMI < 30 Kg/m2, 21.3% had the dual factor high PP – absence of obesity. During the study period, 23 patients died and 13 CV events occurred. In the presence of the dual variable and after adjustment for age, gender, duration of MHD, and pre-existing CV complications, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR (95% CI of CV events and death were respectively 2.7 (0.8–8.3; P = 0.09 and 2.4 (1.1–5.9; P = 0.04.Conclusions: The dual factor, high PP – absence of obesity, is a prognosis factor of outcome. In type 2 diabetics on MHD, a specific management strategy should be proposed in nonobese subjects with wide pulse pressure in order to decrease or prevent the incidence of fatal and nonfatal events.Keywords: dual factor, pulse pressure, body mass index, type 2 diabetes, outcome

  10. Pulse oximetry: fundamentals and technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitzan M

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meir Nitzan,1 Ayal Romem,2 Robert Koppel31Department of Physics/Electro-Optics, Jerusalem College of Technology, Jerusalem, Israel; 2Pulmonary Institute, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; 3Neonatal/Perinatal Medicine, Cohen Children's Medical Center of New York/North Shore-LIJ Health System, New Hyde Park, NY, United StatesAbstract: Oxygen saturation in the arterial blood (SaO2 provides information on the adequacy of respiratory function. SaO2 can be assessed noninvasively by pulse oximetry, which is based on photoplethysmographic pulses in two wavelengths, generally in the red and infrared regions. The calibration of the measured photoplethysmographic signals is performed empirically for each type of commercial pulse-oximeter sensor, utilizing in vitro measurement of SaO2 in extracted arterial blood by means of co-oximetry. Due to the discrepancy between the measurement of SaO2 by pulse oximetry and the invasive technique, the former is denoted as SpO2. Manufacturers of pulse oximeters generally claim an accuracy of 2%, evaluated by the standard deviation (SD of the differences between SpO2 and SaO2, measured simultaneously in healthy subjects. However, an SD of 2% reflects an expected error of 4% (two SDs or more in 5% of the examinations, which is in accordance with an error of 3%–4%, reported in clinical studies. This level of accuracy is sufficient for the detection of a significant decline in respiratory function in patients, and pulse oximetry has been accepted as a reliable technique for that purpose. The accuracy of SpO2 measurement is insufficient in several situations, such as critically ill patients receiving supplemental oxygen, and can be hazardous if it leads to elevated values of oxygen partial pressure in blood. In particular, preterm newborns are vulnerable to retinopathy of prematurity induced by high oxygen concentration in the blood. The low accuracy of SpO2 measurement in critically ill patients and newborns

  11. Structure and magnetic properties of ZnO films doped with Co, Ni or Mn synthesized by pulsed laser deposition under low and high oxygen partial pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivin, J.C. [CSNSM, Bat. 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)], E-mail: pivin@csnsm.in2p3.fr; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics Lasers Department, Laser-Surface-Plasma Interactions Laboratory, PO Box MG-54, RO-77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Berthet, P. [LPCES-ICMMO, UMR8182-CNRS, Bat.410, Universite Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Singh, F. [CSNSM, Bat. 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box 10502, New Delhi, 110067 (India); Patel, M.K. [CSNSM, Bat. 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); High Pressure Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Purnima, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Vincent, L. [CSNSM, Bat. 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2008-11-28

    Zn{sub 1-} {sub x}M{sub x}O (M = Co, Ni, Mn) films with different concentrations of transition metal (10-30%) were synthesized by pulsed laser deposition. The substrates were heated at 400 deg. C and the depositions were performed either under secondary vacuum or under an oxygen pressure of 30 Pa. The occurrence of ion channeling in the films during Rutherford Backscattering Analysis, together with X-ray diffraction, optical absorption and transmission electron microscopy, clearly show that the M atoms are in solid solution on Zn sites. Magnetic properties were investigated by means of magnetometry at 5 and 300 K and Electron Spin Resonance. The Zn{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O and Zn{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O films deposited under low O{sub 2} pressure exhibit both a ferromagnetic and a paramagnetic response up to 300 K, while films deposited under high O{sub 2} pressure and Zn{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}O films are paramagnetic. Broad spin resonance peaks are recorded at room temperature, from ferromagnetic films only. The nearly isotropic magnetic response of these films, which is observed in ESR when varying the field orientation with respect to the surface, seems to indicate that the crystalline anisotropy oppose the shape anisotropy, because of the strong [001] texture of the films.

  12. Effect of laser fluence and ambient gas pressure on surface morphology and chemical composition of hydroxyapatite thin films deposited using pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Tsukasa; Miyake, Akiko; Tashiro, Yuichiro; Komasa, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Yoshiya

    2018-01-01

    The dependence of the surface morphology and chemical composition of hydroxyapatite (HA) thin films on the laser fluence and ambient gas pressure during their formation by pulsed laser deposition was studied as the first step to investigate the effect of physical and chemical interactions between the ablated chemical species and ambient gas molecules on HA film formation. It was found that a higher fluence could decrease the number of large protrusions on the surface of HA thin films. However, too high a fluence caused a phosphorus deficiency from the stoichiometric value, particularly in the case of lower ambient gas pressure. It was also found that for lower fluences, the atomic species among the ablated chemical species were easily scattered by collision processes with ambient gas molecules. This was caused by the lower velocity of the ablated chemical species and higher ambient gas pressure, which induced a shorter mean free path. In addition, these collision processes played an important role in the adsorption, migration, and re-evaporation of the ablated chemical species on the substrate via chemical reactions.

  13. Pulse Wave Velocity as Marker of Preclinical Arterial Disease: Reference Levels in a Uruguayan Population Considering Wave Detection Algorithms, Path Lengths, Aging, and Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Farro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV has emerged as the gold standard for non-invasive evaluation of aortic stiffness; absence of standardized methodologies of study and lack of normal and reference values have limited a wider clinical implementation. This work was carried out in a Uruguayan (South American population in order to characterize normal, reference, and threshold levels of PWV considering normal age-related changes in PWV and the prevailing blood pressure level during the study. A conservative approach was used, and we excluded symptomatic subjects; subjects with history of cardiovascular (CV disease, diabetes mellitus or renal failure; subjects with traditional CV risk factors (other than age and gender; asymptomatic subjects with atherosclerotic plaques in carotid arteries; patients taking anti-hypertensives or lipid-lowering medications. The included subjects (n=429 were categorized according to the age decade and the blood pressure levels (at study time. All subjects represented the “reference population”; the group of subjects with optimal/normal blood pressures levels at study time represented the “normal population.” Results. Normal and reference PWV levels were obtained. Differences in PWV levels and aging-associated changes were obtained. The obtained data could be used to define vascular aging and abnormal or disease-related arterial changes.

  14. Pulse Pressure and Upstroke Time Are Useful Parameters for the Diagnosis of Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Normal Ankle Brachial Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Shunsuke; Hisatake, Shinji; Watanabe, Ippei; Toda, Mikihito; Kabuki, Takayuki; Oka, Takashi; Dobashi, Shintaro; Ikeda, Takanori

    2016-10-01

    Some peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients have normal ankle brachial index (ABI) (0.9 - 1.4), although ABI is a useful parameter for the diagnosis of PAD. We investigated whether other parameters of ABI report sheet are useful to detect these patients. We initially enrolled 3,912 patients (7,824 limbs) who underwent ABI for the first time. Subjects who have normal ABI were divided into the PAD group (n = 136) and the non-PAD group (n = 240) by lower extremity ultrasonography. We investigated blood pressures (BP) (systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), mean (mBP) and pulse pressure (PP)), heart rate, upstroke time (UT), and %mean arterial pressure (%MAP). SBP, mBP, PP, UT, and %MAP in the PAD group were significantly higher. A multivariate analysis showed that mBP, DBP, PP, UT and %MAP were independently associated with the presence of PAD (mBP: odds ratio (OR) 2.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22 - 4.37, P = 0.010; DBP: OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.28 - 0.97, P = 0.039; PP: OR 1.30, 95% CI 0.69 - 2.46, P = 0.041; UT: OR 3.40, 95% CI 2.03 - 5.83, P normal ABI. The measurement of BPs could provide additional information for the diagnosis of PAD.

  15. Size-controlled growth of ZnO nanowires by catalyst-free high-pressure pulsed laser deposition and their optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Z. Liu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Single crystalline ZnO nanowires were fabricated on Si (100 substrates by catalyst-free high-pressure pulsed laser deposition. It is found that the nanowires start to form when the substrate temperature and growth pressure exceed the critical values of 700 oC and 700 Pa, and their size strongly depends on these growth conditions. That is, the aspect ratio of the nanowires decreases with increasing temperature or decreasing pressure. Such a size dependence on growth conditions was discussed in terms of surface migration and scattering of ablated atoms. Room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of ZnO nanowires shows a dominant near-band-edge emission peak at 3.28 eV and a visible emission band centered at 2.39 eV. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence studies reveal that the former consists of the acceptor-bound exciton and free exciton emissions; while the latter varies in intensity with the aspect ratio of the nanowires and is attributed to the surface-mediated deep level emission.

  16. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  17. Changes of dayside auroral distribution caused by a solar wind pressure pulse and associated interplanetary magnetic field disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kozlovsky

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Global auroral images from the IMAGE satellite were used to study statistically changes of the dayside aurora spatial distribution after an abrupt solar wind pressure increase, or so-called "Sudden Impulse" (SI. Contributions from IMF changes associated with a SI were also investigated. The effects of the IMF and pressure variations were separated using a multi-factor correlation analysis. The first prominent effect due to pressure increase is the auroral intensification equatorward of the middle dayside oval within 6 min after a SI occurred. This is consistent with the midday sub-auroral patches. The second effect due to pressure increase is the auroral intensification at high latitudes in the vicinity of the polar cap boundary. For the first 6 min the auroral intensification is most prominent in the postnoon sector. Later on (6–20 min the intensification occurs in the prenoon sector. The most obvious effect of IMF changes is the "IMF By" effect, an intensification (fading of the most poleward auroral forms when IMF By becomes negative (positive. This effect occurs 6–20 min after changes in the interplanetary medium. Such an effect is consistent with the IMF By-related system of field-aligned currents. No significant motion of the dayside auroral oval was observed associated with IMF Bz variations. This can be explained by a response time to IMF Bz changes larger than 20 min.

  18. Calibrated heat-pulse method for the assessment of maize water uptake Desenvolvimento do método do "pulso de calor" para determinação da absorção hídrica em milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Odair Santos

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant water requirements are important aspects of crop production to be determined in the field, in order to judiciously manage crop water usage. Water uptake by field grown maize (Zea mays L., under well-watered conditions was verified with the heat-pulse system. The temperature difference between two radially inserted thermocouples, one 9 mm above and the other 4 mm below a heater piercing the maize stem, was measured every 0.3 seconds following emission of a heat-pulse. Comparisons of the heat-pulse system outputs, lysimetric measurement and transpiration model estimates were monitored on an hourly and daily basis. At normal and low atmospheric demand daily and hourly values of heat-pulse outputs and lysimetric measurement showed good agreement. Hourly agreement of a modified Penman-Monteith energy balance equation estimate and heat-pulse outputs showed accordance between measurement of sap flow and the plant water-loss theory. Study of the relationship between maize canopy water loss rate and heat velocity in the stem showed that these two parameters were proportional and a calibration factor of 1.51 for full soil foliage coverage was verified.A determinação a campo das necessidades hídricas de plantas é um aspecto importante da produção agrícola, para o manejo correto do uso da água pelos cultivos. A absorção de água por uma cultura de milho (Zea mays L., cultivado a campo, em condições de não limitação hídrica, foi verificada através da técnica do pulso de calor. Após a emissão de um pulso, procedeu-se a medições, a cada 0,3 segundos, do diferencial de temperatura entre dois termopares, inseridos radialmente no caule da planta. O primeiro foi colocado 9 mm acima e o segundo 4 mm abaixo de uma fonte de calor ("heater". Foram feitas comparações entre as medições feitas pela técnica do pulso de calor, lisímetro e estimativas da transpiração computadas em modelo, numa base horária e diária. Comparações entre

  19. Randomized Comparison of the Therapeutic Effect of Acupuncture, Massage, and Tachibana-Style-Method on Stiff Shoulders by Measuring Muscle Firmness, VAS, Pulse, and Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Tachibana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To compare the therapeutic efficacy of acupuncture, massage, and Tachibana-Ryojutsu (one of Japanese traditional body balance therapy techniques (SEITAI, on stiff shoulders, the subjects’ muscle firmness, blood pressure, pulse, VAS, and body temperature were measured before and after the treatment. Forty-seven volunteer subjects gave written informed consent to participate in this study. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups to receive acupuncture, massage, or Tachibana-Ryojutsu. Each therapy lasted for 90 seconds. The acupuncture treatment was applied by a retaining-needle at GB-21, massage was conducted softly on the shoulders, and Tachibana-Ryojutsu treated only the muscles and joints from the legs to buttocks without touching the shoulders or backs. The study indicated that the muscle firmness and VAS of the Tachibana-Ryojutsu group decreased significantly in comparison with the acupuncture and massage groups after treatment.

