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Sample records for calculating proton-nucleus elastic

  1. Sensitivity of relativistic impulse approximation proton-nucleus elastic scattering calculations on relativistic mean-field parameterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojsik, M.; Gmuca, S.

    1998-01-01

    Relativistic microscopic calculations are presented for proton elastic scattering from 40 Ca at 500 MeV. The underlying target densities are calculated within the framework of the relativistic mean-field theory with several parameter sets commonly in use. The self consistency of the scalar and vector densities (and thus to relativistic mean-field parameters) is investigated. Recently, the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA) has been widely and repeatedly used for the calculations of proton-nucleus scattering at intermediate energies. These calculations have exhibited significant improvements over the nonrelativistic approaches. The relativistic impulse approximation calculations. in particular, provide a dramatically better description of the spin observables, namely the analyzing power, A y , and the spin-rotation function, Q, at least for energies higher than 400 MeV. In the relativistic impulse approximation, the Dirac optical potential is obtained by folding of the local Lorentz-invariant amplitudes with the corresponding nuclear densities. For the spin zero targets the scalar and vector terms give the dominant contributions. Thus the scalar and vector nuclear densities (both, proton and neutron ones) play the dominant role in the relativistic impulse approximation. While the proton vector densities can be obtained by unfolding from the empirically known charge densities, all other densities used rely to a great extent on theoretical models. The various recipes are used to construct the neutron vector densities and the scalar densities for both, neutrons and protons. In this paper we will study the sensitivity of the relativistic impulse approximation results on the various sets of relativistic mean-field parameters currently in use

  2. Proton nucleus elastic scattering at 800 MeV: the role of intermediate isobars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, J.P.; Maillet, J.P.; Lazard, C.; Lombard, R.J.

    1984-10-01

    Proton nucleus elastic scattering at 800 MeV has been calculated in the Glauber model for 16 O, 40 Ca, 48 Ca and 208 Pb. Nuclear densities are taken from Hartree-Fock-BCS calculations. For the nucleon-nucleon amplitudes, use is made of two recent phase shift analysis. The effects of intermediate isobars are included by means of a simple model. The results show that the experimental data are qualitatively understood. The polarization turns out to be quite sensitive to the intermediate isobar effects, which consequently need to be calculated more carefully

  3. Proton-Nucleus Elastic Cross Sections Using Two-Body In-Medium Scattering Amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, a method was developed of extracting nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections in the medium directly from experiment. The in-medium NN cross sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the Langley Research Center. The ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium was investigated. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium NN cross sections to calculate elastic proton-nucleus cross sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions.

  4. Isobaric intermediate states in proton-nucleus elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, J.P.; Lazard, C.; Lombard, R.J.

    1981-05-01

    The effects of the propagation of isobaric nucleon states in the intermediate steps of the multiple scattering have been studied with application on the proton- 4 He elastic scattering at 1 GeV. The calculations are performed in the Glauber model and results are given for the differential cross section, the polarization and the spin rotation parameter. In our conclusions we stress the large cancellations observed between terms of various orders and the great sensitivity of the effects to the nucleon-nucleon amplitudes

  5. Calculated inclusive neutron production from 400 GeV proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Alsmiller, F.S.; Hermann, O.W.

    1989-08-01

    Calculated inclusive neutron production from 400 GeV proton-nucleus collisions is presented and compared with experimental data. Target nuclei H, Be, Cu, and Pb are considered and the comparisons cover the laboratory energy range of 20 to 400 GeV, and angular range 0.7 to 10 mr. Moderately good agreement between the calculated and experimental data is found, but the agreement in the case of Be, Cu and Pb is significantly better than in the case of H. 8 refs., 4 figs

  6. Elastic and inelastic proton-nucleus scattering at 156MeV: experimental study and analysis in impulse approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparat, Vincent.

    1975-01-01

    In this work a high spatial resolution hodoscope is described. Scattered particles are detected in the image plane of a magnetic spectrometer by a proportional chamber with 96 wires of 1mm spacing. This hodoscope has been used for elastic and inelastic scattering experiments, of 156MeV protons, on 11 targets ranging from 12 C to 209 Bi. A phenomenological optical model calculation has been carried out to analyse the experimental elastic cross sections data. The dependance of the parameters as a function of the number of mass or the incident energy has been studied. The inelastic scattering results have been interpreted within the framework of the D.W.I.A. As the final results are dependant of the nucleon model, the optical potential parameters as well as the finite range approximation, several trials have been performed. Nevertheless, the DWIA seems to give about twice the experimental values for collective excitations in light or medium nuclei. The first order optical potential derived from the impulse approximation was calculated and the results compared to the experimental elastic cross sections. Several approximations were tested as non locality, off energy shell effects and the motion of the target nucleon. The usual approximation on these quantities are justified if the momentum transfer is less than 3fm -1 . The nucleon-nucleus transition matrix is obtained by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, using the moment method. The first order optical potential derived from these calculations is not realistic. The intensity of the nucleon-nucleon transition is too important, and that explained the disagreement at low momentum transfers. This study shows that the multiple scattering expansion of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, is not a good method to obtain the exact solution. It is better to do some approximations (i.e. of shell approximation) directly on the integral equation [fr

  7. Importance of channel coupling for very large angle proton-nucleus scattering and the failure of the optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, R.D.; Sparrow, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of inelastic channels in proton-nucleus scattering grows with momentum transfer, q, so that for large q coupled channels are required. This happens when the elastic and inelastic cross sections become comparable. We incorporate these ideas in a simple analytic framework to explain the large angle p- 208 Pb elastic scattering data at 800 MeV for which standard optical model calculations have failed completely

  8. η production in proton-nucleus reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassing, W.; Batko, G.; Vetter, T.; Wolf, G.

    1991-01-01

    The production of η-mesons in proton-nucleus reactions is analysed with respect to primary nucleon-nucleon (NN→NN η ) and secondary pion-nucleon (πN→ηN) production processes on the basis of Hartree-Fock groundstate momentum distributions and free on-shell production processes. The folding model adopted compares well for meson production with more involved simulations based on VUU transport equations. Similar to K + production in proton-nucleus reactions the η-mesons are primarily produced by the πN→ηN channel. However, η-mesons are absorbed in nuclei via excitation of the N * (1535) resonance which leads to strong distortions of the primordial spectra. On the other hand, the experimental mass dependence of the differential cross sections might yield information about the in-medium properties of this resonance. (orig.)

  9. Medium energy inelastic proton-nucleus scattering with spin dependent NN interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Auger, J.P.

    1981-12-01

    The previously proposed effective profile expansion method for the Glauber multiple scattering model calculation has been extended to the case of proton-nucleus inelastic scattering with spin dependent NN interaction. Using the method which turns out to be computationally simple and of relatively wider applicability, a study of sensitivity of proton-nucleus inelastic scattering calculation to the sometimes neglected momentum transfer dependence of the NN scattering amplitude has been made. We find that the calculated polarization is particularly sensitive in this respect. (author)

  10. Thermalization in high energy proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedemann, R.S.

    1988-03-01

    A relativistic proton-nucleus collision using the intranuclear cascade model is studied. The purpose is to verify the equilibration hypothesis at fragmentation time made by many nuclear fragmentation models. (author)

  11. Momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, F.; Townsend, L.W.

    1993-12-01

    An optical model description, based on multiple scattering theory, of longitudinal momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The crucial role of the imaginary component of the nucleon-nucleon transition matrix in accounting for longitudinal momentum transfer is demonstrated. Results obtained with this model are compared with Intranuclear Cascade (INC) calculations, as well as with predictions from Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (VUU) and quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. Comparisons are also made with experimental data where available. These indicate that the present model is adequate to account for longitudinal momentum transfer in both proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions over a wide range of energies

  12. High energy proton-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beurtey, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    This paper is restricted to an overall global criticism of what has been produced, experimentally and theoretically, during the past ten years, concerning elastic proton scattering at intermediate energy: theoretical models and approximations, phenomenological analysis, criticisms and suggestions on experimental methods

  13. Isolated photon production in proton-nucleus collisions at forward rapidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducloué, B.; Lappi, T.; Mäntysaari, H.

    2018-03-01

    We calculate isolated photon production at forward rapidities in proton-nucleus collisions in the color glass condensate framework. Our calculation uses dipole cross sections solved from the running coupling Balitsky-Kovchegov equation with an initial condition fit to deep inelastic scattering data. For comparison, we also update the results for the nuclear modification factor for pion production in the same kinematics. We present predictions for future forward RHIC and LHC measurements at √{sN N}=200 GeV and √{sN N}=8 TeV .

  14. arXiv Soft photon and two hard jets forward production in proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Altinoluk, Tolga; Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael; Petreska, Elena

    2018-04-11

    We calculate the cross section for production of a soft photon and two hard jets in the forward rapidity region in proton-nucleus collisions at high energies. The calculation is performed within the hybrid formalism. The hardness of the final particles is defined with respect to the saturation scale of the nucleus. We consider both the correlation limit of small momentum imbalance and the dilute target limit where the momentum imbalance is of the order of the hardness of the jets. The results depend on the first two transversemomentum-dependent (TMD) gluon distributions of the nucleus.

  15. Proton-nucleus dynamics at ultra-relativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCubbin, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the basic properties of proton-nucleus (pA) collisions at ultrarelativistic energies are reviewed. These include total and 'partonic' cross-sections, and the differential cross-sections as functions of rapidity, transverse energy, and particle p T , with particular emphasis in all cases on the A dependence. The aim is to introduce a nuclear physics audience to the main trends and ideas; experts in the field will find nothing very new here. (orig.)

