WorldWideScience

Sample records for calderas

  1. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  2. Calderas and magma reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Katharine V.; Giordano, Guido

    2014-11-01

    Large caldera-forming eruptions have long been a focus of both petrological and volcanological studies; petrologists have used the eruptive products to probe conditions of magma storage (and thus processes that drive magma evolution), while volcanologists have used them to study the conditions under which large volumes of magma are transported to, and emplaced on, the Earth's surface. Traditionally, both groups have worked on the assumption that eruptible magma is stored within a single long-lived melt body. Over the past decade, however, advances in analytical techniques have provided new views of magma storage regions, many of which provide evidence of multiple melt lenses feeding a single eruption, and/or rapid pre-eruptive assembly of large volumes of melt. These new petrological views of magmatic systems have not yet been fully integrated into volcanological perspectives of caldera-forming eruptions. Here we explore the implications of complex magma reservoir configurations for eruption dynamics and caldera formation. We first examine mafic systems, where stacked-sill models have long been invoked but which rarely produce explosive eruptions. An exception is the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland, where seismic and petrologic data show that multiple sills at different depths fed a multi-phase (explosive and effusive) eruption. Extension of this concept to larger mafic caldera-forming systems suggests a mechanism to explain many of their unusual features, including their protracted explosivity, spatially variable compositions and pronounced intra-eruptive pauses. We then review studies of more common intermediate and silicic caldera-forming systems to examine inferred conditions of magma storage, time scales of melt accumulation, eruption triggers, eruption dynamics and caldera collapse. By compiling data from large and small, and crystal-rich and crystal-poor, events, we compare eruptions that are well explained by simple evacuation of a zoned

  3. Calderas and mineralization: volcanic geology and mineralization in the Chianti caldera complex, Trans-Pecos Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duex, T.W.; Henry, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes preliminary results of an ongoing study of the volcanic stratigraphy, caldera activity, and known and potential mineralization of the Chinati Mountains area of Trans-Pecos Texas. Many ore deposits are spatially associated with calderas and other volcanic centers. A genetic relationship between calderas and base and precious metal mineralization has been proposed by some and denied by others. Steven and others have demonstrated that calderas provide an important setting for mineralization in the San Juan volcanic field of Colorado. Mineralization is not found in all calderas but is apparently restricted to calderas that had complex, postsubsidence igneous activity. A comparison of volcanic setting, volcanic history, caldera evolution, and evidence of mineralization in Trans-Pecos to those of the San Juan volcanic field, a major mineral producer, indicates that Trans-Pecos Texas also could be an important mineralized region. The Chianti caldera complex in Trans-Pecos Texas contains at least two calderas that have had considerable postsubsidence activity and that display large areas of hydrothermal alteration and mineralization. Abundant prospects in Trans-Pecos and numerous producing mines immediately south of the Trans-Pecos volcanic field in Mexico are additional evidence that ore-grade deposits could occur in Texas.

  4. Caldera Formation on the Vance Seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, D.; Paduan, J.; Cousens, B.; Cornejo, L.; Perfit, M.; Wendt, R.; Stix, J.; Helo, C.

    2006-12-01

    The Vance Seamounts are a chain of near-ridge volcanoes located just west of the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The six volcanoes are built on ocean crust ranging from 0.78 Ma at the southeastern end to 2.55 Ma in the northwest. Morphologic analysis indicates that the volcanoes were constructed sequentially and get younger to the southeast towards the ridge axis. Like many near-ridge volcanoes, some of the Vance Seamounts have large offset calderas that presumably formed above evacuated shallow magma chambers within the upper ocean crust. In summer 2006, we completed 6 dives using MBARI's ROV Tiburon to study the formation of these calderas. The floor of each caldera consists of flat-lying volcaniclastite, under about 25 cm of pelagic sediment. Some caldera floors have mounds of post-caldera pillow flows. The caldera walls have a lower section covered by talus and an upper section of interbedded massive flows with columnar joints (to 11 m thick) and pillow basalts. The top of each caldera wall has a unit of volcanic mudstone to sandstone ranging from 20 cm to 2 m thick. The fine matrix of many of these samples is green hydrothermal clay. The finest siltstone to mudstone samples appear to be layers of massive tan hydrothermal clays. Talus fragments, lava and volcaniclastite outcrops are universally coated and cemented by 1 to 4 cm-thick deposits of hydrothermal Mn-oxide crusts, even on the youngest of the volcanoes. Volcanic particles in the sandstones are mostly dense angular glass, but bubble-wall fragments (limu o Pele) are present and indicate formation during low-energy pyroclastic eruptions. Without the few percent limu o Pele fragments, the glass fragments would resemble those inferred to form by quench granulation. We suggest that quench granulation is actually pyroclastic fragmentation that occurs as coalesced magmatic gas bubbles disrupt the molten lava surface at the vents. Our observations confirm that the more southeasterly offset calderas truncated thick

  5. Caldera rim collapse : A hidden volcanic hazard

    OpenAIRE

    Merle, Olivier; Michon, L.; Bachelery, P.

    2008-01-01

    Following the emblematic flank collapse of Mount St Helens in 1981, numerous models of flank sliding have been proposed. These models have allowed to largely improve the understanding of mechanisms involved in such landslides, which represent a tremendous risk for populations living around volcanoes. In this article, a new mode of landslide formation, related to buried calderas, is described. The model emphasizes the paramount importance of the hidden ring fault that, even when the caldera is...

  6. Krakatau caldera deposits: revisited and verification by geophysical means

    OpenAIRE

    Izumi Yokoyama

    2014-01-01

     One of the differences between volcanic craters and calderas is that the latter bottoms are flatways filled with caldera deposit with lower density in comparison to country rocks. The 1883 Krakatau eruption affords us important knowledge on caldera formation even if it was not observed with modern sophisticated instruments. First, volcanic activities of the Krakatau Islands before and after the 1883 eruption are reexamined: previous suppositions involving a caldera-forming eruption of the pr...

  7. Microearthquakes at Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Improved Detection and Location with Two Additional Caldera Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, P. M.; House, L. S.; Ten Cate, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN) has operated for 43 years, providing data to locate more than 2,500 earthquakes in north-central New Mexico. Roughly 1-2 earthquakes are detected and located per month within about 150 km of Los Alamos, a total of over 900 from 1973 to present. LASN's primary purpose is to monitor seismicity close to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for seismic hazards; monitoring seismicity associated with the nearby Valles Caldera is secondary. Until 2010 the network was focused on monitoring seismic hazards and comprised only 7 stations, all near LANL or in the nearby Jemez Mountains. Just one station—PER, installed in 1998—was close enough to Valles Caldera to be able to detect microearthquakes located in or near the caldera. An initial study of the data from station PER between 1998 and 2002 identified and located 13 events with magnitudes less than 0.5 using the single-station hodogram technique. Those events were all located south of the caldera within a few kilometers of PER. Recently, two new digital broadband stations were installed inside the caldera, one on a northeastern ring-fracture dome, station CDAB, and the other on a northwestern dome, station SAMT. Also, station PER was upgraded with digital broadband instrumentation. Thus, LASN now can detect and record microearthquakes as small as magnitude -1.5 near the caldera, and they can be located using multiple arrival times. Several recent events located near station SAMT on the caldera's ring fracture are the first that have been seen in that area. Additional events were recorded (by all three stations) and located in the area south of the caldera where the earlier hodogram-only events were located. These new multi-station event recordings allow a more quantitative assessment of the uncertainties in the initial single-station hodogram locations. Each event is located using multiple arrival times as well as the hodogram method at as many as three stations. Thus

  8. Magnetic study of the Furnas caldera (Azores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Torta

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available A local ground magnetic study of the Furnas caldera (S. Miguel Island, Azores has provided new insight into the magnetic structure of this volcano. Analysis of the data comprised removal of the IGRF, reduction to the pole, pseudogravity integration and upward continuation. Also, a spectral method was applied to estimate the depth to the magnetic sources, as well as a 2.5D forward modelling technique. Magnetic properties obtained at the laboratory for some representative sample rocks were considered in the modelling process. The most relevant features are the existence of an important negative anomaly inside the caldera and of an intense positive anomaly to the south of the coast. The former points out a decrease in the magnetization of the caldera filling materials with respect to the surrounding rocks, which could be explained as the result of post-eruption processes such as hydrothermal alteration. This is expected as Furnas has an active hydrothermal system probably related with a magmatic reservoir at high temperature. The positive anomaly suggests the existence of a strongly-magnetized body beneath the south coast.

  9. Location of silicic caldera formation in arc settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Gwyneth R; Mahood, Gail A [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, 450 Serra, Mall, Building 320, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Silicic calderas are the surface expressions of silicic magma chambers, and thus their study may yield information about what tectonic and crustal features favor the generation of evolved magma. The goal of this study is to determine whether silicic calderas in arc settings are preferentially located behind the volcanic front. After a global analysis of young, arc-related calderas, we find that silicic calderas at continental margins do form over a wide area behind the front, as compared to other types of arc volcanoes.

  10. Caldera processes and magma-hydrothermal systems continental scientific drilling program: thermal regimes, Valles caldera research, scientific and management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L. (eds.)

    1986-05-01

    Long-range core-drilling operations and initial scientific investigations are described for four sites in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The plan concentrates on the period 1986 to 1993 and has six primary objectives: (1) study the origin, evolution, physical/chemical dynamics of the vapor-dominated portion of the Valles geothermal system; (2) investigate the characteristics of caldera fill and mechanisms of caldera collapse and resurgence; (3) determine the physical/chemical conditions in the heat transfer zone between crystallizing plutons and the hydrothermal system; (4) study the mechanism of ore deposition in the caldera environment; (5) develop and test high-temperature drilling techniques and logging tools; and (6) evaluate the geothermal resource within a large silicic caldera. Core holes VC-2a (500 m) and VC-2b (2000 m) are planned in the Sulphur Springs area; these core holes will probe the vapor-dominated zone, the underlying hot-water-dominated zone, the boiling interface and probable ore deposition between the two zones, and the deep structure and stratigraphy along the western part of the Valles caldera fracture zone and resurgent dome. Core hole VC-3 will involve reopening existing well Baca number12 and deepening it from 3.2 km (present total depth) to 5.5 km, this core hole will penetrate the deep-crystallized silicic pluton, investigate conductive heat transfer in that zone, and study the evolution of the central resurgent dome. Core hole VC-4 is designed to penetrate deep into the presumably thick caldera fill in eastern Valles caldera and examine the relationship between caldera formation, sedimentation, tectonics, and volcanism. Core hole VC-5 is to test structure, stratigraphy, and magmatic evolution of pre-Valles caldera rocks, their relations to Valles caldera, and the influences of regional structure on volcanism and caldera formation.

  11. Yellowstone and Long Valley - A Comparison of Two Restless Calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D. P.; Smith, R. B.

    2007-12-01

    Three large, silicic calderas in the conterminous United States have explosively erupted volumes > 300 km3 within in the last 2 million years -- Yellowstone caldera (Wyoming) Long Valley caldera (California) and the Vallez caldera (New Mexico) all located in extensional tectonic environments. All have shown varying levels of historic unrest. Pronounced unrest episodes at Yellowstone and Long Valley calderas over the past three decades stimulated extensive research on these two closely monitored calderas, and we explore some emerging similarities and differences. Yellowstone caldera is underlain by a long-lived (> 17 my) upper-mantle hot-spot that has fed a series of caldera-forming, extending to the southwest across southern Idaho to central Oregon including three caldera-forming eruptions from the Yellowstone caldera system in the last 2 my, the most recent at 600,000 ybp. It is marked by relatively low density and low seismic velocities extending to depths of at least 400 km and a regional topographic swell with elevations exceeding 2000 m. The extensive Yellowstone hydrothermal system has a thermal output of 5 GW. The most recent magmatic eruption dated at 70,000 ybp. By comparison, Long Valley caldera is underlain by a relatively modest "hot-spot", the locus of which appears to be influenced by a dilatational jog between the dextral Eastern California Shear Zone and the Walker Lane and westward delamination of the dense lithospheric root of the adjacent Sierra Nevada. The Long Valley system has fed multiple eruptions of over the past 4 my and a single caldera-forming eruption at 760,000 ybp. It is marked by a limited topographic swell but with the elevation of the caldera floor and adjacent basins comparable to the 2000-plus m elevation of the Yellowstone swell. Long Valley caldera hydrothermal system has a thermal output of 0.3 GW (including a 40 MW geothermal power plant). The most recent eruptions from the Long Valley Caldera- Mono Domes volcanic field

  12. Setting A Stopwatch for Post-Caldera Effusive Rhyolite Eruptions at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, C. B.; Vazquez, J. A.; Boyce, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Rejuvenation of previously intruded silicic magma is an important process leading to effusive rhyolite, which is the most common product of volcanism at calderas with protracted histories of eruption and unrest such as Yellowstone caldera (Wyoming), Long Valley caldera (California), and Valles caldera (New Mexico) in the United States. Although orders of magnitude smaller in volume than rare caldera-forming supereruptions, these relatively frequent effusions of rhyolite are comparable to the largest eruptions of the 20th century and pose a considerable volcanic hazard. However, the physical pathway from rejuvenation to eruption of silicic magma is unclear, particularly because the time between reheating of a subvolcanic intrusion and eruption is poorly quantified. This study uses trace element diffusion in sanidine crystals measured at nanometer-scale with NanoSIMS to reveal that rejuvenation of a near-solidus or subsolidus silicic intrusion occurred within ~10 months following a protracted period (220 k.y.) of volcanic repose, and resulted in effusion of ~3 km3 of high-silica rhyolite lava at the onset of Yellowstone's last volcanic interval. In addition we find that the frequently made assumption in geospeedometry of a step-function initial condition can be inaccurate despite petrographic evidence for resorption, and can be addressed by interrogating diffusion time scale concordance between multiple trace elements that are geochemically similar. The results of this study reveal that a sufficiently energetic rejuvenation of Yellowstone's shallow crystal-melt mush and/or hydrothermally altered wall rock could lead to an effusive eruption within months. Fortunately, any significant rejuvenation of the reservoir is likely to be associated with deformation or seismicity and identifiable by geophysical monitoring.

  13. The Chacana caldera complex in Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chacana caldera, located immediately east of Quito, capital of Ecuador, forms the most-northern edifice of Ecuadoros rhyolite province. It is a 50X30 km Pleistocene structure that has remained active into historic times. Vitrophyres, welded tuffs, and ignimbrites of rhyolitic and dacitic composition constitute the outer flanks, meantime syngenetic breccias and tuffs, capped later by extensive dacite lava flows and basin sediments, filled the calderaos depression. A notable resurgence occurred that lifted quiet-water sediments to over 4000 m in elevation. The area has numerous hot springs, and little seismic activity.

  14. The graben caldera of Guanajuato, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Tristán-González, M.; Labarthe-Hernández, G.; Marti, J.

    2013-05-01

    Guanajuato has been an important gold and silver mineral district of Mexico since the 16th century until Present. Famous mines such as Rayas, La Valenciana and El Cubo, are part of this important mining development. Stratigraphy and structures are well known, and major faults and vein systems are precisely mapped. The series include a Mesozoic metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary sequence interpreted as a tectonically accreted terrane during Early Cretaceous subduction; a >1000 m thick red beds sequence, apparently Eocene and interpreted originally as molasses posterior to K/T Laramide orogeny, but more probably fanglomerates filling a graben formed during mid-Tertiary extension; an Eocene-Miocene volcanic sequence that accumulated in this tectonic basin and the surrounding area, including andesitic lavas, silicic ignimbrites and surge deposits, and rhyolitic domes. Pyroclastic rocks have not been studied with a volcanological approach, with the purpose of understanding the physical volcanic processes that formed them. Randall (1994) suggested a caldera source for some of them. Our purpose is to describe the volcanic processes involved in the mid-Tertiary units of Guanajuato. There are dacitic and andesitic lavas that were apparently contemporaneous with deposition of the Red Conglomerate of Guanajuato. The ignimbrites correspond to the Sierra Madre Occidental volcanic province. These units were originated as two main pyroclastic densety currents sequences that formed the Loseros-Bufa and the Calderones formations. The former is rhyolitic and the later andesitic-dacitic. Loseros is composed of a series of thin-bedded to laminated pyroclastic surge deposits in continuous and concordant contact with overlying Bufa massive ignimbrite. Bufa ignimbrite is partly welded, with columnar jointing, completely devitrified, and highly silicified by post-deposition hydrothermalism and/or vapor phase alteration. Co-ignimbrite lithic lag breccias are observed at several sites in

  15. Krakatau caldera deposits: revisited and verification by geophysical means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Yokoyama

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available  One of the differences between volcanic craters and calderas is that the latter bottoms are flatways filled with caldera deposit with lower density in comparison to country rocks. The 1883 Krakatau eruption affords us important knowledge on caldera formation even if it was not observed with modern sophisticated instruments. First, volcanic activities of the Krakatau Islands before and after the 1883 eruption are reexamined: previous suppositions involving a caldera-forming eruption of the proto-Krakatau prior to 1883 proved to be unsupported by the bathymetric topographies and gravity anomalies on and around the Krakatau Islands. Then, Anak Krakatau is interpreted as a parasitic cone of the main Krakatau volcano. As supplementary knowledge to discussion of caldera deposits, the results of drillings at several calderas in Japan and Mexico are introduced. Mass deficiency of the caldera deposit at Krakatau caldera is estimated by the gravity anomaly observed there and converted to probable volume with suitable density. For quantitative examination of the subsurface structure beneath the Krakatau complex, spatial distributions of seismic S-wave attenuation and Vp/Vs ratios have been already studied by temporary seismological observations and their results have been published. The high ratios of Vp/Vs observed approximately at Krakatau caldera may be attributable to the caldera deposit that is low density and contain much water. As additional remarks, a zone having both the characters, S-wave attenuation and zones of relatively high Vp/Vs ratio, may be a probable magma reservoir centering at a depth of about 10 km.

  16. Imaging radar observations of Askja Caldera, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, M. C.; Evans, D.; Elachi, C.

    1978-01-01

    A 'blind' test involving interpretation of computer-enhanced like- and cross-polarized radar images is used to evaluate the surface roughness of Askja Caldera, a large volcanic complex in central Iceland. The 'blind' test differs from earlier analyses of radar observations in that computer-processes images and both qualitative and quantitative analyses are used. Attention is given to photogeologic examination and subsequent survey-type field observations, along with aerial photography during the field trip. The results indicate that the 'blind' test of radar interpretation of the Askja volcanic area can be considered suitable within the framework of limitations of radar data considered explicitly from the onset. The limitations of the radar techniques can be eliminated by using oblique-viewing conditions to remove geometric distortions and slope effects.

  17. The Campi Flegrei caldera: unrest mechanisms and hazards

    OpenAIRE

    De Natale, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Troise, C.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Pingue, F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Mastrolorenzo, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Pappalardo, L.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Battaglia, M.; Department of Structural Geology & Geodynamics, University of Göttingen, 37077 Göttingen, Germany; Boschi, E.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione AC, Roma, Italia

    2006-01-01

    In the last four decades, Campi Flegrei caldera has been the world’s most active caldera characterized by intense unrest episodes involving huge ground deformation and seismicity, but, at the time of writing, has not culminated in an eruption. We present a careful review, with new analyses and interpretation, of all the data and recent research results. We deal with three main problems: the tentative reconstruction of the substructure; the modelling of unrest episodes to shed l...

  18. Geology and structure of the Malpaso caldera and El Ocote ignimbrite, Aguascalientes, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto-Obregon, Jorge [Facultad de IngenierIa, UNAM, Coyoacan, 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Aguirre-DIaz, Gerardo [Centro de Geociencias, UNAM, Campus Juriquilla, 76220, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)], E-mail: nieto@servidor.unam.mx, E-mail: ger@geociencias.unam.mx

    2008-10-01

    A new caldera, named Malpaso, is reported west of the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico. The Malpaso caldera is a volcano-tectonic depression, highly fractured and faulted, and was filled by voluminous pyroclastic products related to the caldera collapse. Due to these characteristics it as a graben caldera. It is truncated by younger normal faults of the Calvillo and Aguascalientes grabens. In this work we present a summary of the geologic and structural observations on this caldera, as well as a description of the main caldera product, the high-grade El Ocote ignimbrite.

  19. Genetic relationship between post-caldera and caldera-forming magmas from Aso volcano, SW Japan. Constraints from Sr isotope and trace element compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed the Sr isotope and trace element compositions of the post-caldera volcanic products of Aso volcano in central Kyushu, with the aim of investigating the genetic relationship between the last caldera-forming (Aso-4) magmas and post-caldera magmas. The 87Sr/86Sr ratio of the magmas drastically changed from the homogeneous (0.7041-0.7042) caldera-forming stage to the heterogeneous (0.7040-0.7044) post-caldera stage. In addition, the obtained geochemical data suggested that the Aso-4 magma did not contribute to the origin and compositional evolution of the post-caldera magmas. These observations indicated that the generation of post-caldera magmas was probably independent of the Aso-4 magma. (author)

  20. Reconstruction of caldera collapse and resurgence processes in the offshore sector of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Lena; Spiess, Volkhard; Sacchi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Large collapse calderas are associated with exceptionally explosive volcanic eruptions, which are capable of triggering a global catastrophe second only to that from a giant meteorite impact. Therefore, active calderas have attracted significant attention in both scientific communities and governmental institutions worldwide. One prime example of a large collapse caldera can be found in southern Italy, more precisely in the northern Bay of Naples within the Campi Flegrei Volcanic Area. The Campi Flegrei caldera covers an area of approximately 200 km² defined by a quasi-circular depression, half onland, half offshore. It is still under debate whether the caldera formation was related to only one ignimbritic eruption namely the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff (NYT) eruption at 15 ka or if it is a nested-caldera system related to the NYT and the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption at 39 ka. During the last 40 years, the Campi Flegrei caldera has experienced episodes of unrest involving significant ground deformation and seismicity, which have nevertheless not yet led to an eruption. Besides these short-term episodes of unrest, long-term ground deformation with rates of several tens of meters within a few thousand years can be observed in the central part of the caldera. The source of both short-term and long-term deformation is still under debate and possibly related to a shallow hydrothermal system and caldera resurgence attributed to a deeper magma chamber, respectively. Understanding the mechanisms for unrest and eruptions is of paramount importance as a future eruption of the Campi Flegrei caldera would expose more than 500,000 people to the risk of pyroclastic flows. This study is based on a dense grid (semi-3D) of high-resolution multi-channel seismic profiles acquired in the offshore sector of the Campi Flegrei caldera. The seismic lines show evidence for the escape of fluids and/or gases along weak zones such as faults, thereby supporting the existence of a hydrothermal

  1. The basic feature of the caldera and its evolution in Mongshan (eastern China)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geological setting of the formation of the caldera classification of the volcanic rock cycles distribution laws of the strata facies and lithology as well as volcanofracture system are elucldated , and the evolutionary histroy of the caldera is dated

  2. Science guide for the Long Valley Caldera deep hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundle, J.B.; Eichelberger, J.C. (eds.)

    1989-05-01

    The Magma Energy Program of the US Department of Energy, Geothermal Technology Division, is planning to begin drilling a deep (6 km) exploration well in Long Valley Caldera, California, in September 1988. The location of the well is in the central part of the caldera, coincident with a large number of shallow (5-7 km) geophysical anomalies identified through many independent investigations. Results from the hole will permit the following: direct investigation of the geophysical anomalies interpreted to be magma; investigation of the patterns and conditions of deep fluid circulation and heat transport below the caldera floor; determination of the amount of collapse and subsequent resurgence of the central portion of Long Valley caldera; and determination of the intrusion history of the central plutonic complex beneath the caldera, and establishment of the relationship of intrusive to eruptive events. The hole will thus provide a stringent test of the hypothesis that magma is still present within the central plutonic complex. If the interpretation of geophysical anomalies is confirmed, the hole will provide the first observations of the environment near a large silicic magma chamber. 80 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Carbonatite ring-complexes explained by caldera-style volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Malehmir, Alireza; Troll, Valentin R; Dehghannejad, Mahdieh; Juhlin, Christopher; Ask, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Carbonatites are rare, carbonate-rich magmatic rocks that make up a minute portion of the crust only, yet they are of great relevance for our understanding of crustal and mantle processes. Although they occur in all continents and from Archaean to present, the deeper plumbing system of carbonatite ring-complexes is usually poorly constrained. Here, we show that carbonatite ring-complexes can be explained by caldera-style volcanism. Our geophysical investigation of the Alnö carbonatite ring-complex in central Sweden identifies a solidified saucer-shaped magma chamber at ~3 km depth that links to surface exposures through a ring fault system. Caldera subsidence during final stages of activity caused carbonatite eruptions north of the main complex, providing the crucial element to connect plutonic and eruptive features of carbonatite magmatism. The way carbonatite magmas are stored, transported and erupt at the surface is thus comparable to known emplacement styles from silicic calderas. PMID:23591904

  4. Geophysical expression of the batholith beneath Questa Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, Lindrith; Long, Carl L.; Jones, David W.

    1985-11-01

    Gravity gradients delineate uncharacteristically straight, north-south trending graben faults in the Rio Grande rift west of Questa caldera, and gravity and audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) data show north-south trending low-density and high-resistivity zones from the caldera southward. A gravity inversion technique was used to isolate the gravity anomaly of the caldera and related intrusive rocks from the complicated Bouguer gravity field. The residual gravity anomaly together with AMT data reported in a companion paper by C. L. Long seem to delineate the subcaldera batholith. Geophysical models indicate this to be a north-south trending dikelike or beamlike body about 25 km long, 5 km wide, and >4 km thick, thickness estimate being limited by the penetration depth of the AMT soundings. The north-south trend is not consistent with the regional pattern of early Miocene southwest directed extension and instead may reflect passive control by preexisting north-south strike-slip faults.

  5. Workshop on recent research in the Valles caldera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G. (comp.)

    1985-02-01

    Over the last 5 years, there has been increased interest in the geology of the Jemez Mountains volcanic field, New Mexico. Of special interest is the Toledo-Valles caldera complex, which is targeted for research coring as part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The general topics covered in this workshop were (1) hydrothermal systems and rock-water interactions, (2) volcanology and structural framework of the Jemez volcanic field, (3) determining the presence or absence of melt below the Valles caldera, and (4) deep coring and drilling technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for each presentation.

  6. Potential Hazards of Eruptions around the Tianchi Caldera Lake, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Haiquan; HONG Hanjing; R.S.J. SPARKS; J.S. WALDER; HAN Bin

    2004-01-01

    Since the eruption of the Tianchi volcano about 1000 years ago, there have been at least 3 to 5 eruptions of small to moderate size. In addition, hazardous avalanches, rock falls and debris flows have occurred during periods between eruptions. A future eruption of the Tianchi volcano is likely to involve explosive interaction between magma and the caldera lake. The volume of erupted magma is almost in a range of 0.1-0.5 km3. Tephra fallout may damage agriculture in a large area near the volcano. If only 1% of the lake water were ejected during an eruption and then precipitated over an area of 200 km2, the average rainfall would be 100 mm. Moreover, lahars are likely to occur as both tephra and water ejected from the caldera lake fall onto flanks of the volcano. Rocks avalanching into the caldera lake also would bring about grave hazards because seiches would be triggered and lake water with the volume equal to that of the landslide would spill out of the existing breach in the caldera and cause flooding downstream.

  7. GPS time series at Campi Flegrei caldera (2000-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prospero De Martino

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Campi Flegrei caldera is an active volcanic system associated to a high volcanic risk, and represents a well known and peculiar example of ground deformations (bradyseism, characterized by intense uplift periods, followed by subsidence phases with some episodic superimposed mini-uplifts. Ground deformation is an important volcanic precursor, and, its continuous monitoring, is one of the main tool for short time forecast of eruptive activity. This paper provides an overview of the continuous GPS monitoring of the Campi Flegrei caldera from January 2000 to July 2013, including network operations, data recording and processing, and data products. In this period the GPS time series allowed continuous and accurate tracking of ground deformation of the area. Seven main uplift episodes were detected, and during each uplift period, the recurrent horizontal displacement pattern, radial from the “caldera center”, suggests no significant change in deformation source geometry and location occurs. The complete archive of GPS time series at Campi Flegrei area is reported in the Supplementary materials. These data can be usefull for the scientific community in improving the research on Campi Flegrei caldera dynamic and hazard assessment.

  8. How summit calderas collapse on basaltic volcanoes: new insights from the April 2007 caldera collapse of Piton de la Fournaise volcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michon, Laurent; Catry, Thibault; Merle, Olivier [Laboratoire GeoSciences Reunion, Universite de la Reunion, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, CNRS, UMR 7154 - Geologie des Systemes Volcaniques, 15 avenue Rene Cassin, 97715 Saint Denis (France); Villeneuve, Nicolas [Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement, US 140, BP172, 97492 Sainte-Clotilde cedex (France)], E-mail: laurent.michon@univ-reunion.fr

    2008-10-01

    In April 2007, Piton de la Fournaise volcano experienced a caldera collapse during its largest historical eruption. We present here the resulting deformation and a synthesis of the seismicity recorded during recent caldera collapses. It allows us to propose a unifying mechanism that explains the pulsating collapse dynamics.

  9. How summit calderas collapse on basaltic volcanoes: new insights from the April 2007 caldera collapse of Piton de la Fournaise volcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 2007, Piton de la Fournaise volcano experienced a caldera collapse during its largest historical eruption. We present here the resulting deformation and a synthesis of the seismicity recorded during recent caldera collapses. It allows us to propose a unifying mechanism that explains the pulsating collapse dynamics.

  10. Hollow volcanic tumulus caves of Kilauea Caldera, Hawaii County, Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Halliday

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to lava tube caves with commonly noted features, sizable subcrustal spaces of several types exist on the floor of Kilauea Caldera. Most of these are formed by drainage of partially stabilized volcanic structures enlarged or formed by injection of very fluid lava beneath a plastic crust. Most conspicuous are hollow tumuli, possibly first described by Walker in 1991. Walker mapped and described the outer chamber of Tumulus E-I Cave. Further exploration has revealed that it has a hyperthermic inner room beneath an adjoining tumulus with no connection evident on the surface. Two lengthy, sinuous hollow tumuli also are present in this part of the caldera. These findings support Walkers conclusions that hollow tumuli provide valuable insights into tumulus-forming mechanisms, and provide information about the processes of emplacement of pahoehoe sheet flows.

  11. Hollow volcanic tumulus caves of Kilauea Caldera, Hawaii County, Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    William R. Halliday

    1998-01-01

    In addition to lava tube caves with commonly noted features, sizable subcrustal spaces of several types exist on the floor of Kilauea Caldera. Most of these are formed by drainage of partially stabilized volcanic structures enlarged or formed by injection of very fluid lava beneath a plastic crust. Most conspicuous are hollow tumuli, possibly first described by Walker in 1991. Walker mapped and described the outer chamber of Tumulus E-I Cave. Further exploration has revealed that it has a hyp...

  12. April 2007 collapse of Piton de la Fournaise: A new example of caldera formation

    OpenAIRE

    Michon, Laurent; Staudacher, Thomas; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Bachèlery, Patrick; de Marti, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Collapse calderas are frequent in the evolution of volcanic systems, but very few have formed during historical times. Piton de la Fournaise is one of the world's most active basaltic shield volcanoes. The caldera collapse, which occurred during the April 2007 lateral eruption is one of the few large documented collapse events on this volcano. It helps to understand the mode and origin of caldera collapses in basaltic volcanoes. Field observations, GPS and seismic data show that the collapse ...

  13. Secondary hydrothermal mineral system in the Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormone, A.; Piochi, M.; Di Vito, M. A.; Troise, C.; De Natale, G.

    2012-04-01

    Mineral systems generally develop around the deep root of the volcanoes down to the degassing magma chamber due the selective enrichment process of elements within the host-rock. The mineralization process depends on i) volcanic structure, ii) magma and fluid chemistry, iii) host-rock type and texture, iv) temperature and pressure conditions, and v) action timing that affect the transport and precipitation conditions of elements in the solution. Firstly, it generates a hydrothermal system that in a later phase may generate considerable metallogenic mineralization, in terms of both spatial extension and specie abundance. The study of secondary assemblages through depth and, possibly, through time, together with the definition of the general geological, structural, mineralogical and petrological context is the background to understand the genesis of mineral-to-metallogenic systems. We report our study on the Campi Flegrei volcano of potassic Southern Italy belt. It is a sub-circular caldera characterized by an active high-temperature and fluid-rich geothermal system affected by seismicity and ground deformation in the recent decades. The circulating fluids originate at deeper level within a degassing magma body and give rise at the surface up to 1500 tonnes/day of CO2 emissions. Their composition is intermediate between meteoric water and brines. Saline-rich fluids have been detected at ~3000 in downhole. The hydrothermal alteration varies from argillitic to phillitic, nearby the caldera boundary, to propilitic to thermo-metamorphic facies towards its centre. The Campi Flegrei caldera was defined as analogue of mineralized system such as White Island (New Zealand) that is an example of an active magmatic and embryonic copper porphyry system. In order to enhance the knowledge of such a type of embryonic-like metallogenic system, we have carried out macroscopic and microscopic investigations, SEM-EDS and electron microprobe analyses on selected samples from deep wells

  14. How summit calderas collapse on basaltic volcanoes : new insights from the April 2007 caldera collapse of Piton de la Fournaise volcano

    OpenAIRE

    Michon, L.; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Catry, T; Merle, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    In April 2007, Piton de la Fournaise volcano experienced a caldera collapse during its largest historical eruption. We present here a structural analysis both of the caldera and the surrounding area, and precise GPS data recorded with a dense GPS network specifically dedicated to the analysis of deformation related to the summit collapse structures. Despite a collapse of more than 300 m in the central zone, the geometry of the new caldera is similar in map view to that of the pre-existing col...

  15. Satellites images, digitized topography, and the recognition of the Xela Caldera, Quezaltenango Valley, Guatemala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, D. (Pacific Lutheran Univ., Tacoma, WA (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences); McEwen, A.; Duffield, W. (Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)); Heiken, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The authors propose, based on reconnaissance geology studies and interpretation of landforms as depicted by Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images combined with digitized topography, that the Quezaltenango basin of Guatemala is part of a caldera. The Quezaltenango basin is an elliptical depression, about 12 by 25 km and about 500 m deep. The proposed Xela Caldera extends beyond the basin more than 10 km to the north. The geomorphological features of the area that are typical of a geologically young large-scale caldera include bounding walls that have steep interior and gentle exterior slopes; broad flat areas at the base of the walls; at least one large block, about 3 by 12 km, that only partly floundered as the caldera collapsed; resurgence of a younger volcanic dome, flow and small-scale caldera complex (last active in 1818); younger volcanoes located along the structural margin of the major caldera (one of which is currently active) lobate features on the caldera margins that may indicate a multiple sequence of eruptions; and an active, high-temperature geothermal system. The valley is coincident with a gravity low. Extensive ash-flow tuff sheets that have no identified source are located north of the caldera, and may be the outflow deposits. The Xela caldera is similar in size to the Atitlan caldera, which lies about 50 km southeast of Quezaltenango. The Xela Caldera, if confirmed by future studies, may contain undiscovered geothermal resources, may present a significant geologic hazard to the more than 400,000 people who occupy the Quezaltenango valley, and may be a new member of the list of magmatic systems that have the capability to change global climate for several years.

  16. Geochemistry of low-temperature springs northwest of Yellowstone caldera: Seeking the link between seismicity, deformation, and fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William C.; Bergfeld, D.; van Soest, M.C.; Huebner, M.A.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Revesz, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive geochemical survey of springs outside the northwest margin of the Yellowstone caldera was undertaken in 2003 and 2004. This survey was designed to detect: (1) active leakage from a huge reservoir of CO2 gas recently postulated to extend from beneath the caldera into this area; and (2) lingering evidence for subsurface flow of magmatic fluids into this area during the 1985 seismic swarm and concomitant caldera subsidence. Spring temperatures are low (fluids through the caldera rim in this area.

  17. 14C ages for the ejecta from Kutcharo and Mashu calderas, eastern Hokkaido, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eruption ages of the ejecta from Kutcharo and Mashu calderas were systematically determined by 14C dating. 16 charred samples were newly obtained from the Mashu and Nakashumbetsu Tephra Formations around the calderas and dated by AMS and β-counting methods. Examined units are Ma-d, Ma-e, Ma-f, Ma-j, Ma-k, Ma-l and Ml-a in the Mashu ejecta and 6 Nakashumbetsu tephra layers including Kutcharo Pumice Flow Deposit I (KpI), which is the youngest caldera-forming product from Kutcharo caldera. Results of the 14C dating range from 3,660 ±40 yBP to 36,080±1,300 yBP, and are consistent with the tephrostratigraphy. Calendar age for KpI was newly calculated at almost 40 ka and this age shows there was about 70,000 years recurrence interval between KpI and KpIV caldera-forming eruptions. Mashu caldera has appeared on the eastern part of Kutcharo caldera immediately after the KpI eruption, and calendar age for its main caldera-forming eruption were determined at ca. BC 5,600. (author)

  18. How caldera collapse shapes the shallow emplacement and transfer of magma in active volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, F.; Rivalta, E.; Pinel, V.; Maccaferri, F.; Bagnardi, M.; Acocella, V.

    2015-12-01

    Calderas are topographic depressions formed by the collapse of a partly drained magma reservoir. At volcanic edifices with calderas, eruptive fissures can circumscribe the outer caldera rim, be oriented radially and/or align with the regional tectonic stress field. Constraining the mechanisms that govern this spatial arrangement is fundamental to understand the dynamics of shallow magma storage and transport and evaluate volcanic hazard. Here we show with numerical models that the previously unappreciated unloading effect of caldera formation may contribute significantly to the stress budget of a volcano. We first test this hypothesis against the ideal case of Fernandina, Galápagos, where previous models only partly explained the peculiar pattern of circumferential and radial eruptive fissures and the geometry of the intrusions determined by inverting the deformation data. We show that by taking into account the decompression due to the caldera formation, the modeled edifice stress field is consistent with all the observations. We then develop a general model for the stress state at volcanic edifices with calderas based on the competition of caldera decompression, magma buoyancy forces and tectonic stresses. These factors control: 1) the shallow accumulation of magma in stacked sills, consistently with observations; 2) the conditions for the development of circumferential and/or radial eruptive fissures, as observed on active volcanoes. This top-down control exerted by changes in the distribution of mass at the surface allows better understanding of how shallow magma is transferred at active calderas, contributing to forecasting the location and type of opening fissures.

  19. Aeromagnetic Study of Tke Huichapan Caldera; Central Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, T.; Martin, A.; Alfaro, G.; Oyarzabal, E.

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of the aeromagnetic anomalies over the central sector of the Mexican Volcanic Belt sheds new light on the structure of the Huichapan Caldera. This volcanic center located 100 Km to the north- northwest of Mexico City is approximately 10 km in diameter and related to an ignimbrite sequence. Milan et al, (1993) and. Aguirre-Diaz and Lopez-Martinez (2009) mapped Huichapan area and described the geology and petrology of the erupted products in the region. Aguirre-Diaz and Lopez-Martinez (2009) suggest the idea of two overlapping calderas related to an ignimbrite sequence. The analyzed region is a rectangular area, approximately from 20.25 N to 20.42 N and between 99.42 W and 99.6 W. The total field aeromagnetic data was obtained with a Geometrics G-803 proton magnetometer at a flight altitude of 300 m above ground level. For the analysis of the anomalies, the data was further smoothed to construct a 1 km regularly spaced grid. The anomaly map was compared with the surface geology and larger anomalies were correlated with major volcanic features. Since our main interest was in mapping the subsurface intrusive and volcanic bodies, the total field magnetic anomalies were reduced to the pole by using the double integral Fourier method. The reduced to the pole anomaly map results in a simplified pattern of isolated positive and negative anomalies, which show an improved correlation with all major volcanic structures. For the analysis and interpretation of the anomalies, the reduced to the pole anomalies were continued upward at various reference levels. These operations result in smoothing of the anomaly field by the filtering of high frequency anomalies that may be related to shallow sources. Two profiles were selected that cross the major anomalies on the Huichapan Caldera. The Talwani algorithm for 2-D polygonal bodies has been used for calculating the theoretical anomalies.

  20. Long Valley Caldera 2003 through 2014: overview of low level unrest in the past decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Stuart K.; Hill, David P.; Langbein, John O.; Lisowski, Michael; Mangan, Margaret T.

    2014-01-01

    Long Valley Caldera is located in California along the eastern escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range. The caldera formed about 760,000 years ago as the eruption of 600 km3 of rhyolite magma (Bishop Tuff) resulted in collapse of the partially evacuated magma chamber. Resurgent doming in the central part of the caldera occurred shortly afterwards, and the most recent eruptions inside the caldera occurred about 50,000 years ago. The caldera remains thermally active, with many hot springs and fumaroles, and has had significant deformation and seismicity since at least 1978. Periods of intense unrest in the 1980s to early 2000s are well documented in the literature (Hill and others, 2002; Ewert and others, 2010). In this poster, we extend the timeline forward, documenting seismicity and deformation over the past decade.

  1. Dilational processes accompanying earthquakes in the Long Valley Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, Douglas S.; Tkalcic, Hrvoje; Johnston, M.

    2000-01-01

    Regional distance seismic moment tensor determinations and broadband waveforms of moment magnitude 4.6 to 4.9 earthquakes from a November 1997 Long Valley Caldera swarm, during an inflation episode, display evidence of anomalous seismic radiation characterized by non-double couple (NDC) moment tensors with significant volumetric components. Observed coseismic dilation suggests that hydrothermal or magmatic processes are directly triggering some of the seismicity in the region. Similarity in the NDC solutions implies a common source process, and the anomalous events may have been triggered by net fault-normal stress reduction due to high-pressure fluid injection or pressurization of fluid-saturated faults due to magmatic heating.

  2. Carbonatite ring-complexes explained by caldera-style volcanism

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Magnus; Malehmir, Alireza; Troll, Valentin R.; Dehghannejad, Mahdieh; Juhlin, Christopher; Ask, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Carbonatites are rare, carbonate-rich magmatic rocks that make up a minute portion of the crust only, yet they are of great relevance for our understanding of crustal and mantle processes. Although they occur in all continents and from Archaean to present, the deeper plumbing system of carbonatite ring-complexes is usually poorly constrained. Here, we show that carbonatite ring-complexes can be explained by caldera-style volcanism. Our geophysical investigation of the Alnö carbonatite ring-co...

  3. Sand Dunes Moving in the Nili Patera Caldera on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Recently, it was discovered that the sand dunes on Mars are moving. This important result was obtained by means of some high resolution HiRISE images, recorded three years apart, of the dunes in the Nili Patera caldera. Here we compare an image HiRISE of 2007 with an image of 1999 recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor. Using Gimp, a GNU image processing software, to enhance the images, we can see and measure the motion of the dunes during a longer period of time

  4. A multidisciplinary study of the 2014-2015 Bárðarbunga caldera collapse, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsdóttir, Kristin; Hooper, Andy; Holohan, Eoghan; Halldorsson, Saemundur

    2016-04-01

    The collapse of the ice-filled Bárðarbunga caldera in central Iceland occurred in autumn and winter, when weather was highly unsettled and conditions for monitoring in many ways difficult. Nevertheless several detailed time series could be obtained on the collapse and to a degree the associated flood-basalt eruption in Holuhraun. This was achieved through applying an array of sensors, that were ground, air and satellite based, partly made possible through the EU-funded FUTUREVOLC supersite project. This slow caldera collapse lasted six months, ending in February 2015. The array of sensors used, coupled with the long duration of the event, allowed unprecedented detail in observing a caldera collapse. The deciphering of the course of events required the use of aircraft altimeter surveys of the ice surface, seismic and GPS monitoring, the installation of a GPS station on the glacier surface in the centre of the caldera that continuously recorded the subsidence. Full Stokes 3-D modelling of the 700-800 m thick ice in the caldera, constrained by observations, was applied to remove the component of ice deformation that had a minor effect on the measured subsidence. The maximum subsidence of the subglacial caldera floor was about 65 meters. The combined interpretation of geochemical geobarometers, subsidence geometry with GPS and InSAR deformation signals, seismicity and distinct element deformation modelling of the subsidence provided unprecedented detail of the process and mechanism of caldera collapse. The collapse involved the re-activation of pre-existing ring faults, and was initiated a few days after magma started to drain from underneath the caldera towards the eventual eruption site in Holuhraun, 45 km to the northeast. The caldera collapse was slow and gradual, and the flow rate from underneath the caldera correlates well with the lava flow rate in Holuhraun, both in terms of total volume and variations in time.

  5. A tectonic model of the Askja caldera system based on FEM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, John; Gudmundsson, Agust; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2015-04-01

    The Askja volcanic system lies on the boundary between the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates and is an example of a multiple caldera formed in an extensional regime. Askja is composed of at least three calderas, the last of which formed during an explosive eruption in A.D. 1875. The caldera floor has been subsiding almost continuously since 1983; total subsidence in this period is around 1.1 metres. Perhaps surprisingly, there has been no slip or movement on the caldera bounding ring-faults during this subsidence period. Various models have been proposed to explain this unusual signal. Previous models suggest two magma sources, one shallow at around 3 km depth and one much larger at around 16 km depth. In this model, subsidence is caused by depressurisation in both sources as a result of cooling contraction and crystallisation. In other models subsidence results from magma being squeezed out of the shallow chamber laterally; or somehow draining back into a deep seated reservoir. In this study we examine the contribution of regional extension and structural discontinuities to the current subsidence of Askja caldera. Using a finite element numerical analysis, we ascertain the state of stresses at Askja caldera over time based on several different magma body geometries. We calculate surface displacements expected from extension around a shallow magma body, and place these findings in the context of Icelandic calderas. In addition we investigate the likely stress effects of the Askja caldera on the associated part of the Northern Volcanic Zone. The proposed model seeks to understand the volcano-tectonic conditions at Askja during caldera formation, as well as during rifting episodes. The models presented will be useful in assessing likely future rifting events and fissure swarm activity in Askja caldera, and neighbouring volcanoes.

  6. Radon in groundwater of the Long Valley Caldera, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Long Valley caldera, an area of recently (∼550 y) active volcanism and current seismic activity, 222Rn concentrations in hot, warm, and cold spring waters have been measured since 1982. Rn contents of the waters correlate inversely with temperature and specific conductance, with high concentrations (1500 to 2500 pCi/l) occurring in dilute cold springs on the margins of the caldera, and low concentrations (12 to 25 pCi/l) in hot to boiling springs. Rn correlates only slightly with the uranium contents of the wide range of rocks which host the hydrological system feeding the springs. These environmental effects on the radon record may mask responses to small or distant seismic, volcanic, or crustal deformation events. To date, anomalous changes in water-borne Rn have been observed in connection with at least one earthquake, which occurred close to the monitoring site. This continuing study points out that an understanding of the geological setting, its associated hydrological system, and environmental influences is necessary to properly evaluate concentrations and changes in groundwater radioactivity

  7. Months between rejuvenation and volcanic eruption at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Christy B.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Boyce, Jeremy W

    2015-01-01

    Rejuvenation of previously intruded silicic magma is an important process leading to effusive rhyolite, which is the most common product of volcanism at calderas with protracted histories of eruption and unrest such as Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Valles, USA. Although orders of magnitude smaller in volume than rare caldera-forming super-eruptions, these relatively frequent effusions of rhyolite are comparable to the largest eruptions of the 20th century and pose a considerable volcanic hazard. However, the physical pathway from rejuvenation to eruption of silicic magma is unclear particularly because the time between reheating of a subvolcanic intrusion and eruption is poorly quantified. This study uses geospeedometry of trace element profiles with nanometer resolution in sanidine crystals to reveal that Yellowstone’s most recent volcanic cycle began when remobilization of a near- or sub-solidus silicic magma occurred less than 10 months prior to eruption, following a 220,000 year period of volcanic repose. Our results reveal a geologically rapid timescale for rejuvenation and effusion of ~3 km3 of high-silica rhyolite lava even after protracted cooling of the subvolcanic system, which is consistent with recent physical modeling that predict a timescale of several years or less. Future renewal of rhyolitic volcanism at Yellowstone is likely to require an energetic intrusion of mafic or silicic magma into the shallow subvolcanic reservoir and could rapidly generate an eruptible rhyolite on timescales similar to those documented here.

  8. Highly evolved rhyolitic glass compositions from the Toba Caldera, Sumatra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesner, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The quartz latite to rhyolitic ash flow tuffs erupted form the Toba Caldera, perhaps the largest caldera on earth (100 by 30 kms), provide the unique opportunity to study a highly differentiated liquid in equilibrium with numerous mineral phases. Not only are the rocks very crystal rich (30-50%), but at present a minimum of 15 co-existing mineral phases have been identified. Both whole-rock and glass analyses were made by XRF techniques providing data on both major and trace elements. Whole rock chemistry of individual pumices from the youngest eruption at Toba (75,000 years ago), are suggestive of the eruption of two magma compositions across a boundary layer in the magma chamber. Glass chemistry of the pumices also show two distinct liquid compositions. The more silicic pumices, which have the most evolved glass compositions, are similar to the whole rock chemistry of the few aplitic pumices and cognate granitic xenoliths that were collected. This highly evolved composition resulted from the removal of up to 15 mineral phases and may be a fractionation buffered, univariant composition. The glasses from the less silicic pumices are similar to the whole rock chemistry of the more silicic pumice, thus falling nicely on a fractionation trend towards the univariant composition for these rocks. This set of glass compositions allows an independent test for the origin of distal ashes thought to have erupted from Toba and deposited in Malaysia, the Indian Ocean, and as far away as India.

  9. Radiometric Dating of tephras from Pre-caldera and Caldera-forming stages, Towada volcano, Northeast Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towada volcano is an active volcano located in the northern part of the Northeast Japan arc. We carried out fission-track (FT) and AMS radiocarbon (14C) dating of tephras from Towada and Hakkoda volcanoes to establish a detailed eruptive history during the Pre-caldera and Caldera-forming stages of Towada volcano. The obtained FT ages were 0.23 ± 0.05 Ma for Shirobeta tephra (WP), 0.19 ± 0.05 Ma for T-6 tephra, 0.08 ± 0.03 Ma for Zarame 1 tephra (ZP1), and 0.09 ± 0.03 Ma for Okuse Pyroclastic Flow Deposits. Although these FT ages are consistent with stratigraphy, they have large error ranges of several tens of thousands of years. Therefore, further examinations including application of other chronological dating methods are necessary to obtain more precise estimates of the eruptive age of these tephras. The obtained 14C age was 17,730 ± 70 BP for Biscuit 2 tephra (BP2). Based on stratigraphical consistency, this 14C age is appropriate for the eruptive age of BP2. (author)

  10. Upper crustal structure of the Yellowstone Caldera from seismic delay time analyses and gravity correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1978 Yellowstone-Snake River Plain seismic experiment provided detailed refraction data that were recorded across a two-dimensional array of seismographs in Yellowstone National Park. A delay time analysis was applied to 173 crystalline basement P/sub g/ arrivals from these data to determine the three-dimensional distribution of velocities and the layer configuration of the upper crust beneath the Yellowstone caldera. The P wave velocity structure of the caldera is characterized by a surface layer of combined sediments and rhyolite flows, averaging 2.8 km/s, that range in thickness from 1.5 to 2.0 km. Adjacent to the caldera, the crystalline upper crustal layer has a velocity of 6.05 +- 0.01 km/s, but this layer decreases by 6% to 5.70 km/s beneath the caldera and extends northeast 15 km beyond the caldera. Smaller zones of very low P velocity, 4.0 km/s, a 30% velocity reduction compared to the 6.05 km/s layer, occur in the upper crust beneath the northeastern caldera rim and beneath the southwest caldera in the vicinity of the Upper and Midway Geyser basins. A three-dimensional gravity interpretation based upon densities derived from the seismic model suggests that the regional gravity low of -60 mGal over the caldera correlates directly with (1) the surface layer of combined sediments and rhyolite flows, (2) the low-velocity, 5.7-km/s, upper crustal layer, and (3) the 4.0-km/s low-velocity zone beneath the northeastern caldera rim. An interpretation of the seismic velocities and densities, based on experimental data and theoretical models is made

  11. An overview of the Valles Caldera National Preserve: the natural and cultural resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmenter, Robert R.; Steffen, Anastasia; Allen, Craig D.

    2007-01-01

    The Valles Caldera National Preserve is one of New Mexico’s natural wonders and a popular area for public recreation, sustainable natural resource production, and scientific research and education. Here, we provide a concise overview of the natural and cultural history of the Preserve, including descriptions of the ecosystems, flora and fauna. We note that, at the landscape scale, the Valles caldera appears to be spectacularly pristine; however, humans have extracted resources from the Preserve area for many centuries, resulting in localized impacts to forests, grasslands and watersheds. The Valles Caldera Trust is now charged with managing the Preserve and providing public access, while preserving and restoring these valuable public resources.

  12. Survey and assessment of post volcanic activities of a young caldera lake, Lake Cuicocha, Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    G. Gunkel; Beulker, C.; Grupe, B.; F. Viteri

    2009-01-01

    Cuicocha is a young volcano adjacent to the inactive Pleistocene Cotacachi volcano complex, located in the western cordilleras of the Ecuadorian Andes. A series of eruptions with intensive ash emission and collapse of the caldera occurred around 4500–3000 y BP. A crater 3.2 km in diameter and a maximum depth of 450 m was formed. Further eruptions of the volcano occurred 1300 y BP and formed four smaller domes within the caldera. Over the last few hundred years, a caldera lake has developed, w...

  13. Radon in groundwater of the Long Valley Caldera, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Long Valley caldera, an area of recently (-- 550 y) active volcanism and current seismic activity, 222Rn concentrations in hot, warm, and cold spring waters have been measured since 1982. Rn contents of the waters correlate inversely with temperature and specific conductance, with high concentrations (1500 to 2500 rhoCi1) occurring in dilute cold springs on the margins of the caldera, and low concentrations (12 to 25 rhoCi1) in hot to boiling springs. Rn correlates only slightly with the uranium contents of the rocks which host the hydrological system feeding the springs, which encompass a wide range of rock types. Anomalous changes in groundwater Rn contents may accompany or precede earthquake activity, and a continuous Rn monitoring system was installed in 1983 to monitor short-term variations. A gamma detector is submerged in a natural pond fed by --110C spring waters with --700 rhoCi1 Rn, and measured gamma activity is due almost entirely to 222Rn in the water. The gamma record, which is integrated hourly, shows a consistent, pronounced diurnal variation (--30% of mean count rate), and weaker higher frequency variations. This pattern correlates well with small variations (0C) in water temperature at the Rn monitoring point, and is strongly influenced by precipitation and by patterns of water flow in the pond. It does not adhere closely to a tidal pattern. These environmental effects on the radon record may mask responses to small or distant seismic events. To date, anomalous changes in waterborne Rn have been observed in connection with at least one earthquake, which occurred close to the monitoring site. This continuing study points out that an understanding of the geological setting, its associated hydrological system, and environmental influences is necessary to properly evaluate concentrations and changes in groundwater radioactivity

  14. Field trip guide to the Valles Caldera and its geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.E.; Bolivar, S.L.

    1983-12-01

    This field trip guide has been compiled from extensive field trips led at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the past six years. The original version of this guide was designed to augment a workshop on the Valles Caldera for the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP). This workshop was held at Los Alamos, New Mexico, 5-7 October 1982. More stops were added to this guide to display the volcanic and geothermal features at the Valles Caldera. The trip covers about 90 miles (one way) and takes two days to complete; however, those who wish to compress the trip into one day are advised to use the designated stops listed in the Introduction. Valles Caldera and vicinity comprise both one of the most exciting geothermal areas in the United States and one of the best preserved Quaternary caldera complexes in the world.

  15. Maars to calderas: end-members on a spectrum of explosive volcanic depressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo M. Palladino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We discuss maar-diatremes and calderas as end-members on a spectrum of negative volcanic landforms (depressions produced by explosive eruptions (note – we focus on calderas formed during explosive eruptions, recognizing that some caldera types are not related to such activity. The former are dominated by ejection of material during numerous discrete phreatomagmatic explosions, brecciation, and subsidence of diatreme fill, while the latter are dominated by subsidence over a partly evacuated magma chamber during sustained, magmatic volatile-driven discharge. Many examples share characteristics of both, including landforms that are identified as maars but preserve deposits from non-phreatomagmatic explosive activity, and ambiguous structures that appear to be coalesced maars but that also produced sustained explosive eruptions with likely magma reservoir subsidence. A convergence of research directions on issues related to magma-water interaction and shallow reservoir mechanics is an important avenue toward developing a unified picture of the maar-diatreme-caldera spectrum.

  16. Electrical structure of Plaine des Sables caldera, Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island)

    OpenAIRE

    Schnegg, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    An Audio Magnetotelluric (AMT) profile has been carried out across the Plaine des Sables, a former caldera of the active Piton de la Fournaise volcano, Reunion Island. Located in the Western Indian Ocean, between the Mascarene and Madagascar basins, this basaltic shield volcano originates from the activity of a hot spot. Our aim was to determine the internal structure of the volcano, in particular the shallow electrical properties of an area extending between the old and the new caldera rims....

  17. Dynamics and structural evolution of collapse calderas: A comparison between field evidence, analogue and mathematical models

    OpenAIRE

    Geyer Traver, Adelina

    2007-01-01

    Collapse calderas are defined as the volcanic depression that result from the disruption of the geometry of the magma chamber roof due to down faulting during the course of an eruption. These structures have received considerable attention due to their link to Earth's ore deposits and geothermal energy resources, but also because large pyroclastic eruptions and associated caldera collapse structures represent one of the most catastrophic geologic events that have occurred on the Earth's surfa...

  18. How caldera collapse shapes the shallow emplacement and transfer of magma in active volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, Fabio; Rivalta, Eleonora; Pinel, Virginie; Maccaferri, Francesco; Bagnardi, Marco; Acocella, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Calderas are topographic depressions formed by the collapse of a partly drained magma reservoir. At volcanic edifices with calderas, eruptive fissures can circumscribe the outer caldera rim, be oriented radially and/or align with the regional tectonic stress field. Constraining the mechanisms that govern this spatial arrangement is fundamental to understand the dynamics of shallow magma storage and transport and evaluate volcanic hazard. Here we use numerical models to show that the previously unappreciated unloading effect of caldera formation may contribute significantly to the stress budget of a volcano. We first test this hypothesis against the ideal case of Fernandina, Galápagos, where previous models only partly explained the peculiar pattern of circumferential and radial eruptive fissures and the geometry of the intrusions determined by inverting the deformation data. We show that by taking into account the decompression due to the caldera formation, the modeled edifice stress field is consistent with all the observation. We then develop a general model for the stress state at volcanic edifices with calderas based on the competition of caldera decompression, magma buoyancy forces and tectonic stresses. These factors control the shallow accumulation of magma in stacked sills, consistently with observations as well as the conditions for the development of circumferential and/or radial eruptive fissures, as observed on active volcanoes. This top-down control exerted by changes in the distribution of mass at the surface allows better understanding of how shallow magma is transferred at active calderas, contributing to forecasting the location and type of opening fissures.

  19. Volcanic-plutonic connections in a tilted nested caldera complex in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Sewell, Roderick J.; Tang, Denise L.K.; Campbell, S. Diarmad G.

    2012-01-01

    Exceptional exposures of four, precisely-dated, Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous,silicic volcanic centers and their plutonic equivalents in Hong Kong have provided an excellent opportunity to examine close connections in time and space between magma chambers and their overlying calderas. Here, we describe a ~14 km crustal section through a collapsed caldera in southeastern Hong Kong where the intracaldera fill suggests that the magmatic discharge was of supereruption scale. The main subvol...

  20. Taupo in time and space: dynamics of a rhyolitic caldera volcano and its magmatic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. J.; Allan, A. S.; Barker, S. J.; Morgan, D. J.; Charlier, B. L.; Baker, J. A.; Wooden, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Traditional views see the caldera-forming event as the eruptive career pinnacle of any aspiring large silicic magma system, around which perspectives focus in 'pre-', syn-' and 'post-caldera' groupings of eruptions. Important question arising from such notions are: (1) Is the caldera-forming eruption a freak event, reflecting unusual circumstances, or does it represent a stochastic extreme on a continuously evolving record? (2) How rapidly does the melt-dominant large magma body accumulate? (3) What are the recovery/renewal processes and timings after a caldera-forming eruption? (4) What hangover from the main event is seen in behaviour of the 'post-caldera' system? The central Taupo Volcanic Zone (New Zealand) is a valuable area in which to test models for large silicic systems because of its rapid frequency of moderate to large sizes of its eruptions over the past ~1.6 Ma. Here we review the eruptive record for Taupo volcano itself over the last 50,000 years, highlighting old and new results that detail its evolution over that period, during which the 25.4 ka, ~530 cubic km Oruanui event formed the main caldera-related eruption. In the Taupo area, erupting at vents hangover reflected in the modern system, despite the geographic superposition of vent sites.

  1. Effect of stress fields on magma chamber stability and the formation of collapse calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, William; Burke, Kevin; Strecker, Manfred

    2003-08-01

    The summits of many of the Earth's and other planets' larger volcanoes are occupied by calderas that formed by collapse into an evacuating, underlying magma chamber. These collapse calderas are typically several tens of square kilometers in area and are commonly elliptical in shape. We show that the long axes of late Quaternary collapse calderas in the Kenya rift valley, the western Basin and Range province, the Snake River-Yellowstone Plateau, and the Iceland rift zone are parallel to the upper crustal minimum horizontal stress direction (Sh) as determined by independent criteria. We suggest that circular magma chambers beneath these volcanoes became elliptical by stress-induced spalling of their chamber walls, by a mechanism that is analogous to the formation of breakouts in boreholes and tunnels. In breakouts, the hole becomes elongate parallel to the far-field minimum stress. In the Kenya rift, Late Pleistocene caldera collapse was accompanied by a 45° rotation of Sh and an increase in the magnitude of the maximum horizontal stress (SH). The breakout model predicts increasingly unstable caldera walls under these conditions, a possible explanation for the sudden appearance of so many collapse events in a volcanic setting that had never experienced them before. This mechanism of stress change-induced collapse may have played a role in other caldera settings.

  2. Catastrophic isotopic modification of rhyolitic magma at times of caldera subsidence, Yellowstone plateau volcanic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, W.; Christiansen, R.L.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    This Wyoming volcanic field has undergone repeated eruption of rhyolitic magma strongly depleted in 18O. Large calderas subsided 2.0, 1.3 and 0.6 m.y. ago on eruption of ash-flow sheets. More than 60 other rhyolite lavas and tuffs permit reconstruction of the long-term chemical and isotopic evolution of the silicic system. Narrow delta 18O ranges in the ash-flow sheets contrast with wide delta 18O variation in post-caldera lavas. The earliest post-collapse lavas are 3-6per mille lighter than the preceding ash-flow sheets. The 18O depletions were short-lived events that immediately followed caldera subsidence and sequences of post-caldera lavas record partial recovery toward pre-caldera delta 18O values. Contemporaneous extra-caldera rhyolites show no effects of the repeated depletions. Although some contamination by foundering roof rocks seems to be required, water was probably the predominant contaminant.-W.H.B.

  3. The confirmation of a work hypothesis: a new caldera in the center of the Mexican Volcanic Belt; La confirmacion de una hipotesis de trabajo: una nueva caldera en el centro del Cinturon Volcanico Mexicano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anguita Virella, Francisco; Pal Verma, Surendra; Milan, Marcos; Garcia Cacho, Luis; Samaniego M, Daniel [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    After synthesizing the most relevant aspects of the current volcanology and the genesis process of the collapse calderas, a process is described on the location and confirmation of a new caldera (the Mazahua) in the central part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB). [Espanol] Tras sintetizar los aspectos mas destacados de la vulcanologia actual y el proceso de genesis de las calderas de colapso, se describe el proceso de localizacion y confirmacion de una nueva caldera (la Mazahua) en la parte central del Cinturon Volcanico Mexicano (CVM).

  4. Seismic and gravity signature of the Ischia Island Caldera (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, P.; de Matteis, R.; Russo, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Campania (Italy) coasts are characterized by the presence of several volcanoes. The island of Ischia, located at the northwestern end of the Gulf of Naples, belongs to the Neapolitan Volcanic District together with Phlegrean Fields and Vesuvius, having all these Pleistocene volcanoes erupted in historical times, and it is characterized by diffuse hydrothermal phenomena The island represents the emergent part of a more extensive volcanic area developed mainly westward of the island, with underwater volcanoes aligned along regional fault patterns. The activity of Ischia volcano is testified by the occurrence of eruptions in historical times, the presence of intense hydrothermal phenomena, and by seismic activity (e.g. the 1883 Casamicciola earthquake). Ischia is populated by about 50,000 inhabitants increasing, mainly in the summer, due to thriving tourism business, partially due to its active volcanic state. Hazard assessment at active, densely populated volcanoes is critically based on knowledge of the volcanoes past behavior and the definition of its present state. As a contribution to the definition of the present state of the Ischia island volcano, we obtain a model of the shallow crust using geophysical observables through seismic tomography and 3D gravity inversion. In particular we use travel times collected during the Serapis experiment on the island and its surroundings and free air anomaly. A new 3D gravity inversion procedure has been developed to take better into account the shape and the effects of topography approximating it by a triangular mesh. Below each triangle, a sequence of triangular prisms is built, the uppermost prism having the upper face coincident with the triangle following the topography. The inversion is performed searching for a regularized solution using the minimum norm stabilizer. The main results inferable from the 3D seismic and gravity images are the definition of the caldera rims hypothesize by many authors along the

  5. Under Construction: Rebuilding Kīlauea's Shallow Magma Storage System After Caldera Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, D. A.; Wright, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Draining of Kīlauea's upper level magma reservoir system in ~1500 CE led to a N-S elongate, roughly circular structural caldera ~6.5 km in diameter surrounding a prominent topographic caldera (TC) 4 x 3 km in diameter. The TC was probably at least 600 m deep with a volume of ~4-6 km3. The reservoir system has been rebuilding since then, mostly during the past 200 y of relatively high magma supply. Current reservoir locations are well defined geodetically (Poland et al., 2014) but do not match the presumed configuration of magma storage before the caldera collapse, if the common assumption holds that collapse width equals reservoir width. For example, magma does not underlie the northern 1-2 km of the TC, as judged by relatively high P-wave velocities (Dawson et al., 1999) and lack of deformation related to magma storage. The northernmost reservoir, near Halemaumau, is within the TC, but an order of magnitude more magma fills the south caldera reservoir south of the TC (Poland et al., 2014). Currently, the Halemaumau reservoir is shallower than the south caldera reservoir (1-2 km vs. 3-4 km), but in the 1960s magma was likely stored 3-3.5 km deep near Halemaumau (Wright and Klein, 2014). Many deformation centers are south of the TC and have an E-W spread of ~4 km. These observations suggest an evolving storage system that, if drained today, would not form a caldera of the size or location of the TC. Yet the TC is at the summit of the volcano, the site of an older caldera (Holcomb, 1987) and a positive Bouguer gravity anomaly (Kauahikaua et al., 2000), and is apparently the preferred location of reservoir draining and caldera collapse. We think the reservoir system will continue to evolve, expanding and centering itself below the topographic caldera, which will likely be where the next collapse takes place. Dawson et al., 1999, GRL. Holcomb, 1987, USGS PP 1350. Kauahikaua et al., 2000, Geology. Poland et al., 2014, USGS PP 1801. Wright and Klein, 2014, USGS PP 1806.

  6. Electrical structure of Plaine des Sables caldera, Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Schnegg

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available An Audio Magnetotelluric (AMT profile has been carried out across the Plaine des Sables, a former caldera of the active Piton de la Fournaise volcano, Reunion Island. Located in the Western Indian Ocean, between the Mascarene and Madagascar basins, this basaltic shield volcano originates from the activity of a hot spot. Our aim was to determine the internal structure of the volcano, in particular the shallow electrical properties of an area extending between the old and the new caldera rims. Although several teams had already conducted AMT work in this region a few years ago, there was a need for more a detailed, in depth survey. Our final model displays a noticeable slope of the Plaine des Sables basement oriented toward the present Fournaise summit. This slope is interpreted as resulting from successive landslides toward the ocean. We conclude that this dipping, electrically good conducting layer, probably belongs to the flat layering of an older caldera.

  7. Doubly stochastic models for volcanic hazard assessment at Campi Flegrei caldera

    CERN Document Server

    Bevilacqua, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This study provides innovative mathematical models for assessing the eruption probability and associated volcanic hazards, and applies them to the Campi Flegrei caldera in Italy. Throughout the book, significant attention is devoted to quantifying the sources of uncertainty affecting the forecast estimates. The Campi Flegrei caldera is certainly one of the world’s highest-risk volcanoes, with more than 70 eruptions over the last 15,000 years, prevalently explosive ones of varying magnitude, intensity and vent location. In the second half of the twentieth century the volcano apparently once again entered a phase of unrest that continues to the present. Hundreds of thousands of people live inside the caldera and over a million more in the nearby city of Naples, making a future eruption of Campi Flegrei an event with potentially catastrophic consequences at the national and European levels.

  8. K-Ar ages of dike rocks in the southwestern region of Aso caldera, Kyushu, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aso is a large caldera volcano in Kyushu, Japan. Several dikes, which cut the Pre-Aso volcanic rocks, are exposed in the southwestern region of the caldera (Ono and Watanabe, 1985). The dikes, trending NE-SW and N-S, are composed of pyroxene andesite and hornblende andesite. Systematic relation between the rocks type and direction of the dikes in not observed. In this study, K-Ar ages have been determined on these dike rocks. The ages of dike rocks range from ca. 0.8 to 0.5 Ma, being consistent with the ages of the Pre-Aso volcanic rocks at the caldera wall. There are no significant relations between the ages and the rock type. Except for one sample with weak alteration, the diskes trending NE-SW are older than those of N-S, suggesting a change of direction of the maximum pressure axis of regional stress in the volcanism. (author)

  9. Travel Time Distribution Modeling in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxton, P. D.; Troch, P. A.; Brooks, P. D.; Lyon, S. W.; Gustafson, J. R.; Veatch, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    Modeling the transit times of catchment waters is of paramount importance in hydrology. The distribution of the time it takes for individual water molecules to move through a hydrologic system (a.k.a., the travel time distribution) is a fundamental characterization of a catchment. Travel time distributions are affected by a variety of physical characteristics of catchments (e.g., vegetation type, degree of soil development) that depend on the amount of solar energy the catchment receives. These characteristics, therefore, can be considered a function of aspect. The goal of this research is to constrain travel time distributions on a series of eight radial mountain streams having different slope aspects on Redondo Peak, a resurgent dome in the center of the Valles Caldera, near Los Alamos, New Mexico. Redondo Peak is an excellent natural laboratory for this type of experiment because all aspects are represented on different sides of the mountain while the internal geology and climate are relatively consistent. To model the transit time distributions of each catchment, variations of chemical load of the snowpack, isotopic compositions of meltwater samples, and snowcover distribution data from closely related studies are coupled with periodic stream and precipitation samples that are analyzed for stable water isotopes content. Additional information comes from a network of temperature sensors to monitor the distribution of snowmelt and headwater stream discharge as well as a series of flumes to capture the flows from the streams. The travel time distributions determined in this project provide a bottom up approach to verify catchment-scale models.

  10. Rhyolitic calderas and centers clustered within the active andesitic belt of Ecuador's Eastern Cordillera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Ecuadorian volcanic arc a cluster of scattered rhyolitic and dacitic centers within the mainly andesitic Eastern Cordillera includes large caldera structures (Chalupas, Chacana, Cosanga) as well as smaller edifices, built upon the Paleozoic-Mesozoic metamorphic basement. At the Chacana caldera magmatism dates from 2.7 Ma to historic times. These centers erupted enormous ash flows and thick pumice lapilli falls that covered the InterAndean Valley near Quito. The role of the 50-70 km-thick crust with a notable negative gravity anomaly appears to be related to the generation of this highly silicic magmatism occurring along the crest of the Andes in the NVZ.

  11. Steady subsidence of a repeatedly erupting caldera through InSAR observations: Aso, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Adriano; Acocella, Valerio; Ruch, Joel; Aoki, Yosuke; Borgstrom, Sven; Siniscalchi, Valeria; Geshi, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    The relation between unrest and eruption at calderas is still poorly understood. Aso caldera, Japan, shows minor episodic eruptions, mainly phreatic, associated with steady subsidence. We analyse the recent deformation of Aso using SAR images from 1993 to 2011 and compare this with the eruptive activity. Although the dataset suffers from limitations (e.g., atmospheric effects, coherence loss, low signal to noise ratio), we observe a steady subsidence signal from 1996 to 1998, that suggests an overall contraction of a magmatic source below the caldera centre, from 4.5 to 7 km depth. Because of the similar volumes of the contracting source and erupted material, we propose that the contraction may have been induced by the release of the magmatic fluids feeding the eruptions. If confirmed by further data, this hypothesis suggests that degassing processes play a crucial role in triggering minor eruptions within open conduit calderas, as at Aso. These features underline the importance of defining any eruptive potential also from deflating magmatic systems with open conduit.

  12. Tianmujian caldera. A potential area for locating rich and large uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the comprehensive analysis on geologic, remote sensing, gravimetric, magnetic and geochemical data, and the field geologic investigation, the author has preliminarily ascertained the formation and the distribution characteristics of the Tianmujian caldera, and recognized the porphyroclastic lava system which is extensively distributed in the area. The authors suggest that the Tianmujian volcanic basin experienced two evolution stages--the thermal uplifting and the formation of caldera, that large concealed uranium-rich granitic massif occurs in the area, and during the vertical evolution process the uranium showed its concentration in the lower part and depletion in the upper part, and large amount of ore-forming material moved upward along with the magmatic hydrothermals entering the caldera to form uranium deposit. In addition, it is clarified that the NE-NW rhombic-formed basement structural pattern is predominated by the NE-trending fault. At the same time, the important role of the basement faults in controlling the magmatic activities, in the formation of volcanic basins, as well as the formation of uranium mineralization is emphasized. On the basis of the above comprehensive analysis the authors suggest that the Tianmujian caldera is a quite favourable potential area for possessing the basic conditions necessary for the formation of rich and large uranium deposit including uranium 'source, migration, concentration, preservation' and favourable multiple metallogenic information is displayed in the Tianmujian area

  13. Hydrothermal fluid flow and deformation in large calderas: Inferences from numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, S.; Christiansen, L.B.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Inflation and deflation of large calderas is traditionally interpreted as being induced by volume change of a discrete source embedded in an elastic or viscoelastic half-space, though it has also been suggested that hydrothermal fluids may play a role. To test the latter hypothesis, we carry out numerical simulations of hydrothermal fluid flow and poroelastic deformation in calderas by coupling two numerical codes: (1) TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1999], which simulates flow in porous or fractured media, and (2) BIOT2 [Hsieh, 1996], which simulates fluid flow and deformation in a linearly elastic porous medium. In the simulations, high-temperature water (350??C) is injected at variable rates into a cylinder (radius 50 km, height 3-5 km). A sensitivity analysis indicates that small differences in the values of permeability and its anisotropy, the depth and rate of hydrothermal injection, and the values of the shear modulus may lead to significant variations in the magnitude, rate, and geometry of ground surface displacement, or uplift. Some of the simulated uplift rates are similar to observed uplift rates in large calderas, suggesting that the injection of aqueous fluids into the shallow crust may explain some of the deformation observed in calderas.

  14. Galileo's Last Fly-Bys of Io: NIMS Observations of Loki, Tupan, and Emakong Calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Kamp, L. W.; Davies, A. G.; Smythe, W. D.; Carlson, R. W.; Doute, S.; McEwen, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Leader, F.; Mehlman, R.

    2002-01-01

    NIMS results from the 2001 Galileo fly-bys of Io will be presented, focusing on three calderas that may contain lava lakes. Preliminary results from the January 2002 Io fly-by will be presented. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Evidence from cosmic-ray exposure dating based on 36Cl for the pre-Minoan caldera on Santorini, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassas, Constantin; Bourlès, Didier; Braucher, Regis; Druitt, Tim; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Léanni, Laetitia

    2016-04-01

    The physiography of Santorini prior to the Minoan (Late Bronze Age) eruption (17th century BCE) is of great archaeological interest, given the importance of Santorini as a commercial centre and port in the Minoan empire. However, the paleogeography of the pre-Minoan caldera has been a point of controversy: Heiken and McCoy (1984) advocated the existence, in the southern part of the present-day caldera, of a pre-existing caldera formed during the 172 ka Lower Pumice eruption, whereas Druitt and Francaviglia (1992), based on the presence of in situ plinian pumice from the Minoan eruption adhering to the modern cliff, conceived the pre-Minoan (22 ka) caldera as having occupied much of the northern basin of the present-day caldera. With the goal of settling the debate we performed cosmic ray exposure dating employing in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl to date different generations of caldera cliffs at Santorini, and hence to identify those cliffs predating the Minoan eruption. Our methodology involved the determination of the in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl in basaltic and andesitic rocks cropping out in the cliffs. The samples returned 36Cl CRE ages consistent with previously published field mapping of cliff populations based on geomorphological and stratigraphic arguments (Druitt and Francaviglia 1992), suggesting that much of the present cliff line of northern Santorini predated the Minoan eruption, or was superficially modified by landslips and rockfalls during that eruption. The 36Cl CRE ages enable us to better define the paleogeography of the pre-Minoan caldera. References [1] Druitt, T. H. and Francaviglia, V.1992. Caldera formation on Santorini and the physiography of the islands in the Late Bronze Age. Bulletin of Volcanology 54, 484-493. [2] Heiken G and McCoy F (1984) Caldera development during the Minoan eruption, Thira, Cyclades, Greece. Journal of Geophysical Research: 89 (B10), 8841-8862.