  20. Radial artery pulse pressure variation correlates with brachial artery peak velocity variation in ventilated subjects when measured by internal medicine residents using hand-carried ultrasound devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, J Matthew; Blair, John E A; Hampole, Chetan; Goonewardena, Sascha; Vasaiwala, Samip; Shah, Dipak; Spencer, Kirk T; Schmidt, Gregory A

    2007-05-01

    Rapid prediction of the effect of volume expansion is crucial in unstable patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Both radial artery pulse pressure variation (DeltaPP) and change of aortic blood flow peak velocity are accurate predictors but may be impractical point-of-care tools. We sought to determine whether respiratory changes in the brachial artery blood flow velocity (DeltaVpeak-BA) as measured by internal medicine residents using a hand-carried ultrasound (HCU) device could provide an accurate corollary to DeltaPP in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Thirty patients passively receiving volume-control ventilation with preexisting radial artery catheters were enrolled. The brachial artery Doppler signal was recorded and analyzed by blinded internal medicine residents using a HCU device. Simultaneous radial artery pulse wave and central venous pressure recordings (when available) were analyzed by a blinded critical care physician. A Doppler signal was obtained in all 30 subjects. The DeltaVpeak-BA correlated well with DeltaPP (r = 0.84) with excellent agreement (weighted kappa, 0.82) and limited intraobserver variability (2.8 +/- 2.8%) [mean +/- SD]. A DeltaVpeak-BA cutoff of 16% was highly predictive of DeltaPP > or = 13% (sensitivity, 91%; specificity, 95%). A poor correlation existed between the CVP and both DeltaVpeak-BA (r = - 0.21) and DeltaPP (r = - 0.16). The HCU Doppler assessment of the DeltaVpeak-BA as performed by internal medicine residents is a rapid, noninvasive bedside correlate to DeltaPP, and a DeltaVpeak-BA cutoff of 16% may prove useful as a point-of-care tool for the prediction of volume responsiveness in patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

  1. Influence of the oxygen pressure on the physical properties of the pulsed-laser deposited Te doped SnO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan y Diaz, E., E-mail: enrique.chan@cimav.edu.m [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra 120, Complejo industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109 (Mexico); Camacho, Juan M. [Applied Physics Department, CINVESTAV-IPN, Unidad Merida, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Duarte-Moller, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra 120, Complejo industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109 (Mexico); Castro-Rodriguez, R.; Bartolo-Perez, P. [Applied Physics Department, CINVESTAV-IPN, Unidad Merida, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2010-10-22

    Tellurium doped tin oxide (Te:SnO{sub 2}) thin films were prepared by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) on glass substrates at different oxygen pressures, and the effects of oxygen pressure on the physical properties of as-grown and post-annealed Te:SnO{sub 2} films were investigated. The as-grown films deposited between 1.0 and 50 mTorr showed some evidence of diffraction peaks, with electrical resistivity of {approx}8 x 10{sup 1} {Omega} cm, but increasing the oxygen pressure up to 100 mTorr, three diffraction peaks (1 1 0), (1 0 1) and (2 1 1) were observed containing the SnO{sub 2} tetragonal structure, at 100 mTorr the electrical resistivity decreased abruptly at minimum value of 4 x 10{sup -2} {Omega} cm, and increased reaching values of {approx}4 x 10{sup -1} {Omega} cm. The optical transmittance of the films increased with increasing oxygen pressure and high transmittance ({approx}87%) in VIS region by the films prepared at 100 mTorr and higher. The band gap of as-grown films was {approx}3.5 eV corresponding at of the SnO{sub 2}. After of post-annealed at 500 {sup o}C at atmospheric pressure for 30 min all films showed crystallization, and notable electrical resistivity changes were observed. The carrier density increased monotonically in the range of oxygen pressure between 1.0 and 100 mTorr, reaching values of {approx}2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, then, it decreased abruptly in films grown at 125 mTorr. While the mobility of the free-carrier decreased in the range of oxygen pressure between 1.0 and 100 mTorr, reaching minimum values of {approx}5.8 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The optical transmittance showed similar characteristic like the as-grown films. The figure of merit at 100 mTorr of as-grown films had value {approx}1.2 x 10{sup -5} {Omega}{sup -1}, and for post-annealed films at 100 mTorr the figure of merit was similar {approx}1.7 x 10{sup -6} {Omega}{sup -1}, indicating they were the better films.

  2. Changes of dayside auroral distribution caused by a solar wind pressure pulse and associated interplanetary magnetic field disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kozlovsky

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Global auroral images from the IMAGE satellite were used to study statistically changes of the dayside aurora spatial distribution after an abrupt solar wind pressure increase, or so-called "Sudden Impulse" (SI. Contributions from IMF changes associated with a SI were also investigated. The effects of the IMF and pressure variations were separated using a multi-factor correlation analysis. The first prominent effect due to pressure increase is the auroral intensification equatorward of the middle dayside oval within 6 min after a SI occurred. This is consistent with the midday sub-auroral patches. The second effect due to pressure increase is the auroral intensification at high latitudes in the vicinity of the polar cap boundary. For the first 6 min the auroral intensification is most prominent in the postnoon sector. Later on (6–20 min the intensification occurs in the prenoon sector. The most obvious effect of IMF changes is the "IMF By" effect, an intensification (fading of the most poleward auroral forms when IMF By becomes negative (positive. This effect occurs 6–20 min after changes in the interplanetary medium. Such an effect is consistent with the IMF By-related system of field-aligned currents. No significant motion of the dayside auroral oval was observed associated with IMF Bz variations. This can be explained by a response time to IMF Bz changes larger than 20 min.

  3. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure. Progress report, November 29, 1990--November 25, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyring, E.M.

    1991-11-25

    A high pressure apparatus constructed for measuring the rates of reactions in liquids under pressures ranging from 1 atm to 2000 atm has been used to measure the complexation kinetics of molybdenum hexacarbonyl reacting with 2,2-bipyridine, 4,4{prime}-dimethyl-2-2{prime}-bipyridine and 4,4{prime}-diphenyl-2-2{prime} bipyridine in toluene. Pentacarbonyl reaction intermediates are created by a 10 nsec flash of frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser light. Measured activation volumes for chelate ligand ring closure indicate a change in mechanism from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as steric hindrance increases. A similar high pressure kinetics study of molybdenum carbonyl complexation by several substituted phenanthrolines is now well advanced that indicates that with the more rigid phenanthroline ligands steric effects from bulky substituents have less effect on the ring closure mechanism than in the case of the bipyridine ligands. An experimental concentration dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield of cresyl violet has been harmonized with previously published contradictory reports. Fluorescence of cresyl violet in various solvents and in micellar systems has also been systematically explored.

  4. Influence of surrounding gas, composition and pressure on plasma plume dynamics of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced aluminum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S. Dawood

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a comprehensive study of the plume dynamics of plasmas generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target. The effect of both ambient gas composition (helium, nitrogen or argon and pressure (from ∼5 × 10−7 Torr up to atmosphere is studied. The time- and space- resolved observation of the plasma plume are performed from spectrally integrated images using an intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD camera. The iCCD images show that the ambient gas does not significantly influence the plume as long as the gas pressure is lower than 20 Torr and the time delay below 300 ns. However, for pressures higher than 20 Torr, the effect of the ambient gas becomes important, the shortest plasma plume length being observed when the gas mass species is highest. On the other hand, space- and time- resolved emission spectroscopy of aluminum ions at λ = 281.6 nm are used to determine the Time-Of-Flight (TOF profiles. The effect of the ambient gas on the TOF profiles and therefore on the propagation velocity of Al ions is discussed. A correlation between the plasma plume expansion velocity deduced from the iCCD images and that estimated from the TOF profiles is presented. The observed differences are attributed mainly to the different physical mechanisms governing the two diagnostic techniques.

  5. On the pressure effect in energetic deposition of Cu thin films by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering: A global plasma model and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, B. C.; Meng, D.; Che, H. L.; Lei, M. K.

    2015-05-01

    The modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) discharge processes are numerically modeled and experimentally investigated, in order to explore the effect of the pressure on MPPMS discharges as well as on the microstructure of the deposited thin films. A global plasma model has been developed based on a volume-averaged global description of the ionization region, considering the loss of electrons by cross-B diffusion. The temporal variations of internal plasma parameters at different pressures from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa are obtained by fitting the model to duplicate the experimental discharge data, and Cu thin films are deposited by MPPMS at the corresponding pressures. The surface morphology, grain size and orientation, and microstructure of the deposited thin films are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. By increasing the pressure from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa, both the ion bombardment energy and substrate temperature which are estimated by the modeled plasma parameters decrease, corresponding to the observed transition of the deposited thin films from a void free structure with a wide distribution of grain size (zone T) into an underdense structure with a fine fiber texture (zone 1) in the extended structure zone diagram (SZD). The microstructure and texture transition of Cu thin films are well-explained by the extended SZD, suggesting that the primary plasma processes are properly incorporated in the model. The results contribute to the understanding of the characteristics of MPPMS discharges, as well as its correlation with the microstructure and texture of deposited Cu thin films.

  6. On the pressure effect in energetic deposition of Cu thin films by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering: A global plasma model and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, B. C.; Meng, D.; Che, H. L.; Lei, M. K., E-mail: mklei@dlut.edu.cn [Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-05-28

    The modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) discharge processes are numerically modeled and experimentally investigated, in order to explore the effect of the pressure on MPPMS discharges as well as on the microstructure of the deposited thin films. A global plasma model has been developed based on a volume-averaged global description of the ionization region, considering the loss of electrons by cross-B diffusion. The temporal variations of internal plasma parameters at different pressures from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa are obtained by fitting the model to duplicate the experimental discharge data, and Cu thin films are deposited by MPPMS at the corresponding pressures. The surface morphology, grain size and orientation, and microstructure of the deposited thin films are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. By increasing the pressure from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa, both the ion bombardment energy and substrate temperature which are estimated by the modeled plasma parameters decrease, corresponding to the observed transition of the deposited thin films from a void free structure with a wide distribution of grain size (zone T) into an underdense structure with a fine fiber texture (zone 1) in the extended structure zone diagram (SZD). The microstructure and texture transition of Cu thin films are well-explained by the extended SZD, suggesting that the primary plasma processes are properly incorporated in the model. The results contribute to the understanding of the characteristics of MPPMS discharges, as well as its correlation with the microstructure and texture of deposited Cu thin films.

  7. Pulse pressure and michigan neuropathy screening instrument are independently associated with asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease among type 2 diabetes community residents: A community-based screening program in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chi Fan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is one of the major manifestations of systemic atherosclerosis and plays an important role in low-extremity amputation in type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and risk factors for asymptomatic PAD in type 2 diabetic community residents. Methods: This cross-sectional study enrolled 552 type 2 diabetic adults (232 men and 320 women without subjective symptoms of intermittent claudication. We defined the PAD group as an ankle-brachial index (ABI ≤ 0.90, and the normal group as an ABI 0.91-1.30. Their clinical characteristics, Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI scores and blood pressure were compared. Results: We discovered that 51 patients have asymptomatic PAD. Univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age, history of stroke, longer duration of diabetes (> 10 years, unemployment or retirement, pulse pressure, systolic blood pressure, and high MNSI score (> 2 were risk factors for PAD. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, pulse pressure, high MNSI score, age, and history of stroke were independent risk factors with odds ratios (95% confidence intervals, CI of 1.032 (1.012-1.053, 2.359 (1.274-4.370, 1.050 (1.010-1.091, and 5.152 (1.985-13.368, respectively. Furthermore, the prevalence of PAD increased significantly with increment in the pulse pressure and MNSI. Conclusions: In summary, the overall prevalence of asymptomatic PAD in the type 2 diabetic adults was 9.2%. Age, history of stroke, pulse pressure and MNSI score may provide important clinical information. Primary care physicians should be aware of asymptomatic patients with high pulse pressure and MNSI scores.

  8. Biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction as predictors of pulse pressure and incident hypertension in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Isabel; Hovind, Peter; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2018-01-01

    equations including adjustments for age, sex, smoking status, BMI, HbA1c, serum creatinine, total cholesterol, urinary AER, insulin treatment dose and mean arterial pressure. RESULTS: Increases were noted in all biomarkers except sE-selectin, which decreased over time. Levels differed from baseline at 2...... investigated the longitudinal associations between BP or hypertension as determinants of subsequent (changes in) levels of CRP, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and sE-selectin, but did not find evidence to support a reverse causality hypothesis. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: These findings support the involvement of vascular...

  9. Reference values of one-point carotid stiffness parameters determined by carotid echo-tracking and brachial pulse pressure in a large population of healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriz, Olga; Aboyans, Victor; Minisini, Rosalba; Magne, Julien; Bertin, Nicole; Pirisi, Mario; Bossone, Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    Arterial stiffness can predict cardiovascular events, and the aim of this study was to produce age- and sex-specific reference values for echo-tracking carotid stiffness in healthy subjects. A total of 900 subjects (500 males, mean age 45.8±19 years) were enrolled. Common carotid artery stiffness and compliance, using a high-definition echo-tracking ultrasound system, were evaluated. To compare stiffness parameters across the different age groups, individual scores were transformed into T-scores, indicating how many standard deviation (s.d.) units an individual's score was above or below the mean that was observed in the group including same-sex individuals aged 36 to 44 years. Carotid stiffness was similar among genders, except compliance, which was lower in women (Pparameters increased significantly with age, but the opposite occurred for compliance. The T-score was found to increase significantly across all age groups, with a steeper increase in stiffness around the age of 60 years in women. For each T-score s.d., the corresponding carotid absolute values for arterial stiffness and compliance were obtained. In a multivariate model, carotid stiffness parameters were constantly and independently associated with age, mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure, heart rate and body mass index. Our study provides a normogram of carotid arterial stiffness and compliance indices obtained with the echo-tracking method in a large population of healthy subjects stratified by gender and age that can be used in clinical practice.

  10. VIS/IR spectroscopy of thin AIN films grown by pulsed laser deposition at 400°C and 800°C and various N2 pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalova, S.; Szekeres, A.; Anastasescu, M.; Gartner, M.; Duta, L.; Socol, G.; Ristoscu, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2014-05-01

    The optical properties of pulsed-laser-deposited (PLD) AlN films on silicon are reported in the wide visible and infrared spectral range from 5×104 cm-1 to 350 cm-1. The films were deposited at 400 °C or 800 °C and in vacuum or nitrogen gas ambient at pressures from 0.1 Pa to 10 Pa. The optical constants of the films were determined by modelling the spectroscopic ellipsometry data recorded in both the visible and infrared spectral ranges. The PLD AlN films deposited in vacuum have a bandgap energy of 6.2 eV in a good agreement with the crystalline AlN material, while an effective bandgap narrowing was observed for films deposited in N2 ambient. This effect was most pronounced in films deposited at 400°C, where the optical absorption below the fundamental edge was the largest due to a larger degree of disorder in the films. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to identify AlN phonon modes and stress in the films. The shift and broadening of the E1(TO) peak towards the higher wave numbers indicates that an increased compressive stress is developed in the deposited films as the nitrogen pressure is increased.

  11. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Castaño-Sánchez Carmen; Rodríguez-Martín Carmela; Sánchez-Salgado Benigna; de Cabo-Laso Angela; Castaño-Sánchez Yolanda; Rodríguez-Sánchez Emiliano; Recio-Rodríguez José I; Gómez-Marcos Manuel A; Gómez-Sánchez Leticia; García-Ortiz Luis

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortal...