  16. Photoproduction of lepton pairs in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, B. D.; Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study coherent interactions as a probe of the nonlinear effects in the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we study the multiphoton effects in the production of leptons pairs for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions for heavy nuclei. In the proton-nucleus we assume the ultrarelativistic proton as a source of photons and estimate the photoproduction of lepton pairs on nuclei at RHIC and LHC energies considering the multiphoton effects associated to multiple rescattering of the projectile photon on the proton of the nucleus. In nucleus - nucleus colllisions we consider the two nuclei as a source of photons. As each scattering contributes with a factor {alpha}Z to the cross section, this contribution must be taken into account for heavy nuclei. We consider the Coulomb corrections to calculate themultiple scatterings and estimate the total cross section for muon and tau pair production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  17. Observation of Top Quark Production in Proton-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Ambrogi, F.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Grossmann, J.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, N.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Madlener, T.; Mikulec, I.; Pree, E.; Rad, N.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Spanring, M.; Spitzbart, D.; Waltenberger, W.; Wittmann, J.; Wulz, C.-E.; Zarucki, M.; Chekhovsky, V.; Mossolov, V.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; De Wolf, E. A.; Di Croce, D.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; De Bruyn, I.; De Clercq, J.; Deroover, K.; Flouris, G.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lowette, S.; Marchesini, I.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Beghin, D.; Bilin, B.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Dorney, B.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Kalsi, A. K.; Lenzi, T.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Seva, T.; Starling, E.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Khvastunov, I.; Poyraz, D.; Roskas, C.; Salva, S.; Tytgat, M.; Verbeke, W.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caputo, C.; Caudron, A.; David, P.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Saggio, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Zobec, J.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Coelho, E.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Melo De Almeida, M.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Sanchez Rosas, L. J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Thiel, M.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Misheva, M.; Rodozov, M.; Shopova, M.; Sultanov, G.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Gao, X.; Yuan, L.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liao, H.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Yazgan, E.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, J.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Wang, Y.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Segura Delgado, M. A.; Courbon, B.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Sculac, T.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Mesic, B.; Starodumov, A.; Susa, T.; Ather, M. W.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahrous, A.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Kadastik, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Havukainen, J.; Heikkilä, J. K.; Järvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurila, S.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Siikonen, H.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Leloup, C.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Negro, G.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Titov, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Amendola, C.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Charlot, C.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Lobanov, A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Stahl Leiton, A. G.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Zghiche, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Jansová, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Tonon, N.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Finco, L.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Bagaturia, I.; Autermann, C.; Feld, L.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Preuten, M.; Schomakers, C.; Schulz, J.; Teroerde, M.; Zhukov, V.; Albert, A.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hamer, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Flügge, G.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Müller, T.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Arndt, T.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bermúdez Martínez, A.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Botta, V.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Eren, E.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Grohsjean, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Guthoff, M.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Lenz, T.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Savitskyi, M.; Saxena, P.; Shevchenko, R.; Stefaniuk, N.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wen, Y.; Wichmann, K.; Wissing, C.; Zenaiev, O.; Aggleton, R.; Bein, S.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Karavdina, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kurz, S.; Lapsien, T.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Sonneveld, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baselga, M.; Baur, S.; Butz, E.; Caspart, R.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Faltermann, N.; Freund, B.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Harrendorf, M. A.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Kassel, F.; Kudella, S.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Schröder, M.; Shvetsov, I.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Karathanasis, G.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Kousouris, K.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Gianneios, P.; Katsoulis, P.; Kokkas, P.; Mallios, S.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Triantis, F. A.; Tsitsonis, D.; Csanad, M.; Filipovic, N.; Pasztor, G.; Surányi, O.; Veres, G. I.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Horvath, D.; Hunyadi, Á.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Makovec, A.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Bahinipati, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Dhingra, N.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, S.; Kumar, R.; Kumari, P.; Mehta, A.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, A.; Chauhan, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Bhardwaj, R.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhawandeep, U.; Dey, S.; Dutt, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Thakur, S.; Behera, P. K.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Dugad, S.; Mahakud, B.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Das, P.; Guchait, M.; Jain, Sa.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Sarkar, T.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Hegde, V.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Pandey, S.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Chenarani, S.; Eskandari Tadavani, E.; Etesami, S. M.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Errico, F.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lezki, S.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Borgonovi, L.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Chatterjee, K.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Russo, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Strom, D.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Ravera, F.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; Beschi, A.; Brianza, L.; Brivio, F.; Ciriolo, V.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pauwels, K.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Fienga, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Khan, W. 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A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Saddique, A.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Pyskir, A.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Galinhas, B.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. 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P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Moran, D.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Álvarez Fernández, A.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Cuevas, J.; Erice, C.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; González Fernández, J. R.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Vischia, P.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chazin Quero, B.; Curras, E.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Akgun, B.; Auffray, E.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. 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R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Si, W.; Wang, L.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Gilbert, D.; Hashemi, B.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Kole, G.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Masciovecchio, M.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Gouskos, L.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Bornheim, A.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Newman, H. B.; Nguyen, T. Q.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Ferguson, T.; Mudholkar, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. 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M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Schneider, B.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strait, J.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Joshi, B. M.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Mitselmakher, G.; Shi, K.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Joshi, Y. R.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Kolberg, T.; Martinez, G.; Perry, T.; Prosper, H.; Saha, A.; Santra, A.; Sharma, V.; Yohay, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Cavanaugh, R.; Chen, X.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hangal, D. A.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Kamin, J.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trauger, H.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Rogan, C.; Royon, C.; Sanders, S.; Schmitz, E.; Tapia Takaki, J. 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    2017-12-01

    The first observation of top quark production in proton-nucleus collisions is reported using proton-lead data collected by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of √{sN N }=8.16 TeV . The measurement is performed using events with exactly one isolated electron or muon candidate and at least four jets. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 174 nb-1 . The significance of the t t ¯ signal against the background-only hypothesis is above 5 standard deviations. The measured cross section is σt t ¯=45 ±8 nb , consistent with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  18. Proton nucleus collisions in the Landau hydrodynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence upon energy and the atomic number A for the multiplicities and the angular distributions of the relativistic secondaries is computed according to the hydrodynamic model for proton-nucleus collisions. Some different ways of converting the dependence upon tunnellength in nuclear matter into A dependence are discussed and a phenomenological model employed to exhibit the correlations to the fragmentation of the nucleus. The treatment is valid for arbitrary values of the velocity of sound c 0 in nuclear matter inside the range 0.2 0 0 around c 0 approximately 0.5 is preferred in a comparison to the presently available experimental data. This is the same range of values of the parameter for which the best agreement between theory and experiment occurs in the ISR range. (Auth.)

  19. Observation of Top Quark Production in Proton-Nucleus Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Freer, C; Hortiangtham, A; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Orimoto, T; Teixeira De Lima, R; Trocino, D; Wamorkar, T; Wang, B; Wisecarver, A; Wood, D; Bhattacharya, S; Charaf, O; Hahn, K A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Schmitt, M H; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Bucci, R; Dev, N; Hildreth, M; Hurtado Anampa, K; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Li, W; Loukas, N; Marinelli, N; Meng, F; Mueller, C; Musienko, Y; Planer, M; Reinsvold, A; Ruchti, R; Siddireddy, P; Smith, G; Taroni, S; Wayne, M; Wightman, A; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Alimena, J; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Francis, B; Hart, A; Hill, C; Ji, W; Liu, B; Luo, W; Winer, B L; Wulsin, H W; Cooperstein, S; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Higginbotham, S; Kalogeropoulos, A; Lange, D; Luo, J; Marlow, D; Mei, K; Ojalvo, I; Olsen, J; Palmer, C; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Malik, S; Norberg, S; Barker, A; Barnes, V E; Das, S; Folgueras, S; Gutay, L; Jones, M; Jung, A W; Khatiwada, A; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Peng, C C; Qiu, H; Schulte, J F; Sun, J; Wang, F; Xiao, R; Xie, W; Cheng, T; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Chen, Z; Ecklund, K M; Freed, S; Geurts, F J M; Guilbaud, M; Kilpatrick, M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Padley, B P; Roberts, J; Rorie, J; Shi, W; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Zhang, A; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Duh, Y T; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Han, J; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Lo, K H; Tan, P; Verzetti, M; Ciesielski, R; Goulianos, K; Mesropian, C; Agapitos, A; Chou, J P; Gershtein, Y; Gómez Espinosa, T A; Halkiadakis, E; Heindl, M; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Kyriacou, S; Lath, A; Montalvo, R; Nash, K; Osherson, M; Saka, H; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Delannoy, A G; Heideman, J; Riley, G; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Thapa, K; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Celik, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Delgado, A; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Huang, T; Kamon, T; Mueller, R; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Perniè, L; Rathjens, D; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; De Guio, F; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Gurpinar, E; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Mengke, T; Muthumuni, S; Peltola, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Wang, Z; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Ni, H; Padeken, K; Sheldon, P; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Arenton, M W; Barria, P; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Joyce, M; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Neu, C; Sinthuprasith, T; Wang, Y; Wolfe, E; Xia, F; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Poudyal, N; Sturdy, J; Thapa, P; Zaleski, S; Brodski, M; Buchanan, J; Caillol, C; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Gomber, B; Grothe, M; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Hussain, U; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Ruggles, T; Savin, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    2017-12-15

    The first observation of top quark production in proton-nucleus collisions is reported using proton-lead data collected by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s_{NN}]=8.16  TeV. The measurement is performed using events with exactly one isolated electron or muon candidate and at least four jets. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 174  nb^{-1}. The significance of the tt[over ¯] signal against the background-only hypothesis is above 5 standard deviations. The measured cross section is σ_{tt[over ¯]}=45±8  nb, consistent with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  20. A plausible picture of high-energy proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.O.