  16. A geological and geophysical appraisal of the Baca geothermal field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Michael; Vonder Haar, Stephen

    1986-03-01

    The Baca location #1 geothermal field is located in north-central New Mexico within the western half of the Plio-Pleistocene Valles Caldera. Steam and hot water are produced primarily from the northeast-trending Redondo Creek graben, where downhole temperatures exceed 260°C at depths of less than 2 km. Stratigraphically the reservoir region can be described as a five-layer sequence that includes Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic rocks, and Mesozoic and Tertiary sediments overlying Precambrian granitic basement. Production is mainly controlled by fractures and faults that are ultimately related to activity in the Rio Grande Rift system. Geophysically, the caldera is characterized by a gravity minimum and a resistivity low in its western half. A 40-mgal gravity minimum over the caldera is due mostly to the relatively low-density volcanics and sediments that fill the caldera and probably bears no relation to deep-seated magmatic sources. Two-dimensional gravity modeling indicates that the depth to Precambrian basement in Redondo Canyon is probably at least 3 km and may exceed 5 km in eastern parts of the caldera. Telluric and magnetotelluric surveys have shown that the reservoir region is associated with low resistivity and that a deep low-resistivity zone correlates well with the depth of the primary reservoir inferred from well data. Telluric and magnetotelluric data have also identified possible fault zones in the eastern and western sections of the production region that may form boundaries to the Redondo Creek reservoir. These data also suggest that the reservoir region is located at the intersection of lineaments that trend north-south and northeast-southwest. Magnetotelluric results indicate deep low resistivity at the western edge of the caldera which may be associated with deep hot fluids. On the basis of geophysical and well data, we make three estimates of reservoir dimensions. The estimates of the areal extent of the reservoir range from 10 to 30 km 2

  17. Postcaldera volcanism and hydrothermal activity revealed by autonomous underwater vehicle surveys in Myojin Knoll caldera, Izu-Ogasawara arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsho, Chie; Ura, Tamaki; Kim, Kangsoo; Asada, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Myojin Knoll caldera, one of the submarine silicic calderas lying on the volcanic front of the northern Izu-Ogasawara arc, has attracted increasing attention since the discovery of a large hydrothermal field called the Sunrise deposit. Although numerous submersible surveys have been conducted in Myojin Knoll caldera, they have not sufficiently explored areas to produce a complete picture of the caldera and understand the origin of the Sunrise deposit. We conducted comprehensive deep-sea surveys using an autonomous underwater vehicle and obtained high-resolution bathymetric and magnetic data and sonar images from ~70% of the caldera. The detailed bathymetric map revealed that faulting and magma eruptions, possibly associated with an inflation-deflation cycle of the magma reservoir during postcaldera volcanism, had generally occurred in the caldera wall. The main dome of the central cone was covered with lava flows and exhibits exogenous growth, which is unusual for rhyolitic domes. The magnetization distribution in the central cone indicates preferential magma intrusion along a NW-SE direction. It is presumed that magma migrated along this direction and formed a rhyolite dome at the foot of the southeastern caldera wall, where the Sunrise deposit occurs. The Sunrise deposit is composed mainly of three ridges extending in slope directions and covers ~400 × ~400 m. Magnetization reduction in the deposit area is small, indicating that the alteration zone beneath the Sunrise deposit is slanting rather than vertical. It is presumed that several slanting and near-vertical volcanic vents serve as pathways of hydrothermal fluid in Myojin Knoll caldera.

  18. A catastrophic flood caused by drainage of a caldera lake at Aniakchak Volcano, Alaska, and implications for volcanic hazards assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, C.F.; Walder, J.S.; McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Aniakchak caldera, located on the Alaska Peninsula of southwest Alaska, formerly contained a large lake (estimated volume 3.7 ?? 109 m3) that rapidly drained as a result of failure of the caldera rim sometime after ca. 3400 yr B.P. The peak discharge of the resulting flood was estimated using three methods: (1) flow-competence equations, (2) step-backwater modeling, and (3) a dam-break model. The results of the dam-break model indicate that the peak discharge at the breach in the caldera rim was at least 7.7 ?? 104 m3 s-1, and the maximum possible discharge was ???1.1 ?? 106 m3 s-1. Flow-competence estimates of discharge, based on the largest boulders transported by the flood, indicate that the peak discharge values, which were a few kilometers downstream of the breach, ranged from 6.4 ?? 105 to 4.8 ?? 106 m3 s-1. Similar but less variable results were obtained by step-backwater modeling. Finally, discharge estimates based on regression equations relating peak discharge to the volume and depth of the impounded water, although limited by constraining assumptions, provide results within the range of values determined by the other methods. The discovery and documentation of a flood, caused by the failure of the caldera rim at Aniakchak caldera, underscore the significance and associated hydrologic hazards of potential large floods at other lake-filled calderas.

  19. Using InSAR to investigate long term caldera unrest: case studies from Yellowstone and Long Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    battaglia, maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Interpreting geodetic measurements can be particularly difficult in the case of slow, years-to-decades deformation, such as that commonly observed at large Quaternary silicic calderas. For example, Yellowstone caldera has shown a complex behavior over recent decades: uplift of resurgent domes within the caldera started sometime after 1923, reaching a total of 90 cm, but in 1984 the deformation reversed to subsidence at a rate of 1-2 cm/yr until 1992. Starting in 1992, the deformation began migrating from one resurgent dome to the other, and deformation was also detected along the caldera boundary - the so-called Northern Caldera Rim - starting in the mid-1990s. Evidence from geodetic surveys suggests that magma intrusion and/or pressurization of hydrothermal fluids may both drive uplift at Yellowstone. Geodetic measurements at Long Valley caldera have also revealed multiple episodes of caldera uplift, but in contrast to Yellowstone, deformation is largely restricted to the caldera's single resurgent dome. The fact that the energy released during the resurgent dome uplift is much larger than that which can be explained by seismic activity within and around the caldera, together with the observation that the onset of accelerated deformation precedes increases in earthquake activity by several weeks, suggests that the major source of caldera unrest is probably magma intrusion beneath the resurgent dome. Here we present time series of surface deformation for Yellowstone and Long Valley retrieved by applying the SBAS InSAR technique. We estimate the average regional deformation signal by using the mean velocity values derived from coherent SAR pixels belonging to areas outside the caldera. This tectonic signal is removed from the InSAR displacement and we modeled the InSAR, leveling, and gravity measurements to retrieve the best fitting source parameters. For Yellowstone caldera, different distinct sources, either hydrothermal or magmatic, have been intermittently

  20. Volatiles from the 1994 Eruptions of Rabaul: Understanding Large Caldera Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggensack; Williams; Schaefer; Parnell

    1996-07-26

    The 1994 eruption of Rabaul, in Papua New Guinea, involved a small plinian eruption at Vulcan and a vulcanian eruption on the opposite side of the caldera at Tavurvur. Vulcan's ash leachates indicate seawater interaction that is consistent with earlier observations of low sulfur dioxide emissions and the presence of ice crystals in the initial plinian eruption cloud. In contrast, Tavurvur ash leachates indicate no seawater interaction, and later sulfur dioxide emissions remained high despite low-level eruptive activity. Silicic melt inclusions indicate that the andesitic melt contained about 2 weight percent water and negligible carbon dioxide. Mafic melt inclusions in Tavurvur ash have water and carbon dioxide contents that vary systematically over the course of the eruption. The mafic melt inclusions suggest that a mafic dike intruded from below the silicic chamber and provide further evidence that mafic intrusions drive caldera unrest. PMID:8662536

  1. Ecology of Coyotes on the Valles Caldera National Preserve, New Mexico: Implications for Elk Calf Recruitment

    OpenAIRE

    Gifford, Suzanne J.

    2013-01-01

    Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) managers were concerned about low elk recruitment observed at the same time as an apparent increase in sightings of coyotes and observations of coyote predation on elk calves. The goal of this study was to describe coyotes’ ecological interactions with elk, particularly coyote diet and movements on the Valle Grande, a large grassland meadow in the southeastern portion of the VCNP. We examined coyote diet by quantifying undigested remains of food item...

  2. Caldera formation and varied eruption styles on North Pacific seamounts: the clastic lithofacies record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portner, Ryan A.; Clague, Dave A.; Paduan, Jennifer B.

    2014-08-01

    Detailed examination of volcaniclastic and sedimentary rocks collected from the Taney (30 Ma), President Jackson (4 Ma), Vance (3 Ma) and Alarcon (2 Ma) near-ridge seamount chains of the North Pacific reveals seven clastic lithofacies that record various modes of eruption, magma fragmentation, and particle dispersal. Lithofacies are distinguished by differences in lithology, bedding habit, compositional heterogeneity, and relationship to volcanic landforms. Breccia lithofacies were produced through mechanical fragmentation during caldera collapse (polymict) or effusive eruptions onto steep slopes (monomict). Rare globular lapilli mudstone lithofacies contain clasts with morphologies formed by magma-sediment mingling processes (peperite). Seamount summit pyroclastic deposits include proximal lapilli tuff with vesicular pyroclasts, and more distal limu o Pele tuff lithofacies. Much finer-grained hydrothermal mudstone/tuff lithofacies occurs around caldera rims and contains greenschist minerals, hydrothermal clays and basaltic ash that record subsurface phreatomagmatic fragmentation processes. Very fine-grained ash is transported to distal regions by oceanic currents and hydrothermal plumes, and is a component of the regional pelagic sediment budget. Pyroclastic lithofacies only occur on seamount summits suggesting formation during the latter stages of seamount evolution. As a seamount drifts away from an adjacent ridge axis and associated heat source, its magma supply is reduced allowing for magmatic gas buildup and mild explosive eruptions. During this stage, the diminished melt supply under the seamount is unable to fully compensate for extension along the ridge axis and vertical seamount growth. Lateral intrusion into spreading-related structures in this stage causes magma withdrawal and caldera formation. Formation of caldera ring faults also promotes seawater ingress into subseafloor hydrothermal cells, which interact with magma conduits causing phreatomagmatic

  3. Water budget in the Hakone caldera using hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water budget of the Hakone caldera is estimated by using equations describing the balance of water, of stable isotope content and of dissolved chloride. Six equations with six unknowns are obtained, three for the lake and three for the catchment area. For the lake, computation gives that 58% of water inflow derives from groundwater and 42% from precipitation. Of the outflow, 88% consists of surface drainage and 12% of evaporation. (author)

  4. Dynamic magmatic processes at a continental rift caldera, observed using satellite geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Ryan; Biggs, Juliet; Birhanu, Yelebe; Wilks, Matt; Gottsmann, Jo; Kendall, Mike; Lewi, Elias

    2016-04-01

    Large silicic calderas are a key feature of developing continental rifts, such as the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), and are often observed to be deforming. Corbetti is one such example of a Holocene caldera in the MER that is undergoing deformation. However, the cause of the unrest, and the relationship to rift processes such as magma storage, transport and extension remain poorly understood. To investigate, we use InSAR (ascending and descending Cosmo-SkyMed data) and continuous GPS to observe the temporal and spatial evolution of sustained uplift at the Corbetti Caldera. Within the caldera, which was thought to have formed ~200 ka, there is evidence for numerous periods of resurgent volcanism in the form of plinian eruptions as well as effusive obsidian flows. How the sources of these varying styles of volcanism are reconciled at depth and in time is currently poorly constrained. Previous research has shown that pre-rift structures have a significant influence on the strain field, and hence on the magmatic and hydrothermal processes which drive it. The Cosmo-SkyMed data used in this study was specifically chosen such that each ascending image has a corresponding descending image acquired as contemporaneously as possible. This is necessary, given the rate of uplift, so as to reduce the number of assumptions when constructing time-series from multiple look directions, and when incorporating GPS data. We decompose the ascending and descending line-of-site deformation signals into vertical and east-west components and use finite source modeling to constrain the depth and geometry of the source of deformation. These results are then compared to available seismic, dynamic microgravity and magnetotelluric data to better understand this system, and how it is related to the volcanic hazard and local geothermal resources.

  5. The mechanism of intrusion of the Inyo Dike, Long Valley Caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Zeev; Fink, Jonathan

    1988-01-01

    The dike geometry of the 11-km-long Inyo Dike at the margins of the Long Valley calderas in eastern California is explained here in terms of the interaction between tectonic stresses and local variations in host rock rheology. Relationships between tectonic and magmatic stresses are evaluated, and the magnitude of magmatic pressure at the depth necessary to get the dike to the surface is estimated. The application of the model to other volcanoes is also discussed.

  6. Reconstructing the evoluortunity to study processes related to composite volction of an eroded Miocene caldera volcano (Yamanlar volcano, İzmir, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoğlu, Özgür; Brown, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    The Miocene Yamanlar composite volcano is located in the central part of a shear zone in western Turkey. The volcano's deeply-eroded interior provides excellent three-dimensional exposure of a faulted caldera-floor and caldera-fill rocks as well as surrounding extracaldera ignimbrites. We present a much-revised stratigraphy and geological map of Yamanlar in order to quantify the evolutionary stages of the volcano. The Yamanlar volcanic cone was composed of > 800 m of basaltic-andesite to andesite lavas and lava domes. The volcano underwent at least one phase of caldera formation associated with an explosive eruption that deposited an ignimbrite sheet within and outside the caldera. Lithofacies architecture analysis is applied to the proximal and medial exposures of the Early-Middle Yamanlar Formation, which occurs outside of the caldera. Field evidence of the succession indicates a caldera-forming eruption. Our results indicate that the formation of the Yamanlar caldera resulted from one major catastrophic eruption that generated several sustained pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) subdivided by fall deposits with sharp contacts. The ignimbrite sheet is composed of four flow units. The presence of numerous coarse-grained lithic-rich horizons within the ignimbrite sheet is consistent with caldera subsidence. Post-caldera volcanism is indicated by intrusions and lava domes erupted along the inferred caldera-bounding faults, some of which record ~ 90 m of displacement. Widespread, coarse-grained breccias that overlie the ignimbrite sheet are interpreted as debris avalanche deposits resulting from gravitational failure of the flanks of the volcano or the caldera wall during or after caldera subsidence.

  7. Numerical models of caldera deformation: Effects of multiphase and multicomponent hydrothermal fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutnak, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Ground surface displacement (GSD) in large calderas is often interpreted as resulting from magma intrusion at depth. Recent advances in geodetic measurements of GSD, notably interferometric synthetic aperture radar, reveal complex and multifaceted deformation patterns that often require complex source models to explain the observed GSD. Although hydrothermal fluids have been discussed as a possible deformation agent, very few quantitative studies addressing the effects of multiphase flow on crustal mechanics have been attempted. Recent increases in the power and availability of computing resources allow robust quantitative assessment of the complex time-variant thermal interplay between aqueous fluid flow and crustal deformation. We carry out numerical simulations of multiphase (liquid-gas), multicomponent (H 2O-CO2) hydrothermal fluid flow and poroelastic deformation using a range of realistic physical parameters and processes. Hydrothermal fluid injection, circulation, and gas formation can generate complex, temporally and spatially varying patterns of GSD, with deformation rates, magnitudes, and geometries (including subsidence) similar to those observed in several large calderas. The potential for both rapid and gradual deformation resulting from magma-derived fluids suggests that hydrothermal fluid circulation may help explain deformation episodes at calderas that have not culminated in magmatic eruption.

  8. Surface Deformation of Los Humeros Caldera, Mexico, Estimated by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Basurto, R.; Lopez Quiroz, P.; Carrasco Nuñez, G.; Doin, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Los Humeros caldera is located in the eastern part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, to the north of the state of Puebla and bordering the west side of the state of Veracruz. The study of the caldera, is of great interest because there is a geothermal field currently working inside of it. In fact, Los Humeros, is the third more important geothermal field in Mexico. In this work, we used InSAR to estimate the surface deformation on the caldera, aiming to contribute to its modeling and to help preventing subsidence related hazards on the geothermal field and surroundings. On this study, we calculated 34 interferograms from 21 SAR images of the ENVISAT European Space Agency Mission. The analysis of the interferograms, allow us to detect, decorrelation of the interferometric signal increased, when time spans were greater than 70 days. Also, for those with good signal correlation, the atmospheric signal dominated the interferogram, masking completely the deformation. Moreover, residual orbital ramps were detected, in some of the calculated interferograms. An algorithm capable to remove all the interferogram signal contributions but the deformation related, has been implemented. Resulting deformation and its correlation with several variables like the geology, the hydrogeology and the seismic records, were analysed through its integration in a Geographic Information System.

  9. Imaging hydrothermal systems at Furnas caldera (Azores, Portugal): Insights from Audio-Magnetotelluric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Colin; Kiyan, Duygu; Rath, Volker; Byrdina, Svetlana; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Silva, Catarina; Viveiros, Maria FB; Ferreira, Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The Furnas volcano is the eastern-most of the three active central volcanoes of Sao Miguel Island. The main caldera formed about 30 ka BP, followed by a younger eruption at 10-12 ka BP, which forms the steep topography of more than 200 m in the measuring area. It contains several very young eruptive centers, and a shallow caldera lake. Tectonic features of varying directions have been identified in the Caldera and its vicinity. In the northern part of the caldera, containing the fumarole field of Caldeiras das Furnas, a detailed map of surface CO2 emissions was recently made available. In 2015, a pilot survey of 13 AudioMagnetoTelluric soundings (AMT) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data were collected along two profiles in the eastern part of Furnas caldera in order to image the electrical conductivity of the subsurface. The data quality achieved by both techniques is extraordinary and first results indicate a general correlation between regions of elevated conductivity and the mapped surface CO2 emissions, suggesting that they may both be caused by the presence hydrothermal fluids. Tensor decomposition analysis using the Groom-Bailey approach produce a generalised geo-electric strike direction, 72deg East of North, for the AMT data compared to the surface geological strike derived from the major mapped fault crossing the profiles of 105deg. An analysis of the real induction arrows at certain frequencies (at depths greater than 350 m) infer that an extended conductor at depth does not exactly correspond to the degassing structures at the surface and extends outside the area of investigation. The geometry of the most conductive regions with electrical conductivities less then1 Ώm found at various depths differ from what was expected from earlier geologic and tectonic studies and possibly may not be directly related to the mapped fault systems at the surface. On the eastern profile, which seemed to be more appropriate for 2-D modelling with 72deg strike

  10. Is there a geochemical link between volcanic and plutonic rocks in the Organ Mountains caldera?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memeti, V.; Davidson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Results from separate volcanic and plutonic studies have led to inconsistent conclusions regarding the origins and thus links between volcanic and plutonic systems in continental arcs and the magmatic processes and time scales responsible for their compositional variations. Some have suggested that there is a geochemical and geochronological disconnect between volcanic and plutonic rocks and hence have questioned the existence of magma mush columns beneath active volcanoes. Investigating contemporary volcanic and plutonic rocks that are spatially connected is thus critical in exploring these issues. The ca. 36 Ma Organ Mountains caldera in New Mexico, USA, represents such a system exposing contemporaneous volcanic and plutonic rocks juxtaposed at the surface due to tilting during extensional tectonics along the Rio Grande Rift. Detailed geologic and structural mapping [1] and 40Ar/39Ar ages of both volcanics and plutons [2] demonstrate the spatial and temporal connection of both rock types with active magmatism over >2.5 myr. Three caldera-forming ignimbrites erupted within 600 kyr [2] from this system with a total erupted volume of 500-1,000 km3 as well as less voluminous pre- and post-caldera trachyte and andesite lavas. The ignimbrite sequence ranges from a crystal-poor, high-SiO2 rhyolite at the base to a more crystal-rich, low-SiO2 rhyolite at the top. Compositional zoning with quartz-monzonite at the base grading to syenite and alaskite at the top is also found in the Organ Needle pluton, the main intrusion, which is interpreted to be the source for the ignimbrites [1]. Other contemporaneous and slightly younger plutons have dioritic to leucogranitic compositions. We examined both volcanic and plutonic rocks with petrography and their textural variations with color cathodoluminescence, and used whole rock element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotope geochemistry to constrain magma compositions and origins. Electron microprobe analyses on feldspars have been completed to

  11. The Laramide Mesa formation and the Ojo de Agua caldera, southeast of the Cananea copper mining district, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Dennis P.; Miller, Robert J.; Woodbourne, Keith L.

    2006-01-01

    The Mesa Formation extends from Cananea, Mexico, southeast to the Sonora River and is the main host rock of Laramide porphyry copper deposits in the Cananea District and at the Alacran porphyry prospect to the east. The Mesa consists of two members-a lower andesite and an upper dacite. The lowest part of the dacite member is a crystal tuff about 100 m thick. This tuff is the outfall of a caldera centered near the village of Ojo de Agua, dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 65.8 Ma ?0.4. The Ojo de Agua Caldera is about 9 km in diameter and is filled by a light gray biotite dacite tuff with abundant flattened pumice fragments. The volume of the caldera is estimated to be 24 km3.

  12. Elastomechanical methods in the exploration of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. Final report, June 8, 1981-October 8, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodvarsson, G.

    1981-01-01

    The Valles caldera in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico is a case of an active caldera that is an object for a comprehensive ground tilt field program to map both elastic and rheic discontinuities. Based on a rather comprehensive theoretical development that is outlined in five separate Essays, estimates of the amplitudes of some of the possible ground tilt signals were obtained. Based on the results, the strongest signals of the order of 100 to 200 nanoradians would appear to result from the purely elastic response of the caldera fill to a barometric forcing. Moreover, assuming a magmatic underplate below the Valles, barometric forcing may lead to a flexure of the upper crust that could generate tilt signals of a similar magnitude. Present data material is insufficient to allow a useful estimate to be made of the possible tilt signals due to the rheic properties of a Valles pluton that may be in the state of partial fusion.

  13. Can we see the distal dyke communicate with the caldera? Examples of temporal correlation analysis using seismicity from the Bárðarbunga volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Jónasson, Kristján; Tumi Guðmundsson, Magnús; Hensch, Martin; Hooper, Andrew; Holohan, Eoghan; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Halldórsson, Sæmundur Ari; Vogfjörð, Kristín; Roberts, Matthew; Barsotti, Sara; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Pálsson, Finnur; Parks, Michelle; Dumont, Stephanie; Einarsson, Páll; Guðmundsson, Gunnar

    2016-04-01

    The Bárðarbunga volcano is composed of a large oval caldera (7x11 km) and fissures extending tens of kilometers away from the caldera along the rift zone, which marks the divergent plate boundary across Iceland. On August 16th, 2014 an intense seismic swarm started below the Bárðarbunga caldera and in the two weeks that followed a dyke migrated some 47 km laterally in the uppermost 6-10 km of the crust along the rift. The dyke propagation terminated in lava fields just north of Vatnajökull glacier, where a major (1.5 km3) six months long eruption took place. Intense earthquake activity in the caldera started in the period August 21-24 with over 70 M5 earthquakes accompanying slow caldera collapse, as verified by various geodetic measurements. The subsidence is likely due to magma withdrawal from a reservoir at depth beneath the caldera. During a five months period, October-February, the seismic activity was separated by over 30 km in two clusters; one along the caldera rims (due to piecewise caldera subsidence) and the other at the far end of the dyke (as a result of small shear movements). Here we present statistical analysis comparing the temporal behaviour of seismicity recorded in the two clusters. By comparing the earthquake rate in the dyke in temporal bins before and after caldera subsidence earthquakes to the rate away from these bins (background rate), we show posing a statistical p-value test, that the number of dyke earthquakes was significantly higher (p M4.6) in the caldera. Increased dyke seismicity was also observed 0-3 hours following a large caldera earthquake. Elevated seismicity in the dyke before a large caldera earthquake may occur when a constriction in the dyke was reduced, followed by pressure drop in the chamber. Assuming that the large caldera earthquakes occurred when chamber pressure was lowest, the subsiding caldera piston may have caused temporary higher pressure in the dyke and thereby increased the likelihood of an earthquake

  14. Anomalous shear wave delays and surface wave velocities at Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the effects of a geothermal area on the propagation of intermediate-period (1--30 s) teleseismic body waves and surface waves, a specially designed portable seismograph system was operated in Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming. Travel time residuals, relative to a station outside the caldera, of up to 2 s for compressional phases are in agreement with short-period residuals for P phases measured by other investigators. Travel time delays for shear arrivals in the intermediate-period band range from 2 to 9 s and decrease with increasing dT/dΔ. Measured Rayleigh wave phase velocities are extremely low, ranging from 3.2 km/s at 27-s period to 2.0 km/s at 7-s period; the estimated uncertainty associated with these values is 15%. We propose a model for compressional and shear velocities and Poisson's ratio beneath the Yellowstone caldera which fits the teleseismic body and surface wave data: it consists of a highly anomalous crust with an average shear velocity of 3.0 km/s overlying an upper mantle with average velocity of 4.1 km/s. The high average value of Poisson's ratio in the crust (0.34) suggests the presence of fluids there; Poisson's ratio in the mantle between 40 and approximately 200 km is more nearly normal (0.29) than in the crust. A discrepancy between normal values of Poisson's ratio in the crust calculated from short-period data and high values calculated from teleseismic data can be resolved by postulating a viscoelastic crustal model with frequency-dependent shear velocity and attenuation

  15. Insight into Vent Opening Probability in Volcanic Calderas in the Light of a Sill Intrusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, G.; D'Auria, L.; Martini, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss a novel approach to provide insights on the probability of vent opening in calderas, using a dynamic model of sill intrusion. The evolution of the stress field is the main factor that controls the vent opening processes in volcanic calderas. On the basis of previous studies, we think that the intrusion of sills is one of the most common mechanism governing caldera unrest. Therefore, we have investigated the spatial and temporal evolution of the stress field due to the emplacement of a sill at shallow depth to provide insight on vent opening probability. We carried out several numerical experiments by using a physical model, to assess the role of the magma properties (viscosity), host rock characteristics (Young's modulus and thickness), and dynamics of the intrusion process (mass flow rate) in controlling the stress field. Our experiments highlight that high magma viscosity produces larger stress values, while low magma viscosity leads to lower stresses and favors the radial spreading of the sill. Also high-rock Young's modulus gives high stress intensity, whereas low values of Young's modulus produce a dramatic reduction of the stress associated with the intrusive process. The maximum intensity of tensile stress is concentrated at the front of the sill and propagates radially with it, over time. In our simulations, we find that maximum values of tensile stress occur in ring-shaped areas with radius ranging between 350 m and 2500 m from the injection point, depending on the model parameters. The probability of vent opening is higher in these areas.

  16. A fluid-driven earthquake swarm on the margin of the Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Hill, David P.; Massin, Frederick; Farrell, Jamie; Smith, Robert B.; Taira, Taka'aki

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several decades, the Yellowstone caldera has experienced frequent earthquake swarms and repeated cycles of uplift and subsidence, reflecting dynamic volcanic and tectonic processes. Here, we examine the detailed spatial-temporal evolution of the 2010 Madison Plateau swarm, which occurred near the northwest boundary of the Yellowstone caldera. To fully explore the evolution of the swarm, we integrated procedures for seismic waveform-based earthquake detection with precise double-difference relative relocation. Using cross-correlation of continuous seismic data and waveform templates constructed from cataloged events, we detected and precisely located 8710 earthquakes during the three-week swarm, nearly four times the number of events included in the standard catalog. This high-resolution analysis reveals distinct migration of earthquake activity over the course of the swarm. The swarm initiated abruptly on January 17, 2010 at about 10 km depth and expanded dramatically outward (both shallower and deeper) over time, primarily along a NNW-striking, ~55º ENE-dipping structure. To explain these characteristics, we hypothesize that the swarm was triggered by the rupture of a zone of confined high-pressure aqueous fluids into a pre-existing crustal fault system, prompting release of accumulated stress. The high-pressure fluid injection may have been accommodated by hybrid shear and dilatational failure, as is commonly observed in exhumed hydrothermally affected fault zones. This process has likely occurred repeatedly in Yellowstone as aqueous fluids exsolved from magma migrate into the brittle crust, and it may be a key element in the observed cycles of caldera uplift and subsidence.

  17. Survey and assessment of post volcanic activities of a young caldera lake, Lake Cuicocha, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gunkel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cuicocha is a young volcano adjacent to the inactive Pleistocene Cotacachi volcano complex, located in the western cordilleras of the Ecuadorian Andes. A series of eruptions with intensive ash emission and collapse of the caldera occurred around 4500–3000 y BP. A crater 3.2 km in diameter and a maximum depth of 450 m was formed. Further eruptions of the volcano occurred 1300 y BP and formed four smaller domes within the caldera. Over the last few hundred years, a caldera lake has developed, with a maximum depth of 148 m. The lake water is characterized by sodium carbonate with elevated concentrations of manganese, calcium and chloride. Nowadays, an emission of gases, mainly CO2, and an input of warm spring water occur in Lake Cuicocha. The zone of high activity is in the western basin of the lake at a depth of 78 m, and continuous gas emissions with sediment resuspension were observed using sonar. In the hypolimnion of the lake, CO2 accumulation occurs up to 0.2% saturation, but the risk of a limnic eruption can be excluded at present. The lake possesses monomictic stratification behaviour, and during overturn an intensive gas exchange with the atmosphere occurs. Investigations concerning the sedimentation processes of the lake suggest only a thin sediment layer of up to 10–20 cm in the deeper lake basin; in the western bay, in the area of gas emissions, the lake bottom is partly depleted of sediment in the form of holes, and no lake colmation exists. Decreases in the lake water level of about 30 cm y−1 indicate a percolation of water into fractures and fissures of the volcano, triggered by a nearby earthquake in 1987.

  18. Phytolith and macroscopic charcoal analyses of the Senchomuta drilling core in Asodani Valley, northern part of Aso caldera, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holocene environmental changes and vegetation history are constructed using phytolith and macroscopic-charcoal analyses of a 23-m-deep drilling core obtained at the Senchomuta marsh in Asodani Valley, northern part of Aso caldera, SW Japan. An intra-caldera lake existed in the Asodani Valley prior to approximately 9 cal ka (calibrated 14C age). Multiple large flood events occurred during the period 8.9-8.1 cal ka and emplaced thick sandy deposits in the valley basin. Thereafter, the center of the Asodani Valley (northern part of caldera floor) changed to swampy and fluvial environments. Sasa (cool-temperature dwarf bamboo) grasslands and/or forests with understory Sasa covered slopes of the Asodani Valley basin between 11 and 9 cal ka. Sasa phytoliths significantly increased at ca. 7.3-6.5 cal ka, but thereafter decreased. Miscanthus (Japanese pampas grass) grasslands existed continuously on the slopes. Macroscopic-charcoal particles were abundant during the last 6000 years, and the peak (6.1 cal ka) amount of charcoal particles is consistent with that of Miscanthus phytoliths. This indicates that the existence of Miscanthus grassland might be related to fire events. Inside the Asodani Valley, Phragmites (reed) became established continuously along the shore of the intra-caldera lake (prior to ca. 9 cal ka) and in subsequent marshes. Gramineae phytoliths were detected predominately through all horizons of the drilling core, whereas a small amount of arboreal phytolith was observed at most horizons. We, therefore, believe that forests existed on steep slopes such as the caldera wall where human impacts were small, although Sasa and Miscanthus grasslands were maintained by human activity outside Aso caldera. (author)

  19. Mecanismo de falla de los tubos del sobrecalentador de una caldera acuotubular

    OpenAIRE

    Coronado Marín, John Jairo

    2010-01-01

    En este artículo se investigaron las causas de las fallas presentadas por fisuración longitudinal a partir de la superficie externa en los tubos del sobrecalentador de una caldera acuotubular. La superficie externa de los tubos presentó una capa de color blanco-rojizo que presentó cadenas parafínicas: C-H, grupos funcionales: C-O, N-H y compuestos de azufre, esta capa frágil impide la transferencia de calor, causando un aumento de temperatura del tubo. La falla se presentó por termofluencia d...

  20. A seismological perspective of the shallow magma and hydrothermal systems under Kilauea Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, B. A.; Dawson, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    The past 20 years have seen great strides in our understanding of Kilauea Volcano, in large part due to technological developments and improvements in seismological instrumentation, which now allow the surface effects of subterranean volcanic processes to be imaged in unprecedented detail. High-resolution tomography provided an image of 3D velocity anomalies down to a scale of a few hundred meters, providing indirect evidence for the presence of reservoirs under the summit region of Kilauea. A sharper image of a shallow hydrothermal reservoir under Kilauea Caldera was obtained from frequency-slowness analyses of long-period (LP) seismicity recorded on three small-aperture seismic antennas deployed in the summit caldera. Located within the top 500 m below the caldera floor and extending ~0.6 km and ~1 km in the east-west and north-south directions, this hydrothermal reservoir broadly overlaps the east wall of the Halemaumau pit crater. Further evidence of hydrothermal processes within this zone was obtained from a study of a well-recorded LP event, indicating a source mechanism consistent with the resonance of a horizontal steam-filled crack at a depth of ~150 m near the eastern rim of Halemaumau. Recurring very-long-period (VLP) signals originating in the repeated activation of a compact source region near sea level immediately beneath this hydrothermal reservoir have allowed a gradually emerging view of the shallowest segment of the magma transport pathway under the caldera. Further elaboration of our image of the magma pathway structure, made possible through detailed modeling of VLP signals accompanying degassing activity at a new vent formed in Halemaumau in March 2008, points to a dominant dike segment in the form of a nearly vertical east-trending dike. The inferred dike features a ~20° clockwise rotation in strike under the east edge of Halemaumau, where it intersects a sub-vertical north-striking dike. The triple junction made by the intersection of the

  1. Geochemical Clues on the Processes Controlling the 2005-2014 Unrest at Campi Flegrei Caldera, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, G.; Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Caliro, S.; D'auria, L.; De Martino, P.; Mangiacapra, A.; Petrillo, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of the mechanism which triggers unrests at active calderas is one of the most problematic issues of modern volcanology. In particular, magmatic intrusion vs. hydrothermal dynamics is one of the central questions to understand the signals of several restless calderas of the Earth, including, for example, Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Campi Flegrei. Here we focus on Campi Flegrei caldera, sited in the densely inhabited metropolitan area of Napoli, where an inflation stage showing an accelerating trend started in 2005 and reached a maximum vertical displacement of about 24 cm in July 2014. Fumarolic compositions compared with ground deformation data suggests that this ten year's accelerating uplift is mainly caused by the overlapping of two processes: (i) short time pulses caused by injection of magmatic fluids into the hydrothermal system, and (ii) a long time process of heating of the rocks. The short pulses are highlighted by comparing the residuals of ground deformation, fitted with an accelerating curve, with the fumarolic CO2/CH4 and He/CH4 ratios which are good indicators of the arrival of magmatic gases into the hydrothermal system. These two independent datasets show an impressive temporal correlation, with the same sequence of five peaks with a delay of ~ 200 days of the geochemical signal with respect to the geodetic one. The heating of the hydrothermal system is inferred by an evident increase in the fumarolic activity and by temperature-pressure gas-geoindicators. The accelerating ground deformation is paralleled in fact by an increase in the fumarolic CO/CO2 ratio and by a general decrease of the CH4/CO2ratio, both being sign of increased equilibration temperatures. Comparing the observed fumarolic compositions with the thermodynamically derived equilibrium values we infer that the heating is caused by the condensation of increasing amounts of steam. According to a recent interpretation of fumarolic inert gas species, which relates

  2. A first GPS measurement of vertical seafloor displacement in the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    De Martino, P.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Guardato, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Tammaro, U.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Vassallo, M.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; Iannaccone, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia

    2014-01-01

    This study shows how the GPS technique can be utilized for seafloor displacement measurements and improved the survey control infrastructure in Campi Flegrei caldera, two thirds of which is submerged under the sea. In the Gulf of Pozzuoli, about 2.5 km from the coast where the sea depth is 97 m, a continuous GPS station (CFB1) has been installed since the end of 2011 on the top of a elastic-beacon buoy, rigidly connected by a steel cable to the ballast on the sea bottom. We investigate the us...

  3. LAS COCINAS DEL INFIERNO. LA VISUALIDAD DE LAS MUJERES EN LAS CALDERAS DE PEDRO BOTERO

    OpenAIRE

    Zuriaga Senent, Vicent Francesc

    2013-01-01

    Casi todas las religiones nos hablan del infierno como lugar en el que las almas son torturadas eternamente. El judaísmo lo llama Gehena, la mitología clásica Tártaro y Hades, las religiones paganas Inframundo, y la tradición cristiana castellana Las calderas de Pedro Botero. Los profetas del Antiguo Testamento narran con claridad los tormentos del infierno y Dante en La Divina Comedia nos lo relata con una visión particular. La literatura y el arte nos ofrecen abundancia de imáge...

  4. The marine digital terrain model of the Panarea caldera (Aeolian Islands, Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Anzidei

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available A Marine Digital Elevation Model (MDEM of the still active volcanic area of Panarea caldera is presented in this paper. A fast and accurate survey was performed by means of the Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS geodetic technique coupled with an echo-sounding gear and a real time navigation software. The instrumentation was installed on board of a low draught boat in order to collect data starting from the bathymeter of one meter. Planar positions and depths were obtained with average accuracies of 30 cm and 10 cm respectively providing a 3D map of the seafloor useful for geomorphological, geophysical and volcanic hazard applications.

  5. Hydrothermal precious-metal deposits related to graben-calderas of the Sierra Madre Occidental

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Labarthe-Hernandez, G.; Nieto-Obregon, J.; Tristan-Gonzalez, M.; Gonzalez-Partida, E.

    2007-05-01

    The Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) covers the NW portion of Mexico and it is the host for several important precious metal mine operations, such as Tayoltita, Cienega, Topia, Fresnillo, Zacatecas, Guanajuato and Bolaños, just to mention a few. The southern part of the Basin and Range extension affected also NW Mexico and formed NW- to NE-trending normal faults that bound many large grabens, which are particularly long and deep in the southern SMO. Both graben formation and mid-Tertiary silicic volcanic activity coincided in space and time, particularly for the 38-23 Ma period, the Ignimbrite Flare-up event, but this activity dates back to Eocene and was as young as Miocene. This volcanism included large rhyolitic domes, too. At the southern SMO, the vents of this silicic volcanism are related to graben's master faults and we have named them graben-calderas. Evidences include large pyroclastic dikes and post-ignimbrite aligned rhyolitic domes and lava dikes. All these features were found along the graben-caldera walls or on the graben's shoulders. Some of these vents are related to gold and silver hydrothermal mineralization. In most cases a paleo-lake filled the graben-caldera for a period of time, either during the ignimbrite emplacement or after it. Some of the graben-caldera ignimbrites were deposited in subaqueous environments and post-ignimbrite rhyolitic domes and dikes were intruded in non-consolidated water-saturated tuffs or sedimentary deposits. This lacustrine environment provided the necessary water for the hydrothermal system. The combination of all these factors in space and time, grabens+volcanism+water, resulted in the development of precious-metal hydrothermal ore deposits. Bolaños mine in the Bolaños graben represent our case-study, but we have confirmed the same tectono-volcanic-lake relationship at other mine-districts along the SMO. We conclude that locating the fissural vents of the silicic ignimbrites by means of just geologic mapping is be

  6. High-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the Mono Basin-Long Valley Caldera region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, D. A.; Mangan, M.; McPhee, D.

    2013-12-01

    A new high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the Mono Basin-Long Valley Caldera region greatly enhances previous magnetic interpretations that were based on older, low-resolution, and regional aeromagnetic data sets and provides new insights into volcano-tectonic processes. The surveyed area covers a 8,750 km2 NNW-trending swath situated between the Sierra Nevada to the west and the Basin and Range Province to the east. The surveyed area includes the volcanic centers of Mono Lake, Mono-Inyo Craters, Mammoth Mountain, Devils Postpile, and Long Valley Caldera. The NW-trending eastern Sierra frontal fault zone crosses through the study area, including the active Mono Lake, Silver Lake, Hartley Springs, Laurel Creek, and Hilton Creek faults. Over 6,000 line-kilometers of aeromagnetic data were collected at a constant terrain clearance of 150 m, a flight-line spacing of 400 m, and a tie-line spacing of 4 km. Data were collected via helicopter with an attached stinger housing a magnetic sensor using a Scintrex CS-3 cesium magnetometer. In the northern part of the survey area, data improve the magnetic resolution of the individual domes and coulees along Mono Craters and a circular shaped magnetic anomaly that coincides with a poorly defined ring fracture mapped by Kistler (1966). Here, aeromagnetic data combined with other geophysical data suggests that Mono Craters may have preferentially followed a pre-existing plutonic basement feature that may have controlled the sickle shape of the volcanic chain. In the northeastern part of the survey, aeromagnetic data reveal a linear magnetic anomaly that correlates with and extends a mapped fault. In the southern part of the survey, in the Sierra Nevada block just south of Long Valley Caldera, aeromagnetic anomalies correlate with NNW-trending Sierran frontal faults rather than to linear NNE-trends observed in recent seismicity over the last 30 years. These data provide an important framework for the further analysis of the

  7. The late quaternary tephra layers from the caldera volcanoes in and around kagoshima bay, southern kyushu, japan

    OpenAIRE

    Nagaoka, Shinji

    1988-01-01

    The Aira, Ata and Kikai calderas of Kagoshima Bay have erupted more than twenty silicic tehra formations including more than fifty tephra falls and flows (about 1,000 km^3 in total volume) in the last 150 ka. On the basis of the sequence of eruptive phases which have many kinds of eruption types, the eruptive cycles of these caldera volcanoes are grouped into three types: 1) a plinian cycle (composed of a single plinian phase, or a plinian phase and a moderate-scale pyroclastic flow phase); 2...

  8. Geology of the Mid-Miocene Rooster Comb Caldera and Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field, eastern Oregon: Silicic volcanism associated with Grande Ronde flood basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas R.; Mahood, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    The Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) of eastern Oregon consists of rhyolitic caldera centers and lava fields contemporaneous with and spatially related to Mid-Miocene Columbia River flood basalt volcanism. Previous studies delineated two calderas in the southeastern part of LOVF near Owyhee Reservoir, the result of eruptions of two ignimbrites, the Tuff of Leslie Gulch and the Tuff of Spring Creek. Our new interpretation is that these two map units are differentially altered parts of a single ignimbrite produced in a major phreatomagmatic eruption at ~ 15.8 Ma. Areas previously mapped as Tuff of Spring Creek are locations where the ignimbrite contains abundant clinoptilolite ± mordenite, which made it susceptible to erosion. The resistant intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch has an alteration assemblage of albite ± quartz, indicative of low-temperature hydrothermal alteration. Our new mapping of caldera lake sediments and pre- and post-caldera rhyolitic lavas and intrusions that are chemically similar to intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch point to a single ~ 20 × 25 km caldera, which we name the Rooster Comb Caldera. Erosion of the resurgently uplifted southern half of the caldera created dramatic exposures of intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch cut by post-caldera rhyolite dikes and intrusions that are the deeper-level equivalents of lava domes and flows that erupted into the caldera lake preserved in exposures to the northeast. The Rooster Comb Caldera has features in common with more southerly Mid-Miocene calderas of the McDermitt Volcanic Field and High Rock Caldera Complex, including formation in a basinal setting shortly after flood basalt eruptions ceased in the region, and forming on eruption of peralkaline ignimbrite. The volcanism at Rooster Comb Caldera postdates the main activity at McDermitt and High Rock, but, like it, begins ~ 300 ky after flood basalt volcanism begins in the area, and while flood basalts don't erupt through the silicic focus, are

  9. Magma storage and evolution of the most recent effusive and explosive eruptions from Yellowstone Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befus, Kenneth S.; Gardner, James E.

    2016-04-01

    Between 70 and 175 ka, over 350 km3 of high-silica rhyolite magma erupted both effusively and explosively from within the Yellowstone Caldera. Phenocrysts in all studied lavas and tuffs are remarkably homogenous at the crystal, eruption, and caldera-scale, and yield QUILF temperatures of 750 ± 25 °C. Phase equilibrium experiments replicate the observed phenocryst assemblage at those temperatures and suggest that the magmas were all stored in the upper crust. Quartz-hosted glass inclusions contain 1.0-2.5 % H2O and 50-600 ppm CO2, but some units are relatively rich in CO2 (300-600 ppm) and some are CO2-poor (50-200 ppm). The CO2-rich magmas were stored at 90-150 MPa and contained a fluid that was 60-75 mol% CO2. CO2-poor magmas were stored at 50-70 MPa, with a more H2O-rich fluid (X_{{{text{CO}}2 }} = 40-60 %). Storage pressures and volatiles do not correlate with eruption age, volume, or style. Trace-element contents in glass inclusions and host matrix glass preserve a systematic evolution produced by crystal fractionation, estimated to range from 36 ± 12 to 52 ± 12 wt%. Because the erupted products contain Yellowstone magmatic system may undergo rapid changes. The variations in depth suggest the magmas were sourced from multiple chambers that follow similar evolutionary paths in the upper crust.

  10. Geobotanical characterization of a geothermal system using hyperspectral imagery: Long Valley Caldera, CA; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed hyperspectral Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging System (AVIRIS) imagery taken in September of 1992 in Long Valley Caldera, CA, a geothermally active region expressed surficially by hot springs and fumaroles. Geological and vegetation mapping are attempted through spectral classification of imagery. Particular hot spring areas in the caldera are targeted for analysis. The data is analyzed for unique geobotanical patterns in the vicinity of hot springs as well as gross identification of dominant plant and mineral species. Spectra used for the classifications come from a vegetation spectral library created for plant species found to be associated with geothermal processes. This library takes into account the seasonality of vegetation by including spectra for species on a monthly basis. Geological spectra are taken from JPL and USGS mineral libraries. Preliminary classifications of hot spring areas indicate some success in mineral identification and less successful vegetation species identification. The small spatial extent of individual plants demands either sub-pixel analysis or increased spatial resolution of imagery. Future work will also include preliminary analysis of a hyperspectral thermal imagery dataset and a multitemporal air photo dataset. The combination of these remotely sensed datasets for Long Valley will yield a valuable product for geothermal exploration efforts in other regions

  11. High flux rates of ignimbrite and stratocone growth at Atitlan Caldera, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, H. S.; Jicha, B.; Singer, B. S.

    2010-12-01

    To understand the factors that govern the development of different volcanic edifices, recent studies have quantified eruptive volume, repose interval and crustal thickness among other parameters. Atitlan Caldera, Guatemala provides a compelling locality to contrast the age, volume and repose of several ignimbrite eruptions over the past 160 kyr including the 300 km3 Los Chocoyos ignimbrite, as well as, prolific mafic volcanism from three intracaldera stratocones. Since the caldera-forming eruption 84 kyr, 117 km3 of basaltic andesitic to dacitic lavas have been erupted from stratocones San Pedro, Toliman and Atitlan, resulting in a combined eruption rate of 1.46km3/kyr. These eruption rates are considered minimum values as preliminary 40Ar/39Ar age data suggest the cones are much younger than 84 kyr. Inclusion of the Los Chocoyos eruption increases eruption rates to 4.77 km3/kyr. Average eruption rates of the Atitlan system are an order of magnitude greater than most frontal arc complexes that are commonly characterized by cone growth due to large punctuated silicic eruptions. Although a minor proportion (marked by large punctuated ignimbrite eruptions, but rather by continual profuse outpouring of both rhyolitic and basaltic products.

  12. Cenozoic Ignimbrites, Source Calderas, Relict Magma Chambers, and Tectonic Settings: Perspectives from Cordilleran North America (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P. W.

    2009-12-01

    In the early 1960s, new concepts and innovative techniques coalesced spectacularly to improve understanding of Tertiary pyroclastic volcanism in North America. Spotty recognition of welded tuff, among rocks mostly described as silicic lava flows, exploded with identification of individual ignimbrite sheets, some having volumes >103 km3 and extending >100 km from source calderas. R.l. Smith, during study of the Bandelier Tuff in New Mexico, documented complexities of welding and crystallization zones that provided a genetic framework (cooling units) for ignimbrite studies (even while confusion continues in some areas where talus and vegetation obscure bench-forming contact zones between densely welded cliffs). Also in the 1960s, application of isotopic age determinations (initially K-Ar, now largely superceded by 40Ar/39Ar laser fusion) and precise paleomagnetic pole directions became key tools for correlating ignimbrites, deciphering eruptive histories, and determining volcano-tectonic patterns. Dated ignimbrites provide unique stratigraphic markers within volcanic field, as well as datums for regional structures and the shifting patterns of volcanism related to global plate motions--another happy coincidence in the 1960s as plate-tectonic models were formulated. Tertiary ignimbrite flare-ups along the Cordilleran margin increasingly are recognized as coinciding with inception of regional extension, especially during transitions from episodes of low-angle convergence. Many large caldera sources for the Tertiary ignimbrites have now been identified, in place of prior vague concepts of “volcano-tectonic depressions”, especially as the contrasts between thin outflow and thickly ponded intracaldera ignimbrite with interleaved collapse breccia became appreciated. Multi-km-thick fills in many calderas document that collapse begins early during large ignimbrite eruptions, and downsag inception was succeeded by breakage along ring faults. Resurgent uplift has been

  13. Data analysis and adjustment of the first geodetic surveys in the Caldera of Teide, Tenerife, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, M. J.; Martin, M. D.; Camacho, A. G.

    1986-11-01

    To detect possible superficial deformations in the volcanic Caldera of Teide area (Canary Islands), we have set up a network composed by 17 points which we shall observe successively. In this paper, we present the analysis and reduction of data and the free tridimensional adjustment of the network for the first observation campaign.

  14. Volcanic flood simulation of magma effusion using FLO-2D for drainage of a caldera lake at the Mt. Baekdusan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Khil-Ha; Kim, Sung-Wook; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-05-01

    Many volcanic craters and calderas are filled with large amounts of water that can pose significant flood hazards to downstream communities due to their high elevation and the potential for catastrophic releases of water. Recent reports pointed out the Baekdusan volcano that is located between the border of China and North Korea as a potential active volcano. Since Millennium Eruption around 1000 AD, smaller eruptions have occurred at roughly 100-year intervals, with the last one in 1903. Sudden release of huge volume of water stored in temporarily elevated caldera lakes are a recurrent feature of volcanic environments, due to the case with which outlet channels are blocked by and re-cut through, unwelded pyroclastic deposits. The volcano is showing signs of waking from a century-long slumber recently. Volcanic floods, including breakouts from volcanic lakes, can affect communities beyond the areas immediately affected by a volcanic eruption and cause significant hydrological hazards because floods from lake-filled calderas may be particularly large and high. Although a number of case studies have been presented in the literature, investigation of the underlying physical processes is required as well as a method for interpreting the process of the rapid release of water stored in a caldera lake. The development of various forecasting techniques to prevent and minimize economic and social damage is in urgent need. This study focuses on constructing a flood hazard map triggered by the magma effusion in the Baekdusan volcano. A physically-based uplift model was developed to compute the amount of water and time to peak flow. The ordinary differential equation was numerically solved using the finite difference method and Newton-Raphson iteration method was used to solve nonlinear equation. The magma effusion rate into the caldera lake is followed by examples at other volcanic activities. As a result, the hydrograph serves as an upper boundary condition when hydrodynamic

  15. Asymmetrically multi-collapsed structure of Kikai caldera in southern off Kyushu Island, Japan: A reconstruction from seismic reflection images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, F.; Kiyokawa, S.; Oiwane, H.; Nakamura, Y.; Kameo, K.; Minowa, Y.; Kuratomi, T.

    2012-12-01

    Kikai caldera (Matsumoto, 1943) is a mostly submerged highly active caldera complex located in the southern Japan 40 km off Kyushu Island. The caldera has bathymetrically two rims partially that are previously considered as older-outer and newer-inner ones (Yokoyama et al., 1966). The caldera is believed to be the source of Akahoya tephra (Machida and Arai, 1978) which date was determined as 7300 cal. BP (Fukusawa, 1995) which is the most recent VEI-7 class eruption in the eastern margin of Asia. Intense earthquakes (Naruo and Kobayashi, 2002), low-aspect ratio Koya ignimbrite (Maeno and Taniguchi, 2007) and tsunami (Geshi, 2009) are presumed to have taken place at the climax of the eruption. There are at least two other series of giant eruption deposits that are considered to have originated from the Kikai caldera (Ono et al., 1986) and this indicates that it has been serving as an eruptive center for the past 150,000 years. We conducted seismic reflection observations in two survey cruises (KT-10-18 and KT-11-11) in 2010 and 2011 using a research vessel Tansei-maru of JAMSTEC (Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology). The sound source was a 150 cubic inches G-I gun with 10 seconds of shot interval, and a 48-channled streamer cable was used for acquisition. Totally 24 profiles were obtained with the speed of 4 knots. First, the absence of large fault in northern and western caldera rim indicates Kikai likely had an asymmetric "trapdoor" style collapse (Lipman, 1995) rather than the ideal "piston" type one. Inner and outer topographic rims at the east to south do correspond with large faults, however the both of them may have worked in 7300 BP eruption because they reach to the seafloor. Such asymmetric multi-collapse would provide some characteristics to the climactic pyroclastic flow in 7300 BP. Second, the bathymetric rise at the center of the caldera consists of high-amplitude surface and chaotic thick facies outwardly collapsed by intense normal

  16. A preliminary study of older hot spring alteration in Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, P.B.; Phillips, A.; John, D.; Cosca, M.; Pritchard, C.; Andersen, A.; Manion, J.

    2009-01-01

    Erosion in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera (640??ka), Wyoming, has exposed a cross section of older hydrothermal alteration in the canyon walls. The altered outcrops of the post-collapse tuff of Sulphur Creek (480??ka) extend from the canyon rim to more than 300??m beneath it. The hydrothermal minerals are zoned, with an advanced argillic alteration consisting of an association of quartz (opal) + kaolinite ?? alunite ?? dickite, and an argillic or potassic alteration association with quartz + illite ?? adularia. Disseminated fine-grained pyrite or marcasite is ubiquitous in both alteration types. These alteration associations are characteristic products of shallow volcanic epithermal environments. The contact between the two alteration types is about 100??m beneath the rim. By analogy to other active geothermal systems including active hydrothermal springs in the Yellowstone Caldera, the transition from kaolinite to illite occurred at temperatures in the range 150 to 170????C. An 40Ar/39Ar age on alunite of 154,000 ?? 16,000??years suggests that hydrothermal activity has been ongoing since at least that time. A northwest-trending linear array of extinct and active hot spring centers in the Sevenmile Hole area implies a deeper structural control for the upflowing hydrothermal fluids. We interpret this deeper structure to be the Yellowstone Caldera ring fault that is covered by the younger tuff of Sulphur Creek. The Sevenmile Hole altered area lies at the eastern end of a band of hydrothermal centers that may mark the buried extension of the Yellowstone Caldera ring fault across the northern part of the Caldera. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Geophysical monitoring of the submerged area of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Southern Italy): experiences and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, Giovanni; Guardato, Sergio; De Martino, Prospero; Donnarumma, Gian Paolo; Bobbio, Antonella; Chierici, Francesco; Pignagnoli, Luca; Beranzoli, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The monitoring system of the Campi Flegrei caldera is made up of a dense geophysical network of seismological and geodetic instruments with data acquired and processed at the Monitoring Center of INGV in Naples. As one third of the caldera is covered by the sea, a marine monitoring system has been operating since 2008 in the center of the gulf of Pozzuoli, where the sea depth is about 100 m at ~2.5 km from the coast. The main component of the monitoring system is CUMAS (Cabled Underwater Multidisciplinary Acquisition System), which consists of a sea floor module equipped with geophysical and oceanographic sensors (broad band seismometer, accelerometer, hydrophone, bottom pressure recorder and single point three component water-current meter) and status and control sensors. CUMAS is connected by cable to the top of an elastic beacon buoy equipped with the power supply and data transmission devices. The buoy consists of a float placed below sea level, surrounding and holding a steel pole that supports a turret structure above sea level. The pole, turret and float system are rigidly connected to the ballast on the sea bottom. Thus a GPS installed on the turret can record the vertical sea floor displacement related to the volcanic activity of the area. The GPS has operated since January 2012 with continuous acquisition lasting more than three years and has recorded a cumulative seafloor uplift of about 7-8 cm. The comparison of the pattern of the GPS buoy data with those of the land stations confirms a quasi-symmetrical vertical displacement field of the caldera area. Measurement of vertical sea floor displacement has also been obtained by the analysis of bottom pressure recorder data. These results, in conjunction with the analysis of seismic and hydrophone data, have encouraged us to extend the marine monitoring system with the deployment in the Gulf of Pozzuoli of three new similar systems. We also present preliminary results of the first few months of activity of

  18. Remelting in caldera and rift environments and the genesis of hot, “recycled” rhyolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakin, A. G.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2012-07-01

    Large and small volume rhyolites are generated in calderas and rift zones, inheriting older and isotopically diverse crystal populations from their volcanic predecessors. Low-δ18O values in many of these rhyolites suggest that they were derived from the remelting of solid, hydrothermally altered by meteoric water protoliths that were once close to the surface, but become buried by caldera collapse or rifting. These rhyolites persist for millions of years in these environments with little evidence of coeval basalts. We present a series of numerical experiments on convective melting of roof-rocks by the underplated by near liquidus to superheated silicic melts, generated at the base of the chamber by basaltic intrusions in shallow crustal conditions. We used a range of temperatures and compositions, an appropriate phase diagram with a defined extended eutectic zone appropriate for these environments, varied sill thickness, viscosity of the boundary layer, and considered hydrothermal and lower boundary heat losses. The goal was to estimate melting rates and mechanisms, define conditions that are required for efficient and rapid remelting in the upper crust, quantitatively describe novel details of the dynamics of convecting melting, and compare it to the earlier parametric and numerical treatments of roof melting by underplating. Resolution of numerical experiments allowed us to track mixed thermal and two-phase plume-like convection in silicic magma with a bulk viscosity of 104.5-105.5 Pa s. The following results were obtained: (1) remarkably fast melting/magma generation rates of many meters per year, (2) intrinsic inhomogeneities in the roof accelerates convection and melting rates via rapid gravitational settling of refractory blocks and exposing detachment scars to the melting front, (3) due to rapid melting, hydrothermal heat loss through the roof, and conductive heat dissipation through the bottom are less important on melting timescales. (4) Convective

  19. Acoustic stratigraphy and hydrothermal activity within Epi Submarine Caldera, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, H. Gary; Exon, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    Geological and geophysical surveys of active submarine volcanoes offshore and southeast of Epi Island, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc, have delineated details of the structure and acoustic stratigraphy of three volcanic cones. These submarine cones, named Epia, Epib, and Epic, are aligned east-west and spaced 3.5 km apart on the rim of a submerged caldera. At least three acoustic sequences, of presumed Quaternary age, can be identified on single-channel seismic-reflection profiles. Rocks dredged from these cones include basalt, dacite, and cognate gabbroic inclusions with magmatic affinities similar to those of the Karua (an active submarine volcano off the southeastern tip of Epi) lavas. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  20. Development of large-volume rhyolitic ignibrites (LRI'S): The Chalupas Caldera, an example from Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms responsible for the generation of large volumes of silicic magma and the eruption of large-volume rhyolitic ignimbrites (LRI's) remain poorly understood. Of particular interest are the relative roles of crustal assimilation, fractional crystallization and magma supply and the processes by which large volumes of magma accumulate in crustal chambers rather than erupt in smaller batches. Isotope geochemistry, combined with study of major and trace element variations of lavas, can be used to infer the relative contribution of crustal material and continued magmatic supply. Timescales for the accumulation of magma can be estimated using detailed geochronology. Magma supply rates can be estimated from eruption rates of nearby volcanoes. In this study we investigate the evolution of the Chalupas LRI, a caldera system in the Ecuadorian Andes where LRI's are rare in comparison to the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of South America (au)

  1. Ground deformation at collapse calderas: influence of host rock lithology and reservoir multiplicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of source mechanisms have been proposed to account for observed caldera deformation. Here we present a systematic set of new results from numerical forward modelling using a Finite Element Method. which provides a link between measured ground deformation and the inaccessible deformation source. We simulate surface displacements due to pressure changes in a shallow oblate reservoir overlain by host rock with variable mechanical properties. We find that the amplitude and wavelength of resultant ground deformation is dependent on the distribution of mechanically stiff and soft lithologies and their relative distribution above a reservoir. In addition, we note an influence of layering on the critical ratio of horizontal over vertical displacements, a criterion employed to discriminate between different finite source geometries.

  2. Regional analysis of tertiary volcanic Calderas (western U.S.) using Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatz, David M.; Taranik, James V.

    1989-01-01

    The Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery of the Basin and Range province of southern Nevada was analyzed to identify and map volcanic rock assemblages at three Tertiary calderas. It was found that the longer-wavelength visible and the NIR TM Bands 3, 5, and 7 provide more effective lithologic discrimination than the shorter-wavelength bands, due partly to deeper penetration of the longer-wavelength bands, resulting in more lithologically driven radiances. Shorter-wavelength TM Bands 1 and 2 are affected more by surficial weathering products including desert varnish which may or may not provide an indirect link to lithologic identity. Guidelines for lithologic analysis of volcanic terrains using Landsat TM imagery are outlined.

  3. Catastrophic caldera-forming eruptions II: The subordinate role of magma buoyancy as an eruption trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Patricia M.; Grosfils, Eric B.; de Silva, Shanaka L.

    2015-10-01

    Recent analytical investigations have suggested that magma buoyancy is critical for triggering catastrophic caldera forming eruptions. Through detailed assessment of these approaches, we illustrate how analytical models have been misapplied for investigating buoyancy and are, therefore, incorrect and inconclusive. Nevertheless, the hypothesis that buoyancy is the critical trigger for larger eruptions warrants further investigation. As such, we utilize viscoelastic finite element models that incorporate buoyancy to test overpressure evolution and mechanical failure in the roof due to the coalescence of large buoyant magma bodies for two model cases. In the first case, we mimic empirical approaches and include buoyancy as an explicit boundary condition. In the second set of models, buoyancy is calculated implicitly due to the density contrast between the magma in the reservoir and the host rock. Results from these numerical experiments indicate that buoyancy promotes only minimal overpressurization of large silicic magma reservoirs (implementations and the results from the numerical experiments, we conclude that buoyancy does not provide an eruption triggering mechanism for large silicic systems. Therefore, correlations of buoyancy with magma residence times, the eruption frequency-volume relationship, and the dimensions of calderas are re-assessed. We find a causal relationship with magma reservoir volume that implicates the mechanical conditions of the host rock as a primary control on eruption frequency. As magma reservoirs grow in size (> 100 km3) they surpass a rheological threshold where their subsequent evolution is controlled by host rock mechanics. Consequently, this results in a thermomechanical division between small systems that are triggered "internally" by magmatic processes and large systems that are triggered "externally" by faulting related to roof uplift or tectonism. Finally, critical assessment of recent analytical approaches illustrates that care

  4. Abrupt transition from fractional crystallization to magma mixing at Gorely volcano (Kamchatka) after caldera collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilenko, Maxim; Ozerov, Alexey; Kyle, Philip R.; Carr, Michael J.; Nikulin, Alex; Vidito, Christopher; Danyushevsky, Leonid

    2016-07-01

    A series of large caldera-forming eruptions (361-38 ka) transformed Gorely volcano, southern Kamchatka Peninsula, from a shield-type system dominated by fractional crystallization processes to a composite volcanic center, exhibiting geochemical evidence of magma mixing. Old Gorely, an early shield volcano (700-361 ka), was followed by Young Gorely eruptions. Calc-alkaline high magnesium basalt to rhyolite lavas have been erupted from Gorely volcano since the Pleistocene. Fractional crystallization dominated evolution of the Old Gorely magmas, whereas magma mixing is more prominent in the Young Gorely eruptive products. The role of recharge-evacuation processes in Gorely magma evolution is negligible (a closed magmatic system); however, crustal rock assimilation plays a significant role for the evolved magmas. Most Gorely magmas differentiate in a shallow magmatic system at pressures up to 300 MPa, ˜3 wt% H2O, and oxygen fugacity of ˜QFM + 1.5 log units. Magma temperatures of 1123-1218 °C were measured using aluminum distribution between olivine and spinel in Old and Young Gorely basalts. The crystallization sequence of major minerals for Old Gorely was as follows: olivine and spinel (Ol + Sp) for mafic compositions (more than 5 wt% of MgO); clinopyroxene and plagioclase crystallized at ˜5 wt% of MgO (Ol + Cpx + Plag) and magnetite at ˜3.5 wt% of MgO (Ol + Cpx + Plag + Mt). We show that the shallow magma chamber evolution of Old Gorely occurs under conditions of decompression and degassing. We find that the caldera-forming eruption(s) modified the magma plumbing geometry. This led to a change in the dominant magma evolution process from fractional crystallization to magma mixing. We further suggest that disruption of the magma chamber and accompanying change in differentiation process have the potential to transform a shield volcanic system to that of composite cone on a global scale.

  5. Fiber-Reinforced Rocks Akin to Roman Concrete Help Explain Ground Deformation at Campi Flegrei Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanorio, Tiziana; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

    2016-04-01

    The caldera of Campi Flegrei is one of the active hydrothermal systems of the Mediterranean region experiencing notable unrest episodes in a densely populated area. During the last crisis of 1982-1984, nearly 40,000 people were evacuated for almost two years from the main town of Pozzuoli, the Roman Puteoli, due to the large uplifts (~2 m over two years) and the persistent seismic activity. The evacuation severely hampered the economy and the social make-up of the community, which included the relocation of schools and commercial shops as well as the harbor being rendered useless for docking. Despite the large uplifts, the release of strain appears delayed. Seismicity begins and reaches a magnitude of 4.0 only upon relatively large uplifts (~ 70-80 cm) contrary to what is generally observed for calderas exhibiting much lower deformation levels. Over and above the specific mechanism causing the unrest and the lack of identification of a shallow magmatic reservoir (concrete. The formation of fibrous minerals by intertwining filaments confers shear and tensile strength to the caprock, contributing to its ductility and increased resistance to fracture. The importance of the findings reported in this study lies not only on the fibrous and compositionally nature of the caprock but also on its possible physicochemical deterioration. Given the P-T-XCO2 conditions regulating the decarbonation reactions, the influx of new fluids into the Campi Flegrei system lowers the temperature of the decarbonation reaction and dilutes the existing CO2, thus triggering additional CO2, methane, and steam to form. As these gases rise toward the surface, the natural cement layer halts them, leading to pore pressure increase and subsequent ground deformations.

  6. Petrogenesis of Rinjani Post-1257-Caldera-Forming-Eruption Lava Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heryadi Rachmat

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available After the catastrophic 1257 caldera-forming eruption, a new chapter of Old Rinjani volcanic activity beganwith the appearance of Rombongan and Barujari Volcanoes within the caldera. However, no published petrogeneticstudy focuses mainly on these products. The Rombongan eruption in 1944 and Barujari eruptions in pre-1944, 1966,1994, 2004, and 2009 produced basaltic andesite pyroclastic materials and lava flows. A total of thirty-one sampleswere analyzed, including six samples for each period of eruption except from 2004 (only one sample. The sampleswere used for petrography, whole-rock geochemistry, and trace and rare earth element analyses. The Rombonganand Barujari lavas are composed of calc-alkaline and high K calc-alkaline porphyritic basaltic andesite. The magmashows narrow variation of SiO2 content that implies small changes during its generation. The magma that formedRombongan and Barujari lavas is island-arc alkaline basalt. Generally, data show that the rocks are enriched in LargeIon Lithophile Elements (LILE: K, Rb, Ba, Sr, and Ba and depleted in High Field Strength Elements (HFSE: Y, Ti,and Nb which are typically a suite from a subduction zone. The pattern shows a medium enrichment in Light REEand relatively depleted in Heavy REE. The processes are dominantly controlled by fractional crystallization andmagma mixing. All of the Barujari and Rombongan lavas would have been produced by the same source of magmawith little variation in composition caused by host rock filter process. New flux of magma would likely have occurredfrom pre-1944 until 2009 period that indicates slightly decrease and increase of SiO2 content. The Rombongan andBarujari lava generations show an arc magma differentiation trend.

  7. Pucarilla-Cerro Tipillas volcanic complex: the oldest recognized caldera in the southeastern portion of central volcanic zone of Central Andes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recognize the most eastern and oldest collapse caldera structure in the southern portion of the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes. A description of Middle-Upper Miocene successions related to explosive- effusive events is presented. The location of this centre close to Cerro Galn Caldera attests a recurrence in the volcanism between 12 and 2 Ma in this portion of the Altiplano - Puna Plateau.

  8. New geologic evidence for additional 16.5-15.5 Ma silicic calderas in northwest Nevada related to initial impingement of the Yellowstone hot spot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coble, Matthew A; Mahood, Gail A [Department Geological and Environmental Sciences, 450 Serra Mall, Bldg 320, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3115 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Three silicic calderas have been newly identified in northwest Nevada west of McDermitt caldera. This volcanism is interpreted to have formed during a short interval at 16.5-15.5 Ma, during the waning stage of Steens flood basalt volcanism after the initial impingement of the Yellowstone hot spot. New mapping demonstrates that the area affected by this mid-Miocene silicic volcanism is significantly larger than previously appreciated in the western U.S.

  9. Pucarilla-Cerro Tipillas volcanic complex: the oldest recognized caldera in the southeastern portion of central volcanic zone of Central Andes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, Silvina; Petrinovic, Ivan [CONICET -IBIGEO. Museo de Cs. Naturales, Universidad de Salta, Mendoza 2 (4400), Salta (Argentina)], E-mail: guzmansilvina@gmail.com

    2008-10-01

    We recognize the most eastern and oldest collapse caldera structure in the southern portion of the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes. A description of Middle-Upper Miocene successions related to explosive- effusive events is presented. The location of this centre close to Cerro Galn Caldera attests a recurrence in the volcanism between 12 and 2 Ma in this portion of the Altiplano - Puna Plateau.

  10. Typology of Natural Hazards and Assessment of Associated Risks in the Mount Bambouto Caldera (Cameroon Line, West Cameroon)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ghislain T. ZANGMO; Armand D. KAGOU; David G. NKOUATHIO; Pierre WANDJI

    2009-01-01

    Mount Bambouto is a polygenic stratovoicano of the Cameroon Volcanic Line, built between 21 Ma and 4.5 Ma. It is situated approximately 200 km NE of Mount Cameroon, between 09°55' and 10°15' longitude east and, 05°25' and 05°50' latitude north. The volcano covers an area of (13×8 km). Mount Bambouto is characterized by several natural hazards of different origins: meteorological, such as landslides and rock falls; anthropogenic, such as bushfires, tribal wars and deforestation; and volcanological, such as volcanic eruption. The thematic map shows that 55-60% of the caldera has high probability of occurrence of mass movement. The caldera has a high population density (3000 inhabitants), which increases the level of risk, evaluated at approximately $US3.8 million for patrimony, 3000 civilian deaths and destruction of biodiversity.

  11. Measuring Variable Scales of Surface Deformation in and around the Yellowstone Caldera with TerraSAR-X Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, C. W., Jr.; Dzurisin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Utilizing three years of TerraSAR-X (TSX) Stripmap data covering the Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming, we identify several examples showing the benefits of the high spatial and temporal resolution TSX data. Although the Stripmap footprints are small, compared to those of past SAR satellites, we are nonetheless able to track subsidence/uplift cycles of the ~50 x 80 km Yellowstone caldera using multiple strips. The Stripmap data are also useful for measuring deformation associated with the area of the North Rim anomaly, an area of repeated uplift and subsidence, ~30 km in diameter near the intersection of the north caldera rim, north-trending Mammoth-Norris Corridor, and west-northwest trending seismic belt east of Hebgen Lake. We measured ~45 mm of uplift associated with an episode that occurred mostly during the winter of 2013-2014 (as verified by GPS), and ~15 mm of subsequent subsidence in the early summer of 2014. The TSX Stripmap data have also proven effective at measuring small-scale deformation features. Because of the high-resolution of the TSX Stripmap data, we have also been able to measure many small-scale deforming features in Yellowstone National Park that are associated with apparent aquifer discharge/recharge cycles, unstable slope movement, geyser basin deformation, and deformation related to other hydrothermal features. We present an example of ~3 cm of seasonal deformation likely resulting from water movement in and out of an aquifer along the southwest caldera rim. We also document subsidence of ~1 cm/yr in a circular area nearly 0.5 km across near the vent from the Pitchstone Plateau, a thick rhyolite flow that erupted nearly 70 ka. TSX data are instrumental in identifying the seasonal variation found in some of these features, and in measuring the small spatial areas of deformation associated with other features.

  12. Fluid flow in the resurgent dome of Long Valley Caldera: Implications from thermal data and deep electrical sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribnow, D.F.C.; Schutze, C.; Hurter, S.J.; Flechsig, C.; Sass, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Temperatures of 100??C are measured at 3 km depth in a well located on the resurgent dome in the center of Long Valley Caldera, California, despite an assumed >800??C magma chamber at 6-8 km depth. Local downflow of cold meteoric water as a process for cooling the resurgent dome is ruled out by a Pecle??t-number analysis of temperature logs. These analyses reveal zones with fluid circulation at the upper and lower boundaries of the Bishop Tuff, and an upflow zone in the metasedimentary rocks. Vertical Darcy velocities range from 10 to 70 cm a-1. A 21-km-long geoelectrical profile across the caldera provides resistivity values to the order of 100 to >103 ??m down to a depth of 6 km, as well as variations of self-potential. Interpretation of the electrical data with respect to hydrothermal fluid movement confirms that there is no downflow beneath the resurgent dome. To explain the unexpectedly low temperatures in the resurgent dome, we challenge the common view that the caldera as a whole is a regime of high temperatures and the resurgent dome is a local cold anomaly. Instead, we suggest that the caldera was cooled to normal thermal conditions by vigorous hydrothermal activity in the past, and that a present-day hot water flow system is responsible for local hot anomalies, such as Hot Creek and the area of the Casa Diablo geothermal power plant. The source of hot water has been associated with recent shallow intrusions into the West Moat. The focus of planning for future power plants should be to locate this present-day flow system instead of relying on heat from the old magma chamber. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A 2-D FEM thermal model to simulate water flow in a porous media: Campi Flegrei caldera case study

    OpenAIRE

    V. Romano; Tammaro, U.; P. Capuano

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic and geothermal aspects both exist in many geologically young areas. In these areas the heat transfer process is of fundamental importance, so that the thermal and fluid-dynamic processes characterizing a viscous fluid in a porous medium are very important to understand the complex dynamics of the these areas. The Campi Flegrei caldera, located west of the city of Naples, within the central-southern sector of the large graben of Campanian plain, is a region where both volcani...

  14. Geodesia de precisión aplicada al control de movimientos y deformaciones en la Caldera del Teide

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Ricardo; Sevilla, Miguel J.; Camacho, Antonio G.; Toro y Llaca, Carmen de; Martín, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    The survey of potentially active zones in the earth crust done by geodetic methods in one of the most efective techniques for these researches, and it constitutes an essential complement to the geologic and geophysic information. The Caldera del Teide in Tenerife Island is one of the most interesting volcanic buildings in the Canary Islands, and it has been chosen as a proof laboratory of geodetic methods and techniques in potentially active zones. This work presents the results of the geodet...

  15. Numerical models for ground deformation and gravity changes during volcanic unrest: simulating the hydrothermal system dynamics of an active caldera

    OpenAIRE

    Coco, A.; Gottsmann, J.; F. Whitaker; Rust, A; Currenti, G.; Jasim, A.; Bunney, S.

    2015-01-01

    Ground deformation and gravity changes in active calderas during periods of unrest can signal an impending eruption and thus must be correctly interpreted for hazard evaluation. It is critical to differentiate variation of geophysical observables related to volume and pressure changes induced by magma migration from shallow hydrothermal activity associated with hot fluids of magmatic origin rising from depth. In this paper we present a nu...

  16. Aquifer Recharge Estimation through Atmospheric Chloride Mass Balance at Las Cañadas Caldera, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Rayco Marrero-Diaz; Alcalá, Francisco J.; Nemesio M. Pérez; Dina L. López; Gladys V. Melián; Eleazar Padrón; Germán D. Padilla

    2015-01-01

    The atmospheric chloride mass balance (CMB) method was used to estimate net aquifer recharge in Las Cañadas Caldera, an endorheic summit aquifer area about 2000 m a.s.l. with negligible surface runoff, which hosts the largest freshwater reserve in Tenerife Island, Canary Islands, Spain. The wet hydrological year 2005–2006 was selected to compare yearly atmospheric chloride bulk deposition and average chloride content in recharge water just above the water table, both deduced from periodical...