  12. Comparative Study on the Pulse Wave Variables and Sasang Constitution in Cerebral Infarction Patients and Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko KiDuk

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to determine whether a pulse analyzer was useful 1 to characterize the variables of pulse wave of cerebral infarction patieno (CI, compared with those of healthy subjects, as well as 2 to determine Sasang Constitution in CI and healthy subjects. 1. Calibrated in Gwan, the amount of energy(Energy, height of main peak(H1, height of aorticvalley(H2, height of aortic peak(H3, total area of pulse wave(At, and area of main peak width(Aw of the CI group were higher than those of the healthy group. 2. Calibrated in Cheek, Energy, H1, H2, H3, height of valve valley(H4, At, Aw, and main peak angle(MPA of the CI group were higher than those of the healthy group. 3. Among the healthy (subjects group, Taeumin showed the highest contact pressure(CP and height of valve peak(H5 calibrated in Chon. The main peak width divided by whole time of pulse wave(MPW/T calibrated in Gwan and Cheok, was highest in Soyangin and was lowest in Taeumin. The H3 divided by H1(H3/H1 and the time to valve valley minus the time to main peak and divided by T[(T4-T1/T] calibrated in Cheek were highest in Soyangin. The time to main peak(T1 was longest in Soumin. 4. Among the CI group, At calibrated in Chon was widest in Taeumin and was narrowest in Soumin The time to aortic peak(T3 calibrated in Cheek was longest in Soumin and was shortest in Soyangin. The time to valve peak(T5 was shortest in Soyangin. 5. There were main effects of cerebral infarction in the area of systolic period(As and area of diastolic period(Ad calibrated in Chon, Energy calibrated in Cwan, and Energy, H1, H2, H3, (H4+H5/Hl, and MPA calibrated in Cheek. 6. There were main effects of Sasang Constitution in (T4-T1/T, area of systolic period(As, and Ad calibrated in Chon. 7. The interactions between the cerebral infarction and Sasang Constitution were observed in H5/H1 , T, At, As, Ad, and MPA calibrated in Chon, H4, T4, (T4-T1/T, As, and Ad calibrated in Cwan, and 74,75, and MPW calibrated

  13. Two-dimensional electron density measurement of pulsed positive primary streamer discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yuki; Aono, Kaiho; Ono, Ryo; Kumada, Akiko; Hidaka, Kunihiko; Maeyama, Mitsuaki

    2017-05-01

    Elucidating the electron density of streamer discharges propagating in atmospheric-pressure air is critical for achieving a systematic understanding of the production mechanisms of reactive species. Using Shack-Hartmann-type laser wavefront sensors with a temporal resolution of 2 ns, we carried out single-shot two-dimensional electron density measurements for positive primary streamers generated in a 13 mm air gap between pin-to-plate electrodes. The electron density over the positive primary streamers decayed from 1015 to {{10}14}\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} during the propagation. The decay time constant of the electron density in the primary streamer channels was estimated to be  ˜2 ns. The distribution widths of the electron density were in good agreement with those of the light emission, typically ranging from 0.8 to 1.5 mm.

  14. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure. Progress report, November 25, 1991--September 18, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-09-22

    A laser flash photolysis kinetic study of 2,2{prime}-bipyridine bidentate chelating ligands with one claw in the first coordination sphere of a molybdenum carbonyl complex has been completed at pressures up to 150 MPa. The reaction mechanism for thermal ring closure is found from activation volumes to change from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as substituents on the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands become bulkier. In a similar study of more rigid, substituted phenanthroline bidentate ligands it was found that substituent bulkiness had little effect on the thermal ring closure mechanism. Stability constants for lithium ion complexes with crown ethers in a room temperature molten salt, fluorescence quantum yields for cresyl violet and several other dyes in solution, and the oxidation of alcohols by OsO{sub 4} have also been investigated.

  15. Generation and size classification of single-walled carbon nanotube aerosol using atmospheric pressure pulsed laser ablation (AP-PLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klanwan, Jiraporn; Seto, Takafumi; Furukawa, Takuma; Otani, Yoshio; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Kohno, Masamichi; Hirasawa, Makoto

    2010-10-01

    Gas suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with single tube diameter smaller than 2 nm and length of longer than 500 nm were generated by simple and continuous system using laser ablation technique under atmospheric conditions. Graphite target containing 0.5 wt%-nickel and 0.5 wt%-cobalt was ablated by Nd:YAG laser in an electrical furnace under atmospheric pressure of nitrogen flow that allowed one step and continuous synthesis of the SWCNTs. Size distribution of the gas suspended SWCNTs aerosol was measured using size-classification by a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) coupled with a condensation particle counter (CPC) used as a detector. Characteristics of SWCNT aerosol generated under the different temperature were also investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopes and Raman scattering. Mono-mobility SWCNT aerosol with mobility diameter of 100 and 200 nm was successfully prepared after the size separation using a DMA.

  16. Generation and size classification of single-walled carbon nanotube aerosol using atmospheric pressure pulsed laser ablation (AP-PLA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klanwan, Jiraporn; Seto, Takafumi, E-mail: seto@t.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Furukawa, Takuma; Otani, Yoshio [Kanazawa University, Department of Chemical and Material Engineering (Japan); Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai [Chulalongkorn University, Center of Excellence in Particle Technology, Faculty of Engineering (Thailand); Kohno, Masamichi [Kyushu University, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Japan); Hirasawa, Makoto [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Advanced Manufacturing Research Institute (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Gas suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with single tube diameter smaller than 2 nm and length of longer than 500 nm were generated by simple and continuous system using laser ablation technique under atmospheric conditions. Graphite target containing 0.5 wt%-nickel and 0.5 wt%-cobalt was ablated by Nd:YAG laser in an electrical furnace under atmospheric pressure of nitrogen flow that allowed one step and continuous synthesis of the SWCNTs. Size distribution of the gas suspended SWCNTs aerosol was measured using size-classification by a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) coupled with a condensation particle counter (CPC) used as a detector. Characteristics of SWCNT aerosol generated under the different temperature were also investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopes and Raman scattering. Mono-mobility SWCNT aerosol with mobility diameter of 100 and 200 nm was successfully prepared after the size separation using a DMA.

  17. Modelling of the positive column of a medium-pressure Cs-Xe dc discharge affected by a millimetre wave pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, M. S.; Epstein, I. L.; Lebedev, Yu A.

    2013-10-01

    A time-dependent zero-dimensional kinetic model of the positive column (PC) of a medium-pressure Cs-Xe dc discharge was used to gain a better insight into the physical basics of plasma techniques for imaging and control of millimetre wave (MMW) beams. The model allowed one to study the effect of MMWs on the kinetic and electrical characteristics of the spatially homogeneous PC of a Cs-Xe dc discharge. We computed the PC plasma parameters for 30 Torr and 45 Torr xenon and discharge current densities of about 0.1 A cm-2. First, the dependences of the PC parameters on caesium density were calculated in the case of no MMWs incident on the PC plasma. Then, the temporal evolution of the parameters of the PC plasma affected by a long watt-scale Ka-band MMW pulse was modelled for caesium densities of about 3 × 1012 and 5 × 1012 cm-3. The calculations showed that the electron temperature in the PC plasma attained quasisteady-state values for about 1 µs after the beginning of the MMW pulse. The electron temperature rises by 0.2-0.3 eV as the MMW intensity increases from 0 to 1 W cm-2. The rise time of the electron density decreased with an increase in the MMW intensity W from about 1 ms for W = 0.15 W cm-2 to tens of microseconds for W > 1.5 W cm-2. The steady-state values of the electron density increased in proportion to W, if W 3 W cm-2 could be a cause of the microwave breakdown of the homogeneous PC plasma. The results of the modelling are in good agreement with the published experimental data.

  18. Electrochemical performance of LiFePO{sub 4} modified by pressure-pulsed chemical vapor infiltration in lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jianling [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 College Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Applied Chemistry, Aichi Institute of Technology, Yachigusa 1247, Yakusa-cho, Toyota 470-0392 (Japan)], E-mail: lijianling@metall.ustb.edu.cn; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Naga, Kazuhisa; Ohzawa, Yoshimi; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Aichi Institute of Technology, Yachigusa 1247, Yakusa-cho, Toyota 470-0392 (Japan)

    2007-09-25

    Using the pressure-pulsed chemical vapor infiltration (PCVI) technique, pyrolytic carbon (pyrocarbon) films were deposited on the surface of LiFePO{sub 4} particles for cathode material of lithium-ion batteries. The electrochemical performance of the original LiFePO{sub 4} and PCVIed LiFePO{sub 4} materials was evaluated using a three electrodes cell by galvanostatic charging/discharging at 25, 40 and 55 deg. C, respectively. Morphology and structure of LiFePO{sub 4} were analyzed by SEM, XRD and Raman. The resulting carbon contents at 500, 1000, 2000, 3000 and 5000 pulses were 2.7, 4.7, 9.5, 15.1 and 19.4%, respectively and these samples were abbreviated as 500P, 1000P, 2000P, 3000P and 5000P, respectively. All the PCVIed samples exhibited excellent rate performance. The tendency was more and more obvious with the increase of the current densities. The specific capacities of 500P, 1000P and 2000P were maintained at 117, 124 and 132 mAh g{sup -1}, respectively, which were 120.8, 264.7 and 29.47% larger than those of corresponding original LiFePO{sub 4}, respectively, at a 5C rate at 55 deg. C. The EIS measurement showed that electrochemical reaction resistance (R{sub ct}) of PCVIed LiFePO{sub 4} were obviously decreased, indicating a fast kinetics compared to the original LiFePO{sub 4}. The cycle ability of the 2000P sample was tested at 25 deg. C and C/2 rate. The cell was cycled for 150 cycles and no obviously capacity fade was observed. Its specific capacity of 115 mAh g{sup -1} at 150th cycle is 1.7 times higher than that of original LiFePO{sub 4}.

  19. Inverse correlations between serum ADAMTS13 levels and systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and serum C-reactive protein levels observed at a general health examination in a Japanese population: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enooku, Kenichiro; Kato, Reiko; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Kurano, Makoto; Kume, Yukio; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Ono, Tomoko; Aizawa, Kenichi; Suzuki, Toru; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2013-06-05

    Although a defect in ADAMTS13 activity is known to cause platelet thrombosis resulting in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), recent evidence has revealed that low plasma ADAMTS13 concentrations may increase the risk of ischemic vascular diseases. Furthermore, reduced plasma ADAMTS13 activity has been reported in acute systemic inflammation or sepsis. These findings prompted us to examine whether ADAMTS13 may play a role in more diverse diseases, not limited to TTP. A cross-sectional study was conducted to examine ADAMTS13 concentrations in blood samples from 432 subjects who had undergone a general health examination. Serum ADAMTS 13 concentrations were lower in men than in women and in older age, as previously reported. Of note, the serum ADAMTS13 concentration was significantly and inversely correlated with the systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and serum C reactive protein concentration in both men and women and with the serum γ-glutamyltransferase concentration in men only. In 88 subjects, who underwent a carotid artery evaluation, serum ADAMTS13 concentrations were significantly lower in the subjects with a thicker carotid intima-media. ADAMTS13 may play a role in not only TTP, but also inflammation, oxidative stress, and atherosclerosis. The potentially diverse clinical significance of ADAMTS13 should be prospectively elucidated in a larger cohort. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Site calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Georgieva Yankova, Ginka

    The report describes site calibration measurements carried out on a site in Denmark. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio...... between the wind speed at the center of the turbine hub and at the met mast. The wind speed at the turbine is measured by a temporary mast placed at the foundation for the turbine. The site and measurement equipment is detailed described in [2]. The possible measurement sector for power performance...... according to [1] is also described in [2] and no results from the site calibration have shown any necessary exclusion from this sector. All parts of the sensors and the measurement system have been installed by DTU....

  1. Influence of surface emission processes on a fast-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechereau, François; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of an atmospheric pressure air discharge in a point-to-plane geometry with a dielectric layer parallel to the cathode plane. Experimentally, a discharge reignition in the air gap below the dielectrics has been observed. With a 2D fluid model, it is shown that due to the fast rise of the high voltage applied and the sharp point used, a first positive spherical discharge forms around the point. Then this discharge propagates axially and impacts the dielectrics. As the first discharge starts spreading on the upper dielectric surface, in the second air gap with a low preionization density of {{10}4}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , the 2D fluid model predicts a rapid reignition of a positive discharge. As in experiments, the discharge reignition is much slower, a discussion on physical processes to be considered in the model to increase the reignition delay is presented. The limit case with no initial seed charges in the second air gap has been studied. First, we have calculated the time to release an electron from the cathode surface by thermionic and field emission processes for a work function φ \\in ≤ft[3,4\\right] eV and an amplification factor β \\in ≤ft[100,220\\right] . Then a 3D Monte Carlo model has been used to follow the dynamics of formation of an avalanche starting from a single electron emitted at the cathode. Due to the high electric field in the second air gap, we have shown that in a few nanoseconds, a Gaussian cloud of seed charges is formed at a small distance from the cathode plane. This Gaussian cloud has been used as the initial condition of the 2D fluid model in the second air gap. In this case, the propagation of a double headed discharge in the second air gap has been observed and the reignition delay is in rather good agreement with experiments.