    1976-01-01

    Results experimentally obtained from jets of E(p)=10-10 3 GeV in nuclear emulsion show that the target nucleus in proton-nucleus collisions seems to present ''limiting fragmentation''. In the same energy range, proton-nucleus collisions resemble closely proton-proton collisions and asymmetric shape of rapidities is only caused by the break-up products of heavy targets [fr

  1. Calculation of elastic-plastic strain ranges for fatigue analysis based on linear elastic stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, G.

    1998-01-01

    Fatigue analysis requires that the maximum strain ranges be known. These strain ranges are generally computed from linear elastic analysis. The elastic strain ranges are enhanced by a factor K e to obtain the total elastic-plastic strain range. The reliability of the fatigue analysis depends on the quality of this factor. Formulae for calculating the K e factor are proposed. A beam is introduced as a computational model for determining the elastic-plastic strains. The beam is loaded by the elastic stresses of the real structure. The elastic-plastic strains of the beam are compared with the beam's elastic strains. This comparison furnishes explicit expressions for the K e factor. The K e factor is tested by means of seven examples. (orig.)

  2. Atomistic Calculation of Elastic Moduli in Strained Silicon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Richard; Pan, Ernian; Chung, Peter W; Cai, Xinli; Liew, Kim M; Buldum, Alper

    2007-01-01

    .... Using our approach, the bulk modulus, effective elastic stiffnesses C11, C12, and C44 of the strained silicon, including also the effective Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, are all calculated...

  3. First-principle calculations of structural, electronic, optical, elastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S CHEDDADI

    2017-11-28

    Nov 28, 2017 ... First-principle calculations on the structural, electronic, optical, elastic and thermal properties of the chalcopyrite ... The Kohn–Sham equations were solved using the ... RMTKmax = 7 was used for all the investigated systems,.

  4. Spin observables in inelastic proton-nucleus scattering at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of spin observables in inelastic proton-nucleus reactions for incident proton energies near 1 GeV. At this energy, the dominant reaction mechanisms are (1) quasi-free knockout of one or more nucleons, and (2) pion production through the Δ resonance. The cross section due to quasi-free knockout can be reasonably well understood theoretically in a multiple scattering picture, which uses measured NN amplitudes as input. Calculations of this sort were carried out in reference [10] using scalar NN amplitudes parameterized as Gaussians. The author has extended this picture to include spin dependent NN amplitudes. This allows calculation of all the spin observables, Ay, DLL, DSS, DNN, DLS, and DSL, as well as the cross section dsigma/dOmegadp due to quasi-free knockout of one or more particles. The cross section and polarization Ay have been measured at the LAMPF High Resolution Spectrometer at T/sub L/ = 800 MeV on 12 C. The theoretical results agree well with the data in the quasi-free region. The results for the remaining spin observables provide predictions for experiments which can be performed at LAMPF. By comparing the calculations with the data, it may be possible to separate the contribution due to a quasi-free knockout, and see a signature of quasi-free Δ production in the spin observables

  5. Medium modified two-body scattering amplitude from proton-nucleus total cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    Recently (R.K. Tripathi, J.W. Wilson, F.A. Cucinotta, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 145 (1998) 277; R.K. Tripathi, F.A. Cucinotta, J.W. Wilson, NASA-TP-1998-208438), we have extracted nucleon-nucleon (N-N) cross-sections in the medium directly from experiment. The in-medium N-N cross-sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Here, we investigate the ratio of real to imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium N-N cross-sections to calculate total proton-nucleus cross-sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross-sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions. c2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Particle correlations in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamiya, Sh.

    1981-01-01

    Particle correlations in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at energies of 1-2 GeV/nucleon are investigated. The problems of measurement of the mean free path lambda of protons inside the nucleus and the interaction radius of nucleus-nucleus collisions is considered. The value of lambda has been determined in two-proton coincidence experiment in proton-nucleus interaction at 800 MeV. The observed value of lambda is slightly longer than the expected from free nucleon-nucleon collisions. Some preliminary results on proton emission beyond free nucleon-nucleon kinemaics are given

  7. Atomistic calculations of interface elastic properties in noncoherent metallic bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi Changwen; Jun, Sukky; Kouris, Demitris A.; Kim, Sung Youb

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes theoretical and computational studies associated with the interface elastic properties of noncoherent metallic bicrystals. Analytical forms of interface energy, interface stresses, and interface elastic constants are derived in terms of interatomic potential functions. Embedded-atom method potentials are then incorporated into the model to compute these excess thermodynamics variables, using energy minimization in a parallel computing environment. The proposed model is validated by calculating surface thermodynamic variables and comparing them with preexisting data. Next, the interface elastic properties of several fcc-fcc bicrystals are computed. The excess energies and stresses of interfaces are smaller than those on free surfaces of the same crystal orientations. In addition, no negative values of interface stresses are observed. Current results can be applied to various heterogeneous materials where interfaces assume a prominent role in the systems' mechanical behavior

  8. A calculational round robin in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    Eighteen organisations participated in this elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) numerical analysis round robin which treated the same three-point bend problem as a similar round robin conducted by ASTM four years earlier. The work involved the calculation of overall deformation, J, CTOD and crack profile using plane strain elastic-plastic finite element analysis for a monotonically increasing load up to a maximum deformation which was far beyond the elastic regime. It was found that all of the elastic solutions were accurate to within a few per cent. In the elastic-plastic regime, however, there was a large scatter of the results, increasing with increasing plastic deformation and roughly of the same order as in the ASTM round robin which contained ten solutions. No significant progress has taken place in the state of the art of numerical EPFM analysis over the four-year interval. The reasons for this scatter and tentative conclusions on the most suitable numerical analysis methods in EPFM are discussed. (author)

  9. Production of neutrinos and neutrino-like particles in proton-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dishaw, J.P.

    1979-03-01

    An experimental search was performed to look for the direct production of neutrinos or neutrino-like particles, i.e., neutral particles which interact weakly with hadrons, in proton-nucleus interactions at 400 GeV incident proton energy. Possible sources of such particles include the semi-leptonic decay of new heavy particles such as charm, and the direct production of a light neutral Higgs particle such as the axion. The production of these particles has been inferred in this experiment by energy nonconservation in the collision of a proton with an iron nucleus. The total visible energy of the interaction was measured using a sampling ionization calorimeter. After correcting for beam intensity effects and cutting the data to eliminate systematic effects in the measurement, the final resolution of the calorimeter was 3.51% and increased with decreasing incident beam energy with a square root dependence on the beam energy. Energy nonconservation in the data is manifest as a non-Gaussian distribution on the low side of the calorimeter measured energy. Model calculations yield the fraction of events expected in this non-Gaussian behavior for the various sources of neutrinos or neutrino-like particles. A maximum likelihood fit to the data with the theoretical fraction of events expected yields the 95% confidence level production cross section upper limit values. The upper limits for general production of neutrino-like particles for various parameterizations of the production cross section are presented. The following specific upper limits have been established: charm particle production -3 times the π 0 production cross section. 144 references

  10. Elastic-Plastic Calculation of a Dilatation Compensation Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasiu, Costică; Iliescu, Nicolae; Sorohan, Ștefan

    2017-12-01

    Compensators are elastic structures that have the role of taking over the axial displacements that occur in the junction areas of the technological equipment (pipelines or containers) through which the fluids circulate at pressures and high temperatures. These elastic structures, realized in a very wide range of shapes and sizes, are sujected by the inner pressure and an axial force produced by dilatation of structures in which they are mounted. The calculation of the expansion compensators raises many problems caused by the working regimes of the technological equipments they belong to. Following previous studies, undertaken by calculus and experimental, by the authors of this paper, it was found that in operation the state of stress in these elastic structures exceeds the flow limit of the material from which they are manufacturated. For this reason, in the present paper, the authors present the results of a calculus study, by FEM, on the stress and strain state, in the elasto-plastic regime of a leticular compensator. The calculation was made for two loading modes, separately applied and superimposed. The nonlinear mechanical behavior of this compensator is analyzed and discussed comparatively to the results of previous studies performed in elastic regime on the same type of compensator.

  11. Energy loss, range and fluence distributions, total reaction and projectile fragment production cross sections for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihver, L.; Kanai, T.