  17. Multilocus sequence analysis of Thermoanaerobacter isolates reveals recombining but differentiated subpopulations from geothermal springs of the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russia

    OpenAIRE

    LittyVarghese; ChristopherLHemme

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Thermal environments have island-like characteristics and provide a unique opportunity to study population structure and diversity patterns of microbial taxa inhabiting these sites. Strains having ≥98% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the obligately anaerobic Firmicutes Thermoanaerobacter uzonensis were isolated from seven geothermal springs, separated by up to 1600 m, within the Uzon Caldera (Kamchatka, Russian Far East). The intraspecies variation and spatial patterns of di...

  18. Evidence from cosmic ray exposure (CRE) dating for the existence of a pre-Minoan caldera on Santorini, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassas, C. D.; Bourlès, D. L.; Braucher, R.; Druitt, T. H.; Nomikou, P.; Léanni, L.

    2016-05-01

    Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) dating was performed on the caldera cliffs of Santorini with the aim of detecting cliff segments predating the Minoan eruption (17th century BCE). The methodology involved the determination of in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl concentration in basaltic-to-rhyodacitic whole rocks cropping out in the cliffs. After the samples were processed following the chemical protocol of 36Cl preparation for silicate rocks, 36Cl concentrations were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Important challenges during the implementation procedure were related to large amounts of radiogenic 36Cl, complex modeling of inherited 36Cl, and dominance of the thermal and epithermal (low-energy) neutron capture production pathway. Nevertheless, quantitative assessments on the basis of the contribution of the low-energy neutron capture pathway percent to the total production rate validated the calculated CRE dates. Current CRE ages demonstrate that an ancient caldera existed on pre-Minoan Santorini, occupying at least the northern half of the modern-day caldera.

  19. 3D modelling of the Tejeda Caldera cone-sheet swarm, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrock, Lisa K.; Jensen, Max J.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Mattsson, Tobias; Geiger, Harri

    2015-04-01

    Cone-sheet swarms provide vital information on the interior of volcanic systems and their plumbing systems (e.g. Burchardt et al. 2013). This information is important for the interpretation of processes and dynamics of modern and ancient volcanic systems, and is therefore vital for assessing volcanic hazards and to reduce risks to modern society. To more realistically model cone-sheet emplacement an approximation of their 3D shape needs to be known. Most cone-sheet swarms are not sufficiently exposed laterally and/or vertically, however, which makes it difficult to determine the geometry of a cone-sheet swarm at depth, especially since different shapes (e.g. convex, straight or concave continuations) would produce a similar trace at the surface (cf. Burchardt et al. 2011, and references therein). The Miocene Tejeda Caldera on Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain, hosts a cone-sheet swarm that was emplaced into volcaniclastic caldera infill at about 12.3-7.3 Ma (Schirnick et al. 1999). The dyke swarm displays over 1000 m of vertical exposure and more than 15 km of horizontal exposure, making it a superb locality to study the evolution of cone-sheet swarms in detail and to determine its actual geometry in 3D space. We have used structural data of Schirnick (1996) to model the geometry of the Tejeda cone-sheet in 3D, using the software Move® by Midland Valley Ltd. Based on previous 2D projections, Schirnick et al. (1999) suggested that the cone-sheet swarm is formed by a stack of parallel intrusive sheets which have a truncated dome geometry and form a concentric structure around a central axis, assuming straight sheet-intrusions. Our 3D model gives insight into the symmetries of the sheets and the overall geometry of the cone-sheet swarm below the surface. This visualization now allows to grasp the complexity of the Tejeda cone-sheet swarm at depth, particularly in relation to different possible cone-sheet geometries suggested in the literature (cf. Burchardt et al

  20. Fiber-Reinforced Rocks Akin to Roman Concrete Help Explain Ground Deformation at Campi Flegrei Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanorio, Tiziana; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

    2016-04-01

    The caldera of Campi Flegrei is one of the active hydrothermal systems of the Mediterranean region experiencing notable unrest episodes in a densely populated area. During the last crisis of 1982-1984, nearly 40,000 people were evacuated for almost two years from the main town of Pozzuoli, the Roman Puteoli, due to the large uplifts (~2 m over two years) and the persistent seismic activity. The evacuation severely hampered the economy and the social make-up of the community, which included the relocation of schools and commercial shops as well as the harbor being rendered useless for docking. Despite the large uplifts, the release of strain appears delayed. Seismicity begins and reaches a magnitude of 4.0 only upon relatively large uplifts (~ 70-80 cm) contrary to what is generally observed for calderas exhibiting much lower deformation levels. Over and above the specific mechanism causing the unrest and the lack of identification of a shallow magmatic reservoir (performed a series of direct measurements on deep well cores by combining high-resolution microstructural and mineralogical analyses with the elastic and mechanical properties of well cores from the deep wells drilled in the area right before the unrest of 1982-1984 - San Vito (SV1 and SV2) and Mofete (MF1, MF2, MF5). The rock physics analysis of the well cores provides evidence for the existence of two horizons, above and below the seismogenic area, underlying a natural, coupled process. The basement is a calc-silicate rock housing hydrothermal decarbonation reactions, which provide lime-rich fluids. The caprock above the seismogenic area has a pozzolanic composition and a fibril-rich matrix made of intertwining filaments of ettringite and tobemorite, resulting from lime-pozzolanic reactions. These findings provide evidence for a natural process reflecting that engineering the mortar of the Roman concrete. The formation of fibrous minerals by intertwining filaments confers shear and tensile strength to

  1. Joint use of long water pipe tiltmeters and sea level gauges for monitoring ground deformation at Campi Flegrei caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Roberto; Capuano, Paolo; Tammaro, Umberto; Bilham, Roger

    2014-05-01

    The Campi Flegrei caldera, located in the Campanian Plain, Southern Italy, 15 km west of the city of Naples, is a nested, resurgent, and restless structure in the densely inhabited Neapolitan area. The main caldera at Campi Flegrei is 12 - 15 km across and its rim is thought to have been formed during the catastrophic eruption, occurred 39 ky ago ca., which produced a deposit referred to as the Campanian Ignimbrite. The volcanic hazards posed by this caldera and the related risk are extremely high, because of its explosive character and the about 1.5 million people living within the caldera. Campi Flegrei area periodically experiences significant unrest episodes which include ground deformations, the so-called 'bradisismo'. Following the last eruption (Monte Nuovo, 1538) a general subsidence has been interrupted by episodes of uplift, the most recent of which occurred in 1970-72 and 1982-84. Since 1950 the caldera is showing signs of unrest with ground uplift, seismicity, and composition variation of fumarole fluids. In particular, subsidence has been replaced by intermittent episodes of inflation with short time duration and various maximum amplitude. They occurred in 1989, 1994, 2000, 2005-06, 2008-09 and 2011-2014 with duration of few months and maximum amplitude ranging between 3 and 18 cm., approximately. In the last years an array of water-pipe tiltmeters with lengths between 28 m and 278 m in tunnels on the flanks of the region of maximum inflation has been installed to avoid problems common to the traditional tiltmeters. The tiltmeters record inflation episodes upon which are superimposed local load tides and the effects of the seiches in the Bay of Naples and in the Tyrrhenian sea. We use data recorded by three tide gauges in the Bay of Pozzuoli (Pozzuoli, Miseno, Nisida) to compare water pipe data with sea level to extract astronomical tidal components (diurnal and semidiurnal) and seiches periods (particularly between 20 minutes and 56 minutes) that

  2. Duration of the Banco Bonito Rhyolite Eruption, Vales Caldera, New Mexico based on magma transport modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Benjamin R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baldridge, W. Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gable, Carl W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sicilian, James M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2007-03-05

    Finite volume calculations of the flow of rhyolite are presented to investigate the fate of viscous magmas flowing in planar fractures with realistic length to width ratios of up to 2500:1. Heat and mass transfer for a melt with a temperature dependent viscosity and the potential to undergo phase change are considered. Magma driving pressures and dike widths are chosen to satisfy simple elastic considerations. These models are applied within a parameter space relevant to the Banco Bonito rhyolite flow, Valles caldera, New Mexico. We estimate a maximum eruption duration for the event of ~200 days, realized at a minimum possible dike width of 5-6 m and driving pressure of 7-8 MPa. Simplifications in the current model may warrant scaling of these results. However, we demonstrate the applicability of our model to magma dynamics issues and suggest that such models may be used to infer information about both the timing of an eruption and the evolution of the associated magma source.

  3. Pre-caldera collapse of the Tastau volcanoplutonic ring complex (Eastern Kazakhstan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukina, K.

    2009-04-01

    positive chondrite-normalized REE patterns and negative europium anomaly (mafic enclaves (Ce/Yb)N=4.99 - 5.54, Eu/Eu*=0.68 - 0.78; granite (Ce/Yb)N=5.48 - 8.59, Eu/Eu*=0.24 - 0.64; felsite (Ce/Yb)N=2.50, Eu/Eu*=0.006), except the unhybrid gabbro (Ce/Yb)N=5.3380, Eu/Eu*=1.02). Compositions of the Tastau magmatic rocks hit the intraplate magmatism area and the active continental margins. Relative of succession of a main intrusive events in Tastau volcanoplutonic compex. First event: the calcium basite intrusion during high-speed shear deformation. Second event: the forming of a felsic radial dike swarm, which represents the caldera forming eruption of felsic melt. Third event: the forming of a first granosyenite intrusive ring and a first granosyenite stock, which represents first stage of the collapse caldera. Fourth event: the forming of a second granite intrusive ring and a second granite stock, which represents second stage of the collapse caldera. First of all the catastrophic deformation event in an enclosed space along with the calcium basite intrusion happened. The numerous small (1-70 cm) intrusive mafic bodies are situated mainly in the linear zone of a metasedimentary rock tectonic brecciation crossing the central part of Tastaut volcanoplutonic complex. Within this zone the lithified rock underwent a brittle-ductile deformation and cataclasis. The calcium basites form a dyke swarm and are a source of other bodies: globular, bag-like and irregular morphologies. The composition of the calcium basite is unusual and characterized by wide variations of all main chemical elements (SiO2 = 46.2 - 61.2 %, Al2O3 = 12.6 - 17.7 %, TiO2 = 0.55 - 0.85 %, FeOtot = 3.77 - 6.87 %, MnO = 0.35 - 0.68 %, MgO = 2.0 - 5.64), low alkali contents (Na2O + K2O = 0.78 - 2.9 %) and high contents of CaO (10.8 - 20.7 %). The mafic magma emplacement controlled by regional compressive shear deformation. The magma fragmentation was due to the significant decreasing of viscosity of disintegrated

  4. The shallow-water chitons (Mollusca, Polyplacophora of Caldera, Region of Atacama, northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Araya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Molluscan species of the northern littoral of Chile have been sparsely studied. This work reviews for the first time the diversity of polyplacophoran molluscs around the port of Caldera, in the Region of Atacama (26°45’49”S; 70°45’17”W to 27°20’23”S; 70°56’46”W, northern Chile. Eleven species were found in this study: Acanthopleura echinata (Barnes, 1824; Callistochiton pulchellus (Gray, 1828; Calloplax vivipara (Plate, 1899, Chaetopleura peruviana (Lamarck, 1819; Chiton cumingsii Frembly, 1827; Chiton granosus Frembly, 1827; Chiton magnificus Deshayes, 1827; Enoplochiton niger (Barnes, 1824, Radsia barnesii (Gray, 1828, Tonicia atrata (G. B. Sowerby II, 1840 and Tonicia chilensis (Frembly, 1827. All of the species occurring in the area have distributions in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, from Ecuador to central Chile, and three of them are species endemic to the Chilean coasts (Calloplax vivipara, Radsia barnesii, and Tonicia atrata. This diversity of species is comparable to that of better surveyed faunas of central and southern Chile or Patagonia. Of the eleven species recorded, the geographic distribution records for Callistochiton pulchellus, Radsia barnesii and Tonicia atrata are extended, and Calloplax vivipara is found alive again after 40 years, filling a gap in its known distribution. Illustrations of living specimens in their habitat, distribution records and a taxonomic key for all the studied taxa are also provided.

  5. The Evolution of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy): High- and low-frequency multichannel 2.5D seismic surveying for an amphibian IODP/ICDP drilling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Lena; Spiess, Volkhard; Sacchi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Caldera-forming eruptions are considered as one of the most catastrophic natural events to affect the Earth's surface and human society. The half-submerged Campi Flegrei caldera, located in southern Italy, belongs to the world's most active calderas and, thus, has received particular attention in scientific communities and governmental institutions. Therefore, it has also become subject to a joint approach in the IODP and ICDP programmes. Despite ample research, no scientific consensus regarding the formation history of the Campi Flegrei caldera has been reached yet. So far, it is still under debate whether the Campi Flegrei caldera was formed by only one ignimbritic eruption, namely the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff (NYT) eruption at 15 ka or, if it is a nested-caldera system related to the NYT and the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) eruption at 39 ka. In the last decades, the Campi Flegrei caldera has been characterized by short-term episodes of unrest involving considerable ground deformation (uplift and subsidence of several meters), seismicity and increased temperature at fumaroles. Furthermore, long-term deformation can be observed in the central part of the caldera with uplift rates of several tens of meters within a few thousand years. Recently, it has been proposed that the long-term deformation may be related to caldera resurgence, while short-term uplift episodes are probably triggered by the injection of magmatic fluids into a shallow hydrothermal system at ~2 km depth. However, both long-term and short term uplift could be interpreted as eruption precursor, thereby posing high-concern for a future eruption, which would expose more than 1.5 million people living in the surroundings of the volcanic district to extreme volcanic risks. During a joint Italian-German research expedition in 2008, a semi-3D grid (100-150 m profile spacing) of high-frequency (up to 1000 Hz) multichannel seismic data were acquired to support both the ongoing onshore ICDP and a proposed

  6. Oceanographic signatures and pressure monitoring of seafloor vertical deformation in near-coastal, shallow-water areas: a case study from Santorini Caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Géraud; Deplus, Christine; Escartin, Javier; Ballu, Valérie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Mével, Catherine; Andreani, Muriel

    2016-04-01

    Bottom pressure, tilt and seawater physical-properties were monitored for a year using two instruments within the immerged Santorini caldera (Greece). Piggy-backed on the CALDERA2012 cruise, this geodetic experiment was designed to monitor evolution of the 2011-2012 Santorini unrest. Conducted during a quiescent period, it allowed us to study oceanographic and atmospheric signal in our data series. We observe periodic oceanographic signals associated with tides, and seiches that are likely linked to both the caldera and Cretan basin geometries. In winter, the caldera witnesses sudden cooling events that tilt an instrument towards the Southeast, indicating cold-water influx likely originating from the north-western passage between Thirasia and Oia. We do not obtain evidence of long-term vertical seafloor deformation from the pressure signal, although it may be masked by instrumental drift. However, tilt data suggests a local seafloor tilt event ~1 year after the end of the unrest period which could be consistent with inflation under or near Nea Kameni. In addition, we illustrate that tilt sensor can roughly record seismic induced ground motion which in our case led to a shift in sensors attitude for one seismic event. Seafloor geodetic data recorded at the bottom of the Santorini caldera illustrates that the oceanographic signature is an important part of the signal, which needs to be considered for monitoring volcanic or geological seafloor deformation in shallow-water and/or nearshore areas.

  7. The earliest low and high δ18O caldera-forming eruptions of the Yellowstone plume: implications for the 30–40 Ma Oregon calderas and speculations on plume-triggered delaminations

    OpenAIRE

    Seligman, Angela N.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; McClaughry, Jason; Stern, Richard A.; Fisher, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We present new isotopic and trace element data for four eruptive centers in Oregon: Wildcat Mountain (40 Ma), Crooked River (32–28 Ma), Tower Mountain (32 Ma), and Mohawk River (32 Ma). The first three calderas are located too far east to be sourced through renewed subduction of the Farallon slab following accretion of the Yellowstone-produced Siletzia terrane at ~50 Ma. Basalts of the three eastern eruptive centers yield high Nb/Yb and Th/Yb ratios, indicating an enriched sublithospheric man...

  8. The earliest low and high δ18O caldera-forming eruptions of the Yellowstone plume: Implications for the 30–40 Ma Oregon calderas and speculations on plume-triggered delaminations

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Nicole Seligman; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Jason eMcClaughry; Richard eStern; Chris eFisher

    2014-01-01

    We present new isotopic and trace element data for four eruptive centers in Oregon: Wildcat Mountain (40 Ma), Crooked River (32–28 Ma), Tower Mountain (32 Ma), and Mohawk River (32 Ma). The first three calderas are located too far east to be sourced through renewed subduction of the Farallon slab following accretion of the Yellowstone-produced Siletzia terrane at ~50 Ma. Basalts of the three eastern eruptive centers yield high Nb/Yb and Th/Yb ratios, indicating an enriched sublithospheric man...

  9. Real-time monitoring of seismicity and deformation during the Bárdarbunga rifting event and associated caldera subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Roberts, Matthew; Barsotti, Sara; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Hensch, Martin; Bergsson, Bergur; Kjartansson, vilhjálmur; Erlendsson, Pálmi; Friðriksdóttir, Hildur; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Guðmundsson, Magnús; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Heimisson, Elías; Hjorleifsdóttir, Vala; Soring, Jón; Björnsson, Bogi; Oddsson, Björn

    2015-04-01

    We present a monitoring overview of a rifting event and associated caldera subsidence in a glaciated environment during the Bárðarbunga volcanic crisis. Following a slight increase in seismicity and a weak deformation signal, noticed a few months before the unrest by the SIL monitoring team, an intense seismic swarm began in the subglacial Bárðarbunga caldera on August 16 2014. During the following two weeks, a dyke intruded into the crust beneath the Vatnajökull ice cap, propagating 48 km from the caldera to the east-north-east and north of the glacier where an effusive eruption started in Holuhraun. The eruption is still ongoing at the time of writing and has become the largest eruption in over 200 years in Iceland. The dyke propagation was episodic with a variable rate and on several occasions low frequency seismic tremor was observed. Four ice cauldrons, manifestations of small subglacial eruptions, were detected. Soon after the swarm began the 7x11 km wide caldera started to subside and is still subsiding (although at slower rates) and has in total subsided over 60 meters. Unrest in subglacial volcanoes always calls for interdisciplinary efforts and teamwork plays a key role for efficient monitoring. Iceland has experienced six subglacial volcanic crises since modern digital monitoring started in the early 90s. With every crisis the monitoring capabilities, data interpretations, communication and information dissemination procedures have improved. The Civil Protection calls for a board of experts and scientists (Civil Protection Science Board, CPSB) to share their knowledge and provide up-to-date information on the current status of the volcano, the relevant hazards and most likely scenarios. The evolution of the rifting was monitored in real-time by the joint interpretation of seismic and cGPS data. The dyke propagation could be tracked and new, updated models of the dyke volume were presented at the CPSB meetings, often daily. In addition, deformation

  10. Estudio vulcanológico y qeoquímico del maar de la Caldera del Rey. Tenerife (Canarias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradas Herrero, A.

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study a cartographic, morphological, geochemical and petrographic study is made of the ''Caldera del Rey". The "Caldera del Rey" is a volcanic structure formed by two overlapping maars, The second one (maar that was formed is of greaten dimensions and destroyed part of the first one, Both maars erupted throught a possible fracture N 35 E, which is one of the directions with regional importance in the Archipelago. The eruption, which was very explosive, has been thought to be due in part to the great importance of the gaseous phase of the salic magma and also to the steam produced during the interaction of the magma with underground water. This explosivity can be clearly seen in the cleaf resalte cul out in the "Serie Basáltica Antigua" to some extent penetrated and fragmented by the eruption, The phreatomagmatic character of the eruption is evident because of the existence of accretionary lapilli. The materials emitted are exc1usively of aerial projection: agglomerates, tuffs cinerites. There was no flow of lava. ' Some of the fragments of tuffs as cinerites and pumice are comagmatic. These correspond to salic trachytic phonolitic rocks, which represent one of the last stages of differentiation of the alkaline oceanic magmas. The geochemical character of the materials of the "Caldera del Rey" is characteristic and can be easily distinguished from other nearly salic deposits formed in different cycles.

    En este trabajo se hace el estudio cartográfico, morfológico, petrográfico y geoquímico de la Caldera del Rey. La Caldera del Reyes un edificio volcánico formado por dos maars imbricados. El que se formó en segundo lugar es de mayores dimensiones y destruyó en parte el primero. Ambos aprovecharon para hacer erupción una posible fractura de dirección N 35'"E, de importancia regional en el Archipiélago. La erupción fue de una gran explosividad, que se supone debida, en parte, a la gran importancia de la fase gaseosa del

  11. Strengths and strain energies of volcanic edifices: implications for eruptions, collapse calderas, and landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gudmundsson

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural hazards associated with volcanic edifices depend partly on how fracture resistant the edifices are, i.e. on their strengths. Observations worldwide indicate that large fluid-driven extension fractures (dikes, inclined sheets, shear fractures (landslides, and mixed-mode fractures (ring dikes and ring faults normally propagate more easily in a basaltic edifice (shield volcano than in a stratovolcano. For example, dike-fed eruptions occur once every few years in many basaltic edifices but once every 102-3 yr in many stratovolcanoes. Large landslides and caldera collapses also appear to be more common in a typical basaltic edifice/shield volcano than in a typical stratovolcano. In contrast to a basaltic edifice, a stratovolcano is composed of mechanically dissimilar rock layers, i.e. layers with mismatching elastic properties (primarily Young's modulus. Elastic mismatch encourages fracture deflection and arrest at contacts and increases the amount of energy needed for a large-scale edifice failure. Fracture-related hazards depend on the potential energy available to propagate the fractures which, in turn, depends on the boundary conditions during fracture propagation. Here there are two possible scenarios: one in which the outer boundary of the volcanic edifice or rift zone does not move during the fracture propagation (constant displacement; the other in which the boundary moves (constant load. In the former, the total potential energy is the strain energy stored in the volcano before fracture formation; in the latter, the total potential energy is the strain energy plus the work done by the forces moving the boundary. Constant-displacement boundary conditions favor small eruptions, landslides, and caldera collapses, whereas constant-load conditions favor comparatively large eruptions, landslides, and collapses. For a typical magma chamber (sill-like with a diameter of 8 km, the strain energy change due to magma-chamber inflation

  12. A complex magma reservoir system for a large volume intra- to extra-caldera ignimbrite: Mineralogical and chemical architecture of the VEI8, Permian Ora ignimbrite (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcock, M. A. W.; Bargossi, G. M.; Weinberg, R. F.; Gasparotto, G.; Cas, R. A. F.; Giordano, G.; Marocchi, M.

    2015-11-01

    Intra-caldera settings record a wealth of information on caldera-forming processes, yet field study is rarely possible due to lack of access and exposure. The Permian Ora Formation, Italy, preserves > 1000 m of vertical section through its intra-caldera succession. This provides an excellent opportunity to detail its mineralogical and geochemical architecture and gain understanding of the eruption evolution and insight into the pre-eruptive magma system. Detailed juvenile clast phenocryst and matrix crystal fragment point count and image analysis data, coupled with bulk-rock chemistry and single mineral compositional data, show that the Ora ignimbrite succession is rhyolitic (72.5-77.7% SiO2), crystal-rich (~ 25-57%; average 43%) and has a constant main mineral population (volcanic quartz + sanidine + plagioclase + biotite). Although a seemingly homogeneous ignimbrite succession, important subtle but detectable lateral and vertical variations in modal mineralogy and bulk-rock major and trace elements are identified here. The Ora Formation is comprised of multiple lithofacies, dominated by four densely welded ignimbrite lithofacies. They are crystal-rich, typically lithic-poor (divided into two depo-centres: Southern and Northern, with proximal extra-caldera deposits preserved to the south and north of the system. The Southern and Northern intra-caldera ignimbrite successions are discriminated by variations in total biotite crystal abundance. Detailed mineralogical and chemical data records decreases across the caldera system from south to north in biotite phenocrysts in the groundmass of juvenile clasts (average 12-2%), matrix biotite (average 7.5-2%) and plagioclase crystal fragments (average 18-6%), and total crystal fragment abundance in the matrix (average 47-37%); a biotite compositional change to iron-rich (0.57-0.78 Fe); and bulk-rock element decreases in Fe2O3, MgO, P2O5, Ce, Hf, V, La and Zr, and increases in SiO2, Y and Nb, with TiO2. Together, the

  13. Hydrothermal activity and subsurface soil complexity: implication for outgassing processes at Solfatara crater, Campi Flegrei caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Cristian; Mayer, Klaus; Scheu, Bettina; Isaia, Roberto; Mangiacapra, Annarita; Gresse, Marceau; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Moretti, Roberto; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    The Solfatara area and its fumaroles are the main surface phenomena of the vigorous hydrothermal activity within the active Campi Flegrei caldera system. The existing fault system appears to have a major control on outgassing which in turn leads to a strong alteration of the volcanic products. Moreover the maar-nature of the crater, and its filling by more recent volcanic deposits, resulted in a complex fractured and multilayered cap to the rising gases. As a consequence the hydrothermal alteration differently affects the rocks within the crater, including pyroclastic fallout ash beds, pyroclastic density current deposits, breccias and lavas. The induced changes in both original microstructure and physical and mechanical properties of the rocks control the outgassing behavior. Here, we report results from a measurement survey conducted in July 2015, and aimed to characterize the in-situ physical (temperature, humidity) and mechanical (permeability, strength, stiffness) properties. The survey also included a mapping of the surficial hydrothermal features and their distributions. Chemical analyses and laboratory measurements (porosity, granulometry) of selected samples were additionally performed. Results show that the crater floor area comprises very different kinds of soils, from fine grained, thin laminated deposits around the two bubbling Fangaia mud pools, to crusted hummock formations along the SE and NE border of the crater. Dry and solid alunite-rich deposits are present in the western and southern part. Furthermore we observed evidences of a beginning of crust formation within the central part of the crater. A large range of surface temperatures, from boiling point to ambient temperature, were measured throughout the surveyed area. Outgassing occurs mainly along the crack system, which has also generated the crusted hummocks. Elsewhere the fluid circulation in the subsoil is favored by the presence of coarse and highly porous sulfur-hardened levels, whereas

  14. The Life and Times of Supervolcanoes: Inferences from Long Valley Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Cataclysmic eruptions of silicic magma from "supervolcanoes" are among the most awe-inspiring natural phenomena found in the geologic record, in terms of size, power, and potential hazard. Based on the repose intervals between eruptions of this magnitude, the magmas responsible for them could accumulate gradually in the shallow crust over time scales that may be in excess of a million years (Smith, 1979; Spera and Crisp, 1981; Shaw, 1985). Pre-eruption magma residence time scales can also be inferred from the age difference between eruption (i.e., using 40Ar/39Ar dating to determine the time when hot erupted material cools to below its Ar closure temperature, 200 to 600 degC) and early pre-eruption crystallization (i.e., zircon saturation temperatures; Reid et al., 1997). I will discuss observations from Long Valley a Quaternary volcanic center in California. Long Valley is a voluminous, dominantly silicic caldera system. Based on extensive dating of accessory minerals (e.g., U-Th-Pb dating of zircon and allanite) along with geochemical and isotopic data we find that silicic magmas begin to crystallize 10's to 100's of thousands of years prior to their eruption and that rhyolites record episodes of punctuated and independent evolution rather than the periodic tapping of a long-lived magma. The more punctuated versus more gradual magma accumulation rates required by the absolute and model ages, respectively, imply important differences in the mass and heat fluxes associated with the generation, differentiation, and storage of voluminous rhyolites and emphasize the need to reconcile the magmatic age differences.

  15. Mass transfer constraints on the chemical evolution of an active hydrothermal system, Valles caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Chuma, N.J.; Goff, F.

    1992-01-01

    Partial equilibrium conditions occur between fluids and secondary minerals in the Valles hydrothermal system, contained principally in the Tertiary rhyolitic Bandelier Tuff. The mass transfer processes are governed by reactive phase compositions, surface areas, water-rock ratios, reaction rates, and fluid residence times. Experimental dissolution of the vitric phase of the tuff was congruent with respect to Cl in the solid and produced reaction rates which obeyed a general Arrhenius release rate between 250 and 300??C. The 18O differences between reacted and unreacted rock and fluids, and mass balances calculations involving Cl in the glass phase, produced comparable water-rock ratios of unity, confirming the importance of irreversible reaction of the vitric tuff. A fluid residence time of approximately 2 ?? 103 years, determined from fluid reservoir volume and discharge rates, is less than 0.2% of the total age of the hydrothermal system and denotes a geochemically and isotopically open system. Mass transfer calculations generally replicated observed reservoir pH, Pco2, and PO2 conditions, cation concentrations, and the secondary mineral assemblage between 250 and 300??C. The only extraneous component required to maintain observed calcite saturation and high Pco2 pressures was carbon presumably derived from underlying Paleozoic limestones. Phase rule constraints indicate that Cl was the only incompatible aqueous component not controlled by mineral equilibrium. Concentrations of Cl in the reservoir directly reflect mass transport rates as evidenced by correlations between anomalously high Cl concentrations in the fluids and tuff in the Valles caldera relative to other hydrothermal systems in rhyolitic rocks. ?? 1992.

  16. Optimum geometry for boiler soot blowers nozzles; Geometria optima de toberas para deshollinadores de caldera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza Garza, Jesus; Garcia Tinoco, Guillermo J.; Martinez Flores, Jose Oscar [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1989-12-31

    For boiler soot blowing converging-diverging nozzles are employed, whose function is to convert thermal energy of a gas into kinetic energy to remove the deposits that adhere to the heat exchanger surfaces. In this paper are described the experimental equipment and the methods for flow, dynamic pressure, discharge velocity and air expansion factor calculation in each nozzle, as a function of its design geometry, utilizing air from a five stage centrifugal compressor. The graphic analysis of the results, concludes that the most efficient nozzles are not the ones than develop the greatest velocity, but the ones of highest dynamic pressure at the outlet. The nozzle geometry that allows obtaining the maximum dynamic air pressure at the discharge is A{sub 2}/A{sub g}=1.3676 [Espanol] Para el deshollinado de calderas se utilizan las toberas convergentes-divergentes, cuya funcion es convertir la energia termica de un gas en energia cinetica para remover los depositos que se adhieren a las superficies de intercambio de calor. En este trabajo se describen el equipo experimental y los metodos de calculo para flujo, presion dinamica, velocidad a la descarga y factor de expansion del aire en cada tobera, como funcion de su geometria de diseno. Durante la experimentacion se evaluaron siete disenos diferentes de toberas, empleando aire de un compresor centrifugo de cinco etapas. Del analisis grafico de los resultados, se concluye que las toberas mas eficientes no son las que desarrollan mayor velocidad sino las de mayor presion dinamica de la salida. La geometria de tobera que permite obtener la maxima presion dinamica del aire a la descarga es A{sub 2}/A{sub g} = 1.3676.

  17. Joint body and surface wave tomography applied to the Toba caldera complex (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Koulakov, Ivan; Shapiro, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    We developed a new algorithm for a joint body and surface wave tomography. The algorithm is a modification of the existing LOTOS code (Koulakov, 2009) developed for local earthquake tomography. The input data for the new method are travel times of P and S waves and dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love waves. The main idea is that the two data types have complementary sensitivities. The body-wave data have good resolution at depth, where we have enough crossing rays between sources and receivers, whereas the surface waves have very good near-surface resolution. The surface wave dispersion curves can be retrieved from the correlations of the ambient seismic noise and in this case the sampled path distribution does not depend on the earthquake sources. The contributions of the two data types to the inversion are controlled by the weighting of the respective equations. One of the clearest cases where such approach may be useful are volcanic systems in subduction zones with their complex magmatic feeding systems that have deep roots in the mantle and intermediate magma chambers in the crust. In these areas, the joint inversion of different types of data helps us to build a comprehensive understanding of the entire system. We apply our algorithm to data collected in the region surrounding the Toba caldera complex (north Sumatra, Indonesia) during two temporary seismic experiments (IRIS, PASSCAL, 1995, GFZ, LAKE TOBA, 2008). We invert 6644 P and 5240 S wave arrivals and ~500 group velocity dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love waves. We present a series of synthetic tests and real data inversions which show that joint inversion approach gives more reliable results than the separate inversion of two data types. Koulakov, I., LOTOS code for local earthquake tomographic inversion. Benchmarks for testing tomographic algorithms, Bull. seism. Soc. Am., 99(1), 194-214, 2009, doi:10.1785/0120080013

  18. 40Ar/39Ar Age Constraints on Caldera Formation of the Emmons Lake Volcanic Center, Alaska Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, J.; Layer, P. W.; Mangan, M. T.; Miller, T. P.; Waythomas, C. F.

    2001-12-01

    The Emmons Lake Volcanic Center located on the Alaska Peninsula is a large shield/stratovolcano complex composed of basaltic to andesitic lava flows and dacite to rhyolite pyroclastic flows, domes and ashfall. Two caldera forming eruptions in Pleistocene time each produced more than 50 cubic kilometers of silicic ejecta and created a nested depression measuring 20 km long and 10 km wide. We conducted 40Ar/39Ar whole rock dating of units associated with the first caldera forming event, which because of broad geochemical similarities, has been suggested as a possible source of the Old Crow Tephra, dated throughout interior Alaska and the Yukon at about 140 ka. Samples dated ranged in composition from ~62 to 69 wt % SiO2 and contained 2 - 3 wt % K2O. For each sample, 15 specimens, consisting of small ( ~1 mm) whole rock chips, were fused with an argon ion laser. From these analyses, weighted mean and isochron ages were calculated. For all samples, the initial 40Ar/36Ar ratio was indistinguishable from that of the present-day atmosphere (295.5), indicating that these samples do not contain significant quantities of excess argon. The age of a welded tuff interpreted to be from the opening plinian phase of the eruption is 233 +/- 6 ka, and is identical to the age of a post-collapse rheomorphic tuff (234 +/- 5 ka). A lithic fragment from a syn-collapse lag breccia has an age of 419 +/- 9 ka, which we interpret as representing incorporation of older material. Younger tuffs and domes were dated at 99 +/- 7 ka and 16 +/- 10 ka and imply that the complex was active throughout the late Quaternary. Based on these new age data, and subtle but significant trace element differences in glass and Fe-Ti oxide composition, we conclude that the first major caldera building event occurred at approximately 230 ka, and is probably not responsible for the deposition of the Old Crow tephra.

  19. Analytical modeling of gravity changes and crustal deformation at volcanoes: The Long Valley caldera, California, case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Hill, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    Joint measurements of ground deformation and micro-gravity changes are an indispensable component for any volcano monitoring strategy. A number of analytical mathematical models are available in the literature that can be used to fit geodetic data and infer source location, depth and density. Bootstrap statistical methods allow estimations of the range of the inferred parameters. Although analytical models often assume that the crust is elastic, homogenous and isotropic, they can take into account different source geometries, the influence of topography, and gravity background noise. The careful use of analytical models, together with high quality data sets, can produce valuable insights into the nature of the deformation/gravity source. Here we present a review of various modeling methods, and use the historical unrest at Long Valley caldera (California) from 1982 to 1999 to illustrate the practical application of analytical modeling and bootstrap to constrain the source of unrest. A key question is whether the unrest at Long Valley since the late 1970s can be explained without calling upon an intrusion of magma. The answer, apparently, is no. Our modeling indicates that the inflation source is a slightly tilted prolate ellipsoid (dip angle between 91?? and 105??) at a depth of 6.5 to 7.9??km beneath the caldera resurgent dome with an aspect ratio between 0.44 and 0.60, a volume change from 0.161 to 0.173??km3 and a density of 1241 to 2093??kg/m3. The larger uncertainty of the density estimate reflects the higher noise of gravity measurements. These results are consistent with the intrusion of silicic magma with a significant amount of volatiles beneath the caldera resurgent dome. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Manejo de Mercancías Químicas peligrosas en puerto Caldera, Puntarenas, Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Mora

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Puerto Caldera, located in Puntarenas, Costa Rica, is one of the most important Harbors of Central America, which is a key point to transport about 1.5 millions of metric tons of different categories of products every year, including dangerous chemical merchandise. The chemical has have originated emergencies, which has given rise to the necessity to asses load and unload process, and storage. In attention to the matter the most important aspects related to the fulfillment of the national and international norms during the merchandise dangerous transportation in Harbors were evaluated. According to the evaluation of the different handling, storage and transportation processes, Puerto Caldera, face among others the following problems: Personal training necessities addressed to the employees involved in the process of handling dangerous merchandise. Insufficient equipment and materials to guarantee a safe environment. The permanence of merchandise for long periods in warehouse. Unsuitable conditions of warehouse for the proper storage of chemical merchandise. Absence of classification and location criteria of dangerous chemical merchandise in the unloading and loading areas as well as in warehouse. Based up the previous evaluations, the following aspects were developed: An improvement plan for adequate handling of chemical merchandise. Recommendation of specific guidelines to create a Contingencies Plan. The purposes of the two aspects are to promote actions to diminish the risk of accidents associated to the handling of a dangerous merchandise. In the same way, it was proposed a Plan of Improvement and basic lineaments to elaborate a Plan of Contingencies that includes actions to diminish the risk of accidents associated to the handling of dangerous merchandise and to diminish the consequences, in case of accident, as far as the loss of lives, damages to the people, the property and the environment. All this will make Puerto Caldera a safe place

  1. Geodetic constraints to the source mechanism of the 2011-2013 unrest at Campi Flegrei (Italy) caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasatti, Elisa; Polcari, Marco; Bonafede, Maurizio; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Campi Flegrei (Italy) is a nested caldera and together with Vesuvius is one of the Italian GEO Geohazard Supersites (GSNL). The area is characterized by one of the highest volcanic hazard of the world, due to the very high density of inhabitants (1800/km²), the persistent activity of the system and the explosive character of volcanism. A major unrest episode took place in 1982-84, when the town of Pozzuoli, located at the caldera center, was uplifted by 1.80 m. Minor uplifts of few centimeters, seismic swarms and degassing episodes took place in 1989, 2000 and 2004-06. Since 2005 Campi Flegrei is uplifting, reaching a ground velocity of 9 cm/yr in 2012, showing that the caldera is in a critical state on the verge of instability. In this work, we present results from SAR Interferometry and geodetic data modelling at Campi Flegrei in the framework of the EU's FP7 MED-SUV Project. We exploit two COSMO-SkyMed data sets to map the deformation field during 2011-2013. The spatial distributions of the cumulative displacement from COSMO-SkyMed ascending/descending orbits show similar behaviors, confirming the bell-shaped pattern of the deformation at least within the inner rim of the caldera. The resulting data, together with GPS data from the Neapolitan Volcanoes Continuous GPS network (NeVoCGPS) is fitted through a geophysical inversion process using finite element forward models to account for the 3D heterogeneous medium. The best fit model is a north dipping mixed-mode dislocation source lying at ~5 km depth. The driving mechanism is ascribable to magma input into the source of the large 1982-1984 unrest (since similar source characteristics were inferred) that generates initial inflation followed by additional shear slip accompanying the extension of crack tips. The history and the current state of the system indicate that Campi Flegrei is able to erupt again. Constraining the defomation source may have important implications in terms of civil protection and the

  2. Modelo para estudios de estabilidad de calderas de recuperación de calor (HRSG) y turbina de vapor

    OpenAIRE

    Corasaniti, Víctor Fabián; Agüero, Jorge Luis; Bianchi Lastra, Raúl E.

    2013-01-01

    En este trabajo se presenta la determinación y validación de los parámetros de un modelo digital para estudios de estabilidad que representa dos Calderas de Recuperación de Calor (HRSG, del inglés Heat Recovery Steam Generator), conjuntamente con la Turbina de Vapor a la cual suministran vapor. Los 2 HRSG producen vapor a partir de los gases de escape de 2 turbinas de gas. El modelo de simulación se implementa en el programa PSS/E (Power System Simulator), programa usado para estudios de est...

  3. Selected data fron continental scientific drilling core holes VC-1 and VC-2a, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musgrave, J.A.; Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Luedemann, G.; Garcia, S.; Dennis, B.; Hulen, J.B.; Janik, C.; Tomei, F.A.

    1989-02-01

    This report presents geochemical and isotopic data on rocks and water and wellbore geophysical data from the Continental Scientific Drilling Program core holes VC-1 and VC-2a, Valles Caldera, New Mexico. These core holes were drilled as a portion of a broader program that seeks to answer fundamental questions about magma, water/rock interactions, ore deposits, and volcanology. The data in this report will assist the interpretation of the hydrothermal system in the Jemez Mountains and will stimulate further research in magmatic processes, hydrothermal alteration, ore deposits, hydrology, structural geology, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. 37 refs., 36 figs., 28 tabs.

  4. A 2-D FEM thermal model to simulate water flow in a porous media: Campi Flegrei caldera case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Romano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic and geothermal aspects both exist in many geologically young areas. In these areas the heat transfer process is of fundamental importance, so that the thermal and fluid-dynamic processes characterizing a viscous fluid in a porous medium are very important to understand the complex dynamics of the these areas. The Campi Flegrei caldera, located west of the city of Naples, within the central-southern sector of the large graben of Campanian plain, is a region where both volcanic and geothermal phenomena are present. The upper part of the geothermal system can be considered roughly as a succession of volcanic porous material (tuff saturated by a mixture formed mainly by water and carbon dioxide. We have implemented a finite elements approach in transient conditions to simulate water flow in a 2-D porous medium to model the changes of temperature in the geothermal system due to magmatic fluid inflow, accounting for a transient phase, not considered in the analytical solutions and fluid compressibility. The thermal model is described by means of conductive/convective equations, in which we propose a thermal source represented by a parabolic shape function to better simulate an increase of temperature in the central part (magma chamber of a box, simulating the Campi Flegrei caldera and using more recent evaluations, from literature, for the medium's parameters (specific heat capacity, density, thermal conductivity, permeability. A best-fit velocity for the permeant is evaluated by comparing the simulated temperatures with those measured in wells drilled by Agip (Italian Oil Agency in the 1980s in the framework of geothermal exploration. A few tens of days are enough to reach the thermal steady state, showing the quick response of the system to heat injection. The increase in the pressure due to the heat transport is then used to compute ground deformation, in particular the vertical displacements characteristics of the Campi Flegrei caldera

  5. Estimating the eruptive volume of a large pyroclastic body: the Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff, Valles caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Geoffrey W.; Wolff, John A.; Self, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    The 1.60 Ma caldera-forming eruption of the Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff produced Plinian and coignimbrite fall deposits, outflow and intracaldera ignimbrite, all of it deposited on land. We present a detailed approach to estimating and reconstructing the original volume of the eroded, partly buried large ignimbrite and distal ash-fall deposits. Dense rock equivalent (DRE) volume estimates for the eruption are 89 + 33/-10 km3 of outflow ignimbrite and 144 ± 72 km3 of intracaldera ignimbrite. Also, there was at least 65 km3 (DRE) of Plinian fall when extrapolated distally, and 107 + 40/-12 km3 of coignimbrite ash was "lost" from the outflow sheet to form an unknown proportion of the distal ash fall. The minimum total volume is 216 km3 and the maximum is 550 km3; hence, the eruption overlaps the low end of the super-eruption spectrum (VEI ˜8.0). Despite an abundance of geological data for the Otowi Member, the errors attached to these estimates do not allow us to constrain the proportions of intracaldera (IC), outflow (O), and distal ash (A) to better than a factor of three. We advocate caution in applying the IC/O/A = 1:1:1 relation of Mason et al. (2004) to scaling up mapped volumes of imperfectly preserved caldera-forming ignimbrites.

  6. A probability tomography approach to the analysis of potential field data in the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Patella

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of the application of the 3D probability tomography imaging approach to the study of the Campi Flegrei (CF caldera are presented and discussed. The tomography approach has been applied to gravity, magnetic and ground deformation data already available in literature. The analysis of the 3D tomographic images is preceded by a brief qualitative interpretation of the original survey maps and by an outline of the probability tomography approach for each geophysical prospecting method. The results derived from the 3D tomographic images are the high occurrence probabilities of both gravity and ground deformation source centres in the CF caldera under the town of Pozzuoli. A Bouguer negative anomaly source centre is highlighted in the depth range 1.6-2 km b.s.l., whereas a positive ground deformation point source, responsible for the bradyseismic crisis of 1982-1984, is estimated at a mean depth of 3-4 km b.s.l. These inferences, combined with the results of a previous analysis of magnetotelluric, dipolar geoelectrical and self-potential data, corroborate the hypothesis that the bradyseismic events in the CF area may be explained by hot fluids vertical advection and subsequent lateral diffusion within a trapped reservoir overlying a magma chamber.

  7. Origins of felsic magmas in Japanese subduction zone: Geochemical characterizations of tephra from caldera-forming eruptions <5 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Nagahashi, Yoshitaka; Satoguchi, Yasufumi; Chang, Qing

    2015-07-01

    Dacitic to rhyolitic glass shards from 80 widespread tephras erupted during the past 5 Mys from calderas in Kyushu, and SW, central, and NE Japan were analyzed. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to determine 10 major and 33 trace elements and 207Pb/206Pb-208Pb/206Pb isotope ratios. The tephras were classified into three major geochemical types and their source rocks were identified as plutonic, sedimentary, and intermediate amphibolite rocks in the upper crust. A few tephras from SW Japan were identified as adakite and alkali rhyolite and were regarded to have originated from slab melt and mantle melt, respectively. The Pb isotope ratios of the tephras are comparable to those of the intermediate lavas in the source areas but are different from the basalts in these areas. The crustal assimilants for the intermediate lavas were largely from crustal melts and are represented by the rhyolitic tephras. A large heat source is required for forming large volumes of felsic crustal melts and is usually supplied by the mantle via basalt. Hydrous arc basalt formed by cold slab subduction is voluminous, and its heat transfer with high water content may have melted crustal rocks leading to effective felsic magma production. Coincidence of basalt and felsic magma activities shown by this study suggests caldera-forming eruptions are ultimately the effect of a mantle-driven cause.

  8. Environmental Magnetism of mid-Pleistocene Lacustrine Sediments of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, L. L.; Geissman, J. W.; Fawcett, P.; Tim, W.; Goff, F.

    2007-12-01

    Rock magnetic measurements are applied to almost 80 m of lacustrine sediment (VC-3) to augment independent means of interpreting the environmental conditions of a mid-Pleistocene lake in the Valle Grande of the Valles Caldera, northern New Mexico. An age model for the core is pinned to an Ar/Ar age determination of 552 ± 3 ka for a sanidine bearing ash layer at 78 m depth and major transitions in the organic carbon record at 53 m, 40 m, 27 m, and 17 m; these data suggest that deposition of VC-3 spans MIS 14 to MIS 10, including glacial terminations VI (531 ka) and V (426 ka). AF demagnetization resolves positive inclination magnetizations from most of the core, consistent with Brunhes normal polarity. Three thin (magnetizations may indicate poorly-recorded geomagnetic polarity events at ~406 ka (11α), ~536 ka (14α) and the Big Lost excursion (~580 ± 8 ka). Data from an array of rock magnetic investigations indicate magnetite, titanomagnetite, and pyrhotite characterize VC-3 sediments. Susceptibility and frequency dependent susceptibility experiments at low temperature reveal an abundance of paramagnetic and super-paramagnetic material. Scanning electron microscopy of magnetic separates show an array of Fe-oxide and Fe-sulfide grains, including titanomagnetites with trellis ilmenite intergrowths. NRM intensities of sediment deposited during glacial periods typically range from 0.04 mA/m to values as high as 1.6 mA/m; interglacial sediment NRM intensities range from 0.05 mA/m to 0.2 mA/m. NRM values increase to 3.3 mA/m, between 48 m to 43 m, where the sediment exhibits shallow mud crack, bioturbation, and oxidation. Overall, trends in susceptibility, ARM, and SIRM are similar to those in NRM intensity. Bivariate plot of susceptibility/ARM shows little variation in concentration of low coercivity minerals (i.e. magnetite) in VC-3 sediments. Also, the concentration of high coercivity minerals (i.e. hematite) indicated by the IRM/susceptibility curve show similar

  9. Geochemical exploration of a promissory Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS): the Acoculco caldera, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Loic; Romero, Ruben Bernard; Pérez-Zarate, Daniel; Guevara, Mirna; Santoyo Gutiérrez, Edgar

    2014-05-01

    The Acoculco caldera (Puebla, Mexico) has been identified by the Mexican Federal Electricity Company (in Spanish 'Comisión Federal de Electricidad', CFE) as a potential Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) candidate. Two exploration wells were drilled and promising temperatures of ~300° C have been measured at a depth of 2000 m with a geothermal gradient of 11oC/100m, which is three times higher than the baseline gradient measured within the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. As usually observed in Hot Dry Rock systems, thermal manifestations in surface are scarce and consist in low-temperature bubbling springs and soil degassing. The goals of this study were to identify the origin of these fluids, to estimate the soil degassing rate and to explore new areas for a future detailed exploration and drilling activities. Water and gas samples were collected for chemical and isotopic analysis (δ18O, δD, 3He/4He, 13C, 15N) and a multi-gas (CO2, CH4, H2S) soil survey was carried out using the accumulation chamber method. Springs' compositions indicate a meteoric origin and the dissolution of CO2 and H2S-rich gases, while gas compositions reveal a MORB-type origin mixed with some arc-type contribution. Gas geothermometry results are similar to temperatures measured during well drilling (260° C-300° C). Amongst all measured CO2 fluxes, only 5% (mean: 5543 g m-2 day-1) show typical geothermal values, while the remaining fluxes are low and correspond to biogenic degassing (mean: 18 g m-2 day-1). The low degassing rate of the geothermal system is a consequence of the intense hydrothermal alteration observed in the upper 800 m of the system which acts as an impermeable caprock. Highest measured CO2 fluxes (above > 600 g m-2 day-1) have corresponding CH4/CO2 flux ratios similar to mass ratios of sampled gases, which suggest an advective fluid transport. To represent field conditions, a numerical model was also applied to simulate the migration of CO2 towards the surface through a

  10. Lithologic Control on Secondary Clay Mineral Formation in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caylor, E.; Rasmussen, C.; Dhakal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the transformation of rock to soil is central to landscape evolution and ecosystem function. The objective of this study was to examine controls on secondary mineral formation in a forested catchment in the Catalina-Jemez CZO. We hypothesized landscape position controls the type of secondary minerals formed in that well-drained hillslopes favor Si-poor secondary phases such as kaolinite, whereas poorly drained portions of the landscape that collect solutes from surrounding areas favor formation of Si-rich secondary phases such as smectite. The study focused on a catchment in Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico where soils are derived from a mix of rhyolitic volcanic material, vegetation includes a mixed conifer forest, and climate is characterized by a mean annual precipitation of ~800 mm yr-1 and mean annual temperature of 4.5°C. Soils were collected at the soil-saprolite boundary from three landscape positions, classified as well drained hillslope, poorly drained convergent area, and poorly drained hill slope. Clay fractions were isolated and analyzed using a combination of quantitative and qualitative x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses and thermal analysis. Quantitative XRD of random powder mounts indicated the presence of both primary phases such as quartz, and alkali and plagioclase feldspars, and secondary phases that include illite, Fe-oxyhydroxides including both goethite and hematite, kaolinite, and smectite. The clay fractions were dominated by smectite ranging from 36-42%, illite ranging from 21-35%, and kaolinite ranging from 1-8%. Qualitative XRD of oriented mounts confirmed the presence of smectite in all samples, with varying degrees of interlayering and interstratification. In contrast to our hypothesis, results indicated that secondary mineral assemblage was not strongly controlled by landscape position, but rather varied with underlying variation in lithology. The catchment is underlain by a combination of porphorytic rhyolite and

  11. Near real-time monitoring of surface deformation at Long Valley Caldera, California (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, K.; Llenos, A. L.; Herring, T.

    2013-12-01

    Continuous monitoring of volcanic activity enables us to detect changes from usual activity, issue alerts of impending eruptions and thereby reduce volcanic risk. We have developed a near real-time monitoring tool for surface deformation: the Targeted Projection Operator (TPO). TPO is simple, fast, and easily applied whenever new data are available. With Global Positioning System (GPS) data, we have used TPO for continuous monitoring of surface deformation in the Long Valley Caldera (LVC) region in eastern California. TPO projects GPS position time series onto a target spatial pattern and obtains the amplitude of the projection at each epoch. For this, we assume that a deformation event (i.e., an inflationary or deflationary event) has the same spatial pattern as past events but with possibly different amplitude. This assumption is reasonable for the recent quiet phase in LVC because the 2007-2009 inflation is similar to the 2009-2010 deflation with respect to the deformation pattern. We selected horizontal pattern of the 2009-2010 event along which the GPS data are projected to recover the time-varying amplitudes. Large changes in amplitude imply changes in strength of the event. An anomalous change can be detected by comparing with amplitudes during relatively quiet time periods. Growing misfits between the TPO spatial pattern and the spatial variations of the GPS pattern, indicate changes in the deformation mechanism which can then be explored to assess whether potentially new mechanisms are developing. So far this has not been the case for LVC; the current spatial patterns of deformation match the shape deduced for the 2007-2009 inflation event. TPO shows that LVC has experienced inflation since late 2011 although the rate briefly slowed down in May and October 2012 and has started to slow again since June 2013. The rate of this event is about four times faster than the 2007-2009 inflation event and is consistent with a Mogi source located beneath the resurgent

  12. Tephra dispersal during the Campanian Ignimbrite (Italy) eruption: implications for ultra-distal ash transport during the large caldera-forming eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Victoria C.; Isaia, Roberto; Engwell, Sam L.; Albert, Paul. G.

    2016-06-01

    The Campanian Ignimbrite eruption dispersed ash over much of the central eastern Mediterranean Sea and eastern Europe. The eruption started with a Plinian phase that was followed by a series of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) associated with the collapse of the Plinian column and the caldera. The glass compositions of the deposits span a wide geochemical range, but the Plinian fallout and PDCs associated with column collapse, the Lower Pumice Flow, only erupted the most evolved compositions. The later PDCs, the Breccia Museo and Upper Pumice Flow, erupted during and after caldera collapse, tap a less evolved component, and intermediate compositions that represent mixing between the end-members. The range of glass compositions in the Campanian Ignimbrite deposits from sites across the central and eastern Mediterranean Sea allow us to trace the dispersal of the different phases of this caldera-forming eruption. We map the fallout from the Plinian column and the plumes of fine material associated with the PDCs (co-PDCs) across the entire dispersal area. This cannot be done using the usual grain-size methods as deposits in these distal regions do not retain characteristics that allow attribution to either the Plinian or co-PDC phases. The glass compositions of the tephra at ultra-distal sites (>1500 km from the vent) match those of the uppermost PDC units, suggesting that most of the ultra-distal dispersal was associated with the late co-PDC plume that was generated during caldera collapse.

  13. Ambient seismic noise tomography reveals a hidden caldera and its relation to the Tarutung pull-apart basin at the Sumatran Fault Zone, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, Trond; Muksin, Umar; Bauer, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the noise recordings of a short-period seismic network to derive a shallow crustal S-wave velocity model at the Sumatra Fault in Northern Sumatra, Indonesia. By correlating the noise of 40 seismic stations' recording for 9 months, we could recover Rayleigh waves from vertical component recordings with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. Group velocities of the Rayleigh waves could be determined in the period range from 0.71 to 4.4 s. These group velocities were used to invert for 2D group velocity maps at specific periods. Finally, the derived group velocity maps were inverted for a 3D S-wave velocity model. This model shows a region of a strong velocity decrease off the Great Sumatran Fault Zone, at the northeastern margin of the young Tarutung pull-apart basin. This observed low velocity block coincides with a caldera-like morphological feature which is interpreted as the surface expression of a hidden volcanic caldera. Considering the surface manifestations of geothermal activity around this anomaly, we conclude that the caldera is still acting as a heat source. On the other hand, the weak morphological expression at the surface indicates a certain age of the caldera which might be older than the Tarutung pull-apart basin. The findings provide important constraints on general concepts for the formation of pull-apart basins along the Sumatran fault and their relation to volcanism.

  14. The earliest low and high δ18O caldera-forming eruptions of the Yellowstone plume: Implications for the 30–40 Ma Oregon calderas and speculations on plume-triggered delaminations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Nicole Seligman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present new isotopic and trace element data for four eruptive centers in Oregon: Wildcat Mountain (40 Ma, Crooked River (32–28 Ma, Tower Mountain (32 Ma, and Mohawk River (32 Ma. The first three calderas are located too far east to be sourced through renewed subduction of the Farallon slab following accretion of the Yellowstone-produced Siletzia terrane at ~50 Ma. Basalts of the three eastern eruptive centers yield high Nb/Yb and Th/Yb ratios, indicating an enriched sublithospheric mantle source, while Mohawk River yields trace element and isotopic (δ18O and εHf values that correlate with its location above a subduction zone. The voluminous rhyolitic tuffs and lavas of Crooked River (41 x 27 km have δ18Ozircon values that include seven low δ18Ozircon units (1.8–4.5 ‰, one high δ18Ozircon unit (7.4–8.8 ‰, and two units with heterogeneous zircons (2.0–9.0 ‰, similar to younger Yellowstone-Snake River Plain rhyolites. In order to produce these low δ18O values, a large heat source, widespread hydrothermal circulation, and repeated remelting are all required. In contrast, Wildcat Mountain and Tower Mountain rocks yield high δ18Ozircon values (6.4–7.9 ‰ and normal to low εHfi values (5.2–12.6, indicating crustal melting of high-δ18O supracrustal rocks. We propose that these calderas were produced by the first appearance of the Yellowstone plume east of the Cascadia subduction zone, which is supported by plate reconstructions that put the Yellowstone plume under Crooked River at 32–28 Ma. Given the eastern location of these calderas along the suture of the accreted Siletzia terrane and North America, we suggest that the Yellowstone hotspot is directly responsible for magmatism at Crooked River, and for plume-assisted delamination of portions of the edge of the Blue Mountains that produced the Tower Mountain magmas, while the older Wildcat Mountain magmas are related to suture zone instabilities that were created

  15. Dynamics of the 2007 Eruptions of Piton de la Fournaise and the Related Caldera Collapse from a Single Very Broad-band Seismic Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Roult, Geneviève; Michon, Laurent; Barruol, Guilhem; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Di Muro, Andrea; Reymond, Dominique; Peltier, Aline; Staudacher, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Seismic records from the RER very broad-band seismic station (La Réunion Island) belonging to the GEOSCOPE network are investigated to understand the eruptive succession (February to May) of Piton de la Fournaise and the caldera collapse episode of April 2007. Data first indicate that the short-lived, small volume, summit eruption of February 18 occurred during a phase of continuous inflation initiated in January 2007. Inflation decelerated around 2 weeks before a second short-lived small volume eruption on March 30-31 on the SE flank, almost simultaneous with a sudden, large deflation of the edifice. Deflation rate, which had stabilized at a relatively low level, increased anew on April 1 while no magma was emitted, followed on April 2 by a more distant and one of the most voluminous eruptions of the last two centuries at La Réunion Island. The RER station shows that very long period (VLP) and ultra long period (ULP) events developed during this period. Seven ULP events preceded the caldera collapse and 48 ones occurred during the caldera collapse over 9 days, most of which during the first 30 hours. A thorough examination of the seismic signals corrected for tide effects shows that each collapse event was coeval with VLP and ULP signals. Each individual collapse showed similar ULP and VLP signals characterized by periods of ~ 500 s and ~ 7 s, respectively. The back-azimuth of most ULP signals related to the caldera collapse points clearly toward the Dolomieu caldera. The strikingly constant duration of the VLP signals (around 20 s) related to the collapse events and their occurrence before the collapse initiation suggest a physical control of the volcanic edifice. Waveforms and spectrograms of the various caldera collapse events show very homogeneous patterns, suggesting a similar and repeating volcano-tectonic process for the formation of the VLP signals events. Although tilt may be responsible of part of the ULP signals observed during the collapse events, we

  16. Keanakākoʻi Tephra produced by 300 years of explosive eruptions following collapse of Kīlauea's caldera in about 1500 CE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Donald A.; Rose, Timothy R.; Fiske, Richard S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2012-01-01

    The Keanakākoʻi Tephra at Kīlauea Volcano has previously been interpreted by some as the product of a caldera-forming eruption in 1790 CE. Our study, however, finds stratigraphic and 14C evidence that the tephra instead results from numerous eruptions throughout a 300-year period between about 1500 and 1800. The stratigraphic evidence includes: (1) as many as six pure lithic ash beds interleaved in sand dunes made of earlier Keanakākoʻi vitric ash, (2) three lava flows from Kīlauea and Mauna Loa interbedded with the tephra, (3) buried syneruptive cultural structures, (4) numerous intraformational water-cut gullies, and (5) abundant organic layers rich in charcoal within the tephra section. Interpretation of 97 new accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C ages and 4 previous conventional ages suggests that explosive eruptions began in 1470–1510 CE, and that explosive activity continued episodically until the early 1800s, probably with two periods of quiescence lasting several decades. Kīlauea's caldera, rather than forming in 1790, predates the first eruption of the Keanakākoʻi and collapsed in 1470–1510, immediately following, and perhaps causing, the end of the 60-year-long, 4–6 km3 ʻAilāʻau eruption from the east side of Kīlauea's summit area. The caldera was several hundred meters deep when the Keanakākoʻi began erupting, consistent with oral tradition, and probably had a volume of 4–6 km3. The caldera formed by collapse, but no eruption of lava coincided with its formation. A large volume of magma may have quickly drained from the summit reservoir and intruded into the east rift zone, perhaps in response to a major south-flank slip event, leading to summit collapse. Alternatively, magma may have slowly drained from the reservoir during the prolonged ʻAilāʻau eruption, causing episodic collapses before the final, largest downdrop took place. Two prolonged periods of episodic explosive eruptions are known at Kīlauea, the Keanak

  17. The effect of pressurized magma chamber growth on melt migration and pre-caldera vent locations through time at Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Wright, Heather M.; Bacon, Charles R.

    2015-02-01

    The pattern of eruptions at long-lived volcanic centers provides a window into the co-evolution of crustal magma transport, tectonic stresses, and unsteady magma generation at depth. Mount Mazama in the Oregon Cascades has seen variable activity over the last 400 ky, including the 50 km3 climactic eruption at ca. 7.7 ka that produced Crater Lake caldera. The physical mechanisms responsible for the assembly of silicic magma reservoirs that are the precursors to caldera-forming eruptions are poorly understood. Here we argue that the spatial and temporal distribution of geographically clustered volcanic vents near Mazama reflects the development of a centralized magma chamber that fed the climactic eruption. Time-averaged eruption rates at Mount Mazama imply an order of magnitude increase in deep magma influx prior to the caldera-forming event, suggesting that unsteady mantle melting triggered a chamber growth episode that culminated in caldera formation. We model magma chamber-dike interactions over ∼50 ky preceding the climactic eruption to fit the observed distribution of surface eruptive vents in space and time, as well as petrologically estimated deep influx rates. Best fitting models predict an expanding zone of dike capture caused by a growing, oblate spheroidal magma chamber with 10-30 MPa of overpressure. This growing zone of chamber influence causes closest approaching regional mafic vent locations as well as more compositionally evolved Mazama eruptions to migrate away from the climactic eruptive center, returning as observed to the center after the chamber drains during the caldera-forming eruption.

  18. Permeability and continuous gradient temperature monitoring of volcanic rocks: new insights from borehole and laboratory analysis at the Campi Flegrei caldera (Southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlino, Stefano; Piochi, Monica; Tramelli, Anna; Troise, Claudia; Mormone, Angela; Montanaro, Cristian; Scheu, Bettina; Klaus, Mayer; Somma, Renato; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The pilot borehole recently drilled in the eastern caldera of Campi Flegrei (Southern Italy), during the Campi Flegrei Deep Drill Project (CFDDP) (in the framework of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program) allowed (i) estimating on-field permeability and coring the crustal rocks for laboratory experiments, and (ii) determining thermal gradient measurements down to ca. 500 m of depth. We report here a first comparative in situ and laboratory tests to evaluate the rock permeability in the very high volcanic risk caldera of Campi Flegrei, in which ground deformations likely occur as the persistent disturbance effect of fluid circulation in the shallower geothermal system. A large amount of petro-physical information derives from outcropping welded tuffs, cores and geophysical logs from previous AGIP's drillings, which are located in the central and western part of the caldera. We discuss the expected scale dependency of rock permeability results in relation with well-stratigraphy and core lithology, texture and mineralogy. The new acquired data improve the database related to physical property of Campi Flegrei rocks, allowing a better constrain for the various fluid-dynamical models performed in the tentative to understand (and forecast) the caldera behavior. We also present the first data on thermal gradient continuously measured through 0 - to 475 m of depth by a fiber optic sensor installed in the CFDDP pilot hole. As regards, we show that the obtained values of permeability, compared with those inferred from eastern sector of the caldera, can explain the different distribution of temperature at depth, as well as the variable amount of vapor phase in the shallow geothermal system. The measured temperatures are consistent with the distribution of volcanism in the last 15 ka.

  19. The Oldest Known Caldera Associated with the Yellowstone Hotspot: New Geologic Mapping, Geochemistry, and 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology for the Northern McDermitt Volcanic Field, Northern Nevada and Southeastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, T. R.; Mahood, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    McDermitt Volcanic Field (MVF) of Nevada and Oregon is one of three major caldera centers associated with Mid-Miocene Steens/Columbia River flood basalts. Pioneering geologic mapping of MVF by Rytuba and McKee (1984) and subsequent work established four main ignimbrites within the field. Our new 40Ar/39Ar ages (FCT=28.02 Ma) are 16.41±0.02 (±2σ) Ma for Tuff of Oregon Canyon, 16.35±0.04 Ma for Tuff of Trout Creek Mountains, 16.30±0.04 Ma for Tuff of Long Ridge, and 15.56±0.08 Ma for Tuff of Whitehorse Creek. We have mapped two previously unrecognized overlapping calderas that we interpret as sources for Tuff of Oregon Canyon and Tuff of Trout Creek. These ~20-km diameter calderas lie north of the well-known McDermitt Caldera; a smaller 7-km caldera that formed on eruption of the Tuff of Whitehorse Creek is nested within them. Argon ages and geochemistry of alkali rhyolite lava domes in the northern MVF define two populations: ~16.6-16.3 Ma associated with the newly recognized calderas, and ~15.5-15.3 Ma outlining the margins of the younger Whitehorse Caldera. Consistent with both ignimbrites erupting from the same evolving magma system, the high-silica alkali rhyolite Tuff of Oregon Canyon lies on compositional trends defined by the Tuff of Trout Creek, which is zoned from a moderately crystal-rich high-silica alkali rhyolite to a strongly porphyritic low-silica alkali rhyolite. They both are distinguished from the Tuff of Long Ridge from McDermitt Caldera by their higher Zr/Rb, and relatively high FeO* concentrations distinguish all MVF ignimbrites from ignimbrites from the nearby High Rock Caldera Complex, where the oldest caldera formed on eruption of the Idaho Canyon Tuff at 16.38±0.02 Ma (Coble and Mahood, in review). The Tuff of Trout Creek rests conformably on the Tuff of Oregon Canyon west and southwest of the calderas, where they overlie a thick stack of Steens Basalt lavas. To the east and southeast the two ignimbrites are separated by as much as

  20. Numerical models for ground deformation and gravity changes during volcanic unrest: simulating the hydrothermal system dynamics of a restless caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco, A.; Gottsmann, J.; Whitaker, F.; Rust, A.; Currenti, G.; Jasim, A.; Bunney, S.

    2016-04-01

    Ground deformation and gravity changes in restless calderas during periods of unrest can signal an impending eruption and thus must be correctly interpreted for hazard evaluation. It is critical to differentiate variation of geophysical observables related to volume and pressure changes induced by magma migration from shallow hydrothermal activity associated with hot fluids of magmatic origin rising from depth. In this paper we present a numerical model to evaluate the thermo-poroelastic response of the hydrothermal system in a caldera setting by simulating pore pressure and thermal expansion associated with deep injection of hot fluids (water and carbon dioxide). Hydrothermal fluid circulation is simulated using TOUGH2, a multicomponent multiphase simulator of fluid flows in porous media. Changes in pore pressure and temperature are then evaluated and fed into a thermo-poroelastic model (one-way coupling), which is based on a finite-difference numerical method designed for axi-symmetric problems in unbounded domains.Informed by constraints available for the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy), a series of simulations assess the influence of fluid injection rates and mechanical properties on the hydrothermal system, uplift and gravity. Heterogeneities in hydrological and mechanical properties associated with the presence of ring faults are a key determinant of the fluid flow pattern and consequently the geophysical observables. Peaks (in absolute value) of uplift and gravity change profiles computed at the ground surface are located close to injection points (namely at the centre of the model and fault areas). Temporal evolution of the ground deformation indicates that the contribution of thermal effects to the total uplift is almost negligible with respect to the pore pressure contribution during the first years of the unrest, but increases in time and becomes dominant after a long period of the simulation. After a transient increase over the first years of unrest

  1. Numerical models for ground deformation and gravity changes during volcanic unrest: simulating the hydrothermal system dynamics of an active caldera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Coco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ground deformation and gravity changes in active calderas during periods of unrest can signal an impending eruption and thus must be correctly interpreted for hazard evaluation. It is critical to differentiate variation of geophysical observables related to volume and pressure changes induced by magma migration from shallow hydrothermal activity associated with hot fluids of magmatic origin rising from depth. In this paper we present a numerical model to evaluate the thermo-poroelastic response of the hydrothermal system in a caldera setting by simulating pore pressure and thermal expansion associated with deep injection of hot fluids (water and carbon dioxide. Hydrothermal fluid circulation is simulated using TOUGH2, a multicomponent multiphase simulator of fluid flows in porous media. Changes in pore pressure and temperature are then evaluated and fed into a thermo-poroelastic model (one-way coupling, which is based on a finite-difference numerical method designed for axi-symmetric problems in unbounded domains. Based on data for the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy, a series of simulations assess the influence of fluid injection rates and mechanical properties on the hydrothermal system, uplift and gravity. Heterogeneities in hydrological and mechanical properties associated with the presence of ring faults are a key determinant of the fluid flow pattern and consequently the geophysical observables. Peaks (in absolute value of uplift and gravity change profiles computed at the ground surface are located close to injection points (namely at the centre of the model and fault areas. Temporal evolution of the ground deformation indicates that the contribution of thermal effects to the total uplift is almost negligible with respect to the pore pressure contribution during the first years of the unrest, but increases in time and becomes dominant after a long period of the simulation. After a transient increase over the first years of unrest, gravity

  2. Modelling of Subglacial Volcanic and Geothermal Activity, during the 2014-15 Bárdarbunga-Holuhraun Eruption and Caldera Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, H. I.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Hognadottir, T.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic unrest was observed within the subglacial caldera of Bárdarbunga on 16 August 2014, followed by seismicity tracing the path of a lateral dyke extending underneath the Vatnajökull glacier out to 45 km to the north east of the volcano. A short subaerial fissure eruption occurred at the site of the Holuhraun lavas, just north of the glacier edge on 29 August, before recommencing in earnest on 31 August with a large effusive eruption and accompanying slow caldera collapse, which lasted for approximately 6 months. The glacier surface around Bárdarbunga was monitored using aerial altimeter profiling. Several shallow depressions, known as ice cauldrons, formed around the caldera rim and on Dyngjujökull glacier above the dyke propagation path. The cauldrons range in volume from approximately 0.0003 km3 to 0.02 km3. Two types of melting were observed: high initial heat flux over a period of days which gradually disappears; and slower but more sustained melting rates. We present time series data of the development and evolution of these cauldrons, with estimates of the heat flux magnitudes involved.The nature of the heat source required to generate these cauldrons is not obvious. Two scenarios are explored: 1) small subglacial eruptions; or 2) increased geothermal activity induced by the dyke intrusion. We investigate these scenarios using numerical modelling, considering the surface heat flux produced, and timescales and spatial extent of associated surface anomalies. It is found that a magmatic intrusion into rocks where the groundwater is near the boiling point curve can cause rapid increase in geothermal activity, but even a shallow intrusion into a cold groundwater reservoir will have a muted thermal response. Thus, our results indicate that minor subglacial eruptions are the most plausible explanation for the observed rapid melting far from known geothermal areas. These results have implications for the interpretation of thermal signals observed at ice

  3. The eruptive history and chemical stratigraphy of a post-caldera, steady-state volcano: Yasur, Vanuatu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Chris W.; Handley, Heather K.; Cronin, Shane J.; Turner, Simon P.

    2014-07-01

    The persistent activity of Yasur volcano, a post-caldera scoria cone in the southern Vanuatu Arc, along with the uniformity exhibited by its eruptive products, indicates that it is a "steady-state" volcano. This implies that rates of magma replenishment and tapping are in equilibrium. Examination of recently exposed tephra sequences suggests that Strombolian-style activity at Yasur has persisted in its current form for the last 630-850 years. Eruption of tephra with uniform grain size and texture throughout this period indicates invariant eruption magnitude and style. Based on tephra accumulation rates, a uniform, time-averaged eruption flux of ˜410-480 m3 days-1 is estimated. Major and trace element analyses of glass shards and mineral grains from these tephra deposits show limited variation in magma composition throughout that time, consistent with a chemically buffered magma reservoir and models for steady-state volcanism. Similarly, mineral crystallisation temperature estimates are within error, suggesting the magma reservoir has retained a constant temperature through this time, while pressure estimates suggest shallow crystallisation. Eruptions appear to be driven by gas release, with small fluctuations in magma chemistry and eruptive behaviour governed by perturbations in volatile flux. This period of steady-state activity was preceded by ˜600 years of higher-magnitude, lower-frequency eruptions during which less evolved compositions were erupted. Variation between these two styles of eruptive behaviour may be explained by a shift from a periodically closed to fully opened conduit, allowing more regular magma release and changes to degassing regimes. New radiocarbon ages suggest a period of irregular eruptive behaviour extending >1,400 year B.P. Overall, a transition from an irregular to a very steady magmatic system has occurred over the past ˜2 kyr. Previously determined tectonic indicators for caldera resurgence in the area suggest revived magma

  4. Advisory expert system for energy analysis in industrial boilers; Sistema experto asesor en el analisis energetico de calderas industriales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemper Valverde, Nicolas; Lara Rosano, Felipe; Vazquez Nava, Rodolfo [Laboratorio de Inteligencia Artificial, Instituto de Ingenieria UNAM, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents an expert system for the operational analysis of industrial boilers, estimating the potential of heat recovery, in the small and medium size industry. The package is friendly, practical, flexible easy to maintain and expandable to take into consideration the user`s specific requirements and allows the analysis of the energy losses in the combustion, feed water, drains, and insulation, identifying the enhancements and estimating the saving potential, in energy as well as economical. [Espanol] En este trabajo se presenta un sistema experto para analizar la operacion de calderas industriales estimando el potencial de recuperacion de calor, en la pequena y mediana industria. El paquete es amigable, practico, flexible, facil en su mantenimiento y expandible para tomar en consideracion los requerimientos especificos de los usuarios y permite el analisis de las perdidas de energia en la combustion, agua de alimentacion, purgas y aislamientos, identificando las mejoras y estimando ahorros potenciales, tanto energeticos como economicos.

  5. Evaluation of minderal resource potential, Caldera geology, and volcano-tectonic framework at and near Yucca Mountain, Task 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Larson, L.T. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1993-09-30

    This report summarizes the results of Task 3 work that was initially discussed in our monthly reports for the period October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993, and contained in our various papers and abstracts, both published and currently in press or in review. Our work during this period was involved (a) the continuation of studies begun prior to October, 1992, focussed mainly on aspects of the caldera geology, volcanic stratigraphy, magmatic activity, hydrothermal mineralization and extensional tectonics of the western and northwestern parts of the southwestern and Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF), studies of the subsurface rocks of Yucca Mountain utilizing drill hole samples obtained in 1991 and 1992, and (b) new studies of veins and siliceous rocks cropping out in northwestern Yucca Mountain that provide evidence for previously unrecognized hydrothermal activity during the Crater Flat Tuff period of volcanism.

  6. Evaluation of mineral resource potential, caldera geology, and volcano-tectonic framework at and near Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Larson, L.T. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1992-09-30

    This report summarizes the result of Task 3 work initially discussed in our monthly reports for the period October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992, and contained in our various papers and abstracts, both published and currently in press or review. Our work during this period has involved (a) the continuation of studies begun prior to October, 1991, focussed mainly on aspects of the caldera geology, volcanic stratigraphy, magmatic activity, hydrothermal mineralization and extensional tectonics of the western and northwestern parts of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF), and (b) new studies of the alteration and trace-metal geochemistry of subsurface rocks at Yucca Mountain utilizing drill hole samples obtained in late 1991 and early 1992.