  2. Comparação entre as variações respiratórias da amplitude de onda pletismográfica da oximetria de pulso e do pulso arterial em pacientes com e sem uso de norepinefrina Comparison between respiratory pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform amplitude and arterial pulse pressure variations among patients with and without norepinephrine use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Loures de Araújo Penna

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: A variação respiratória da pressão arterial é um bom preditor da resposta a fluidos em pacientes ventilados. Foi recentemente demonstrado que a variação respiratória na pressão arterial de pulso se correlaciona com a variação da amplitude da onda pletismográfica da oximetria de pulso. Nossa intenção foi avaliar a correlação entre a variação respiratória da pressão arterial de pulso e a variação respiratória na amplitude da onda pletismográfica da oximetria de pulso, e determinar se esta correlação foi influenciada pela administração de norepinefrina. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo de sessenta pacientes com ritmo sinusal normal sob ventilação mecânica, profundamente sedados e hemodinamicamente estáveis. Foram monitorados o índice de oxigenação e pressão arterial invasiva. A variação respiratória da pressão do pulso e a variação respiratória da amplitude da onda pletismográfica na oximetria de pulso foram registradas simultaneamente batimento a batimento, e foram comparadas utilizando o coeficiente de concordância de Pearson e regressão linear. RESULTADOS: Trinta pacientes (50% necessitaram de norepinefrina. Ocorreu uma correlação significante (K=0,66; pOBJECTIVES: Arterial pulse pressure respiratory variation is a good predictor of fluid response in ventilated patients. Recently, it was shown that respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure correlates with variation in pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform amplitude. We wanted to evaluate the correlation between respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure and respiratory variation in pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform amplitude, and to determine whether this correlation was influenced by norepinephrine administration. METHODS: Prospective study of sixty patients with normal sinus rhythm on mechanical ventilation, profoundly sedated and with stable hemodynamics. Oxygenation index and invasive arterial pressure were

  3. Testing of calibration and reconditioning of the pressurizer safety valves; Pruebas de tarado y reacondicionamiento de las valvulas de seguridad del presionador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mediavilla, F.; Jardi, X.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents All activities that are required in the proposal of Tecnatom as: transport of valves to the laboratory in special containers and preparation of the expedition of the radioactive packages testing of leakage of valves with nitrogen, leak and calibration with initial steam and final tests, overhaul of the valve including the process Jack and Lap and mounting and dismounting of valves in the plant. (Author)

  4. Carotid arterial stiffness as a surrogate for aortic stiffness: relationship between carotid artery pressure-strain elastic modulus and aortic pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Y; Fleg, J L; Kemper, M K; Rywik, T M; Earley, C J; Metter, E J

    1999-02-01

    Common carotid arterial (CCA) stiffness can be assessed during carotid ultrasonography, but its association with aortic stiffness, a well-defined cardiovascular risk factor, has not been clarified. This study examines the relationship between CCA and aortic stiffness. CCA pressure-strain elastic modulus (Ep) and aortic pulse wave velocity (APWV) were evaluated in 110 healthy volunteers (age 56.2 +/- 14.6 y) by B-mode and Doppler ultrasonography. CCA Ep increased linearly with age and was higher in men than in women (model r2 = 0.50, p < 0.001). APWV increased quadratically with age (model r2 = 0.54, p < 0.001), similarly for women and men. Both CCA Ep and APWV were linearly associated with systolic blood pressure (BP) (r = 0.53 and 0.46, respectively) but not with diastolic BP. A linear relationship was found between CCA Ep and APWV (APWV = 194.7 + 5.67 x Ep [model r2 = 0.42, p < 0.001]). CCA Ep was associated with APWV (p < 0.001) independent of age, gender, and BP (model r2 = 0.62, p < 0.001), and the most parsimonious model to explain APWV included CCA Ep and age (APWV = 601.73 - 15.64 x age + 0.223 x age2 + 2.69 x Ep [model r2 = 0.60, p < 0.001]). Thus, CCA Ep is moderately associated with APWV. CCA stiffness as assessed by B-mode may be useful as a surrogate for aortic stiffness.

  5. HFE H63D polymorphism as a modifier of the effect of cumulative lead exposure on pulse pressure: the Normative Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aimin; Park, Sung Kyun; Wright, Robert O; Weisskopf, Marc G; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Nie, Huiling; Sparrow, David; Hu, Howard

    2010-09-01

    Cumulative lead exposure is associated with a widened pulse pressure (PP; the -difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure), a marker of arterial stiffness and a predictor of cardiovascular disease. Polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis gene (HFE) have been shown to modify the impact of cumulative lead exposure on measures of adult cognition and cardiac function. We examined whether the HFE mutations modify the impact of lead on PP in -community-dwelling older men. We examined 619 participants with a total of 1,148 observations of PP from a substudy of bone lead levels (a measure of cumulative exposure, measured by in vivo K-shell X-ray fluorescence) and health in the Normative Aging Study between 1991 and 2001. Linear mixed-effects regression models with random intercepts were constructed. Of the 619 subjects, 138 and 72 carried the HFE H63D and C282Y variants, respectively. After adjusting for age; education; alcohol intake; smoking; daily intakes of calcium, sodium, and potassium; total calories; family history of hypertension; diabetes; height; heart rate; high-density lipoprotein (HDL); total cholesterol:HDL ratio; and waist circumference, baseline bone lead levels were associated with steeper increases in PP in men with at least one H63D allele (p-interaction = 0.03 for tibia and 0.02 for patella) compared with men with only the wild types or C282Y variant. The HFE H63D polymorphism, but not the C282Y mutation, appears to enhance susceptibility to the deleterious impact of cumulative lead on PP, possibly via prooxidative or pro-inflammatory mechanisms.

  6. Evaluation of stroke volume variation and pulse pressure variation as predictors of fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing protective one-lung ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Duan, Mingda; Zhao, Feng; Mi, Weidong

    2015-08-01

    In order to investigate whether the hemodynamic indices, including stroke volume variation (SVV) and pulse pressure variation (PPV) could predict fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing protective one-lung ventilation. 60 patients scheduled for a combined thoracoscopic and laparoscopic esophagectomy were enrolled and randomized into two groups. The patients in the protective group (Group P) were ventilated with a tidal volume of 6 mL/kg, an inspired oxygen fraction (FiO2) of 80%, and a positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 cm H2O. Patients in the conventional group (Group C) were ventilated with a tidal volume of 8 mL/kg and a FiO2 of 100%. Dynamic variables were collected before and after fluid loading (7 mL/kg hydroxyethyl starch 6%, 0.4 mL/kg/min). Patients whose stroke volume index (SVI) increased by more than 15% were defined as responders. Data collected from 45 patients were finally analyzed. Twelve of 24 patients in Group P and 10 of 21 patients in Group C were responders. SVV and PPV significantly changed after the fluid loading. The receive operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that the thresholds for SVV and PPV to discriminate responders were 8.5% for each, with a sensitivity of 66.7% (SVV) and 75% (PPV) and a specificity of 50% (SVV) and 83.3% (PPV) in Group P. However, the thresholds for SVV and PPV were 8.5% and 7.5% with a sensitivity of 80% (SVV) and 90% (PPV) and a specificity of 70% (SVV) and 80% (PPV) in Group C. We found SVV and PPV could predict fluid responsiveness in protective one-lung ventilation, but the accuracy and ability of SVV and PPV were weak compared with the role they played in a conventional ventilation strategy.

  7. Inaccuracy in determining mean arterial pressure with oscillometric blood pressure techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Jorn; Vincent, Hieronymus H; Verhaar, Marianne C; Bos, Willem J W

    2013-05-01

    Accurate determination of MAP is important in the calibration of pressure waveforms for calculating central blood pressure (BP). Currently, a precise, individualized measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) can be obtained only with intra-arterial measurements of BP or with applanation tonometry. We conducted a study of whether easy-to-use oscillometric devices, validated for systolic and diastolic BP measurements (BHS protocol), give accurate determinations of MAP. We compared measurements of MAP made with the WatchBP Office oscillometric monitor in 102 subjects with values of MAP assessed by pulse-wave analysis (PWA) (SphygmoCor). The mean (± SD) oscillometric MAP assessed with the WatchBP Office monitor was 97 ± 12.5 mm Hg, which was equivalent to 23.6 ± 9.1% of the pulse pressure (PP) above diastolic blood pressure (DBP). The MAP as assessed through PWA was 106 ± 14.6 mm Hg (P < 0.01), or 37.7 ± 3.9% of the PP above DBP. In simultaneous measurements made on both arms with the WatchBP Office monitor we observed individual differences in pressure in the left vs. the right arm. The MAP displayed by the WatchBP Office monitor is too imprecise to be used for calibrations. We suggest that devices for measuring BP not display MAP unless their accuracy is tested.

  8. Plasma Renalase is Not Associated with Blood Pressure and Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Adults With Normal Renal Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the association of renalase with blood pressure (BP and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV in order to better understand the role of renalase in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis. Methods: A total of 344 subjects with normal kidney function were recruited from our previously established cohort in Shaanxi Province, China. They were divided into the normotensive (NT and hypertensive (HT groups or high baPWV and normal baPWV on the basis of BP levels or baPWV measured with an automatic waveform analyzer. Plasma renalase was determined through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Plasma renalase did not significantly differ between HT and NT groups (3.71 ± 0.69 µg/mL vs. 3.72 ± 0.73 μg/mL, P = 0.905 and between subjects with and without high baPWV (3.67 ± 0.66 µg/mL vs. 3.73 ± 0.74 µg/mL, P = 0.505. However, baPWV was significantly higher in the HT group than in the NT group (1460.4 ± 236.7 vs. 1240.7 ± 174.5 cm/s, P Conclusion: Plasma renalase may not be associated with BP and baPWV in Chinese subjects with normal renal function.

  9. Spatiotemporal Evolution of Ar(3P2) Metastable Density Generated in a Pulsed DC Atmospheric Pressure micro-Plasma Jet Impinging on a Glass Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazeli, K.; Bauville, G.; Es-Sebbar, Et-T.; Fleury, M.; Neveau, O.; Pasquiers, St.; Santos Sousa, J.; Laboratoire de Physique des gaz et des plasmas Team

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric Pressure micro-Plasma Jets (APPJs) are promising tools in various domains such as biomedical and material treatments. In this work, APPJs are produced in pure argon at variable flow rates (i.e., 200, 400 and 600 sccm), by applying high voltage positive pulses (250 ns in FWHM and 6 kV in amplitude) at a repetition frequency of 20 kHz. The generated plasma impacts an ungrounded glass plate placed at a distance of 5 mm from the tube's orifice and perpendicular to the streamers propagation. At these conditions, a diffuse discharge is established resulting in a non-filamentary and reproducible plasma, in contrast with the free-jet case (no target). This allows the quantification of the absolute density of the Ar(1s5) metastable state by using laser absorption spectroscopy to probe the transition 1s5 -> 2p9 at 811.531 nm. The experiments show the dependence on the gas flow rate and on the axial and radial positions of the maximum density (6-9x1013 cm-3) . At 200 sccm, it is obtained close to the tube's orifice, while with increasing flow rate it is displaced towards the plate. Regarding the radial variation, density maxima are obtained in a small area around the streamers propagation axis.

  10. The Role of Ambient Gas and Pressure on the Structuring of Hard Diamond-Like Carbon Films Synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei C. Popescu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hard carbon thin films were synthesized on Si (100 and quartz substrates by the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD technique in vacuum or methane ambient to study their suitability for applications requiring high mechanical resistance. The deposited films’ surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, crystalline status by X-ray diffraction, packing and density by X-ray reflectivity, chemical bonding by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, adherence by “pull-out” measurements and mechanical properties by nanoindentation tests. Films synthesized in vacuum were a-C DLC type, while films synthesized in methane were categorized as a-C:H. The majority of PLD films consisted of two layers: one low density layer towards the surface and a higher density layer in contact with the substrate. The deposition gas pressure played a crucial role on films thickness, component layers thickness ratio, structure and mechanical properties. The films were smooth, amorphous and composed of a mixture of sp3-sp2 carbon, with sp3 content ranging between 50% and 90%. The thickness and density of the two constituent layers of a film directly determined its mechanical properties.

  11. Prognostic impact of pulse pressure at admission on in-hospital outcome after primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Jun; Kohno, Yoshio; Sawada, Takahisa; Hashimoto, Sho; Ito, Daisuke; Kimura, Masayoshi; Matsui, Akihiro; Yokoi, Hirokazu; Arihara, Masayasu; Irie, Hidekazu; Hyogo, Masayuki; Shima, Takatomo; Nakamura, Takeshi; Matoba, Satoaki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Matsumuro, Akiyoshi; Shirayama, Takeshi; Kitamura, Makoto; Furukawa, Keizo; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2013-07-01

    Data regarding relationship between pulse pressure (PP) at admission and in-hospital outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are still lacking. A total of 1413 primary PCI-treated AMI patients were classified into quintiles based on admission PP (admission; right coronary artery, left main trunk (LMT), or multivessels as culprit lesions; larger number of diseased vessels; lower Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) grade in the infarct-related artery before/after primary PCI; and higher value of peak creatine phosphokinase concentration. Patients with PP admission, LMT or multivessels as culprit lesions, chronic kidney disease, and age were the independent positive predictors of the in-hospital mortality, whereas admission PP 49-57 mmHg, hypercholesterolemia, and TIMI 3 flow before/after PCI were the negative ones, but admission PP admission PP 49-57 mmHg might be correlated with better in-hospital prognosis in Japanese AMI patients undergoing primary PCI.

  12. Sensor Calibration Design Based on D-Optimality Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajiyev Chingiz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a procedure for optimal selection of measurement points using the D-optimality criterion to find the best calibration curves of measurement sensors is proposed. The coefficients of calibration curve are evaluated by applying the classical Least Squares Method (LSM. As an example, the problem of optimal selection for standard pressure setters when calibrating a differential pressure sensor is solved. The values obtained from the D-optimum measurement points for calibration of the differential pressure sensor are compared with those from actual experiments. Comparison of the calibration errors corresponding to the D-optimal, A-optimal and Equidistant calibration curves is done.

  13. Design and application of pulse information acquisition and analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ultrasound coupling guidance by startup acquisition system of pulse and regulated pressure, researchers could observe pulse picture and the change of radial artery motion in real-time. When finding the optimum pulse pressure and various indexes were relatively stable, we started to record the pressure pulse picture,.

  14. Use of pore-water pressure and discharge data as orthogonal information in the calibration and validation of a distributed hillslope model for landslide prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukose Kuriakose, Sekhar; Jetten, Victor; van Beek, L. P. H.; van Westen, C. J.; Sankar, G.