    1992-07-01

    We have developed a computer code for calculations of energy loss (dE/dx) and range distributions for heavy ions in any media. The results from our calculations are in very good agreement with previous calculations. We have developed semiempirical total reaction cross section formulae for proton-nucleus (with Z p ≤26) and nucleus-nucleus (with Z p and Z t ≤26) reactions. These formulae apply for incident energies above 15 MeV and 100 MeV/nucleon respectively. From the total reaction cross sections, we can calculate the mean free paths and the fluence distributions of protons and heavy ions in any media. We have compared all the calculated reaction cross sections and the mean free paths with experimental data, and the agreement is good. We have also constructed a procedure for calculating projectile fragment production cross sections, by scaling semiempirical proton-nucleus partial cross section systematics. The scaling is performed using a scaling parameter deduced from our reaction cross sections formulae, and additional enhancements factors. All products with atomic number ranging from that of the projectile (Z p ) down to Z=2 can be calculated. The agreement between the calculated cross sections and the experimental data is better than earlier published results. (author)

  12. Pion- and proton-nucleus interactions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehnhard, D.

    1992-12-01

    We report on scattering and reaction experiments on light nuclei using the π-meson and proton beams from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). Differential cross sections, cross section asymmetries, and angular correlation functions have been measured in order to test models of the reaction mechanism and of nuclear structure. At LAMPF we have measured asymmetries for pion scattering from polarized 13 C which are uniquely sensitive to the isoscalar spin density. In order to determine details of the reaction mechanism, we have obtained approval for a scattering experiment on polarized 3 He for which the nuclear structure is very well known. We have completed data taking for two studies of elastic scattering of π + from 6 Li and l3 C. The detailed differential cross sections from these experiments will be used to constrain theoretical analyses of previous polarization experiments done at the Pierre-Scherrer-Institute (PSI) and at LAMPF. We have analyzed π-triton coincidence events from the 4 He(π,π' t)p reaction and have found evidence for direct triton knockout from 4 He. We have extended these angular correlation measurements to higher energies and to 2 H and 3 He targets. At IUCF we have performed the first 4 He(p,n) experiment at intermediate energies, T p = 100, 147, and 200 MeV, in a search for previously reported narrow states in 4 Li of widths of ∼ 1 MeV. Within the statistics of the data we have found no evidence for such narrow structures

  13. Proton-Nucleus Collisions at the LHC: Scientific Opportunities and Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Salgado, C A; Arleo, F; Armesto, N; Botje, M; Cacciari, M; Campbell, J; Carli, C; Cole, B; D'Enterria, D; Gelis, F; Guzey, V; Hencken, K; Jacobs, P; Jowett, J M; Klein, S R; Maltoni, F; Morsch, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Qiu, J W; Satogata, T; Sikler, F; Strikman, M; Takai, H; Vogt, R; Wessels, J P; White, S N; Wiedemann, U A; Wyslouch, B; Zhalov, M

    2012-01-01

    Proton-nucleus (p+A) collisions have long been recognized as a crucial component of the physics programme with nuclear beams at high energies, in particular for their reference role to interpret and understand nucleus-nucleus data as well as for their potential to elucidate the partonic structure of matter at low parton fractional momenta (small-x). Here, we summarize the main motivations that make a proton-nucleus run a decisive ingredient for a successful heavy-ion programme at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and we present unique scientific opportunities arising from these collisions. We also review the status of ongoing discussions about operation plans for the p+A mode at the LHC.

  14. Field theoretical approach to proton-nucleus reactions: II-Multiple-step excitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiras, A.; Kodama, T.; Nemes, M.

    1989-01-01

    A field theoretical formulation to multiple step excitation process in proton-nucleus collision within the context of a relativistic eikonal approach is presented. A closed form expression for the double differential cross section can be obtained whose structure is very simple and makes the physics transparent. Glauber's formulation of the same process is obtained as a limit of ours and the necessary approximations are studied and discussed. (author) [pt

  15. Inclusive spectra of hadrons in proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorkyan, S.R.; Gulkanyan, G.R.; Kotzinyan, A.M.; Zhamkochyan, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    A model is proposed, which allows one to describe all exprimental data on inclusive spectra of different hadrons produced on nuclei. The model is based on the following assumptions. After the first inelastic collision with nucleon in the nucleus the proton transforms into some excited system H, which collides with the other nucleons during its passage through the nucleus. Since in inelastic collisions the slow sea partons play the dominant role, the valence quarks of this system H coincide with those of proton. Fragmentation of H into hadrons (as well as into proton) is dilated in the lab system by the Lorentz factor E/m >> 1 and so it takes place out of the nucleus. Using the methods of multiple scattering theory one can receive the connection between inclusive spectra on nuclei and those on nucleons. The calculations of inclusive spectra of different hadrons (p, p, πsup(-+), ksup(+-)) were done, and a satisfactory description of the experimental data was obtained. It should be noted that this description was done without introduction of any free parameters. Analogous models are discussed, and their diffference from the method proposed is outlined

  16. DFT calculation for elastic constants of orthorhombic structure within WIEN2K code: A new package (ortho-elastic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshak, Ali H.; Jamal, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new package for calculating elastic constants of orthorhombic structure is released. ► The package called ortho-elastic. ► It is compatible with [FP-(L)APW+lo] method implemented in WIEN2k code. ► Several orthorhombic structure compounds were used to test the new package. ► Elastic constants calculated using this package show good agreement with experiment. - Abstract: A new package for calculating the elastic constants of orthorhombic structure is released. The package called ortho-elastic. The formalism of calculating the ortho-elastic constants is described in details. The package is compatible with the highly accurate all-electron full-potential (linearized) augmented plane-wave plus local orbital [FP-(L)APW+lo] method implemented in WIEN2k code. Several orthorhombic structure compounds were used to test the new package. We found that the calculated elastic constants using the new package show better agreement with the available experimental data than the previous theoretical results used different methods. In this package the second-order derivative E ″ (ε) of polynomial fit E=E(ε) of energy vs strains at zero strain (ε=0), used to calculate the orthorhombic elastic constants.

  17. CGC factorization for forward particle production in proton-nucleus collisions at next-to-leading order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iancu, E.; Mueller, A.H.; Triantafyllopoulos, D.N.

    2016-01-01

    Within the Color Glass Condensate effective theory, we reconsider the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation of the single inclusive particle production at forward rapidities in proton-nucleus collisions at high energy. Focusing on quark production for definiteness, we establish a new factorization scheme, perturbatively correct through NLO, in which there is no ‘rapidity subtraction’. That is, the NLO correction to the impact factor is not explicitly separated from the high-energy evolution. Our construction exploits the skeleton structure of the (NLO) Balitsky-Kovchegov equation, in which the first step of the evolution is explicitly singled out. The NLO impact factor is included by computing this first emission with the exact kinematics for the emitted gluon, rather than by using the eikonal approximation. This particular calculation has already been presented in the literature http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.122301, http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.86.054005, but the reorganization of the perturbation theory that we propose is new. As compared to the proposal in http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.122301, http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.86.054005, our scheme is free of the fine-tuning inherent in the rapidity subtraction, which might be the origin of the negativity of the NLO cross-section observed in previous studies.

  18. CGC factorization for forward particle production in proton-nucleus collisions at next-to-leading order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iancu, E. [Institut de physique théorique, Université Paris Saclay,CNRS, CEA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mueller, A.H. [Department of Physics, Columbia University,New York, NY 10027 (United States); Triantafyllopoulos, D.N. [European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas - ECT*, Trento (Italy); Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Strada delle Tabarelle 286, I-38123 Villazzano (Italy)

    2016-12-13

    Within the Color Glass Condensate effective theory, we reconsider the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation of the single inclusive particle production at forward rapidities in proton-nucleus collisions at high energy. Focusing on quark production for definiteness, we establish a new factorization scheme, perturbatively correct through NLO, in which there is no ‘rapidity subtraction’. That is, the NLO correction to the impact factor is not explicitly separated from the high-energy evolution. Our construction exploits the skeleton structure of the (NLO) Balitsky-Kovchegov equation, in which the first step of the evolution is explicitly singled out. The NLO impact factor is included by computing this first emission with the exact kinematics for the emitted gluon, rather than by using the eikonal approximation. This particular calculation has already been presented in the literature http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.122301, http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.86.054005, but the reorganization of the perturbation theory that we propose is new. As compared to the proposal in http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.122301, http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.86.054005, our scheme is free of the fine-tuning inherent in the rapidity subtraction, which might be the origin of the negativity of the NLO cross-section observed in previous studies.

  19. Field theoretical approach to proton-nucleus reactions. I - One step inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiras, A.; Kodama, T.; Nemes, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    In this work we obtain a closed form expression to the double differential cross section for one step proton-nucleus reaction within a field theoretical framework. Energy and momentum conservation as well as nuclear structure effects are consistently taken into account within the field theoretical eikonal approximation. In our formulation the kinematics of such reaction is not dominated by the free nucleon-nucleon cross section but a new factor which we call relativistic differential cross section in a Born Approximation. (author) [pt

  20. Study of proton-nucleus collisions at high energies based on the hydrodynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, N.; Weiner, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    We study proton-nucleus collisions at high energies using the one-dimensional hydrodynamical model of Landau with special emphasis on the effect of the size of the target nucleus and of the magnitude of velocity of sound of excited hadronic matter. We convert a collision problem of a proton and a nucleus with a spherical shape into that of a proton and a one-dimensional nuclear tunnel whose length is determined from the average impact parameter. By extending the methods developed by Milekhin and Emelyanov, we obtain the solutions of the hydrodynamical equations of proton-nucleus collisions for arbitrary target tunnel length and arbitrary velocity of sound. The connection between these solutions and observable physical quantities is established as in the work of Cooper, Frye, and Schonberg. Extensive numerical analyses are made at E/sub lab/ = 200 GeV and for the velocity of sound u = 1/√3 of a relativistic ideal Bose gas and u = 1/(7.5)/sup 1/2/ of an interacting Bose gas. In order to compare proton-nucleus collisions with proton-proton collisions, all the analyses are made in the equal-velocity frame. We find the following results. (1) In comparing the number of secondary particles produced in p-A collisions N/sub p/A with those in p-p collisions N/sub p/p, while most of the excess of N/sub p/A over N/sub p/p is concentrated in the backward rapidity region, there exists also an increase of N/sub p/A with A in the forward rapidity region. This result is at variance with the predictions of the energy-flux-cascade model and of the coherent-production model. (2) The excess energies are contained exclusively in the backward region. We also find evidence for new phenomena in proton-nucleus collisions. (3) The existence of an asymmetry of average energies of secondary particles between forward and backward regions, in particular, >> for larger nuclear targets. Thus, energetic particles are predominantly produced in the backward region

  1. Dynamics of Anti-Proton -- Protons and Anti-Proton -- Nucleus Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Galoyan, A; Uzhinsky, V

    2016-01-01

    A short review of simulation results of anti-proton-proton and anti-proton-nucleus interactions within the framework of Geant4 FTF (Fritiof) model is presented. The model uses the main assumptions of the Quark-Gluon-String Model or Dual Parton Model. The model assumes production and fragmentation of quark-anti-quark and diquark-anti-diquark strings in the mentioned interactions. Key ingredients of the model are cross sections of string creation processes and an usage of the LUND string fragmentation algorithm. They allow one to satisfactory describe a large set of experimental data, especially, a strange particle production, Lambda hyperons and K mesons.