  7. Regulatory, Land Ownership, and Water Availability Factors for a Magma Well: Long Valley Caldera and Coso Hot Springs, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackett, Robert

    1985-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is currently engaged in a program to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of extracting thermal energy from high-level molten magma bodies. The program is being carried out under the direction of Sandia National Laboratories where a number of individual projects support the overall program. The existing program elements include (1) high-temperature materials compatibility testing; (2) studies of properties of melts of various compositions; and (3) the investigation of the economics of a magma energy extraction system. Another element of the program is being conducted with the cooperation of the U.S. Geological Survey, and involves locating and outlining magma bodies at selected sites using various geophysical techniques. The ultimate goal here will be to define the limits of a magma body as a drilling target. During an earlier phase of the program, more than twenty candidate study sites considered were evaluated based upon: (1) the likelihood of the presence of a shallow magma chamber, (2) the accessibility of the site, and (3) physical and institutional constraints associated with each site with respect to performing long-term experiments. From these early phase activities, the number of candidate sites were eventually narrowed to just 2. The sites currently under consideration are Coso Hot Springs and the Long Valley caldera (Figure 1). This report describes certain attributes of these sites in order to help identify potential problems related to: (1) state and federal regulations pertaining to geothermal development; (2) land ownership; and (3) water resource availability. The information sources used in this study were mainly maps, publications, and informative documents gathered from the California Division of Oil and Gas and the U.S. Department of the Interior. Environmental studies completed for the entire Long Valley caldera study area, and for portions of the Coso Hot Springs study area were also used for reference.

  8. Shear wave splitting, vP/vS, and GPS during a time of enhanced activity at Aso caldera, Kyushu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unglert, K.; Savage, M. K.; Fournier, N.; Ohkura, T.; Abe, Y.

    2011-11-01

    We performed shear wave splitting analyses and calculated vP/vS-ratios on local earthquakes recorded at seven stations around Aso volcano, Japan, between 2001 and 2008. The mean vP/vS of 1.61 ± 0.01 from all stations is among the lowest average values found anywhere in the world. A temporal change of shear wave splitting fast polarization is observed at one station. Additionally, spatial variations of shear wave splitting delay times and vP/vS-ratios show a correlation at three stations. We suggest that stress-controlled anisotropy dominates at these stations. GPS baselines and 2D strain reveal extension in the caldera in 2003, and compression before and after 2003. Strain shortening axes indicate either a variation in regional stress or a local stress source that overprints the regional field in 2003. Baseline changes correlate with periods of increased low frequency seismic activity located deeper than 15 km. Compaction and degassing of a previously reported sill at approximately 15 km depth could lead to constantly high pressure of volcanic gases over a wide area and explain the generally low vP/vS-ratios and the observed compression in the caldera. We propose that a small volume of magma intruded into the sill in 2003, caused extension at the surface, and triggered ash eruptions between 2003 and 2005. Associated localized migration of gases in overpressured cracks with aspect ratios potentially ˜0.5 in the upper crust with porosities ≥0.1 could be the source of changes in seismic anisotropy, and explain the slight variations observed in vP/vS.

  9. The link between volcanism and plutonism in epizonal magma systems; high-precision U-Pb zircon geochronology from the Organ Mountains caldera and batholith, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Matthew; Farmer, G. Lang; Bowring, Samuel A.; Wooton, Kathleen M.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Coleman, Drew S.; Verplanck, Philip L.

    2016-02-01

    The Organ Mountains caldera and batholith expose the volcanic and epizonal plutonic record of an Eocene caldera complex. The caldera and batholith are well exposed, and extensive previous mapping and geochemical analyses have suggested a clear link between the volcanic and plutonic sections, making this an ideal location to study magmatic processes associated with caldera volcanism. Here we present high-precision thermal ionization mass spectrometry U-Pb zircon dates from throughout the caldera and batholith, and use these dates to test and improve existing petrogenetic models. The new dates indicate that Eocene volcanic and plutonic rocks in the Organ Mountains formed from ~44 to 34 Ma. The three largest caldera-related tuff units yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates of 36.441 ± 0.020 Ma (Cueva Tuff), 36.259 ± 0.016 Ma (Achenback Park tuff), and 36.215 ± 0.016 Ma (Squaw Mountain tuff). An alkali feldspar granite, which is chemically similar to the erupted tuffs, yielded a synchronous weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 36.259 ± 0.021 Ma. Weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates from the larger volume syenitic phase of the underlying Organ Needle pluton range from 36.130 ± 0.031 to 36.071 ± 0.012 Ma, and the youngest sample is 144 ± 20 to 188 ± 20 ka younger than the Squaw Mountain and Achenback Park tuffs, respectively. Younger plutonism in the batholith continued through at least 34.051 ± 0.029 Ma. We propose that the Achenback Park tuff, Squaw Mountain tuff, alkali feldspar granite and Organ Needle pluton formed from a single, long-lived magma chamber/mush zone. Early silicic magmas generated by partial melting of the lower crust rose to form an epizonal magma chamber. Underplating of the resulting mush zone led to partial melting and generation of a high-silica alkali feldspar granite cap, which erupted to form the tuffs. The deeper parts of the chamber underwent continued recharge and crystallization for 144 ± 20 ka after the final eruption. Calculated magmatic

  10. The 2007 eruptions and caldera collapse of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion Island) from tilt analysis at a single very broadband seismic station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Roult, Geneviève; Michon, Laurent; Barruol, Guilhem; Muro, Andrea Di

    2014-04-01

    Seismic records from La Réunion Island very broadband Geoscope station are investigated to constrain the link between the 2007 eruptive sequence and the related caldera collapse of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano. Tilt estimated from seismic records reveals that the three 2007 eruptions belong to a single inflation-deflation cycle. Tilt trend indicates that the small-volume summit eruption of 18 February occurred during a phase of continuous inflation that started in January 2007. Inflation decelerated 24 days before a second short-lived, small-volume eruption on 30 March, almost simultaneous with a sudden, large-scale deflation of the volcano. Deflation rate, which had stabilized at relatively low level, increased anew on 1 April while no magma was erupted, followed on 2 April by a major distal eruption and on 5 April by a summit caldera collapse. Long-term tilt variation suggests that the 2007 eruptive succession was triggered by a deep magma input.

  11. Acerca de la propuesta "Caldera de Ñireco" en el centro-oeste de los Andes Neuquinos (38º50'S - 70º50'O The "Ñireco Caldera" in the central-western Neuquén Andes (38º50'S - 70º50'O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio F González Díaz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available En el tramo austral del alto estructural de Copahue-Pino Hachado, a la latitud de la cuenca lacustre Moquehue-Aluminé y cercanías del límite argentino-chileno, ha sido distinguido un conjunto anómalo de nueve calderas resultantes de la actividad volcánica del Plioceno-Cuaternario. La "caldera de Ñireco", parte integrante de este conjunto, es motivo del presente trabajo. Los autores objetan el reconocimiento de tal componente morfoestructural a partir de un análisis geomorfológico, estructural y estratigráfico del área. A partir de ello, se reconoce una correspondencia entre los propuestos límites de dicha caldera, y la situación de los principales valles resultantes del proceso erosivo fluvial, cuyo desarrollo estuvo controlado por fallas inversas y lineamientos regionales. No existen evidencias que faciliten el reconocimiento de un aparato volcánico que teóricamente albergue la sugerida depresión caldérica, o remanentes de sus flancos externos e internos. En el sector central de la propuesta "caldera de Ñireco" se dan las mayores alturas topográficas de la región (± 2.900 m s.n.m., valores que superan ampliamente a los de la Cordillera Principal a estas latitudes. La estratigrafía local de la propuesta área de la caldera está compuesta esencialmente por las rocas más antiguas de la zona (granitoides del Paleozoico superior y secuencias volcánicas y volcaniclásticas del Triásico y no guarda coincidencia temporal alguna con la actividad volcánica del Plioceno-Cuaternario, la que se halla bien representada inmediatamente al norte y sur del sector analizado. La zona de estudio se enmarca por el contrario dentro de una faja plegada y corrida de piel gruesa y vergencia occidental, en donde la inversión tectónica jugó un rol central.In the southern segment of the Copahue- Pino Hachado block, next to the Moquehue-Alumine lacustrine basin, an anomalous concentration of calderas, resulting from a Pliocene

  12. The 2007 eruptions and caldera collapse of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion Island) from tilt analysis at a single very broadband seismic station

    OpenAIRE

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.,; Roult, Geneviève; Michon, Laurent; Barruol, Guilhem; Muro, Andrea Di

    2014-01-01

    International audience Seismic records from La Réunion Island very broadband Geoscope station are investigated to constrain the link between the 2007 eruptive sequence and the related caldera collapse of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano. Tilt estimated from seismic records reveals that the three 2007 eruptions belong to a single inflation-deflation cycle. Tilt trend indicates that the small-volume summit eruption of 18 February occurred during a phase of continuous inflation that started ...

  13. The combined use of InSAR and GPS Time-Series to Infer the Deformation Signals at the Yellowstone Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, A.; Tizzani, P.; Battaglia, M.; Castaldo, R.; Lanari, R.; Zeni, G.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the Yellowstone caldera geological unrest between 1977 and 2010 by analyzing temporal changes in differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), precise spirit leveling andgravity measurements. The analysis of the 1992-2010 displacement time series has been retrieved by applying an "improved" version of the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) InSAR technique which complements a novel multi-temporal noise filtering approach with a suitable identification of the network of small baseline pairs. As a result, we have identified three areas of deformation: (i) the Mallard Lake (ML) and Sour Creek (SC) resurgent domes, (ii) a region close to the Northern Caldera Rim (NCR), and (iii) the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP). While the eastern SRP shows a signal related to tectonic deformation, the other two regions are influenced by the caldera unrest. We removed the tectonic signal from the InSAR displacements, and we modeled the InSAR, leveling, and gravity measurements to retrieve the best fitting source parameters. Our findings confirmed the existence of different distinct sources, beneath the brittle-ductile transition zone, which have been intermittently active during the last three decades. Moreover, we interpreted our results in the light of existing seismic tomography studies. Concerning the SC dome, we highlighted the role of hydrothermal fluids as the driving force behind the 1977-1983 uplift; since 1983-1993 the deformation source transformed into a deeper one with a higher magmatic component. Furthermore, our results support the magmatic nature of the deformation source beneath ML dome for the overall investigated period. Finally, the uplift at NCR is interpreted as magma accumulation, while its subsidence could either be the result of fluids migration outside the caldera or the gravitational adjustment of the source from a spherical to a sill-like geometry.

  14. Evaluating Spatial Heterogeneity and Environmental Variability Inferred from Branched Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraethers (GDGTs) Distribution in Soils from Valles Caldera, New Mexic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Quintana, S. H.; Werne, J. P.; Brown, E. T.; Halbur, J.; Sinninghe Damsté, , J.; Schouten, S.; Correa-Metrio, A.; Fawcett, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are recently discovered bacterial membrane lipids, ubiquitously present in peat bogs and soils, as well as in rivers, lakes and lake sediments. Their distribution appears to be controlled mainly by soil pH and annual mean air temperature (MAT) and they have been increasingly used as paleoclimate proxies in sedimentary records. In order to validate their application as paleoclimate proxies, it is essential evaluate the influence of small scale environmental variability on their distribution. Initial application of the original soil-based branched GDGT distribution proxy to lacustrine sediments from Valles Caldera, New Mexico (NM) was promising, producing a viable temperature record spanning two glacial/interglacial cycles. In this study, we assess the influence of analytical and spatial soil heterogeneity on the concentration and distribution of 9 branched GDGTs in soils from Valles Caldera, and show how this variability is propagated to MAT and pH estimates using multiple soil-based branched GDGT transfer functions. Our results show that significant differences in the abundance and distribution of branched GDGTs in soil can be observed even within a small area such as Valles Caldera. Although the original MBT-CBT calibration appears to give robust MAT estimates and the newest calibration provides pH estimates in better agreement with modern local soils in Valles Caldera, the environmental heterogeneity (e.g. vegetation type and soil moisture) appears to affect the precision of MAT and pH estimates. Furthermore, the heterogeneity of soils leads to significant variability among samples taken even from within a square meter. While such soil heterogeneity is not unknown (and is typically controlled for by combining multiple samples), this study quantifies heterogeneity relative to branched GDGT-based proxies for the first time, indicating that care must be taken with samples from heterogeneous soils in MAT and p

  15. Numerical models for ground deformation and gravity changes during volcanic unrest:simulating the hydrothermal system dynamics of a restless caldera

    OpenAIRE

    Coco, Armando; Gottsmann, Joachim H; Whitaker, Fiona F; Rust, Alison C; Currenti, Gilda; Jasim, Alia; Bunney, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Ground deformation and gravity changes in restless calderas during periods of unrest can signal an impending eruption and thus must be correctly interpreted for hazard evaluation. It is critical to differentiate variation of geophysical observables related to volume and pressure changes induced by magma migration from shallow hydrothermal activity associated with hot fluids of magmatic origin rising from depth. In this paper we present a numerical model to evaluate the thermo-poroelastic resp...

  16. Using quartz and plagioclase to gain insight into chemical and thermal evolution of the Rotoiti magma prior to the caldera-forming eruption ±55 ka, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The zoned plagioclase and quartz crystals within the multiple magmas that erupted during the ∼55 ka Rotoiti caldera forming eruption appear to have had complex thermal and compositional histories. Compositional zoning suggests that magmatic systems were open, and received multiple pulses of hotter and more mafic magma. Limited diffusion across the crystals indicates that crystals did not dwell at magmatic temperatures for prolonged periods (<100 years), and suggest that the melts were generated and erupted quickly.

  17. Calcification and Silicification: Fossilization Potential of Cyanobacteria from Stromatolites of Niuafo‘ou's Caldera Lakes (Tonga) and Implications for the Early Fossil Record

    OpenAIRE

    Kremer, Barbara; Kazmierczak, Józef; Łukomska-Kowalczyk, Maja; Kempe, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Calcification and silicification processes of cyanobacterial mats that form stromatolites in two caldera lakes of Niuafo‘ou Island (Vai Lahi and Vai Si‘i) were evaluated, and their importance as analogues for interpreting the early fossil record are discussed. It has been shown that the potential for morphological preservation of Niuafo‘ou cyanobacteria is highly dependent on the timing and type of mineral phase involved in the fossilization process. Four main modes of mineralization of cyano...

  18. Domes, Ash and Dust - Controls on soil genesis in a montane catchment of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, C.; Meding, S. M.; Vazquez, A.; Chorover, J.

    2012-12-01

    Soil genesis in volcanic terrain may be controlled by complex assemblages of parent materials and local topography. The objective of this work was to quantify topographic and parent material controls on soil and catchment evolution in a mixed conifer, montane catchment in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, as part of the Jemez River Basin Critical Zone Observatory. The field site is a 16 ha catchment at an elevation of 3,000 m, with a frigid soil temperature regime (0-8 *C), ustic soil moisture regime with bimodal precipitation of winter snowfall and convective summer rainfall (880 mm yr-1), and an overstory dominated by spruce and fir with dense grass cover in open areas. The catchment is located on the resurgent Redondo Dome that uplifted shortly after the last major eruption of the Valles Caldera 1.2 My ago. The dome includes a complex assemblage of pre-eruptive caldera materials and extant sedimentary rocks embedded within a welded, hydrothermally altered rhyolitic tuff. We sampled a transect of seven soil profiles spanning the dominant east-west aspect of the catchment across a catena with profiles located in summit, backslope, footslope, and toeslope positions. Soil morphology was described in the field and soil samples analyzed using a range of geochemical and mineralogical techniques including quantitative and qualitative x-ray diffraction of bulk samples and particle size fractions, elemental analysis by x-ray fluorescence, and laser particle size analysis. The data indicated strong landscape position control on soil drainage, grading from well-drained summits to poorly-drained toeslope positions based on the presence/absence of redoximorphic features. The drainage patterns were coupled with downslope thickening of dark, organic matter rich surface horizons, likely a function of both in situ organic matter production and downslope colluvial transport of carbon rich surface materials. Mineralogical and geochemical data indicated clear within profile lithologic

  19. Hydrothermal fluid flow models of Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy constrained by InSAR surface deformation time series observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, P.; Lanari, R.; Manzo, M.; Sansosti, E.; Tizzani, P.; Hutnak, M.; Hurwitz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, located along the Bay of Naples, has a long history of significant vertical deformation, with the most recent large uplift (>1.5m) occurring in 1983-1984. Each episode of uplift has been followed by a period of subsidence that decreases in rate with time and may be punctuated by brief episodes of lesser uplift. The large amplitude of the major uplifts that occur without volcanic activity, and the subsequent subsidence has been argued as evidence for hydrothermal amplification of any magmatic source. The later subsidence and its temporal decay have been argued as due to diffusion of the pressurized caldera fill material into the less porous surrounding country rock. We present satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) time series analysis of ERS and Envisat data from the European Space Agency, based on exploiting the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) approach [Berardino et al., 2002]; this allows us to generate maps of relative surface deformation though time, beginning in 1992 through 2007, that are relevant to both ascending and descending satellite orbits. The general temporal behavior is one of subsidence punctuated by several lesser uplift episodes. The spatial pattern of deformation can be modeled through simple inflation/deflation sources in an elastic halfspace. Given the evidence to suggest that fluids may play a significant role in the temporal deformation of Campi Flegrei, rather than a purely magmatic or magma chamber-based interpretation, we model the temporal and spatial evolution of surface deformation as a hydrothermal fluid flow process. We use the TOUGH2-BIOT2 set of numerical codes [Preuss et al., 1999; Hsieh, 1996], which couple multi-phase (liquid-gas) and multi-component (H2O-CO2) fluid flow in a porous or fractured media with plane strain deformation and fluid flow in a linearly elastic porous medium. We explore parameters related to the depth and temporal history of fluid injection, fluid

  20. Acerca de la propuesta "Caldera de Ñireco" en el centro-oeste de los Andes Neuquinos (38º50'S - 70º50'O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio F González Díaz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available En el tramo austral del alto estructural de Copahue-Pino Hachado, a la latitud de la cuenca lacustre Moquehue-Aluminé y cercanías del límite argentino-chileno, ha sido distinguido un conjunto anómalo de nueve calderas resultantes de la actividad volcánica del Plioceno-Cuaternario. La "caldera de Ñireco", parte integrante de este conjunto, es motivo del presente trabajo. Los autores objetan el reconocimiento de tal componente morfoestructural a partir de un análisis geomorfológico, estructural y estratigráfico del área. A partir de ello, se reconoce una correspondencia entre los propuestos límites de dicha caldera, y la situación de los principales valles resultantes del proceso erosivo fluvial, cuyo desarrollo estuvo controlado por fallas inversas y lineamientos regionales. No existen evidencias que faciliten el reconocimiento de un aparato volcánico que teóricamente albergue la sugerida depresión caldérica, o remanentes de sus flancos externos e internos. En el sector central de la propuesta "caldera de Ñireco" se dan las mayores alturas topográficas de la región (± 2.900 m s.n.m., valores que superan ampliamente a los de la Cordillera Principal a estas latitudes. La estratigrafía local de la propuesta área de la caldera está compuesta esencialmente por las rocas más antiguas de la zona (granitoides del Paleozoico superior y secuencias volcánicas y volcaniclásticas del Triásico y no guarda coincidencia temporal alguna con la actividad volcánica del Plioceno-Cuaternario, la que se halla bien representada inmediatamente al norte y sur del sector analizado. La zona de estudio se enmarca por el contrario dentro de una faja plegada y corrida de piel gruesa y vergencia occidental, en donde la inversión tectónica jugó un rol central.

  1. Distribution, population structure, reproduction and diet of Ophiolimna antarctica (Lyman, 1879) from Kemp Caldera in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschen, Rachel E.; Tyler, Paul A.; Copley, Jonathan T.

    2013-08-01

    A new population of Ophiolimna antarctica (Lyman, 1879) was discovered at 1546 m in Kemp Caldera, a topographic feature with active hydrothermal venting at the southern end of the South Sandwich Islands, Southern Ocean. The distribution, population structure, reproduction, and diet of O. antarctica were investigated. O. antarctica were found predominantly on basalt with an over-dispersed distribution. The mean density was 17 individuals m-2 with a range of 9-24 individuals m-2. There was a bimodal population structure, with separate juvenile and adult peaks. Sexes were separate and the sex ratio was not significantly different from equality. The maximum oocyte diameter was 520 μm, suggesting direct or lecithotrophic development, whilst individual females reproduced asynchronously. Stomach contents included crustacean fragments, flocculate material, diatoms, forams, fish scales, and ophiuroid tissues and spines, which was indicative of omnivory. There was no apparent influence of hydrothermal vents <500 m away on the diet of Ophiolimna antarctica. The ecology of Ophiolimna antarctica is consistent with what is known for other Antarctic and deep-sea ophiuroid species.

  2. Radiogenic Heat Production in the Gölcük Caldera and Direkli, Isparta Angle (Southwest Anatolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayten Uyanık, Nurten; Öncü, Ziya; Akkurt, İskender

    2016-04-01

    The radiogenic heat is one of the important parameter due to the radioactivity has existed since beginning of universe as prediction of Big-Bang theory. In this study the radiogenic heat production of the Gölcük caldera and Direkli fields of the Isparta-Turkey, has been investigated. Total of 1390 data were obtained in the study area. The study area is included of the Gölcük volcanism and its around that is located in Isparta province of Turkey's Mediterranean region. The Gölcük volcanism is a young volcanism. Around this volcanism the andesite, trachy andesite, tuff, pumice and such a geological units is available. The data were collected using in-situ measurements with gamm-ray spectrometer. These measurements were covered natural radioactive elements (Uranium U, Thorium Th and Potassium K). Radiogenic heat production values were calculated using the literature relationships and in-situ measurement values of these radioactive elements. Radiogenic heat map of study area were obtained using radiogenic heat production values. In the map the red zone areas shows highest heat values while green zones areas of the map presents lowest heat values. Key words: Radioactive elements, radiogenic heat, map, Gölcük-Direkli(Isparta), Turkey

  3. Aquifer Recharge Estimation through Atmospheric Chloride Mass Balance at Las Cañadas Caldera, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayco Marrero-Diaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric chloride mass balance (CMB method was used to estimate net aquifer recharge in Las Cañadas Caldera, an endorheic summit aquifer area about 2000 m a.s.l. with negligible surface runoff, which hosts the largest freshwater reserve in Tenerife Island, Canary Islands, Spain. The wet hydrological year 2005–2006 was selected to compare yearly atmospheric chloride bulk deposition and average chloride content in recharge water just above the water table, both deduced from periodical sampling. The potential contribution of chloride to groundwater from endogenous HCl gas may invalidate the CMB method. The chloride-to-bromide molar ratio was an efficient tracer used to select recharge water samples having atmospheric origin of chloride. Yearly net aquifer recharge was 631 mm year−1, i.e., 69% of yearly precipitation. This result is in agreement with potential aquifer recharge estimated through an independent lumped-parameter rainfall-runoff model operated by the Insular Water Council of Tenerife. This paper illustrates basic procedures and routines to use the CMB method for aquifer recharge in active volcanic oceanic islands having sparse-data coverage and groundwater receiving contribution of endogenous halides.

  4. Task 3: Evaluation of mineral resource potential, caldera geology, and volcano-tectonic framework at and near Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Larson, L.T. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This report summarizes the work of Task 3 that was initially discussed in our monthly reports for the period October 1, 1993 through September 30, 1994, and is contained in our various papers and abstracts, both published and in press or currently in review. Our efforts during this period have involved the continuation of studies begun prior to October, 1993, focussed mainly on aspects of the caldera geology, magmatic activity, hydrothermal mineralization and extensional tectonics of the western and central parts of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF), studies of the subsurface rocks of Yucca Mountain utilizing drill-hole sampled obtained in 1991 and 1992, and studies of veins and siliceous ledges cropping out in northwestern Yucca Mountain. These veins and ledges provide evidence for near-surface hydrothermal activity in northwestern Yucca Mountain during the Crater Flat Tuff period of volcanism. During the period of this report we have concentrated our efforts on the production and publication of documents summarizing many of the data, interpretations and conclusions of Task 3 studies pertaining to hydrothermal activity and mineralization in the Yucca Mountain region and their relations to volcanism and tectonic activity. The resulting two manuscripts for journal publication and a compilation of radiometric age and trace-element geochemical data are appended to this report.

  5. Near real-time monitoring of volcanic surface deformation from GPS measurements at Long Valley Caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kang Hyeun; Herring, Thomas A.; Llenos, Andrea L.

    2013-03-01

    Long Valley Caldera in eastern California is an active volcanic area and has shown continued unrest in the last three decades. We have monitored surface deformation from Global Positioning System (GPS) data by using a projection method that we call Targeted Projection Operator (TPO). TPO projects residual time series with secular rates and periodic terms removed onto a predefined spatial pattern. We used the 2009-2010 slow deflation as a target spatial pattern. The resulting TPO time series shows a detailed deformation history including the 2007-2009 inflation, the 2009-2010 deflation, and a recent inflation that started in late-2011 and is continuing at the present time (November 2012). The recent inflation event is about four times faster than the previous 2007-2009 event. A Mogi source of the recent event is located beneath the resurgent dome at about 6.6 km depth at a rate of 0.009 km3/yr volume change. TPO is simple and fast and can provide a near real-time continuous monitoring tool without directly looking at all the data from many GPS sites in this potentially eruptive volcanic system.

  6. Mechanisms and timescales of generating eruptible rhyolitic magmas at Yellowstone caldera from zircon and sanidine geochronology and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelten, Mark; Cooper, Kari M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Glessner, Justin G

    2015-01-01

    We constrain the physical nature of the magma reservoir and the mechanisms of rhyolite generation at Yellowstone caldera via detailed characterization of zircon and sanidine crystals hosted in three rhyolites erupted during the (ca. 170 – 70 ka) Central Plateau Member eruptive episode – the most recent post-caldera magmatism at Yellowstone. We present 238U-230Th crystallization ages and trace-element compositions of the interiors and surfaces (i.e., unpolished rims) of individual zircon crystals from each rhyolite. We compare these zircon data to 238U- 230Th crystallization ages of bulk sanidine separates coupled with chemical and isotopic data from single sanidine crystals. Zircon age and trace-element data demonstrate that the magma reservoir that sourced the Central Plateau Member rhyolites was long-lived (150 – 250 kyr) and genetically related to the preceding episode of magmatism, which occurred ca. 256 ka. The interiors of most zircons in each rhyolite were inherited from unerupted material related to older stages of Central Plateau Member magmatism or the preceding late Upper Basin Member magmatism (i.e., are antecrysts). Conversely, most zircon surfaces crystallized near the time of eruption from their host liquids (i.e., are autocrystic). The repeated recycling of zircon interiors from older stages of magmatism demonstrates that sequentially erupted Central Plateau Member rhyolites are genetically related. Sanidine separates from each rhyolite yield 238U-230Th crystallization ages at or near the eruption age of their host magmas, coeval with the coexisting zircon surfaces, but are younger than the coexisting zircon interiors. Chemical and isotopic data from single sanidine crystals demonstrate that the sanidines in each rhyolite are in equilibrium with their host melts, which considered along with their near-eruption crystallization ages suggests that nearly all CPM sanidines are autocrystic. The paucity of antecrystic sanidine crystals relative to

  7. 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb Ages and Isotopic Data for Oligocene Ignimbrites, Calderas, and Granitic Plutons, Southern Stillwater Range and Clan Alpine Mountains: Insights into the Volcanic-Plutonic Connection and Crustal Evolution in Western Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, D. A.; Watts, K. E.; Henry, C.; Colgan, J. P.; Cousens, B.

    2014-12-01

    Calderas in the southern Stillwater Range (SSR) and Clan Alpine Mountains (CAM) were formed during the mid-Tertiary ignimbrite flareup and subsequently tilted (40->90°) by large-magnitude extension. New geologic mapping, geochemistry, and 40Ar/39Ar and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating document 2 periods of magmatism resulting in 4 nested calderas and related granitoid plutons in sections up to 10 km thick. The first period included pre-caldera rhyolite lava domes (30(?) Ma), ~5 km of pre- and post-collapse intermediate lavas and rhyolite tuff that filled the Job Canyon caldera (~29.4 to 28.8 Ma), and the >4-5 km thick, geochemically similar IXL pluton (28.9±0.4 Ma) that intruded the Job Canyon caldera. The second period included pre-caldera rhyolite lava domes and dikes (~25.5 Ma) and 3 ignimbrite units in 3 calderas: tuff of the Louderback Mountains (low-silica rhyolite; ≥600 m thick; ~25.2 Ma); tuff of Poco Canyon (high-silica rhyolite; up to 4.3 km thick; 25.27±0.05 Ma); and ≥2000 km3 tuff of Elevenmile Canyon (trachydacite to rhyolite; up to 4.5 km thick; 25.12±0.01 Ma). The composite Freeman Creek pluton (granite, 24.8±0.4 Ma; granodiorite, 25.0±0.2 Ma) and Chalk Mountain rhyolite porphyry (25.2±0.2 Ma) and granite (24.8±0.3 Ma) plutons intruded the Poco Canyon and Elevenmile Canyon calderas. Early (30 Ma) rhyolites have the least radiogenic compositions (Sri~0.7040), whereas other units are relatively homogeneous (Sri~0.7050, ENd~0.0). Oxygen isotope compositions for SSR and CAM calderas are highly variable (d18Oquartz=5.6-8.2‰, d18Osanidine=5.5-7.0‰, d18Ozircon= 4.1-6.3‰), corresponding to a magmatic range of 5.7-7.9‰. U-Pb dating of zircons indicates homogeneous age populations and few/no xenocrysts and antecrysts. These data show that (1) thick plutons (>2-5 km) underlie compositionally and temporally related caldera-filling ignimbrites, (2) caldera-forming cycles are isotopically variable, requiring divergent magmatic sources in relatively

  8. The predominance of post-wildfire erosion in the long-term denudation of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, Caitlin A.; Pelletier, Jon D.

    2016-05-01

    Wildfires can dramatically increase erosion rates over time scales on the order of several years, yet few data firmly constrain the relative importance of post-wildfire erosion in the long-term denudation of landscapes. We tested the hypothesis that wildfire-affected erosion is responsible for a large majority of long-term denudation in the uplands of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, by quantifying erosion rates in wildfire-affected and non-wildfire-affected watersheds over short (~100-101 years) time scales using suspended sediment loads, multitemporal terrestrial laser scanning, and airborne laser scanning and over long (~103-106 years) time scales using 10Be inventories and incision into a dated paleosurface. We found that following the Las Conchas fire in 2011, mean watershed-averaged erosion rates were more than 1000 µm yr-1, i.e., ~103-105 times higher than nearby unburned watersheds of similar area, relief, and lithology. Long-term denudation rates are on the order of 10-100 µm yr-1. Combining data for wildfire-affected and non-wildfire-affected erosion rates into a long-term denudation rate budget, we found that wildfire-affected erosion is responsible for at least 90% of denudation over geologic time scales in our study area despite the fact that such conditions occur only at a small fraction of the time. Monte Carlo analyses demonstrate that this conclusion is robust with respect to uncertainties in the rates and time scales used in the calculations.

  9. Cultivation and complete genome sequencing of Gloeobacter kilaueensis sp. nov., from a lava cave in Kilauea Caldera, Hawai'i.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy H W Saw

    Full Text Available The ancestor of Gloeobacter violaceus PCC 7421(T is believed to have diverged from that of all known cyanobacteria before the evolution of thylakoid membranes and plant plastids. The long and largely independent evolutionary history of G. violaceus presents an organism retaining ancestral features of early oxygenic photoautotrophs, and in whom cyanobacteria evolution can be investigated. No other Gloeobacter species has been described since the genus was established in 1974 (Rippka et al., Arch Microbiol 100:435. Gloeobacter affiliated ribosomal gene sequences have been reported in environmental DNA libraries, but only the type strain's genome has been sequenced. However, we report here the cultivation of a new Gloeobacter species, G. kilaueensis JS1(T, from an epilithic biofilm in a lava cave in Kīlauea Caldera, Hawai'i. The strain's genome was sequenced from an enriched culture resembling a low-complexity metagenomic sample, using 9 kb paired-end 454 pyrosequences and 400 bp paired-end Illumina reads. The JS1(T and G. violaceus PCC 7421(T genomes have little gene synteny despite sharing 2842 orthologous genes; comparing the genomes shows they do not belong to the same species. Our results support establishing a new species to accommodate JS1(T, for which we propose the name Gloeobacter kilaueensis sp. nov. Strain JS1(T has been deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (BAA-2537, the Scottish Marine Institute's Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa (CCAP 1431/1, and the Belgian Coordinated Collections of Microorganisms (ULC0316. The G. kilaueensis holotype has been deposited in the Algal Collection of the US National Herbarium (US# 217948. The JS1(T genome sequence has been deposited in GenBank under accession number CP003587. The G+C content of the genome is 60.54 mol%. The complete genome sequence of G. kilaueensis JS1(T may further understanding of cyanobacteria evolution, and the shift from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis.

  10. A coupled hydrothermal and mechanical model for estimating thermo-poroelastic deformation, gravity and magnetic changes in calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco, A.; Gottsmann, J.; Whitaker, F.; Rust, A.; Currenti, G. M.; Jasim, A.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing integration of satellite and ground-based geophysical observations in volcanic areas has dramatically enhanced our ability to detect and track complex processes that can be difficult to reconcile with models of elastic mechanical behavior of upper crust. This study uses a thermo-poroelastic model to evaluate ground deformation, magnetic and gravity changes caused by hydrothermal fluid circulation and pressurization of magma chambers, in which surface topography, crustal heterogeneities and the presence of faults are taken into account. We develop a numerical framework for more realistic assessment of geophysical observations associated with volcanic processes, with particular focus on calderas. The numerical model is fully coupled with TOUGH2, a commercial software simulating multi-phase and multi-component fluid flow and heat transfer. The two-way coupling is performed through: (i) the concept of effective stress, which is controlled by pore pressure and thermal expansion, and (ii) empirical expressions for porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure, which are dependent on the effective stress. The model is applied to Campi Flegrei to simulate a generic unrest period caused by a deep injection of hot water and CO2. Vertical uplift reaches 12 cm in 3 years, with associated thermomagnetic variations of c. 14 nT and gravity changes of c. 210 μGal, comparable to those observed during the 1982-84 bradyseism. Gravity and magnetic signals continuously increase for 2 years and approach steady state after 2.5 years. The contribution of thermal effects to total ground deformation is almost negligible in the first 3 years, but reaches half of the total after 15 years, and is dominant after 35 years. We also simulated the presence of faults and the contribution of a deeper magma chamber pressurization, which affect considerably the sub-surface circulation, and consequently the geophysical changes at the surface.

  11. Monitoring CO2 emissions in tree kill areas near the resurgent dome at Long Valley Caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfeld, D.; Evans, William C.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of yearly measurements of the diffuse CO2 flux and shallow soil temperatures collected since 2006 across two sets of tree-kill areas at Long Valley Caldera, California. These data provide background information about CO2 discharge during a period with moderate seismicity, but little to no deformation. The tree kills are located at long-recognized areas of weak thermal fluid upflow, but have expanded in recent years, possibly in response to geothermal fluid production at Casa Diablo. The amount of CO2 discharged from the older kill area at Basalt Canyon is fairly constant and is around 3-5 tonnes of CO2 per day from an area of about 15,000 m2. The presence of isobutane in gas samples from sites in and around Basalt Canyon suggests that geothermal fluid production directly effects fluid upflow in the region close to the power plant. The average fluxes at Shady Rest are lower than average fluxes at Basalt Canyon, but the area affected by fluid upflow is larger. Total CO2 discharged from the central portion of the kill area at Shady Rest has been variable, ranging from 6 to11 tonnes per day across 61,000 m2. Gas collected at Shady Rest contains no detectable isobutane to link emissions chemically to geothermal fluid production, but two samples from 2009-10 have detectable H2S and suggest an increasing geothermal character of emitted gas. The appearance of this gas at the surface may signal increased drawdown of water levels near the geothermal productions wells.

  12. Shallow sub-surface structure of the central volcanic complex of Tenerife, Canary Islands: implications for the evolution and the recent reactivation of the Las Canadas caldera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new local Bouguer anomaly map of the Central Volcanic Complex (CVC) of Tenerife, Spain. The high-density core of the CVC and the pronounced gravity low centred in the Las Canadas caldera (LCC) in greater detail than previously available. Mathematical construction of a subsurface model from the local anomaly data, employing a 3-D inversion enables mapping of the shallow structure beneath the complex, giving unprecedented insights into the sub-surface architecture of the complex, and shedding light on its evolution.

  13. Investigations of volcanic and earthquake-related deformation: Observations and models from Long Valley Caldera, northwestern Peloponnese, and northwestern Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lujia

    2011-12-01

    The advent of Global Positioning System (GPS) has revolutionized geodesy with high accuracy, fast speed, simple use, and low cost. This dissertation investigates three topics on volcano and earthquake-related deformation using GPS measurements and models to demonstrate the power of the new generation of geodetic methods. The three topics include the 2002-2003 continued episodic inflation at Long Valley Caldera in eastern California, the coseismic and postseismic response of the energetic 2008 MW 6.4 Achaia-Elia Earthquake in northwest Peloponnese, Greece, and the interseismic megathrust coupling and forearc sliver transport near the Nicoya Peninsula in northwest Costa Rica.

  14. Rendimiento térmico de calderas bagaceras modernas en Tucumán, R. Argentina Thermal efficiency of modern bagasse boilers in Tucumán, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico J. Franck Colombres

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron tres calderas de vapor modernas instaladas en ingenios azucareros de Tucumán, R. Argentina, equipos que se encuadran dentro de las tecnologías de producción más limpia. Tomando como base la metodología de cálculo de la eficiencia térmica de generadores de vapor desarrollada en 2008 por la Sección Ingeniería y Proyectos Agroindustriales de la Estación Experimental Agroindustrial Obispo Colombres, y a partir de los datos recolectados por medio de mediciones y balances de materia y energía, se determinaron sus principales variables características de operación. Las eficiencias energéticas determinadas para cada una fueron del 73,5%; 75,2% y 77,3%. Se realizó además una comparación con las calderas de vapor convencionales y se determinó el ahorro de bagazo que puede obtenerse con las calderas modernas, el cual resultó ser de un 27,6%. Como una ventaja adicional, se hace mención a la posibilidad de mejora del rendimiento térmico del ciclo motriz de la planta, que viene acompañada con el aumento de la presión de trabajo de la caldera.Three modern steam boilers, installed in sugar mills in Tucumán, R. Argentina, to attain a cleaner production, were evaluated. Their major operating variables were determined using the methodology for calculating thermal efficiency of steam generators developed by Sección Ingeniería y Proyectos Agroindustriales of Estación Experimental Agroindustrial Obispo Colombres in 2008, and data obtained from measurements and material and energy balances. Energy efficiency values determined for each boiler were 73.5%, 75.2% and 77.3%, respectively. A comparison with conventional steam boilers was drawn and it was found that bagasse savings amounted to about 27.6% when modern boilers were used. The possibility of improving the thermal efficiency of the plant cycle by increasing boiler pressure is mentioned as an additional advantage.

  15. Rendimiento térmico de calderas bagaceras modernas en Tucumán, R. Argentina Thermal efficiency of modern bagasse boilers in Tucumán, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Federico J. Franck Colombres; Marcos A. Golato; Walter D. Morales; Carolina Cruz; Dora Paz

    2011-01-01

    Se evaluaron tres calderas de vapor modernas instaladas en ingenios azucareros de Tucumán, R. Argentina, equipos que se encuadran dentro de las tecnologías de producción más limpia. Tomando como base la metodología de cálculo de la eficiencia térmica de generadores de vapor desarrollada en 2008 por la Sección Ingeniería y Proyectos Agroindustriales de la Estación Experimental Agroindustrial Obispo Colombres, y a partir de los datos recolectados por medio de mediciones y balances de materia y ...

  16. Warm brine lakes in craters of active mud volcanoes, Menes caldera off NW Egypt: evidence for deep-rooted thermogenic processes

    OpenAIRE

    Dupre, Stephanie; Mascle, Jean; Foucher, Jean-Paul; Harmegnies, Francois; Woodside, John; Pierre, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The Menes caldera is a fault-controlled depression (~8 km in diameter) at ~3,000 m water depth in the western province of the Nile deep-sea fan off NW Egypt, comprising seven mud volcanoes (MVs) of which two are active. Based on multichannel and chirp seismic data, temperature profiles, and high-resolution bathymetric data collected during the 2000 Fanil, 2004 Mimes and 2007 Medeco2 expeditions, the present study investigates factors controlling MV morphology, the geometry of feeder channels,...

  17. Shallow sub-surface structure of the central volcanic complex of Tenerife, Canary Islands: implications for the evolution and the recent reactivation of the Las Canadas caldera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottsmann, J [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queens Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Camacho, A G; Fernandez, J [Instituto de Astronomia y Geodesia (CSIC-UCM), Ciudad Universitaria, Pza. de Ciencias, 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain); MartI, J [Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' , CSIC, Lluis Sole SabarIs s/n, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Wooller, L; Rymer, H [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); GarcIa, A [Department of Volcanology, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, C/ Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: j.gottsmann@bristol.ac.uk

    2008-10-01

    We present a new local Bouguer anomaly map of the Central Volcanic Complex (CVC) of Tenerife, Spain. The high-density core of the CVC and the pronounced gravity low centred in the Las Canadas caldera (LCC) in greater detail than previously available. Mathematical construction of a subsurface model from the local anomaly data, employing a 3-D inversion enables mapping of the shallow structure beneath the complex, giving unprecedented insights into the sub-surface architecture of the complex, and shedding light on its evolution.

  18. Caldera La Peligrosa (47º15´S, 71°40´O: un evento clave en la Provincia Silícea Chon Aike

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Sruoga

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available En el área ubicada entre el lago Ghío y la sierra Colorada, en la Cordillera Patagónica Austral, aflora una secuencia piroclástico- lávica de carácter proximal correspondiente al Complejo El Quemado, de edad jurásica tardía. A partir del análisis integrado de litofacies y estructuras se llevó a cabo la reconstrucción de la arquitectura volcánica. Se han reconocido cuatro litofacies ignimbríticas y una litofacies lávico-hipabisal de composición riolítica, cuyo emplazamiento estuvo controlado por un sistema de fallas transtensionales de orientación NNO predominante. Se propone un modelo de evolución de la caldera La Peligrosa en tres etapas:1 pre-colapso, durante la cual se define una zona dilatante propicia para la formación de la caldera, con incipiente fallamiento en bloques, 2 colapso, cuando ocurre el emplazamiento de potentes ignimbritas cristalinas y megabrechas en una cubeta de subsidencia progresiva, controlada por un régimen transtensional con dirección de extensión NE y 3 post-colapso, durante la cual se produce el derrame de lavas junto con la intrusión de cuerpos dómicos, bajo condiciones de extensión oblicua con dirección de extensión NO. El pasaje de un ambiente transtensional a condiciones de extensión oblicua acompañó las últimas etapas del desarrollo de la caldera representando un notable cambio en las condiciones de la deformación en tiempos jurásicos. La formación y desarrollo de la caldera La Peligrosa puede ser considerada como un evento clave para entender los mecanismos eruptivos del vasto volcanismo ignimbrítico de la Provincia Silícea Chon Aike.

  19. Incorporating surface indicators of reservoir permeability into reservoir volume calculations: Application to the Colli Albani caldera and the Central Italy Geothermal Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Guido; De Benedetti, Arnaldo Angelo; Bonamico, Andrea; Ramazzotti, Paolo; Mattei, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The Quaternary Roman Volcanic Province extends for over 200 km along the Tyrrhenian margin of the Italian peninsula and is composed of several caldera complexes with significant associated geothermal potential. In spite of the massive programs of explorations conducted by the then state-owned ENEL and AGIP companies between the 1970s and 1990s, and the identification of several high enthalpy fields, this resource remains so far unexploited, although it occurs right below the densely populated metropolitan area of Roma capital city. The main reason for this failure is that deep geothermal reservoirs are associated with fractured rocks, the secondary permeability of which has been difficult to predict making the identification of the most productive volumes of the reservoirs and the localisation of productive wells uncertain. As a consequence, almost half of the many exploration deep bore-holes drilled in the area reached a dry target. This work reviews available data and re-assesses the geothermal potential of caldera-related systems in Central Italy, by analysing in detail the case of the Colli Albani caldera system, the closest to Roma capital city. A GIS based approach identifies the most promising reservoir volumes for geothermal exploitation and uses an improved volume method approach for the evaluation of geothermal potential. The approach is based on a three dimensional matrix of georeferenced spatial data; the A axis accounts for the modelling of the depth of the top of the reservoirs based on geophysical and direct data; the B axis accounts for the thermal modelling of the crust (i.e. T with depth) based on measured thermal gradients. Both A and B data are necessary but not sufficient to identify rock volumes actually permeated by geothermal fluids in fractured reservoirs. We discuss the implementation of a C axis that evaluates all surface data indicating permeability in the reservoir and actual geothermal fluid circulation. We consider datasets on: i

  20. An integrated multidisciplinary re-evaluation of the geothermal system at Valles Caldera, New Mexico, using an immersive three-dimensional (3D) visualization environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, A.; Bennett, S. E.; Wildgoose, M.; Cantwell, C.; Elliott, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    We describe an approach to explore the spatial relationships of a geothermal resource by examining diverse geological, geophysical, and geochemical data sets using the immersive 3-dimensional (3D) visualization capabilities of the UC Davis Keck Center for Active Visualization in the Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES). The KeckCAVES is a facility where stereoscopic images are projected onto four, surfaces (three walls and a floor), which the user perceives as a seamless 3D image of the data. The user can manipulate and interact with the data, allowing a more intuitive interpretation of data set relationships than is possible with traditional 2-dimensional techniques. We incorporate multiple data sets of the geothermal system at Valles Caldera, New Mexico: topography, lithology, faults, temperature, alteration mineralogy, and magnetotellurics. With the ability to rapidly and intuitively observe data relationships, we are able to efficiently and rapidly draw conclusions about the subsurface architecture of the Valles Caldera geothermal system. We identify two high-temperature anomalies, one that corresponds with normal faults along the western caldera ring fracture, and one that with the resurgent dome. A cold-temperature anomaly identified adjacent to the resurgent dome high-temperature anomaly appears to relate to a fault controlled graben valley that acts as a recharge zone, likely funneling cold meteoric water into the subsurface along normal faults observed on published maps and cross sections. These high-temperature anomalies broadly correspond to subsurface regions where previous magnetotelluric studies have identified low apparent resistivity. Existing hot springs in the Sulfur Springs area correspond to the only location where our modeled 100°C isotherm intersects the ground surface. Correlation between the first occurrence of key alteration minerals (pyrite, chlorite, epidote) in previously drilled boreholes and our temperature model vary, with chlorite showing a

  1. Análisis y caracterización de la combustión de pélets en una caldera Solarfocus TII30 de llama invertida

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban González, Irene

    2014-01-01

    En el presente TFG, se han realizado ensayos de combustión con ocho muestras de pélets diferentes en una instalación térmica con una caldera Solarfocus de 30kW. La finalidad es establecer una relación entre el tipo de pélet y la combustión desde el punto de vista de la eficiencia energética y las emisiones contaminantes. Experimentalmente, se examina la evolución de algunos parámetros de la caldera, como la temperatura de los humos o el coeficiente de aire. Esto permite establecer el perio...

  2. The role of magma mixing and mafic recharge in the evolution of a back-arc quaternary caldera: The case of Payún Matrú, Western Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, Irene Raquel; Petrinovic, Ivan Alejandro; Llambías, Eduardo Jorge; D'Elia, Leandro; González, Pablo Diego; Aragón, Eugenio

    2016-02-01

    The Quaternary Payún Matrú volcano is a long-lived edifice that developed a summit caldera 8 km wide, with abundant pre- and post-caldera volcanic activity. It is the main volcano of the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field, which is located in the back-arc Payenia Basaltic Province, at mid-western Argentina. The composition of Payún Matrú is mainly trachytic, with lesser amounts of trachyandesitic and basaltic trachyandesitic lavas. The Payún Matrú Volcanic Field includes also the Payún Liso stratovolcano and more than 200 monogenetic basaltic cones and associated lava flows that are located east and west of the caldera. The aim of this work is to show the Payún Matrú evolution based on the mineralogical and textural characterization and to make inferences on the trigger mechanism for the explosive eruption which leads to the caldera formation. Some intermediate lavas and trachytes include phenocrysts with contrasting textures and composition, such as inverse zoning in plagioclase and clinopyroxenes, sieved plagioclases with a more calcic rim and calcic plagioclases with a more sodic rim, indicating that they could not have formed together and suggesting magma mixing processes. In addition, a few lavas show mafic enclaves or texturally different groundmasses with fluidal contacts, indicating mingling between two magmas. These lavas are found in the pre-caldera stage and the early post-caldera stage of Payún Matrú. The trachytic pyroclastic deposits related to the caldera collapse do not exhibit evidence of hybridization, although they present a minor proportion of dissolved feldspars and biotite replaced by anhydrous minerals, suggesting that a restricted zone of the chamber was reheated. This may be explained by a mafic recharge event where part of the host trachytic magma was heated, but without a complete homogenization between the host and recharging magmas. These features, in addition to the abundant basaltic volcanism east and west of the caldera, suggest

  3. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tuff vents in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy): Toward a new chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the Holocene volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, L.; Insinga, D.D.; Calvert, A.T.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Campi Flegrei hosts numerous monogenetic vents inferred to be younger than the 15 ka Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. Sanidine crystals from the three young Campi Flegrei vents of Fondi di Baia, Bacoli and Nisida were dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. These vents, together with several other young edifices, occur roughly along the inner border of the Campi Flegrei caldera, suggesting that the volcanic conduits are controlled by caldera-bounding faults. Plateau ages of ∼9.6 ka (Fondi di Baia), ∼8.6 ka (Bacoli) and ∼3.9 ka (Nisida) indicate eruptive activity during intervals previously interpreted as quiescent. A critical revision, involving calendar age correction of literature 14C data and available 40Ar/39Ar age data, is presented. A new reference chronostratigraphic framework for Holocene Phlegrean activity, which significantly differs from the previously adopted ones, is proposed. This has important implications for understanding the Campi Flegrei eruptive history and, ultimately, for the evaluation of related volcanic risk and hazard, for which the inferred history of its recent activity is generally taken into account.

  4. El capitán Miguel Caldera y la frontera chichimeca: entre el mestizo historiográfico y el soldado del rey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz Guadalajara, Juan Carlos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to examine critically the image that contemporary historiography has built around the figure of Captain Miguel Caldera. In contrast, it shows aspects that bring us closer to his Hispanic identity, to his role as a member of the militia in the service of Philip II of Spain and to the part he played as an instrument of domination and in the disappearance of the nomads of the Chichimecan frontier. It also contributes to the discussion of frontier cultural development in the context of the Hispanic monarchy’s expansion in the 16th century.

    Este artículo intenta un acercamiento crítico a la imagen que la historiografía contemporánea ha construido en torno a la figura del capitán Miguel Caldera. Muestra, en contraste, elementos que nos aproximan a su identidad hispánica, a su papel como miliciano al servicio de Felipe II y a su función como vehículo de la dominación y desaparición de los nómadas de la frontera chichimeca. También pretende aportar elementos de discusión sobre el proceso cultural fronterizo en el ámbito de la expansión de la monarquía hispánica en el siglo XVI.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tuff vents in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy): toward a new chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the Holocene volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, L.; Insinga, D. D.; Calvert, A. T.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.

    2011-11-01

    The Campi Flegrei hosts numerous monogenetic vents inferred to be younger than the 15 ka Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. Sanidine crystals from the three young Campi Flegrei vents of Fondi di Baia, Bacoli and Nisida were dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. These vents, together with several other young edifices, occur roughly along the inner border of the Campi Flegrei caldera, suggesting that the volcanic conduits are controlled by caldera-bounding faults. Plateau ages of ˜9.6 ka (Fondi di Baia), ˜8.6 ka (Bacoli) and ˜3.9 ka (Nisida) indicate eruptive activity during intervals previously interpreted as quiescent. A critical revision, involving calendar age correction of literature 14C data and available 40Ar/39Ar age data, is presented. A new reference chronostratigraphic framework for Holocene Phlegrean activity, which significantly differs from the previously adopted ones, is proposed. This has important implications for understanding the Campi Flegrei eruptive history and, ultimately, for the evaluation of related volcanic risk and hazard, for which the inferred history of its recent activity is generally taken into account.

  6. Probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment related to underwater explosions in the Campi Flegrei caldera: Gulfs of Napoli and Pozzuoli (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvrova, Martina; Selva, Jacopo; Paris, Raphael; Brizuela, Beatriz; Costa, Antonio; Grezio, Anita; Lorito, Stefano; Tonini, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Tsunami caused by underwater volcanic explosions are typically characterized by short period waves and greater dispersion compared to tsunami generated by earthquakes, and the impact in the far-field is often limited. However, the effect of dispersion is reduced for underwater explosions occurring in shallow-water environments, as the length-to-depth ratio of the waves rapidly increase, and runup inland can be locally high. This effect was particularly illustrated by the 19 m runup at Karymsky Lake, Kamchatka, in 1996 (Belousov et al., 2010; Ulvrova et al., 2014). Hazards related to underwater volcanic explosions are challenging to evaluate and might be underestimated in some cases. In this study we consider different scenarios of explosions in the offshore part of the Campi Flegrei (Phlegraean Fields) caldera in the Pozzuoli - Naples region (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy). The onshore eruptive history of the caldera is well documented (e.g. Orsi et al., 2004), but past and future activity offshore has been rarely discussed. The probability for eruptions in the submarine part of the caldera is perhaps low (Selva et al., 2012), but scenarios of tsunamis generated by underwater explosions and their impact in the proximal field (Bay of Pozzuoli) and far field (Bay of Naples) deserve to be considered due to high population density in the adjacent coastal areas. Initial surface displacement is estimated as a function of explosion energy at a given depth. We study 17 different potential vent locations within the Pozzuoli Bay, and 3 different vent radii (200 m, 650 m and 900 m), corresponding to the three representative eruptive scenarios identified in Orsi et al. (2009) and Selva et al. (2010). We then use these sources in a Bayesian Event Tree framework, following the procedure defined in Selva et al. (2010), in order to evaluate a first order Probabilistic Hazard Analysis for this type of tsunami sources for the Gulfs of Napoli and Pozzuoli. Belousov A., Voight B., Belousova M

  7. Magma Chamber Model of Batur Caldera, Bali, Indonesia: Compositional Variation of Two Facies, Large-Volume Dacitic Ignimbrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igan S. Sutawidjaja

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.2.2.111-124Batur is one of the finest known calderas on Earth, and is the source of at least two major ignimbrite eruptions with a combined volume of some 84 km3 and 19 km3. These ignimbrites have a similar compositions, raising the question of whether they are geneticaly related. The Batur Ignimbrite-1 (BI-1 is crystal poor, containing rhyodacitic (68 - 70wt % SiO2, white to grey pumices and partly welded and unwelded. The overlying Batur Ignimbrite-2 (BI-2 is a homogeneous grey to black dacitic pumices (64 - 66 wt % SiO2, unwelded and densely welded (40 - 60% vesicularity, crystal and lithic rich. Phase equilibria indicate that the Batur magma equilibrated at temperatures of 1100 - 1300oC with melt water contents of 3 - 6 wt%. The post-eruptive Batur magma was cooler (<1100oC and it is melt more water rich (> 6 wt % H2O. A pressure of 20 kbar is infered from mineral barometry for the Batur magma chamber. Magmatic chamber model is one in which crystals and melt separate from a convecting Batur magma by density differences, resulting in a stratified magma chamber with a homogeneous central zone, a crystal-rich accumulation zone near the walls or base, and a buoyant, melt-rich zone near the top. This is consistent with the estimated magma temperatures and densities: the pre-eruptive BI-1 magma was hoter (1300oC and more volatile rich (6 wt % H2O with density 2.25 g/cm3 than the BI-2 magma (1200oC; 4 wt % H2O in density was higher (2.50 g/cm3. Batur melt characteristics and intensive parameters are consistent with a volatile oversaturation-driven eruption. However, the higher H2O content, high viscosity and low crystal content of the BI-1 magma imply an external eruption trigger.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Hydrometeorological Conditions in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico during the North American Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez-Barroso, L. A.; Rinehart, A. J.; Aragon, C. A.; Bisht, G.; Cardenas, M. B.; Engle, E.; Forman, B.; Frisbee, M.; Gutierrez-Jurado, H. A.; Hong, S.; Tai, K.; Wyckoff, R. L.; Vivoni, E. R.

    2005-12-01

    The hydrometeorological conditions of mountain environments in semiarid regions are poorly understood, particularly during the North American Monsoon. Although it is well known that the climate and hydrology of mountain ranges are dynamically distinct of surrounding lowlands, little quantitative observational data has been collected to assess the spatial and temporal variations in hydrometeorological conditions in these settings. Factors such as topographic position, vegetation type and soil properties have a strong influence on the hydrological response to atmospheric conditions. Similarly, landscape features such as relief and aspect can play a major role on the local meteorological conditions in mountainous environments. In order to better understand the relation between mountain hydrometeorology and topographic and ecological factors, a spatially extensive field campaign was carried out in the Valles Caldera National Preserve in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico, USA. This region forms a portion of the headwaters of the Rio Grande and displays distinct hydrologic responses during the summer and winter seasons. A twelve day sampling period during the summer monsoon season (July to August 2005) was selected to observe the land-atmosphere interactions resulting from convective storms in the region. The hydrometeorological field campaign included seventy-one sampling sites where daily rainfall, meteorological variables (e.g. air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and barometric pressure), volumetric soil moisture, and soil temperature were measured. Each site consisted of a one square meter plot that was characterized in term of terrain position, vegetation and surface properties. Likewise, daily gravimetric soil samples were taken in order to compare with the volumetric measurements inferred using an impedance probe. In this study, we present a preliminary analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of soil and atmospheric variables during

  9. The structure of iron-hydroxide mounds at hydrothermal environment in shallow marine, Satsuma Iwo-Jima, Kikai caldera, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratomi, T.; Kiyokawa, S.; Ikehara, M.; Goto, S.; Hoshino, T.; Ikegami, F.; Minowa, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Satsuma Iwo-Jima Island, located 38km south of Kyusyu, Japan, is a volcanic island in the northwestern rim of Kikai caldera. Iron-rich mounds develop with hydrothermal activity (pH=5.5, 50-60 °C) in Nagahama bay southwestern this island. The brownish seawater at the bay is due to mixing of the hot spring water (Shikaura and Tazaki, 2001) with the high deposition rate (1 m per year) of iron-rich sediments (Kiyokawa et al., 2012). In this study, we found the structure of mounds has unique information by the observation with X-ray CT scan, FE-SEM, and the thin-sectioned sample, and the chemical analysis with EDS, XRF, and XRD. Samples (20-30 cm long) were piece of mounds made from two layers: black high-density hard layer and brownish low-density soft layer. X-ray CT scan observation shows that the inside of samples is constructed from the aggregation of convex structure (3-4 cm). Low-density layers have many pipe-like structure (typical radius: 1 mm). Petrographic observations indicate that both high- and low-density layers have filament-like forms, however the form in low-density layer is perpendicular to those in high-density layer. In low-density layer, small particles on the filament-like form and the number increases toward high-density layer. FE-SEM observation shows that filament-like form in high-density layer consists of aggregation of bacillus-like form as the chain of particles (about 2 μm). At low-density layer, on the other hand, bacteria-like form with smaller particles (twisted). Furthermore, all particles are iron-hydroxides such as ferrihydrite with silica because they are consist of Fe, Si and O with broad peak in XRD. We conclude that the mounds at Nagahama bay were constructed form aggregation of convex structure with many pipes as the hydrothermal vent. Bacteria-like form probably is the stalk of neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria because of those unique forms. Such a bacteria prefers an environment of redox interface (Chan et al., 2011

  10. Temporal evolution of a post-caldera, mildly peralkaline magmatic system: Furnas volcano, São Miguel, Azores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, A. J.; Gertisser, R.; O'Driscoll, B.; Pacheco, J. M.; Whitley, S.; Pimentel, A.; Self, S.

    2016-05-01

    Furnas is one of three active central volcanoes on São Miguel Island, Azores, and is considered to be one of the most hazardous in the archipelago. In this study, the pre-eruptive magma plumbing system of the 10 young (Group (UFG) is investigated via whole rock major and trace element geochemistry, mineral chemistry, thermobarometry, and petrogenetic modelling. The main aim of this work is to elucidate the petrogenesis of the Furnas trachytes, constrain the P-T-fO2 conditions under which they evolve, and investigate the temporal evolution of the magma plumbing system. Results indicate that the trachytes are derived predominantly from extended fractional crystallisation of alkali basalt parental magmas, at depths between ~3 and 4 km. This is considered to take place in a density-stratified reservoir, with alkali basalt magmas at the base and hydrous trachytes forming an upper cap or cupola. The presence of this reservoir at shallow crustal depths beneath the caldera likely inhibits the ascent and subsequent eruption of mafic magmas, generating a compositional Daly Gap. Rare syenitic ejecta represent in situ crystallisation of trachytic magmas in the thermal boundary zone at the top of the reservoir. Trachytic enclaves within these syenites, in addition to banded pumices and ubiquitous clinopyroxene antecrysts in the UFG pumice falls, provide evidence for mingling/mixing processes within the magmatic system. Despite relatively uniform major element compositions, systematic trace element variations within individual eruptions highlight the importance of fractional crystallisation during late-stage evolution of the trachytes. This is facilitated by the accumulation of water and the development of mild peralkalinity, which contribute to low pre-eruptive melt viscosities and efficient crystal settling. Compositional zoning patterns between individual eruptions cannot be accounted for by periodic tapping of a single magma batch undergoing fractional crystallisation

  11. Geophysical imaging of the lacustrine sediments deposited in the La Calderilla Volcanic Caldera (Gran Canaria Island, Spain) for paleoclimate research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himi, Mahjoub; Rodríguez-González, Alejandro; Criado, Constantino; Tapias, Josefina C.; Ravazzi, Cesare; Pérez-Torrado, Francisco; Casas, Albert

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of well-preserved maar structures is important not only for studying the eruptive activity and formation of volcanoes, but also for paleoclimate research, since laminated maar lake sediments may contain very detailed archives of climate and environmental history. Maars are a singular type of volcanic structure generated by explosive phreatomagmatic eruptions as a result of interaction between rising magma and groundwater. This kind of structures are characterised by circular craters, often filled with water and/or lacustrine sediments and surrounded by a ring of pyroclastic deposits.Recently a borehole was drilled at the bottom of La Calderilla volcanic complex which penetrated about 8.7 m in its sedimentary sequence and paleobotanical study has supplied the first evidence of paleoenvironmental evolution during the Holocene on the Gran Canaria Island. This survey, however, did not penetrate into the substrate because the total thickness of the sedimentary fill was unknown. Since the age of formation of La Calderilla volcanic complex based on K/Ar dating is about 85,000 years (Upper Pleistocene), the possibility of its sedimentary fill extends beyond of the Holocene is extremely attractive, since, for example, there are few paleoenvironmental data regarding how much the last glaciation that affected the Canary Islands. In these circumstances, the knowledge of the total thickness of the lacustrine sediments is crucial to design a deeper borehole in the next future. Therefore, the subsurface characterisation provided by geophysics is essential for determining thickness and geometry of the sedimentary filling. Multielectrode ERT method was used to obtain five 2-D resistivity cross-sections into La Calderilla volcanic caldera. An Iris Syscal Pro resistivity system with 48 electrodes connected to a 94 m long cable (2m electrode spacing) in Wenner-Schlumberger configuration for an investigation depth of about 20 m. Data quality (q 8000 Ω.m) that can be

  12. Variability of the planktonic foraminifera community across the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, Fuente Caldera Section, Baetic Ranges (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda-Lisarri, A.

    2013-12-01

    During the Eocene/Oligocene transition, in a massive extinction event that took place about 33.7 million years ago, the current high resolution study analyzes qualitatively and quantitatively the community structure of the planktonic foraminifera that were preserved in the hemipelagic sediments of the Tethys Sea. The sampled section of the Fuente Caldera column, located in the Baetic mountain ranges, spans a register of 396,551.7 years. Based in the identification of 27 species, that belong to 13 genera and 2 families of foraminifera, there have been found three biozones of Gonzalvo Zonation (Gonzalvo, 2002) in the studied stratigraphic interval: Turborotalia cocoaensis and Cribrohantkenina lazzarii Biozones (Rupelian), and Paragloborotalia increbescens (Priabonian). The planktonic foraminifera associations variability patterns are defined by paleoecologic indexes (diversity index, high and low latitude species index and planktonic and benthic foraminifera index), by geochemical proxies: δ18O and δ13C and by 'Q' Mode Factor Analysis. They prove that the deposition environment is outer platform and also, they suggest that the studied area in the Tethys Sea underwent many thermal pulses, during which some species extinct or appear. In the first extinction event the species Turborotalia cocoaensis and Turborotalia cunialensis became extinct. In the second one, Hantkenina alabamensis, Hantkenina brevispina, Cribrohantkenina lazzarii and Pseudohastigerina micra became extinct while a succession occured; Globigerina officinalis, Globoturborotalita anguliofficinalis and Tenuitellinata angustiumbilicata appeared. The cooling event that finished in the Lower Oligocene was the biggest of these pulses, which was extremely abrupt and corresponds to the Oi-1 event that was described by Miller (Miller, 1991). All this evidences that the planktonic foraminifera extinction in the Upper Eocene was a gradual and fast event, what is supported by the Factor Analysis application. Key

  13. Millennial-Scale Climate Variability During a mid-Pleistocene Glacial (MIS 12) from a Terrestrial Lacustrine Record in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, P. J.; Brown, E. T.; Werne, J. P.; Contreras, S.; Anderson, R. S.; Dodd, J. P.; Sharp, Z. D.; Heikoop, J. M.; Allen, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    We present a high-resolution terrestrial climate record from the Valles Caldera, New Mexico which spans some 200,000 years from mid MIS 14 to early MIS 10. The glacial periods represented in the record exhibit millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger like variability, especially in MIS 12, one of the coldest glacials in the Pleistocene. High resolution proxies from core VC-3 including scanning XRF data, sediment density, color, and magnetic susceptibility show approximately 23 millennial-scale oscillations in MIS 12 with an average duration of 2,300 years. Many of these oscillations are characterized by relatively slow coolings followed by abrupt warmings, similar to D-O events in the Greenland ice core record. MBT/CBT MAT estimates in the MIS 12 portion of the core show stadial to interstadial warmings of up to 6 °C. The VC-3 stadials correlate with high percentages of boreal taxa pollen ( Picea, Abies ) (up to 25%) while interstadials have lower boreal pollen percentages (~5%) and many correlate with local maxima in Juniperus> and Quercus> . Significant changes in the hydrologic cycle also occur at these millennial timescales. Oxygen isotope data from diatom silica record changes of up to 10 per mil from stadial to interstadial, probably reflecting a combination of changes in moisture source (Pacific vs. Gulf of Mexico), moisture transport pathway, and the seasonality of precipitation. Several interstadials correlate with increases in Cyperaceae (sedge) pollen suggesting a shallower lake with a broad marshy zone around its margin. This zone was minimized during stadials when the lake was deeper. Interstadial shallowing probably resulted from higher evaporation rates and/or a reduction in winter precipitation. This combination of proxies from the Valles Caldera suggests that glacial stage millennial-scale climate variability in the American southwest was strongly driven by changes in the strength and location of the winter polar jet, which in turn affected the local

  14. Chemical abrasion-SIMS (CA-SIMS) U-Pb dating of zircon from the late Eocene Caetano caldera, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Kathryn E.; Coble, Matthew A.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Henry, Christopher D.; Colgan, Joseph P.; John, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Zircon geochronology is a critical tool for establishing geologic ages and time scales of processes in the Earth's crust. However, for zircons compromised by open system behavior, achieving robust dates can be difficult. Chemical abrasion (CA) is a routine step prior to thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) dating of zircon to remove radiation-damaged parts of grains that may have experienced open system behavior and loss of radiogenic Pb. While this technique has been shown to improve the accuracy and precision of TIMS dating, its application to high-spatial resolution dating methods, such as secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), is relatively uncommon. In our efforts to U-Pb date zircons from the late Eocene Caetano caldera by SIMS (SHRIMP-RG: sensitive high resolution ion microprobe, reverse geometry), some grains yielded anomalously young U-Pb ages that implicated Pb-loss and motivated us to investigate with a comparative CA and non-CA dating study. We present CA and non-CA 206Pb/238U ages and trace elements determined by SHRIMP-RG for zircons from three Caetano samples (Caetano Tuff, Redrock Canyon porphyry, and a silicic ring-fracture intrusion) and for R33 and TEMORA-2 reference zircons. We find that non-CA Caetano zircons have weighted mean or bimodal U-Pb ages that are 2–4% younger than CA zircons for the same samples. CA Caetano zircons have mean U-Pb ages that are 0.4–0.6 Myr older than the 40Ar/39Ar sanidine eruption age (34.00 ± 0.03 Ma; error-weighted mean, 2σ), whereas non-CA zircons have ages that are 0.7–1.3 Myr younger. U-Pb ages do not correlate with U (~ 100–800 ppm), Th (~ 50–300 ppm) or any other measured zircon trace elements (Y, Hf, REE), and CA and non-CA Caetano zircons define identical trace element ranges. No statistically significant difference in U-Pb age is observed for CA versus non-CA R33 or TEMORA-2 zircons. Optical profiler measurements of ion microprobe pits demonstrate consistent depths of ~ 1.6

  15. Sixty thousand years of magmatic volatile history before the caldera-forming eruption of Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Heather Michelle; Bacon, Charles R.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2012-12-01

    The well-documented eruptive history of Mount Mazama, Oregon, provides an excellent opportunity to use pre-eruptive volatile concentrations to study the growth of an explosive silicic magmatic system. Melt inclusions (MI) hosted in pyroxene and plagioclase crystals from eight dacitic-rhyodacitic eruptive deposits (71-7.7 ka) were analyzed to determine variations in volatile-element concentrations and changes in magma storage conditions leading up to and including the climactic eruption of Crater Lake caldera. Temperatures (Fe-Ti oxides) increased through the series of dacites, then decreased, and increased again through the rhyodacites (918-968 to ~950 to 845-895 °C). Oxygen fugacity began at nickel-nickel-oxide buffer (NNO) +0.8 (71 ka), dropped slightly to NNO +0.3, and then climbed to its highest value with the climactic eruption (7.7 ka) at NNO +1.1 log units. In parallel with oxidation state, maximum MI sulfur concentrations were high early in the eruptive sequence (~500 ppm), decreased (to ~200 ppm), and then increased again with the climactic eruption (~500 ppm). Maximum MI sulfur correlates with the Sr content (as a proxy for LREE, Ba, Rb, P2O5) of recharge magmas, represented by basaltic andesitic to andesitic enclaves and similar-aged lavas. These results suggest that oxidized Sr-rich recharge magmas dominated early and late in the development of the pre-climactic dacite-rhyodacite system. Dissolved H2O concentrations in MI do not, however, correlate with these changes in dominant recharge magma, instead recording vapor solubility relations in the developing shallow magma storage and conduit region. Dissolved H2O concentrations form two populations through time: the first at 3-4.6 wt% (with a few extreme values up to 6.1 wt%) and the second at ≤2.4 wt%. CO2 concentrations measured in a subset of these inclusions reach up to 240 ppm in early-erupted deposits (71 ka) and are below detection in climactic deposits (7.7 ka). Combined H2O and CO2

  16. Deformation near the Casa Diablo geothermal well field and related processes Long Valley caldera, Eastern California, 1993-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howle, J.F.; Langbein, J.O.; Farrar, C.D.; Wilkinson, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    Regional first-order leveling lines, which extend from Lee Vining, CA, to Tom's Place, CA, have been surveyed periodically since 1957 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Geodetic Survey (NGS), and Caltrans. Two of the regional survey lines, or leveling networks, intersect at the Casa Diablo geothermal well field. These leveling networks, referenced to a distant bench mark (C916) near Lee Vining, provide time-series vertical control data of land-surface deformation that began around 1980. These data are also useful for delineating localized subsidence at Casa Diablo related to reservoir pressure and temperature changes owing to geothermal development that began in 1985. A comparison of differences in bench-mark elevations for five time periods between 1983 and 1997 shows the development and expansion of a subsidence bowl at Casa Diablo. The subsidence coincides spatially with the geothermal well field and temporally with the increased production rates and the deepening of injection wells in 1991, which resulted in an increase in the rate of pressure decline. The subsidence, superimposed on a broad area of uplift, totaled about 310 mm by 1997. The USGS established orthogonal tilt arrays in 1983 to better monitor deformation across the caldera. One tilt array (DBR) was established near what would later become the Casa Diablo geothermal well field. This array responded to magmatic intrusions prior to geothermal development, tilting away from the well field. With the start of geothermal fluid extraction in 1985, tilt at the DBR array reversed direction and began tilting into the well field. In 1991, geothermal power production was increased by a factor of four, and reservoir pressures began a period of steep decline. These changes caused a temporary three-fold increase in the tilt rate. The tilt rate became stable in 1993 and was about 40% lower than that measured in 1991-1992, but still greater than the rates measured during 1985-1990. Data from the

  17. Sixty thousand years of magmatic volatile history before the caldera-forming eruption of Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Heather M.; Bacon, Charles R.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The well-documented eruptive history of Mount Mazama, Oregon, provides an excellent opportunity to use pre-eruptive volatile concentrations to study the growth of an explosive silicic magmatic system. Melt inclusions (MI) hosted in pyroxene and plagioclase crystals from eight dacitic–rhyodacitic eruptive deposits (71–7.7 ka) were analyzed to determine variations in volatile-element concentrations and changes in magma storage conditions leading up to and including the climactic eruption of Crater Lake caldera. Temperatures (Fe–Ti oxides) increased through the series of dacites, then decreased, and increased again through the rhyodacites (918–968 to ~950 to 845–895 °C). Oxygen fugacity began at nickel–nickel-oxide buffer (NNO) +0.8 (71 ka), dropped slightly to NNO +0.3, and then climbed to its highest value with the climactic eruption (7.7 ka) at NNO +1.1 log units. In parallel with oxidation state, maximum MI sulfur concentrations were high early in the eruptive sequence (~500 ppm), decreased (to ~200 ppm), and then increased again with the climactic eruption (~500 ppm). Maximum MI sulfur correlates with the Sr content (as a proxy for LREE, Ba, Rb, P2O5) of recharge magmas, represented by basaltic andesitic to andesitic enclaves and similar-aged lavas. These results suggest that oxidized Sr-rich recharge magmas dominated early and late in the development of the pre-climactic dacite–rhyodacite system. Dissolved H2O concentrations in MI do not, however, correlate with these changes in dominant recharge magma, instead recording vapor solubility relations in the developing shallow magma storage and conduit region. Dissolved H2O concentrations form two populations through time: the first at 3–4.6 wt% (with a few extreme values up to 6.1 wt%) and the second at ≤2.4 wt%. CO2 concentrations measured in a subset of these inclusions reach up to 240 ppm in early-erupted deposits (71 ka) and are below detection in climactic deposits (7.7 ka). Combined H2O and

  18. The comparative evaluation of ERTS-1 imagery for resource inventory in land use planning. [Oregon - Newberry Caldera, Mt. Washington, and Big Summit Prairie in Crook County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrumpf, B. J. (Principal Investigator); Simonson, G. H.; Paine, D. P.; Lawrence, R. D.; Pyott, W. T.; Herzog, J. H.; Murray, R. J.; Norgren, J. A.; Cornwell, J. A.; Rogers, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Multidiscipline team interpretation and mapping of resources for Crook County is complete on 1:250,000 scale enlargements of ERTS imagery and 1:120,000 hi-flight photography. Maps of geology, soils, vegetation-land use and land resources units were interpreted to show limitations, suitabilities, and geologic hazards for land use planning. Mapping of lineaments and structures from ERTS imagery has shown a number of features not previously mapped in Oregon. A multistage timber inventory of Ochoco National Forest was made, using ERTS images as the first stage. Inventory of forest clear-cutting practices was successfully demonstrated with color composites. Soil tonal differences in fallow fields correspond with major soil boundaries in loess-mantled terrain. A digital classification system used for discriminating natural vegetation and geologic material classes was successful in separating most major classes around Newberry Caldera, Mt. Washington, and Big Summit Prairie.

  19. Evaluación de la calidad ambiental de los sedimentos marinos en el sistema de bahías de Caldera (27°S, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Valdés

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Se midió la concentración y distribución de Cu, Ni, Pb, V, Fe, Al y Zn en los sedimentos marinos en cuatro bahías (Caldera, Calderilla, Inglesa y Salada de la Región de Atacama, Chile. Las concentraciones medias globales fueron 76,8 mg kg-1 de Cu, 90,4 mg kg-1 de Zn, 39 mg kg-1 de Pb, 23,4 mg kg-1 de Ni, 118,5 mg kg-1 de V, 0,09% de Fe y 0,1 mg kg-1 para Al. El análisis estadístico realizado sobre la distribución y contenido de metales encontrado en estas bahías permitió separarlas en tres grupos diferentes; bahía Caldera caracterizada por un alto grado de industrialización, principalmente con actividades asociadas a la minería, bahía Calderilla con actividades de cultivos marinos y actividad industrial asociada a la pesca industrial, y bahías Inglesa y Salada, muy similares entre sí, caracterizadas por una intensa actividad de cultivos marinos y escasa o nula influencia de actividad industrial minera o pesquera. La aplicación del índice de geoacumulación y de normas ambientales de calidad de sedimentos permiten concluir que los niveles de metales medidos en estas bahías muestran un enriquecimiento incipiente asociado a la actividad antrópica desarrollada en la zona pero que, de momento solamente, suponen un riesgo ocasional para las comunidades bentónicas.