    2010-05-01

    The plateau margins of highland Kerala (The Western Ghats), India is conducive to slope failures. A slope hydrology coupled slope stability model named STARWARS+PROBSTAB capable of predicting the spatio-temporal probabilities of shallow landslide initiation was identified and used for the region in a data poor environment (Kuriakose et al., DOI:10.1002/esp.1794). The study revealed that a detailed characterization of the slope hydrological response of the region such as transient ground water level (TGWL), discharge (Q) and base flow (BF) is necessary to calibrate the slope hydrology model, outputs of which could be used as inputs in the stability model for the accurate prediction of space and time of occurrence of shallow landslides in the region. A catchment named Aruvikkal (upstream of Meenachil River, in the district of Kottayam) measuring 9.35 km2 was instrumented in 2007 with an automated weather station (Vantage Pro2 Plus), 13 piezometers (Keller DCX 22AA) measuring the TGWL and a stage height (SH) gauge at the outlet of the catchment. A rating curve was prepared based on velocity measurements at the outlet and subsequently the Q was calculated. BF was separated from the Q data using a master recession curve filtering approach of USDA (Arnold et al., 1995). The TGWL, Q and BF were subjected to a time series analysis (cross correlation; CC) with the rainfall (RF). The Q response of the catchment to RF was very rapid that a peak CC of 0.45 was observed within a lag of 1 to 2 hrs. The existence of a significant BF component was also noticed which had a peak CC of 0.21 exists at a lag time of 17 hrs. Of the TGWL data from thirteen piezometers nine showed acceptable cross correlations of >0.21 (the peak CC of BF). The rainfall-TGWL-Q-BF response lags do not show very significant seasonal variability except in terms of its absolute cross correlation coefficients. The strongest relationships were observed during the SW monsoon seasons. The analysis indicated that

  15. Influence on Calculated Blood Pressure of Measurement Posture for the Development of Wearable Vital Sign Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouhei Koyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied a wearable blood pressure sensor using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensor, which is a highly accurate strain sensor. This sensor is installed at the pulsation point of the human body to measure the pulse wave signal. A calibration curve is built that calculates the blood pressure by multivariate analysis using the pulse wave signal and a reference blood pressure measurement. However, if the measurement height of the FBG sensor is different from the reference measurement height, an error is included in the reference blood pressure. We verified the accuracy of the blood pressure calculation with respect to the measurement height difference and the posture of the subject. As the difference between the measurement height of the FBG sensor and the reference blood pressure measurement increased, the accuracy of the blood pressure calculation decreased. When the measurement height was identical and only posture was changed, good accuracy was achieved. In addition, when calibration curves were built using data measured in multiple postures, the blood pressure of each posture could be calculated from a single calibration curve. This will allow miniaturization of the necessary electronics of the sensor system, which is important for a wearable sensor.

  16. Relación entre amplitud del pulso ocular y presión intraocular:: efectividad del tratamiento hipotensor Association of ocular pulse amplitude and intraocular pressure and effectiveness of the hypotensive treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itahimy Ambrós Gómez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Determinar la asociación entre la amplitud del pulso ocular y la tensión ocular en los pacientes con glaucoma primario de ángulo abierto según grupos de tratamiento. Evaluar la amplitud del pulso ocular como medio para medir la efectividad de la terapia antihipertensiva ocular. Definir correlación entre espesor corneal central/tensión ocular y entre espesor corneal/amplitud del pulso usando el tonómetro de contorno dinámico. MÉTODOS: Se estudiaron 90 pacientes mayores de 15 años con diagnóstico reciente de glaucoma primario de ángulo abierto que aún no habían recibido tratamiento alguno; con ellos se conformaron tres grupos de estudio de forma aleatoria y según el medicamento indicado: Grupo l: Timolol 0,5 %, Grupo II: Travoprost (Travatán 0,2 % y Grupo III: Dorzolamida (Trusopt 2 %. A estos pacientes se les tomó la medida del espesor corneal central por paquimetría previa al tratamiento, a la semana, al mes y a los 3 meses en el servicio de glaucoma del Hospital "Ramón Pando Ferrer" (diciembre-2006 a mayo-2007. Se midieron además las variables presión intraocular y amplitud del pulso ocular. RESULTADOS: Se encontró menor amplitud del pulso a medida que disminuía la presión intraocular, existió mayor descenso de la presión y de la amplitud del pulso en el grupo tratado con Travoprost, hubo para este grupo de tratamiento una mejor correlación entre ambas variables. No se encontró correlación entre el espesor corneal central y presión intraocular, ni entre espesor corneal y amplitud del pulso. CONCLUSIONES: Monitorear la presión y la amplitud del pulso puede ser eficaz para conocer el efecto de la terapéutica hipotensora ocular.OBJECTIVES: To determine the association of the ocular pulse amplitude and the ocular pressure in patients with primary open angle glaucoma by groups under treatment; to evaluate the ocular pulse amplitude as a means to assess the effectiveness of anti-hypertensive ocular therapy

  17. 40 CFR 92.120 - NDIR analyzer calibration and checks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) of this section, determine the saturation vapor pressure. (7) Calculate the water concentration (Z... instructions for initial start-up and basic operating adjustments. (2) Calibration curve. Develop a calibration... for each range by the spanning process. ...

  18. Pulse on Pulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik; Carlson, Merete

    2012-01-01

    of the visitor’s beating heart to the blink of a fragile light bulb, thereby transforming each light bulb into a register of individual life. But at the same time the blinking light bulbs together produce a chaotically flickering light environment composed by various layers of repetitive rhythms, a vibrant...... and pulsating ‘room’. Hence, the visitors in Pulse Room are invited into a complex scenario that continuously oscillates between various aspects of signification (the light bulbs representing individual lives; the pulse itself as the symbolic ‘rhythm of life’) and instants of pure material processuality...... (flickering light bulbs; polyrhythmic layers). Taking our point of departure in a discussion of Gilles Deleuze’s concepts of modulation and signaletic material in relation to electronic media, we examine how the complex orchestration of pulsation between signification and material modulation produces...

  19. Mercury Calibration System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  20. High performance pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothaus, Michael G.; Moran, Stuart L.; Hardesty, Leonard W.

    1992-06-01

    The device is a compact Marx-type generator capable of producing a high-voltage burst of pulses having risetimes less than 10 nanoseconds at repetition rates up to 10 kHz. High-pressure hydrogen switches are used as the switching elements to achieve high rep-rate. A small coaxial design provides low inductance and a fast risetime. The device may be used as a high-rep-rate high-voltage trigger generator, or as a high-voltage pulse source capable of producing up to 1 MV pulses at high repetition rates.

  1. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, R. A.; Islamy, M. R. F.; Munir, M. M.; Latief, H.; Irsyam, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM.

  2. Oxygen-Mass-Flow Calibration Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed calibration standard for mass flow rate of oxygen based on conduction of oxygen ions through solid electrolyte membrane made of zirconia and heated to temperature of 1,000 degrees C. Flow of oxygen ions proportional to applied electric current. Unaffected by variations in temperature and pressure, and requires no measurement of volume. Calibration cell based on concept used to calibrate variety of medical and scientific instruments required to operate with precise rates of flow of oxygen.

  3. Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

    2009-03-12

    /mass spectrometry (ID/ICP/MS) performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The outputs of mercury calibrators are compared to one another using a nesting procedure which allows direct comparison of one calibrator with another at specific concentrations and eliminates analyzer variability effects. The qualification portion of the EPA interim traceability protocol requires the vendors to define calibrator performance as affected by variables such as pressure, temperature, line voltage, and shipping. In 2007 WRI developed and conducted a series of simplified qualification experiments to determine actual calibrator performance related to the variables defined in the qualification portion of the interim protocol.

  4. Absolute, pressure-dependent validation of a calibration-free, airborne laser hygrometer transfer standard (SEALDH-II from 5 to 1200 ppmv using a metrological humidity generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Buchholz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly accurate water vapor measurements are indispensable for understanding a variety of scientific questions as well as industrial processes. While in metrology water vapor concentrations can be defined, generated, and measured with relative uncertainties in the single percentage range, field-deployable airborne instruments deviate even under quasistatic laboratory conditions up to 10–20 %. The novel SEALDH-II hygrometer, a calibration-free, tuneable diode laser spectrometer, bridges this gap by implementing a new holistic concept to achieve higher accuracy levels in the field. We present in this paper the absolute validation of SEALDH-II at a traceable humidity generator during 23 days of permanent operation at 15 different H2O mole fraction levels between 5 and 1200 ppmv. At each mole fraction level, we studied the pressure dependence at six different gas pressures between 65 and 950 hPa. Further, we describe the setup for this metrological validation, the challenges to overcome when assessing water vapor measurements on a high accuracy level, and the comparison results. With this validation, SEALDH-II is the first airborne, metrologically validated humidity transfer standard which links several scientific airborne and laboratory measurement campaigns to the international metrological water vapor scale.

  5. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Recio-Rodríguez, José I; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Emiliano; Castaño-Sánchez, Yolanda; de Cabo-Laso, Angela; Sánchez-Salgado, Benigna; Rodríguez-Martín, Carmela; Castaño-Sánchez, Carmen; Gómez-Sánchez, Leticia; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2010-03-18

    Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk.The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home) blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The medication used for diabetes, arterial hypertension and hyperlipidemia will be registered, together

  6. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaño-Sánchez Carmen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. Methods/Design Design: This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. Setting: The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Study population: Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Measurements: Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The

  7. DAWN GRAND CALIBRATED MARS FLYBY COUNTS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRaND RDR are a time-ordered collection of corrected gamma ray and neutron counting data and calibrated pulse height spectra acquired by GRaND during all phases...

  8. Diamond-like carbon film preparation using a high-repetition nanosecond pulsed glow discharge plasma at gas pressure of 1 kPa generated by a SiC-MOSFET inverter power supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yusuke; Ogura, Masataka; Maegawa, Takuya; Otsubo, Akira; Nishimura, Yoshimi; Nagata, Masayoshi; Yatsuzuka, Mitsuyasu

    2017-10-01

    A high-repetition nanosecond pulsed glow discharge plasma at a gas pressure of 1 kPa was generated using a SiC-MOSFET inverter power supply for diamond-like carbon (DLC) film preparation. At a high repetition frequency above 50 kHz, the period of the nanosecond voltage pulse became shorter than the decay time of the afterglow plasma, and many ions and radicals remained in the gap space. The deposition rate was 0.1 µm/min, which was 5 times higher than that of a conventional plasma CVD process. An increase in hardness to 13 GPa and a decrease in hydrogen content in the DLC film were confirmed by increasing the repetition frequency to 200 kHz.

  9. Assembly delay line pulse generators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    Assembly of six of the ten delay line pulse generators that will power the ten kicker magnet modules. One modulator part contains two pulse generators. Capacitors, inductances, and voltage dividers are in the oil tank on the left. Triggered high-pressure spark gap switches are on the platforms on the right. High voltage pulse cables to the kicker magnet emerge under the spark gaps. In the centre background are the assembled master gaps.

  10. Pulsed Laser Propulsion Performance of 11-cm Parabolic `Bell' Engines: CO2 TEA vs. EDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koichi; Sasoh, Akihiro; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2006-05-01

    Single pulse laboratory experiments were carried out with a high-power CO2 Transversely-Excited Atmospheric (TEA) laser using three laser pulsejet engines, shaped as parabolic bells, measuring 11-cm in diameter. Assuming the vertex is set at the parabola's focus, the "calibration bell" engines had three different total divergence angles of 60, 87.2, and 120 degrees (i.e., viewing outward towards the 11-cm nozzle exit plane). The objective was to quantify and calibrate the effects of laser pulse duration upon the momentum coupling coefficient (Cm) performance from the two CO2 lasers, using laser pulse energy as the parametric variable. Bell engine performance data from the TEA laser are contrasted with former results from the PLVTS CO2 electron discharge laser (EDL). The single-pulse PLVTS tests were conducted in Sept. 2000 and Sept. 2001, revealing that the impulse and Cm performance of the 60° bell generally exceeded the 87.2° engine, which in turn outperformed the 120° bell. With PLVTS, the maximum single-pulse Cm varied from 275 to 375 N-sec/MJ. In contrast, the 2 microsecond TEA laser tests generated results that were distinctively different from that of the EDL. Both tests used a standard ballistic pendulum to measure airbreathing engine performance at a pressure of one atmosphere.

  11. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina

    2016-05-02

    This poster presents the development, implementation, and operation of the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL) Longwave (LW) system at the Southern Great Plains Radiometric Calibration Facility for the calibration of pyrgeometers that provide traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group.

  12. Electric field measurements in a nanosecond pulse discharge by picosecond CARS/4-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ben; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor; Lempert, Walter

    2014-10-01

    Time-resolved electric field measurements in hydrogen by picosecond CARS/4-wave mixing are presented. Measurements are carried out in a high voltage nanosecond pulse discharge in hydrogen in plane-to-plane geometry, at pressures of up to several hundred Torr, and with a time resolution of 0.2 ns. Absolute calibration of the diagnostics is done using a sub-breakdown high voltage pulse of 12 kV/cm. A diffuse discharge is obtained by applying a peak high voltage pulse of 40 kV/cm between the electrodes. It is found that breakdown occurs at a lower field, 15--20 kV/cm, after which the field in the plasma is reduced rapidly due to plasma self shielding The experimental results are compared with kinetic modeling calculations, showing good agreement between the measured and the predicted electric field.

  13. NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel: Upgrade and Cloud Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ide, Robert F.; Steen, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, NASA Glenn s Icing Research Tunnel underwent a major modification to it s refrigeration plant and heat exchanger. This paper presents the results of the subsequent full cloud calibration. Details of the calibration procedure and results are presented herein. The steps include developing a nozzle transfer map, establishing a uniform cloud, conducting a drop sizing calibration and finally a liquid water content calibration. The goal of the calibration is to develop a uniform cloud, and to build a transfer map from the inputs of air speed, spray bar atomizing air pressure and water pressure to the output of median volumetric droplet diameter and liquid water content.

  14. Effect of Integral Non-Linearity on Energy Calibration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The integral non-linearity (INL) of four spectroscopy systems, two integrated (A1 and A2) and two classical (B1 and B2) systems was determined using pulses from a random pulse generator. The effect of INL on the system's energy calibration was also determined. The effect is minimal in the classical system at high ...

  15. Uncalibrated pulse power analysis fails to reliably measure cardiac output in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broch, Ole; Renner, Jochen; Höcker, Jan; Gruenewald, Matthias; Meybohm, Patrick; Schöttler, Jan; Steinfath, Markus; Bein, Berthold

    2011-01-01

    Uncalibrated arterial pulse power analysis has been recently introduced for continuous monitoring of cardiac index (CI). The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of arterial pulse power analysis with intermittent transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Forty-two patients scheduled for elective coronary surgery were studied after induction of anaesthesia, before and after CPB respectively. Each patient was monitored with the pulse contour cardiac output (PiCCO) system, a central venous line and the recently introduced LiDCO monitoring system. Haemodynamic variables included measurement of CI derived by transpulmonary thermodilution (CITPTD) or CI derived by pulse power analysis (CIPP), before and after calibration (CIPPnon-cal., CIPPcal.). Percentage changes of CI (ΔCITPTD, ΔCIPPnon-cal./PPcal.) were calculated to analyse directional changes. Before CPB there was no significant correlation between CIPPnon-cal. and CITPTD (r2 = 0.04, P = 0.08) with a percentage error (PE) of 86%. Higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) values were significantly correlated with higher CIPPnon-cal. (r2 = 0.26, P < 0.0001). After CPB, CIPPcal. revealed a significant correlation compared with CITPTD (r2 = 0.77, P < 0.0001) with PE of 28%. Changes in CIPPcal. (ΔCIPPcal.) showed a correlation with changes in CITPTD (ΔCITPTD) only after CPB (r2 = 0.52, P = 0.005). Uncalibrated pulse power analysis was significantly influenced by MAP and was not able to reliably measure CI compared with TPTD. Calibration improved accuracy, but pulse power analysis was still not consistently interchangeable with TPTD. Only calibrated pulse power analysis was able to reliably track haemodynamic changes and trends.