  2. Charmonia and Drell-Yan production in proton-nucleus collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandro, B; Arnaldi, R; Atayan, M; Baglin, C; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borenstein, S R; Borges, G; Bussière, A; Capelli, L; Castanier, C; Castor, J I; Chaurand, B; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Claudino, T; Comets, M P; Constans, N; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; Cruz, J; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Ducroux, L; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gavrilov, Yu K; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grigorian, S; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Hakobyan, R S; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavitcheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Macciotta, P; MacCormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prado da Silva, W L; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scalas, E; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, Ermanno; Villatte, L; Willis, N; CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Charmonium production in p-A collisions is a unique tool for the study of the interaction of bound ccbar in nuclear matter. It can provide details on the basic features of the resonance formation mechanism and, in particular, on its non-perturbative aspects. In this Letter, we present an experimental study of Charmonia and Drell-Yan production in proton-nucleus collisions at 450GeV/c. The results are analyzed in the framework of the Glauber model and lead to the values of the nuclear absorption cross-section sigma^abs_pA for j/psi and psi'. Then, we compare the J/psi absorption in proton-nucleus and sulphur-uranium interactions, using NA38 data. We obtain that, for the J/psi, omega^abs_pA and omega^abs_SU are compatible, showing that no sizeable additional suppression mechanism in present S-U collisions, and confirming that the anomalous J/psi suppression only sets in for Pb-Pb interactions.

  3. A calculational round robin in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, L.H.

    Eighteen organizations participated in this round robin which treated the same three-point bend problem as an ASTM round robin four years earlier. Overall deformation, J, CTOD and crack profile were the main results required using plane strain elastic-plastic finite element analysis for a monotonically increasing load up to a maximum deformation which was far beyond the elastic regime. All elastic solutions were accurate to within a few percent. In the elastic-plastic regime, however, there was a large scatter of the results, increasing with increasing plastic deformation and roughly of the same order as in the ASTM round robin which contained ten solutions. Apparently no significant progress has taken place in the state of the art of numerical EPFM analysis in four years time. The paper discusses the reasons for this scatter and draws tentative conclusions on the most suitable numerical analysis methods in EPFM. (Auth.)

  4. Quarkonium production in high energyproton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Valle, Z C; Corcella, G; Fleuret, F; Ferreiro, E G; Kartvelishvili, V; Kopeliovich, B; Lansberg, J P; Lourenco, C; Martinez, G; Papadimitriou, V; Satz, H; Scomparin, E; Ullrich, T; Teryaev, O; Vogt, R; Wang, J X

    2011-03-14

    We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarization studies. Afterwards, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in broader perpectives, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

  5. Percolation picture of disintegration of nuclei in the proton-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botvina, A.S.; Lanin, L.V.

    1992-01-01

    Breakup of nuclei into fragments in the proton-nucleus interaction is studied. It is assumed that breakup occurs in two stages. During the first stage the incident particle interacts with individual nucleons of the nucleus, and high-energy reaction products are emitted from the nucleus. This stage is described by means of the intranuclear-cascade model. During the second stage some of the nuclei, whose excitation energy is high, or whose density is very inhomogeneous, break up. This breakup is described by means of a percolation model which takes into account the spatial distribution of nucleons in the nucleus and which generalizes the percolation description of the 'liquid-gas' phase transition for finite nuclei. Features of this breakup mechanism are studied. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that it is not sufficient to consider percolation only in the coordinate space, and that the momentum distribution of the nucleons in the nucleus must be taken into account

  6. Quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conesa del Valle, Z.; Corcella, G.; Fleuret, F.; Ferreiro, E.G.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kopeliovich, B.; Lansberg, J.P.; Lourenco, C.; Martinez, G.; Papadimitriou, V.; Satz, H.; Scomparin, E.; Ullrich, T.; Teryaev, O.; Vogt, R.; Wang, J.X.

    2011-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarisation studies. Afterwards, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in broader perpectives, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

  7. 1-3 Nuclear In-medium Effects of Strange Particles in Proton-nucleus Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng; Zhaoqing[1

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of the in-medium properties of strange particles from heavy-ion collisions is very complicated, since he nuclear density varies in the evolution of nucleus-nucleus collisions. To avoid the uncertainties of the baryon ensities during the stage of strange particle production, one can investigate proton-nucleus collisions where the uclear density is definite around the saturation density. Dynamics of strange particles produced in the protoninduced uclear the reactions near the threshold energies has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum olecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model. The in-medium modifications on particle production in densenuclear matter are considered through the corrections to the elementary cross sections via the effective mass and he mean-field potentials[1].

  8. First-principles calculations for elastic properties of OsB{sub 2} under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Junwei [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Chen Xiangrong, E-mail: x.r.chen@tom.co [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); International Centre for Materials Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Luo Fen [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Ji Guangfu [Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2009-11-01

    The structure, elastic properties and elastic anisotropy of orthorhombic OsB{sub 2} are investigated by density functional theory method with the ultrasoft pseudopotential scheme in the frame of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) as well as local density approximation (LDA). The obtained structural parameters, elastic constants, elastic anisotropy and Debye temperature for OsB{sub 2} under pressure are consistent with the available experimental data and other theoretical results. It is found that the elastic constants, bulk modulus and Debye temperature of OsB{sub 2} tend to increase with increasing pressure. It is predicted that OsB{sub 2} is not a superhard material from our calculations.

  9. First-principles calculations for elastic properties of OsB2 under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Junwei; Chen Xiangrong; Luo Fen; Ji Guangfu

    2009-01-01

    The structure, elastic properties and elastic anisotropy of orthorhombic OsB 2 are investigated by density functional theory method with the ultrasoft pseudopotential scheme in the frame of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) as well as local density approximation (LDA). The obtained structural parameters, elastic constants, elastic anisotropy and Debye temperature for OsB 2 under pressure are consistent with the available experimental data and other theoretical results. It is found that the elastic constants, bulk modulus and Debye temperature of OsB 2 tend to increase with increasing pressure. It is predicted that OsB 2 is not a superhard material from our calculations.

  10. First-principles calculations for elastic properties of OsB 2 under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun-Wei; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Luo, Fen; Ji, Guang-Fu

    2009-11-01

    The structure, elastic properties and elastic anisotropy of orthorhombic OsB 2 are investigated by density functional theory method with the ultrasoft pseudopotential scheme in the frame of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) as well as local density approximation (LDA). The obtained structural parameters, elastic constants, elastic anisotropy and Debye temperature for OsB 2 under pressure are consistent with the available experimental data and other theoretical results. It is found that the elastic constants, bulk modulus and Debye temperature of OsB 2 tend to increase with increasing pressure. It is predicted that OsB 2 is not a superhard material from our calculations.

  11. Comparison of inclusive particle production in 14.6 GeV/c proton-nucleus collisions with simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, D.E.; Lo, K.H.; Comfort, J.R.; Sivertz, M.

    2006-01-01

    Inclusive charged pion, kaon, proton and deuteron production in 14.6 GeV/c proton-nucleus collisions measured by BNL experiment E802 is compared with results from the GEANT3, GEANT4 and FLUKA simulation packages. The FLUKA package is found to have the best overall agreement

  12. Production of neutrinos and neutrino-like particles in proton-nucleus interactions. [400 GeV, cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dishaw, J.P.

    1979-03-01

    An experimental search was performed to look for the direct production of neutrinos or neutrino-like particles, i.e., neutral particles which interact weakly with hadrons, in proton-nucleus interactions at 400 GeV incident proton energy. Possible sources of such particles include the semi-leptonic decay of new heavy particles such as charm, and the direct production of a light neutral Higgs particle such as the axion. The production of these particles has been inferred in this experiment by energy nonconservation in the collision of a proton with an iron nucleus. The total visible energy of the interaction was measured using a sampling ionization calorimeter. After correcting for beam intensity effects and cutting the data to eliminate systematic effects in the measurement, the final resolution of the calorimeter was 3.51% and increased with decreasing incident beam energy with a square root dependence on the beam energy. Energy nonconservation in the data is manifest as a non-Gaussian distribution on the low side of the calorimeter measured energy. Model calculations yield the fraction of events expected in this non-Gaussian behavior for the various sources of neutrinos or neutrino-like particles. A maximum likelihood fit to the data with the theoretical fraction of events expected yields the 95% confidence level production cross section upper limit values. The upper limits for general production of neutrino-like particles for various parameterizations of the production cross section are presented. The following specific upper limits have been established: charm particle production < 670 ..mu..barns, supersymmetric particle production carrying an additional quantum number R < 33 ..mu..barns (mass of 1 GeV), 8 ..mu..barns (mass of 3 GeV); axion production < 10/sup -3/ times the ..pi../sup 0/ production cross section. 144 references.

  13. Calculation of elastic constants of BCC transition metals: tight-binding recursion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, K.; Hamada, N.; Terakura, K.