  20. Insights into the 3D architecture of an active caldera ring-fault at Tendürek volcano through modeling of geodetic data

    KAUST Repository

    Vasyura-Bathke, Hannes

    2015-04-28

    The three-dimensional assessment of ring-fault geometries and kinematics at active caldera volcanoes is typically limited by sparse field, geodetic or seismological data, or by only partial ring-fault rupture or slip. Here we use a novel combination of spatially dense InSAR time-series data, numerical models and sand-box experiments to determine the three-dimensional geometry and kinematics of a sub-surface ring-fault at Tendürek volcano in Turkey. The InSAR data reveal that the area within the ring-fault not only subsides, but also shows substantial westward-directed lateral movement. The models and experiments explain this as a consequence of a ‘sliding-trapdoor’ ring-fault architecture that is mostly composed of outward-inclined reverse segments, most markedly so on the volcano\\'s western flanks but includes inward-inclined normal segments on its eastern flanks. Furthermore, the model ring-fault exhibits dextral and sinistral strike-slip components that are roughly bilaterally distributed onto its northern and southern segments, respectively. Our more complex numerical model describes the deformation at Tendürek better than an analytical solution for a single rectangular dislocation in a half-space. Comparison to ring-faults defined at Glen Coe, Fernandina and Bárðarbunga calderas suggests that ‘sliding-trapdoor’ ring-fault geometries may be common in nature and should therefore be considered in geological and geophysical interpretations of ring-faults at different scales worldwide.

  1. Fluid-faulting evolution in high definition: Connecting fault structure and frequency-magnitude variations during the 2014 Long Valley Caldera, California, earthquake swarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Ellsworth, William L.; Hill, David P.

    2016-03-01

    An extended earthquake swarm occurred beneath southeastern Long Valley Caldera between May and November 2014, culminating in three magnitude 3.5 earthquakes and 1145 cataloged events on 26 September alone. The swarm produced the most prolific seismicity in the caldera since a major unrest episode in 1997-1998. To gain insight into the physics controlling swarm evolution, we used large-scale cross correlation between waveforms of cataloged earthquakes and continuous data, producing precise locations for 8494 events, more than 2.5 times the routine catalog. We also estimated magnitudes for 18,634 events (~5.5 times the routine catalog), using a principal component fit to measure waveform amplitudes relative to cataloged events. This expanded and relocated catalog reveals multiple episodes of pronounced hypocenter expansion and migration on a collection of neighboring faults. Given the rapid migration and alignment of hypocenters on narrow faults, we infer that activity was initiated and sustained by an evolving fluid pressure transient with a low-viscosity fluid, likely composed primarily of water and CO2 exsolved from underlying magma. Although both updip and downdip migration were observed within the swarm, downdip activity ceased shortly after activation, while updip activity persisted for weeks at moderate levels. Strongly migrating, single-fault episodes within the larger swarm exhibited a higher proportion of larger earthquakes (lower Gutenberg-Richter b value), which may have been facilitated by fluid pressure confined in two dimensions within the fault zone. In contrast, the later swarm activity occurred on an increasingly diffuse collection of smaller faults, with a much higher b value.

  2. Inyección de aire secundario caliente en calderas de vapor bagaceras y su influencia en el rendimiento térmico Injection of heated secondary air in steam bagasse boilers and its influence on thermal efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos A. Golato; Gustavo Aso; Dora Paz; Gerónimo J. Cárdenas

    2005-01-01

    Como alternativa para aumentar la eficiencia térmica de calderas bagaceras productoras de vapor, se evalúa la inyección de aire secundario al hogar, previamente calentado. Además, se reúne información sobre la combustión y los factores que influyen en dicho fenómeno. Se calculó el rendimiento térmico en una caldera bagacera con inyección de aire secundario frío, mediante el empleo de balances de masa y energía con datos de ensayos experimentales. Se planteó luego un modelo teórico para el cas...

  3. FEM-based linear inverse modeling using a 3D source array to image magma chambers with free geometry. Application to InSAR data from Rabaul Caldera (PNG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchin, Erika; Masterlark, Timothy; Dawson, John; Saunders, Steve; Martí Molist, Joan

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we present a method to fully integrate a family of finite element models (FEMs) into the regularized linear inversion of InSAR data collected at Rabaul caldera (PNG) between February 2007 and December 2010. During this period the caldera experienced a long-term steady subsidence that characterized surface movement both inside the caldera and outside, on its western side. The inversion is based on an array of FEM sources in the sense that the Green's function matrix is a library of forward numerical displacement solutions generated by the sources of an array common to all FEMs. Each entry of the library is the LOS surface displacement generated by injecting a unity mass of fluid, of known density and bulk modulus, into a different source cavity of the array for each FEM. By using FEMs, we are taking advantage of their capability of including topography and heterogeneous distribution of elastic material properties. All FEMs of the family share the same mesh in which only one source is activated at the time by removing the corresponding elements and applying the unity fluid flux. The domain therefore only needs to be discretized once. This precludes remeshing for each activated source, thus reducing computational requirements, often a downside of FEM-based inversions. Without imposing an a-priori source, the method allows us to identify, from a least-squares standpoint, a complex distribution of fluid flux (or change in pressure) with a 3D free geometry within the source array, as dictated by the data. The results of applying the proposed inversion to Rabaul InSAR data show a shallow magmatic system under the caldera made of two interconnected lobes located at the two opposite sides of the caldera. These lobes could be consistent with feeding reservoirs of the ongoing Tavuvur volcano eruption of andesitic products, on the eastern side, and of the past Vulcan volcano eruptions of more evolved materials, on the western side. The interconnection and

  4. Magma mixing and the generation of isotopically juvenile silicic magma at Yellowstone caldera inferred from coupling 238U–230Th ages with trace elements and Hf and O isotopes in zircon and Pb isotopes in sanidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelten, Mark E.; Cooper, Kari M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Reid, Mary R.; Barfod, Gry H.; Wimpenny, Josh; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The nature of compositional heterogeneity within large silicic magma bodies has important implications for how silicic reservoirs are assembled and evolve through time. We examine compositional heterogeneity in the youngest (~170 to 70 ka) post-caldera volcanism at Yellowstone caldera, the Central Plateau Member (CPM) rhyolites, as a case study. We compare 238U–230Th age, trace-element, and Hf isotopic data from zircons, and major-element, Ba, and Pb isotopic data from sanidines hosted in two CPM rhyolites (Hayden Valley and Solfatara Plateau flows) and one extracaldera rhyolite (Gibbon River flow), all of which erupted near the caldera margin ca. 100 ka. The Hayden Valley flow hosts two zircon populations and one sanidine population that are consistent with residence in the CPM reservoir. The Gibbon River flow hosts one zircon population that is compositionally distinct from Hayden Valley flow zircons. The Solfatara Plateau flow contains multiple sanidine populations and all three zircon populations found in the Hayden Valley and Gibbon River flows, demonstrating that the Solfatara Plateau flow formed by mixing extracaldera magma with the margin of the CPM reservoir. This process highlights the dynamic nature of magmatic interactions at the margins of large silicic reservoirs. More generally, Hf isotopic data from the CPM zircons provide the first direct evidence for isotopically juvenile magmas contributing mass to the youngest post-caldera magmatic system and demonstrate that the sources contributing magma to the CPM reservoir were heterogeneous in 176Hf/177Hf at ca. 100 ka. Thus, the limited compositional variability of CPM glasses reflects homogenization occurring within the CPM reservoir, not a homogeneous source.

  5. Geomorfología de la región de los lagos Moquehue y Aluminé: consideraciones acerca de las propuestas Calderas Meseta del Arco y Nacimientos del Aluminé (Neuquén

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio F. González Díaz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Se exponen elementos de juicio geomórficos y estructurales, que avalan la morfogénesis glaciaria de la depresión en artesa que aloja la cuenca lacustre Moquehue-Aluminé, ubicada en la cordillera neuquina (38°30´S, adyacente al límite internacional. Trabajos anteriores distinguen en la región dos calderas de un gran complejo volcánico plio-cuaternario, situado al este del frente volcánico actual e integrado por nueve depresiones caldéricas y cuerpos dómicos asociados. En el área de estudio sólo la caldera de Pino Hachado tiene la validez necesaria, cuestionándose el reconocimiento de las calderas denominadas Nacimientos del Aluminé y Meseta del Arco, al tiempo que se avala el origen erosivo de las abruptas escarpas orientales que marginan el plateau de Lonco Luan-Meseta del Arco, las que fueran interpretadas como márgenes de las sugeridas calderas. Se analizan las fases o tipología del englazamiento pleistoceno local, su extensión, las direcciones de los principales movimientos de su flujo y su más que probable aporte de hielo por difluencia, a un contemporáneo englazamiento en Chile (laguna Icalma. Se describen aspectos de la morfogenia volcánica cenozoica y otros más locales de la remoción en masa y el proceso eólico. Se incorporan breves comentarios acerca de un propuesto drenaje atlántico de un río Bío Bío preglaciario y se cuestiona aquellos antecedentes que avalan la extensión en la región de la fosa Bío Bío-Aluminé y la presencia de las citadas calderas. Una serie de perfiles esquemáticos topográfico-geológicos contribuyen a dicho cuestionamiento.

  6. Understanding the Dynamics of the February-April 2007 Eruptions of the Piton de la Fournaise and the Related Caldera Collapse from a Single Very Broad-band Seismic Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, F. R.; Roult, G. C.; Michon, L.; Barruol, G.; Ferrazzini, V.; di Muro, A.; Reymond, D.; Peltier, A.; Staudacher, T.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic records from the RER very broad-band seismic station (La Réunion Island) belonging to the GEOSCOPE network are investigated to understand the eruptive succession (February to May) of Piton de la Fournaise and the caldera collapse episode of April 2007. Data first indicate that the short-lived, small volume, summit eruption of February 18 occurred during a phase of continuous inflation initiated in end of January 2007. Inflation decelerated around 2 weeks before a second short-lived small volume eruption on March 30-31 on the SE flank, which was coeval with a sudden, large deflation of the edifice. Deflation rate, which was stabilized at a relatively low level, increased anew on April 1 while no magma was emitted, followed on April 2 by a distant and one of the most voluminous eruptions of the last two centuries at La Réunion Island. The RER station shows that very long period (VLP) and ultra long period (ULP) events developed during this period. Seven ULP events preceded the caldera collapse and 48 ones occurred during the caldera collapse over 9 days, most of which during the first 30 hours. A thorough examination of the seismic signal corrected from the tide effects shows that each collapse event was coeval with VLP and ULP signals. Each repeating individual collapse showed similar ULP and VLP signals characterized by periods of ~ 500 s and ~ 7 s, respectively. Polarization measurements (back-azimuth) of the ULP clearly point toward a source located beneath the Dolomieu crater. The strikingly constant duration of the VLP signals (around 20 s) related to the collapse events and occurring before the collapse initiation suggests a physical control of the volcanic edifice. Waveforms and spectrograms of the various caldera collapse events show very homogeneous patterns, suggesting a similar and repeating volcano-tectonic process for the formation of the VLP signals events. Although tilt may be responsible of part of the ULP signals observed during the

  7. Monitoreo de un sistema de secado de bagazo acoplado a una caldera en un ingenio de México Monitoring of a bagasse drying system attached to a boiler in a sugar mill in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico J. Franck Colombres

    Full Text Available Se evaluó el desempeño de un secador de bagazo diseñado por la Estación Experimental Agroindustrial Obispo Colombres, acoplado a una caldera bagacera convencional en un ingenio de México (caldera Nº 5. Para ello, se realizaron ensayos de mediciones y balances de materia y energía, para la caldera operando con el secador y sin él en funcionamiento. La caldera Nº 5, de una producción nominal de 60 t/h de vapor y una presión máxima de trabajo de 29 bar, cuando fue alimentada únicamente con bagazo húmedo pudo generar como máximo 33 t/h de vapor a 19 bar y 269ºC, con un rendimiento energético de 60,4% y un índice de generación de 1,6 kg de vapor/ kg de bagazo. Con la adición del secador, se logró secar 28,6 toneladas de bagazo de 50,2% a 30,4% de humedad. Aproximadamente un 72% de este bagazo presecado se mezcló con bagazo húmedo y se utilizó para alimentar la caldera, produciéndose así 58,4 t/h de vapor; es decir, 77% más de vapor que sin secador. El rendimiento energético del sistema caldera-secador fue de 73,6%, un 21,8% superior al de la caldera sin secador, mientras que el índice de generación fue de 2,0 kg de vapor/ kg de bagazo, 25% mayor que el de la caldera original. Este aumento en la producción de vapor permitió sacar de servicio a la caldera Nº 6, que producía aproximadamente 20 t/h de vapor, con un rendimiento similar al de la caldera Nº 5 sin secador. Estas mejoras dieron como resultado, un ahorro de energía de 45,4 MJ/h, aproximadamente un 18% respecto a la energía consumida por ambas calderas (Nº 5 y Nº 6 cuando no funcionaba el secador. Este ahorro equivale a 1103 l/h de "fuel oil", es decir, alrededor de 1,5 millones de dólares por zafra.A bagasse dryer designed by Estación Experimental Agroindustrial Obispo Colombres was attached to a conventional bagasse boiler (Boiler No. 5 in a sugar mill in Mexico for evaluation. Measurement tests and material and energy balances for the boiler operating

  8. Hydrothermal brecciation in the Jemez Fault zone, Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Results from CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program) corehole VC-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks intersected deep in Continental Scientific Drilling Program corehole VC-1, adjacent to the late Cenozoic Valles caldera complex, have been disrupted to form a spectacular breccia sequence. The breccias are of both tectonic and hydrothermal origin, and probably formed in the Jemez fault zone, a major regional structure with only normal displacement since mid-Miocene. Tectonic breccias are contorted, crushed, sheared, and granulated; slickensides are commmon. Hydrothermal breccias, by contrast, lack these frictional textures, but arej commonly characterized by fluidized matrix foliation and prominent clast rounding. Fluid inclusions in the hydrothermal breccias are dominantly two-phase, liquid-rich at room temperature, principally secondary, and form two distinctly different compositional groups. Older inclusions, unrelated to brecciation, are highly saline and homogenize to the liquid phase in the temperature range 189 to 246/sup 0/C. Younger inclusions, in part of interbreccia origin, are low-salinity and homogenize (also to liquid) in the range 230 to 283/sup 0/C. Vapor-rich inclusions locally trapped along with these dilute liquid-rich inclusions document periodic boiling. These fluid-inclusion data, together with alteration assemblages and textures as well as the local geologic history, have been combined to model hydrothermal brecciation at the VC-1 site.

  9. Warm brine lakes in craters of active mud volcanoes, Menes caldera off NW Egypt: evidence for deep-rooted thermogenic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Stéphanie; Mascle, Jean; Foucher, Jean-Paul; Harmegnies, François; Woodside, John; Pierre, Catherine

    2014-06-01

    The Menes caldera is a fault-controlled depression (~8 km in diameter) at ~3,000 m water depth in the western province of the Nile deep-sea fan off NW Egypt, comprising seven mud volcanoes (MVs) of which two are active. Based on multichannel and chirp seismic data, temperature profiles, and high-resolution bathymetric data collected during the 2000 Fanil, 2004 Mimes and 2007 Medeco2 expeditions, the present study investigates factors controlling MV morphology, the geometry of feeder channels, and the origin of emitted fluids. The active Cheops and Chephren MVs are 1,500 m wide with subcircular craters at their summits, about 250 m in diameter, generally a few tens of metres deep, and filled with methane-rich muddy brines with temperatures reaching 42 °C and 57 °C respectively. Deployments of CTDs and corers with attached temperature sensors tracked these warm temperatures down to almost 0.5 km depth below the brine lake surface at the Cheops MV, in a feeder channel probably only a few tens of metres wide. Thermogenic processes involve the dissolution of Messinian evaporites by warm fluids likely sourced even deeper, i.e. 1.7 and 2.6 km below the seabed at the Cheops and Chephren MVs respectively, and which ascend along listric faults. Seepage activity appears broadly persistent since the initiation of mud volcanism in the Early Pliocene, possibly accompanied by lateral migration of feeder channels.

  10. Monitoring the hydrologic system for potential effects of geothermal and ground-water development in the Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1980's, renewed interest in the geothermal potential of the Long valley caldera, California, highlighted the need to balance the benefits of energy development with the established recreational activities of the area. The Long Valley Hydrologic Advisory Committee, formed in 1987, instituted a monitoring program to collect data during the early stages of resource utilization to evaluate potential effects on the hydrologic system. This paper reports that early data show declines in streamflow, spring flow, and ground-water levels caused by 6 years of below-average precipitation. Springs in the Hot Creek State Fish Hatchery area discharge water that is a mixture of nonthermal and hydrothermal components. Possible sources of nonthermal water have been identified by comparing deuterium concentrations in streams and springs. The equivalent amount of undiluted thermal water discharged from the springs was calculated on the basis of boron and chloride concentrations. Quantifying the thermal and nonthermal fractions of the total flow may allow researchers to assess changes in flow volume or temperature of the springs caused by ground-water or geothermal development

  11. Pterópodos thecosomados en el Pacífico suroriental frente a Caldera, Chile (Mollusca, Opistobranchiata: Euthecostomata y Pseudothecostomata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Labrín

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Se analizaron los pterópodos thecosomados colectados en una transecta oceanógrafica efectuada entre Caldera, Chile (~27°S y los alrededores de Isla de Pascua e Isla Salas y Gómez, Pacífico suroriental. Se registró un total de 2021 individuos, agrupados en 18 especies, siendo Clio pyramidata y Styliola subula especies dominantes a lo largo del transecto, las más frecuentes y representadas en 18 de las 23 estaciones analizadas. Las especies más abundantes fueron S. subula (35%, C. pyramidata (28% y Cavolinia inflexa (13%. Las siguientes especies constituyen nuevos registros para el Pacífico suroriental: Cavolinia labiata, Cavolinia uncinata, Cavolinia gibosa, Cuvierina columnella, Clio cuspidata, Clio chaptali, Diacria trispinosa, D. quadridentata, D. major, Cymbulia sp. y Peracle reticulata. La clasificación permite reconocer tres conjuntos de estaciones caracterizadas por sus especies, abundancia total, riqueza de especies y diversidad, que incluyen un conjunto nerítico (71-79°W, un conjunto oceánico (82-105°W y un conjunto de estaciones talasoepipelágicas asociadas a las islas oceánicas.

  12. Tracking millennial-scale climate variability through the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 12 using terrigenous biomarkers in lacustrine sediments from Valles Caldera, New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, S.; Werne, J. P.; Brown, E. T.; Anderson, R. S.; Fawcett, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Quaternary is characterized by cyclic intervals of warm interglacial and cold glacial stages with the MIS 12 highlighted as one of the most severe glacial stages. Recent studies reported abrupt climatic episodes at millennial scale during MIS 12 and the transition to MIS 11 similar to Dansgaard-Oeschger [D/O] and Heinrich events but weaker in amplitude than the dramatic oscillations observed in the last glacial period. The climate variability of MIS 12 is well documented in marine and ice-sheet isotopic records but terrestrial records are scarce and often fragmented. We will present a high-resolution paleoclimate reconstruction through the MIS 12, including MIS 13-12 and MIS 12-11 transitions, from paleo-lake sediments taken in Valles Caldera, New Mexico. Measurements including scanning X-ray fluorescence, pollen, terrigenous biomarkers and bulk and compound-specific stable isotopes that usually serve as paleoclimatic proxies of precipitation and vegetation will be contrasted. Terrigenous lipid biomarkers confirm that vegetation responds rapidly to millennial-scale climate variability and provide knowledge of how these millennial oscillations impacted western North America.

  13. Calcification and silicification: fossilization potential of cyanobacteria from stromatolites of Niuafo'ou's Caldera Lakes (Tonga) and implications for the early fossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Barbara; Kazmierczak, Józef; Lukomska-Kowalczyk, Maja; Kempe, Stephan

    2012-06-01

    Calcification and silicification processes of cyanobacterial mats that form stromatolites in two caldera lakes of Niuafo'ou Island (Vai Lahi and Vai Si'i) were evaluated, and their importance as analogues for interpreting the early fossil record are discussed. It has been shown that the potential for morphological preservation of Niuafo'ou cyanobacteria is highly dependent on the timing and type of mineral phase involved in the fossilization process. Four main modes of mineralization of cyanobacteria organic parts have been recognized: (i) primary early postmortem calcification by aragonite nanograins that transform quickly into larger needle-like crystals and almost totally destroy the cellular structures, (ii) primary early postmortem silicification of almost intact cyanobacterial cells that leave a record of spectacularly well-preserved cellular structures, (iii) replacement by silica of primary aragonite that has already recrystallized and obliterated the cellular structures, (iv) occasional replacement of primary aragonite precipitated in the mucopolysaccharide sheaths and extracellular polymeric substances by Al-Mg-Fe silicates. These observations suggest that the extremely scarce earliest fossil record may, in part, be the result of (a) secondary replacement by silica of primary carbonate minerals (aragonite, calcite, siderite), which, due to recrystallization, had already annihilated the cellular morphology of the mineralized microbiota or (b) relatively late primary silicification of already highly degraded and no longer morphologically identifiable microbial remains. PMID:22794297

  14. Warm Brine Lakes in Craters of Active Mud Volcanoes, Menes Caldera off NW Egypt: Evidence for Deep-Rooted Thermogenic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, S.; Mascle, J.; Foucher, J. P.; Woodside, J. M.; Pierre, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Menes caldera is a fault-controlled depression (~8 km in diameter) at ~3,000 m water depth in the western province of the Nile deep-sea fan off NW Egypt, comprising seven mud volcanoes (MVs) of which two are active. Based on multichannel and chirp seismic data, temperature profiles, and high-resolution bathymetric data collected during several oceanographic expeditions, the present study investigates factors controlling mud volcano morphology, the geometry of feeder channels, and the origin of emitted fluids (Dupré et al. 2014). The active Cheops and Chephren mud volcanoes are 1,500 m wide with subcircular craters at their summits, about 250 m in diameter, generally a few tens of metres deep, and filled with methane-rich muddy brines with temperatures reaching 42 °C and 57 °C respectively. Deployments of CTDs and corers with attached temperature sensors tracked these warm temperatures down to almost 0.5 km depth below the brine lake surface at the Cheops mud volcano, in a feeder channel probably only a few tens of metres wide. Thermogenic processes involve the dissolution of Messinian evaporites by warm fluids likely sourced even deeper, i.e. 1.7 and 2.6 km below the seabed at the Cheops and Chephren MVs respectively, and which ascend along listric faults. Seepage activity appears broadly persistent since the initiation of mud volcanism in the Early Pliocene, possibly accompanied by lateral migration of feeder channels.

  15. Exploiting the outcome of FUTUREVOLC: The 2014-2015 rifting event, effusive eruption and gradual caldera collapse at Bardarbunga volcanic system, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Vogfjord, Kristin S.; Gudmundson, Magnus T.; Ofeigsson, Benedikt G.; Dumont, Stéphanie; Parks, Michelle; Jonsdottir, Kristin; Hooper, Andrew; Hreinsdottir, Sigrun; Rafn Heimisson, Elias; White, Robert; Agustsdottir, Thorbjorg; Bean, Chris; Loughlin, Susan C.; Petur Heidarsson, Einar; Barsotti, Sara; Roberts, Matthew; Ripepe, Maurizio; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Consortium, Futurevolc

    2016-04-01

    Activity in the Bardarbunga volcanic system in Iceland 2014-2015 included major lava eruption (~1.5 km3) and gradual caldera collapse (~66 m), connected by a 50-km-long laterally injected dyke that formed mostly over 2-4 weeks after onset of activity on 16 August 2014. This rifting event is the main magmatic activity studied by the FUTUREVOLC project, a 3.5 year, 26-partner project funded by FP7 Environment Programme of the European Commission, addressing topic "Long-term monitoring experiment in geologically active regions of Europe prone to natural hazards: the Supersite concept. The project end is 31 March 2016 and it had aims to (i) establish an innovative volcano monitoring system and strategy, (ii) develop new methods for near real-time integration of multi-parametric datasets, (iii) apply a seamless transdisciplinary approach to further scientific understanding of magmatic processes, and (iv) to improve delivery, quality and timeliness of transdisciplinary information from monitoring scientists to civil protection. A review will be presented on how FUTUREVOLC has contributed to the response and study of the Bardarbunga activity and other events in Iceland during the project period.

  16. The mechanics of unrest at Long Valley caldera, California: 1. Modeling the geometry of the source using GPS, leveling and two-color EDM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Segall, P.; Murray, J.; Cervelli, Peter; Langbein, J.

    2003-01-01

    We surveyed 44 existing leveling monuments in Long Valley caldera in July 1999, using dual frequency global positioning system (GPS) receivers. We have been able to tie GPS and leveling to a common reference frame in the Long Valley area and computed the vertical deformation by differencing GPS-based and leveled orthometric heights. The resurgent dome uplifted 74??7 cm from 1975 to 1999. To define the inflation source, we invert two-color EDM and uplift data from the 1985-1999 unrest period using spherical or ellipsoidal sources. We find that the ellipsoidal source satisfies both the vertical and horizontal deformation data, whereas the spherical point source cannot. According to our analysis of the 1985-1999 data, the main source of deformation is a prolate ellipsoid located beneath the resurgent dome at a depth of 5.9 km (95% bounds of 4.9-7.5 km). This body is vertically elongated, has an aspect ratio of 0.475 (95% bounds are 0.25-0.65) and a volume change of 0.086 km3 (95% bounds are 0.06-0.13 km3). Failure to account for the ellipsoidal nature of the source biases the estimated source depth by 2.1 km (35%), and the source volume by 0.038 km3 (44%). ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamic model of intrusion of magma and/or magmatic fluids in the large-scale deformation source of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescentini, Luca; Amoruso, Antonella; Luongo, Annamaria

    2015-04-01

    The Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera is located in a densely populated area close to Naples (Southern Italy). It is renowned as a site of continual slow vertical movements. After the last eruption in 1538, the caldera generally subsided until 1969 when minor uplift occurred. In the early 1970s this uplift became significant (~1.5 m max). A further large uplift episode occurred from 1982 to 1984 (~1.8 m max), and subsequently smaller uplift episodes have occurred since then. Amoruso et al. (2014a,b) have recently shown that the CF surface deformation field from 1980 to 2013 can be decomposed into two stationary parts. Large-scale deformation can be explained by a quasi-horizontal source, oriented NW to SE and mathematically represented by a pressurized finite triaxial ellipsoid (PTE) ~4 km deep, possibly related to the injection of magma and/or magmatic fluids from a deeper magma chamber into a sill, or pressurization of interconnected (micro)cavities. Residual deformation not accounted for by PTE is confined to the Solfatara fumarolic area and can be mathematically explained by a small (point) pressurized oblate spheroid (PS) ~2 km below the Solfatara fumarolic field, that has been equated with a poroelastic response of the substratum to pore pressure increases near the injection point of hot magmatic fluids into the hydrothermal system. A satisfying feature of this double source model is that the geometric source parameters of each are constant over the period 1980-2013 with the exception of volume changes (potencies). Several papers have ascribed CF deformation to the injection of magmatic fluids at the base of the hydrothermal system. All models predict complex spatial and temporal evolution of the deformation pattern and consequently contrast with the observed deformation pattern stationarity. Also recently proposed dynamic models of sill intrusion in a shallow volcanic environment do not satisfy the observed CF deformation pattern stationarity. We have developed an

  18. Contribution of 2009-2014 COSMO-SkyMed SAR data to the interpretation of the Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoruso, Antonella; Crescentini, Luca; Luongo, Annamaria; Zinno, Ivana; Casu, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera is located in a densely populated volcanic region in the northern suburbs of Naples (Southern Italy). The coast near CF is famous for its significant vertical motions since Roman times, which are documented by drowned and elevated harbor works that have recorded slow variations in local sea level. After the last eruption in 1538, the caldera subsided and it has been doing so more-or-less steadily since 1969 when minor uplift occurred. In the early 1970s this uplift became significant (~1.5 m max). A further large uplift episode occurred from 1982 to 1984 (~1.8 m max), and subsequently smaller uplift episodes have occurred later on. From 2006 to spring 2013, CF was mostly uplifting at an increasing rate. Uplifting started again during summer 2014. Amoruso et al. (2014a,b) have recently shown that the CF ground deformation field from 1980 to 2013 can be decomposed into two stationary parts. Large-scale deformation can be explained by a quasi-horizontal source, oriented NW to SE and mathematically represented by a pressurized finite triaxial ellipsoid (PTE) ~4 km deep, possibly related to the injection of magma and/or magmatic fluids from a deeper magma chamber into a sill. Residual deformation not accounted for by PTE is confined to the Solfatara fumarolic area and can be mathematically explained by a small (point) pressurized oblate spheroid (PS) ~2 km below the Solfatara fumarolic field, that has been equated with a poroelastic response of the substratum to pore pressure increases near the injection point of hot magmatic fluids into the hydrothermal system. A satisfying feature of this double source model is that the geometric source parameters of each are constant over the period 1980-2013 with the exception of volume changes (potencies); potency time histories for PTE and PS, to which the time evolutions of the two components of the ground displacement field are related, are somewhat similar but not identical. Amoruso et al. (2014a

  19. Inventariando la biodiversidad en el Parque Nacional de La Caldera de Taburiente (La Palma, Islas Canarias, España: novedades científicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo-Quero, Teresa

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the first result of an agreement between the Organismo Autónomo Parques Nacionales and the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, entitled “Inventory and study of the Invertebrate Fauna of the National Park of La Caldera de Taburiente”. A detailed account of the faunistic novelties found up to now among the specimens of terrestrial and freshwater invertebrates collected along the two years of sampling (July 1999 to July 2001, whose number is estimated in ca. 500,000, is given. A brief description of planning and of methodology applied to the inventory of the invertebrate fauna is made and a tabulated summary of novelties is presented. The list shows at present 284 families, 594 genera and 739 species. For the Canary Islands, the present record of new taxa is 29 families, 115 genera (1 of them confirmed as new to Science and 3 awaiting confirmation and 187 species (24 new to Science. Moreover, 242 genera and 338 species are new to the fauna of La Palma I., being known from other islands of the archipelago. Other 47 taxa, still being studied, could be new to Science as well. These results have been reached with the study of just a minimal part of the whole material, which underlines the need for systematic, continued sampling to evaluate the faunistic richness of poorly explored areas and its possible necessity for protection. Therefore, one should expect more novelties and the inventory may increase significantly when all the material is revised.

    El presente artículo es el primer resultado de un convenio entre el Organismo Autónomo Parques Nacionales y el Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, denominado “Inventario y estudio de la Fauna Invertebrada del Parque Nacional de La Caldera de Taburiente”. Se detallan las novedades faunísticas encontradas hasta el momento entre los ejemplares de invertebrados terrestres y dulceacuícolas recogidos durante los dos años de muestreo (julio de 1999 a

  20. MED SUV TASK 6.3 Capacity building and interaction with decision makers: Improving volcanic risk communication through volcanic hazard tools evaluation, Campi Flegrei Caldera case study (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, Rosella; Isaia, Roberto; Sandri, Laura; Cristiani, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    In the communication chain between scientists and decision makers (end users), scientific outputs, as maps, are a fundamental source of information on hazards zoning and the related at risk areas definition. Anyway the relationship between volcanic phenomena, their probability and potential impact can be complex and the geospatial information not easily decoded or understood by not experts even if decision makers. Focusing on volcanic hazard the goal of MED SUV WP6 Task 3 is to improve the communication efficacy of scientific outputs, to contribute in filling the gap between scientists and decision-makers. Campi Flegrei caldera, in Neapolitan area has been chosen as the pilot research area where to apply an evaluation/validation procedure to provide a robust evaluation of the volcanic maps and its validation resulting from end users response. The selected sample involved are decision makers and officials from Campanian Region Civil Protection and municipalities included in Campi Flegrei RED ZONE, the area exposed to risk from to pyroclastic currents hazard. Semi-structured interviews, with a sample of decision makers and civil protection officials have been conducted to acquire both quantitative and qualitative data. The tested maps have been: the official Campi Flegrei Caldera RED ZONE map, three maps produced by overlapping the Red Zone limit on Orthophoto, DTM and Contour map, as well as other maps included a probabilistic one, showing volcanological data used to border the Red Zone. The outcomes' analysis have assessed level of respondents' understanding of content as displayed, and their needs in representing the complex information embedded in volcanic hazard. The final output has been the development of a leaflet as "guidelines" that can support decision makers and officials in understanding volcanic hazard and risk maps, and also in using them as a communication tool in information program for the population at risk. The same evaluation /validation process

  1. Fuel oil-water emulsions to reduce unburned particle emissions from boilers; Emulsiones agua en combustoleo para reducir las emisiones de particulas inquemadas en calderas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diego Marin, Antonio; Ocampo Barrera, Rene; Martinez Flores, Marco Antonio; Tamayo Flores, Gustavo Adolfo; Alarcon Quiroz, Ernesto [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    To diminish the problems caused by fuels in boilers such as abnormal soiling of heat interchange surfaces, decrease of thermal and combustion efficiencies and increment of pollutants it is proposed the utilization of fuel oil water emulsions. This technology process is described, its development and application in other countries is shown and mention is made of the experiences in this regard at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), as well as the perspectives this technology has in Mexico. In conclusion, the fuel oil water emulsion is an alternative that can help burning efficiently the fuel oil and so to contribute to fulfill with the limits established by the environmental regulations on pollutant emissions. The development of this technology is economical and of simple application, compared with others, such as the installation of new burners, the utilization of a commercial technology for flue gas conditioning, etcetera [Espanol] Para disminuir los problemas ocacionados por el combustoleo en las calderas como: ensuciamientos anormales de las superficies de intercambio de calor, disminucion de eficiencias termicas y de combustion e incremento de las emisiones, se propone la utilizacion de la emulsion de agua en combustoleo. Se describe el proceso de esta tecnologia, se muestra su desarrollo y aplicacion en otros paises y se mencionan las experiencias a este respecto en el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), asi como las perspectivas que tiene esta tecnologia en Mexico. En conclusion, la emulsion de agua en combustoleo es una alternativa que puede ayudar a quemar eficientemente al combustoleo y asi contribuir a cumplir con los limites de emisiones que establecen normas ambientales. El desarrollo de esta tecnologia es economica y de aplicacion sencilla, comparada con otras como: la instalacion de nuevos quemadores, la utilizacion de una tecnologia comercial para acondicionar los gases de combustion, etcetera

  2. Geomorphological and hydrogeological features of the Pocos de Caldas caldera and the Osamu Utsumi mine and Morro do Ferro analogue study sites, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Osamu Utsumi mine and Morro do Ferro study sites lie within the Pocos de Caldas plateau which is roughly circular in outline with a diameter of 35 km and an area of approximately 800 km2. Its general altitude lies between 1300 and 1600 m. The plateau is the eroded form of a caldera which was initially intruded some 80 million years ago. Geomorphologically, both sites occupy watershed areas adjacent to small streams in the centre of the plateau. The climate of the area has a market wet season from November to April and is dry the rest of the year. The streams are ephemeral in their upper reaches, tending to dry up in the dry season as they are fed by a declining base flow. In the wet season they exhibit flash flood fed by high-intensity rainfall causing overland flow. The wet season also provides recharge to the groundwater. Natural slopes are steep and the original vegetation was thin forest cover which is now restricted to the valley bottoms; usable slopes have poor quality grass cover used for cattle grazing. The plateau is a stable feature and its surface has been eroding at an average rate of 12 m per million years over a period of 50 million years. The mine geology is dominantly volcanic to subvolcanic phonolites that have been hydrothermally altered. Fracturing of the rock is extensive. Downward diffusion of oxygen in groundwaters during deep weathering has produced a distinct redox zone seen as a colour change from green/grey to brown/yellow. Morro do Ferro has a more weathered version (laterite/clay) of the same geology penetrated by magnetite breccia dykes. Whilst the area surrounding Morro do Ferro remains untouched, that around the mine has been seriously disturbed by mining activity which has penetrated the water-table. The existing mine has modified groundwater flow patterns and disturbed the movement of oxidising and reducing waters. (au) (47 refs.)

  3. Why does the Size of the Laacher See Magma Chamber and its Caldera Size not go together? - New Findings with regard to Active Tectonics in the East Eifel Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Berberich, Gabriele

    2013-04-01

    The East Eifel's early Cenozoic tectonic development is characterized by a main stress field trending in NW-SE direction, causing a re-organisation of postvariscan dextral strike-slip faults in approximately 105° direction, the formation of the tectonic depression of the Neuwieder Basin and small-scale transtension zones. The 105° trending strike-slip faults are staggered in equidistant intervals of several kilometers. This system continues from the Eifel to the North into the Ruhr Carboniferous, where it has been recognized due to the extensive underground coal mining first (Loos et al. 1999). Our recent research on analyses of tectonics in quarries, quartz/ore-dykes, mapping of minerals springs and gas analyses, has revealed a prominent 105° trending strike-slip fault cutting the South of Laacher See ("Laacher See Strike-slip Fault"). Within the Laacher See caldera, the "Laacher See Strike-slip Fault" can be tracked by a wide mofette zone that was mapped with a self-propelled submarine. At present, the "Laacher See Strike-slip Fault" can be tracked from Holzmühlheim in the West, Spessart, Wehrer Kessel, Laacher See, Plaidt to Bad Ems and furthermore to the South-East. Along this direction five intersections points of the "Laacher See Strike-slip Fault" with the Lahn River are documented, creating small-scale mofette fields in the Lahn River. In the Neuwied Basin, near Plaidt, the "Laacher See Strike-slip Fault" is intersected by the NW-SE-trending Ochtendung Fault. Regional strike-slip faults in combination with block rotation and uplift could have provided the voids for the magma chambers of the Wehrer Kessel and the Laacher See Caldera. Holohan et al. (2005) showed in analogue models that regional strike-slip regimes (including Riedel shears, chamber-localised graben fault, and a partial Y-shear) play a decisive role for caldera formation. In the East Eifel tectonic movement rates of active faults are approx. 1 mm/year (Meyer & Stets 2002, Cambell et al

  4. Crustal-scale recycling in caldera complexes and rift zones along the Yellowstone hotspot track: O and Hf isotopic evidence in diverse zircons from voluminous rhyolites of the Picabo volcanic field, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Dana L.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Watts, Kathryn E.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Fu, Bin; McCurry, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Rhyolites of the Picabo volcanic field (10.4–6.6 Ma) in eastern Idaho are preserved as thick ignimbrites and lavas along the margins of the Snake River Plain (SRP), and within a deep (>3 km) borehole near the central axis of the Yellowstone hotspot track. In this study we present new O and Hf isotope data and U–Pb geochronology for individual zircons, O isotope data for major phenocrysts (quartz, plagioclase, and pyroxene), whole rock Sr and Nd isotope ratios, and whole rock geochemistry for a suite of Picabo rhyolites. We synthesize our new datasets with published Ar–Ar geochronology to establish the eruptive framework of the Picabo volcanic field, and interpret its petrogenetic history in the context of other well-studied caldera complexes in the SRP. Caldera complex evolution at Picabo began with eruption of the 10.44±0.27 Ma (U–Pb) Tuff of Arbon Valley (TAV), a chemically zoned and normal-δ18O (δ18O magma=7.9‰) unit with high, zoned 87Sr/86Sri (0.71488–0.72520), and low-εNd(0) (−18) and εHf(0) (−28). The TAV and an associated post caldera lava flow possess the lowest εNd(0) (−23), indicating ∼40–60% derivation from the Archean upper crust. Normal-δ18O rhyolites were followed by a series of lower-δ18O eruptions with more typical (lower crustal) Sr–Nd–Hf isotope ratios and whole rock chemistry. The voluminous 8.25±0.26 Ma West Pocatello rhyolite has the lowest δ18O value (δ18Omelt=3.3‰), and we correlate it to a 1,000 m thick intracaldera tuff present in the INEL-1 borehole (with published zircon ages 8.04–8.35 Ma, and similarly low-δ18O zircon values). The significant (4–5‰) decrease in magmatic-δ18O values in Picabo rhyolites is accompanied by an increase in zircon δ18O heterogeneity from ∼1‰ variation in the TAV to >5‰ variation in the late-stage low-δ18O rhyolites, a trend similar to what is characteristic of Heise and Yellowstone, and which indicates remelting of variably hydrothermally altered tuffs

  5. The Shallow Plumbing System of Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion island, Indian Ocean) Revealed by the Major 2007 Caldera Forming Eruption (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muro, A.; Metrich, N.; Daniele, V.; Rosi, M.; Armienti, P.; Fougeroux, T.; Deloule, E.; Arienzo, I.; Civetta, L.

    2013-12-01

    The 2007 eruption represents a major event in the recent history of Piton de la Fournaise volcano because it produced: i) the most voluminous lava field (at least 0.21 km3), ii) the most intense lava fountaining activity (>200 m high), iii) the largest SO2 plume (>230 kt), iv) the largest summit collapse (1 km wide x 0.34 km deep) and v) the main flank slip event (up to 1.4 m eastwards) ever documented at PdF. The bulk magma volume extruded during the 2007 eruptive sequence is similar to that emitted during the entire 1998-2006 period. As a whole, the volume of magma emitted during the whole 1998-2007 activity cycle is remarkably close to that estimated (~0.35 km3) for the shallow plumbing system of Piton de la Fournaise. The 2007 eruptive sequence consisted of three successive phases (February, March and April). The main caldera forming phase of April ended a 9 years long period (1998-2007) of continuous edifice inflation and frequent eruptive activity (3 eruptions per year on average). On the contrary, post-2007 activity punctuates a trend of continuous deflation and consists of small-volume summit eruptions of moderate/low MgO magmas and frequent shallow magma intrusions. The 2007 lavas and pyroclasts cover the complete range of textures and crystal content an composition typically found in PdF products. The broad range of textures and the large volumes of pyroclasts, lava and gas emitted in 2007 provide an unique and exceptional record of the time-integrated evolution of PdF magma, and represent an unique opportunity to image the volcano plumbing system and bring new constraints on the processes controlling its magmatic and volatile budget. We here address these issues by using an unprecedented geochemical dataset (major, volatile and trace elements, Sr-Nd isotopes) on bulk rocks, minerals, glass inclusions and glass matrices from a very detailed sample set, representative of the time evolution of extruded magma during the entire 2007 eruptive sequence.

  6. Mineralogical and sulfur isotopic characterization of the sulfur-bearing mineralization from the active degassing area of Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormone, Angela; Piochi, Monica; Balassone, Giuseppina; Strauss, Harald; Troise, Claudia; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    The Campi Flegrei caldera is a site of persistent hydrothermal circulation and gaseous emissions inside the Pozzuoli town and nearby the city of Napoli (Italy). The solfataric phenomena are associated with episodes of low-magnitude seismicity and vertical ground displacement since Roman times, evolving to the Monte Nuovo eruption in the 1538 AD. Pronounced geochemical anomalies, uplift rates up to 1 m/y and up to ten thousands microearthquakes per year also characterized the four most recent decades of unrest. The degassing phenomena are concentrated within the Solfatara crater, although, since 2006, the hydrothermal activity strongly increased in the Pisciarelli district, i.e. on the north-east slope of the tuff. We investigated sulfur-bearing mineral precipitates sampled from the active fumaroles both within the Solfatara and along the Pisciarelli slope. Mineral assemblage, texture and chemistry were determined for the efflorescence precipitated nearby the fumaroles and along the mud pool by x-ray diffraction, back-scattered electron microscope and electron diffuse microanalysis. δ34S compositions were also determined on separated sulfur-minerals. The new data have been compared with scattered literature data, including few existing for the previous '70 and '80 unrest episodes. Native sulfur and alunite are the main mineral phases that associate with alunogene, and, locally, pickeringite and potassium alum. Sporadically mereiterite, amarillite, and pyrite have been found as neogenesis mineralization along the outcropping rocks. The mud pool is rich in gypsum, potassium alum and pyrite. δ34S values range from -5.48 to 0.0‰, being slightly lower than previous data. The obtained results suggest that the Pisciarelli area is characterized by magmatic-hydrothermal, magmatic-steam and steam-heated environments, developed on a argillitic hydrothermal facies that thickens in correspondence of the degassing area. These environments develop and continuously evolve in

  7. Discovery of a Plains Caldera Complex and Extinct Lava Lake in Arabia Terra, Mars: Implications for the Discovery of Additional Highland Volcanic Source Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, Jacob; Michalski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Several irregularly shaped topographic depressions occur near the dichotomy boundary in northern Arabia Terra, Mars. The geomorphology of these features suggests that they formed by collapse, opposed to meteor impact. At least one depression (approx.55 by 85 km) displays geologic features indicating a complex, multi-stage collapse history. Features within and around the collapse structure indicate volcanic processes. The complex occurs within Hesperian ridged plains of likely volcanic origin and displays no crater rim or evidence for ejecta. Instead the depression consists of a series of circumferential graben and down-dropped blocks which also display upper surfaces similar to ridged plain lavas. Large blocks within the depression are tilted towards the crater center, and display graben that appear to have originally been linked with circumferential graben outside of the complex related to earlier collapse events. A nearly 700 m high mound exists along a graben within the complex that might be a vent. The deepest depression displays two sets of nearly continuous terraces, which we interpret as high-stands of a drained lava lake. These features appear similar to the black ledge described during the Kilauea Iki eruption in 1959. A lacustrine origin for the terraces seems unlikely because of the paucity of channels found in or around the depression that could be linked to aqueous surface processes. In addition, there is no obvious evidence for lacustrine sediments within the basin. Together with the presence of significant faulting that is indicative of collapse we conclude that this crater complex represents a large caldera formed in the Late Noachian to Early Hesperian. Other linear and irregular depressions in the region also might be linked to ancient volcanism. If that hypothesis is correct, it suggests that northern Arabia Terra could contain a large, previously unrecognized highland igneous province. Evacuation of magma via explosive and effusive activity

  8. Distribución horizontal de larvas de crustáceos decápodos capturadas entre Caldera e isla de Pascua (Pacífico sudoriental, octubre de 1999 Horizontal distribution of the crustacean decapod larvae collected between Caldera and Easter Island (Southeastern Pacific, October 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Rivera

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Las larvas de crustáceos decápodos son componentes importantes del meroplancton, llegando a constituir grandes concentraciones en ciertos periodos del año. No obstante, el conocimiento de la distribución y abundancia de éstas a niveles taxonómicos finos es escaso. Este trabajo analizó la distribución espacial longitudinal de las larvas de decápodos recolectadas entre Caldera y la isla de Pascua y su relación con dos variables ambientales, durante el crucero Cimar 5-islas oceánicas realizado en octubre de 1999. Se identificaron 31 unidades taxonómicas, correspondientes a grupos de decápodos pelágicos, mesopelágicos y bentónicos. Las larvas más abundantes fueron de la familia Sergestidae. La diversidad fue notoriamente variable destacándose dos máximos, uno en la zona nerítica continental y el segundo a 150 mn de la costa. Mediante análisis de ordenación (MDS se detectó la presencia de dos comunidades de larvas de decápodos, asociadas a las condiciones de temperatura y salinidad de las aguas subantárticas relacionadas con la corriente de Humboldt y a las aguas subtropicales, respectivamente. Además, se identificaron tres ensambles entre larvas de decápodos, relacionados con el hábitat de los ejemplares adultos. Se discuten las relaciones de las larvas con su medio y con las condiciones oceanográficas y topográficas del área de estudioThe crustacean decapod larvae are a very important component of the meroplankton. They constitute high concentrations during certain seasons of the year. Nevertheless, the knowledge about their distribution and abundance at a fine taxonomic level is really poor. This paper, analyzed the longitudinal spatial distribution of the decapod larvae collected between Caldera and Easter island and the relationships with two environmental variables, during the cruise Cimar 5-oceanic islands, October 1999. The 31 taxa of larvae that correspond to three groups, pelagic, mesopelagic and benthonic

  9. Inyección de aire secundario caliente en calderas de vapor bagaceras y su influencia en el rendimiento térmico Injection of heated secondary air in steam bagasse boilers and its influence on thermal efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos A. Golato

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Como alternativa para aumentar la eficiencia térmica de calderas bagaceras productoras de vapor, se evalúa la inyección de aire secundario al hogar, previamente calentado. Además, se reúne información sobre la combustión y los factores que influyen en dicho fenómeno. Se calculó el rendimiento térmico en una caldera bagacera con inyección de aire secundario frío, mediante el empleo de balances de masa y energía con datos de ensayos experimentales. Se planteó luego un modelo teórico para el caso de calentar todo este aire secundario, y se determinó el nuevo rendimiento térmico. Finalmente se realizó un análisis técnico-económico para evaluar la rentabilidad del uso de esta tecnología, teniendo en cuenta el ahorro de bagazo y su equivalente en gas natural. Para el caso analizado, los resultados mostraron: aumento del rendimiento térmico de la caldera (1,62 puntos; mejora del índice de generación de vapor (2,27%; reducción del consumo de bagazo (2,45%; aceptable periodo de repago de la inversión (114 días de zafra.Previously heated secondary air injection is evaluated as an alternative to increase thermal efficiency of bagasse steam boilers. Aspects regarding the combustion process and the factors affecting it are also described. Tests were made in a bagasse boiler of a sugar mill. Thermal efficiency of the bagasse boiler with cold secondary air injection was determined by solving mass and energy balances. A new thermal efficiency for the case in which all secondary air is pre-heated with hot gases was determined afterwards. Finally, a technical-economic analysis was made to evaluate the yield of this technology, taking into account bagasse saving and its equivalent in natural gas. For the analyzed case, the results showed: an increase in the thermal efficiency of the boiler (1,62 points; a higher steam production index (2,27%; a reduction in bagasse consumption (2,45%; an acceptable payback period of the investment (114

  10. Evolution of the 120 ka caldera-forming eruption of Kutcharo volcano, eastern Hokkaido, Japan: Geologic and petrologic evidence for multiple vent systems and rapid generation of pyroclastic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Akiko; Nakagawa, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the eruptive sequence and temporal evolution of juvenile materials during the 120 ka Kutcharo pumice flow IV (Kp IV) eruption, which was the most voluminous (175 km3: bulk volume) caldera-forming eruption of Kutcharo volcano. The eruptive deposits are divided into four units in ascending order. Unit 1 is widely dispersed and consists of silt-sized, cohesive ash. Unit 2 is a thin, moderately sorted pumice fall deposit with a restricted distribution and small volume (producing a stable Plinian column. The presence of multiple vent systems could have allowed the system to bypass an initial eruptive stage with a stable Plinian column and begin its climactic stage, represented by Unit 3, rapidly. Multiple vents could have been the result of sequential injections of mafic magma in the early stages of the Kp IV eruption.

  11. Control estructural en el desarrollo de una concentración anómala de calderas en los Andes de Neuquén: Complejo Volcánico Pino Hachado (38°30' S y 71°O Structural control on the development of an anomalous concentration of calderas in the Neuquén Andes: Pino Hachado volcanic complex (38°30´S-71°W

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tunstall

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los complejos volcánicos más importantes de los Andes del Sur se desarrolló durante los últimos 5 Ma y está ubicado a los 38°30'S próximo a la divisoria de aguas. Este se caracteriza por la presencia de calderas y complejos dómicos los cuales están amalgamados en un plateau volcánico de 50 x 50 kilómetros. El emplazamiento de estos cuerpos está asociado con la actividad pliocena-cuaternaria de una de las ramificaciones hacia el área de retroarco del Sistema de Fallas de Liquiñe-Ofqui. Sin embargo, la coincidencia entre la geometría cuadrangular de las calderas y los controles lineares del volcanismo monogenético, con la estructura interpretada a partir del análisis de la información magnetométrica sugiere un mecanismo de efusión en el retroarco asociado a la reactivación de la estructura del basamento. La interpretación estructural basada en datos aeromagnéticos regionales constituye una buena aproximación para determinar la segmentación del basamento durante las sucesivas fases de atenuamiento cortical en la región. De esta forma la geometría final y la distribución del compejo volcánico de Pino Hachado (38°30'S-71°O, aunque relacionadas con la tectónica pliocena-cuaternaria, serían reflejo de la estructura de los depocentros jurásico-miocenos enterrados bajo espesas secuencias neógenas en el área limítrofe.One of the most important concentrations of volcanic complexes in the entire Southern Andes, developed during the last 5 Ma, is present at 38°30´S next to the drainage divide. These volcanic features, formed calderas and domic complexes which have been amalgamated in a volcanic plateau of 50 x 50 kilometers. Its origin is associated with young activity of one of the branches of the northern intra-arc Liquiñe-Ofqui fault system, as widespread Plio-Quaternary faulting is developed east of the volcanic arc. Moreover, quadrangular geometries in the volcanic complexes, as well as widespread linear

  12. History of earthquakes and vertical ground movement in Campi Flegrei caldera, Southern Italy: comparison of precursory events to the A.D. 1538 eruption of Monte Nuovo and of activity since 1968

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, J.J.; Gasparini, P.

    1991-01-01

    The record of felt earthquakes around Naples Bay in southern Italy is probably complete since the mid-15th century. According to this record, intense earthquake swarms originating beneath Campi Flegrei, an explosive caldera located along the north coast of Naples Bay, have occurred only twice: (1) before the only historical eruption in Campi Flegrei in 1538; and (2) from mid-1983 to December 1984. Earthquake activity during the earlier period, which began at least a few years, and possibly as many as 30 years, before the 1538 eruption, damaged many buildings in the city of Pozzuoli, located near the center of Campi Flegrei. Minor seismic activity, which consisted of only a few felt earthquakes, occurred from 1970 to 1971. The second period of intense earthquake swarms lasted from mid-1983 to 1984, again damaging many buildings in Pozzuoli. Two periods of uplift along the shoreline within Campi Flegrei have also been noted since the mid-15th century: (1) during the few decades before the 1538 eruption; and (2) as two distinct episodes since 1968. Uplift of a few meters probably occurred a few decades before the 1538 eruption; uplift of as much as 3.0 m has occurred in Pozzuoli since 1968. These similarities strongly suggest that, for the first time in 440 years, the same process that caused intense local earthquake swarms and uplift in the early 1500's and led to an eruption in 1538, has again occurred beneath Campi Flegrei. Though no major seismicity or uplift has occurred since December 1984, because of the large amount of extensional strain accumulated during the past two decades, if a third episode of seismicity and rapid uplift occurs, it may lead to an eruption within several months after the resumption of activity. ?? 1991.

  13. NEAR AND FAR-FIELD EFFECTS OF TSUNAMIS GENERATED BY THE PAROXYSMAL ERUPTIONS, EXPLOSIONS, CALDERA COLLAPSES AND MASSIVE SLOPE FAILURES OF THE KRAKATAU VOLCANO IN INDONESIA ON AUGUST 26-27, 1883

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paroxysmal phases of Krakatau's volcanic activity on August 26-27, 1883, included numerous submarine Surtsean (phreatomagmatic eruptions, three sub air Plinian eruptions from the three main craters of Krakatau on Rakata island, followed by a fourth gigantic, sub air, Ultra-Plinian explosion. Landslides, flank failures, subsidences and a multiphase massive caldera collapse of the volcano - beginning near the Perbowetan crater on the northern portion of Rakata and followed by a collapse of the Danan crater - occurred over a period of at least 10 hours. The first of the three violent explosions occurred at 17: 07 Greenwich time (GMT on August 26.The second and third eruptions occurred at 05:30 GMT and at 06:44 GMT on August 27. Each of these events, as well as expanding gases from the submarine phreatomagmatic eruptions, lifted the water surrounding the island into domes or truncated cones that must have been about 100 meters or more in height. The height of the resulting waves attenuated rapidly away from the source because of their short periods and wavelengths. It was the fourth colossal explosion (VEI=6 and the subsequent massive f lank failure and caldera collapse of two thirds of Rakata Island, at 10:02 a.m., on August 27 that generated the most formidable of the destructive tsunami waves. A smaller fifth explosion, which occurred at 10:52 a.m., must have generated another large water cone and sizable waves. The final collapse of a still standing wall of Krakatau - which occurred several hours later at 16:38, generated additional waves.The near field effects of the main tsunami along the Sunda Strait in Western Java and Southern Sumatra, were devastating. Within an hour after the fourth explosion/caldera collapse, waves reaching heights of up to 37 m (120 feet destroyed 295 towns and villages and drowned a total of 36,417 people. Because of their short period and wavelength, the wave heights attenuated rapidly with distance away from the

  14. Estudio de modificaciones geométricas en boquillas de calderas piro y acuotubulares para la combustión eficiente de crudos pesados // Study of geometric modifications in pyro and aquatubular mouthpieces of boilers for the efficient combustion of heavy oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lincheta Mesa

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un estudio de boquillas de quemadores de calderas piro y acuotubulares. Se analizan diferentes variantes en lasdimensiones, forma y posición de los conductos de atomizador que dan paso al combustible y al fluido auxiliar en el casode quemadores con atomización por vapor.En todos los casos se evalúa el cono de pulverización y la calidad del spray, analizando la influencia de la presión deatomización y de la configuración geométrica en la eficiencia de atomización.Se determina la eficiencia de la combustión con varios tipos de boquillas, demostrándose la efectividad de lasmodificaciones introducidas cuando se queman combustibles de menor calidad.Se concluye que es posible sustituir algunas boquillas de importación y elevar la eficiencia en la combustión de crudospesados y sus mezclas, con un significativo efecto económico y como un paso más en el perfeccionamiento de las CentralesEléctricas del país para el aprovechamiento del crudo nacional.Palabras claves: quemador, atomizador, fuel oil, caldera, generación de vapor, combustibles, combustión._____________________________________________________________________Abstract :It is presented a study of mouthpieces of pyro and aquatubular burners of boilers. Different variants are analyzed indimensions, forms and position of the atomizer conduits that open the way to the fuel and auxiliary fluid in case of burnerswith steam atomization.In all cases, it is evaluated the pulverization cone and the quality of spray, analyzing the influence of atomization pressureand geometric configuration in the atomization efficiency.Estudio de modificaciones geométricas en boquillas de calderas piro y acuotubulares para la combustión eficiente decrudos pesadosThe efficiency of combustion is determined with several types of mouthpieces. The effectiveness of the introducedmodifications in connection with the import mouthpieces is demonstrated when fuels of smaller quality burns.It is

  15. Control estructural en el desarrollo de una concentración anómala de calderas en los Andes de Neuquén: Complejo Volcánico Pino Hachado (38°30' S y 71°O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tunstall

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los complejos volcánicos más importantes de los Andes del Sur se desarrolló durante los últimos 5 Ma y está ubicado a los 38°30'S próximo a la divisoria de aguas. Este se caracteriza por la presencia de calderas y complejos dómicos los cuales están amalgamados en un plateau volcánico de 50 x 50 kilómetros. El emplazamiento de estos cuerpos está asociado con la actividad pliocena-cuaternaria de una de las ramificaciones hacia el área de retroarco del Sistema de Fallas de Liquiñe-Ofqui. Sin embargo, la coincidencia entre la geometría cuadrangular de las calderas y los controles lineares del volcanismo monogenético, con la estructura interpretada a partir del análisis de la información magnetométrica sugiere un mecanismo de efusión en el retroarco asociado a la reactivación de la estructura del basamento. La interpretación estructural basada en datos aeromagnéticos regionales constituye una buena aproximación para determinar la segmentación del basamento durante las sucesivas fases de atenuamiento cortical en la región. De esta forma la geometría final y la distribución del compejo volcánico de Pino Hachado (38°30'S-71°O, aunque relacionadas con la tectónica pliocena-cuaternaria, serían reflejo de la estructura de los depocentros jurásico-miocenos enterrados bajo espesas secuencias neógenas en el área limítrofe.

  16. Impact of channelized flow on temperature distribution and fluid flow in restless calderas:Insight from Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Jasim, Alia; Whitaker, Fiona F; Rust, Alison C

    2015-01-01

    Magmatic hydrothermal systems develop by the imposition of a magmatically derived heat flux upon a shallow groundwater system. As such their dynamics can be intermittently perturbed by changing conditions within the associated magmatic system. Understanding the nature of the coupling between the magmatic and groundwater systems is thus key to discriminating geophysical signals of magmatic unrest from purely hydrothermal ones.Using a series of numerical groundwater models run with TOUGH2, we s...

  17. Formation de caldera par fluage d'un système hydrothermal volcanique

    OpenAIRE

    Barde-Cabusson, Stéphanie

    2007-01-01

    The influence of a hydrothermal system within a volcanic edifice has been poorly studied with respect to volcano instability. This study deals with the relation between hydrothermal systems and tectonics, through the analysis of the deformations triggered in a volcanic cone by the flow of hydrothermally altered rocks. The presence of these clays, ductile at geological time scale, deeply changes the behaviour and the evolution of a volcanic edifice, which may lead to the formation of huge coll...

  18. Gravity changes and passive SO 2 degassing at the Masaya caldera complex, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Jones, Glyn; Rymer, Hazel; Rothery, David A.

    2003-04-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for persistent volcanism can be acquired through the integration of geophysical and geochemical data sets. By interpreting data on micro-gravity, ground deformation and SO 2 flux collected at Masaya Volcano since 1993, it is now clear that the characteristically cyclical nature of the activity is not driven by intrusion of additional magma into the system. Rather, it may be due in large part to the blocking and accumulation of gas by restrictions in the volcano substructure. The history of crater collapse and formation of caverns beneath the crater floor would greatly facilitate the trapping and storage of gas in a zone immediately beneath San Pedro and the other craters. Another mechanism that may explain the observed gravity and gas flux variations is the convective overturn of shallow, pre-existing, degassed, cooled, dense magma that is replaced periodically by lower density, hot, gas-rich magma from depth. Buoyant gas-rich magma rises from depth and is emplaced near the surface, resulting in the formation and fluctuation of a low-density gas-rich layer centred beneath Nindirı´ and Santiago craters. As this magma vigorously degasses, it must cool, increase in density and eventually sink. Five stages of activity have been identified at Masaya since 1853 and the most recent data suggest that the system may have been entering another period of reduced degassing in 2000. This type of analysis has important implications for hazard mitigation because periods of intense degassing are associated with poor agricultural yields and reduced quality of life. A better understanding of persistent cyclically active volcanoes will allow for more effective planning of urban development and agricultural land use.

  19. High-temperature, large-volume, lavalike ash-flow tuffs without calderas in southwestern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekren, E.B.; McIntyre, David H.; Bennett, Earl H.

    1984-01-01

    Rhyolitic rocks were erupted from vents in and adjacent to the Owyhee Mountains and Owyhee Plateau of southwestern Idaho from 16 m.y. ago to about 10 m.y. ago. They were deposited on a highly irregular surface developed on a variety of basement rocks that include granitic rocks of Cretaceous age, quartz latite and rhyodacite tuffs and lava flows of Eocene age, andesitic and basaltic lava flows of Oligocene age, and latitic and basaltic lava flows of early Miocene age. The rhyolitic rocks are principally welded tuffs that, regardless of their source, have one feature in common-namely internal characteristics indicating en-masse, viscous lavalike flowage. The flowage features commonly include considerable thicknesses of flow breccia at the bases of various cooling units. On the basis of the tabular nature of the rhyolitic deposits, their broad areal extents, and the local preservation of pyroclastic textures at the bases, tops, and distal ends of some of the deposits, we have concluded that the rocks were emplaced as ash flows at extremely high temperatures and that they coalesced to liquids before final emplacement and cooling. Temperatures of l090?C and higher are indicated by iron-titanium oxide compositions. Rhyolites that are about 16 m.y. old are preserved mostly in the downdropped eastern and western flanks of the Silver City Range and they are inferred to have been erupted from the Silver City Range. They rarely contain more than about 2 percent phenocrysts that consist of quartz and subequal amounts of plagioclase and alkali feldspar; commonly, they contain biotite, and they are the only rhyolitic rocks in the area to do so. The several rhyolitic units that are 14 m.y. to about 10 m.y. old contain only pyroxene-principally ferriferous and intermediate pigeonites-as mafic constituents. The rhyolites of the Silver City Range comprise many cooling units, none of which can be traced for great distances. Rocks erupted from the Owyhee Plateau include two sequences that were traced over areas having diameters of about 100 km. These two sheets are the herein-named Swisher Mountain Tuff, which is about 13.8 m.y. old, and the Little Jacks Tuff, which is about 10 m.y. old. The Swisher Mountain Tuff was erupted from the Juniper Mountain volcanic center, a gentle dome that is not bounded by arcuate faults indicative of cauldron subsidence. The tuff is 200 m thick over a considerable area in and adjacent to its source. It apparently thins gradually toward its distal edges, and it is inferred to be uniformly distributed around its source at Juniper Mountain. The unit contains vitrophyres at various intervals from base to top, and, although the vitrophyres are, in general, flow layered and commonly flow brecciated, they occasionally contain well-defined pumice clasts. The vitrophyres indicate compound cooling, and, near the distal edges of the sheet, some of them probably represent complete cooling breaks. The Little Jacks Tuff onlaps the Swisher Mountain Tuff in expo sures east of Juniper Mountain, and it is inferred to have been erupted from a source on the part of the Owyhee Plateau that lies just east of the area studied. This inferred source area, like that at Juniper Mountain, is also expressed today as a gentle dome without structural features indicative of cauldron subsidence. The Little Jacks Tuff, in most exposures in the deep canyons of the Plateau, consists of at least four cooling units, and, in places in the eastern part of the studied area near the source area, it possibly comprises as many as six. Although there is no obvious evidence of erosion between the various cooling units, magnetic polarity measurements indicate that there were at least two magnetic reversals during the eruption interval of the Little Jacks Tuff. Like the Swisher Mountain Tuff, the Little Jacks has flattened pumice clasts in a few outcrops-principally at the bases of the various cooling units. The two tuff sequences are calc-a

  20. Magma storage and evolution of the Central Plateau Member Rhyolites, Yellowstone caldera, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befus, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    We use volatile and trace element contents from quartz-hosted melt inclusions to place constraints on the pre-eruptive storage and evolution of 6 lavas and 3 tuffs from the Central Plateau Member Rhyolites, Yellowstone. Overall, inclusions contain 1.0-2.5% H2O and 50-600 ppm CO2. Individual units have more restricted volatile contents, and define regions in H2O and CO2 space with internal variability of ±0.5 wt.% and ±100 ppm, respectively. Water contents in both lavas and pyroclastic units are similar, but CO2 contents vary and can be used to separate the units as CO2-rich and CO2-poor. CO2-rich units contain 300 to 600 ppm CO2 (Tuff of Bluff Point, Pitchstone Plateau, Trischmann Knob, Buffalo Lake, Summit Lake). CO2-poor units contain 50 to 200 ppm CO2 (Solfatara Plateau, West Yellowstone, Tuff of Cold Mountain Creek, unnamed tuff on Douglas Knob). Volatile contents do not correlate with eruption age, volume, or style. Inclusions from individual units contain incompatible trace-element concentrations that range from primitive to evolved. Incompatible elements within each unit increase systematically from primitive inclusions (units differ by <20%), to more evolved inclusions, and finally to highly evolved matrix. The inclusions preserve a systematic evolution produced by crystal fractionation, which we estimate to range from 38±8 wt.% to 54±11 wt.%. Inclusions from the Tuffs of Bluff Point and Cold Mountain Creek display similar evolution, except that matrix glass in those tuffs is less evolved than the inclusions. We infer the magmas were volatile-saturated at depth because H2O and CO2 do not correlate positively with incompatible elements. If true, then the CO2-rich magmas were stored at 90 to 150 MPa and contained a fluid that was 60-75 mol.% CO2, whereas CO2-poor magmas were stored at 50 to 70 MPa and contained a more H2O-rich fluid (XCO2 = 40-60%). The variations in pressure/depth suggest the magmas were at least temporarily stored as separate batches that followed similar evolutionary paths in the shallow crust.

  1. Some water mites (Acari, Hydrachnidia from Caldera de Taburiente National Park (La Palma, Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecasas, A. G.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Protzia cf. lata, Lebertia fimbriata Thor, 1899; Limnesia martianezi Lundblad, 1962; Atractides gomerae Lundblad, 1962 are mentioned for the first time for the island of La Palma: Feltria menzeli Walter, 1922 and Aturus atlantica Lundblad, 1942 for the first time in the Canary islands. It is the first record of the genus Feltria Koenike, 1892 in Macaronesia.

    Protzia cf. lata, Lebertia fimbriata Thor, 1899; Limnesia martianezi Lundblad, 1962; Atractides gomerae Lundblad, 1962 han sido encontradas por primera vez en la isla de La Palma: Feltria menzeli Walter, 1922 y Aturus atlantica Lundblad, 1942 son nueva cita para las islas Canarias y es la primera vez que se registra el género Feltria Koenike, 1892 en Macaronesia.

  2. ALKALINE VOLCANISM IN THE KOLA PENINSULA, RUSSIA: PALEOZOIC KHIBINY, LOVOZERO AND KONTOZERO CALDERAS

    OpenAIRE

    Арзамасцев, Андрей; Петровский, Михаил

    2012-01-01

    Представлены результаты изучения палеозойских вулканических серий Кольской провинции, распространенных в районах Ловозера, Хибин, Контозера и Ивановского вулкано-плутонического комплекса. Особенностью вулканитов является присутствие умеренно щелочных базанитов наряду с недонасыщенными кремнеземом щелочными ассоциациями. Все породы значительно обогащены некогерентными элементами: содержания Rb, Ba, Sr, Zr, Nb, Y в вулканитах ловозерской и контозерской свит значительно превышают таковые в щелоч...

  3. Buoyancy-driven convection and mixing in magma chambers - the case of Phlegraean Fields caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Chiara P.; Longo, Antonella; Bagagli, Matteo; Papale, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Ascent of primitive magmas from depth into shallow, partially degassed reservoirs is commonly assumed to be a viable eruption trigger. At Phlegraean Fields (Southern Italy), processes of convection and mixing have been identified as taking an active part both in pre- and syn-eruptive stages in many eruptions of different size. We performed numerical simulations of magma chamber replenishment referring to an archetypal case whereby a shallow, small magma chamber containing degassed phonolite is invaded by volatile-rich shoshonitic magma coming from a deeper, larger reservoir. The system evolution is solely driven by buoyancy, as the magma entering the shallower chamber is less dense than the degassed, resident phonolite. The evolution in space and time of physical quantities such as pressure, gas content and density is highly heterogeneous; nonetheless, an overall decreasing exponential trend in time can be observed and characterizes the whole process. The same exponentially decreasing trend can be observed in the amplitude of the ground deformation signals (seismicity over the whole frequency spectrum) calculated from the results of the magmatic dynamics. Exponential decay in the efficiency of the mixing process has been also observed experimentally, albeit on much smaller length and time scales (Morgavi et al., Contrib. Min. Petr. 2013). Depending on the initial and boundary conditions explored, such as chamber geometry or density contrast, the time constant thus the duration of the process can vary. Independently, the evolution of pressure in the magmatic system also depends on the initial and boundary conditions, leading either to eruption-favourable conditions or not. Relating the time scales for convective processes to be effective with their outcomes in terms of stresses at the chamber boundaries can substantially improve our ability to forecast eruptions at volcanoes worldwide.

  4. Thermodynamic state updated of the volcanic caldera and geothermal reservoir of Los Humeros, Puebla, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on information of enthalpies of the fluids of wells from the geothermal reservoir of Los Humeros, Puebla, Mexico, we determined the thermodynamic conditions of the reservoir comparing the values of enthalpies of the fluids of discharge of the wells with the values published in the literature for different thermodynamic state of fluids.

  5. 222Rn and CO2 at las Canadas Caldera (Tenerife, Canary Islands)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon, CO2 and environmental variables have been recorded during nearly three years at a shelter hosting a 505 m deep well located close to Teide volcano. Different temporal patterns are observed, annual, semi-annual, semidiurnal and multi-day fluctuations, the latter observed as gradual variation of the semidiurnal signal. CO2 is anticorrelated with atmospheric pressure (Patm) at daily and at multi-day scale, pointing to a barometric control on the rate of up-flow through the pipe of volcanic CO2 exhaled from the aquifer. Rn daily maximum lags pressure by 2 hours or more, exhibiting a positive correlation at the multi-day scale. Also, an apparent quasi-fortnightly period is detected for Rn, CO2 and Patm during summer months, with different relations among them (reversal at CO2 compared to Rn and Patm), pointing to a long period tidal modulation on these gases. Several anomalous large semidiurnal radon peaks were detected, some of them possibly related to seismic events within the volcanic edifice. This work defines radon baseline levels during a period of low geo-dynamic activity at a site which is in direct contact with a CO2 saturated aquifer that could be easily perturbed by potential unrest at the central volcanic edifice of the island. (authors)

  6. Age and impacts of the caldera-forming Aniakchak II eruption in western Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, J. J.; Payne, R. J.; Heggen, M. P.; de la Riva Caballero, A.; van der Plicht, J.

    2014-07-01

    The mid-Holocene eruption of Aniakchak volcano (Aniakchak II) in southwest Alaska was among the largest eruptions globally in the last 10,000 years (VEI-6). Despite evidence for possible impacts on global climate, the precise age of the eruption is not well-constrained and little is known about regional environmental impacts. A closely spaced sequence of radiocarbon dates at a peatland site over 1000 km from the volcano show that peat accumulation was greatly reduced with a hiatus of approximately 90-120 yr following tephra deposition. During this inferred hiatus no paleoenvironmental data are available but once vegetation returned the flora changed from a Cyperaceae-dominated assemblage to a Poaceae-dominated vegetation cover, suggesting a drier and/or more nutrient-rich ecosystem. Oribatid mites are extremely abundant in the peat at the depth of the ash, and show a longer-term, increasingly wet peat surface across the tephra layer. The radiocarbon sample immediately below the tephra gave a date of 1636-1446 cal yr BC suggesting that the eruption might be younger than previously thought. Our findings suggest that the eruption may have led to a widespread reduction in peatland carbon sequestration and that the impacts on ecosystem functioning were profound and long-lasting.

  7. Strengths and strain energies of volcanic edifices: implications for eruptions, collapse calderas, and landslides

    OpenAIRE

    A. Gudmundsson

    2012-01-01

    Natural hazards associated with volcanic edifices depend partly on how fracture resistant the edifices are, i.e. on their strengths. Observations worldwide indicate that large fluid-driven extension fractures (dikes, inclined sheets), shear fractures (landslides), and mixed-mode fractures (ring dikes and ring faults) normally propagate more easily in a basaltic edifice (shield volcano) than in a stratovolcano. For example, dike-fed eruptions occur once every few years in many basaltic edifice...

  8. Multibeam collection for VANC02MV: Multibeam data collected aboard Melville from 2002-09-07 to 2002-10-09, departing from Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica and returning to Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  9. The dispersal of ash during explosive eruptions from central volcanoes and calderas: an underestimated hazard for the central Mediterranean area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The central Mediterranean area comprises some of the most active volcanoes of the northern hemisphere. Some of their names recall myths or events in human history: Somma-Vesuvius, Etna, Stromboli, Vulcano, Ischia and Campi Flegrei. These volcanoes are still active today, and produce both effusive and explosive eruptions. In particular, explosive eruptions can produce and disperse large amount of volcanic ash, which pose a threat to environment, economy and human health over a large part of the Mediterranean area. We present and discuss data of ash dispersal from some explosive eruptions of southern Italy volcanoes, which dispersed centimetre -thick ash blankets hundred of kilometres from the source, irrespective of the more limited dispersal of the respective coarse grained fallout and PDC deposits. The collected data also highlight the major role played by lower atmosphere winds in dispersal of ash from weak plumes and ash clouds that accompany PDC emplacement.

  10. Usos del suelo y capacidad de carga territorial: el caso de la Caldera del Rey(Tenerife, Islas Canarias)

    OpenAIRE

    José Iván Bolaños González

    2002-01-01

    Adeje, municipio suroccidental de la isla de Tenerife, ha experimentado un importante crecimiento turístico en las últimas décadas, concentrándose las urbanizaciones destinadas a dicha actividad en el ámbito costero colmatándolo progresivamente. Como consecuencia, la superficie ocupada por uno de los principales cultivos de exportación de Canarias, el plátano, se ha reducido notablemente, pues este uso del suelo compite con la expansión turística en detrimento del platanal. ...

  11. The effects of forest vegetation on snow accumulation, ablation, and meltwater routing, Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, P. D.; Molotch, N.; Musselman, K.; Small, E.; McConnell, J.; Bales, R.; Rinehart, A.