  16. Pump out the volume--The effect of tracheal and subelytral pressure pulses on convective gas exchange in a dung beetle, Circellium bacchus (Fabricus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Frances D; Förster, Thomas D; Hetz, Stefan K

    2010-05-01

    Many flightless beetles like the large apterous dung beetle Circellium bacchus, possess a subelytral cavity (SEC) providing an extra air space below the elytra which connects to the tracheal system (TS) via metathoracic and abdominal spiracles. By measuring subelytral and intratracheal pressure as well as body movements and gas exchange simultaneously in a flow-through setup, we investigated the contribution of convection on Circellium respiratory gas exchange. No constriction phase was observed. TS and SEC pressures were always around atmospheric values. During interburst phase open abdominal spiracles and a leaky SEC led to small CO(2)-peaks on a continuous CO(2) baseline, driven by intermittent positive tracheal pressure peaks in anti-phase with small negative subelytral pressure peaks caused by dorso-ventral tergite action. Spiracle opening was accompanied by two types of body movements. Higher frequency telescoping body movements at the beginning of opening resulted in high amplitude SEC and TS pressure peaks. High frequency tergite movements caused subelytral pressure peaks and led to a saw tooth like CO(2) release pattern in a burst. We propose that during the burst open mesothoracic spiracles increase the compliance of the subelytral cavity allowing big volumes of tracheal air being pulled out by convection. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Plasma renin activity to plasma aldosterone concentration ratio correlates with night-time and pulse pressures in essential hypertensive patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/AT1 blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spannella, Francesco; Giulietti, Federico; Balietti, Paolo; Borioni, Elisabetta; Lombardi, Francesca E; Ricci, Maddalena; Cocci, Guido; Landi, Laura; Sarzani, Riccardo

    2017-11-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and AT1 blockers (ARB) are commonly used antihypertensive drugs, but several factors may affect their effectiveness. We evaluated the associations between ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) parameters and plasma renin activity (PRA)-to-plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) ratio (RAR) to test renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition in essential hypertensive patients treated with ACE-I or ARB for at least 12 months. We evaluated 194 consecutive patients referred to our Hypertension Centre. ABPM, PRA and PAC tests were performed without any changes in drug therapy. RAR, PRA and PAC tertiles were considered for the analyses. Mean age: 57.4 ± 12.0 years; male prevalence: 63.9%. No differences between RAR tertiles regarding the use of ACE-I or ARB (P = 0.385), as well as the other antihypertensive drug classes, were found. A reduction of all ABPM values considered (24-h BP, daytime BP and night-time BP and 24-h pulse pressure (PP), daytime PP and night-time PP) and a better BP control were observed at increasing RAR tertiles, with an odds ratio = 0.12 to be not controlled during night-time period for patients in the third tertile compared with patients in the first tertile (P < 0.001). This association remained significant even after adjusting for 24-h BP control. All the associations were also confirmed for PRA tertiles, but not for PAC tertiles. Higher RAR values indicate effective renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition and lower night-time and pulse pressures in real-life clinical practice. It could be a useful biomarker in the management of essential hypertensive patients treated with ACE-I or ARB.

  18. Pulse oximetry in pediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouzas, Sotirios; Priftis, Kostas N; Anthracopoulos, Michael B

    2011-10-01

    The introduction of pulse oximetry in clinical practice has allowed for simple, noninvasive, and reasonably accurate estimation of arterial oxygen saturation. Pulse oximetry is routinely used in the emergency department, the pediatric ward, and in pediatric intensive and perioperative care. However, clinically relevant principles and inherent limitations of the method are not always well understood by health care professionals caring for children. The calculation of the percentage of arterial oxyhemoglobin is based on the distinct characteristics of light absorption in the red and infrared spectra by oxygenated versus deoxygenated hemoglobin and takes advantage of the variation in light absorption caused by the pulsatility of arterial blood. Computation of oxygen saturation is achieved with the use of calibration algorithms. Safe use of pulse oximetry requires knowledge of its limitations, which include motion artifacts, poor perfusion at the site of measurement, irregular rhythms, ambient light or electromagnetic interference, skin pigmentation, nail polish, calibration assumptions, probe positioning, time lag in detecting hypoxic events, venous pulsation, intravenous dyes, and presence of abnormal hemoglobin molecules. In this review we describe the physiologic principles and limitations of pulse oximetry, discuss normal values, and highlight its importance in common pediatric diseases, in which the principle mechanism of hypoxemia is ventilation/perfusion mismatch (eg, asthma exacerbation, acute bronchiolitis, pneumonia) versus hypoventilation (eg, laryngotracheitis, vocal cord dysfunction, foreign-body aspiration in the larynx or trachea). Additional technologic advancements in pulse oximetry and its incorporation into evidence-based clinical algorithms will improve the efficiency of the method in daily pediatric practice.

  19. Development of a Cardiovascular Simulator for Studying Pulse Diagnosis Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was undertaken to develop a cardiovascular simulator for use in the study of pulse diagnosis. The physical (i.e., pulse wave transmission and reflection and physiological (i.e., systolic and diastolic pressure, pulse pressure, and mean pressure characteristics of the radial pulse wave were reproduced by our simulator. The simulator consisted of an arterial component and a pulse-generating component. Computer simulation was used to simplify the arterial component while maintaining the elastic modulus and artery size. To improve the reflected wave characteristics, a palmar arch was incorporated within the simulator. The simulated radial pulse showed good agreement with clinical data.

  20. The effect of oxygen pressure on structure, electrical conductivity and oxygen permeability of Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Daneshmandi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF thin films were deposited on single crystal SrTiO3 (STO (100 by pulsed laser deposition (PLD technique at different pressures of oxygen. Crystal structure of bulk and thin film samples was studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD. The XRD results indicate that both bulk and thin film samples have cubic structures. AFM micrographs showed an increase in RMS roughness by oxygen pressure. The electrical resistance was measured at room temperature up to 600 and 800 °C in air using four probe method for bulk and thin films, respectively. A sharp drop in resistance was observed by increasing temperature up to 400 °C, that was explained with the small polaron hopping model. Polaron activation energy was calculated by Arrhenius relation. It was decreased over increasing oxygen pressure. The surface exchange coefficient (Kchem of the 300 mTorr sample was measured by electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR technique. The results suggested a linear relationship between Kchem and reciprocal of absolute temperature.

  1. Depth profile characterization of Zn-TiO2 nanocomposite films by pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge-optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Deborah; Fernández, Beatriz; Frade, Tania; Gomes, Anabela; Pereira, Maria Isabel da Silva; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2011-04-15

    In recent years particular effort is being devoted towards the development of radiofrequency (rf) pulsed glow discharges (GDs) coupled to optical emission spectrometry (OES) for depth profile analysis of materials with technological interest. In this work, pulsed rf-GD-OES is investigated for the fast and sensitive depth characterization of Zn-TiO(2) nanocomposite films deposited on conductive substrates (Ti and steel). The first part of this work focuses on assessing the advantages of pulsed GDs, in comparison with the continuous GD, in terms of analytical emission intensities and emission yields. Next, the capability of pulsed rf-GD-OES for determination of thickness and compositional depth profiles is demonstrated by resorting to a simple multi-matrix calibration procedure. A rf forward power of 75 W, a pressure of 600 Pa, 10 kHz pulse frequency and 50% duty cycle were selected as GD operation parameters.Quantitative depth profiles obtained with the GD proposed methodology for Zn-TiO(2) nanocomposite films, prepared by the occlusion electrodeposition method using pulsed reverse current electrolysis, have proved to be in good agreement with results achieved by complementary techniques, including scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The work carried out demonstrates that pulsed rf-GD-OES is a promising tool for the fast analytical characterization of nanocomposite films. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis Polarimetry Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moellenbrock, George

    2017-10-01

    Synthesis instrumental polarization calibration fundamentals for both linear (ALMA) and circular (EVLA) feed bases are reviewed, with special attention to the calibration heuristics supported in CASA. Practical problems affecting modern instruments are also discussed.

  3. STUCTURE OF PULSED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Bokun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of pulsed layer is proposed which can be suggested as a state of particulates that is blown by intermittent gas flow with speed which has the force to start material moving. Layer during one cycle is in a suspension, falling down and immobile state resulting in changes of particles arrangement as well as ways of gas flowing through layer. Moreover, it allows carrying out effective interphase heat exchange even adamant real granulation.The process of formation of impact flows is considered aw well as their influence on formation of air bubbles in pulsed layer. At startup of air blast the balance between the force of hydro-dynamic resistance is broken, on one side, and forces of gravity, particles inertia and their links with walls on the other side. The layer is transferred in the state of pulsed pseudo-fluidization, and presents gas-disperse mixture, inside of which impulse of pressure increasing is spreading to all sides as pressure waves (compression. These waves are the sources of impact flows’ formation, the force of which is two times more than during the stationary flow.The waves of pressure are divided into weak and strong ones depending on movement velocity within gas-disperse system. Weak waves are moving with a sound speed and strong ones in active phase of pulsed layer are moving over the speed of sound limit within gas-disperse system. The peculiarity of strong wave is that parameters of system (pressure, density and others are changing in discrete steps.The article describes the regime of layer’s falling down in the passive stage of cycle, which begins after finishing of gas impulse action. And suspension layer of moving up granular material is transferred in the state of falling resulting in change of the layer structure.

  4. Pulse Oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people need more oxygen when asleep than when awake. Some need more oxygen with activity than when ... oxygen saturation levels (below 80%) or with very dark skin. When should I use a pulse oximeter? ...

  5. Arterial pressure measurement: Is the envelope curve of the oscillometric method influenced by arterial stiffness?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelido, G [Electronic department, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional FRBA, Bs. As. (Argentina); Angiletta, S [Electronic department, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional FRBA, Bs. As. (Argentina); Pujalte, A [Electronic department, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional FRBA, Bs. As. (Argentina); Quiroga, P [Electronic department, Universidad Favaloro FICEN, Bs. As. (Argentina); Cornes, P [Electronic department, Universidad Favaloro FICEN, Bs. As. (Argentina); Craiem, D [Electronic department, Universidad Favaloro FICEN, Bs. As. (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Measurement of peripheral arterial pressure using the oscillometric method is commonly used by professionals as well as by patients in their homes. This non invasive automatic method is fast, efficient and the required equipment is affordable with a low cost. The measurement method consists of obtaining parameters from a calibrated decreasing curve that is modulated by heart beats witch appear when arterial pressure reaches the cuff pressure. Diastolic, mean and systolic pressures are obtained calculating particular instants from the heart beats envelope curve. In this article we analyze the envelope of this amplified curve to find out if its morphology is related to arterial stiffness in patients. We found, in 33 volunteers, that the envelope waveform width correlates to systolic pressure (r=0.4, p<0.05), to pulse pressure (r=0.6, p<0.05) and to pulse pressure normalized to systolic pressure (r=0.6, p<0.05). We believe that the morphology of the heart beats envelope curve obtained with the oscillometric method for peripheral pressure measurement depends on arterial stiffness and can be used to enhance pressure measurements.

  6. Velocidade da onda de pulso, pressão arterial e adipocitocinas em adultos jovens: estudo do Rio de Janeiro Pulse wave velocity, blood pressure and adipocytokines in young adults: the Rio de Janeiro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Luiz Pizzi

    2012-01-01

    identificação do acometimento vascular nessa faixa etária.BACKGROUND: Data on noninvasive vascular assessment and their association with cardiovascular risk variables are scarce in young individuals. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between pulse wave velocity and blood pressure, anthropometric and metabolic variables, including adipocytokines, in young adults. METHODS: A total of 96 individuals aged 26 to 35 years (mean 30.09 ± 1.92; 51 males were assessed in the Rio de Janeiro study. Pulse wave velocity (Complior method, blood pressure, body mass index, glucose, lipid profile, leptin, insulin, adiponectin and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR were analyzed. Subjects were stratified into three groups according to the PWV tertile for each gender. RESULTS: The group with the highest pulse wave velocity (PWV tertile showed higher mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, body mass index, insulin, and HOMA-IR, as well as lower mean adiponectin; higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus/glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. There was a significant positive correlation of PWV with systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and mean blood pressure, body mass index, and LDL-cholesterol, and a negative correlation with HDL-cholesterol and adiponectin. In the multiple regression model, after adjustment of HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and adiponectin for gender, age, body mass index and mean blood pressure, only the male gender and mean blood pressure remained significantly correlated with PWV. CONCLUSION: PWV in young adults showed a significant association with cardiovascular risk variables, especially in the male gender, and mean blood pressure as important determinant variables. The findings suggest that PWV measurement can be useful for the identification of vascular impairment in this age group.

  7. Velocidade da onda de pulso, pressão arterial e adipocitocinas em adultos jovens: estudo do Rio de Janeiro Pulse wave velocity, blood pressure and adipocytokines in young adults: the Rio de Janeiro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Luiz Pizzi

    2013-01-01

    identificação do acometimento vascular nessa faixa etária.BACKGROUND: Data on noninvasive vascular assessment and their association with cardiovascular risk variables are scarce in young individuals. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between pulse wave velocity and blood pressure, anthropometric and metabolic variables, including adipocytokines, in young adults. METHODS: A total of 96 individuals aged 26 to 35 years (mean 30.09 ± 1.92; 51 males were assessed in the Rio de Janeiro study. Pulse wave velocity (Complior method, blood pressure, body mass index, glucose, lipid profile, leptin, insulin, adiponectin and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR were analyzed. Subjects were stratified into three groups according to the PWV tertile for each gender. RESULTS: The group with the highest pulse wave velocity (PWV tertile showed higher mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, body mass index, insulin, and HOMA-IR, as well as lower mean adiponectin; higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus/glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. There was a significant positive correlation of PWV with systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and mean blood pressure, body mass index, and LDL-cholesterol, and a negative correlation with HDL-cholesterol and adiponectin. In the multiple regression model, after adjustment of HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and adiponectin for gender, age, body mass index and mean blood pressure, only the male gender and mean blood pressure remained significantly correlated with PWV. CONCLUSION: PWV in young adults showed a significant association with cardiovascular risk variables, especially in the male gender, and mean blood pressure as important determinant variables. The findings suggest that PWV measurement can be useful for the identification of vascular impairment in this age group.