    1984-01-01

    The elastic constants of BCC transition metals (Fe, Nb, Mo and W) are calculated by using the tight-binding d band and the Born-Mayer repulsive potential. Introducing a small distortion characteristic to C 44 (or C') elastic deformation and calculating the energy change up to second order in the atomic displacement, the shear elastic constants C 44 and C' are determined. The elastic constants C 11 and C 12 are then calculated by using the relations B=1/3(C 11 + 2C 12 ) and C'=1/2(C 11 -C 12 ), where B is the bulk modulus. In general, the agreement between the present results and the experimental values is satisfactory. The characteristic elasticity behaviour, i.e. the strong Nsub(d) (number of d electrons) dependence of the observed anisotropy factor A=C 44 /C', will also be discussed. (author)

  14. Density functional calculations of elastic properties of portlandite, Ca(OH)(2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Jakob Lund

    2005-01-01

    The elastic constants of portlandite, Ca(OH)(2), are calculated by use of density functional theory. A lattice optimization of an infinite (periodic boundary conditions) lattice is performed on which strains are applied. The elastic constants are extracted by minimizing Hooke's law of linear...

  15. Classifiers for centrality determination in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altsybeev Igor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Centrality, as a geometrical property of the collision, is crucial for the physical interpretation of nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus experimental data. However, it cannot be directly accessed in event-by-event data analysis. Common methods for centrality estimation in A-A and p-A collisions usually rely on a single detector (either on the signal in zero-degree calorimeters or on the multiplicity in some semi-central rapidity range. In the present work, we made an attempt to develop an approach for centrality determination that is based on machine-learning techniques and utilizes information from several detector subsystems simultaneously. Different event classifiers are suggested and evaluated for their selectivity power in terms of the number of nucleons-participants and the impact parameter of the collision. Finer centrality resolution may allow to reduce impact from so-called volume fluctuations on physical observables being studied in heavy-ion experiments like ALICE at the LHC and fixed target experiment NA61/SHINE on SPS.

  16. J/psi production in proton-nucleus collisions at ALICE: cold nuclear matter really matters

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Heavy quarkonia are expected to be sensitive to the properties of strongly interacting matter, at both low and high temperatures. In nucleus-nucleus collisions, a phase transition to a deconfined state of quarks and gluons (Quark-Gluon Plasma) is thought to take place once the temperature of the system exceeds a critical temperature of the order of 150-200 MeV. The deconfined state can induce a suppression of charmonium (due to color screening, dominant at SPS and RHIC energies), which can be overturned at LHC energy by the (re)combination of the large number of free c and cbar quarks, taking place when the system cools down below the critical temperature. Cold nuclear matter also has an influence on heavy quarkonia. Such effects can be studied in proton-nucleus collisions, where no deconfined state is expected to be created. At LHC energy, they mainly include nuclear shadowing, gluon saturation, break-up of the quarkonium states, and parton energy loss in the initial and final state. The study of these eff...

  17. A least squares calculational method: application to e±-H elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, J.N.; Chakraborty, S.

    1989-01-01

    The least squares calcualtional method proposed by Das has been applied for the e ± -H elastic scattering problems for intermediate energies. Some important conclusions are made on the basis of the calculation. (author). 7 refs ., 2 tabs

  18. Numerical calculations of effective elastic properties of two cellular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncer, Enis

    2005-01-01

    Young's moduli of regular two-dimensional truss-like and eye-shaped structures are simulated using the finite element method. The structures are idealizations of soft polymeric materials used in ferro-electret applications. In the simulations, the length scales of the smallest representative units are varied, which changes the dimensions of the cell walls in the structures. A power-law expression with a quadratic as the exponent term is proposed for the effective Young's moduli of the systems as a function of the solid volume fraction. The data are divided into three regions with respect to the volume fraction: low, intermediate and high. The parameters of the proposed power-law expression in each region are later represented as a function of the structural parameters, the unit-cell dimensions. The expression presented can be used to predict a structure/property relationship in materials with similar cellular structures. The contribution of the cell-wall thickness to the elastic properties becomes significant at concentrations >0.15. The cell-wall thickness is the most significant factor in predicting the effective Young's modulus of regular cellular structures at high volume fractions of solid. At lower concentrations of solid, the eye-shaped structure yields a lower Young's modulus than a truss-like structure with similar anisotropy. Comparison of the numerical results with those of experimental data for poly(propylene) show good agreement regarding the influence of cell-wall thickness on elastic properties of thin cellular films

  19. The Calculation of Weighted Price Elasticity of Tax: Turkey (1998-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin YILMAZ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the assumption of “the weighted price elasticity of tax is a unit in the developing countries” suggested in the first studies which examine the impacts of the inflation on tax revenues, will be reevaluated for Turkey in the period of 1998-2013. We use Turkish tax and price index data for calculating the weighted price elasticity of tax. Via the method of dynamic ordinary least squares (DOLS, the long run weighted price elasticity of tax system is guessed. The importance of this study is the fact that this is first study intended to the calculation of the weighted price elasticity of tax for Turkey. In this sense, it will be instructive study for the reconsideration of the assumption of “the weighted price elasticity of tax is a unit in the developing countries”.

  20. Fatigue analysis - computation of the actual strain range using elastic calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.

    1987-04-01

    The design codes used in nuclear industry do not contain all the same rules allowing to deduce from an elastic calculation the actual deformation variation. Knowledge of strain range is needed for fatigue analysis. Elastic calculation does not give the actual range. The aim of this paper is discussing ways to correct elastic results and proposing a practical method to do it. Two corrections are required. The first one is related to elastic follow up effect when shakedown is not obtained (correction on secondary stress). The second one is related to stress raisers effect (correction on peak stress). It is shown that NEUBER's rule is not convenient for the second correction when shakedown is not fulfilled [fr

  1. All-loop calculations of total, elastic and single diffractive cross sections in RFT via the stochastic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolevatov, R. S.; Boreskov, K. G.

    2013-01-01

    We apply the stochastic approach to the calculation of the Reggeon Field Theory (RFT) elastic amplitude and its single diffractive cut. The results for the total, elastic and single difractive cross sections with account of all Pomeron loops are obtained.

  2. All-loop calculations of total, elastic and single diffractive cross sections in RFT via the stochastic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolevatov, R. S. [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Boreskov, K. G. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117259, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    We apply the stochastic approach to the calculation of the Reggeon Field Theory (RFT) elastic amplitude and its single diffractive cut. The results for the total, elastic and single difractive cross sections with account of all Pomeron loops are obtained.

  3. The first-principles calculations for the elastic properties of Zr2Al under compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Xiaoli; Wei Dongqing; Chen Xiangrong; Zhang Qingming; Gong Zizheng

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The calculated elastic constants C ij as a function of pressure P. Display Omitted Research highlights: → It is found that the five independent elastic constants increase monotonically with pressure. C 11 and C 33 vary rapidly as pressure increases, C 13 and C 12 becomes moderate. However, C 44 increases comparatively slowly with pressure. Figure shows excellent satisfaction of the calculated elastic constants of Zr 2 Al to these equations and hence in our calculation, the Zr 2 Al is mechanically stable at pressure up to 100 GPa. - Abstract: The first-principles calculations were applied to investigate the structural, elastic constants of Zr 2 Al alloy with increasing pressure. These properties are based on the plane wave pseudopotential density functional theory (DFT) method within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for exchange and correlation. The result of the heat of formation of Zr 2 Al crystal investigated is in excellent consistent with results from other study. The anisotropy, the shear modulus, and Young's modulus for the ideal polycrystalline Zr 2 Al are also studied. It is found that (higher) pressure can significantly improve the ductility of Zr 2 Al. Moreover, the elastic constants of Zr 2 Al increase monotonically and the anisotropies decrease with the increasing pressure. Finally, it is observed that Zr d electrons are mainly contributed to the density of states at the Fermi level.

  4. Elastic and thermal properties of silicon compounds from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Haijun; Zhu, H.J. [Yancheng Institute of Technology (China). School of Materials Engineering; Cheng, W.H. [Yancheng Institute of Technology (China). Dept. of Light Chemical Engineering; Xie, L.H. [Sichuan Normal Univ., Chengdu (China). Inst. of Solid State Physics and School of Physics and Electronic Engineering

    2016-11-01

    The structural and elastic properties of V-Si (V{sub 3}Si, VSi{sub 2}, V{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, and V{sub 6}Si{sub 5}) compounds are studied by using first-principles method. The calculated equilibrium lattice parameters and formation enthalpy are in good agreement with the available experimental data and other theoretical results. The calculated results indicate that the V-Si compounds are mechanically stable. Elastic properties including bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio are also obtained. The elastic anisotropies of V-Si compounds are investigated via the three-dimensional (3D) figures of directional dependences of reciprocals of Young's modulus. Finally, based on the quasi-harmonic Debye model, the internal energy, Helmholtz free energy, entropy, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient, Grueneisen parameter, and Debye temperature of V-Si compounds have been calculated.