    2006-12-01

    The NSF-funded Science and Technology Center SAHRA is leading a major, interdisciplinary effort to design, implement, and operate a long-term environmental observatory to quantify the affects of vegetation change on basin-scale water balance in semi-arid environments. Much our research is focused on high elevation catchments in New Mexico where snow and snowmelt provide the major source of water for lower elevations. While the spatial distribution of snow has been reasonably well characterized in many headwater catchments, relatively little work has focused on the interactions between snow cover, vegetation, soil moisture, and water yield in relatively low latitude, high solar load systems that characterize much of the semi-arid southwest. Within our experimental study sites in northern New Mexico we quantified the effects of forest vegetation on snow accumulation and ablation along with concurrent studies of soil moisture, sap flow, evapotranspiration, groundwater levels, stream discharge, and water routing. Detailed snowpit analyses and ultrasonic snow depth sensors indicated that forest vegetation affected snowcover both through physical interception and through mediating energy fluxes. At maximum accumulation, canopy interception resulted in a 47% reduction of under canopy SWE. Conversely, shade cover resulted in 24.6% more SWE in the open on the north sides of trees than the exposed south sides. Spring melt rates were 54% greater in the open than beneath the canopy. We found that vegetative shading may delay maximum SWE accumulation by up to three weeks and greatly increase snow cover duration by minimizing ablation rates. These initial data differ from results at higher latitudes where snowmelt rates were unaffected by the distribution of vegetation. Ongoing studies are designing to assess the inter-annual variability in snow cover as well as long term contributions of snowmelt to both stream flow and groundwater.

  12. Automatic earthquake detection and classification with continuous hidden Markov models: a possible tool for monitoring Las Canadas caldera in Tenerife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possible interaction of (volcano-) tectonic earthquakes with the continuous seismic noise recorded in the volcanic island of Tenerife was recently suggested, but existing catalogues seem to be far from being self consistent, calling for the development of automatic detection and classification algorithms. In this work we propose the adoption of a methodology based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), widely used already in other fields, such as speech classification.

  13. Size and volume evaluation of the caldera collapse on Piton de la Fournaise volcano during the April 2007 eruption using ASTER stereo imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Urai, Minoru; Geshi, Nobuo; Staudacher, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    [1] The scale of summit collapse during the April 2007 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise volcano, Réunion Island, western Indian Ocean, was evaluated using before-and-after differential digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from nadir and backward-looking images from the Advanced Spaceborne Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER) instrument. The dimensions of horizontal length and width, volume and depth of the depression were estimated as 1,100 Â 800 m, 9.6 Â 10 7 m 3 and 320 m, respect...

  14. Intra-eruptive gas emissions and shallow magma storage after the 2007 summit caldera collapse of Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muro, A.; Aiuppa, A.; Burton, M.; Metrich, N.; Allard, P.; Fougeroux, T.; Giudice, G.; Guida, R.

    2012-04-01

    In spite of its frequent eruptive and intrusive activity (1 event/ 9 months, on average), Piton de la Fournaise volcano is characterized by weak gas emissions during intra-eruptive periods. This behaviour clearly contrasts with that of other persistently active mafic volcanoes such as Etna, Popocatepetl, Hawaii, Stromboli or Yasur. At Piton de la Fournaise, visible surface gas emissions between eruptions occur as low-temperature (<100 °C) fumaroles on the inner cliffs of the summit Dolomieu crater and steam release from peri-crateric fractures. Occasional bursts of vapour from the summit crater occur during intense rain episodes because of the presence of recent and still hot lava flows and dykes. We here report on results for i) the first periodic monitoring of the summit crater fumaroles (H2O, CO2, SO2, H2S) during October 2010 to January 2012, using a MultiGAS sensor device, and ii) the dissolved volatile content of melt inclusions and crystal-melt equilibria in post-2007 eruptive products. The post-2007 PdF activity consisted in small volume (0.1-2.9 Mm3) and often short-lived, summit or proximal eruptions and several shallow intrusions. The activity cycle in the period October 2010-January 2012 consisted in two proximal eruptions (October and December 2010) and one shallow intrusion (February 2011, about 2 km below volcano summit). The intrusion was followed by a general trend of decreasing seismic activity (both in number and energy of events) and increasing host-medium seismic velocity, consistent with an observed contraction and deflation of the summit cone. We show here that PdF crater fumaroles are steam-dominated (H2O/CO2: 170-30) and emit H2S as the only sulphur species (CO2/H2S: 20-180; no SO2 detected, at least since April 2011). We find that the decrease in seismic activity and edifice contraction since February 2011 was paralleled by markedly decreasing H2O/CO2 ratio and increasing CO2/H2S ratio, which could reflect declining rates of H2O and H2S (residual) degassing from the cooling shallow magma intrusions. Melt inclusion studies and mineral equilibria analysis indicate that the basalts recently emitted by Piton de la Fournaise had a relatively low MgO content (MgO: 7.1+/-0.6 wt%), quite uniform moderate contents of water (H2O max 1 wt%) and sulphur (S<1600 ppm), and were poor in carbon (CO2<300 ppm). These observations support the hypothesis that the recent volcanic activity was due to magma transfer and storage within a relatively small (<50 MPa) pressure/depth range, corresponding to the subaerial part of the volcanic pile. In such conditions H2O and sulphur are likely to be the most sensitive volatiles for tracking the evolution of PDF volcanic activity.

  15. Authigenic carbonates related to active seepage of methane-rich hot brines at the Cheops mud volcano, Menes caldera (Nile deep-sea fan, eastern Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Catherine; Bayon, Germain; Blanc-Valleron, Marie-Madeleine; Mascle, Jean; Dupré, Stéphanie

    2014-06-01

    On the passive margin of the Nile deep-sea fan, the active Cheops mud volcano (MV; ca. 1,500 m diameter, ~20-30 m above seafloor, 3,010-3,020 m water depth) comprises a crater lake with hot (up to ca. 42 °C) methane-rich muddy brines in places overflowing down the MV flanks. During the Medeco2 cruise in fall 2007, ROV dives enabled detailed sampling of the brine fluid, bottom lake sediments at ca. 450 m lake depth, sub-surface sediments from the MV flanks, and carbonate crusts at the MV foot. Based on mineralogical, elemental and stable isotope analyses, this study aims at exploring the origin of the brine fluid and the key biogeochemical processes controlling the formation of these deep-sea authigenic carbonates. In addition to their patchy occurrence in crusts outcropping at the seafloor, authigenic carbonates occur as small concretions disseminated within sub-seafloor sediments, as well as in the bottom sediments and muddy brine of the crater lake. Aragonite and Mg-calcite dominate in the carbonate crusts and in sub-seafloor concretions at the MV foot, whereas Mg-calcite, dolomite and ankerite dominate in the muddy brine lake and in sub-seafloor concretions near the crater rim. The carbonate crusts and sub-seafloor concretions at the MV foot precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with bottom seawater temperature; their low δ13C values (-42.6 to -24.5‰) indicate that anaerobic oxidation of methane was the main driver of carbonate precipitation. By contrast, carbonates from the muddy lake brine, bottom lake concretions and crater rim concretions display much higher δ13C (up to -5.2‰) and low δ18O values (down to -2.8‰); this is consistent with their formation in warm fluids of deep origin characterized by 13C-rich CO2 and, as confirmed by independent evidence, slightly higher heavy rare earth element signatures, the main driver of carbonate precipitation being methanogenesis. Moreover, the benthic activity within the seafloor sediment enhances aerobic oxidation of methane and of sulphide that promotes carbonate dissolution and gypsum precipitation. These findings imply that the coupling of carbon and sulphur microbial reactions represents the major link for the transfer of elements and for carbon isotope fractionation between fluids and authigenic minerals. A new challenge awaiting future studies in cold seep environments is to expand this work to oxidized and reduced sulphur authigenic minerals.

  16. A new record of Chironomus (Chironomus) acidophilus Keyl (Diptera, Chironomidae) from the Uzon volcanic caldera (Kronotsky Reserve, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia), its karyotype, ecology and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Oksana V; Lobkova, Ludmila E; Zhirov, Sergey V; Petrova, Ninel A

    2015-01-01

    Morphology, cytology, ecology and biology of Holarctic Chironomus (Chironomus) acidophilus Keyl, 1960 (Diptera, Chironomidae) was examined from material collected in the geothermal Vosmerka Lake (pH=2.0-2.5). An illustrated redescription of C. acidophilus is given on the basis of adult males reared from field-collected pupae, and of simultaneously collected larvae. Additional larvae belonging to the pseudothummi-complex were identified as C. acidophilus on the basis of their karyotype. The karyotype of C. acidophilus (2n=8) and detailed mapping of the 4 chromosome arms A, E, D and F are provided. The population of C. acidophilus from Kamchatka was found to be karyologically monomorphic. Information on distribution and ecology of C. acidophilus from Vosmerka Lake (total mineralization 1583.5 mg/l) is also given. Chironomus acidophilus is the only species of aquatic insects recorded in this lake. Lack of competition and a richness of food resources contribute to the high abundance (35161 ind./m2) and biomass (11.342 g/m2) of the larvae of C. acidophilus in Vosmerka Lake. PMID:26249988

  17. Medición de gas Radón (RN222 en aguas termales del Cerro Pacho, Caldera Coatepeque, El Salvador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Rodríguez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan concentraciones de radón (Rn222 y evaluación de radio (Ra226 disueltos en agua. El objetivo es contribuir al monitoreo volcánico, adaptando y validando metodología analítica. El muestreo fue de tipo discreto y mensual, desde junio 2011 hasta marzo 2013. Las concentraciones de radón varían de 0,48 ± 0,1 a 1,54 ± 0,13 Bq/L (promedio 1,24 Bq/L; concentraciones de radio se evaluaron de enero a diciembre 2012, los valores encontrados no demuestran detección de radio al nivel de confianza del 95 % respecto al límite de detección (4,2 mBq/L. En noviembre 2012 se observó disminución de radón, posiblemente relacionado a anomalías de subducción con epicentro a 143 km del cerro Pacho, registrando sismicidad volcánica 40 días antes con incrementos de microsismos y actividad volcano-tectónica. Se ha generado las primeras mediciones de radón en agua termal, estableciendo la línea base para evaluar el comportamiento de estos radionucleidos con la actividad sísmica.

  18. Inflation of Long Valley caldera, California, Basin and Range strain, and possible Mono Craters dike opening from 1990-94 GPS surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, G.A.; Langbein, J.; Stein, R.S.; Lisowski, M.; Svarc, J.

    1997-01-01

    Five years of annual Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys of a network centered on Long Valley, California, constrain displacement rates for these stations relative to a central station in the network. These observations are consistent with recent models of resurgent dome inflation in Long Valley (Langbein et al., 1995) and have sufficient signal to detect the presence of Basin and Range strain in the Long Valley region. The data also allow for the possibility of dike inflation beneath the Mono Craters; dike intrusion is consistent with the Mono Craters' recent geologic history of ash eruptions, with seismic tomography, leveling data, and geologic studies of these volcanic domes and flows. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Intra-eruptive gas emissions and shallow magma storage after the 2007 summit caldera collapse of Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muro, A.; Aiuppa, A.; Burton, M.; Metrich, N.; Allard, P.; Fougeroux, T.; Giudice, G.; Guida, R.

    2012-04-01

    In spite of its frequent eruptive and intrusive activity (1 event/ 9 months, on average), Piton de la Fournaise volcano is characterized by weak gas emissions during intra-eruptive periods. This behaviour clearly contrasts with that of other persistently active mafic volcanoes such as Etna, Popocatepetl, Hawaii, Stromboli or Yasur. At Piton de la Fournaise, visible surface gas emissions between eruptions occur as low-temperature (host-medium seismic velocity, consistent with an observed contraction and deflation of the summit cone. We show here that PdF crater fumaroles are steam-dominated (H2O/CO2: 170-30) and emit H2S as the only sulphur species (CO2/H2S: 20-180; no SO2 detected, at least since April 2011). We find that the decrease in seismic activity and edifice contraction since February 2011 was paralleled by markedly decreasing H2O/CO2 ratio and increasing CO2/H2S ratio, which could reflect declining rates of H2O and H2S (residual) degassing from the cooling shallow magma intrusions. Melt inclusion studies and mineral equilibria analysis indicate that the basalts recently emitted by Piton de la Fournaise had a relatively low MgO content (MgO: 7.1+/-0.6 wt%), quite uniform moderate contents of water (H2O max 1 wt%) and sulphur (Sstorage within a relatively small (<50 MPa) pressure/depth range, corresponding to the subaerial part of the volcanic pile. In such conditions H2O and sulphur are likely to be the most sensitive volatiles for tracking the evolution of PDF volcanic activity.

  20. Hyporheic Exchange Flows and Biogeochemical Patterns near a Meandering Stream: East Fork of the Jemez River, Valles Caldera National Preserve, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, H.; Wooten, J. P.; Swanson, E.; Senison, J. J.; Myers, K. D.; Befus, K. M.; Warden, J.; Zamora, P. B.; Gomez, J. D.; Wilson, J. L.; Groffman, A.; Rearick, M. S.; Cardenas, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    A study by the 2012 Hydrogeology Field Methods class of the University of Texas at Austin implemented multiple approaches to evaluate and characterize local hyporheic zone flow and biogeochemical trends in a highly meandering reach of the of the East Fork of the Jemez River, a fourth order stream in northwestern New Mexico. This section of the Jemez River is strongly meandering and exhibits distinct riffle-pool morphology. The high stream sinuosity creates inter-meander hyporheic flow that is also largely influenced by local groundwater gradients. In this study, dozens of piezometers were used to map the water table and flow vectors were then calculated. Surface water and ground water samples were collected and preserved for later geochemical analysis by ICPMS and HPLC, and unstable parameters and alkalinity were measured on-site. Additionally, information was collected from thermal monitoring of the streambed, stream gauging, and from a series of electrical resistivity surveys forming a network across the site. Hyporheic flow paths are suggested by alternating gaining and losing sections of the stream as determined by stream gauging at multiple locations along the reach. Water table maps and calculated fluxes across the sediment-water interface also indicate hyporheic flow paths. We find variability in the distribution of biogeochemical constituents (oxidation-reduction potential, nitrate, ammonium, and phosphate) along interpreted flow paths which is partly consistent with hyporheic exchange. The variability and heterogeneity of reducing and oxidizing conditions is interpreted to be a result of groundwater-surface water interaction. Two-dimensional mapping of biogeochemical parameters show redox transitions along interpreted flow paths. Further analysis of various measured unstable chemical parameters results in observable trends strongly delineated along these preferential flow paths that are consistent with the direction of groundwater flow and the assumed direction of inter-meander hyporheic flow.

  1. Sistemas de generación eléctrica mediante calderas de vapor energizadas por radiación solar concentrada

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Antón, Javier

    2008-01-01

    La creciente demanda de energía, el elevado coste del petróleo, y los problemas ambientales requieren de nuevas plantas de potencia de alto rendimiento, bajo coste de generación, rápida construcción y poco contaminantes. Basándose en estas ideas, la evolución del parque de generación eléctrica ha ido adaptándose con el paso de los años, adoptando tecnologías (ciclos combinados) o mejorando las existentes (nuclear, hidroeléctrica de bombeo). De forma paralela a estas formas de generación fue s...

  2. Multibeam collection for DANA06RR: Multibeam data collected aboard Roger Revelle from 2004-02-09 to 2004-03-09, departing from Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica and returning to Mazatlan, Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  3. Multibeam collection for NEMO04MV: Multibeam data collected aboard Melville from 2000-06-12 to 2000-06-28, departing from Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica and returning to San Diego, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  4. Comment on “40Ar/39Ar dating of tuff vents in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy): toward a new chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the Holocene volcanic activity” by Fedele et al. [Bull Volcanol; 73:1323–1336

    OpenAIRE

    Isaia, R.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Di Vito, M. A.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; De Vita, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Rosi, M.; Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Pisa, Italia; Sbrana, A.; Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita` degli Studi di Pisa

    2012-01-01

    The volcanic history of each active volcano is assembled through detailed field work that establishes stratigraphic position of the eruption deposits, radiometric ages and study of historical sources. The volcanic history is important for hazard assessment, thus the scientific community must validate the strength of conclusions. Fedele et al. (2011) propose a new reference chronostratigraphic framework for Holocene Phlegrean activity, and discuss the implications for t...

  5. Multibeam collection for NEMO03MV: Multibeam data collected aboard Melville from 2000-05-15 to 2000-06-08, departing from Manzanillo, Mexico and returning to Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  6. Multibeam collection for DRFT05RR: Multibeam data collected aboard Roger Revelle from 2001-09-27 to 2001-10-31, departing from Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica and returning to Callao, Peru

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  7. 屈斜路カルデラ周辺におけるMT 法による比抵抗探査

    OpenAIRE

    本多, 亮; 山谷, 祐介; 市原, 寛; 長谷, 英彰; 茂木, 透; 山下, 晴之; 大山, 倫敦; 上嶋, 誠; 中川, 光弘

    2011-01-01

     Two noticeable caldera lakes exist around Teshikaga region, Eastern Hokkaido, Northern Japan. One is the Lake Masyu, and the other is the Lake Kutcharo, upon the largest caldera in Japan. The calderas locate on the Akan-Shiretoko volcanic line, and the region is still active. We can see many geothermal and fumarolic phenomena around. Recently, the chronology of the volcanic activity in this region is well surveyed by geologists, and the clarification of the eruption mechanism ...

  8. Communication between earthquake clusters separated by over 30 km supports simple volcano plumbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, K.; Jonasson, K.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Hensch, M.; Hooper, A. J.; Holohan, E. P.; Sigmundsson, F.; Halldorsson, S. A.; Hognadottir, T.; Magnússon, E.; Pálsson, F.; Walter, T. R.; Ofeigsson, B.; Parks, M.; Roberts, M. J.; Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Cesca, S.; Guðmundsson, G.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Jarosch, A. H.; Dumont, S.; Fridriksdóttir, H. M.; Barsotti, S.; Einarsson, P.

    2015-12-01

    The subglacial Bárðarbunga volcano is composed of a large oval caldera (7x11 km) and fissures extending tens of kilometers away from the caldera along the rift zone, which marks the divergent plate boundary across Iceland. On August 16th, 2014 an intense seismic swarm started below the Bárðarbunga caldera and in the two weeks that followed a dyke migrated some 47 km laterally in the uppermost 6-10 km of the crust along the rift. The dyke propagation terminated in lava fields just north of Vatnajökull glacier, where a major (1.5 km3) six months long eruption took place. Intense earthquake activity in the caldera started in the period August 21-24 with over 70 M5 earthquakes accompanying slow caldera collapse, as verified by various geodetic measurements. The subsidence is likely due to magma withdrawal from a reservoir at depth beneath the caldera. During a five months period, October-February, the seismic activity was separated by over 30 km in two clusters; one along the caldera rims (due to piecewise caldera subsidence) and the other at the far end of the dyke (as a result of small shear movements). Here we present statistical analysis comparing the temporal behaviour of seismicity recorded in the two clusters. By comparing the earthquake rate in the dyke in temporal bins before and after caldera subsidence earthquakes to the rate away from these bins (background rate), we show that the number of dyke earthquakes was significantly higher (p M4.6) in the caldera. Increased dyke seismicity was also observed 0-3 hours following a large caldera earthquake. Elevated seismicity in the dyke before a large caldera earthquake may occur when a constriction in the dyke was reduced, followed by pressure drop in the chamber. Assuming that the large caldera earthquakes occurred when chamber pressure was lowest, the subsiding caldera piston may have caused temporary higher pressure in the dyke and thereby increased the likelihood of an earthquake. Our results thus suggests

  9. Eruption products of the 1883 eruption of Krakatau and their final settlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Yokoyama

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Firstly the volume of pyroclastic ejecta during the 1883 eruption of Krakatau is re-examined. To revise the volume of flow deposits, the author basically follows Verbeek’s observation while to estimate the fall deposits, as the last resort, the author assumes that volume ratios fall / flow are common to similar caldera eruptions, and the ratios determined by the caldera- forming eruptions of Novarupta and Pinatubo are applied to the Krakatau eruption. Verbeek’s estimation of the total volume of ejecta, 12 km3 is revised to 19 km3. This is significantly different from the volume of disrupted volcano edifice, 8 km3. Such a result does not support the predecessors’ hypothesis that calderas are formed by collapses of volcano edifices into magma reservoirs in replacement of the total ejecta. Through the discussion on the volume estimation of volcanic ejecta on and around Krakatau, the author recognizes that such estimation should be originally very difficult to attain enough accuracy. Much importance of “caldera deposits” to post-eruption settlements of the ejecta is emphasized. In relation to caldera formation, mechanical stability of a cavity in the crust is discussed. Lastly, upon the basis of subsurface structure, especially caldera deposits, a structural image of Krakatau caldera is presented.

  10. Quaternary volcanism in Deception Island (Antarctica): South Shetland Trench subduction-related signature in the Bransfield Basin back arc domain; Vulcanismo cuaternario de la Isla Decepcion (Antartida): una signatura relacionada con la subduccion de la Fosa de las Shetland del Sur en el dominio de tras-arco de la Cuenca de Bransfield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, C.; Ubide, T.; Lago, M.; Gil-Imaz, A.; Gil-Pena, I.; Galindo-Zaldivar, J.; Rey, J.; Maestro, A.; Lopez-Martinez, J.

    2014-06-01

    Deception Island shows a volcanism related to the Phoenix Plate subduction and roll-back under South Shetland Block in the present times. The development of the island is related to the evolution and collapse of a volcanic caldera, and this study is focused on the petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry of the post-caldera rocks. We have made a study of the lava flows, dikes and the youngest historic eruption in 1970. These rocks range from dacite to rhyolite and have a microporphyritic texture with olivine and minor clinopyroxene. A pre-caldera basaltic andesite has also been studied. It has a microporphyritic texture with clinopyroxene. The intermediate and acid compositions alternating in the volcanostratigraphic sequence suggest either mafic recharge events or melt extraction from different levels in the deep magmatic system. All the studied compositions share a subduction-related signature similar to other magmatics from the Bransfield Basin. However, compositional differences between pre-caldera and post-caldera rocks indicate a different magma source and depth of crystallisation. According to the geothermobarometric calculations the pre-caldera magmas started to crystallise at deeper levels (13.5-15 km) than the post-caldera magmas (6.2-7.8 km). Specifically, the postcaldera magmas indicate a smaller influence of the subducting slab in the southwestern part of the Bransfield Basin in respect to the available data from other sectors as well as the involvement of crustal contamination in the genesis of the magmas. (Author)

  11. Quaternary volcanism in Deception Island (Antarctica): South Shetland Trench subduction-related signature in the Bransfield Basin back arc domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deception Island shows a volcanism related to the Phoenix Plate subduction and roll-back under South Shetland Block in the present times. The development of the island is related to the evolution and collapse of a volcanic caldera, and this study is focused on the petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry of the post-caldera rocks. We have made a study of the lava flows, dikes and the youngest historic eruption in 1970. These rocks range from dacite to rhyolite and have a microporphyritic texture with olivine and minor clinopyroxene. A pre-caldera basaltic andesite has also been studied. It has a microporphyritic texture with clinopyroxene. The intermediate and acid compositions alternating in the volcanostratigraphic sequence suggest either mafic recharge events or melt extraction from different levels in the deep magmatic system. All the studied compositions share a subduction-related signature similar to other magmatics from the Bransfield Basin. However, compositional differences between pre-caldera and post-caldera rocks indicate a different magma source and depth of crystallisation. According to the geothermobarometric calculations the pre-caldera magmas started to crystallise at deeper levels (13.5-15 km) than the post-caldera magmas (6.2-7.8 km). Specifically, the postcaldera magmas indicate a smaller influence of the subducting slab in the southwestern part of the Bransfield Basin in respect to the available data from other sectors as well as the involvement of crustal contamination in the genesis of the magmas. (Author)

  12. Geologic and preliminary reservoir data on the Los Humeros Geothermal System, Puebla, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferriz, H.

    1982-01-01

    Exploratory drilling has confirmed the existence of a geothermal system in the Los Humeros volcanic center, located 180 km east of Mexico City. Volcanic activity in the area began with the eruption of andesites, followed by two major caldera-forming pyroclastic eruptions. The younger Los Potreros caldera is nested inside the older Los Humeros caldera. At later stages, basaltic andesite, dacite, and olivine basalt lavas erupted along the ring-fracture zones of both calderas. Geologic interpretation of structural, geophysical, and drilling data suggests that: (1) the water-dominated geothermal reservoir is hosted by the earliest andesitic volcanic pile, is bounded by the ring-fracture zone of the Los Potreros caldera, and is capped by the products of the oldest caldera-forming eruption; (2) permeability within the andesitic pile is provided by faults and fractures related to intracaldera uplift; (3) the geothermal system has potential for a large influx of meteoric water through portions of the ring-fracture zones of both calderas; and (4) volcanic centers with similar magmatic and structural conditions can be found in the eastern Cascades, USA.

  13. Investigating Rapid Uplift and Subsidence Near Norris, Yellowstone, During 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, W. K.; Cervelli, P. F.; Shelly, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Although Yellowstone's last magmatic eruption occurred about 70,000 years ago, hydrothermal explosions, earthquakes, and ground deformation still occur as testament to ongoing volcanic and tectonic processes. Since the late 1990s, a network of continuously recording Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers has recorded uplift and subsidence of the caldera and northwest caldera margin near Norris Geyser Basin. Previous deformation episodes have shown opposing vertical motion at the two sites, which has been attributed to temporal variations in magmatic fluid flux from the caldera laterally through the Norris-Mammoth fault corridor that intersects the caldera's northwest margin (Dzurisin et al., 2012; Wicks et al., 2006). These episodes have exhibited gradual changes, transitioning from uplift to subsidence (and vice versa) over weeks to months. Large earthquake swarms accompanied transitions from caldera uplift to subsidence in 1985 and 2010. Recent deformation in Yellowstone differs from previously observed episodes. In the latter half of 2013, uplift began around Norris, and by January of 2014 it reached rates of over 15 cm/yr. Also at the start of 2014, caldera deformation shifted from approximately 4 years of slow subsidence to slow uplift. On March 30, 2014, a M4.8 earthquake, the largest in Yellowstone since 1980, occurred northwest of Norris Geyser Basin near the center of uplift. Shortly after the event, deformation near Norris abruptly reversed to rapid subsidence (over 20 cm/yr). Caldera uplift began to accelerate around the same time. Thus, uplift can occur simultaneously in both the caldera and the Norris area, and dramatic reversals from rapid uplift to rapid subsidence can occur within a matter of days. While the complexity of the deformation defies a simple explanation, we hypothesize that the rapid transition from uplift to subsidence at Norris may indicate that the M4.8 earthquake opened a pathway for fluid migration away from Norris and allowed an

  14. Calibration of a Groundwater Model of Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, W. E.; MacNeil, R. E.; Connor, C. B.

    2005-05-01

    Masaya Volcano consists of an active, 400-m-high, 6-km2, composite cone within a large (50-km2) basaltic caldera, and has a history of large phreatomagmatic eruptions. In order to better understand the hydrologic processes in this system, a groundwater model has been developed of the caldera using the USGS model MODFLOW. Transient electromagnetic (TEM) soundings were used to map the water table within the caldera. The water level of Lake Masaya, which occupies the lower one-fifth of the caldera, was used as a calibration point for the soundings. The TEM soundings revealed a water table mound beneath the cone, but not within the more permeable part of the caldera surrounding it. The differences between our estimated water levels inside the caldera and known regional water levels outside strongly suggest that the caldera walls are acting as hydrologic barriers, effectively isolating the groundwater-flow system within the caldera. A total of 29 estimated water levels and two ground-water-flux measurements were used to calibrate the model. The flux measurements were (1) a net flux into Lake Masaya of 1.2 m/yr, calculated from an estimate of lake evaporation and a transient lake-level record during the dry season, and (2) a net steam emission flux of 400 kg/sec from the active vent in Santiago crater. The lake and the steam vents are the only substantial discharges of groundwater within the caldera, each accounting for about half of the annual recharge. The steam discharge is substantially larger than other similar volcanoes in the world, suggesting its origin may be dominantly meteoric. The model calibration revealed that a deep, highly permeable layer must feed the active vent in order for the steam emissions to be maintained at their current levels. Quantifying this type of groundwater-vent interaction could be important to the understanding and prediction of future phreatomagmatic eruptions.

  15. The importance of shallow hydrothermal island arc systems in ocean biogeochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkes, Jeffrey A.; Connelly, Douglas P.; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrothermal venting often occurs at submarine volcanic calderas on island arc chains, typically at shallower depths than mid-ocean ridges. The effect of these systems on ocean biogeochemistry has been under-investigated to date. Here we show that hydrothermal effluent from an island arc caldera was rich in Fe(III) colloids (0.02-0.2 mu m; 46% of total Fe), contributing to a fraction of hydrothermal Fe that was stable in ocean water. Iron(III) colloids from island arc calderas may be transfer...

  16. Temporal monitoring of subglacial volcanoes with TanDEM-X — Application to the 2014–2015 eruption within the Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Cristian; Minet, Christian; Fritz, Thomas; Eineder, Michael; Bamler, Richard

    2016-01-01

    On August 29, 2014, a lava eruption commenced in the Holuhraun plain, north-east of the Bárðarbunga caldera in Iceland. The eruption ended on February 27, 2015, thus lasting for a period of about 6 months. During these months the magma chamber below the caldera gradually deflated, feeding the eruption and causing the rare event of a slow caldera collapse. In this scenario, TanDEM-X remote sensing data are of particular interest. By producing medium-high resolution and accurate elevation model...

  17. Co-combustión de biomasa forestal en una central térmica de carbón pulverizado de bajo rango: Influencia del tamaño de partícula en el comportamiento de la caldera

    OpenAIRE

    Canalís Martínez, Paula; Royo Herrer, Francisco Javier

    2013-01-01

    La co-combustión comparte con otras tecnologías que utilizan biomasa para la generación de electricidad las mismas ventajas frente al uso de combustibles fósiles y, además, presenta otras como una menor inversión o un aprovechamiento con mayor rendimiento. Sin embargo, esta tecnología conlleva algunos problemas que es necesario acotar para conseguir su total implantación. Una de las incertidumbres que plantea, previa a su puesta en marcha, es la influencia que puede tener sobre la planta orig...

  18. null Kilauea, USA Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The basaltic shield volcano on the Island of Hawaii is among the most extensively studied volcanoes in the world. The volcano, with its summit caldera, is located...

  19. Evolution and Erosion of Tyrrhena and Hadriaca Paterae, Mars: New Insights from MOC and MOLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, T. K. P.; Crown, D. A.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae, Mars, using MOC and MOLA data reveals new information about caldera formation, channel development, and lava flow-field emplacement. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Composition of garnets in the fossil geothermal system of Hafnarfjall

    OpenAIRE

    Haraldur Sigurjónsson 1987

    2016-01-01

    Garnet is an important high temperature index mineral in geothermal systems. At Hafnarfjall samples were collected from the fossil geothermal system within the caldera that has been exposed by erosion, these samples were found to contain garnets. The geothermal system was caused by a gabbro intrusion that formed by multiple intrusions of dolerite, this overode the previous geothermal system along the caldera fault. This was also observed in the composition of garnets related to quartz veins. ...

  1. Characteristics of the summit lakes of Ambae volcano and their potential for generating lahars

    OpenAIRE

    Bani, P.; Join, J.-L.; Cronin, S.J.; Lardy, M; Rouet, I.; Garaebiti, E.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions through crater lakes often generate lahars, causing loss of life and property. On Ambae volcano, recent eruptive activities have rather tended to reduce the water volume in the crater lake (Lake Voui), in turn, reducing the chances for outburst floods. Lake Voui occupies a central position in the summit caldera and is well enclosed by the caldera relief. Eruptions with significantly higher magnitude than that of 1995 and 2005 are required for an outburst. A more probable sc...

  2. Rapid heterogeneous assembly of multiple magma reservoirs prior to Yellowstone supereruptions

    OpenAIRE

    Jörn-Frederik Wotzlaw; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Stern, Richard A.; Francois-Xavier D’Abzac; Urs Schaltegger

    2015-01-01

    Large-volume caldera-forming eruptions of silicic magmas are an important feature of continental volcanism. The timescales and mechanisms of assembly of the magma reservoirs that feed such eruptions as well as the durations and physical conditions of upper-crustal storage remain highly debated topics in volcanology. Here we explore a comprehensive data set of isotopic (O, Hf) and chemical proxies in precisely U-Pb dated zircon crystals from all caldera-forming eruptions of Yellowstone supervo...

  3. Seismic energy envelopes in volcanic media: in need of boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    De Siena, L.; University of Munster, Institut fur Geophysik, Correnstrasse 24, 48149 Munster, Germany; Del Pezzo, E.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Thomas, C.; University of Munster, Institut fur Geophysik, Correnstrasse 24, 48149 Munster, Germany; Curtis, A.; School of GeoSciences, The University of Edinburgh, Grant Institute, The King’s Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, UK.; Margerin, L.; Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Plan´etologie, CNRS, Universit´e de Toulouse, Observatoire Midi-Pyr´en´ees, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France

    2013-01-01

    Seismogram envelopes recorded at Campi Flegrei caldera show diffusive characteristics as well as steep amplitude increases in the intermediate and late coda, which can be related to the presence of a non-uniformly scattering medium. In this paper, we first show the results of a simulation with a statistical model considering anisotropic scattering interactions, in order to match coda-envelope duration and shape.We consider as realistic parameters for a volcanic caldera the pres...

  4. The structural architecture of the Los Humeros volcanic complex and geothermal field, Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Sulpizio, Roberto; Carrasco Núñez, Gerardo; Davila Harris, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    The development of geothermal energy in Mexico is a very important goal, given the presence of a large heat anomaly, associated with the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, the renewability of the resource and the low environmental impact. The Quaternary Los Humeros volcanic complex is an important geothermal target, whose evolution involved at least two caldera events, that alternated with other explosive and effusive activity. The first caldera forming event was the 460 ka eruption that produced the Xaltipan ignimbrite and formed a 15-20 km wide caldera. The second collapse event occurred 100 ka with the formation of the Zaragoza ignimbrite and a nested 8-10 km wide caldera. The whole volcano structure, the style of the collapses and the exact location of the calderas scarps and ring faults are still a matter of debate. The Los Humeros volcano hosts the productive Los Humeros Geothermal Field, with an installed capacity of 40 MW and additional 75 MW power plants under construction. Recent models of the geothermal reservoir predict the existence of at least two reservoirs in the geothermal system, separated by impermeable rock units. Hydraulic connectivity and hydrothermal fluids circulation occurs through faults and fractures, allowing deep steam to ascend while condensate flows descend. As a consequence, the plans for the exploration and exploitation of the geothermal reservoir have been based on the identification of the main channels for the circulation of hydrothermal fluids, constituted by faults, so that the full comprehension of the structural architecture of the caldera is crucial to improve the efficiency and minimize the costs of the geothermal field operation. In this study, we present an analysis of the Los Humeros volcanic complex focused on the Quaternary tectonic and volcanotectonics features, like fault scarps and aligned/elongated monogenetic volcanic centres. Morphostructural analysis and field mapping reveal the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of

  5. Geologic Results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Vicki S.; Eichelberger, John C.; Keskinen, Mary J.; Layer, Paul W.

    1992-03-24

    As a deep well in the center of a major Quaternary caldera, the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) provides a new perspective on the relationship between hydrothermal circulation and a large crustal magma chamber. It also provides an important test of models for the subsurface structure of active continental calderas. Results will impact geothermal exploration, assessment, and management of the Long Valley resource and should be applicable to other igneous-related geothermal systems. Our task is to use the cuttings and core from LVEW to interpret the evolution of the central caldera region, with emphasis on evidence of current hydrothermal conditions and circulation. LVEW has reached a depth of 2313 m, passing through post-caldera extrusives and the intracaldera Bishop Tuff to bottom in the Mt. Morrison roof pendant of the Sierran basement. The base of the section of Quaternary volcanic rocks related to Long Valley Caldera was encountered at 1800 m of which 1178 m is Bishop Tuff. The lithologies sampled generally support the classic view of large intercontinental calderas as piston-cylinder-like structures. In this model, the roof of the huge magma chamber, like an ill-fitting piston, broke and sank 2 km along a ring fracture system that simultaneously and explosively leaked magma as Bishop Tuff. Results from LVEW which support this model are the presence of intact basement at depth at the center of the caldera, the presence of a thick Bishop Tuff section, and textural evidence that the tuff encountered is not near-vent despite its central caldera location. An unexpected observation was the presence of rhyolite intrusions within the tuff with a cumulative apparent thickness in excess of 300 m. Chemical analyses indicate that these are high-silica, high-barium rhyolites. Preliminary {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses determined an age of 626 {+-} 38 ka (this paper). These observations would indicate that the intrusions belong to the early post-collapse episode of

  6. Structural analysis and thermal remote sensing of the Los Humeros Volcanic Complex: Implications for volcano structure and geothermal exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, G.; Groppelli, G.; Sulpizio, R.; Carrasco-Núñez, G.; Dávila-Harris, P.; Pellicioli, C.; Zucca, F.; De Franco, R.

    2015-08-01

    The Los Humeros Volcanic Complex (LHVC) is an important geothermal target in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Understanding the structure of the LHVC and its influence on the occurrence of thermal anomalies and hydrothermal fluids is important to get insights into the interplay between the volcano-tectonic setting and the characteristics of the geothermal resources in the area. In this study, we present a structural analysis of the LHVC, focused on Quaternary tectonic and volcano-tectonic features, including the areal distribution of monogenetic volcanic centers. Morphostructural analysis and structural field mapping revealed the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of the structural features in the study area. Also, thermal infrared remote sensing analysis has been applied to the LHVC for the first time, to map the main endogenous thermal anomalies. These data are integrated with newly proposed Unconformity Bounded Stratigraphic Units, to evaluate the implications for the structural behavior of the caldera complex and geothermal field. The LHVC is characterized by a multistage formation, with at least two major episodes of caldera collapse: Los Humeros Caldera (460 ka) and Los Potreros Caldera (100 ka). The study suggests that the geometry of the first collapse recalls a trap-door structure and impinges on a thick volcanic succession (10.5-1.55 Ma), now hosting the geothermal reservoir. The main ring-faults of the two calderas are buried and sealed by the widespread post-calderas volcanic products, and for this reason they probably do not have enough permeability to be the main conveyers of the hydrothermal fluid circulation. An active, previously unrecognized fault system of volcano-tectonic origin has been identified inside the Los Potreros Caldera. This fault system is the main geothermal target, probably originated by active resurgence of the caldera floor. The active fault system defines three distinct structural sectors in the caldera floor, where the

  7. How Did Ca. 300 Years of Explosive Activity at Kilauea End?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Kilauea experienced ~300 years of frequent explosive eruptions following caldera collapse in about 1500 CE, producing the Keanakāko';i Tephra. The first 200 years were dominated by juvenile-rich phreatomagmatic eruptions, and the next 100 years by lithic-rich phreatomagmatic and phreatic explosive events. For most of this time, the caldera was deep enough (≥600 m) to allow magma and hot rock to interact with external water at and below the water table. This situation changed after the deadly 1790 eruption. The first eruption was magmatic, involving high fountaining that deposited pumice across >25 km2 south of the caldera. The pumice is hard to find today; it was mostly eroded away soon after deposition and is found only in protected areas along drainages and next to obstacles. The deposit has a consistent internal stratigraphy regardless of its thickness (maximum of 12 cm): lower third mostly achneliths (Pele's hair and tears), upper two- thirds pumice bombs and lapilli. The fountaining, the first purely magmatic event since reticulite erupted in ca. 1500, probably signifies a rising magma column and early filling of the caldera. The next eruption was phreatic, depositing fine lithic ash a few millimeters thick across >45 km2 south of the caldera. It may record withdrawal of the magma column and collapse of part of the caldera floor to or below the water table. The magma column rose soon thereafter, and its free surface was above the water table for some time. This event is recorded by Pele's hair deposited on the lithic ash across >30 km2 south of the caldera. The hair forms a jackstraw mat 40 km2 south of the caldera. Mean grain size along the dispersal axis decreases from 7 mm on the rim of the caldera to 2 mm 7 km south of the caldera, where the deposit disappears into forest. This subplinian eruption records interaction of groundwater with both conduit wallrock and magma, probably during renewed collapse. A few ballistic blocks fell near the caldera soon

  8. Incremental assembly and prolonged consolidation of Cordilleran magma chambers--Evidence from the Southern Rocky Mountain volcanic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    Recent inference that Mesozoic Cordilleran plutons grew incrementally during >106 yr intervals, without the presence of voluminous eruptible magma at any stage, minimizes close associations with large ignimbrite calderas. Alternatively, Tertiary ignimbrites in the Rocky Mountains and elsewhere, with volumes of 1–5 × 103 km3, record multistage histories of magma accumulation, fractionation, and solidification in upper parts of large subvolcanic plutons that were sufficiently liquid to erupt. Individual calderas, up to 75 km across with 2–5 km subsidence, are direct evidence for shallow magma bodies comparable to the largest granitic plutons. As exemplified by the composite Southern Rocky Mountain volcanic field (here summarized comprehensively for the first time), which is comparable in areal extent, magma composition, eruptive volume, and duration to continental-margin volcanism of the central Andes, nested calderas that erupted compositionally diverse tuffs document deep composite subsidence and rapid evolution in subvolcanic magma bodies. Spacing of Tertiary calderas at distances of tens to hundreds of kilometers is comparable to Mesozoic Cordilleran pluton spacing. Downwind ash in eastern Cordilleran sediments records large-scale explosive volcanism concurrent with Mesozoic batholith growth. Mineral fabrics and gradients indicate unified flow-age of many pluton interiors before complete solidification, and some plutons contain ring dikes or other textural evidence for roof subsidence. Geophysical data show that low-density upper-crustal rocks, inferred to be plutons, are 10 km or more thick beneath many calderas. Most ignimbrites are more evolved than associated plutons; evidence that the subcaldera chambers retained voluminous residua from fractionation. Initial incremental pluton growth in the upper crust was likely recorded by modest eruptions from central volcanoes; preparation for caldera-scale ignimbrite eruption involved recurrent magma input and

  9. Paleomagnetism from Deception Island (South Shetlands archipelago, Antarctica), new insights into the interpretation of the volcanic evolution using a geomagnetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Urcia, B.; Gil-Peña, I.; Maestro, A.; López-Martínez, J.; Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; Soto, R.; Gil-Imaz, A.; Rey, J.; Pueyo, O.

    2016-07-01

    Deception Island shows the most recent exposed active volcanism in the northern boundary of the Bransfield Trough. The succession of the volcanic sequence in the island is broadly divided into pre- and post-caldera collapse units although a well-constrained chronological identification of the well-defined successive volcanic episodes is still needed. A new paleomagnetic investigation was carried out on 157 samples grouped in 20 sites from the volcanic deposits of Deception Island (South Shetlands archipelago, Antarctic Peninsula region) distributed in: (1) volcanic breccia (3 sites) and lavas (2 sites) prior to the caldera collapse; (2) lavas emplaced after the caldera collapse (10 sites); and (3) dikes cutting pre- and the lowermost post-caldera collapse units (5 sites). The information revealed by paleomagnetism provides new data about the evolution of the multi-episodic volcanic edifice of this Quaternary volcano, suggesting that the present-day position of the volcanic materials is close to their original emplacement position. The new data have been combined with previous paleomagnetic results in order to tentatively propose an age when comparing the paleomagnetic data with a global geomagnetic model. Despite the uncertainties in the use of averaged paleomagnetic data per volcanic units, the new data in combination with tephra occurrences noted elsewhere in the region suggest that the pre-caldera units (F1 and F2) erupted before 12,000 year BC, the caldera collapse took place at about 8300 year BC, and post-caldera units S1 and S2 are younger than 2000 year BC.

  10. 3d Velocity Tomography of The Kos - Nisyros Volcanic Area - East Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, S.; Ilinski, D.; Makris, J.; Chonia, T.; Stavrakakis, J.

    Since June 2000, active and passive seismic observations have been carried out by IfG, GeoPro GmbH, Hamburg and Institute of Geodynamics, Athens within the frame of the project GEOWARN (Geo-Spacial Warning Systems Nisyros Volcano, Greece: An Emergency Case Study of the Volcanic Area of Nisyros) supported by the European Community. In the active experiment 48 recording seismic units were deployed and recorded more than 7000 shots in 3D array. The Nisyros volcano has been identified as an apophytic intrusion of much larger volcanic structure with a caldera of 35 km diameter, extending between the southern coasts of the islands of Kos and Nisyros. To obtain 3-D velocity structure of the area a tomographic inversion was made using 6800 rays which probed the area with a very high ray density. The method applied and the high accuracy of active tomographic data allowed to resolve the high velocity bodies in the caldera. The complex volcanic structure is identified by high velocity rocks in- truding through the upper crust and penetrating the volcanic cone to depth of approx. 1.0 km to 1.8 km below the surface. Particularly high velocity bodies were identified below the islands of Yali and the central caldera of Nisyros. The high velocity bodies at shallow depth were interpreted as high-density cumulates of solidified magma intru- sion in the caldera. These intrusions explain very high temperature of 300C observed in the lower aquifer in the caldera at 1.5 km depth as confirmed by drilling. The vol- canic edifices of Kos, Yali, Nisyros and Strongily are part of a major volcanic caldera nearly 35 km in diameter. This size of the volcanic caldera explains the large volume of ignimbrites erupted 160 000 years ago. By combining geodetic, geophysical, geo- chemical and geological observations it is intended to correlate magma movements and associated changes of physical and chemical parameters of the recent volcanism.

  11. Predicted Geology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Phase II Drilling Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-04-20

    Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley (PM-OV) Phase II drilling will occur within an area that encompasses approximately 117 square kilometers (45 square miles) near the center of the Phase I PM-OV hydrostratigraphic framework model area. The majority of the investigation area lies within dissected volcanic terrain between Pahute Mesa on the north and Timber Mountain on the south. This area consists of a complex distribution of volcanic tuff and lava of generally rhyolitic composition erupted from nearby calderas and related vents. Several large buried volcanic structural features control the distribution of volcanic units in the investigation area. The Area 20 caldera, including its structural margin and associated caldera collapse collar, underlies the northeastern portion of the investigation area. The southern half of the investigation area lies within the northwestern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex, including portions of the caldera moat and resurgent dome. Another significant structural feature in the area is the west-northwest-trending Northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone, which bisects the northern portion of the investigation area and forms a structural bench. The proposed wells of the UGTA Phase II drilling initiative can be grouped into four generalized volcanic structural domains based on the stratigraphic distribution and structural position of the volcanic rocks in the upper 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) of the crust, a depth that represents the approximate planned total depths of the proposed wells.

  12. Geological evolution of a Pleistocene rhyolitic center: Sierra La Primavera, Jalisco, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahood, G.A.

    1980-10-01

    The Sierra La Primavera volcanic complex consists of late Pleistocene comenditic lava flows and domes, ash-flow tuff, air-fall pumice, and caldera-lake sediments. The earliest lavas were erupted about 120,000 years ago, and were followed approximately 95,000 years ago by the eruption of about 20 km/sup 3/ of magma as ash flows that form the compositionally-zoned Tala Tuff. Collapse of the roof zone of the magma chamber led to the formation of a shallow 11-km-diameter caldera. It soon filled with water, forming a caldera lake in which sediment began to collect. The four major fault systems in the Sierra La Primavera are related to caldera collapse or to uplife caused by the insurgence of the southern arc magma. Steam vents and large-discharge 65/sup 0/C hot springs are associated with the faulting. Calculated equilibrium temperatures of the geothermal fluids are approx. 170/sup 0/C, but temperatures in excess of 240/sup 0/C have been encountered in an exploratory drill hole. A seismic survey showed attenuation of both S and P waves within the caldera, P waves attenuated more severely than S waves. The greatest attenuation is associated with an area of steam vents, and the rapid lateral variations in attenuation suggest that they are produced by a shallow geothermal system rather than by underlying magma.

  13. Converting NAD83 GPS Heights Into NAVD88 Elevations With LVGEOID, a Hybrid Geoid Height Model for the Long Valley Volcanic Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Dzurisin, Daniel; Langbein, John; Svarc, Jerry; Hill, David P.

    2008-01-01

    A GPS survey of leveling benchmarks done in Long Valley Caldera in 1999 showed that the application of the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) geoid model GEOID99 to tie GPS heights to historical leveling measurements would significantly underestimate the caldera ground deformation (known from other geodetic measurements). The NGS geoid model was able to correctly reproduce the shape of the deformation, but required a local adjustment to give a realistic estimate of the magnitude of the uplift. In summer 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a new leveling survey along two major routes crossing the Long Valley region from north to south (Hwy 395) and from east to west (Hwy 203 - Benton Crossing). At the same time, 25 leveling bench marks were occupied with dual frequency GPS receivers to provide a measurement of the ellipsoid heights. Using the heights from these two surveys, we were able to compute a precise geoid height model (LVGEOID) for the Long Valley volcanic region. Our results show that although the LVGEOID and the latest NGS GEOID03 model practically coincide in areas outside the caldera, there is a difference of up to 0.2 m between the two models within the caldera. Accounting for this difference is critical when using the geoid height model to estimate the ground deformation due to magmatic or tectonic activity in the caldera.

  14. The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system

  15. The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, M.R. Jr.

    1988-05-01

    Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

  16. S-wave velocity structure beneath Changbaishan volcano inferred from receiver function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianping Wu; Yuehong Ming; Lihua Fang; Weilai Wang

    2009-01-01

    The S wave velocity structure in Changbaishan volcanic region was obtained from teleseismic receiver func-tion modeling. The results show that there exist distinct low velocity layers in crust in volcano area. Beneath WQD station near to the Tianchi caldera the low velocity layer at 8 km depth is 20 km thick with the lowest S-wave velocity about 2.2 km/s. At EDO station located 50 km north of Tianchi caldera, no obvious crustal low velocity layer is detected. In the volcanic re-gion, the thickness of crustal low velocity layer is greater and the lowest velocity is more obvious with the distance shorter to the caldem. It indicates the existence of the high temperature material or magma reservoir in crust near the Tianchi caldera. The receiver functions and inversion result from different back azimuths at CBS permanent seismic station show that the thickness of near surface low velocity layer and Moho depth change with directions. The near surface low velocity layer is obviously thicker in south direction. The Moho depth shows slight uplifting in the direction of the caldera located. We con-sider that the special near surface velocity structure is the main cause of relatively lower prominent frequency of volcanic earthquake waveforms recorded by CBS station. The slight uplifting of Moho beneath Tianchi caldera indicates there is a material exchanging channel between upper mantle and magma reservoir in crust.

  17. Probabilistic-Numerical assessment of pyroclastic current hazard at Campi Flegrei and Naples city: Multi-VEI scenarios as a tool for full-scale risk management

    CERN Document Server

    Mastrolorenzo, Giuseppe; Pappalardo, Lucia; Rossano, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The Campi Flegrei volcanic field (Italy) poses very high risk to the highly urbanized Neapolitan area. Eruptive history was dominated by explosive activity producing pyroclastic currents (PDCs; (Proclastic Density Currents) ranging in scale from localized base surges to regional flows. Here we apply probabilistic numerical simulation approaches to produce PDC hazard maps, based on a comprehensive spectrum of flow properties and vent locations. These maps and provide all probable Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) scenarios from different source vents in the caldera, relevant for risk management planning. For each VEI scenario, we report the conditional probability for PDCs (i.e., the probability for a given area to be affected by the passage of PDCs) and related dynamic pressure. Model results indicate that PDCs from VEI<4 events would be confined within the Campi Flegrei caldera, PDC propagation being impeded by the northern and eastern caldera walls. Conversely, PDCs from VEI 4-5 events could invade a wide...

  18. Ulysses Patera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Released 18 July 2002) It is helpful to look at the context for this THEMIS image, which covers a large area over the summit of Ulysses Patera. Ulysses Patera is one of the many volcanoes that make up the giant Tharsis volcanic province, although Ulysses itself is fairly small in comparison to the other volcanoes in this area. In the context image, there are 3 circular features near the top of the volcano. The large, central feature is called a 'caldera', and is the result of volcanic activity at Ulysses. The other two circular features are impact craters. The THEMIS image primarily spans across the central caldera, but also covers a portion of the northernmost impact crater. We know that the large central caldera must have formed earlier than the two craters, because its circular form has been cut by the smaller crater rims. In the THEMIS image, there are stair-stepping plateaus in the northern portion of the image. These are part of the rim of the northern crater, and are caused by collapse or subsidence after the impact event. Just to the south of this crater, 'rayed' patterns can be seen on part of the caldera floor. The rayed pattern is most likely due to a landslide of material down the crater rim slope. Another possibility is that the impact that formed the northern crater caused material to be ejected radially, and then parts of the ejecta have either been buried or eroded away. Other signs of mass movement events in this image are dark streaks, caused by dust avalanches, visible in the caldera's northern wall. In the central portion of the image, there are two lobe-shaped features-one overlaps the other-that appear to have flowed westward. It is likely that these features are ejecta lobes, because they are located adjacent to the southeastern crater (see context image). The fluidized appearance of these ejecta lobes is probably due to a significant amount of ice or water being present in the soil at the time

  19. Argon geochronology of late Pleistocene to Holocene Westdahl volcano, Unimak Island, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Andrew T.; Moore, Richard B.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    High-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of selected lavas from Westdahl Volcano places time constraints on several key prehistoric eruptive phases of this large active volcano. A dike cutting old pyroclastic-flow and associated lahar deposits from a precursor volcano yields an age of 1,654+/-11 k.y., dating this precursor volcano as older than early Pleistocene. A total of 11 geographically distributed lavas with ages ranging from 47+/-14 to 127+/-2 k.y. date construction of the Westdahl volcanic center. Lava flows cut by an apparent caldera-rim structure yielded ages of 81+/-5 and 121+/-8 k.y., placing a maximum date of 81 ka on caldera formation. Late Pleistocene and Holocene lavas fill the caldera, but most of them are obscured by the large summit icecap.

  20. SCHLUMBERGER SOUNDING RESULTS OVER THE NEWBERRY VOLCANO AREA, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisdorf, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    Schlumberger soundings were made in the Newberry volcano area of Oregon to categorize the electrical properties of possible Cascade geothermal systems. An east-west geoelectric cross section constructed from the interpreted soundings shows a low-resistivity zone in the caldera, that corresponds to the increase in thermal gradient observed in a U. S. Geological Survey test well. Another low resistivity zone about 600 m deep is present just to the west of the caldera boundary. A north-south geoelectric cross section shows the configuration of the western low-resistivity zone. Maps of interpreted resistivity at depths of 750 and 1000 m show that the main low resistivity area west of the caldera has two tongues, one oriented easterly and the other oriented southerly.

  1. Density and distribution of megafauna at the Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano (the Barents Sea based on image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rybakova (Goroslavskaya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available During a survey of the Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano (HMMV, located on the Bear Island Fan in the southwest Barents Sea at ~ 1250 m water depth, different habitats inside the volcano caldera and outside it were photographed using a towed camera platform, an Ocean Floor Observation System (OFOS. Three transects were performed across the caldera and one outside, in the background area, each transect was ~ 2 km in length. We compared the density, taxa richness and diversity of non-symbiotrophic megafauna in areas inside the volcano caldera with different bacterial mat and pogonophoran tubeworm cover. Significant variations in megafaunal composition, density and distribution were found between considered areas. Total megafaunal density was highest in areas of dense pogonophoran populations (mean 52.9 ind. m−2 followed by areas of plain light-coloured sediment that were devoid of bacterial mats and tubeworms (mean 37.7 ind. m−2. The lowest densities were recorded in areas of dense bacterial mats (mean ≤ 1.4 ind. m−2. Five taxa contributed to most of the observed variation: the ophiuroid Ophiocten gracilis, lysianassid amphipods, the pycnogonid Nymphon macronix, the caprellid Metacaprella horrida and the fish Lycodes squamiventer. In agreement with previous studies, three zones within the HMMV caldera were distinguished, based on different habitats and megafaunal composition: "bacterial mats", "pogonophoran fields" and "plain light-coloured sediments". The zones were arranged almost concentrically around the central part of the caldera that was devoid of visible megafauna. The total number of taxa showed little variation inside (24 spp. and outside the caldera (26 spp.. The density, diversity and composition of megafauna varied substantially between plain light-coloured sediment areas inside the caldera and the HMMV background. Megafaunal density was lower in the background (mean 25.3 ind

  2. Estudio técnico y económico para la mejora del comportamiento energético del Colegio de Educación Infantil y Primaria “CEIP FONTES” en Torre-Pacheco, (Murcia)

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Lozano, Mariano José

    2015-01-01

    Consiste en un estudio técnico y económico para mejora del comportamiento energético del colegio de educación infantil y primaria “Fontes” de Torre-Pacheco, e incluye el diseño de la instalación de una caldera de biomasa y sistema activo de aprovechamiento de la energía solar, en sustitución de la actual caldera de gasóleo y radiadores eléctricos. La conclusión es que el alto porcentaje no renovable conlleva importantes implicaciones medioambientales, (emisión de compuestos a la a...

  3. Characterizing Geographic Variability in Magma Composition and Eruptive Style During Voluminous Mid-Tertiary Magmatism in the Northern Great Basin Using Zircon U-Pb Geochronology and Phenocryst O Isotopic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, J. P.; Watts, K. E.; Henry, C.; John, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Following a period of magmatic quiescence in the early Tertiary, magmatism returned to the western U.S. with vigor, migrating southward across the Cordillera from the Eocene to the early Miocene. Although often referred to as the "ignimbrite flareup," the large caldera-forming silicic eruptions associated with Great Basin phase of this event are mostly restricted to the late Oligocene to early Miocene of central Nevada, while voluminous Eocene magmatism in northeastern Nevada manifested instead as dikes, plutons, and flow-dome complexes with few small-volume tuffs. The 34 Ma Caetano caldera, one of the northernmost calderas of central Nevada, is characterized by magmatic δ18O values of ~10-10.5‰ (based on analysis of zircon, quartz, and plagioclase) and numerous inherited (mostly Proterozoic) zircons, consistent with a substantial metasedimentary contribution to the magma. In this respect it is similar to non-caldera forming magmas further north and east, including those from Eocene mid-crustal depths now exposed in the Ruby Mountains core complex. In contrast, the 25 Ma Elevenmile-Poco Canyon caldera complex in the Stillwater Range, one of the westernmost and youngest caldera systems, is characterized by magmatic δ18O values of 5.5-7.5‰ and a lack of inherited zircon, consistent with assimilation of little sedimentary material. Intervening caldera systems show a progressive southwestward decrease in magmatic δ 18O values, consistent with a decreasing metasedimentary contribution to their source magmas. These patterns may reflect profound changes in crustal architecture across the mid-Tertiary Great Basin. Eocene northeastern Nevada lay in the hinterland of the Cretaceous Sevier fold-thrust belt, where Paleozoic sedimentary rocks were buried to depths >25 km in a crust 40-50 km thick. This thick metasedimentary crustal column may have conspired to stall silicic magmas in the crust and prevent the formation of large eruptible magma chambers. Formation of

  4. Diseño y optimización de una planta termosolar con concentradores cilindro-parabólicos

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzana Gaona, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Este proyecto consiste en el diseño de una central termosolar cilíndrico-parabólica de 50 MW en el sur de España. Para ver las diferentes alternativas en el diseño de la instalación se han realizado tres estudios por separado para ver el efecto de cada uno de ellos. Se ha analizado la central sin almacenamiento ni caldera auxiliar, posteriormente con almacenamiento y por último con almacenamiento y caldera auxiliar. Se ha explicado las principales partes de la central y sus diferentes misione...

  5. Geochronology of the largest explosive eruptions in Kamchatka and their reflection in the Greenland Ice sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of multi-year detailed studied on dating of the largest explosive eruptions on the Kamchatka and their reflections in the Greenland Ice Sheet are summarized. The eruptions age determination was conducted by the 14C -dating of buried organic residues. The analysis showed that out of two acid peaks probable for caldera-forming eruptions the peak of 6476 year before our era is considered the most preferable one. Its maximum value (710 ppb) for the whole profile of the Greenland Ice Sheet corresponds to the largest volume of pyroclastics of the caldera-forming (above 120 km3)

  6. Uzon-Geysernaya volcano-tectonic depression: geodynamics phenomena last years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugaenko, Yulia

    2010-05-01

    One of the most active volcanic arcs in the Pacific Rim, Kamchatka is also one with poor geophysical constraints on its shallow magma plumbing systems. Uzon calderas lie within a graben approximately 20 km wide running beneath the eastern Kamchatka volcanic group. Cross sections of the shallow crustal graben show that it steps WNW from its southeasterly bounding fault beneath Kikhpinych volcano, deepening toward Uzon caldera. Uzon Caldera Summary (by Global Volcanism Program, http://www.volcano.si.edu ): Country, Subregion Name: Russia; Kamchatka Peninsula Volcano Number: 1000-17 Volcano Type: Calderas Last Known Eruption: 200 AD +/- 300 years Summit Elevation: 1617 m (5,305 feet) Coordinates: 54.50°N, 159.97°E Kikhpinych volcano Summary (by Global Volcanism Program, http://www.volcano.si.edu ): Country, Subregion Name: Russia, Kamchatka Peninsula Volcano Number: 1000-18 Volcano Type: Stratovolcanoes Last Known Eruption: 1550 (?) Summit Elevation: 1552 m (5,092 feet) Coordinates: 160.253°N, 160.253°E The twin Uzon and Geysernaya calderas, containing Kamchatka's largest geothermal area, from a 7x18 km Uzon-Geysernaya volcano-tectonic depression that originated during multiple eruptions during the mid-Pleistocene. Post-caldera activity was largely Pleistocene in age and consisted of the extrusion of small silicic lava domes and flows, maar formation and several Holocene phreatic eruptions. The extensive high-temperature hydrothermal system includes the many hot springs, mudpots, and geysers of the Valley of the Geysers on the SE margin of the Uzon-Geysernaya depression. Hydrothermal explosions took place in the western part of caldera in 1986 and 1989. The Valley of the Geysers in the far eastern portion of Uzon caldera is considered derived from shallow meteoric water in contact with a heat source associated with Kikhpinych volcano The general structure places a deep aquifer shallower than a depth of about 2 km with the top of a cooling magma chamber at depths

  7. Hydrologic budget of the late Oligocene Lake Creede and the evolution of the upper Rio Grande drainage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Paul B.; Steven, Thomas A.; Hayba, Daniel O.

    2000-01-01

    The filling history, hydrologic budget, and geomorphic development of ancient Lake Creede and its tributary basin are evaluated to determine the factors that controlled its character. The lake filled the Creede caldera that formed in the late Oligocene as a consequence of the eruption of the Snowshoe Mountain Tuff. The caldera's sedimentary fill accumlated to a depth of about 1.26 km and had a volume of about 89 km3. The highest lake level was ~3300 m (10,800 ft) present altitude before it drained eastward across a broad volcanic plateau as the ancestral Rio Grande. A tributary canyon several hundred meters deep was cut into hard rhyolite in the north wall of the caldera before the lake was more than half full; its presence demonstrates that ancient Lake Creede filled slowly and thus occupied a long-lived, closed basin. The slow filling rate is incompatible with the present water flux through the Creede caldera basin, because such a flow would fill the basin geologically instantaneously. This mismatch, together with the recognition that the Oligocene climate was similar to that of today, forces the reexamination of the hydrologic and geomorphic history of the caldera. That appraisal shows that the caldera cannot have resurged rapidly immediately after caldera collapse, and that ancient watershed must have been lass than half as large as the present upper Rio Grande basin. The ancient lake had a more or less constant surface area of about 200 km2 that approximated a steady-state condition between inflow and evaporation. Although the lake level fluctuated with climatic variations, its surface elevation steadily climbed as sediment accumulated, accelerating as resurgance and dome growth usurped spacewithin the basin. It could have had one playa stage early in its development and another after the basin had nearly filled with sediment, but there is no direct evidence for either. At least the lower half of the sedimentary column (the part sampled by the scientific

  8. Magma flow paths and strain patterns in magma chambers growing by floor subsidence: a model based on magnetic fabric study of shallow-level plutons in the Stiavnica volcano-plutonic complex, Western Carpathians

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomek, Filip; Žák, J.; Chadima, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 11 (2014), Article 873. ISSN 0258-8900 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) * caldera * intrusive strain * magma emplacement * pluton floor subsidence * stratovolcano Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2014

  9. Monitoring changes in seismic velocity related to an ongoing rapid inflation event at Okmok volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennington, Ninfa L.; Haney, Matthew; De Angelis, Silvio; Thurber, Clifford H.; Freymueller, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Okmok is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. In an effort to improve our ability to detect precursory activity leading to eruption at Okmok, we monitor a recent, and possibly ongoing, GPS-inferred rapid inflation event at the volcano using ambient noise interferometry (ANI). Applying this method, we identify changes in seismic velocity outside of Okmok's caldera, which are related to the hydrologic cycle. Within the caldera, we observe decreases in seismic velocity that are associated with the GPS-inferred rapid inflation event. We also determine temporal changes in waveform decorrelation and show a continual increase in decorrelation rate over the time associated with the rapid inflation event. The magnitude of relative velocity decreases and decorrelation rate increases are comparable to previous studies at Piton de la Fournaise that associate such changes with increased production of volatiles and/or magmatic intrusion within the magma reservoir and associated opening of fractures and/or fissures. Notably, the largest decrease in relative velocity occurs along the intrastation path passing nearest to the center of the caldera. This observation, along with equal amplitude relative velocity decreases revealed via analysis of intracaldera autocorrelations, suggests that the inflation source may be located approximately within the center of the caldera and represent recharge of shallow magma storage in this location. Importantly, there is a relative absence of seismicity associated with this and previous rapid inflation events at Okmok. Thus, these ANI results are the first seismic evidence of such rapid inflation at the volcano.

  10. Characteristics of the summit lakes of Ambae volcano and their potential for generating lahars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions through crater lakes often generate lahars, causing loss of life and property. On Ambae volcano, recent eruptive activities have rather tended to reduce the water volume in the crater lake (Lake Voui, in turn, reducing the chances for outburst floods. Lake Voui occupies a central position in the summit caldera and is well enclosed by the caldera relief. Eruptions with significantly higher magnitude than that of 1995 and 2005 are required for an outburst. A more probable scenario for lahar events is the overflow from Lake Manaro Lakua bounded on the eastern side by the caldera wall. Morphology and bathymetry analysis have been used to identify the weakest point of the caldera rim from which water from Lake Manaro Lakua may overflow to initiate lahars. The 1916 disaster described on south-east Ambae was possibly triggered by such an outburst from Lake Manaro Lakua. Taking into account the current level of Lake Manaro Lakua well below a critical overflow point, and the apparently low potential of Lake Voui eruptions to trigger lahars, the Ambae summit lakes may not be directly responsible for numerous lahar deposits identified around the Island.

  11. 78 FR 69569 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for the Jemez...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... on tribal land and private lands (New Mexico Endemic Salamander Team 2000, p. 1). The Valles Caldera..., subterranean igneous rock in areas with high soil moisture (New Mexico Endemic Salamander Team 2000, p. 2... Jemez Mountains salamander (Plethodon neomexicanus) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (Act),...

  12. Rapid magma evolution constrained by zircon petrochronology and 40Ar/39Ar sanidine ages for the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff, Yellowstone, USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivera, Tiffany; Storey, Michael; Schmitz, Mark;

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the time scales of magmatic differentiation, storage, and eruption of large volume silicic magmas is a primary goal of igneous petrology. Within the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff (HRT; Idaho, USA), representing the earliest and largest caldera-forming eruption associated with Yellowstone...

  13. Estudi comparatiu de sistemes de producció d'energia tèrmica per a una guarderia al Prat de Llogregat

    OpenAIRE

    Gila, Daniel; Gonzàlez, Frederic; Fulcarà, Vicenç

    2011-01-01

    Estudi comparatiu de diferents sistemes de producció d’energia tèrmica (calderes de gas, energia solar tèrmica, bomba de calor geotèrmica, caldera de biomassa i motor de cogeneració de gas) per a un sistema de calefacció i ACS d’una guarderia en el Prat de Llobregat.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Methylacidiphilum kamchatkense" Strain Kam1, a Thermoacidophilic Methanotrophic Verrucomicrobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikstad, Helge-André; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2015-01-01

    "Candidatus Methylacidiphilum kamchatkense" strain Kam1 is an aerobic methane-oxidizing thermoacidophilic bacterium belonging to the Verrucomicrobia phylum. It was recovered from an acidic geothermal site in Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russian Federation. Its genome possesses three complete pmoCAB gene clusters encoding particulate methane monooxygenase enzymes and a complete Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle for carbon assimilation. PMID:25745002

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Methylacidiphilum kamchatkense" Strain Kam1, a Thermoacidophilic Methanotrophic Verrucomicrobium.

    OpenAIRE

    Erikstad, Helge Andre; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2015-01-01

    "Candidatus Methylacidiphilum kamchatkense" strain Kam1 is an aerobic methane-oxidizing thermoacidophilic bacterium belonging to the Verrucomicrobia phylum. It was recovered from an acidic geothermal site in Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russian Federation. Its genome possesses three complete pmoCAB gene clusters encoding particulate methane monooxygenase enzymes and a complete Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle for carbon assimilation.

  16. Volcano deformation in central Main Ethiopian Rift system (Aluto Volcano) inferred from continuous GPS and dynamic gravity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhanu, Yelebe; Biggs, Juliet; Gottsmann, Joachim; Lewi, Elias; Lloyd, Ryan; Bekele, Berhanu

    2016-04-01

    Silicic volcanic centres in the rift systems frequently experience unrest indicating long-term activity in the underlying magmatic system, but it is difficult to distinguish the contributions of hydrothermal fluids, magma or gasses. Aluto volcano which is located in the central MER system is situated between the Lakes Ziway and Langano in the north and south respectively. Continuous GPS installed from April 2013 to October 2015 shows subsidence initially, with the largest subsidence observed in the eastern part of the caldera (2 cm/yr). InSAR observations from TerraSAR-X show a radially-symmetric pattern of long-term subsidence. Dynamic gravity surveys carried out in October 2014 and 2015 showed that there is a net mass loss in the western and central part of the caldera and mass gain in the eastern and southern part of the caldera, with a sharp gradient between the two. This complex spatial pattern of gravity change is significantly different to the simple pattern of deformation indicating multiple sources of pressure and mass change exist within the caldera. We explain the ratio of gravity to height change (dg/dh) throughout the volcano by considering cooling and crystallisation of magma body, draining and precipitation of hydrothermal fluids and changes in the water table and lake levels. Keywords: volcano deformation, dynamic gravity, continental rift

  17. Testing and optimization of the seismic networks of Campi Flegrei (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramelli, A.; Troise, C.; De Natale, G.; Orazi, M.

    2013-11-01

    The definition of the network resolution power is an important parameter to be considered when evaluating most of the seismic analysis, being connected to the location quality and earthquakes detectability. We estimated the resolving power of the seismic network of Campi Flegrei. The results show that the actual moment magnitude threshold is 0.5 in the Solfatara area, center of the caldera, but increases sharply going away from the center. We also estimated the theoretical resolution power of the actual seismic network of Campi Flegrei plus 5 hypothetical borehole stations, moving the borehole stations into 3 different wells. As expected, big improvements in the location parameters come from the use of borehole stations. The results show that a 3000 m deep borehole located close to the actual hypocentral area would allow to detect and locate the very low magnitude earthquakes, probably connected to the hydrothermal system characterizing the Campi Flegrei caldera. Finally, we performed an optimization analysis of the permanent seismic network of Campi Flegrei finding the best 3 station positions that would increase the resolution power of the network to locate earthquakes in the South and offshore part of the caldera. We evidenced that the actual network has an improvable resolution in the South and West part of the caldera.

  18. Mosses new to New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bryophyte inventory was conducted in the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP), New Mexico, from 2009 to 2011. Specimens representing 113 species of bryophytes were collected. Of those bryophytes, seven of the mosses were new to New Mexico: Atrichum tenellum (Rohling) Bruch & Schimper, Dicranum ...

  19. Major Martian Volcanoes from MOLA - Arsia Mons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Two views of Arsia Mons, the southern most of the Tharsis montes, shown as topography draped over a Viking image mosaic. MOLA topography clearly shows the caldera structure and the flank massive breakout that produced a major side lobe. The vertical exaggeration is 10:1.

  20. High-resolution AUV mapping and lava flow ages at Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Dreyer, B. M.; Caress, D. W.; Martin, J.

    2011-12-01

    Mapping along mid-ocean ridges, as on land, requires identification of flow boundaries and sequence, and ages of some flows to understand eruption history. Multibeam sonars on autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) now generate 1-m resolution maps that resolve lava pillars, internal flow structures and boundaries, and lava flow emplacement sequences using crosscutting relations and abundance of fissures. MBARI has now mapped the summit caldera floor and rims and the upper south rift zone on Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. With the advent of the high-resolution bathymetry and the ability to observe flow contacts to determine superposition using ROVs and submersibles, the missing component has been determining absolute ages of the flows. We used the MBARI ROV Doc Ricketts to collect short push cores (summit of Axial Seamount and for 6 from the lowermost south rift. Ages of nearby samples commonly yield statistically identical ages, and 2 cores near the center of the caldera had multiple layers dated. These ages systematically increase with depth, indicating that redistribution of sediment by bottom currents does not significantly affect the stratigraphy. We will expand these collections in summer 2011. The coring is accompanied by collection of flow samples for chemistry and video observations to confirm contact locations and flow superposition inferred from the mapping data. Six ages from the lowermost part of the south rift of Axial Seamount include samples on a cone with deep summit crater that is ~16,580 aBP and on 5 flows between 950 and 1510 aBP. Two additional flows from the southeast rim of the caldera are 905 and 2005 aBP. An age of 6910 aBP from 15 cm depth in a 2-m volcaniclastic unit on top of a pre-caldera flow on the eastern rim of the caldera suggests formation of the caldera several tens of thousands aBP. Seven ages on at least 5 flows on the floor of Axial caldera range from 620 to 1145 aBP, whereas 10 extensive mapped flows are all inferred

  1. High-precision mapping of seismicity in the 2014 Bárdarbunga volcanic episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogfjörd, Kristín S.; Hensch, Martin; Gudmundsson, Gunnar B.; Jónsdóttir, Kristín

    2015-04-01

    The Bárdarbunga volcano and its associated fissure swarm in Iceland's Eastern volcanic zone is a highly active system with over 20 eruptions in the last 11 centuries. The location of this active volcano and much of the fissure swarm under several hundred metres thick ice gives rise to multiple hazards, including explosive, subglacial eruptions and associated subglacial floods (jökulhlaups), as well as fissure eruptions extruding large volumes of lava. After a decade of increasing seismic activity, volcanic unrest at Bárdarbunga suddenly escalated into a minor subglacial eruption on 16 August 2014. In the following weeks seismic activity soared and surface deformation of tens of cm were observed, caused by rifting and a dyke intrusion, which propagated 48 km northward from the central volcano (Sigmundsson et al., 2014). The dyke propagation stopped just outside the glacial margin and ended in a fissure eruption at Holuhraun at the end of August. At the time of writing the eruption is ongoing, having extruded a lava volume of over 1 km3 and released high rates of SO2 into the atmosphere. Over twenty thousand microearthquakes have been recorded. Initially most were in the dyke, but after the first two weeks the activity around the caldera rim increased and over 70 shallow earthquakes with MW > 5 have been located along the caldera rim accompanied by caldera subsidence. At the onset of the unrest on 16 August, the seismicity was located in the caldera and north of the caldera rim, but already in the first few hours the activity propagated out of the caldera to the SE. Still, the activity continued for a few days in the fissure swarm to the NE of the rim. High-precision earthquake locations in the propagating dyke have revealed its very detailed, planar rifting segments, with the events distributed over a 3-4 km depth range, and mostly between 6 and 9 km. These very planar event distributions are highly unusual in volcanic areas and strongly suggest rifting of

  2. Volcano geodesy: The search for magma reservoirs and the formation of eruptive vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, J.J.; Dzurisin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Routine geodetic measurements are made at only a few dozen of the world's 600 or so active volcanoes, even though these measurements have proven to be a reliable precursor of eruptions. The pattern and rate of surface displacement reveal the depth and rate of pressure increase within shallow magma reservoirs. This process has been demonstrated clearly at Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Long Valley caldera, California; Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy; Rabaul caldera, Papua New Guinea; and Aira caldera and nearby Sakurajima, Japan. Slower and lesser amounts of surface displacement at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming, are attributed to changes in a hydrothermal system that overlies a crustal magma body. The vertical and horizontal dimensions of eruptive fissures, as well as the amount of widening, have been determined at Kilauea, Hawaii; Etna, Italy; Tolbachik, Kamchatka; Krafla, Iceland; and Asal-Ghoubbet, Djibouti, the last a segment of the East Africa Rift Zone. Continuously recording instruments, such as tiltmeters, extensometers, and dilatometers, have recorded horizontal and upward growth of eruptive fissures, which grew at rates of hundreds of meters per hour, at Kilauea; Izu-Oshima, Japan; Teishi Knoll seamount, Japan; and Piton de la Fournaise, Re??union Island. In addition, such instruments have recorded the hour or less of slight ground movement that preceded small explosive eruptions at Sakurajima and presumed sudden gas emissions at Galeras, Colombia. The use of satellite geodesy, in particular the Global Positioning System, offers the possibility of revealing changes in surface strain both local to a volcano and over a broad region that includes the volcano.