  8. Calibration of Geodetic Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bajtala

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of metrology and security systems of unification, correctness and standard reproducibilities belong to the preferred requirements of theory and technical practice in geodesy. Requirements on the control and verification of measured instruments and equipments increase and the importance and up-to-date of calibration get into the foreground. Calibration possibilities of length-scales (of electronic rangefinders and angle-scales (of horizontal circles of geodetic instruments. Calibration of electronic rangefinders on the linear comparative baseline in terrain. Primary standard of planar angle – optical traverse and its exploitation for calibration of the horizontal circles of theodolites. The calibration equipment of the Institute of Slovak Metrology in Bratislava. The Calibration process and results from the calibration of horizontal circles of selected geodetic instruments.

  9. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  10. A Study of New Pulse Auscultation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yun Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new type of pulse auscultation system, which uses a condenser microphone to measure pulse sound waves on the wrist, captures the microphone signal for filtering, amplifies the useful signal and outputs it to an oscilloscope in analog form for waveform display and storage and delivers it to a computer to perform a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT and convert the pulse sound waveform into a heartbeat frequency. Furthermore, it also uses an audio signal amplifier to deliver the pulse sound by speaker. The study observed the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine’s pulsing techniques, where pulse signals at places called “cun”, “guan” and “chi” of the left hand were measured during lifting (100 g, searching (125 g and pressing (150 g actions. Because the system collects the vibration sound caused by the pulse, the sensor itself is not affected by the applied pressure, unlike current pulse piezoelectric sensing instruments, therefore, under any kind of pulsing pressure, it displays pulse changes and waveforms with the same accuracy. We provide an acquired pulse and waveform signal suitable for Chinese Medicine practitioners’ objective pulse diagnosis, thus providing a scientific basis for this Traditional Chinese Medicine practice. This study also presents a novel circuit design using an active filtering method. An operational amplifier with its differential features eliminates the interference from external signals, including the instant high-frequency noise. In addition, the system has the advantages of simple circuitry, cheap cost and high precision.

  11. Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yun; Li, Lee; Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai

    2014-10-01

    This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18 × 15 × 15 cm3, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

  12. Measurement uncertainty in pulmonary vascular input impedance and characteristic impedance estimated from pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound and pressure: clinical studies on 57 pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lian; Hunter, Kendall S; Kirby, K Scott; Ivy, D Dunbar; Shandas, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular input impedance better characterizes right ventricular (RV) afterload and disease outcomes in pulmonary hypertension compared to the standard clinical diagnostic, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Early efforts to measure impedance were not routine, involving open-chest measurement. Recently, the use of pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler-measured velocity to non-invasively estimate instantaneous flow has made impedance measurement more practical. One critical concern remains with clinical use: the measurement uncertainty, especially since previous studies only incorporated random error. This study utilized data from a large pediatric patient population to comprehensively examine the systematic and random error contributions to the total impedance uncertainty and determined the least error prone methodology to compute impedance from among four different methods. We found that the systematic error contributes greatly to the total uncertainty and that one of the four methods had significantly smaller propagated uncertainty; however, even when this best method is used, the uncertainty can be large for input impedance at high harmonics and for the characteristic impedance modulus. Finally, we found that uncertainty in impedance between normotensive and hypertensive patient groups displays no significant difference. It is concluded that clinical impedance measurement would be most improved by advancements in instrumentation, and the best computation method is proposed for future clinical use of the input impedance. PMID:20410558

  13. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  14. Intense Pulsed Light Therapy for Skin Rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBernardo, Barry E; Pozner, Jason N

    2016-07-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL), also known as pulsed light and broad band light, is a nonlaser light source used to treat a variety of vascular and pigmented lesions, photo damage, active acne, and unwanted hair. Current IPL systems are much improved from older-generation devices with better calibration, integrated cooling, and improved tuning. These devices are extremely popular because of their versatility and are often the first devices recommended and purchased in many offices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Suppression of transverse ablative Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration by using elliptically polarized laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Dong; Qiao, B; Zhou, C T; Yan, X Q; Yu, M Y; He, X T

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the transverse Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instability in the hole boring radiation pressure acceleration can be suppressed by using elliptically polarized (EP) laser. A moderate ${J}\\times{B}$ heating of the EP laser will thermalize the local electrons, which leads to the transverse diffusion of ions, suppressing the short wavelength perturbations of RT instability. A proper condition of polarization ratio is obtained analytically for the given laser intensity and plasma density. The idea is confirmed by two dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, showing that the ion beam driven by the EP laser is more concentrated and intense compared with that of the circularly polarized laser.

  16. Pulse plating

    CERN Document Server

    Hansal, Wolfgang E G; Green, Todd; Leisner, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The electrodeposition of metals using pulsed current has achieved practical importance in recent years. Although it has long been known that changes in potential, with or without polarity reversal, can significantly affect the deposition process, the practical application of this has been slow to be adopted. This can largely be explained in terms of the complex relationship between the current regime and its effect on the electrodeposition process. In order to harness these effects, an understanding of the anodic and cathodic electrochemical processes is necessary, together with the effects of polarity reversal and the rate of such reversals. In this new monograph, the basics of metal electrodeposition from solution are laid out in great detail in seven distinct chapters. With this knowledge, the reader is able to predict how a given pulse train profile can be adopted to achieve a desired outcome. Equally important is the choice of a suitable rectifier and the ancillary control circuits to enable pulse platin...

  17. Autonomous calibration of single spin qubit operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Florian; Unden, Thomas; Zoller, Jonathan; Said, Ressa S.; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2017-12-01

    Fully autonomous precise control of qubits is crucial for quantum information processing, quantum communication, and quantum sensing applications. It requires minimal human intervention on the ability to model, to predict, and to anticipate the quantum dynamics, as well as to precisely control and calibrate single qubit operations. Here, we demonstrate single qubit autonomous calibrations via closed-loop optimisations of electron spin quantum operations in diamond. The operations are examined by quantum state and process tomographic measurements at room temperature, and their performances against systematic errors are iteratively rectified by an optimal pulse engineering algorithm. We achieve an autonomous calibrated fidelity up to 1.00 on a time scale of minutes for a spin population inversion and up to 0.98 on a time scale of hours for a single qubit π/2 -rotation within the experimental error of 2%. These results manifest a full potential for versatile quantum technologies.

  18. Calibration of parameters of water supply network model using genetic algorithm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomasz Boczar; Norbert Adamikiewicz; Włodzimierz Stanisławski

    2017-01-01

    ...: the pressure on the node and volume flow in the network section. The first calibration method regards to application of the genetic algorithm, which is a build in plugin - “Epanet Calibrator...

  19. Calibration of Photon Sources for Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, Alex

    Source calibration has to be considered an essential part of the quality assurance program in a brachytherapy department. Not only it will ensure that the source strength value used for dose calculation agrees within some predetermined limits to the value stated on the source certificate, but also it will ensure traceability to international standards. At present calibration is most often still given in terms of reference air kerma rate, although calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water would be closer to the users interest. It can be expected that in a near future several standard laboratories will be able to offer this latter service, and dosimetry protocols will have to be adapted in this way. In-air measurement using ionization chambers (e.g. a Baldwin—Farmer ionization chamber for 192Ir high dose rate HDR or pulsed dose rate PDR sources) is still considered the method of choice for high energy source calibration, but because of their ease of use and reliability well type chambers are becoming more popular and are nowadays often recommended as the standard equipment. For low energy sources well type chambers are in practice the only equipment available for calibration. Care should be taken that the chamber is calibrated at the standard laboratory for the same source type and model as used in the clinic, and using the same measurement conditions and setup. Several standard laboratories have difficulties to provide these calibration facilities, especially for the low energy seed sources (125I and 103Pd). Should a user not be able to obtain properly calibrated equipment to verify the brachytherapy sources used in his department, then at least for sources that are replaced on a regular basis, a consistency check program should be set up to ensure a minimal level of quality control before these sources are used for patient treatment.

  20. Stabilizing transverse ablative Rayleigh Taylor like instability by using elliptically polarized laser pulses in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration regime

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Dong; Zhou, C T; Yan, X Q; Yu, M Y; He, X T

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that the transverse Rayleigh Taylor like instability can be well stabilized by using elliptically polarized laser in the hole boring radiation pressure acceleration regime. The $\\bm{J}\\times\\bm{B}$ effect of the laser will thermalize the local electrons and support a transverse diffusion mechanism of the ions, resulting in the stabilization of the short wavelength perturbations, which is quite similar to the ablative Rayleigh Taylor instability in the initial confinement fusion research. The proper range of polarization ratio is obtained from a theoretical model for the given laser intensity and plasma density. The stabilization mechanism is well confirmed by two dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, and the ion beam driven by the elliptically polarized laser is more concentrated and intense compared with that of the circularly polarized laser.

  1. Site Calibration, FGW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    This Site Calibration report is describing the results of a measured site calibration for a site in Denmark. The calibration is carried out by DTU Wind Energy in accordance with Ref.[3] and Ref.[4]. The measurement period is given. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance...... measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio between the wind speed at the center of the turbine hub and at the met mast. The wind speed at the turbine is measured by a temporary mast placed at the foundation for the turbine. The site and measurement equipment...

  2. Assessing the blood pressure waveform of the carotid artery using an ultrasound image processing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleimani, Effat; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe [Dept. of Medical Physics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fatouraee, Nasser [Dept. of Medical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saben, Hazhir [Dept. Radiology, Imaging Center of Imam Khomaini Hospital, Tehran Medical Sciences University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to introduce and implement a noninvasive method to derive the carotid artery pressure waveform directly by processing diagnostic sonograms of the carotid artery. Ultrasound image sequences of 20 healthy male subjects (age, 36±9 years) were recorded during three cardiac cycles. The internal diameter and blood velocity waveforms were extracted from consecutive sonograms over the cardiac cycles by using custom analysis programs written in MATLAB. Finally, the application of a mathematical equation resulted in time changes of the arterial pressure. The resulting pressures were calibrated using the mean and the diastolic pressure of the radial artery. A good correlation was found between the mean carotid blood pressure obtained from the ultrasound image processing and the mean radial blood pressure obtained using a standard digital sphygmomanometer (R=0.91). The mean absolute difference between the carotid calibrated pulse pressures and those measured clinically was -1.333±6.548 mm Hg. The results of this study suggest that consecutive sonograms of the carotid artery can be used for estimating a blood pressure waveform. We believe that our results promote a noninvasive technique for clinical applications that overcomes the reproducibility problems of common carotid artery tonometry with technical and anatomical causes.

  3. Multi-Objective Optimization of Pulse Testing Results Using Parallel Compositional Simulations for Reservoir Characterization of a CO2-EOR Field in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, B.; Wheeler, M.; Sun, A. Y.

    2016-12-01

    This study aims at calibrating subsurface models by reproducing pulse testing results carried out at a CO2-EOR field located in Mississippi. Pulse testing is a cost-effective tool to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of rock formation for geological carbon sequestration projects because the periodic injection of CO2 reduces the interference on reservoir operations. The pressure perturbation induced by the injection is recorded at two monitoring wells at the test area of the field. The observed pressure pulse patterns are reproduced by running compositional simulations. The computational cost associated with the numerical simulations is reduced using high-performance parallel computing. For efficient history matching, the observed and simulated pulse patterns in the time domain are transformed into the frequency domain using fast Fourier transform. The CO2 injection responses are assimilated using an evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm in order to improve the matching process and to quantify the posterior uncertainty. A tradeoff relationship between the matching qualities measured at the monitoring wells is detected by invoking multi-objective optimization. The posterior ensemble composed of non-dominated subsurface models reduces the bias in the uncertainty models as compared to conventional global-objective optimization algorithms, indicating that the model calibration based on Pareto-optimality can yield rigorous uncertainty quantification.

  4. An automated pressure data acquisition system for evaluation of pressure sensitive paint chemistries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey, Bradley S.; Mitchell, Michael; Burkett, Cecil G.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    An automated pressure data acquisition system for testing of pressure sensitive phosphorescent paints was designed, assembled, and tested. The purpose of the calibration system is the evaluation and selection of pressure sensitive paint chemistries that could be used to obtain global aerodynamic pressure distribution measurements. The test apparatus and setup used for pressure sensitive paint characterizations is described. The pressure calibrations, thermal sensitivity effects, and photodegradation properties are discussed.

  5. Dynamic Calibration and Validation of an Accelerometer Force Balance for Hypersonic Lifting Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An accelerometer-based force balance was designed and developed for the measurement of drag, lift, and rolling moment on a blunt-nosed, flapped delta wing in a short-duration hypersonic shock tunnel. Calibration and validation of the balance were carried out by a convolution technique using hammer pulse test and surface pressure measurements. In the hammer pulse test, a known impulse was applied to the model in the appropriate direction using an impulse hammer, and the corresponding output of the balance (acceleration was recorded. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT was operated on the output of the balance to generate a system response function, relating the signal output to the corresponding load input. Impulse response functions for three components of the balance, namely, axial, normal, and angular, were obtained for a range of input load. The angular system response function was corresponding to rolling of the model. The impulse response functions thus obtained, through dynamic calibration, were operated on the output (signals of the balance under hypersonic aerodynamic loading conditions in the tunnel to get the time history of the unknown aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the model. Surface pressure measurements were carried out on the model using high frequency pressure transducers, and forces and moments were deduced thereon. Tests were carried out at model angles of incidence of 0, 5, 10, and 15 degrees. A good agreement was observed among the results of different experimental methods. The balance developed is a comprehensive force/moment measurement device that can be used on complex, lifting, aerodynamic geometries in ground-based hypersonic test facilities.