  5. Complex Correlation Kohn-T Method of Calculating Total and Elastic Cross Sections. Part 1; Electron-Hydrogen Elastic Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report on the first part of a study of electron-hydrogen scattering, using a method which allows for the ab initio calculation of total and elastic cross sections at higher energies. In its general form the method uses complex 'radial' correlation functions, in a (Kohn) T-matrix formalism. The titled method, abbreviated Complex Correlation Kohn T (CCKT) method, is reviewed, in the context of electron-hydrogen scattering, including the derivation of the equation for the (complex) scattering function, and the extraction of the scattering information from the latter. The calculation reported here is restricted to S-waves in the elastic region, where the correlation functions can be taken, without loss of generality, to be real. Phase shifts are calculated using Hylleraas-type correlation functions with up to 95 terms. Results are rigorous lower bounds; they are in general agreement with those of Schwartz, but they are more accurate and outside his error bounds at a couple of energies,

  6. Anisotropic elastic and thermal properties of titanium borides by first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Liang; Gao, Yimin [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Xiao, Bing [Department of Physics and Quantum Theory Group, School of Science and Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Li, Yefei, E-mail: yefeili@126.com [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Wang, Guoliang [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2013-12-05

    Highlights: •Elastic properties of titanium borides are calculated by first principles calculation. •Thermodynamical stability of titanium borides is analyzed. •Heat capacity and thermal expansion coefficient for titanium borides are calculated and compared. •Grüneisen parameters of titanium borides are calculated. -- Abstract: The anisotropic elastic and thermal expansions of the titanium borides (TiB{sub 2}, Ti{sub 3}B{sub 4}, TiB{sub P}nma and TiB{sub F}m3{sup ¯}m) are calculated from first-principles using density functional theory. All borides show different anisotropic elastic properties; the bulk, shear and Young’s moduli are consistent with those determined experimentally. The temperature dependence of thermal expansions is mainly caused by the restoration of thermal energy due to phonon excitations at low temperature. When the temperature is higher than 500 K, the volumetric coefficient is increased linearly by increasing temperature. Meanwhile, the heat capacities of titanium borides are obtained based on the knowledge of thermal expansion coefficient and the elasticity, the calculations are in good agreement with the experiments.

  7. Elastic properties of cubic perovskite BaRuO{sub 3} from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Deming; Liu Xiaojuan; Lv Shuhui; Li Hongping [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Meng Jian, E-mail: jmeng@ciac.jl.c [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2010-08-01

    We present first-principles investigations on the structural and elastic properties of the cubic perovskite BaRuO{sub 3} using density-functional theory within both local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Basic physical properties, such as lattice constant, shear modulus, elastic constants (C{sub ij}) are calculated. The calculated energy band structures show that the cubic perovskite BaRuO{sub 3} is metallic. We have also predicted the Young's modulus (Y), Poisson's ratio ({upsilon}), and Anisotropy factor (A).

  8. The elastic and thermodynamic properties of ZrMo2 from first principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xian-Kun; Zhou, Wei; Zheng, Zhou; Peng, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Elastic and thermodynamic properties of ZrMo 2 under high temperature and pressure are calculated by first principles. • Mechanical stability is testified from elastic constants at zero pressure. • Phonon scattering of ZrMo 2 under different temperature are obtained. - Abstract: The elastic and thermodynamic properties of ZrMo 2 under high temperature and pressure are investigated by first-principles calculations based on pseudopotential plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and quasi-harmonic Debye model. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The calculated elastic constants of ZrMo 2 increase monotonically with increasing pressure, and the relationship between the elastic constants and pressure show that ZrMo 2 satisfies the mechanical stability criteria under applied pressure (0–65 GPa). The related mechanical properties such as bulk modulus (B), shear modulus (G), Young’s modulus (E), and Poisson’s ratio (v) are also studied for polycrystalline of ZrMo 2 . The calculated B/G value shows that ZrMo 2 behaves in a ductile manner, and higher pressure can significantly improve the ductility of ZrMo 2 . The pressure and temperature dependencies of the relative volume, the bulk modulus, the elastic constants, the heat capacity and the thermal expansion coefficient, as well as the Grüneisen parameters are obtained and discussed by the quasi-harmonic Debye model in the ranges of 0–1800 K and 0–65 GPa

  9. J/$\\psi$ production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, M C; Alexa, C; Arnaldi, R; Ataian, M R; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, Marc; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borges, G; Bussière, A; Capelli, L; Castanier, C; Castor, J I; Chaurand, B; Chevrot, I; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Claudino, T; Comets, M P; Constans, N; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Ducroux, L; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gavrilov, Yu K; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Hakobyan, R S; Haroutunian, R; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavitcheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Macciotta, P; MacCormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prado da Silva, W L; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scalas, E; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Silva, S; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, Ermanno; Villatte, L; Willis, N

    2002-01-01

    The NA38 and NA50 experiments at the CERN SPS have measured charmonium production in different colliding systems with the aim of observing a phase transition from ordinary hadronic matter towards a state in which quarks and gluons are deconfined (quark-gluon plasma, QGP). This experimental research is based on the prediction that the J/ psi yield should be suppressed in deconfined matter. The analysis of the data collected by the NA50 experiment with Pb-Pb collisions at 158 GeV/c per nucleon shows that the J/ psi is anomalously suppressed with respect to the pattern observed in proton-nucleus and light ion reactions. (9 refs).

  10. Comparison of stress and total energy methods for calculation of elastic properties of semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, M A; Schulz, S; O'Reilly, E P

    2013-01-16

    We explore the calculation of the elastic properties of zinc-blende and wurtzite semiconductors using two different approaches: one based on stress and the other on total energy as a function of strain. The calculations are carried out within the framework of density functional theory in the local density approximation, with the plane wave-based package VASP. We use AlN as a test system, with some results also shown for selected other materials (C, Si, GaAs and GaN). Differences are found in convergence rate between the two methods, especially in low symmetry cases, where there is a much slower convergence for total energy calculations with respect to the number of plane waves and k points used. The stress method is observed to be more robust than the total energy method with respect to the residual error in the elastic constants calculated for different strain branches in the systems studied.

  11. Quantum Mechanical Calculations Of Elastic Properties Of Doped Tetragonal Yttria-Stabilized Zirconium Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Natanzon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report first principles calculations of the electronic and elastic properties of yttriastabilized tetragonal zirconium dioxide doped with metal oxides like: GeO2, TiO2, SiO2,MgO and Al2O3. It is shown that addition of such dopants affects selected elastic propertiesof ZrO2, which is driven by the attraction of electron density by dopant atom and creationof stronger dopant–oxygen bonds. This effect contributes to the increase of superplasticityof doped material.

  12. First Principles Calculations for X-ray Resonant Spectra and Elastic Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yongbin Lee

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, we discuss applications of first principles methods to x-ray resonant spectra and elastic properties calculation. We start with brief reviews about theoretical background of first principles methods, such as density functional theory, local density approximation (LDA), LDA+U, and the linear augmented plane wave (LAPW) method to solve Kohn-Sham equations. After that we discuss x-ray resonant scattering (XRMS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and the branching problem in the heavy rare earths Ledges. In the last chapter we discuss the elastic properties of the second hardest material AlMgB 14

  13. Elastic Properties of Tricalcium Aluminate from High-Pressure Experiments and First-Principles Calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Juhyuk

    2012-06-04

    The structure and elasticity of tricalcium aluminate (C 3A) have been experimentally and theoretically studied. From high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments, the bulk modulus of 102(6) and 110(3) GPa were obtained by fitting second- and third-order finite strain equation of state, respectively. First-principles calculations with a generalized gradient approximation gave an isotropic bulk modulus of 102.1 GPa and an isothermal bulk modulus of 106.0 GPa. The static calculations using the exchange-correlation functional show an excellent agreement with the experimental measurements. Based on the agreement, accurate elastic constants and other elastic moduli were computed. The slight difference of behavior at high pressure can be explained by the infiltration of pressure-transmitting silicone oil into structural holes in C 3A. The computed elastic and mechanical properties will be useful in understanding structural and mechanical properties of cementitious materials, particularly with the increasing interest in the advanced applications at the nanoscale. © 2012 The American Ceramic Society.

  14. Elastic Properties of Tricalcium Aluminate from High-Pressure Experiments and First-Principles Calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Juhyuk; Yoon, Seyoon; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The structure and elasticity of tricalcium aluminate (C 3A) have been experimentally and theoretically studied. From high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments, the bulk modulus of 102(6) and 110(3) GPa were obtained by fitting second- and third-order finite strain equation of state, respectively. First-principles calculations with a generalized gradient approximation gave an isotropic bulk modulus of 102.1 GPa and an isothermal bulk modulus of 106.0 GPa. The static calculations using the exchange-correlation functional show an excellent agreement with the experimental measurements. Based on the agreement, accurate elastic constants and other elastic moduli were computed. The slight difference of behavior at high pressure can be explained by the infiltration of pressure-transmitting silicone oil into structural holes in C 3A. The computed elastic and mechanical properties will be useful in understanding structural and mechanical properties of cementitious materials, particularly with the increasing interest in the advanced applications at the nanoscale. © 2012 The American Ceramic Society.