  3. High-precision Pb Isotopes Reveal Two Small Magma Bodies Beneath the Summit of Kilauea Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietruszka, A. J.; Heaton, D. E.; Marske, J. P.; Garcia, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    The summit magma storage reservoir of Kilauea Volcano is one of the most important components of the volcano's magmatic plumbing system, but its geometry is poorly known. High-precision Pb isotopic analyses of Kilauea summit lavas (1959-1982) define the minimum number of magma bodies within the summit reservoir and their volumes. The 206Pb/204Pb ratios of these lavas display a temporal decrease due to changes in the composition of the parental magma delivered to the volcano. Analyses of multiple lavas from some individual eruptions reveal small but significant differences in 206Pb/204Pb. The extra-caldera lavas from Aug. 1971 and Jul. 1974 display lower Pb isotope ratios and higher MgO contents (10 wt. %) than the intra-caldera lavas (MgO ~7-8 wt. %) from each eruption. From 1971 to 1982, the 206Pb/204Pb ratios of the lavas define two separate decreasing temporal trends. The intra-caldera lavas from 1971, 1974, 1975, Apr. 1982 and the lower MgO lavas from Sep. 1982 have higher 206Pb/204Pb ratios at a given time (compared to the extra-caldera lavas and the higher MgO lavas from Sep. 1982). These trends require that the intra- and extra-caldera lavas (and the Sep. 1982 lavas) were supplied from two separate, partially isolated magma bodies. Numerous studies (Fiske and Kinoshita, 1969; Klein et al., 1987) have long identified the locus of Kilauea's summit reservoir ~2 km southeast of Halemaumau (HMM) at a depth of ~2-7 km, but more recent investigations have discovered a second magma body located Piton de la Fournaise Volcano on Réunion Island (Albarède, 1993).

  4. Cycles of explosive and effusive eruptions at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Don; Rose, Timothy R.; Mucek, Adonara E; Garcia, Michael O.; Fiske, Richard S.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2014-01-01

    The subaerial eruptive activity at Kīlauea Volcano (Hawai‘i) for the past 2500 yr can be divided into 3 dominantly effusive and 2 dominantly explosive periods, each lasting several centuries. The prevailing style of eruption for 60% of this time was explosive, manifested by repeated phreatic and phreatomagmatic activity in a deep summit caldera. During dominantly explosive periods, the magma supply rate to the shallow storage volume beneath the summit dropped to only a few percent of that during mainly effusive periods. The frequency and duration of explosive activity are contrary to the popular impression that Kīlauea is almost unceasingly effusive. Explosive activity apparently correlates with the presence of a caldera intersecting the water table. The decrease in magma supply rate may result in caldera collapse, because erupted or intruded magma is not replaced. Glasses with unusually high MgO, TiO2, and K2O compositions occur only in explosive tephra (and one related lava flow) and are consistent with disruption of the shallow reservoir complex during caldera formation. Kīlauea is a complex, modulated system in which melting rate, supply rate, conduit stability (in both mantle and crust), reservoir geometry, water table, and many other factors interact with one another. The hazards associated with explosive activity at Kīlauea’s summit would have major impact on local society if a future dominantly explosive period were to last several centuries. The association of lowered magma supply, caldera formation, and explosive activity might characterize other basaltic volcanoes, but has not been recognized.

  5. The May 2005 eruption of Fernandina volcano, Galápagos: The first circumferential dike intrusion observed by GPS and InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, W.W., Jr.; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Geist, Dennis J.; Poland, M.; Johnson, Daniel J.; Batt, S.; Harpp, Karen S.; Ruiz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The May 2005 eruption of Fernandina volcano, Galápagos, occurred along circumferential fissures parallel to the caldera rim and fed lava flows down the steep southwestern slope of the volcano for several weeks. This was the first circumferential dike intrusion ever observed by both InSAR and GPS measurements and thus provides an opportunity to determine the subsurface geometry of these enigmatic structures that are common on Galápagos volcanoes but are rare elsewhere. Pre- and post- eruption ground deformation between 2002 and 2006 can be modeled by the inflation of two separate magma reservoirs beneath the caldera: a shallow sill at ~1 km depth and a deeper point-source at ~5 km depth, and we infer that this system also existed at the time of the 2005 eruption. The co-eruption deformation is dominated by uplift near the 2005 eruptive fissures, superimposed on a broad subsidence centered on the caldera. Modeling of the co-eruption deformation was performed by including various combinations of planar dislocations to simulate the 2005 circumferential dike intrusion. We found that a single planar dike could not match both the InSAR and GPS data. Our best-fit model includes three planar dikes connected along hinge lines to simulate a curved concave shell that is steeply dipping (~45–60°) toward the caldera at the surface and more gently dipping (~12–14°) at depth where it connects to the horizontal sub-caldera sill. The shallow sill is underlain by the deep point source. The geometry of this modeled magmatic system is consistent with the petrology of Fernandina lavas, which suggest that circumferential eruptions tap the shallowest parts of the system, whereas radial eruptions are fed from deeper levels. The recent history of eruptions at Fernandina is also consistent with the idea that circumferential and radial intrusions are sometimes in a stress-feedback relationship and alternate in time with one another.

  6. Low-(18)O Silicic Magmas: Why Are They So Rare?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsley, S.D.; Gregory, R.T.

    1998-10-15

    LOW-180 silicic magmas are reported from only a small number of localities (e.g., Yellowstone and Iceland), yet petrologic evidence points to upper crustal assimilation coupled with fractional crystallization (AFC) during magma genesis for nearly all silicic magmas. The rarity of 10W-l `O magmas in intracontinental caldera settings is remarkable given the evidence of intense 10W-l*O meteoric hydrothermal alteration in the subvolcanic remnants of larger caldera systems. In the Platoro caldera complex, regional ignimbrites (150-1000 km3) have plagioclase 6180 values of 6.8 + 0.1%., whereas the Middle Tuff, a small-volume (est. 50-100 km3) post-caldera collapse pyroclastic sequence, has plagioclase 8]80 values between 5.5 and 6.8%o. On average, the plagioclase phenocrysts from the Middle Tuff are depleted by only 0.3%0 relative to those in the regional tuffs. At Yellowstone, small-volume post-caldera collapse intracaldera rhyolites are up to 5.5%o depleted relative to the regional ignimbrites. Two important differences between the Middle Tuff and the Yellowstone 10W-180 rhyolites elucidate the problem. Middle Tuff magmas reached water saturation and erupted explosively, whereas most of the 10W-l 80 Yellowstone rhyolites erupted effusively as domes or flows, and are nearly devoid of hydrous phenocrysts. Comparing the two eruptive types indicates that assimilation of 10W-180 material, combined with fractional crystallization, drives silicic melts to water oversaturation. Water saturated magmas either erupt explosively or quench as subsurface porphyrins bejiire the magmatic 180 can be dramatically lowered. Partial melting of low- 180 subvolcanic rocks by near-anhydrous magmas at Yellowstone produced small- volume, 10W-180 magmas directly, thereby circumventing the water saturation barrier encountered through normal AFC processes.

  7. Volcanic history and 40Ar/39Ar and 14C geochronology of Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, A.T.; Moore, R.B.; McGeehin, J.P.; Rodrigues da Silva, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Seven new 40Ar/39Ar and 23 new radiocarbon ages of eruptive units, in support of new geologic mapping, improve the known chronology of Middle to Late Pleistocene and Holocene volcanic activity on the island of Terceira, Azores and define an east-to-west progression in stratovolcano growth. The argon ages indicate that Cinco Picos Volcano, the oldest on Terceira, completed its main subaerial cone building activity by about 370-380??ka. Collapse of the upper part of the stratovolcanic edifice to form a 7 ?? 9??km caldera occurred some time after 370??ka. Postcaldera eruptions of basalt from cinder cones on and near the caldera floor and trachytic pyroclastic flow and pumice fall deposits from younger volcanoes west of Cinco Picos have refilled much of the caldera. The southern portion of Guilherme Moniz Volcano, in the central part of the island, began erupting prior to 270??ka and produced trachyte domes, flows, and minor pyroclastic deposits until at least 111??ka. The northern part of Guilherme Moniz Caldera is less well exposed than the southern part, but reflects a similar age range. The northwest portion of the caldera was formed sometime after 44??ka. Several well-studied ignimbrites that blanket much of the island likely erupted from Guilherme Moniz Volcano. The Pico Alto Volcanic Center, a tightly spaced cluster of trachyte domes and short flows, is a younger part of Guilherme Moniz Volcano. Stratigraphic studies and our new radiocarbon ages suggest that most of the Pico Alto eruptions occurred during the period from about 9000 to 1000??years BP. Santa Barbara Volcano is the youngest stratovolcano on Terceira, began erupting prior to 29??ka, and has been active historically. ?? 2006.

  8. Audiomagnetotelluric exploration across the Waíanae Range, Óahu, Hawaíi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdardottir, T. D.; Thomas, D. M.; Wallin, E.; Winchester, C.; Sinton, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) method is capable of providing direct evidence of a geothermal resource within the extinct Waíanae volcano, Óahu, Hawaíi. Geothermal systems are becoming an increasingly important energy source worldwide. With electric energy costs in Hawaíi the most expensive in the US (30.54 cents/kWh), it is important to investigate the potential of local geothermal resources. Slightly elevated temperature and chloride concentrations, measured in the 1970's at wells in the upper Lualualei Valley indicate the possibility of a geothermal resource. Previous geophysical investigations: self-potential, rotating quadripole resistivity, and shallow soil temperature surveys in the caldera measured low resistivity values. Resistivity is related to rock characteristics (e.g., porosity, saturation, salinity, temperature, chemistry, and the presence of weathered minerals). We are investigating the area further using the AMT method. We have collected profiles of AMT measurements across the Lualualei Valley and the Waíanae caldera boundary. Anthropogenic noise and access in this area is problematic. Electrical noise, originating from power lines along roads and very low frequency radio towers in the vicinity, add noise to the data. Limited access to sites on military lands inhibit data collection. However, preliminary results show that we have successfully imaged the expected higher resistivity values as our profiles cross the mountains bounding the caldera. As data continue to be collected across the Waíanae Caldera and Range and we begin modeling our data in two dimensions, we expect to be able to identify water table elevations, detect lateral variability between salt and fresh water saturation, estimate thickness of the freshwater lens and depth to the transition zone, image fault structures at the caldera boundary, and with enough sensitivity to conductivity, we can identify regions of elevated temperature.

  9. Surface displacements resulting from magma-chamber roof subsidence, with application to the 2014-2015 Bardarbunga-Holuhraun volcanotectonic episode in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, John; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2015-12-01

    The conditions which lead to caldera collapse are still poorly constrained. As there have only been four, possibly five, well-documented caldera forming events in the past century, the geodetic signals produced during chamber roof subsidence, or chamber volume reduction (shrinkage) in general, are not well documented or understood. In particular, when two or more geodetic sources are operating and providing signals at the same time, it is important to be able to estimate the likely contribution of each. Simultaneous activities of different geodetic sources are common and include pressure changes in magma chambers/reservoirs occurring at the same time as dyke emplacement. Here we present results from numerical models designed to simulate the subsidence of a magma-chamber roof, either directly (chamber shrinkage) or through ring-fault displacement, and the induced surface deformation and crustal stresses. We consider chamber depths at 3 km, 5 km, and 7 km below the crustal surface, using both non-layered (isotropic) and layered (anisotropic) crustal models. We also model the effects of a caldera lake and of a thick ice cover (ice sheet) on top of the caldera. The results suggest that magma-chamber roof subsidences between 20 m and 100 m generate large (tens of centimetres) vertical and, in particular, horizontal displacements at the surfaces of the ice and the crust out to distances of up to tens of kilometres from the caldera/chamber centre. Crustal layering tends to reduce, but increasing chamber depth to enlarge, the horizontal and vertical surface displacements. Applying the results to the ice subsidence in the Bardarbunga Caldera during the 2014-2015 Bardarbunga-Holuhraun volcanotectonic episode indicates that the modelled ice displacements are less than those geodetically measured. Also, the geodetically measured crustal displacements are less than expected for a 60 m chamber-roof subsidence. The modelling results thus suggest that only part of the ice

  10. A re-appraisal of the stratigraphy and volcanology of the Cerro Galán volcanic system, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkes, Christopher B.; Wright, Heather M.; Cas, Ray A.F.; de Silva, Shanaka L.; Lesti, Chiara; Viramonte, Jose G.

    2011-01-01

    From detailed fieldwork and biotite 40Ar/39Ar dating correlated with paleomagnetic analyses of lithic clasts, we present a revision of the stratigraphy, areal extent and volume estimates of ignimbrites in the Cerro Galán volcanic complex. We find evidence for nine distinct outflow ignimbrites, including two newly identified ignimbrites in the Toconquis Group (the Pitas and Vega Ignimbrites). Toconquis Group Ignimbrites (~5.60–4.51 Ma biotite ages) have been discovered to the southwest and north of the caldera, increasing their spatial extents from previous estimates. Previously thought to be contemporaneous, we distinguish the Real Grande Ignimbrite (4.68 ± 0.07 Ma biotite age) from the Cueva Negra Ignimbrite (3.77 ± 0.08 Ma biotite age). The form and collapse processes of the Cerro Galán caldera are also reassessed. Based on re-interpretation of the margins of the caldera, we find evidence for a fault-bounded trapdoor collapse hinged along a regional N-S fault on the eastern side of the caldera and accommodated on a N-S fault on the western caldera margin. The collapsed area defines a roughly isosceles trapezoid shape elongated E-W and with maximum dimensions 27 × 16 km. The Cerro Galán Ignimbrite (CGI; 2.08 ± 0.02 Ma sanidine age) outflow sheet extends to 40 km in all directions from the inferred structural margins, with a maximum runout distance of ~80 km to the north of the caldera. New deposit volume estimates confirm an increase in eruptive volume through time, wherein the Toconquis Group Ignimbrites increase in volume from the ~10 km3 Lower Merihuaca Ignimbrite to a maximum of ~390 km3 (Dense Rock Equivalent; DRE) with the Real Grande Ignimbrite. The climactic CGI has a revised volume of ~630 km3 (DRE), approximately two thirds of the commonly quoted value.

  11. Eruptive History and Chemical Evolution of the Precaldera and Postcaldera Basalt-Dacite Sequences, Long Valley, California: Implications for Magma Sources, Current Seismic Unrest, and Future Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Roy A.

    2004-01-01

    The Long Valley Volcanic Field in east-central California straddles the East Sierran frontal fault zone, overlapping the Sierra Nevada and western Basin and Range Provinces. The volcanic field overlies a mature mid-Tertiary erosional surface that truncates a basement composed mainly of Mesozoic plutons and associated roof pendants of Mesozoic metavolcanic and Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Long Valley volcanism began about 4 Ma during Pliocene time and has continued intermittently through the Holocene. The volcanism is separable into two basalt-rhyolite episodes: (1) an earlier, precaldera episode related to Long Valley Caldera that climaxed with eruption of the Bishop Tuff and collapse of the caldera; and (2) a later, postcaldera episode structurally related to the north-south-trending Mono-Inyo Craters fissure system, which extends from the vicinity of Mammoth Mountain northward through the west moat of the caldera to Mono Lake. Eruption of the basalt-dacite sequence of the precaldera basalt-rhyolite episode peaked volumetrically between 3.8 and 2.5 Ma; few basalts were erupted during the following 1.8 m.y. (2.5?0.7 Ma). Volcanism during this interval was dominated by eruption of the voluminous rhyolites of Glass Mountain (2.2?0.8 Ma) and formation of the Bishop Tuff magma chamber. Catastrophic rupture of the roof of this magma chamber caused eruption of the Bishop Tuff and collapse of Long Valley Caldera (760 ka), after which rhyolite eruptions resumed on the subsided caldera floor. The earliest postcaldera rhyolite flows (700?500 ka) contain quenched globular basalt enclaves (mafic magmatic inclusions), indicating that basaltic magma had reentered shallow parts of the magmatic system after a 1.8-m.y. hiatus. Later, at about 400 ka, copious basalts, as well as dacites, began erupting from vents mainly in the west moat of the caldera. These later eruptions initiated the postcaldera basalt-rhyolite episode related to the Mono-Inyo Craters fissure system, which

  12. Morphology, volcanism, and mass wasting in Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, C.R.; Gardner, J.V.; Mayer, L.A.; Buktenica, M.W.; Dartnell, P.; Ramsey, D.W.; Robinson, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    Crater Lake was surveyed nearly to its shoreline by high-resolution multibeam echo sounding in order to define its geologic history and provide an accurate base map for research and monitoring surveys. The bathymetry and acoustic backscatter reveal the character of landforms and lead to a chronology for the concurrent filling of the lake and volcanism within the ca. 7700 calibrated yr B.P. caldera. The andesitic Wizard Island and central-plattform volcanoes are composed of sequences of lava deltas that record former lake levels and demonstrate simultaneous activity at the two vents. Wizard Island eruptions ceased when the lake was ~80 m lower than at present. Lava streams from prominent channels on the surface of the central platform descended to feed extensive subaqueous flow fields on the caldera floor. The Wizard Island and central-platform volcanoes, andesitic Merriam Cone, and a newly discovered probable lava flow on the eastern floor of the lake apparently date from within a few hundred years of caldera collapse, whereas a small rhydacite dome was emplaced on the flank of Wizard Island at ca. 4800 cal. yr B.P. Bedrock outcrops on the submerged caldera walls are shown in detail and, in some cases, can be correlated with exposed geologic units of Mount Mazama. Fragmental debris making up the walls elsewhere consists of narrow talus cones forming a dendritic pattern that leads to fewer, wider ridges downslope. Hummocky topography and scattered blocks up to ~280 m long below many of the embayments in the caldera wall mark debris-avalanche deposits that probably formed in single events and commonly are affected by secondary failures. The flat-floored, deep basins contain relatively fine-grained sediment transported from the debris aprons by sheet-flow turbidity currents. Crater Lake apparently filled rapidly (ca. 400-750 yr) until reaching a permeable layer above glaciated lava identified by the new survey in the northeast caldera wall at ~1845 m elevation

  13. Yellowstone Volcanic Unrest from GPS and SAR Interferometric Observations between 1992 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Incorporating geodetic measurements from nine Global Positioning System (GPS) stations and multi-sensor Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), six prominent episodes of Yellowstone caldera unrest are identified between 1992 and 2015. Episode 1: 1992-1995, deflation rate of about 2.7 cm/yr, episode 2: 1996-2000, minimal deflation of 0.5 cm/yr with considerable inflation of 1.7 cm/yr at Norris, episode 3: 2000-2004, slight deflation of 0.7 cm/yr with local inflation of 0.6 cm/yr at Norris, episode 4: 2004-2009, extraordinary inflation of 3-8 cm/yr with substantial deflation of 1-4 cm/yr at Norris, episode 5: 2010-2014, notable deflation of about 1-2.4 cm/yr across the entire caldera floor, and ultimately episode 6: 2014-2015, remarkable caldera-wide inflation of about 2-6 cm/yr. During the period of observation (1992-2015), extensive deformation has occurred primarily at three locations; namely, the Mallard Lake resurgent dome, the Sour Creek resurgent dome, and the Norris Geyser Basin that is located nearby the northwestern rim of the caldera. InSAR data acquired during 1992-2015 by ERS-1, ERS-2, ENVISAT, TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X, and Sentinel-1 are analyzed using the two-pass and the small baseline subset interferometric methods. The created interferograms do not show any alignment of crustal deformation with fault zones across the intermittently active caldera, which indicate that the magma charge and discharge, as well as the widespread hydrothermal activity are responsible for the induced deformation. Fault zones most likely have acted as pathways for the movements of magma and hydrothermal fluids, but they do not have any influence on the measured rates of surface motion. Source modeling of recent GPS and InSAR measurements indicates the existence of two distinct planar sources beneath the caldera (8-12 km) and the Norris Geyser Basin (10-16 km).

  14. Wendo Koshe Pumice: The latest Holocene silicic explosive eruption product of the Corbetti Volcanic System (Southern Ethiopia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapprich, Vladislav; Žáček, Vladimír; Verner, Kryštof; Erban, Vojtěch; Goslar, Tomasz; Bekele, Yewubinesh; Legesa, Firdawok; Hroch, Tomáš; Hejtmánková, Petra

    2016-01-01

    The Plinian eruption of the Wendo Koshe crater within the Corbetti Caldera occurred around 396 BC. The pumice lapilli deposit, with a thickness exceeding 10 cm, dispersed over an area of over 1000 km2 around the towns of Hawasa and Shashemene. Most of the pumice was deposited by fall-out; however, minor local pyroclastic density currents also occurred. The calculated volume of preserved pumice fall deposit (approximately 1.2 km3), combined with the estimated volume of dispersed fine ash distributed further from the volcano, corresponds to an estimated volume of 0.4 km3 (dense rock equivalent) of erupted magma. The age of the pumice eruption (396 ± 38 BC) was determined by 14C radiometric dating of a paleosoil that developed on previous pyroclastic deposits buried by the pumice. The majority of the post-caldera volcanic products are characterized by a relatively uniform chemical composition (TiO2 = 0.24-0.27 wt.%, Zr = 1300-1600 ppm, ƩREE = 920-1150 ppm) without any significant development in composition. Despite the negligible variations in composition of the magmas that erupted during the last 2500 years within the Corbetti Volcanic System, a significant change in composition was documented prior to the 396 BC Wendo Koshe younger pumice eruption. The caldera stage ignimbrite of Corbetti (TiO2 = 0.34 wt.%, Zr = 500 ppm, ƩREE = 370 ppm) and the early post-caldera obsidians are (TiO2 = 0.34 wt.%, Zr = 800 ppm, ƩREE = 410 ppm) characterized by a commenditic composition, and the character of the rhyolitic magmas shifted towards pantellerites in the post-caldera stage. The compositional contrast is confirmed also by Sr isotope ratios. The Corbetti ignimbrite is characterized by being more radiogenic (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70678) than the post-caldera obsidians (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7046-0.7047). In contrast to the trace-element concentrations, the early Chabi obsidian does not differ from younger obsidians in isotope composition. Similarly to other silicic volcanic systems of the

  15. Comparison of magmatic structures beneath Redoubt (Alaska) and Toba (Northern Sumatra) volcanoes derived from local earthquake tomography studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkina, Ekaterina; Koulakov, Ivan; West, Michael

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of seismic tomography studies of two different volcanoes - Mt. Redoubt and Toba caldera. These two subduction related volcanoes have different ages and scales of eruption activity. Velocity model beneath the Redoubt volcano is based on tomographic inversion of P- and S- arrival time data from over 4000 local earthquakes recorded by 19 stations since 1989 to 2012 provided by the Alaskan Volcano Observatory (University of Fairbanks). Just below the volcano edifice we observe an anomaly of high Vp/Vs ratio reaching 2.2 which is seen down to 2- 3 km depth. This indicates a presence of partially molten substance or fluid filled rocks. We can suggest that anomaly area matches with volcano magma chamber. One of the previous velocity models of Toba caldera was obtained by Koulakov et al. (2009) and was based on data recorded by temporary network from January to May 1995. In this study this "old" dataset was supplemented with "new" data recorded by a temporary network deployed in approximately same area by GFZ-Potsdam from May to November 2008. We have manually picked the arrival times from the local events recorded by the later experiment and then performed the tomography inversion for the combined dataset using the LOTOS code (Koulakov, 2009). In the uppermost layers we observe strong low-velocity P- and S- anomalies within the Caldera which can be interpreted by the presence of think sediments filling the caldera. In the lower crust and uppermost mantle we observe a vertical anomaly of low P- and S-velocities which probably represent the path of conduits which link the caldera area with the slab. Similar to Redoubt volcano, resulting velocity model of Toba has an increased value of Vp/Vs ratio that indicates a presence of magma reservoir. Comparison of the tomographic results obtained for the completely different volcanic systems helps in understanding some basic principles of feeding the volcanoes. This study was partly supported by the Project #7

  16. The 2005 eruption of Sierra Negra volcano, Galápagos, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Dennis J.; Harpp, Karen S.; Naumann, Terry R.; Poland, Michael P.; Chadwick, William W.; Hall, Minard; Rader, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Sierra Negra volcano began erupting on 22 October 2005, after a repose of 26 years. A plume of ash and steam more than 13 km high accompanied the initial phase of the eruption and was quickly followed by a ~2-km-long curtain of lava fountains. The eruptive fissure opened inside the north rim of the caldera, on the opposite side of the caldera from an active fault system that experienced an mb 4.6 earthquake and ~84 cm of uplift on 16 April 2005. The main products of the eruption were an `a`a flow that ponded in the caldera and clastigenic lavas that flowed down the north flank. The `a`a flow grew in an unusual way. Once it had established most of its aerial extent, the interior of the flow was fed via a perched lava pond, causing inflation of the `a`a. This pressurized fluid interior then fed pahoehoe breakouts along the margins of the flow, many of which were subsequently overridden by `a`a, as the crust slowly spread from the center of the pond and tumbled over the pahoehoe. The curtain of lava fountains coalesced with time, and by day 4, only one vent was erupting. The effusion rate slowed from day 7 until the eruption’s end two days later on 30 October. Although the caldera floor had inflated by ~5 m since 1992, and the rate of inflation had accelerated since 2003, there was no transient deformation in the hours or days before the eruption. During the 8 days of the eruption, GPS and InSAR data show that the caldera floor deflated ~5 m, and the volcano contracted horizontally ~6 m. The total eruptive volume is estimated as being ~150×106m3. The opening-phase tephra is more evolved than the eruptive products that followed. The compositional variation of tephra and lava sampled over the course of the eruption is attributed to eruption from a zoned sill that lies 2.1 km beneath the caldera floor.

  17. Cycles of edifice growth and destruction at Tharsis Tholus, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, T.; McGuire, P. C.; Münn, S.; Cailleau, B.; Dumke, A.; Neukum, G.; Procter, J. N.

    2009-04-01

    Tharsis Tholus, approx. 800 km to the ENE of Ascraeus Mons, is unique among Martian volcanoes as it is structurally divided into sectors suggesting a complex volcano-tectonic evolution [1-3]. The objective of this study was 1) to identify cycles of edifice growth and destruction and causes of instability, 2) to estimate the mineralogical composition of rocks and loose deposits, 3) to provide a time frame of volcanic activity, and 4) to characterize eruptive styles at Tharsis Tholus. The edifice has a planar extension of 155 km (NW-SE) by 125 km (NE-SW) with an elevation up to 9000 m on the west flank. The volcano exhibits a strong relief and can be subdivided into five major sectors: north flank, west flank, east flank, south flank, and the central caldera. The slopes vary from 50×10³ km³ results. The structure of the edifice indicates at least four large deformation events. The central and most prominent structure of the volcano is its central caldera. It is bordered by a well-preserved system of concentric normal faults. The maximum subsidence of the caldera floor is 3000 m; the collapse volume is calculated at approx. 2160 km³. The caldera (36.7×38.9 km) has an elliptic shape oriented NW-SE. The flanks of the volcano are characterized by four large scarps oriented radially from the central caldera. The arcuate shapes of the scarps and their orientations suggest voluminous collapses of the western and eastern volcano flanks. On the southern flank, a further caldera structure is displayed by an arcuate scarp and a plateau-like plain. Due to a large impact event, most of the caldera structure is now concealed. Large parts of the volcano are cut by parallel normal faults forming grabens. These grabens post-date the large collapse structures at the volcano's flanks. All graben structures are oriented in the NE-SW direction. Minimum and maximum graben widths are 0.47 km and 4.36 km, respectively. Multiple areas of volcanic activity at Tharsis Tholus were

  18. Deep Basalt Aquifers in Orcus Patera, Elysium Basin Mars: Perspectives for Exobiology Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grin, E. A.; Cabrol, N. A.

    1998-01-01

    Direct indicators of shorelines, spillways, and terraces allowed to determine the extent of the Elysium Paleolake between the contour-lines 1000 and 500 m below the Martian datum. The Elysium Paleolake is bordered north by Orcus Patera (14N/181W), which lies west of the Tartarus Montes and Tartarus Colles. The Orcus Patera displays an ellipse-shaped collapsed caldera of 360-km long and 100-km wide. Viking topographic data show that the bottom of the caldera is located at 2500 below the Martian datum, and surrounded by a steep-walled ram art which crest is located at about 0 m elevation. Considering the localization of Orcus Patera in the Elysium paleolake, its altimetry, and the magmatic origin of this caldera, we propose the existence of a paleolake in Orcus Patera generated (a) by juvenile water from magma during the Noachian period, and (b) by intermittent influx of the Elysium Basin from Hesperian to Amazonian. Results are encouraging to consider this site as a potential high-energy source environment for microbial communities. are circumscribed by a 50-km wide lava field mapped as Noachian material. The structure of Orcus Patera represents the record of material erupted from a magmatic reservoir. The caldera is enclosed by steep inner walls (25% measured from topographic data), values which could be in agreement with the presence of a deep magmatic reservoir, as suggested by the typology of Crumpler et.al. The depth of the caldera might be due to the collapse of the magma reservoir, and the release of gases accompanying the magma thermal evolution. Origins of water for the paleolake(s): The water that generated a paleolake in Orcus Patera may have come from two origins: (1) Juvenile water: Plescia and Crips estimated a magma H20 content by weight between 0.5% and 1.5% using for the first value a comparison with terrestrial basalt, and for the second values from a Martian meteorite. The amount of H20 can be estimated by the volume of erupted lava, and the lava

  19. Volcanic geology of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢光福; 王德滋; 金庆民; 沈渭洲; 陶奎元

    2002-01-01

    At Admiralty Bay of central King George Island, Keller Peninsula, Ullman Spur and Point Hennequin are main Tertiary volcanic terranes. Field investigation and isotopic datings indicate that, there occurred three periods of eruptions ( three volcanic cycles) and accompanying N-toward migration of the volcanic center on Keller Peninsula. After the second period of eruptions, the crater collapsed and a caldera was formed, then later eruptions were limited at the northern end of the peninsula and finally migrated to Ullman Spur. Thus Keller Peninsula is a revived caldera, and its volcanism migrated toward E with time. Point Hennequin volcanism happened more or less simultaneously with the above two areas, but has no clear relation in chemical evolution with them, frequently it belongs to another independent volcanic center.

  20. Global Characteristics of 'Arachnoids' on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, V. E.; Stofan, E. R.

    1996-03-01

    The term "arachnoid" has been used colloquially to describe circular to elliptical structures having a set of radiating lineaments distinctly resembling the legs of a spider. However, little is known about the origin of these features and whether or not they are genetically related to each other or to other circular structures on Venus (e.g., coronae, volcanoes, and calderas). We have conducted a global survey of these features in order to more clearly define their characteristics and determine if they are in fact a separate type of feature. In contrast to previous counts, we find a rather small global population of only 36 features that we feel we can confidently call "arachnoids". A detailed examination of these features reveals that they do not display a common set of volcanic or tectonic characteristics indicative of a single process of formation. We also find that these features do not appear to universally represent a particular stage of corona, volcano, or caldera development. _

  1. On the geochemistry of the Kyra eruption sequence of Nisyros volcano on Nisyros and Tilos, Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyra sequence is a volcanic eruption sequence originating from the eastern flank of Nisyros volcano, Greece. Its eruptions products can be found not only on Nisyros itself but also on the nearby non-volcanic island of Tilos. In an extensive sampling campaign, outcrops of the Kyra eruption products on Nisyros were sampled and corresponding samples on Tilos were taken. The clear stratigraphical relationship between the different units within in the individual outcrops, combined with the chemical information gained by the application of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) to the samples, made a detailed chemo-stratigraphy of the complete eruption sequence possible. It can be shown that the sequence is separated into eight distinguishable eruptions. Furthermore, no eruption products of the caldera-forming eruptions from Nisyros (Lower- and Upper Caldera Pumice) or from Santorin were found on Tilos.

  2. On the geochemistry of the Kyra eruption sequence of Nisyros volcano on Nisyros and Tilos, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterba, Johannes H., E-mail: jsterba@ati.ac.at [Atominstitut der oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna University of Technology (Austria); Steinhauser, Georg; Bichler, Max [Atominstitut der oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna University of Technology (Austria)

    2011-11-15

    The Kyra sequence is a volcanic eruption sequence originating from the eastern flank of Nisyros volcano, Greece. Its eruptions products can be found not only on Nisyros itself but also on the nearby non-volcanic island of Tilos. In an extensive sampling campaign, outcrops of the Kyra eruption products on Nisyros were sampled and corresponding samples on Tilos were taken. The clear stratigraphical relationship between the different units within in the individual outcrops, combined with the chemical information gained by the application of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) to the samples, made a detailed chemo-stratigraphy of the complete eruption sequence possible. It can be shown that the sequence is separated into eight distinguishable eruptions. Furthermore, no eruption products of the caldera-forming eruptions from Nisyros (Lower- and Upper Caldera Pumice) or from Santorin were found on Tilos.

  3. Deformation and stress-change modeling at Sierra Negra volcano, Galapagos, from ENVISAT INSAR and GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Sigurjon; Chadwick, W.W.; Poland, M.; Geist, D.

    2008-01-01

    We use radar interferograms and GPS observations to constrain models of magma accumulation and faulting at Sierra Negra volcano, Galápagos, during the years before its 2005 eruption. The data have shown ~5 m of pre-eruption uplift and multiple trapdoor faulting events on an intra-caldera fault system. We find the pattern of uplift to be consistent with an inflating sill at 2.2 km depth under the caldera. Our deformation modeling and stress-change calculations suggest that the inflating sill triggered faulting on an inward- dipping thrust fault and that the faulting in turn relieved the pressure within the sill. This sill-fault interaction tends to thicken the sill and limit its lateral extent within the area bounded by the fault.

  4. A Seismological Portrait of the Anomalous 1996 Bardarbunga Volcano, Iceland, Earthquake (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalcic, H.; Dreger, D. S.; Foulger, G. R.; Julian, B. R.; Fichtner, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Bardarbunga volcano lies beneath the 500-m-thick Vatnajokull icecap, the largest glacier in Europe. Earthquakes with atypical seismic radiation have occurred beneath the Bardarbunga caldera and have been routinely reported in the Global CMT catalog. An earthquake with Mw 5.6 and a strong non-double-couple (NDC) radiation pattern occurred beneath the caldera on 29 September, 1996. A peculiarity of that earthquake was that it was the first in a sequence of seismic and magmatic events and that it was followed, not preceded or accompanied, by a major eruption which ultimately led to a breakout flood from the subglacial caldera lake. The earthquake was recorded well by the regional-scale Iceland Hotspot Project seismic experiment. One of the proposed hypotheses to explain the observed displacements and the sequence of events was the inflation of a shallow magma chamber that might have caused rupture on ring faults below the chamber. Iceland has a heterogeneous crust, with variable thickness, and thus a 1D structural model is not ideal for waveform modeling. We investigated the earthquake with a point-source complete moment-tensor (MT) inversion method using regional long-period seismic waveforms and a composite structural model of Iceland based on joint modeling of teleseismic receiver functions and surface-wave dispersion. When such a model is used, the waveform modeling yields a NDC solution with a strong, vertically oriented compensated linear vector dipole component and a statistically insignificant volumetric contraction. The absence of a volumetric component is surprising in the case of a large volcanic earthquake that cannot be explained by shear slip on a planar fault. A possible mechanism that can produce an earthquake without a volumetric component involves two offset sources with similar but opposite volume changes. We show that although such a model cannot be ruled out, it is unlikely. In order to investigate the hypothesis of a rupture occurring on a

  5. Origin and deformation of Holocene shoreline terraces, Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, G.A.; Locke, W.W.

    1986-08-01

    Geodetic surveys within the Yellowstone caldera have documented active uplift that is most likely caused by magmatic processes in the upper crust. Along the northeast shore of Yellowstone Lake, maximum relative uplift rates are 10 mm/yr for the period 1923-1975. However, information on deformation prior to historic instrumental records has been lacking. In this study, closely spaced data on elevations of postglacial shoreline terraces around the north end of Yellowstone Lake reveal complex tilting. Though most Holocene deformation is probably magma related, the pattern of shoreline tilting deviates significantly from the historic pattern of roughly symmetric inflation of the caldera. Along the northeast shore, where tilt directions of historic and shoreline deformation are similar, differential uplift of a > 2500-yr-old terrace is roughly 10 m; this gives a maximum uplift rate of 4 mm/yr. These unique Holocene terraces may exist due to episodic deformation because vertical movements affecting the lake outlet directly control lake level.

  6. Simulating Irregular Source Geometries for Ionian Plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volcanic plumes on Io respresent a complex rarefied flow into a near-vacuum in the presence of gravity. A 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to investigate the gas dynamics of such plumes, with a focus on the effects of source geometry on far-field deposition patterns. A rectangular slit and a semicircular half annulus are simulated to illustrate general principles, especially the effects of vent curvature on deposition ring structure. Then two possible models for the giant plume Pele are presented. One is a curved line source corresponding to an IR image of a particularly hot region in the volcano's caldera and the other is a large area source corresponding to the entire caldera. The former is seen to produce the features seen in observations of Pele's ring, but with an error in orientation. The latter corrects the error in orientation, but loses some structure. A hybrid simulation of 3D slit flow is also discussed.

  7. Geohydrology model of the geothermal reservoirs at Los Humeros, Puebla, Mexico; Modelo hidrogeologico de los yacimientos geotermicos de los Humeros, Puebla, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cedillo Rodriguez, Fidel [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Perote, Veracruz (Mexico)

    1999-12-01

    Petrology, geochemical studies of water and gases, and reservoir engineering studies of geothermal wells at Los Humeros geothermal field confirm the presence of two geothermal reservoirs. This finding is verified by petrological and structural correlation and the study of casing conditions in the production intervals of reworked wells and deviated wells. These confirm the presence of two reservoirs separated by a layer of vitric tuffs (Toba Vitrea Humeros): the upper, formed by units of Augite Andesite, has a neutral pH and is noncorrosive; the lower, formed by basalts and hornblende Andesites has a very high temperatures and acid pH. The large differences in elevations among the potentiometric levels in the wells do not let us infer the flow direction of deep geothermal fluids. Lithology, hydrogeochemical and piezometric results from gradient wells drilled inside Los Humeros caldera showed two shallow aquifers, one relatively cold and another with higher temperatures. Due to the great distances between wells and to the geologic environment, it was not possible to infer the direction of the fluid flow in either the cold or the warm water reservoir. Regional studies of hydrology, geophysics, hydrogeochemistry and structural geology confirm that the shallow groundwater (cold and warm aquifers) has no hydraulic communication or any geochemical or geological relationship with the geothermal wells, water wheels or springs in the areas surrounding Los Humeros caldera. Therefore, the recharge of the cold and warm shallow aquifers must occur inside the closed basin of Los Humeros caldera, which is topographically well defined. These aquifers recharge the geothermal reservoir through faults and fractures inside the limits of Los Humeros collapsed area. Sections of the regional structural geology show that the granitic and argillaceous limestone outcrops located outside the caldera at the same topographic level, at which these rocks are observed in geothermal wells, impede

  8. A geologic and anthropogenic journey from the Precambrian to the new energy economy through the San Juan volcanic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Douglas B.; Burchell, Alison; Johnson, Raymond H.

    2010-01-01

    The San Juan volcanic field comprises 25,000 km2 of intermediate composition mid-Tertiary volcanic rocks and dacitic to rhyolitic calderas including the San Juan–Uncompahgre and La Garita caldera-forming super-volcanoes. The region is famous for the geological, ecological, hydrological, archeological, and climatological diversity. These characteristics supported ancestral Puebloan populations. The area is also important for its mineral wealth that once fueled local economic vitality. Today, mitigating and/or investigating the impacts of mining and establishing the region as a climate base station are the focuses of ongoing research. Studies include advanced water treatment, the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of propylitic bedrock for use in mine-lands cleanup, and the use of soil amendments including biochar from beetle-kill pines. Biochar aids soil productivity and revegetation by incorporation into soils to improve moisture retention, reduce erosion, and support the natural terrestrial carbon sequestration (NTS) potential of volcanic soils to help offset atmospheric CO2 emissions. This field trip will examine the volcano-tectonic and cultural history of the San Juan volcanic field as well as its geologic structures, economic mineral deposits and impacts, recent mitigation measures, and associated climate research. Field trip stops will include a visit to (1) the Summitville Superfund site to explore quartz alunite-Au mineralization, and associated alteration and new water-quality mitigation strategies; (2) the historic Creede epithermal-polymetallic–vein district with remarkably preserved resurgent calderas, keystone-graben, and moat sediments; (3) the historic mining town of Silverton located in the nested San Juan–Silverton caldera complex that exhibits base-metal Au-Ag mineralization; and (4) the site of ANC and NTS studies. En route back to Denver, we will traverse Grand Mesa, a high NTS area with Neogene basalt-derived soils and will enjoy a soak

  9. About the Mechanism of Volcanic Eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Nechayev, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A new approach to the volcanic eruption theory is proposed. It is based on a simple physical mechanism of the imbalance in the system "magma-crust-fluid". This mechanism helps to explain from unified positions the different types of volcanic eruptions. A criterion of imbalance and magma eruption is derived. Stratovolcano and caldera formation is analyzed. High explosive eruptions of the silicic magma is discussed

  10. Contenido de metales en Cancer polyodon (Crustacea: Decapoda) en un sistema de bahías del norte de Chile (27°S) Metal contents in Cancer polyodon (Crustacea: Decapoda) in a bay system of northern Chile (27°S)

    OpenAIRE

    Alexis Castillo; Jorge Valdés

    2011-01-01

    El contenido de Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb, Fe, Al y Ni fue analizado en tejido muscular de Cancer polyodon en las bahías de Caldera, Calderilla, Inglesa y Salada (Atacama, Chile). Los resultados fueron comparados con estudios similares desarrollados por otros autores y la normativa de carácter nacional e internacional relacionada con el contenido de metales pesados en crustáceos para consumo humano. El orden de abundancia de los metales analizados en C. polyodon fue Cd

  11. Volcano collapse along the Aleutian Ridge (western Aleutian Arc)

    OpenAIRE

    Montanaro, C.; J. Beget

    2011-01-01

    The Aleutian Ridge, in the western part of the Aleutian Arc, consists of a chain of volcanic islands perched atop the crest of a submarine ridge with most of the active Quaternary stratocones or caldera-like volcanoes being located on the northern margins of the Aleutian Islands. Integrated analysis of marine and terrestrial data resulted in the identification and characterization of 17 extensive submarine debris avalanche deposits from 11 volcanoes. Two morphological types of deposits are re...

  12. Structure and morphology of the submarine flank of an active volcano: Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion Island, Indian Ocean)

    OpenAIRE

    Lenat, J-f; Bachelery, P.; Bonneville, A.; Galdeano, A; Labazuy, P.; Rousset, D.; Vincent, P.

    1990-01-01

    In 1984, a Seabeam bathymetric survey and the measurement of the gravity and magnetic fields of the submarine east flak of Piton de la Fournaise were carried out with R/V Jean Charcot . Piton de la Fournaise, one of the most active volcanoes in the world, is a basaltic shield volcano which occupies the southeastern thirdt of Reunion Island in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Most recent volcanic activity occurred within the youngest caldera and along two volcanic rift zones, which trend northea...

  13. Geomicrobiology of sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake: geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function

    OpenAIRE

    Inskeep, William P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Macur, Richard E.; Clingenpeel, Scott; Tenney, Aaron; Lovalvo, David; Beam, Jacob P; Mark A Kozubal; Shanks, W. C.; Lisa A Morgan; Kan, Jinjun; Gorby, Yuri; Yooseph, Shibu; Nealson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) is a large high-altitude (2200 m), fresh-water lake, which straddles an extensive caldera and is the center of significant geothermal activity. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary study was to evaluate the microbial populations inhabiting thermal vent communities in Yellowstone Lake using 16S rRNA gene and random metagenome sequencing, and to determine how geochemical attributes of vent waters influence the distribution of specific ...

  14. Geomicrobiology of sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake: Geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function

    OpenAIRE

    Inskeep, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) is a large high-altitude (2200 m), fresh-water lake, which straddles an extensive caldera and is the center of significant geothermal activity. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary study was to evaluate the microbial populations inhabiting thermal vent communities in Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone Lake) using 16S rRNA gene and random metagenome sequencing, and to determine how geochemical attributes of vent waters influence the distri...

  15. Is Efate (Vanuatu, SW Pacific) a result of subaerial or submarine eruption? An alternative model for the 1 Ma Efate Pumice Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert; Németh, Karoly; Cronin, Shane

    2010-09-01

    The Efate Pumice Formation (EPF) is a trachydacitic volcaniclastic succession widespread in the central part of Efate Island and also present on Hat and Lelepa islands to the north. The volcanic succession has been inferred to result from a major, entirely subaqueous explosive event north of Efate Island. The accumulated pumice-rich units were previously interpreted to be subaqueous pyroclastic density current deposits on the basis of their bedding, componentry and stratigraphic characteristics. Here we suggest an alternative eruptive scenario for this widespread succession. The major part of the EPF is distributed in central Efate, where pumiceous pyroclastic rock units several hundred meters thick are found within fault scarp cliffs elevated about 800 m above sea level. The basal 200 m of the pumiceous succession is composed of massive to weakly bedded pumiceous lapilli units, each 2-3 m thick. This succession is interbedded with wavy, undulatory and dune bedded pumiceous ash and fine lapilli units with characteristics of co-ignimbrite surges and ground surges. The presence of the surge beds implies that the intervening units comprise a subaerial ignimbrite-dominated succession. There are no sedimentary indicators in the basal units examined that are consistent with water-supported transportation and/or deposition. The subaerial ignimbrite sequence of the EPF is overlain by a shallow marine volcaniclastic Rentanbau Tuffs. The EPF is topped by reef limestone, which presumably preserved the underlying EPF from erosion. We here propose that the EPF was formed by a combination of initial subaerial ignimbrite-forming eruptions, followed by caldera subsidence. The upper volcaniclastic successions in our model represent intra-caldera pumiceous volcaniclastic deposits accumulated in a shallow marine environment in the resultant caldera. The present day elevated position of the succession is a result of a combination of possible caldera resurgence and ongoing arc

  16. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  17. Estudio espectroscópico y DRX de afloramientos terrestres volcánicos en la isla de Tenerife como posibles análogos de la geología marciana

    OpenAIRE

    Lalla, E. A.; López-Reyes, G.; Sansano, A.; Sanz-Arranz, A.; Schmanke, D.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Medina-García, J.; Martínez-Frías, J.; Rull-Pérez, F.

    2015-01-01

    Several volcanic outcrops from Tenerife Island (Las Cañadas Caldera, historical volcanism and Gu.imar-Malpaís outcrop) has been selected as a potential terrestrial analog for Mars, regarding the Martian mineralogy and its volcanic characteristic. Diverse alteration processes, including weathering and hydrothermal alteration have been detected in these volcanics environments, which could be considered as part of a model for the primitive volcanic activity of Mars. The selected materials ha...

  18. Preliminary Seismic Tomography of Deception Island Volcano, South Shetland Islands (Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandomeneghi, D.; Barclay, A. H.; Ben Zvi, T.; Wilcock, W.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Almendros, J.

    2005-12-01

    Deception Island, 62°59' S, 60°41' W, is an active volcano located in Bransfield Strait between the Antarctic Peninsula and the main South Shetland Islands. The volcano has a basal diameter of ~30 km and rises ~1500 m from the seafloor to a maximum height of over 500 m above sea level. The 15-km-diameter emerged island is horseshoe-shaped with a flooded inner bay that is accessible to the ocean through a 500-m-wide passage. The island is composed of volcanic rocks which date from Ireland, Mexico, Argentina and Germany. The main objective of the experiment was to collect a high quality data set that could be used to obtain two and three-dimensional P-wave tomographic images of the volcano. A total of 119 land seismic stations and 14 ocean bottom seismometers were deployed for two rounds of shooting and recorded more than 5000 airgun shots that were distributed within the caldera and around the island. The initial dataset used for the three-dimensional seismic tomography comprises more than 90000 P-wave travel times that were determined using both automatic and manual first-arrival picking procedures. The inversion code makes use of accurate ray tracing procedure and comprehensive topography's information.A preliminary three-dimensional P-wave inversion of the automatically-picked travel times resolves structure down to 4 km depth. The tomographic image is characterized by low seismic velocities beneath the caldera floor and regions of anomalously high and low velocity around the margins of the caldera. We will present the results of additional tomographic inversions and resolution tests and will relate the observed anomalies to the distribution of recent eruptions and models for the origin of the caldera.

  19. Study on the Long-Period source mechanism at Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    De Lauro, E.; Dept. Ingegneria Industriale, Università degli Studi di Salerno,; Falanga, M.; Dept. Ingegneria Industriale, Università degli Studi di Salerno,; Petrosino, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia

    2012-01-01

    The source properties of the Long-Period events that occurred at Campi Flegrei Caldera (Italy) during the 2004–2006 ground uplift episode are investigated by analyzing the temporal release of seismic energy, amplitude distribution and inter-event occurrence time. Moreover, an entropy-based decomposition method is applied to identify the simpler waveforms thought to be representative of the source mechanism of Long-Period events. On the basis of the outcomes, we propose that the main part of t...

  20. Ground motion observations and simulation for local earthquakes in the Campi Flegrei volcanic area

    OpenAIRE

    Galluzzo, D.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Bianco, F.; La Rocca, M.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Zonno, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Milano-Pavia, Milano, Italia

    2015-01-01

    Ground motion produced by low magnitude earthquakes can be used to predict peak values in high seismic risk areas where large earthquakes data are not available. In the present work 20 local earthquakes (MD[[-0.3, 2.2]) occurred in the Campi Flegrei caldera during the last decade were analyzed. We followed this strategy: empirical relations were used to calibrate synthetic modeling, accounting for the source features and wave propagation effects. Once the source and path parame...

  1. Active Andean volcanism: its geologic and tectonic setting

    OpenAIRE

    CHARLES R STERN

    2004-01-01

    The Andean volcanic arc includes over 200 potentially active Quaternary volcanoes, and at least 12 giant caldera/ignimbrite systems, occurring in four separate segments referred to as the Northern, Central, Southern and Austral Volcanic Zones. Volcanism results from subduction of the Nazca and Antarctic oceanic plates below South America. Active volcanoes occur where the angle of subduction is relatively steep (25°), and active arc segments are separated by regions below which subduction angl...

  2. Testing and optimization of the seismic networks of Campi Flegrei (Southern Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    Tramelli, A.; C. Troise; G. De Natale; Orazi, M.

    2013-01-01

    The definition of the network resolution power is an important parameter to be considered when evaluating most of the seismic analysis, being connected to the location quality and earthquakes detectability. We estimated the resolving power of the seismic network of Campi Flegrei. The results show that the actual moment magnitude threshold is 0.5 in the Solfatara area, center of the caldera, but increases sharply going away from the center. We also estimated the th...

  3. Uniform pattern of normal faulting at the temporally distributed centers of eruption along the path of the Yellowstone hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarpanah, Armita; Babaie, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    The northeasterly migration of the Yellowstone hotspot (YHS) has led both to the successive eruption of lava from a temporally ordered set of calderas, and related thermally-induced normal faulting along the Snake River Plain (SRP) over the past 16.6 Ma. We have applied a series of structural and statistical methods to analyze the spatial distribution and orientation of the normal faults to understand the kinematics of the mid-Tertiary-Quaternary faulting event along the SRP in the northern Rockies. The azimuths of the linear directional mean (LDM) and the directional (autocorrelation) anisotropy ellipses in the semivariograms, applying Ordinary Kriging, for different sets of normal fault traces give an estimate for the horizontal component of extension for normal faulting. The sub-parabolic spatial pattern of the normal fault LDMs, and their sub-parallel alignment with the minor axes of the Standard Deviation Ellipses (SDEs) in and around different caldera, suggest uniform normal faulting during thermally-induced extensions along the SRP. The asymmetric, sub-parabolic distribution of the spatial trajectories (form lines) of the LDMs and the major axes of the directional (anisotropy) ellipses of the traces of normal faults in the youngest three calderas are similar to the reported parabolic distribution of earthquake epicenters along active normal faults around the YHS. The parallelism of the axis of the sub-parabolic pattern with the trajectories of the LDMs, the major axes of the directional anisotropy ellipses, and the deduced extension directions for each caldera, suggest systematic and progressive normal faulting due to the thermal regime of the hotspot as it migrated to the northeast. This implies that the age of normal faulting progressively decreases to the northeast.

  4. Results of geoelectrical surveys in the area of Crater 70, Deception Island, Maritime Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Antonio; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2015-01-01

    Deception Island is horse-shoe shaped stratovolcano with 15 km diameter and a large caldera that opens towards the southeast, forming a bay about 7 km wide. The maximum altitude is at Mount Pond (539 m a.s.l.). About 57% of the island area is covered by glaciers. In geological terms Deception Island is composed of volcano-sedimentary deposits, including pyroclastic flows and deposits, strombolian scoriae and lava, volcanic and hypo-volcanic indurated ashes, and phreatomagmatic deposits. Recen...

  5. Reducing volcanic risk on Fogo Volcano, Cape Verde, through a participatory approach: which outcome?

    OpenAIRE

    P. Texier-Teixeira; Chouraqui, F.; A. Perrillat-Collomb; Lavigne, F.; J. R. Cadag; Grancher, D.

    2014-01-01

    This research paper presents the outcomes of Work Package 5 (socio-economical vulnerability assessment and community-based disaster risk reduction) of the MIAVITA (MItigate and Assess risk from Volcanic Impact on Terrain and human Activities) research programme conducted on Fogo Volcano, Cape Verde. The study lasted for almost 3 years (May 2010 to January 2012), of which most of the time was spent in the village of Chã das Caldeiras, situated within the 9 km wide caldera ...

  6. Landslide Susceptibility Zonation Model On Jeneberang Watershed Using Geographical Information System and Analytical Hierarchy Process

    OpenAIRE

    Solle, Salam Muchtar; Muslimin Mustafa; Sumbangan Baja; A. M. Imran

    2013-01-01

    The area of Jeneberang Watershed is prone to landslides due to geologic, geomorphologic and rainfall characteristics of the region. In 2004, a huge caldera wall of the watershed collapsed in the Eastern part resulting in infrastructure damage, human casualties and sequence disaster as debris flow. Potential landslides still occur in the future. It is necessary to conduct research to prepare a landslide susceptibility map of the region. The ...

  7. LANDSLIDE SUSCEPTIBILITY ZONATION MODEL ON JENEBERANG WATERSHED BASED ON GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM AND ANALYTICAL HIERARCHY PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Solle Salam, Muchtar

    2008-01-01

    The area of Jeneberang Watershed is prone to landslides due to geologic, geomorphologic and rainfall characteristics of the region. In the year 2004 the huge caldera wall collapsed in the Eastern part of the watershed area resulting in infrastructure damage, human casualties and sequencely disaster as debries flow. Potential landslides still occur in the future. It is necessary to conduct research to prepare a landslide susceptibility map of the region. The objectives of this study are as fol...

  8. Lithospheric buckling and intra-arc stresses: A mechanism for arc segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kerri L.

    1989-01-01

    Comparison of segment development of a number of arcs has shown that consistent relationships between segmentation, volcanism and variable stresses exists. Researchers successfully modeled these relationships using the conceptual model of lithospheric buckling of Yamaoka et al. (1986; 1987). Lithosphere buckling (deformation) provides the needed mechanism to explain segmentation phenomenon; offsets in volcanic fronts, distribution of calderas within segments, variable segment stresses and the chemical diversity seen between segment boundary and segment interior magmas.

  9. Looking into a volcanic area: An overview on the 350 m scientific drilling at Colli

    OpenAIRE

    Mariucci, M. T.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; Pierdominici, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; Pizzino, L.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; Marra, F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; Montone, P.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia

    2008-01-01

    A 350m deep boreholewas drilled in the Colli Albani volcanic district (Central Italy) in order to: understand the shallow crust structure beneath the volcanic complex; characterize the rock physical properties especially through in-situ measurements and, afterward, laboratory experiments; assess the local present-day stress field; install a broad-band seismometer at depth. The borehole is located adjacent to the western rim of the Tuscolano–Artemisio caldera, where several phenome...

  10. A revision of the structure and stratigraphy of pre-Green Tuff ignimbrites at Pantelleria (Strait of Sicily)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotolo, Silvio G.; Scaillet, Stephane; La Felice, Sonia; Vita-Scaillet, Grazia

    2013-01-01

    At Pantelleria, peralkaline silicic magmas were erupted across a range of eruptive typologies and magnitudes: pyroclastic flows, Plinian to strombolian pumice fallout and lava flows. In this paper we focus on the intermediate cycle of eruptive activity which is bracketed by ignimbrite units slightly older than the two caldera collapses which marked the volcanological activity of the island. This age interval (180-85 ka) was punctuated by six ignimbrite-forming eruptions (silicic and variably peralkaline) for a cumulative erupted magma volume of approximately 6 km3 dense rock equivalent. Based on new 40Ar/39Ar (Na,K)-feldspar ages and petrographic data, we propose an updated volcanostratigraphic scheme for these welded and rheomorphic ignimbrites that can be summarised as follows: (i) the age of the old ('La Vecchia') caldera collapse is now tightly constrained between 140 and 146 ka and the caldera-forming eruption can be traced to a lithic-rich welded tuff breccia that outcrops in two opposite sectors of the island (south-west and north-east); (ii) four ignimbrite units previously considered unrelated are now merged in two distinct eruptive paroxysmal events at 107 and 85 ka. In particular, the 85 ka eruptive event is comparable in magnitude to the younger (caldera forming) Green Tuff Plinian eruption; (iii) the recurrence patterns of the 107 and 85 ka eruptions, compared to the Green Tuff, allow us to qualitatively assess that the climax in production of low-temperature silicic and peralkaline melt was focused in the age interval 85-45 ka.

  11. Edge-detection applied to moving sand dunes on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Here we discuss the application of an edge detection filter, the Sobel filter of GIMP, to the recently discovered motion of some sand dunes on Mars. The filter allows a good comparison of an image HiRISE of 2007 and an image of 1999 recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor of the dunes in the Nili Patera caldera, measuring therefore the motion of the dunes on a longer period of time than that previously investigated.

  12. Early volcanic history of the Rabaul area

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Chris O.; Duncan, Robert A.

    2016-04-01

    We conducted an extensive program of 40Ar-39Ar age determinations on a suite of 27 volcanic rock samples from key stratigraphic units at Rabaul, Papua New Guinea in order to improve understanding of the early eruption history of the multiple volcanic systems present in the area. Analyses of whole rock, plagioclase and groundmass separates yielded statistically significant ages for 24 samples. Replicate analyses (groundmass, plagioclase) for 17 of the samples provided concordant ages. The oldest systems in the Rabaul area (>1 Ma to ≈300 ka) are in the south, associated with the caldera-like Varzin Depression, and in the north, at the stratovolcanoes Watom and Tovanumbatir. The earliest known activity of the Rabaul system occurred between about 330 and 200 ka and involved emplacement of lava flows and scoria deposits. Major explosive activity at the Rabaul system commenced at about 200 ka and produced a sequence of dacitic ignimbrites that culminated with the emplacement of the large-volume Malaguna Pyroclastics at about 160 ka. Calderas may have been formed as a consequence of the large volumes of tephra produced during some of these eruptions. Products of the early activity are found in the northern and northeastern walls of Rabaul Caldera and on the northeastern flank of Tovanumbatir. This leads to the conclusion that the source of the early activity at Rabaul probably was located in the northern part of the present caldera complex. A shift in the focus of activity at the Rabaul system took place between about 160 and 125 ka. All of the younger (appears to have been similar to that of the last ≈18 ky.

  13. Landslides density map of S. Miguel Island, Azores archipelago

    OpenAIRE

    Valadão, P.; Gaspar, J. L.; Queiroz, G.; Ferreira, T

    2002-01-01

    The Azores archipelago is located in the Atlantic Ocean and is composed of nine volcanic islands. S. Miguel, the largest one, is formed by three active, E-W trending, trachytic central volcanoes with caldera (Sete Cidades, Fogo and Furnas). Chains of basaltic cinder cones link those major volcanic structures. An inactive trachytic central volcano (Povoação) and an old basaltic volcanic complex (Nordeste) comprise the easternmost part of th...

  14. Spatial distribution of volcanoes on Io: implications for tidal heating and magma ascent

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Beggan, Ciaran D.; Still, Susanne; Beuthe, Michael; Lopes, Rosaly M.C.; Williams, David A.; Radebaugh, Jani; Wright, William

    2013-01-01

    Extreme volcanism on Io results from tidal heating, but its tidal dissipation mechanisms and magma ascent processes are poorly constrained. Here we analyze the distribution of volcanic hotspots and paterae identified within the first 1:15,000,000-scale global geologic map of Io to characterize their patterns of spatial organization. Ionian hotspots correspond to the locations of observed positive thermal anomalies, whereas paterae are caldera-like volcano-tectonic depressions that record loc...

  15. On the fate of pumice rafts formed during the 2012 Havre submarine eruption

    OpenAIRE

    Jutzeler, Martin; Marsh, Robert; Carey, Rebecca J.; White, James D. L.; Talling, Peter J.; Karlstrom, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Pumice rafts are floating mobile accumulations of low-density pumice clasts generated by silicic volcanic eruptions. Pumice in rafts can drift for years, become waterlogged and sink, or become stranded on shorelines. Here we show that the pumice raft formed by the impressive, deep submarine eruption of the Havre caldera volcano (Southwest Pacific) in July 2012 can be mapped by satellite imagery augmented by sailing crew observations. Far from coastal interference, the eruption produced a sing...

  16. Interpretation of gravity and magnetic anomalies at Lake Rotomahana: Geological and hydrothermal implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caratori Tontini, F.; de Ronde, C. E. J.; Scott, B. J.; Soengkono, S.; Stagpoole, V.; Timm, C.; Tivey, M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the geological and hydrothermal setting at Lake Rotomahana, using recently collected potential-field data, integrated with pre-existing regional gravity and aeromagnetic compilations. The lake is located on the southwest margin of the Okataina Volcanic Center (Haroharo caldera) and had well-known, pre-1886 Tarawera eruption hydrothermal manifestations (the famous Pink and White Terraces). Its present physiography was set by the caldera collapse during the 1886 eruption, together with the appearance of surface activities at the Waimangu Valley. Gravity models suggest that subsidence associated with the Haroharo caldera is wider than the previously mapped extent of the caldera margins. Magnetic anomalies closely correlate with heat-flux data and surface hydrothermal manifestations and indicate that the west and northwestern shore of Lake Rotomahana are characterized by a large, well-developed hydrothermal field. The field extends beyond the lake area with deep connections to the Waimangu area to the south. On the south, the contact between hydrothermally demagnetized and magnetized rocks strikes along a structural lineament with high heat-flux and bubble plumes which suggest hydrothermal activity occurring west of Patiti Island. The absence of a well-defined demagnetization anomaly at this location suggests a very young age for the underlying geothermal system which was likely generated by the 1886 Tarawera eruption. Locally confined intense magnetic anomalies on the north shore of Lake Rotomahana are interpreted as basalt dikes with high magnetization. Some appear to have been emplaced before the 1886 Tarawera eruption. A dike located in proximity of the southwest lake shore may be related to the structural lineament controlling the development of the Patiti geothermal system, and could have been originated from the 1886 Tarawera eruption.

  17. Geothermal well completions: an overview of existing methods in four types of developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    Existing practices and capabilities for completing producing and injection wells for geothermal application in each of four categories of geothermal environments are discussed. Included are steam wells in hard, fractured rocks (The Geysers, California), hot water wells in sedimentary formations (Imperial Valley, California), hot, dry impermeable rocks with circulating water systems (Valles Caldera, New Mexico), and geopressured, geothermal water wells with associated hydrocarbon production on the U.S. Gulf Coast.

  18. El Domo Vitrofírico Escuela Piedra Parada del Complejo Volcanico Piroclastico del Río Chubut Medio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Aragón

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudia la geología y geoquímica de un domo vitrofírico riolítico de 0,8 km², vinculado a otros cinco domos que están alineados a lo largo del foso de una caldera paleocena de 25 km de diámetro. El domo pertenece al magmatismo post-colapso de la caldera. Las fracturas anulares controlaron la distribución de los domos a lo largo del foso. Las fracturas radiales controlaron el conducto de alimentación del domo. El domo muestra relaciones de intrusividad y extrusión respecto de las tufolitas lacustres que lo contienen. Riolitas foliadas intruyen y sobreyacen al domo por su punto mas elevado, cuando este estaba aún a alta temperatura. La geoquímica muestra que los vitrófiros y lavas foliadas, son riolitas con alto potasio, de naturaleza calcoalcalina, comagmáticas y probablemente vinculadas a un intrusivo andesitico tipo etmolito o embudo, que también está restringido al foso de la caldera.

  19. Magnetostratigraphy of the Ahuachapan-Chipilapa geothermal field, El Salvador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fucugauchi, Jaime Urrutia [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Lab. de Paleomagnetismo y Geofisica Nuclear, Coyoacan (Mexico); Rodriguez, Vicente Torres; Partida, Eduardo Gonzalez [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Dept. de Geotermia, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    1997-12-01

    The volcanic stratigraphy for the Ahuachapan-Chipilapa geothermal field is defined on the basis of the magnetostratigraphic results on 156 oriented samples from 33 sites. The magnetostratigraphic sequence shows that the major volcanism associated with the Concepcion de Ataco caldera and the Cuyanausul volcano took place during the middle Brunhes chron (Quaternary). Pre-caldera activity of small centers such as Empalizada and Apaneca in the southern sector of the field occurred during the early Brunhes (0.77{+-}0.07 Ma). Basaltic-andesitic activity associated with the Cuyanausul volcano took place earlier, i.e. during the Matuyama chron, possibly around 1.3{+-}0.15 and 1.7{+-}0.3 Ma. The local igneous basement is composed of Late Miocene-Pliocene andesites, ignimbrites and volcano-sedimentary deposits. Normal polarities and a K-Ar date of 7.37{+-}0.73 Ma indicate that the volcanic activity in the study area extends beyond the Gauss chron. The polarity of some of the units in the post-caldera sequence and in the Concepcion de Ataco and Cuyanausul sequences suggest that they may have recorded short polarity sub-chrons. (Author)

  20. Petrology of the prehistoric lavas and dyke of the Barren Island, Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Alam; D Chandrasekharam; O Vaselli; B Capaccioni; P Manetti; P B Santo

    2004-12-01

    Although Barren Island (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean) witnessed several volcanic eruptions during historic times, the eruptions that led to the formation of this volcanic island occurred mainly during prehistoric times. It is still active and currently in the fumarolic stage. Its volcanic evolution appears to be characterized by a constructive phase with the piling up of lava flows and scoria deposits and Strombolian activities, followed by a sudden collapse of the main cone. Deposits of a possible caldera-forming eruption were not recognized earlier. After a period of peri-calderic hydromagmatic activity, whose deposits presently mantle inner and outer caldera walls, a new phase of intracalderic Vulcanian activities took place. A prominent dyke in the SE inner side of the caldera wall was recognized. Petrographically the lava flows and dyke are similar but they differ in their chemical composition (viz., SiO2, MgO, Ni, Cr) significantly. Similarity in major, minor and trace element composition (viz., K/La, K/Nb, K/Rb, K/Ti ratios) of these rocks together with Chondrite normalized trace element (Rb, Ba, Sr, P, Zr, Ti and Nb) and REE (La, Ce, Nd and Y) patterns of the Barren Island prehistoric lava flows and dyke and low-K lavas of Sunda Arc indicates that Barren Island must have evolved from a source similar to that of Sunda Arc lavas during the Quaternary Period.

  1. Long-period seismic events with strikingly regular temporal patterns on Katla volcano's south flank (Iceland)

    CERN Document Server

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Guðmundsson, Ólafur; Einarsson, Páll; Tryggvason, Ari; Lund, Björn; Lucchi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Katla is a threatening volcano in Iceland, partly covered by the M\\'yrdalsj\\"okull ice cap. The volcano has a large caldera with several active geothermal areas. A peculiar cluster of long-period seismic events started on Katla's south flank in July 2011, during an unrest episode in the caldera that culminated in a glacier outburst. The seismic events were tightly clustered at shallow depth in the Gvendarfell area, 4 km south of the caldera, under a small glacier stream on the southern margin of M\\'yrdalsj\\"okull. No seismic events were known to have occurred in this area before. The most striking feature of this seismic cluster is its temporal pattern, characterized by regular intervals between repeating seismic events, modulated by a seasonal variation. Remarkable is also the stability of both the time and waveform features over a long time period, around 3.5 years. No comparable examples have been found in the literature. Both volcanic and glacial processes can produce similar waveforms and therefore have ...

  2. Three-Dimensional Analysis of dike/fault interaction at Mono Basin (California) using the Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marra, D.; Battaglia, M.

    2013-12-01

    Mono Basin is a north-trending graben that extends from the northern edge of Long Valley caldera towards the Bodie Hills and is bounded by the Cowtrack Mountains on the east and the Sierra Nevada on the west. The Mono-Inyo Craters volcanic chain forms a north-trending zone of volcanic vents extending from the west moat of the Long Valley caldera to Mono Lake. The Hartley Springs fault transects the southern Mono Craters-Inyo Domes area between the western part of the Long Valley caldera and June Lake. Stratigraphic data suggest that a series of strong earthquakes occurred during the North Mono-Inyo eruption sequence of ~1350 A.D. The spatial and temporal proximity between Hartley Springs Fault motion and the North Mono-Inyo eruption sequence suggests a possible relation between seismic events and eruptions. We investigate the interactions between slip along the Hartley Springs fault and dike intrusion beneath the Mono-Inyo craters using a three-dimensional finite element model of the Mono Basin. We employ a realistic representation of the Basin that includes topography, vertical and lateral heterogeneities of the crust, contact relations between fault planes, and a physical model of the pressure required to propagate the dike. We estimate (a) the distribution of Coulomb stress changes to study the influence of dike intrusion on Hartley Springs fault, and (b) the local stress and volumetric dilatation changes to understand how fault slip may influence the propagation of a dike towards the surface.

  3. Two concepts of uranium geology in the United States of America that may be useful in Latin American uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two concepts of the origin and deposition of uranium are described that are somewhat different from the conventional sandstone deposits of the United States of America. The first concept relates to granites as source and host rocks. Work done in the Granite Mountains of Wyoming provides considerable support for a granitic source. Calculations indicate that between 50 and 75% of the uranium has been leached from the granite to depths of nearly 400 m, and could have been source rocks for deposits in the Tertiary sandstones in adjacent basins. Areas of intense fracturing are also hosts for redeposition and concentration of uranium in granites of the Granite Mountains. The second concept describes resurgent cauldrons as source and host rocks. The development of resurgent cauldrons provides a variety of geological settings favourable for both intra-caldera deposits and deposits forming in adjacent basins. A collapsed caldera may contain a lake into which sediments from ejected material carrying uranium could be carried and into which direct contributions of uranium could come from the underlying magma. Weathering of uranium-bearing material deposited outside the caldera could provide uranium to be redeposited in conventional deposits such as roll fronts. Geological investigations carried out in the Great Basins of Utah and Nevada are cited. (author)

  4. Jan Mayen revisited, the sister volcanoes Sør-Jan and Nord-Jan (Beerenberg) and their evolution through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskuldsson, A.; Gjerlxw, E.; Pedersen, R. B.; Thorseth, I. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Island of Jan Mayen is situated at 71°N and 8.3°W in the north Atlantic at the southern edge of the Jan Mayen fracture zone. It is a volcanic island extending for about 53 km from SW towards NE. Maximum width of the island is 15.8 km at its northern tip, while minimum width is only 2.5 km at its centre. The island is built up by two main edifices that have erupted repeatedly, namely Sør-Jan and Nord-Jan or Beerenberg. Petrology of the two edifices is strikingly different. In the south volcanic products are characterized by evolved basalts and trackites to rhyolites. Crystals of ol, cpx, opx are small and in low portions in the rocks. Plg is however common. A 220 m thick plinian formation is found at Borga location in Sør Jan resting on top of a palaeo beach at the altitude of some 170-200 m. This we interpret as caldera formation on Sør Jan and the beach uplift a later stage resurgent activity within the caldera. Further the post caldera volcanic activity all indicates that magma has been stored for shorter or longer time before eruption on surface. Nord Jan or Beerenberg on the other hand shows more primitive magma evolution indicating its younger age. At the flanks of Beerenberg (e.g. Esk krater and Kapp Fishburn) volcanic activity is characterized by ankaramitic magma, with ol, opx and cpx (to lesser extent) in the size range of 1-4 cm and portions up 30% of the whole rock. Plg is absent in these rocks. Volcanic vents closer to the summit area of Beerenberg have smaller ol, cpx and opx (to a lesser extent) and in much lower portion than at the flank eruption sites. These rocks also all carry plg, indicating magma reservoir development and shallow magma residence towards the centre of Beerenberg. We will present a model for the evolution of the Jan Mayen Island, as a migrating volcanism from South towards North. At first the volcanism is characterized by mantle derived magma, namely ankaramites. Prolonged activity forms magma chambers in the crust that

  5. Age, geochemical composition, and distribution of Oligocene ignimbrites in the northern Sierra Nevada, California: Implications for landscape morphology, elevation, and drainage divide geography of the Nevadaplano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, E.J.; Calvert, A.T.; Graham, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the topographic and landscape evolution of the Cenozoic Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range, we combine geochemical and isotopic age correlations with palaeoaltimetry data from widely distributed ignimbrites in the northern Sierra Nevada, California. A sequence of Oligocene rhyolitic ignimbrites is preserved across the modern crest of the range and into the western foothills. Using trace and rare earth element geochemical analyses of volcanic glass, these deposits have been correlated to ignimbrites described and isotopically dated in the Walker Lane fault zone and in central Nevada (Henry et al., 2004, Geologic map of the Dogskin mountain quadrangle; Washoe County, Nevada; Faulds et al., 2005, Geology, v. 33, p. 505-508). Ignimbrite deposits were sampled within the northern Sierra Nevada and western Nevada, and four distinct geochemical compositions were identified. The majority of samples from within the northern Sierra Nevada have compositions similar to the tuffs of Axehandle Canyon or Rattlesnake Canyon, both likely sourced from the same caldera complex in either the Clan Alpine Mountains or the Stillwater Range, or to the tuff of Campbell Creek, sourced from the Desatoya Mountains caldera. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations from these samples of 31.2, 30.9, and 28.7Ma, respectively, support these correlations. Based on an Oligocene palinspastic reconstruction of the region, our results show that ignimbrites travelled over 200km from their source calderas across what is now the crest of the Sierra Nevada, and that during that time, no drainage divide existed between the ignimbrite source calderas in central Nevada and sample locations 200km to the west. Palaeoaltimetry data from Sierra Nevada ignimbrites, based on the hydrogen isotopic composition of hydration water in glass, reflect the effect of a steep western slope on precipitation and indicate that the area had elevations similar to the present-day range. These combined

  6. Style and age of late Oligocene-early Miocene deformation in the southern Stillwater Range, west central Nevada: Paleomagnetism, geochronology, and field relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Mark R.; John, David A.; Conrad, James E.; McKee, Edwin H.