  6. Heat driven pulse pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Steve M (Inventor); Martins, Mario S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A heat driven pulse pump includes a chamber having an inlet port, an outlet port, two check valves, a wick, and a heater. The chamber may include a plurality of grooves inside wall of the chamber. When heated within the chamber, a liquid to be pumped vaporizes and creates pressure head that expels the liquid through the outlet port. As liquid separating means, the wick, disposed within the chamber, is to allow, when saturated with the liquid, the passage of only liquid being forced by the pressure head in the chamber, preventing the vapor from exiting from the chamber through the outlet port. A plurality of grooves along the inside surface wall of the chamber can sustain the liquid, which is amount enough to produce vapor for the pressure head in the chamber. With only two simple moving parts, two check valves, the heat driven pulse pump can effectively function over the long lifetimes without maintenance or replacement. For continuous flow of the liquid to be pumped a plurality of pumps may be connected in parallel.

  7. Pressure estimation for diamond anvils cell under very-low pressures, hydrostatic conditions -evaluation for quartz Raman peak shifts-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, K.; Okamoto, K.

    2016-12-01

    Pressure shift of the ruby R1 luminescent shift has been used as primary pressure gauge in diamond-anvils experiments. However, the pressure calibration under low-pressure conditions (quartz Raman-shift pressure gauge reported by Schmidt and Ziemenn (2000). At pressure lower than 1 GPa, their pressure calibration give 0.2 GPa lower conditions than the Ruby pressure gauge at 1 GPa.

  8. Pulsed Power Bibliography. Volume 2. Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    inoestigated at different pressures and generating signal nacimum peak pouer; One flow rote and sturate volume detereine amplitudes. 22 Refs. mauimumrunn...and Local Thermodyvasic Equilibrium INTERUPTION (LTE) of the arc planna. .srical solutions for the field variables T.E. Browne Jr. are obtained by...complete high current pulse amplifier were fabricated and teste forSwpplTss. Pulse Ognerater; S inductsr DiOedes; diode sturation charsctettcs and pulse

  9. Site Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Vesth, Allan

    This report describes the site calibration carried out at Østerild, during a given period. The site calibration was performed with two Windcube WLS7 (v1) lidars at ten measurements heights. The lidar is not a sensor approved by the current version of the IEC 61400-12-1 [1] and therefore the site...

  10. TWSTFT Link Calibration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302...and Bauch A (2014) THE EUROPEAN TW CALIBRATION CAMPAIGN 2014 IN THE SCOPE OF GALILEO (TGVF- FOC), An opportunity to update, TW link calibrations in

  11. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Villanueva, Héctor

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and correspondi...

  12. Development of pulse diagnostic devices in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunho Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In Korean medicine, pulse diagnosis is one of the important methods for determining the health status of a patient. For over 40 years, electromechanical pulse diagnostic devices have been developed to objectify and quantify pulse diagnoses. In this paper, we review previous research and development for pulse diagnostic devices according to various fields of study: demand analysis and current phase, literature studies, sensors, actuators, systems, physical quantity studies, clinical studies, and the U-health system. We point out some confusing issues that have been naively accepted without strict verification: original pressure pulse waveform and derivative pressure pulse waveform, pressure signals and other signal types, and minutely controlled pressure exertion issues. We then consider some technical and clinical issues to achieve the development of a pulse diagnostic device that is appropriate both technically and in terms of Korean medicine. We hope to show the history of pulse diagnostic device research in Korea and propose a proper method to research and develop these devices.

  13. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhen, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dean, T.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  14. Aortic distensibility as a surrogate for intertwin pulse pressure differences in monochorionic pregnancies with and without twin-twin transfusion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlmuth, C; Osei, F A; Moise, K J; Johnson, A; Papanna, R; Bebbington, M; Gardiner, H M

    2016-08-01

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) complicates 10-15% of monochorionic diamniotic (MCDA) twin pregnancies. The donor response to hypovolemia allows the transfer of vasoactive mediators to the recipient, causing increased recipient afterload and hypertension. Our objective was to apply a novel speckle-tracking technique to measure the aortic fractional area change (AFAC) during the cardiac cycle in MCDA twins with and without TTTS, and identify intertwin differences in AFAC and parameters of cardiac function. High-frame rate four-chamber views of the fetal heart, including the mid-thoracic aorta, were collected prospectively in MCDA twin pairs referred to our center between June 2014 and April 2015. Using speckle-tracking software, the endovascular border of the aorta was traced manually during systole, with guidance on cardiac cycle timing by anatomical M-mode. AFAC, defined as the difference between maximum and minimum area divided by minimum area, expressed as a percentage, was calculated offline and averaged over three cardiac cycles. Tissue Doppler and displacement were used to measure long-axis cardiac function. Intra- and interclass correlation coefficients were used to test observer variability. Fifty-one MCDA twin pregnancies were included, comprising uncomplicated MCDA (n = 14), TTTS Stages 1/2 (n = 21) and TTTS Stages 3/4 (n = 16). Median gestational age was 20.4 (range, 16.2-27.5) weeks. Mean ± SD heart rate was 142.6 ± 7.2 bpm with no significant intertwin pair differences. AFAC was significantly higher in recipients than in donors of TTTS pairs (Stages 1/2: 72.3 ± 29.9% vs 43.7 ± 19.3%, P pressure. No intertwin differences in AFAC were seen in uncomplicated MCDA pairs. Inter- and intraclass correlation coefficients for AFAC were 0.894 and 0.888. AFAC correlated significantly with combined cardiac output (r = 0.252, P = 0.011) and left and right E/E' ratio (left: r = 0.302, P = 0.004; right: r

  15. Correlation between diurnal variation of intraocular pressure, ocular pulse amplitude and corneal structural properties Correlação entre a variação diurna da pressão intraocular, amplitude de pulso e propriedades estruturais corneanas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Silva Villas-Bôas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fluctuation of intraocular pressure measurements obtained by Goldmann applanation tonometry, dynamic contour tonometry, and corneal compensated non-contact tonometry during office hours in glaucoma and healthy participants. This study also aims at correlating the intraocular pressure fluctuations with fluctuations of corneal hysteresis, central corneal thickness, mean central corneal curvature and ocular pulse amplitude. METHODS: A total of 12 controls (24 eyes and 21 patients (38 eyes with open-angle glaucoma were recruited. Intraocular pressure measured by Goldmann applanation tonometry, dynamic contour tonometry and corneal compensated non-contact tonometry, ocular pulse amplitude, central corneal curvature and thickness, corneal hysteresis, and resistance factor were obtained at intervals of 2 hours, between 9 AM and 5 PM. RESULTS: Intraocular pressure fluctuated significantly throughout the day in controls and glaucoma individuals with all tonometers (POBJETIVO: Avaliar a flutuação das medidas da pressão intraocular obtidas pela tonometria de aplanação de Goldmann, tonometria de contorno dinâmico e pela tonometria de não-contato com compensação corneana durante o período ambulatorial, em participantes com glaucoma e saudáveis. Esse estudo também correlacionou as flutuações da pressão intraocular com as flutuações da histerese corneana, espessura corneana central, média da curvatura corneana central e amplitude de pulso ocular. MÉTODOS: Um total de 12 controles (24 olhos e 21 pacientes com glaucoma de ângulo aberto (38 olhos foram selecionados. A pressão intraocular medida pela tonometria de aplanação de Goldmann, tonometria de contorno dinâmico e tonometria de não-contato com compensação corneana, amplitude de pulso ocular, a curvatura central e espessura corneanas, a histerese corneana e o fator de resistência foram medidos em intervalos de 2 horas, entre 9

  16. Absolute calibration of a multilayer-based XUV diagnostic

    CERN Document Server

    Stuik, R; Tümmler, J; Bijkerk, F

    2002-01-01

    A portable, universal narrowband XUV diagnostic suitable for calibration of various XUV light sources, was built, tested and fully calibrated. The diagnostic allows measurement of the absolute XUV energy and average power in two selected wavelength bands, at 11.4 and 13.4 nm. In addition, the pulse-to-pulse and long-term XUV stability of the source can be assessed, as well as the contamination of multilayer XUV optics exposed to the source. This paper describes the full calibration procedure: all optical elements were calibrated at the wavelength of operation by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the storage ring Bessy II, a full analysis of geometrical factors was done, and the influence of the spectral emissivity of the source on the calibration was analyzed in detail. The calibration was performed both for the centroid wavelength as for the full bandwidth of the diagnostic. The total uncertainty in the absolute calibration allowed measurement of source characteristics with an uncertainty of less than...

  17. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J.B.A. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Jouvard, J.-M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Carvou, E. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Menneveux, J.; Yu, J. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ouf, F.-X. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sureté Nucléaire IRSN/PSN-RES/SCA/LPMA BP 68, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Carles, S. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Perez, J. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Marco de Lucas, M.C., E-mail: delucas@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); and others

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • NPs formed in a plasma-plume during laser irradiation of metals (Al, Ti, Ag) were studied. • In situ SAXS and ex situ TEM, XRD and Raman spectra were measured. • NPs size decreased when increasing the O{sub 2} fraction in a controlled O{sub 2}+N{sub 2} atmosphere. • The oxidation of metal NPs in the plasma restricts the increase of the size of the NPs. - Abstract: The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O{sub 2}–N{sub 2} gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2–5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O{sub 2} percentage in the O{sub 2}–N{sub 2} gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  18. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  19. Diagnostics of pulse contrast for petawatt laser in SGII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xiaoping; Liu, Daizhong; Zhu, Baoqiang; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2015-02-01

    Pulse contrast is an important parameter for ultrafast pulses. It shall be 108 or higher in order to avoid effect from noise before main pulse. Diagnostics with cross-correlation can achieve high temporal resolution such as ~7fs. Cross-correlation has advantage in pulse contrast measurement than autocorrelation because it can distinguish noise before or after main pulse. High dynamic range is also essential in pulse contrast measurement. Cross-correlation signal from a single shot is converted into a signal series through fiber array, which can be analyzed by a set of a PMT and an oscilloscope. Noise from nonlinear crystal and scatter needs decrease to improve dynamic range. And pulse power is also discussed in pulse contrast experiments. Time delay τ is generated by travel stage in measurement for repetition pulses. Then energy instability will generate error in this measurement. In measurement for single shot pulse, time delay τ is generated by slant angle of beams. The scanning procession is completed with thousands parts of beam section within a single shot, and error will generated from no uniformity in near field. Performance test of pulse contrast measurement is introduced in subsequent sections. Temporal resolution is testified by self-calibration. Dynamic range is judged by a parallel flat. At last pulse contrast of petawatt laser is diagnosed by a single shot cross-correlator with high confidence. The ratio is 10-6 at 50ps before main pulse, and 10-4 at 10ps before main pulse.

  20. Frequency Domain Analysis of a Gas Fired Mechanically Valved Pulse Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeier, Yedidia

    1993-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of a mechanically valved pulse combustor in the frequency domain. The pulse combustor is treated as a feedback system. The forward branch of the system consists of the acoustic resonator, while the feedback loop consists of the combustion heat release process and the heat loss through the pulse combustor walls. The model of the acoustic resonator is based upon an analysis of the conservation equation for the combustion chamber energy oscillations and the tail pipe acoustics. The present study utilizes a phenomenological approach to model the periodic heat release process in the combustor. The model accounts for the mixing of cold reactants with hot products, flame extinction due to high velocities during the injection time, and the kinetics of the chemical reaction. The results of this study indicate that a high periodic heat transfer must take place in the combustion zone of mechanically valved pulse combustors. The intensity of this oscillating heat transfer is an order of magnitude larger than has been observed until the present study. The results imply that the unsteady heat transfer contributes vital feedback that stabilizes the limit cycle of the pulse combustor. The study was extended to include preliminary experimental evidence for the existence of a very high wall heat losses in the combustion zone, as predicted by the model. No model of pulse combustor that fails to account for unsteady heat transfer in the combustion zone can be considered fully accurate. A calibration procedure is developed to optimize the model prediction. This calibration process is oriented to provide an accurate prediction of the important parameters; namely, the pressure level and the operating frequency, at the cost of less accuracy in predicting relatively less important parameters. The model developed in the study has been used to develop a software package application for design and analysis of pulse combustors. The use of the software for pulse

  1. Free-field reciprocity calibration of laboratory standard (LS) microphones using a time selective technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud; Barrera Figueroa, Salvador

    2006-01-01

    Although the basic principle of reciprocity calibration of microphones in a free field is simple, the practical problems are complicated due to the low signal-to-noise ratio and the influence of cross talk and reflections from the surroundings. The influence of uncorrelated noise can be reduced...... by conventional narrow-band filtering and time averaging, while correlated signals like cross talk and reflections can be eliminated by using time-selective postprocessing techniques. The technique used at DPLA overcomes both these problems using a B&K Pulse analyzer in the SSR mode (steady state response......) and an FFT-based time-selective technique. The complex electrical transfer impedance is measured in linear frequency steps from a few kHz to about three times the resonance frequency of the microphones. The missing values at low frequencies are estimated from a detailed knowledge of the pressure...

  2. Approximation Behooves Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Ribeiro, André Manuel; Poulsen, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Calibration based on an expansion approximation for option prices in the Heston stochastic volatility model gives stable, accurate, and fast results for S&P500-index option data over the period 2005–2009....

  3. SRHA calibration curve

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — an UV calibration curve for SRHA quantitation. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Chang, X., and D. Bouchard. Surfactant-Wrapped Multiwalled...

  4. Air Data Calibration Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is for low altitude subsonic altimeter system calibrations of air vehicles. Mission is a direct support of the AFFTC mission. Postflight data merge is...

  5. SPOTS Calibration Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The results are presented using the procedure outlined by the Standardisation Project for Optical Techniques of Strain measurement to calibrate a digital image correlation system. The process involves comparing the experimental data obtained with the optical measurement system to the theoretical values for a specially designed specimen. The standard states the criteria which must be met in order to achieve successful calibration, in addition to quantifying the measurement uncertainty in the system. The system was evaluated at three different displacement load levels, generating strain ranges from 289 µstrain to 2110 µstrain. At the 289 µstrain range, the calibration uncertainty was found to be 14.1 µstrain, and at the 2110 µstrain range it was found to be 28.9 µstrain. This calibration procedure was performed without painting a speckle pattern on the surface of the metal. Instead, the specimen surface was prepared using different grades of grit paper to produce the desired texture.

  6. Ames Balance Calibration Laboratory