    2000-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and geochronologic data combined with geologic mapping tightly restrict the timing and character of a late Oligocene to early Miocene episode of large magnitude extension in the southern Stillwater Range and adjacent regions of west central Nevada. The southern Stillwater Range was the site of an Oligocene to early Miocene volcanic center comprising (1) 28.3 to 24.3 Ma intracaldera ash flow tuffs, lava flows, and subjacent plutons associated with three calderas, (2) 24.8 to 20.7 Ma postcaldera silicic dikes and domes, and (3) unconformably overlying 15.3 to 13.0 Ma dacite to basalt lava flows, plugs, and dikes. The caldera-related tuffs, lava flows, and plutons were tilted 60°-70° either west or east during the initial period of Cenozoic deformation that accommodated over 100% extension. Directions of remanent magnetization obtained from these extrusive and intrusive, caldera-related rocks are strongly deflected from an expected Miocene direction in senses appropriate for their tilt. A mean direction for these rocks after tilt correction, however, suggests that they were also affected by a moderate (33.4° ± 11.8°) component of counterclockwise vertical axis rotation. Paleomagnetic data indicate that the episode of large tilting occurred during emplacement of 24.8 to 20.7 Ma postcaldera dikes and domes. In detail, an apparent decrease in rotation with decreasing age of individual, isotopically dated bodies of the postcaldera group indicates that most tilting occurred between 24.4 and 24.2 Ma. The onset of tilting immediately following after the final caldera eruptions suggests that the magmatism and deformation were linked. Deformation was not driven by magma buoyancy, however, because tilting equally affected the caldera systems of different ages, including their plutonic roots. It is more likely that regional extension was focused in the southern Stillwater Range due to magmatic warming and reduction of tensile strength of the brittle crust

  7. New 40Ar/39Ar Ages From Southwest Bolivia Refine the Timing of APVC Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, M.; de Silva, S. L.; Jicha, B.; Singer, B.; Jiménez, N.; Ort, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC) of the Central Andes has produced prodigious silicic volcanism (at least 11,000 km3 of magma) over the last 10 Ma including some of the largest known ignimbrites on Earth. Despite excellent exposure, little previous work had been conducted on the timing and distribution of ignimbrite volcanism in the Lípez region of southwestern Bolivia, the heart of the APVC. To address this deficiency we have performed ~612 single crystal laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar analyses from 39 pumice and bulk matrix samples collected from the main ignimbrite units within the Lípez region. Geochemistry of pumice and mineral samples, and paleomagnetic data are also being used to correlate individual ignimbrite units. Our new 40Ar/39Ar results establish new or refined eruption ages (with 2σ error) from the Vilama caldera at 8.41±0.02 Ma, Pastos Grandes caldera at 5.45±0.02 and 2.94±0.01 Ma, and Guacha caldera at 5.65±0.01, and 3.57±0.02 Ma. New ages were also determined for eruptions from the Panizos ignimbrite shield (6.86±0.03 Ma), Juvina ignimbrite shield (5.23±0.01 Ma), and the Laguna Colorado ignimbrite shield (2.21±0.05 and 1.95±0.03 Ma). The oldest ignimbrite we have found in the area is 10.33±0.64 Ma, a local unit beneath the Vilama ignimbrite. The youngest units have been identified west of the Guacha caldera with eruption ages of 1.70±0.6 Ma and 0.70±0.01 Ma. These results demonstrate that ignimbrite-producing eruptions in the Lípez region span the age of APVC volcanism previously established, with the largest eruptions occurring from long-lived, cyclic supervolcano caldera systems like Guacha and Pastos Grandes. The aggregate data from the APVC support the hypothesis that the APVC developed predominantly during distinct pulses of massive ignimbrite eruptions at ~8, 6, and 4 Ma and attest to episodic behavior of the magmatic system. Ignimbrites of geothermal presence and active local surface deformation suggest that the magma

  8. The May 2005 eruption of Fernandina volcano, Galápagos: The first circumferential dike intrusion observed by GPS and InSAR

    KAUST Repository

    Chadwick, William W Jr

    2010-12-15

    The May 2005 eruption of Fernandina volcano, Galápagos, occurred along circumferential fissures parallel to the caldera rim and fed lava flows down the steep southwestern slope of the volcano for several weeks. This was the first circumferential dike intrusion ever observed by both InSAR and GPS measurements and thus provides an opportunity to determine the subsurface geometry of these enigmatic structures that are common on Galápagos volcanoes but are rare elsewhere. Pre- and post- eruption ground deformation between 2002 and 2006 can be modeled by the inflation of two separate magma reservoirs beneath the caldera: a shallow sill at ~1 km depth and a deeper point-source at ~5 km depth, and we infer that this system also existed at the time of the 2005 eruption. The co-eruption deformation is dominated by uplift near the 2005 eruptive fissures, superimposed on a broad subsidence centered on the caldera. Modeling of the co-eruption deformation was performed by including various combinations of planar dislocations to simulate the 2005 circumferential dike intrusion. We found that a single planar dike could not match both the InSAR and GPS data. Our best-fit model includes three planar dikes connected along hinge lines to simulate a curved concave shell that is steeply dipping (~45-60°) toward the caldera at the surface and more gently dipping (~12-14°) at depth where it connects to the horizontal sub-caldera sill. The shallow sill is underlain by the deep point source. The geometry of this modeled magmatic system is consistent with the petrology of Fernandina lavas, which suggest that circumferential eruptions tap the shallowest parts of the system, whereas radial eruptions are fed from deeper levels. The recent history of eruptions at Fernandina is also consistent with the idea that circumferential and radial intrusions are sometimes in a stress-feedback relationship and alternate in time with one another. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Initiation of large-volume silicic centers in the Yellowstone hotspot track: insights from H2O- and F-rich quartz-hosted rhyolitic melt inclusions in the Arbon Valley Tuff of the Snake River Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Dana L.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Loewen, Matthew W.; Wallace, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    During the onset of caldera cluster volcanism at a new location in the Snake River Plain (SRP), there is an increase in basalt fluxing into the crust and diverse silicic volcanic products are generated. The SRP contains abundant and compositionally diverse hot, dry, and often low-δ18O silicic volcanic rocks produced through time during the formation of individual caldera clusters, but more H2O-rich eruptive products are rare. We report analyses of quartz-hosted melt inclusions from pumice clasts from the upper and lower Arbon Valley Tuff (AVT) to gain insight into the initiation of caldera cluster volcanism. The AVT, a voluminous, caldera-forming rhyolite, represents the commencement of volcanism (10.44 Ma) at the Picabo volcanic field of the Yellowstone hotspot track. This is a normal δ18O rhyolite consisting of early and late erupted members (lower and upper AVT, respectively) with extremely radiogenic Sr isotopes and unradiogenic Nd isotopes, requiring that ~50 % of the mass of these elements is derived from melts of Archean upper crust. Our data reveal distinctive features of the early erupted lower AVT melt including: variable F concentrations up to 1.4 wt%, homogenous and low Cl concentrations (~0.08 wt%), H2O contents ranging from 2.3 to 6.4 wt%, CO2 contents ranging from 79 to 410 ppm, and enrichment of incompatible elements compared to the late erupted AVT, subsequent Picabo rhyolites, SRP rhyolites, and melt inclusions from other metaluminous rhyolites (e.g., Bishop Tuff, Mesa Falls Tuff). We couple melt inclusion data with Ti measurements and cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging of the host quartz phenocrysts to elucidate the petrogenetic evolution of the AVT rhyolitic magma. We observe complex and multistage CL zoning patterns, the most critical being multiple truncations indicative of several dissolution-reprecipitation episodes with bright CL cores (higher Ti) and occasional bright CL rims (higher Ti). We interpret the high H2O, F, F/Cl, and

  10. Long Period Earthquakes Beneath California's Young and Restless Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, A. M.; Dawson, P. B.; Shelly, D. R.; Hill, D. P.; Mangan, M.

    2013-12-01

    The newly established USGS California Volcano Observatory has the broad responsibility of monitoring and assessing hazards at California's potentially threatening volcanoes, most notably Mount Shasta, Medicine Lake, Clear Lake Volcanic Field, and Lassen Volcanic Center in northern California; and Long Valley Caldera, Mammoth Mountain, and Mono-Inyo Craters in east-central California. Volcanic eruptions occur in California about as frequently as the largest San Andreas Fault Zone earthquakes-more than ten eruptions have occurred in the last 1,000 years, most recently at Lassen Peak (1666 C.E. and 1914-1917 C.E.) and Mono-Inyo Craters (c. 1700 C.E.). The Long Valley region (Long Valley caldera and Mammoth Mountain) underwent several episodes of heightened unrest over the last three decades, including intense swarms of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, rapid caldera uplift, and hazardous CO2 emissions. Both Medicine Lake and Lassen are subsiding at appreciable rates, and along with Clear Lake, Long Valley Caldera, and Mammoth Mountain, sporadically experience long period (LP) earthquakes related to migration of magmatic or hydrothermal fluids. Worldwide, the last two decades have shown the importance of tracking LP earthquakes beneath young volcanic systems, as they often provide indication of impending unrest or eruption. Herein we document the occurrence of LP earthquakes at several of California's young volcanoes, updating a previous study published in Pitt et al., 2002, SRL. All events were detected and located using data from stations within the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN). Event detection was spatially and temporally uneven across the NCSN in the 1980s and 1990s, but additional stations, adoption of the Earthworm processing system, and heightened vigilance by seismologists have improved the catalog over the last decade. LP earthquakes are now relatively well-recorded under Lassen (~150 events since 2000), Clear Lake (~60 events), Mammoth Mountain

  11. Shoshonite and sub-alkaline magmas from an ultrapotassic volcano: Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data on the Roccamonfina volcanic rocks, Roman Magmatic Province, Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conticelli, Sandro; Marchionni, Sara; Rosa, Davide; Giordano, Guido; Boari, Elena; Avanzinelli, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    The Roccamonfina volcano is characterised by two stages of volcanic activity that are separated by volcano-tectonic caldera collapses. Ultrapotassic leucite-bearing rocks are confined to the pre-caldera stage and display geochemical characteristics similar to those of other volcanoes in the Roman Province. After the major sector collapse of the volcano, occurred at ca. 400 ka, shoshonitic rocks erupted from cinder cones and domes both within the caldera and on the external flanks of the pre-caldera Roccamonfina volcano. On the basis of new trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data, we show that the Roccamonfina shoshonitic rocks are distinct from shoshonites of the Northern Roman Province, but are very similar to those of the Neapolitan volcanoes. The last phases of volcanic activity erupted sub-alkaline magmas as enclaves in trachytic domes, and as lavas within the Monte Santa Croce dome. Ultrapotassic rocks of the pre-caldera composite volcano are plagioclase-bearing leucitites characterised by high levels of incompatible trace elements with an orogenic signature having troughs at Ba, Ta, Nb, and Ti, and peaks at Cs, K, Th, U, and Pb. Initial values of 87Sr/86Sr range from 0.70926 to 0.70999, 143Nd/144Nd ranges from 0.51213 to 0.51217, while the lead isotope rations vary between 18.788-18.851 for 206Pb/204Pb, 15.685-15.701 for 207Pb/204Pb, and 39.048-39.076 for 208Pb/204Pb. Shoshonites show a similar pattern of trace element depletions and enrichments to the earlier ultrapotassic leucite-bearing rocks but have a larger degree of differentiation and lower concentrations of incompatible trace elements. On the other hand, shoshonitic rocks have Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopes consistently different than pre-caldera ultrapotassic leucite-bearing rocks. 87Sr/86Sr ranges from 0.70665 to 0.70745, 143Nd/144Nd ranges from 0.51234 to 0.51238, 206Pb/204Pb ranges from 18.924 to 19.153, 207Pb/204Pb ranges from 15.661 to 15.694, and 208Pb/204Pb ranges from 39.084 to 39.212. High-K calc

  12. Submarine Arc Volcanism in the Southern Mariana Arc: Results of Recent ROV studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, A. R.; Tamura, Y.; Stern, R. J.; Embley, R. W.; Hein, J. R.; Jordan, E.; Ribeiro, J. M.; Sica, N.; Kohut, E. J.; Whattam, S. A.; Hirahara, Y.; Senda, R.; Nunokawa, A.

    2009-12-01

    The submarine Diamante cross-arc volcanoes (~16°N) and the Sarigan-Zealandia Bank Multi-Volcano Complex (SZBMVC; ~16°45’N), north and south, respectively, of Anatahan Island in the southern Mariana Arc, were studied during several dives in June 2009 using the ROV Hyper-Dolphin, cruise NT09-08 (R/V Natsushima); neither has been studied in detail before. The data collected provide a new perspective on how the subduction factory operates to complement previous studies on other cross-arc volcanic chains in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc. The Diamante complex consists of three major edifices, two cones (West and Central Diamante) and a more complex caldera-like edifice at the volcanic front (East Diamante). West and Central Diamante are basaltic volcanoes but East Diamante has a more complex history. Our studies indicate initial construction of a basaltic volcano. Magmatic evolution led to a violent caldera-forming and quieter dome-building events. Post-caldera quiescence allowed a carbonate platform to grow, now preserved on the eastern caldera wall. Felsic magma or hot rock provides a heat source for an active hydrothermal field associated with felsic domes in the caldera, which NOAA investigators discovered in 2004. A new type of hydrothermal deposit was discovered in the hydrothermal field, consisting of large sulfide-sulfate mounds topped by bulbous constructions of low-temperature Fe and Mn oxides. Vents on the mounds were observed to emit shimmering water. The SZBMVC consists of six closely spaced edifices whose loci are aligned along two parallel trends, one along the volcanic front (Zealandia Bank, Sarigan and South Sarigan), and one about 15 km west towards the rear-arc (Northwest Zealandia, West Zealandia and West Sarigan). Zealandia Bank dives revealed that, as with East Diamante, initial activity was basaltic and became more evolved with time. The western half of Zealandia Bank is dominated by felsic lavas centered on a small (~2 km diameter) caldera and

  13. First 3D thermal mapping of an active volcano using an advanced photogrammetric method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Raphael; Baratoux, David; Lacogne, Julien; Lopez, Teodolina; Fauchard, Cyrille; Bretar, Frédéric; Arab-Sedze, Mélanie; Staudacher, Thomas; Jacquemoud, Stéphane; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc

    2014-05-01

    to extract 3D informations from thermal images taken from different positions. This paper presents the first 3D thermal map of an active volcano (Piton de la Fournaise, La Réunion Island) directly generated from 70 thermal images (so-called "stereothermogrammetric" DEM). The data were obtained above Dolomieu caldera by helicopter just before sunrise, during a clear weather in 2008. They were obtained before the eruptive events occurring within the Dolomieu caldera. We used a 28 mm focal FLIR Thermacam PM695 lent by the Piton de la Fournaise Observatory. The thermal images were acquired automatically every 30 seconds with the helicopter flying around the caldera at low altitude (less than 100 m height above the caldera). This survey led to the acquisition of images with a ground pixel size in the range of 1-3 m. A particular attention has been brought to the obtaining of a high overlap percentage (80 percents) for the localization of the maximum tie points on the image. Finally, the acquisition of 70 images allowed the generation of a 3D thermal model of the caldera containing more than 500000 points. i.e. 1 point each 2 m², considering a surface of 106 m² for the Dolomieu caldera. This model is then compared with a DEM recently obtained with the LIDAR method after the eruptive events occurring within Dolomieu. The comparison of these independent methods leads to the validation of the stereothermogrammetric method. It allows the quantification of the thickness of the lava flows within the Dolomieu collapse in 2008 and 2009, i.e. approximately 80 meters, as estimated by previous studies from field observations.

  14. Probing the Source of Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (Sergey Soloviev Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, John C.

    2015-04-01

    What if we knew where magma is located under a volcano and its current state? Such information would transform volcanology. For extreme events, we typically know where the vulnerabilities are: people, lifelines, and critical infrastructure, but seldom do we know the 'source term' beforehand. For restless calderas such as Campi Flegrei, Italy and Yellowstone, USA, the threat is silicic magma within the caldera itself. Great effort has gone into finding such bodies through surface measurements. 'Discovery' is declared when consensus is achieved. But there is a difference between consensus and knowledge. By following certain conventions in finding magma bodies (aseismic volume, seismic attenuation, Mogi source location, water and CO2 content of melt inclusions) and depicting them in accepted ways (oblate spheroids or lenses with an impossible solid/liquid boundary discontinuity), we perpetuate myths that mislead even ourselves. The consensus view of the Long Valley Caldera, USA, magma reservoir has evolved over 40 years from a 104 km3 balloon to two tiny pockets of magma, in part because drilling revealed a temperature of 100°C at 3 km depth over the 'balloon'. Oil and gas exploration is free of fanciful reservoirs because there is ground truth. Geophysics and geology define a possible reservoir and a well is drilled. If oil is not there, the model needs revision. The situation is worse for conditions of magma storage. The heretofore-unknowable roof zone of magma chambers has been invoked for separating melt from crystals and/or for accumulating vapor and evolved magma leading to eruption. Anything is possible when there are no data. The accidental (but technically remarkable) drilling discovery of rhyolite magma at 2,100 m depth under Krafla Caldera, Iceland by Landsvirkjun Co. and the Iceland Deep Drilling Project opens the door to properly detect magma and to understand how magma evolves, energizes hydrothermal systems, and erupts. A new project before the

  15. Unrest at Bárdarbunga: Preparations for possible flooding due to subglacial volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardardottir, Jorunn; Roberts, Matthew; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Einarsson, Bergur; Thorarinsdottir, Tinna; Johannesson, Tomas; Sigurdsson, Oddur; Egilson, David; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Imo hydrological-monitoring-team

    2015-04-01

    Located partly beneath northwest Vatnajökull, Iceland, the Bárdarbunga volcanic system comprises an ice-capped central volcano and a fissure swarm extending beyond the ice margin. During the last 1100 years the volcano has erupted on at least 26 occasions. Outburst floods (jökulhlaups) on a scale of >100,000 m3 s-1 are known to have occurred during major explosive eruptions. Repeated jökulhlaups from Bárdarbunga have inundated the Jökulsá á Fjöllum River, which drains over 200 km northwards from the Dyngjujökull outlet glacier to the north coast of Iceland. Depending on the location of the eruption within the 80 km2 caldera, jökulhlaups could also flow northwards along Skjálfandafljót River and towards west and southwest into present-day tributaries of the extensively hydropower-harnessed Thjórsá River. On 16 August 2014, an intense earthquake swarm began within the Bárdarbunga caldera. Seismicity propagated from the caldera, extending ~10 km northwards of the ice margin where a fissure eruption developed in late August and remains ongoing in early January 2015. In connection with the lateral migration of magma from the caldera, the ice surface of Bárdarbunga has lowered by over 60 m; also associated with increased geothermal heat on the caldera rim, as manifested by the development of ice-surface depressions. In preparation for a subglacial eruption in the Bárdarbunga volcanic system, the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) has made several assessments of likely hydrological hazards. Assessments were undertaken on Jökulsá á Fjöllum and Skjálfandafljót at key locations where preliminary evacuation plans for populated areas were made in cooperation with the local police. Floodwater extent was estimated for key infrastructures, such as bridges, telecommunication and power lines for maximum discharge levels ranging from 3,000 to 20,000 m3 s-1. The estimations were made using either simple Manning's calculations or HEC-RAS modelling

  16. pXRF quantitative analysis of the Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff: Generating large, robust data sets to decipher trace element zonation in large silicic magma chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoose, A. E.; Wolff, J.; Conrey, R.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in portable X-Ray fluorescence (pXRF) analytical technology have made it possible for high-quality, quantitative data to be collected in a fraction of the time required by standard, non-portable analytical techniques. Not only do these advances reduce analysis time, but data may also be collected in the field in conjunction with sampling. Rhyolitic pumice, being primarily glass, is an excellent material to be analyzed with this technology. High-quality, quantitative data for elements that are tracers of magmatic differentiation (e.g. Rb, Sr, Y, Nb) can be collected for whole, individual pumices and subsamples of larger pumices in 4 minutes. We have developed a calibration for powdered rhyolite pumice from the Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff analyzed with the Bruker Tracer IV pXRF using Bruker software and influence coefficients for pumice, which measures the following 19 oxides and elements: SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, FeO*, MnO, CaO, K2O, P2O5, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, Ce, Pb, and Th. With this calibration for the pXRF and thousands of individual powdered pumice samples, we have generated an unparalleled data set for any single eruptive unit with known trace element zonation. The Bandelier Tuff of the Valles-Toledo Caldera Complex, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, is divided into three main eruptive events. For this study, we have chosen the 1.61 Ma, 450 km3 Otowi Member as it is primarily unwelded and pumice samples are easily accessible. The eruption began with a plinian phase from a single source located near center of the current caldera and deposited the Guaje Pumice Bed. The initial Unit A of the Guaje is geochemically monotonous, but Units B through E, co-deposited with ignimbrite show very strong chemical zonation in trace elements, progressing upwards through the deposits from highly differentiated compositions (Rb ~350 ppm, Nb ~200 ppm) to less differentiated (Rb ~100 ppm, Nb ~50 ppm). Co-erupted ignimbrites emplaced during column collapse show

  17. Amazonian volcanic activity at the Syrtis volcanic province, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, Thomas; Jodlowski, Piotr; Fawdon, Peter; Michael, Greg; Tanaka, Kenneth

    2014-05-01

    The Syrtis Major volcanic province, including the entire Syrtis Major Planum, is located near the Martian highland/lowland transitional zone west of Isidis Planitia. It covers ≡7.4×105 km2 and contains two low-shield volcanic edifices with N-S elongated calderas named Nili and Meroe Paterae. The estimated thickness of erupted material in the province ranges from approximately 0.5 km to 1.0 km with a total volume of about 1.6-3.2×105 km3 [1]. The timing of volcanic activity in the Syrtis Major volcanic province has been suggested to be restricted to the Hesperian Period [1-4]. In the geological map of Greeley and Guest [2], volcanic material of Syrtis Major was assigned an Hesperian age based on the density of observed craters larger than 5 km in diameter. Using the same crater density range, recent studies of Hiesinger et al. [1] and Tanaka et al. [3] and Tanaka et al. [4] assigned an Early Hesperian and Early to Late Hesperian age, respectively, for the entire province. In this study we mapped lava flows, lava channels, and major lava-flow margins and report model ages for lava-flow formation and caldera segments of Nili and Meroe Paterae. The objective of this ongoing survey is to better understand the eruption frequency of this volcanic province. In total, we mapped 67 lava flows, caldera segments, and intra-crater fillings of which 55 were dated. Crater size-frequency distributions (CSFD) were mapped on HRSC and CTX imagery using CraterTools [5]. CSFDs were analyzed and model ages determined in Craterstats [6] using the production and chronology functions of Ivanov [7] and Hartmann and Neukum [8], respectively. A detailed description of the utilization of the crater-counting technique and its limitations with respect to small-scale mapping is given in Platz et al. [9]. Model ages range between 838 Ma (Middle Amazonian) to 3.6 Ga (Late Hesperian). In our survey, a broad age peak occurs between 2 to 2.6 Ga, continuously declining thereafter. We note that

  18. Deformation derived from GPS geodesy associated with Bárðarbunga 2014 rifting event in Iceland

    KAUST Repository

    Ofeigsson, Benedikt Gunnar

    2015-04-01

    On August 16, 2014 an intense seismic swarm started below the eastern part of Bárðarbunga Caldera in the north-western corner of Vatnajökull ice-cap, Iceland, marking the onset of the first rifting event in Iceland since the Krafla fires (1975-1984). The migration of the seismicity was corroborated by ground deformation in areas outside the ice cap and on nunataks within the ice cap suggesting a lateral propagation of magma, from the Bárðabunga system. The sesimicity migrated out of the caldera forming a dyke with roughly three segments, changing direction each time until August 28 when the migration stopped around 10 km south of Askja Volcano, eventually leading to a short lived eruption in Holuhraun north of Dyngjujökull. A second fissure eruption started in Holuhraun on August 31 which is still ongoing at the time of this writing. In the months prior to the onset of the activity, subtle signs of inflation where observed on continuous GPS sites around the Bárðarbunga indicating a volume increase in the roots of the volcanic system. When the activity started on August 16, the deformation pattern indicated a simultaneous deflation centered within the caldera and a lateral growth of a dyke also reflected in the migration of seismicity along segments of variable strike. A maximum widening of 1.3 m occurred between stations on opposite sides of the dyke spaced 25 km apart. Significant movements where detected on GPS site more then 80 km away from the tip of dyke. Displacements indicated the fastest rate of widening at any time in the most distal segment of the dyke throughout its evolution. After the dyke stopped propagating, the inflation continued, decaying exponentialy with time. On September 4, five days into the second fissure eruption, the movements associated with the dyke where no longer significant. As the fissure eruption continues, a slowly decaying contraction is observed around the Bárðarbunga central volcano, both shown in the piston like

  19. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. J. Townsend

    2002-03-01

    Well ER-EC-2A was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in January and February of 2000 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in the Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 412.9 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,516.1 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 228.0 meters, approximately two months after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 81 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 212 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 30 samples. The well was collared in rhyolite lava and penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon and the Timber Mountain Group. The preliminary geologic interpretation of borehole data indicates that this well was drilled within the margins of the buried Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks calderas, and that caldera collapse in this area was deeper than expected, resulting in a section of Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon (caldera-filling deposit) that is much thicker than expected.

  20. The Mw4.8 Norris Geyser Basin Earthquake of 30 March, 2014 and its Relationship to Crustal Deformation and Seismic Activity of the Yellowstone Volcanic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, J.; Shelly, D. R.; Smith, R. B.; Puskas, C. M.; Chang, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    The largest earthquake to be recorded in Yellowstone in over 30 years, a magnitude 4.8 earthquake, occurred on March 30, 2014 near the Norris Geyser Basin on the NW side of the 0.64 Ma Yellowstone caldera. The earthquake was felt throughout Yellowstone and the surrounding region. We analyze this unusual event using data from the Yellowstone Seismic and Geodetic networks in the context of active volcanic-tectonic processes of the Yellowstone volcanic system and its relationship to regional swarm seismicity and crustal deformation. Moment tensor analysis of the March 30 earthquake revealed a strike-slip, double-couple source mechanism with no isotropic contribution. This earthquake was part of a larger sequence of earthquake swarm activity in the Norris Geyser Basin area that began in September 2013 and continued into June 2014. During that period, 50-60% of the total seismicity recorded in Yellowstone, including nearly all of the swarm seismicity (earthquakes clustered in time and space), occurred in the Norris Geyser Basin area. In addition, GPS derived deformation data revealed unusually high uplift rates at ~15 cm/yr in the Norris area prior to the MW4.8 event, while a dramatic reversal to subsidence at rates of ~20 cm/yr occurred after the event. Regionally, the much larger Yellowstone caldera had experienced subsidence since January 2010 at rates of ~1.5 cm/yr prior to the MW4.8 event. After March 30, 2014 the caldera reversed to regional uplift at rates of ~10 cm/yr, similar to accelerated uplift rates observed in mid-2004.

  1. Mezcla de magmas en Vulcanello (Isla Vulcano, Italia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparicio, A.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic activity in Vulcano starts about 350 ka ago and continues up to present day with the development of thre main episodes corresponding to the calderas of Piano and La Fossa, and Vulcanello. These cover a compositional range from rhyolitic to trachybasaltic rocks. This lithological diversity is produced by different petrogenetic processes such as fractional crystallization, assimilation coupled to fractional crystallization (AFC, mixing, etc.The eruption of Vulcanello area emitted trachyandesitic materials, including shoshonites and latites. A magma-mixing process is established between trachytes and shoshonites to origine latites. Trachytes and rhyolites are produced by fractional crystallization and by ACF processes (assimilation of sedimentary rocks from trachyandesitic magmas.La actividad volcánica de Isla Vulcano comienzó aproximadamente hace 350.000 años y continúa hasta la actualidad con el desarrollo de tres grandes episodios correspondientes a las caldera de Piano, caldera de Fossa y a Vulcanello, que han emitido piroclastos y coladas de composiciones muy variadas, desde riolitas a traquibasaltos. Esta variedad litológica ha sido relacionada con procesos petrogenéticos tan diversos como cristalización fraccionada, asimilación simultánea con cristalización (ACF, mezcla de magmas, etc.El episodio de Vulcanello emite rocas traquiandesíticas, con composiciones shoshoníticas y latíticas. Un proceso de mezcla de magmas es reconocido entre traquitas y shoshonitas para generar latitas. Traquitas y riolitas son producidas por procesos de cristalización fraccionada simple y por ACF con asimilación de rocas sedimentarias a partir de magmas traquiandesíticos.

  2. Storage, migration, and eruption of magma at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, 1971-1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, W.A. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA); Christiansen, R.L.; Koyanagi, R.Y.; Peterson, D.W.

    1982-08-01

    The magmatic plumbing system of Kilauea Volcano consists of a broad region of magma generation in the upper mantle, a steeply inclined zone through which magma rises to an intravolcano reservoir located about 2 to 6 km beneath the summit of the volcano, and a network of conduits that carry magma from this reservoir to sites of eruption within the caldera and along east and southwest rift zones. The functioning of most parts of this system was illustrated by activity during 1971 and 1972. When a 29-month-long eruption at Mauna Ulu on the east rift zone began to wane in 1971, the summit region of the volcano began to inflate rapidly; apparently, blockage of the feeder conduit to Mauna Ulu diverted a continuing supply of mantle-derived magma to prolonged storage in the summit reservoir. Rapid inflation of the summit area persisted at a nearly constant rate from June 1971 to February 1972, when a conduit to Mauna Ulu was reopened. The cadence of inflation was twice interrupted briefly, first by a 10-hour eruption in Kilauea Caldera on 14 August, and later by an eruption that began in the caldera and migrated 12 km down the southwest rift zone between 24 and 29 September. The 14 August and 24-29 September eruptions added about 10/sup 7/ m/sup 3/ and 8 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/, respectively, of new lava to the surface of Kilauea. These volumes, combined with the volume increase represented by inflation of the volcanic edifice itself, account for an approximately 6 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3//month rate of growth between June 1971 and January 1972, essentially the same rate at which mantle-derived magma was supplied to Kilauea between 1952 and the end of the Mauna Ulu eruption in 1971.

  3. CONCENTRACIÓN DE MINERALES DE TITANIO CONTENIDOS EN LAS ARENAS DE PLAYAS DE LA REGIÓN DE ATACAMA - CHILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Valderrama Campusano

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo tiene como fin caracterizar y concentrar minerales de titanio contenidos en las arenas de playas de la Región de Atacama. El análisis mineralógico indicó que los principales constituyentes son cuarzo, feldespato, ilmenita, titanita, rutilo y trazas de circonita, monacita y wolframita. Los análisis químicos indican que la ley de TiO2 es de 2,3% y 3,15% para las arenas de Huasco y Caldera, respectivamente. Al retirar el material sobre 0,300 mm, se produce una preconcentración, aumentando las leyes de TiO2 a 5,33% para Huasco y 6,48% para Caldera. Las pruebas de concentración gravitacional fueron realizadas en una mesa Wilfley, y fueron estudiados diferentes ángulos de inclinación de la mesa, para la concentración primaria (2,5°; 3,0°; 3,5º y 4,0° y la limpieza (5,0°; 5,5; 6,0° y 6,5° respectivamente. Los mejores resultados fueron obtenidos usando un ángulo de inclinación de 3,0° para la concentración primaria y 6,0° para limpiar el concentrado. Con estos resultados se diseñó un circuito para las arenas de Huasco, lográndose un concentrado final con una ley de 46,0% de TiO2 y una recuperación de 21,2%, y para Caldera, se obtuvo un concentrado final de 51,3% TiO2 con una recuperación de 17,4%.

  4. Time-lapse integrated geophysical imaging of magmatic injections and fluid-induced fracturing causing Campi Flegrei 1983-84 Unrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Siena, Luca; Crescentini, Luca; Amoruso, Antonella; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Castellano, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Geophysical precursors measured during Unrest episodes are a primary source of geophysical information to forecast eruptions at the largest and most potentially destructive volcanic calderas. Despite their importance and uniqueness, these precursors are also considered difficult to interpret and unrepresentative of larger eruptive events. Here, we show how novel geophysical imaging and monitoring techniques are instead able to represent the dynamic evolution of magmatic- and fluid-induced fracturing during the largest period of Unrest at Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy (1983-1984). The time-dependent patterns drawn by microseismic locations and deformation, once integrated by 3D attenuation tomography and absorption/scattering mapping, model injections of magma- and fluid-related materials in the form of spatially punctual microseismic bursts at a depth of 3.5 km, west and offshore the city of Pozzuoli. The shallowest four kilometres of the crust work as a deformation-based dipolar system before and after each microseismic shock. Seismicity and deformation contemporaneously focus on the point of injection; patterns then progressively crack the medium directed towards the second focus, a region at depths 1-1.5 km south of Solfatara. A single high-absorption and high-scattering aseismic anomaly marks zones of fluid storage overlying the first dipolar centre. These results provide the first direct geophysical signature of the processes of aseismic fluid release at the top of the basaltic basement, producing pozzolanic activity and recently observed via rock-physics and well-rock experiments. The microseismicity caused by fluids and gasses rises to surface via high-absorption north-east rising paths connecting the two dipolar centres, finally beingq being generally expelled from the maar diatreme Solfatara structure. Geophysical precursors during Unrest depict how volcanic stress was released at the Campi Flegrei caldera during its period of highest recorded seismicity

  5. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01

    Well ER-EC-7 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 265.8 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 422.5 meters. The planned depth of 762 meters was not reached due to borehole stability problems. One completion string with two isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 227.8 meters, 20 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings, supplemented by geophysical log data, and incorporating data from detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. Beneath a thin alluvial deposit, the well penetrated 410 meters of lava and bedded tuff of the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon Group, deposited in the Timber Mountain caldera moat after caldera collapse. The geologic interpretation of data from this well provides information on the thickness, lithologic composition, and hydrogeologic character of moat-filling rocks in the southern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field.

  6. Fluid Chemistry Through an Eruption Cycle at Axial Seamount 1998-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D. A.; Chadwick, B.; Lilley, M. D.; Roe, K. K.; Lupton, J. E.; Dziak, R. P.; Walker, S. L.; Olson, E. J.; Evans, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    A primary goal for the NeMO seafloor observatory at Axial Seamount was to monitor and study a hydrothermal system through the cycle from one eruption to the next. With the January 1998 eruption and the April 2011 eruption discovered during Jason ROV operations in late July this year, that goal has now been accomplished. Based on observations and fluid temperature/chemistry measurements before and after both eruptions, there are common features leading up to and following the eruptions. Both eruptions at Axial originated in the SE corner of the caldera associated with the S Rift Zone. Isolated snowblower vents were found on new lava following both eruptions. Centimeter-thick orange hydrothermal mats formed rapidly on the new lava flows. There is some evidence that the fluids from ASHES vent field, located near the SW caldera wall, were hottest before the 1998 eruption. A second high-temperature vent field is located in the SE caldera just east of the recent lava flows. Lava flows came close to both high-temperature fields in 2011, but did not flow over any known chimneys. Recorded time series for several high-temperature vents show increasing temperatures from 2001 through 2010. Vent fluid chlorinity decreased at ASHES for 0.5 to 2 years following the 1998 eruption. As of 3.5 months after the 2011 eruption, ASHES fluid chlorinity did not change significantly. High gas contents reflect magma degassing throughout the entire history of fluid sampling at Axial. Spatial and temporal patterns of vent fluid chemistry will be presented.

  7. Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2003-01-01

    This report consists of a large map sheet and a pamphlet. The map shows the geology, some photographs, description of map units, and correlation of map units. The pamphlet gives the full text about the geologic map. The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water; the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones.

  8. Ar-40/Ar-39 age constraints for the Jaramillo Normal Subchron and the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izett, Glen A.; Obradovich, John D.

    1994-02-01

    Our mid-Pleistocene Ar-40/Ar-39 age recalibration of the geomagnetic polarity timescale is nearly in accord with the oxygen isotope, climate record calibration of the astronomical timescale proposed by Johnson (1982) and Shackleton et al. (1990). Ar-40/Ar-39 ages of a normally magnetized rhyolite dome in the Valles caldera, northern Mexico, yielded a weighted-mean age of 1.004 +/- 0.019 Ma. A K-Ar age of 0.909 +/- 0.019 Ma for this rock by Doell and Dalrymple (1966) was the linchpin for the recognition and calibration of the Jaramillo Normal Subchron (JNS). Other Ar-40/Ar-39 ages from the Valles caldera and Ar-40/Ar-39 ages of Ivory Coast tektites indicate that the JNS began at about 1.11 Ma and ended before 0.92 Ma, probably near 0.97 Ma. The Matuyama-Brunhes boundary occurred between 0.79 Ma and 0.76 Ma on the basis of Ar-40/Ar-39 sanidine ages from (1) three reversely magnetized rhyolite domes of the Valles caldera (0.793 +/- 0.018 Ma, 0.794 +/- 0.007 Ma, and 0.812 +/- 0.023 Ma) and pumice (0.789 +/- 0.006 Ma) from the reversely magnetized Oldest Toba Tuff of Sumatra and (2) pumice (0.764 +/- 0.005 Ma and 0.757 +/- 0.009 Ma) from the lower and upper units of the normally magnetized Bishop Tuff. The age of the boundary may be close to 0.77 Ma as deduced from rates of sedimentation in ancient Lake Bonneville, Utah.

  9. Quantitative hazard assessment at Vulcano (Aeolian islands): integration of geology, event statistics and physical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; de Astis, Gianfilippo; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sulpizio, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    The analysis of stratigraphy and of pyroclastic deposits particle features allowed the reconstruction of the volcanic history of La Fossa di Vulcano. An eruptive scenario driven by superficial phreatomagmatic explosions emerged. A statistical analysis of the pyroclastic Successions led to define a repetitive sequence of dilute pyroclastic density currents as the most probable events at short term, followed by fallout of dense ballistic blocks. The scale of such events is related to the amount of magma involved in each explosion. Events involving a million of cubic meters of magma are probable in view of what happened in the most recent eruptions. They led to the formation of hundreds of meters thick dilute pyroclastic density currents, moving down the volcano slope at velocities exceeding 50 m/sec. The dispersion of desnity currents affected the whole Vulcano Porto area, the Vulcanello area and also overrode the Fossa Caldera's rim, spreading over the Piano area. Similarly, older pyroclastic deposits erupted at different times (Piano Grotte dei Rossi formation, ~20-7.7 ka) from vents within La Fossa Caldera and before La Fossa Cone formation. They also were phreatomagmatic in origin and fed dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDC). They represent the eruptions with the highest magnitude on the Island. Therefore, for the aim of hazard assessment, these deposits from La Fossa Cone and La Fossa Caldera were used to depict eruptive scenarios at short term and at long term. On the base of physical models that make use of pyroclastic deposits particle features, the impact parameters for each scenario have been calculated. They are dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration of density currents, and impact energy of ballistic blocks. On this base, a quantitative hazard map is presented, which could be of direct use for territory planning and for the calculation of the expected damage.

  10. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar study of Okmok volcano, Alaska, 1992-2003: Magma supply dynamics and postemplacement lava flow deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiming; Masterlark, Timothy; Dzurisin, D.

    2005-01-01

    Okmok volcano, located in the central Aleutian arc, Alaska, is a dominantly basaltic complex topped with a 10-km-wide caldera that formed circa 2.05 ka. Okmok erupted several times during the 20th century, most recently in 1997; eruptions in 1945, 1958, and 1997 produced lava flows within the caldera. We used 80 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images (interferograms) to study transient deformation of the volcano before, during, and after the 1997 eruption. Point source models suggest that a magma reservoir at a depth of 3.2 km below sea level, located beneath the center of the caldera and about 5 km northeast of the 1997 vent, is responsible for observed volcano-wide deformation. The preeruption uplift rate decreased from about 10 cm yr-1 during 1992-1993 to 2 ??? 3 cm yr-1 during 1993-1995 and then to about -1 ??? -2 cm yr-1 during 1995-1996. The posteruption inflation rate generally decreased with time during 1997-2001, but increased significantly during 2001-2003. By the summer of 2003, 30 ??? 60% of the magma volume lost from the reservoir in the 1997 eruption had been replenished. Interferograms for periods before the 1997 eruption indicate consistent subsidence of the surface of the 1958 lava flows, most likely due to thermal contraction. Interferograms for periods after the eruption suggest at least four distinct deformation processes: (1) volcano-wide inflation due to replenishment of the shallow magma reservoir, (2) subsidence of the 1997 lava flows, most likely due to thermal contraction, (3) deformation of the 1958 lava flows due to loading by the 1997 flows, and (4) continuing subsidence of 1958 lava flows buried beneath 1997 flows. Our results provide insights into the postemplacement behavior of lava flows and have cautionary implications for the interpretation of inflation patterns at active volcanoes.

  11. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii from local seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guoqing; Shearer, Peter M.; Matoza, Robin S.; Okubo, Paul G.; Amelung, Falk

    2016-01-01

    We present a new three-dimensional seismic velocity model of the crustal and upper mantle structure for Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii. Our model is derived from the first-arrival times of the compressional and shear waves from about 53,000 events on and near the Island of Hawaii between 1992 and 2009 recorded by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory stations. The Vp model generally agrees with previous studies, showing high-velocity anomalies near the calderas and rift zones and low-velocity anomalies in the fault systems. The most significant difference from previous models is in Vp/Vs structure. The high-Vp and high-Vp/Vs anomalies below Mauna Loa caldera are interpreted as mafic magmatic cumulates. The observed low-Vp and high-Vp/Vs bodies in the Kaoiki seismic zone between 5 and 15 km depth are attributed to the underlying volcaniclastic sediments. The high-Vp and moderate- to low-Vp/Vs anomalies beneath Kilauea caldera can be explained by a combination of different mafic compositions, likely to be olivine-rich gabbro and dunite. The systematically low-Vp and low-Vp/Vs bodies in the southeast flank of Kilauea may be caused by the presence of volatiles. Another difference between this study and previous ones is the improved Vp model resolution in deeper layers, owing to the inclusion of events with large epicentral distances. The new velocity model is used to relocate the seismicity of Mauna Loa and Kilauea for improved absolute locations and ultimately to develop a high-precision earthquake catalog using waveform cross-correlation data.

  12. Active high-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity and attenuation structure at Medicine Lake Volcano, northern California Cascade Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J.R.; Zucca, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano is a basalt through rhyolite shield volcano of the Cascade Range, lying east of the range axis. The Pg wave from eight explosive sources which has traveled upward through the target volume to a dense array of 140 seismographs provides 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 7 km of the crust beneath the volcano. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes of this type are underlain only by small silicic magma chambers. We image a low-velocity low-Q region not larger than a few tens of cubic kilometers in volume beneath the summit caldera, supporting the hypothesis. A shallower high-velocity high-density feature, previously known to be present, is imaged for the first time in full plan view; it is east-west elongate, paralleling a topographic lineament between Medicine Lake volcano and Mount Shasta. Differences between this high-velocity feature and the equivalent feature at Newberry volcano, a volcano in central regon resembling Medicine Lake volcano, may partly explain the scarcity of surface hydrothermal features at Medicine Lake volcano. A major low-velocity low-Q feature beneath the southeast flank of the volcano, in an area with no Holocene vents, is interpreted as tephra, flows, and sediments from the volcano deeply ponded on the downthrown side of the Gillem fault. A high-Q normal-velocity feature beneath the north rim of the summit caldera may be a small, possibly hot, subsolidus intrusion. A high-velocity low-Q region beneath the eastern caldera may be an area of boiling water between the magma chamber and the ponded east flank material. -from Authors

  13. A 3D velocity model for earthquake location in Campi Flegrei area: application to the 1982-84 uplift event

    OpenAIRE

    Satriano, C.; Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II, Napoli, Italy; Zollo, A.; Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II, Napoli, Italy; Capuano, P.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Russo, G.; Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II, Napoli, Italy; Vanorio, T.; Géosciences Azur, CNRS, Université de Nice, Sophie Antinopolies, Valbonne, France; Caielli, G.; Istituto per la Dinamica dei Processi Ambientali (IDPA), CNR, Milano, Italy; Lovisa, L.; Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e Geofisica Sperimentale, Trieste, Italy; Moretti, M.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione CNT, Roma, Italia

    2006-01-01

    The uplift crisis of the 1982-1984 in the Campi Flegrei area underlined the importance of seismic surveillance for this volcanic caldera. One of the key elements for an effective seismic network is to make use of a reliable velocity model for earthquake location. In the present work we will discuss criteria for the construction and validation of a new 3D P-wave velocity model for earthquake location in the Campi Flegrei area built from the integration of two high-resolution ...

  14. Multidisciplinary Investigations at Panarea (Aeolian Islands) after the exhalative crisis of 2002-11-02

    OpenAIRE

    Bortoluzzi, G.; CNR-ISMAR Bologna; Aliani, S.; CNR-ISMAR La Spezia; Ligi, M.; CNR-ISMAR Bologna; D'Oriano, F.; CNR-ISMAR Bologna; Riminucci, F.; CNR-ISMAR Bologna; Carmisciano, C.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Cocchi, L.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Muccini, F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia

    2010-01-01

    Panarea and surrounding Islets form a volcanic edifice, that is part of the Eastern sector of the Aeolian Arc, Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. It is now considered inactive, since last documented activity is 20 Ka old. However, on 2002-11-02, gas started to flow violently from the seafloor in the caldera E of the Island, mainly along NE and NW structural lineaments, and lasting up to 2003-2004 with a consistent flux, orders of magnitude larger that 'steady-state' fumarolic activity documented there ...

  15. Climatización de una piscina cubierta en Pamplona

    OpenAIRE

    Goñi Echeverz, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    En el presente proyecto se evaluarán las diferentes alternativas a la hora de climatizar una piscina municipal cubierta a 25ºC el agua de la piscina y 27ºC y 65% humedad el aire del recinto. Se plantean diversos escenarios técnicos económicos, partiendo de un mix compuesto por una instalación geotérmica, una de solar térmica y para cubrir puntas de demanda energética una caldera biomasa, tras realizar el estudio económico el mix es 40-40-20% respectivamente. Para poder plant...

  16. A Self Potential study of the summit geothermal system of the Krafla volcano (Iceland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulia Di Giuseppe, Maria; Troiano, Antonio; Somma, Renato; Carlino, Stefano; Troise, Claudia; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The Krafla central volcano is located on the North Iceland Rift Zone. The Krafla geothermal field is located in a large (8 km) collapse caldera that formed approximately 110 000 years ago. Rhyolite formations border the caldera and an extensive geothermal system occurs within it. A 100 km long and 5-10 km wide fissure swarm transects the volcano. These and the central constitute together the Krafla volcanic system. The caldera has been the site of extensive drilling for geothermal development. Drilling started in 1974 and a total of 43 wells have been drilled and at least two wells hit rhyolitic magma, at the depth of 1.5 and 2.1 km respectively. The subsurface structure of Krafla has been investigated by seismic, gravimetric, electromagnetic, and geodetic techniques. Good geophysical evidence confirms the presence of a shallow magma chamber under the central part of the caldera at about 3 km depth. The resistivity structure of the Krafla volcano has also been investigated, first by DC methods but later by joint application of MT and TEM. In the framework of the Krafla Magma Drilling Project (KMDP), a Self Potential (SP) survey has been realized in order to characterize the background flow pattern in the area. SP method measures the distribution of the electric potential at Earth surface generated in rocks because of various physical and chemical processes. The SP is the only method that is directly sensitive to the pattern of groundwater flow and to changes in the seepage velocity. At first, a NS profile crossing the IDDP-1 borehole site has been realized. A secondary profile, in a roughly EW direction orthogonal to the first one has been also performed. Both profiles have an approximate length of 4 km, which should be enough to characterize the flow pattern in the crust overlying the magma chamber. After the completion of the profiles, a first analysis through a probabilistic algorithm has been attempted. The findings has been used as starting constrain for a

  17. Magnetic properties and electron spin resonance of Ecuadorian obsidians. Application to provenance research of archeological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obsidians from major Ecuadorian sources were analyzed by SQUID magnetometry and electron spin resonance (ESR). The association of these two techniques permits to differentiate obsidians from the sources of Cotopaxi volcano and from the Quiscatola and Mullumica-Callejones sources of the Chacana caldera, taking into account various parameters arising from the M vs. H cycles and the X-band ESR spectra. The analysis of 27 archeological samples coming from the prehispanic site of La Mana allowed us to infer that most of them come from the Mullumica-Callejones source

  18. Insights on the March 1998 eruption at Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion ) from microgravity monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Bonvalot, Sylvain; Remy, Dominique; Deplus, Christine; Diament, Michel; Gabalda, Germinal

    2008-01-01

    [1] We investigate the temporal gravity changes associated with one of the major recent eruptions at Piton de la Fournaise volcano (March 1998) that occurred after an unusual five-year quiet period and initiated a new eruptive cycle. Repeated microgravity surveys allowed us to measure residual gravity changes up to 100 mGal within the Enclos Fouqué caldera for four months before the start of the eruption. We first analyzed the temporal gravity changes and the height changes, also measured at ...

  19. The link between multistep magma ascent and eruption intensity: examples from the recent activity of Piton de la Fournaise (La Réunion Island).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muro, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Caldera collapses represent catastrophic events, which induce drastic modification in a volcano plumbing system and can result in major and fast evolution of the system dynamics. At Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) volcano, the 2007 eruptive sequence extruded the largest lava volume (240 Mm3) since at least 3 centuries, provoking the collapse of a small (1 km wide; 340 m deep) summit caldera. In about 35 days, the 2007 major eruption generated i) the greatest lava output rate, ii) the strongest lava fountaining activity (> 200 m high), iii) the largest SO2 volume (> 230 kt) ever documented at PdF. This event ended a 9 year-long period (1998-2007) of continuous edifice inflation and sustained eruptive activity (3 eruptions per year on average). Unexpectedly and in spite of the large volume of magma erupted in 2007, volcano unrest and eruptive activity resumed quickly in 2008, soon after caldera collapse, and produced several closely spaced intracaldera eruptions and shallow intrusions. The post-2007 activity is associated with a trend of continuous volcano deflation and consists in small-volume (<3 Mm3) weak (< 20 m high fountains; strombolian activity) summit/proximal eruptions of moderate/low MgO magmas and frequent shallow magma intrusions. Non-eruptive tremor and increase in SO2 emissions were interpreted as evidences of magma intrusions at shallow depth (< 2.0 km) preceding the eruptions. The 2007-2011 phase of activity represents an ideal case-study to analyze the influence of magma ascent kinetics on the evolution of volcano dynamics at a persistently active basaltic volcano. In order to track magma storage and ascent, we compare geochemical data on fast quenched glasses (melt inclusions, Pele's hairs, coarse ash fragments produced by lava-sea water interaction, glassy crust of lavas, high-temperature lavas quenched in water, matrix glasses) with the geophysical record of volcano unrest. Petro-chemical data suggest that the shallow PdF plumbing system is formed by

  20. Morphology of Piton de la Fournaise basaltic shield volcano (La Réunion Island): Characterization and implication in the volcano evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Michon, Laurent; Saint-Ange, Francky

    2008-01-01

    The topography of Piton de la Fournaise volcano (PdF) differs from the classic view of basaltic shield volcanoes as it is characterized by (1) several steep slope zones on its flanks and (2) a large U-shaped caldera, the Enclos-Grand Brûlé structure (EGBS). Most of these structures were previously interpreted as the scars of lateral landslides, the deposits of which cover the submarine flanks of PdF. We carried out a detailed analysis of the morphology of PdF, which reveals that the steep slo...

  1. Timing of a large volcanic flank movement at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano using noise-based seismic monitoring and ground deformation measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, D.; Brenguier, Florent; Froger, Jean-Luc; Shapiro, N.M.; PELTIER, A.; Staudacher, T.

    2013-01-01

    In volcanic domains, magma transport and pressure build-up induce high stress-strain perturbations in the surrounding volcanic edifice that may lead to volcanic flank movements and possible instability. In this study, we focus on the 2007 March-April episode of volcanic activity at Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) Volcano, La R'eunion Island. This episode was associated with a large volume of emitted lava (240 × 106 m3) and a 340-m caldera collapse. We present observations of continuous seismic ve...

  2. Glass and mineral analyses from first deposits of Peach Spring Supereruption (SW USA) illuminate initial tapping of a zoned magma chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccracken, R. G.; Miller, C. F.; Buesch, D.; Gualda, G. A.; Covey, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Peach Spring supereruption (18.78±0.02 Ma) was sourced from Silver Creek caldera in the southern Black Mountains, Arizona (Ferguson et al. in press). The resulting ignimbrite, the Peach Spring Tuff (PST), blanketed >32,000 km2 of Arizona, California, and Nevada (Buesch, 1993). Underlying the ignimbrite is a thin (≤ 1m thick) basal layered deposit that consists of texturally distinct layers 1a-e (Valentine et al. 1989) and is present up to ~100 km from the source caldera. Basal layered deposits contain the first material erupted during the PST supereruption, preceding the main eruption event. Petrography and geochemistry of minerals and pumice clasts from basal layered deposits collected ~15-100 km from the caldera, combined with a survey of glass and crystal compositions from both outflow and basal deposits, permit (1) comparisons with the overlying ignimbrite, and (2) insights into the initial stages of the supereruption and extraction of magma from the chamber. Pumice clasts from a pumice-rich layer (1a2) of the basal deposit were characterized by LA-ICPMS and SEM. Unaltered glass has a uniform high-Si rhyolite composition (76.7% SiO2, 13.0% Al2O3, 3.6% Na2O, 5.3% K2O, 0.6% FeO, 30%) trachyte pumice that dominates the intracaldera fill and is present at the tops of proximal outflow sections (Pamukcu et al. in press). A broader survey by EMP of minerals and glass shards from basal layered deposits and outflow ignimbrite (Buesch, 1993 and unpublished data, 1992) support the general conclusion that distal outflow is dominated by high-Si rhyolite, but demonstrate that trachyte is present throughout ignimbrite and basal deposits. Although SiO2 concentration is dominantly ~76-78 wt%, a small but persistent population ranges from ~66-72 wt%. Likewise, 6% (in layer 1a2) to 40% of all plagioclase in basal and outflow deposit samples is relatively calcic (An>27), indicating trachyte origin. The above data (1) confirm the existence of two compositions of erupted

  3. Composition, distribution and neutralization of “acid rain” derived from Masaya volcano, Nicaragua

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Noye; Parnell, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Acid rain (pH 2.5-5.0) from the volcanic plume of Masaya Caldera, Nicaragua, is composed of HCI and H2SO4 in systematically varying proportions. The dominance of HCl in volcanic acid rain makes it distinctly different from anthropogenic acid rain. The pH of volcanic acid rain is largely controlled by its HCl concentration. Volcanic acids are locally damaging, killing vegetation with the conspicuous exception of the shrubs Malanthora and Lantana. These shrubs have the ability to rapidly and co...

  4. Collaborative studies target volcanic hazards in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Gregg J. S.; Rose, William I.

    Central America is the second-most consistently active volcanic zone on Earth, after Indonesia. Centuries of volcanic activity have produced a spectacular landscape of collapsed calderas, debris flows, and thick blankets of pyroclastic materials. Volcanic activity dominates the history, culture, and daily life of Central American countries.January 2002 marked the third consecutive year in which a diverse group of volcanologists and geophysicists conducted focused field studies in Central America. This type of multi-institutional collaboration reflects the growing involvement of a number of U.S. and non-U.S. universities, and of other organizations, in Guatemala and El Salvador (Table 1).

  5. Sub-surface geology, petrochemistry and hydrothermal alteration of Wells MW-03, MW-09 and MW-20 from Menengai geothermal field, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Mgejwa, Ngereja Myabi, 1981-

    2016-01-01

    The Menengai geothermal field is one of the high temperature geothermal systems in Kenya. It is seated within the Great East Africa Rift System in the Central Kenyan Rift Valley and covered by quarternary volcanics. The study wells, MW-03, MW-09 and MW-20, were drilled inside the Menengai caldera, which is characterized by ring faults, the Molo TVA which trends NNW-SSE and the Solai TVA which trends NNE-SSW direction. The volcano formed about 200,000 years ago and the prominent 12 x 8 km cal...

  6. Submarine hydrothermal activity and gold-rich mineralization at Brothers Volcano, Kermadec Arc, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Massoth, Gary J.; Butterfield, David A.; Christenson, Bruce W.; Ishibashi, Junichiro; Ditchburn, Robert G.; Hannington, Mark D.; Brathwaite, Robert L.; Lupton, John E.; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Graham, Ian J.; Zellmer, Georg F.; Dziak, Robert P.; Embley, Robert W.; Dekov, Vesselin M.; Munnik, Frank; Lahr, Janine; Evans, Leigh J.; Takai, Ken

    2011-07-01

    Brothers volcano, of the Kermadec intraoceanic arc, is host to a hydrothermal system unique among seafloor hydrothermal systems known anywhere in the world. It has two distinct vent fields, known as the NW Caldera and Cone sites, whose geology, permeability, vent fluid compositions, mineralogy, and ore-forming conditions are in stark contrast to each other. The NW Caldera site strikes for ˜600 m in a SW-NE direction with chimneys occurring over a ˜145-m depth interval, between ˜1,690 and 1,545 m. At least 100 dead and active sulfide chimney spires occur in this field and are typically 2-3 m in height, with some reaching 6-7 m. Their ages (at time of sampling) fall broadly into three groups: water/rock interactions. Iron oxide crusts 3 years in age cover the main cone summit and appear to have formed from Fe-rich brines. Evidence for magmatic contributions to the hydrothermal system at Brothers includes: high concentrations of dissolved CO2 (e.g., 206 mM/kg at the Cone site); high CO2/3He; negative δD and δ18OH2O for vent fluids; negative δ34S for sulfides (to -4.6‰), sulfur (to -10.2‰), and δ15N2 (to -3.5‰); vent fluid pH values to 1.9; and mineral assemblages common to high-sulfidation systems. Changing physicochemical conditions at the Brothers hydrothermal system, and especially the Cone site, occur over periods of months to hundreds of years, as shown by interlayered Cu + Au- and Zn-rich zones in chimneys, variable fluid and isotopic compositions, similar shifts in 3He/4He values for both Cone and NW Caldera sites, and overprinting of "magmatic" mineral assemblages by water/rock-dominated assemblages. Metals, especially Cu and possibly Au, may be entering the hydrothermal system via the dissolution of metal-rich glasses. They are then transported rapidly up into the system via magmatic volatiles utilizing vertical (˜2.5 km long), narrow (˜300-m diameter) "pipes," consistent with evidence of vent fluids forming at relatively shallow depths. The NW

  7. Geothermal resources of Sao Miguel Island, Azores, Portugal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, W.A.; Muffler, L.J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Geothermal studies were carried out on the island of Sao Miguel, Azores to characterize the nature of the resource, to estimate its magnitude, and to identify target areas toward which exploration and developmental drilling might be directed. The main geothermal resource areas are Furnas, Agua de Pau, and Sete Cidades, three Quaternary silicic volcanic centers characterized by summit calderas beneath which magmatic heat sources provide thermal energy to overlying hydrothermal convection systems. For each of the systems, the studies have defined the size of the system, the subsurface temperature, the thermodynamic state of fluid in the system, the chemical composition of the fluid, and permeable parts of the system. 8 figs. (ACR)

  8. Problemática y conocimiento actual de Las tefras tierra blanca joven en el área Metropolitana de San Salvador, El Salvador Problematic and current knowledge of the tierra blanca joven tephras in the metropolitan area of San Salvador, El Salvador

    OpenAIRE

    José A. Chávez; Walter Hernández; Lubomir Kopecky

    2012-01-01

    En la actualidad el Área Metropolitana de San Salvador experimenta problemas graves de movimientos de ladera, erosión, colapso o asentamientos del terreno; fenómenos que son englobados popularmente en El Salvador por el término “cárcavas”. Esta problemática se presenta principalmente en las tefras volcánicas llamadas Tierra Blanca Joven (TBJ) producto de la última erupción pliniana de la Caldera de Ilopango, cuyos productos son una intercalación de estratos de piroclastos de caída...

  9. PYROCLASTIC FLOW MODELING TO RECONSTRUCT A VOLCANIC EDIFICE IN PAIPA (BOYACÁ-COLOMBIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Óscar

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Pyroclastic deposits produced by the domes collapse (resurgence of a caldera collapse, at the west of the Honda Grande creek (Paipa, Boyacá-Colombia were related by INGEOMINAS. These deposits fill the valleys of Olitas, Calderitas and a creek at the south of the Alto de los Volcanes reaching distances near to 3 km from the focus between the Alto de los Volcanes and El Mirador Hill.The flows were modeled using 3D Software (Sheridan and Kover, 1996. A volcanic simulation was done obtaining the height and morphology of the volcanic edifice before the collapse during the last eruptive event.

  10. Large eruption-triggered ocean-island landslide at Tenerife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, P; Branney, M; Storey, Michael

    2011-01-01

    An extensive debris-avalanche deposit has been discovered on Cañadas volcano, Tenerife (Canary Islands). The onshore component of the 733 ± 3 ka Abona landslide deposit exposes classic block facies and mixed facies across 90 km2. Three lines of evidence together show that the avalanche was...... breadcrust surfaces; (3) these blocks yield the same 40Ar/39Ar date as the associated ignimbrite and fall deposit. Landslide hummocks dammed surface water, forming ephemeral lakes perched on the volcano flank. Phonolite dome growth destabilized the southeast sector of a mid-Pleistocene Cañadas caldera wall...

  11. Nature, origine et évolution des fluides dans le district minier de la caldeira d'oued bélif (nefza, Tunisie septentrionale)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbi, Fouad; Slim-Shimi, Najet; Tlig, Said; Zargouni, Fouad

    1999-02-01

    Fluid inclusion studies were undertaken on quartz, fluorite and calcites in the Oued Bélif caldera ore district in northern Tunisia. Two main groups of inclusions were distinguished: a fluid inclusion group, of magmatic origin, with a temperature higher than 350 °C and salinity higher than 30 wt % NaCl; and a group of mixing between magmatic and meteoric fluids with temperatures and salinities ranging from 150 to 250 °C and from 15 to 25 wt % NaCl, respectively. These two groups result from hydrothermal circulations of respectively, "porphyry copper" and epithermal systems; this is confirmed by the nature of the alteration.

  12. Remote Sensing Studies of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, as an Aid to Understanding Volcanic Processes on Mars, Venus and Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    2004-12-01

    By virtue of the near-continuous activity, relatively safety of the eruptions, and excellent field access within a U.S. National Park, extensive testing of new field, airborne and orbital remote sensing data sets has taken place at Kilauea, Hawaii, over the last 20 years. Here I review the important role that such studies of Kilauea have had in understanding volcano morphology and eruption processes on Mars, Venus and Io. Many types of remote sensing data have been collected over Kilauea that have direct planetary analogs. Two space shuttle radar missions (SIR-B and SIR-C) had Kilauea as a primary target, and there have been three deployments of the TOPSAR airborne radar (1993, 1996, and 2000) to Hawaii. These data have been used to understand the radar scattering properties of lava flows on Venus, as well as assessing the importance of multi-incidence angle and look-direction radar data for structural mapping. Topographic mapping of Kilauea caldera by an airborne lidar was conducted at 1 m/pixel in 2004 to facilitate the analysis of the topography of lava flows, vents and fractures at a scale that is not possible using MOLA data for Mars, but may be relevant when data are studied from the Mars Express stereo camera or the HiRISE instrument on MRO. Thermal studies of active lava flows and the Kupianaha lava lake provide insights into effusive volcanism on Io. Not only can the dynamics of Ionian lava lakes (e.g., Loki Patera) be studied, but also on-going work with MODIS and GOES satellite data for Kilauea are being used to understand lava flow and vent dynamics as they may relate to the resurfacing mechanism(s) of Io. Comparison of data acquisition for on-going Mars missions and Kilauea also show similarities in the approach to planetary and terrestrial volcanology. Systematic imaging of Kilauea volcano at increasingly high spatial resolution (for both multispectral and topographic mapping) continues to be of value for planetary analogs and technique development

  13. Reducing volcanic risk on Fogo Volcano, Cape-Verde, through a participatory approach: which out coming?

    OpenAIRE

    P. Texier-Teixeira; Chouraqui, F.; A. Perrillat-Collomb; Lavigne, F.; J. R. Cadag; Grancher, D.

    2013-01-01

    This research paper presents the outcomes of the Work Package 5 (Socio-economical Vulnerability Assessment and Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction) of the MIAVITA Research Program (MItigate and Assess risk from Volcanic Impact on Terrain and human Activities) conducted in Fogo Volcano, Cape-Verde. The study lasted for almost 3 yr (May 2010–January 2012) of which most of the time was spent in the village of Chã das Caldeiras, situated within the 9 km-wide caldera o...

  14. Magma Genesis in Kabanjahe Region Continental Margin Arc of Sumatra

    OpenAIRE

    Bhakti H. Harahap

    2014-01-01

    DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v6i2.120Volcanic rocks in Kabanjahe region, Karo Regency, North Sumatra Province, are products of old Toba Caldera, Sibayak Volcano, and Sipiso-piso Volcano. Rhyolitic tuff is the main lithology distributed over a large area in this region. Others are basaltic, basaltic andesitic, andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic lavas. Data show that the rock was originated from magma of a continental origin formed at a subduction zone environment. Petrogenetic modelling suggests that the...

  15. Short Term Changes in Shear Wave Splitting at Sierra Negra Volcano, 2010: Possible Indicator of a Magmatic Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzieta, J. C.; Ruiz, M. C.; Ebinger, C. J.; Geist, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Sierra Negra volcano, Galapagos, is a basaltic shield volcano with the largest caldera (7x10 km) in the islands. Frequent eruptions have been dated, with a time interval between them typically in the order of decades (7 were confirmed in the last century), the last one occurred in 2005. We present new results from a shear wave splitting study performed at Sierra Negra volcano using nearly two years (Aug 2009-Jun 2011) of data obtained from SIGNET (Sierra Negra Integrated Geophysical Network) project. Changes in fast shear wave polarity are detected during the period of 4-10 June 2010, which are interpreted as the result of a crustal (6-10 km) magmatic intrusion event. The goal of this study was to determine the state of crustal stress at and around Sierra Negra in order to establish how different possible stress sources (i.e. the Galapagos spreading center, the Nazca plate movement along the insular platform, the loads of Sierra Negra and its interaction with nearby active volcanoes) are controlling volcanism within the region, as well as to test the method as a potential tool for detecting and forecasting changes in eruptive activity. Shear wave splitting (SWS) is an indicator of seismic anisotropy and is expected in volcanic regions as explained by extensive-dilatancy anisotropy (EDA) theory. Thus, we selected the SWS method to identify the local and regional state of stress. In stations far from the caldera two regional main stress directions are determined, oriented N-S or E-W, which may be associated with either the influence of the Galapagos spreading center or to the Nazca plate movement respectively. SWS results around the caldera were stable and agreed with radial or circumferential fissure strikes. During the 4-10 June 2010 however, daily seismic event rates increased reaching average monthly event numbers in just a few days. The majority of these events were located in the southeastern part of Sierra Negra's edifice. In this period the polarization

  16. Geothermal materials survey: Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant, Baca, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, P.F. II

    1980-10-07

    The results of a materials survey for the Baca 50 MW(e) single flash geothermal plant in the Valles Caldera of New Mexico are presented. From the design documents provided, materials proposed for use in contact with the plant atmosphere, the two-phase geofluid, the separated steam, and the recirculating condensate cooling water were assessed for suitability. Special emphasis was given to records of performance of the materials in other geothermal plants. Based upon these considerations of chemical reactivity and plant operating experience, a number of recommendations were made.

  17. Late Cretaceous paleomagnetism of the Tucson Mountains: implications for vertical axis rotations in south central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Lipman, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Tucson Mountains of southern Arizona are the site of an Upper Cretaceous caldera from which the rhyolitic Cat Mountain Tuff was erupted at about 72 Ma. Two magnetic units within the Cat Mountain Tuff are distinguished by paleomagnetic data in both the northern and southern Tucson Mountains. The available paleomagnetic data indicate that rocks in southern Arizona have not remained unrotated with respect to North America since Late Cretaceous time and that vertical axis rotations may have played an important role in the region during Laramide deformation. -from Authors

  18. Geobotanical Remote Sensing for Geothermal Exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickles, W L; Kasameyer, P W; Martini, B A; Potts, D C; Silver, E A

    2001-05-22

    This paper presents a plan for increasing the mapped resource base for geothermal exploration in the Western US. We plan to image large areas in the western US with recently developed high resolution hyperspectral geobotanical remote sensing tools. The proposed imaging systems have the ability to map visible faults, surface effluents, historical signatures, and discover subtle hidden faults and hidden thermal systems. Large regions can be imaged at reasonable costs. The technique of geobotanical remote sensing for geothermal signatures is based on recent successes in mapping faults and effluents the Long Valley Caldera and Mammoth Mountain in California.

  19. Global scale concentrations of volcanic activity on Venus: A summary of three 23rd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference abstracts. 1: Venus volcanism: Global distribution and classification from Magellan data. 2: A major global-scale concentration of volcanic activity in the Beta-Atla-Themis region of Venus. 3: Two global concentrations of volcanism on Venus: Geologic associations and implications for global pattern of upwelling and downwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Aubele, Jayne C.; Head, James W.; Guest, J.; Saunders, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the analysis of data from the Magellan Mission, we have compiled a global survey of the location, dimensions, and subsidiary notes of all identified volcanic features on Venus. More than 90 percent of the surface area was examined and the final catalog comprehensively identifies 1548 individual volcanic features larger than approximately 20 km in diameter. Volcanic features included are large volcanoes, intermediate volcanoes, fields of small shield volcanoes, calderas, large lava channels, and lava floods as well as unusual features first noted on Venus such as coronae, arachnoids, and novae.

  20. The uranium potential of the Bushveld igneous complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of published literature supported by field observations on the uranium potential of the Bushveld Complex indicates that this geological region may host deposits with reserves in the range of a few thousand tons U3O8. The possibility that the Bushveld Complex or its cover rocks hosts, or has ever hosted in the past, giant uranium deposits such as those of Olympic Dam, Key Lake, Jabiluka or Rossing is considered to be unlikely. The potential for volcanogenic, caldera-type deposits in the Rooiberg Felsites remains at present untested. Recommendations for research currently sponsored by the AEC at the University of Pretoria are presented

  1. Izu-Oshima volcano, Japan: nine years of geochemical monitoring by means of CO_{2} soil diffuse degassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Pedro A.; Mori, Toshiya; Notsu, Kenji; Morita, Masaaki; Padrón, Eleazar; Onizawa, Shin'ya; Melián, Gladys; Sumino, Hirochicka; Asensio-Ramos, María; Nogami, Kenji; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    Izu-Oshima is a 15×9 km active volcanic island located around 100 km SSW of Tokyo. The centre of the island is occupied by a caldera complex with a diameter of 3 km. A large post-caldera cone known as Mt. Mihara is located at the south-western quadrant of the caldera. Izu-Oshima has erupted 74 times, consisting mainly in fissure eruptions, both inside and outside of the caldera. The last eruption of Izu-Oshima occurred in 1986. Since 2007, seven soil gas surveys have been carried out to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of diffuse CO2 emission from this volcanic system and to identify those structures controlling the degassing process. Diffuse CO2 emission surveys were always carried out following the accumulation chamber method. Spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. The location of the CO2 anomalies has always shown a close relationship with the structural characteristics of the volcano, with most of the gas discharged from the rim of the summit crater. Temporal evolution of diffuse CO2 emission rate from Mt. Miharayama has shown a good temporal correlation with the seismicity recorded in and around Izu Oshima island during the period of study. The two peaks of seismic activity occur when highest CO2 diffuse emissions were computed, March 2007, August 2010 and July 2011, may be associated with fluid pressure fluctuations in the volcanic system due to the seismicity. In order to strength the contribution of deep seated gases to the diffuse emission, we performed carbon isotopic analysis of soil gas samples at selected sites during 2010, 2013 and 2015 surveys. At isotopic compositions lighter than ˜- 6‰ the soil CO2 effluxes were always low, while at heavier isotopic compositions an increasing number of points are characterized by relatively high soil CO efflux as a consequence of the addition of the hydrothermal CO2 source. Soil CO2 efflux peak values (xBackground) showed also a

  2. ESTABILIZACIÓN ALCALINA DE BIOSÓLIDOS COMPOSTADOS DE PLANTAS DE TRATAMIENTO DE AGUAS RESIDUALES DOMÉSTICAS PARA APROVECHAMIENTO AGRÍCOLA ALKALI STABILIZATION OF COMPOSTED BIOSOLIDS FROM DOMESTIC WASTEWATER TREATMEN PLANTS FOR AGRICULTURE PURPOSE

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Torres Lozada; Carlos Arturo Madera Parra; Genny Virginia Martínez Puentes

    2008-01-01

    Uno de los limitantes del aprovechamiento agrícola de lodos y biosólidos producidos por plantas de tratamiento de aguas residuales domésticas - PTAR es su calidad microbiológica y parasitológica. Se evaluó la estabilización alcalina del compost obtenido a partir la planta de tratamiento de aguas residuales Cañaveralejo de Cali, Colombia (PTAR-C), utilizando ceniza de calderas de una industria papelera, Cal Hidratada (CH) y Cal Viva (CV), en combinaciones con el compost del 8, 15 y 30% para CH...

  3. The 2000 AD eruption of Copahue Volcano, Southern Andes

    OpenAIRE

    José Antonio Naranjo; Edmundo Polanco

    2004-01-01

    Although all historic eruptions of the Copahue volcano (37°45'S-71°10.2'W, 3,001 m a.s.l.) have been of low magnitude, the largest (VEI=2) and longest eruptive cycle occurred from July to October 2000. Phreatic phases characterized the main events as a former acid crater lake was blown up. Low altitude columns were deviated by low altitude winds in variable directions, but slightly predominant to the NNE. The presence of the El Agrio caldera depression to the east of Copahue volcano may have ...

  4. Provenance study of obsidians from the archaeological site of La Mana (Ecuador) by electron spin resonance (ESR), SQUID magnetometry and 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obsidians from major Ecuadorian sources (outcrops) were analyzed by electron spin resonance, SQUID magnetometry and 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. If the last technique allows to discriminate obsidians from the Quiscatola source, an association of ESR with SQUID magnetometry permits to differentiate obsidians from the sources of Cotopaxi volcano, from the Quiscatola and Mullumica-Callejones sources of the Chacana caldera and to infer that the 12 analyzed obsidians from the pre-Hispanic site of La Mana come from the Mullumica-Callejones source.

  5. Diseño del colector de gases de escape de una planta de cogeneración

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Timoneda, David

    2005-01-01

    Este proyecto tiene como objetivo el diseño de un colector de gases de escape en una planta de cogeneración de energía. La función del colector es el transporte de los humos, que se producen en dicha planta industrial, hasta una caldera de vapor, donde se aprovechará su energía térmica para generar vapor con la principal finalidad de producir energía eléctrica mediante una turbina. Dicha planta industrial se encarga del tratamiento de residuos plásticos, de manera que a partir de éstos y p...

  6. The 2014 Lake Askja rockslide tsunami - optimization of landslide parameters comparing numerical simulations with observed run-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sif Gylfadóttir, Sigríður; Kim, Jihwan; Kristinn Helgason, Jón; Brynjólfsson, Sveinn; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Jóhannesson, Tómas; Bonnevie Harbitz, Carl; Løvholt, Finn

    2016-04-01

    The Askja central volcano is located in the Northern Volcanic Zone of Iceland. Within the main caldera an inner caldera was formed in an eruption in 1875 and over the next 40 years it gradually subsided and filled up with water, forming Lake Askja. A large rockslide was released from the Southeast margin of the inner caldera into Lake Askja on 21 July 2014. The release zone was located from 150 m to 350 m above the water level and measured 800 m across. The volume of the rockslide is estimated to have been 15-30 million m3, of which 10.5 million m3 was deposited in the lake, raising the water level by almost a meter. The rockslide caused a large tsunami that traveled across the lake, and inundated the shores around the entire lake after 1-2 minutes. The vertical run-up varied typically between 10-40 m, but in some locations close to the impact area it ranged up to 70 m. Lake Askja is a popular destination visited by tens of thousands of tourists every year but as luck would have it, the event occurred near midnight when no one was in the area. Field surveys conducted in the months following the event resulted in an extensive dataset. The dataset contains e.g. maximum inundation, high-resolution digital elevation model of the entire inner caldera, as well as a high resolution bathymetry of the lake displaying the landslide deposits. Using these data, a numerical model of the Lake Askja landslide and tsunami was developed using GeoClaw, a software package for numerical analysis of geophysical flow problems. Both the shallow water version and an extension of GeoClaw that includes dispersion, was employed to simulate the wave generation, propagation, and run-up due to the rockslide plunging into the lake. The rockslide was modeled as a block that was allowed to stretch during run-out after entering the lake. An optimization approach was adopted to constrain the landslide parameters through inverse modeling by comparing the calculated inundation with the observed run

  7. Volcano-estratigrafía y tectónica del Valle Central Occidentaly las estribaciones de los Montes del Aguacate a lo largo de la ruta 27, Costa Rica Volcano-stratigraphy and tectonics of the Western Central Valley and Montes del Aguacate along road 27, Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Hernán Porras; Monserrat Cascante; Raquel Granados; Guillermo E Alvarado

    2012-01-01

    La Ruta 27, también conocida como carretera Ciudad Colón-Caldera, ofrece cortes geológicos de entre 5 y 40 m de altura que muestran una buena parte de la estratigrafía, en su mayoría volcánica y subvolcánica, del extremo occidental del Valle Central y las estribaciones de los Montes del Aguacate. Se observa una secuencia volcánica correlacionable con la Formación Grifo Alto (Plioceno), profundamente hidrotermalizada (alteración propilítica) en varios sectores, compuesta por lavas, brechas y d...

  8. Diseño de la tarjeta de control de un sistema de planchado industrial

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Rubio, Benito

    2012-01-01

    Se ha diseñado una tarjeta de control para automatizar un centro de planchado industrial, que suministra una potencia de 2 KW en contacto con el tejido, generando vapor en una caldera de 5 litros de capacidad. Para la realización del proyecto y la selección de materiales se ha tenido en cuenta la legislación vigente en materia de recipientes a presión. Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Industrial Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena

  9. Sistema de planchado industrial automático

    OpenAIRE

    Olmos Parra, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Este Proyecto muestra el diseño de una tarjeta de control para automatizar un centro de planchado industrial, que suministra una potencia de 4 KW en contacto con el tejido, generando vapor en una caldera de 5 litros de capacidad. Para la realización del mismo y la selección de materiales se ha tenido en cuenta la legislación vigente en materia de recipientes a presión. Real Decreto 769/1999,