  15. Trends in elasticity and electronic structure of 5d transition metal diborides: first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xianfeng; Wu Zhijian; Xu Yuanhui; Zhou Defeng; Liu Xiaojuan; Meng Jian

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the cohesive energy, heat of formation, elastic constant and electronic band structure of transition metal diborides TMB 2 (TM = Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os and Ir, Pt) in the Pmmn space group using the ab initio pseudopotential total energy method. Our calculations indicate that there is a relationship between elastic constant and valence electron concentration (VEC): the bulk modulus and shear modulus achieve their maximum when the VEC is in the range of 6.8-7.2. In addition, trends in the elastic constant are well explained in terms of electronic band structure analysis, e.g., occupation of valence electrons in states near the Fermi level, which determines the cohesive energy and elastic properties. The maximum in bulk modulus and shear modulus is attributed to the nearly complete filling of TM d-B p bonding states without filling the antibonding states. On the basis of the observed relationship, we predict that alloying W and Re in the orthorhombic structure OsB 2 might be harder than alloying the Ir element. Indeed, the further calculations confirmed this expectation

  16. Trends in elasticity and electronic structure of 5d transition metal diborides: first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Xianfeng [Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Chemistry and Physics, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Wu Zhijian [Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Chemistry and Physics, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Xu Yuanhui [School of Biological Engineering, Changchun University of Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhou Defeng [School of Biological Engineering, Changchun University of Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Liu Xiaojuan [Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Chemistry and Physics, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Meng Jian [Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Chemistry and Physics, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2007-05-16

    We investigate the cohesive energy, heat of formation, elastic constant and electronic band structure of transition metal diborides TMB{sub 2} (TM = Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os and Ir, Pt) in the Pmmn space group using the ab initio pseudopotential total energy method. Our calculations indicate that there is a relationship between elastic constant and valence electron concentration (VEC): the bulk modulus and shear modulus achieve their maximum when the VEC is in the range of 6.8-7.2. In addition, trends in the elastic constant are well explained in terms of electronic band structure analysis, e.g., occupation of valence electrons in states near the Fermi level, which determines the cohesive energy and elastic properties. The maximum in bulk modulus and shear modulus is attributed to the nearly complete filling of TM d-B p bonding states without filling the antibonding states. On the basis of the observed relationship, we predict that alloying W and Re in the orthorhombic structure OsB{sub 2} might be harder than alloying the Ir element. Indeed, the further calculations confirmed this expectation.

  17. Fatigue analysis - computation of the actual strain range using elastic calculations (factor Ke)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure vessels are not eternal, their life is not endless, but must be long enough for profitable use. Fatigue is the most important damage limiting life time. It is due to variable loading and especially to deformation-controlled loading like thermal dilatation (thermal stress). Hence, it is of prime importance to perform an fatigue analysis in the design phase in order to be sure the pressure vessel life meet requirement of the design specification. It is also useful to perform such an analysis for assessing the remaining life. To compute the fatigue damage, knowledge of the strain range is needed. As calculation taking into account non linear behavior of the material are very expensive and not always reliable, the current practice is using elastic computation. The aim of this paper is to discuss the methods for correcting the elastically calculated strain range and to propose a sound and practical method

  18. Density functional theory and evolution algorithm calculations of elastic properties of AlON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batyrev, I. G.; Taylor, D. E.; Gazonas, G. A.; McCauley, J. W. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    Different models for aluminum oxynitride (AlON) were calculated using density functional theory and optimized using an evolutionary algorithm. Evolutionary algorithm and density functional theory (DFT) calculations starting from several models of AlON with different Al or O vacancy locations and different positions for the N atoms relative to the vacancy were carried out. The results show that the constant anion model [McCauley et al., J. Eur. Ceram. Soc. 29(2), 223 (2009)] with a random distribution of N atoms not adjacent to the Al vacancy has the lowest energy configuration. The lowest energy structure is in a reasonable agreement with experimental X-ray diffraction spectra. The optimized structure of a 55 atom unit cell was used to construct 220 and 440 atom models for simulation cells using DFT with a Gaussian basis set. Cubic elastic constant predictions were found to approach the experimentally determined AlON single crystal elastic constants as the model size increased from 55 to 440 atoms. The pressure dependence of the elastic constants found from simulated stress-strain relations were in overall agreement with experimental measurements of polycrystalline and single crystal AlON. Calculated IR intensity and Raman spectra are compared with available experimental data.

  19. Structure of the semi-decoupled π 1/2[411] band in odd proton nucleus 169Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Hai; Deng Fuguo; Shao Liqin; Zhou Hongyu; Sun Huibin; Lu Jingbin; Zhao Guangyi; Yin Lichang; Liu Yunzuo

    2003-01-01

    High spin states of the odd proton-nucleus 169 Ta have been populated in the reaction 155 Gd( 19 F, 5 n) with beam energies of 97 MeV. Rotational band based on d 3/2 proton 1/2[411] Nilsson state has been pushed up to 39/2 + in the α=1/2 decay sequence. Its signature partner, the α=-1/2 decay sequence with four link transitions has been established and 1/2[411] band in 169 Ta was reassigned to be a semi-decoupled band. The systematics of the signature splitting in the K=1/2 bands in the rear-earth region and the accidental degeneracy conclusion given by the angular projection shell model were discussed

  20. Density functional theory for calculation of elastic properties of orthorhombic crystals: Application to TiSi2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindran, P.; Fast, L.; Korzhavyi, P.A.; Johansson, B.; Wills, J.; Eriksson, O.

    1998-01-01

    A theoretical formalism to calculate the single crystal elastic constants for orthorhombic crystals from first principle calculations is described. This is applied for TiSi 2 and we calculate the elastic constants using a full potential linear muffin-tin orbital method using the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The calculated values compare favorably with recent experimental results. An expression to calculate the bulk modulus along crystallographic axes of single crystals, using elastic constants, has been derived. From this the calculated linear bulk moduli are found to be in good agreement with the experiments. The shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio for ideal polycrystalline TiSi 2 are also calculated and compared with corresponding experimental values. The directional bulk modulus and the Young's modulus for single crystal TiSi 2 are estimated from the elastic constants obtained from LDA as well as GGA calculations and are compared with the experimental results. The shear anisotropic factors and anisotropy in the linear bulk modulus are obtained from the single crystal elastic constants. From the site and angular momentum decomposed density of states combined with a charge density analysis and the elastic anisotropies, the chemical bonding nature between the constituents in TiSi 2 is analyzed. The Debye temperature is calculated from the average elastic wave velocity obtained from shear and bulk modulus as well as the integration of elastic wave velocities in different directions of the single crystal. The calculated elastic properties are found to be in good agreement with experimental values when the generalized gradient approximation is used for the exchange and correlation potential. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  1. Calculated Changes in the Elastic Properties of MgCNi3 at the Superconducting Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Abd-Shukor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We calculated the elastic properties of MgCNi3 at the superconducting transition ( using various thermodynamic and acoustic data. From the calculations, a step discontinuity of 8 ppm in the bulk modulus, 7 ppm in the Young’s modulus, and 3 ppm in the longitudinal sound velocity ( is expected at . The step discontinuities at the transition temperature indicated the importance of lattice changes to the superconducting mechanism of MgCNi3. The Debye temperature was calculated to be 460 K. The electron-phonon coupling constants calculated in the weak and strong coupling limits of the BCS theory and the van Hove scenario showed that MgCNi3 is a moderately strong coupled superconductor.

  2. Calculation of the Strip Foundation on Solid Elastic Base, Taking into Account the Karst Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, R.; Lodigina, N.

    2017-07-01

    Karst processes greatly complicate the construction and operation of buildings and structures. Due to the karstic deformations at different times there have been several major accidents, which analysis showed that in all cases the fundamental errors committed at different stages of building development: site selection, engineering survey, design, construction or operation of the facilities. Theory analysis of beams on elastic foundation is essential in building practice. Specialist engineering facilities often have to resort to multiple designing in finding efficient forms of construction of these facilities. In work the calculation of stresses in cross-sections of the strip foundation evenly distributed load in the event of karst. A comparison of extreme stress in the event of karst and without accounting for the strip foundation as a beam on an elastic foundation.

  3. The Relationship between Trabecular Bone Structure Modeling Methods and the Elastic Modulus as Calculated by FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Topoliński

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trabecular bone cores were collected from the femoral head at the time of surgery (hip arthroplasty. Investigated were 42 specimens, from patients with osteoporosis and coxarthrosis. The cores were scanned used computer microtomography (microCT system at an isotropic spatial resolution of 36 microns. Image stacks were converted to finite element models via a bone voxel-to-element algorithm. The apparent modulus was calculated based on the assumptions that for the elastic properties, E=10 MPa and ν=0.3. The compressive deformation as calculated by finite elements (FE analysis was 0.8%. The models were coarsened to effectively change the resolution or voxel size (from 72 microns to 288 microns or from 72 microns to 1080 microns. The aim of our study is to determine how an increase in the distance between scans changes the elastic properties as calculated by FE models. We tried to find a border value voxel size at which the module values were possible to calculate. As the voxel size increased, the mean voxel volume increased and the FEA-derived apparent modulus decreased. The slope of voxel size versus modulus relationship correlated with several architectural indices of trabecular bone.

  4. Calculated temperature dependence of elastic constants and phonon dispersion of hcp and bcc beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Steven; Arapan, Sergiu; Harmon, Bruce; Eriksson, Olle

    2011-03-01

    Conventional first principle methods for calculating lattice dynamics are unable to calculate high temperature thermophysical properties of materials containing modes that are entropically stabilized. In this presentation we use a relatively new approach called self-consistent ab initio lattice dynamics (SCAILD) to study the hcp to bcc transition (1530 K) in beryllium. The SCAILD method goes beyond the harmonic approximation to include phonon-phonon interactions and produces a temperature-dependent phonon dispersion. In the high temperature bcc structure, phonon-phonon interactions dynamically stabilize the N-point phonon. Fits to the calculated phonon dispersion were used to determine the temperature dependence of the elastic constants in the hcp and bcc phases. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the Department of Energy-Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  5. Thermodynamics and elastic properties of Ir from first-principle calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiang; Huang Duohui; Cao Qilong; Wang Fanhou

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the quasiharmonic approximation, the thermodynamics and elastic properties, including phonon dispersion curves, equation of state, linear thermal expansion coefficient and temperature-dependent entropy, enthalpy, heat capacity, elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus of Ir have been studied using first-principles projector-augmented wave method. The results revealed that the predicted phonon dispersion curves of Ir are in agreement with the experimental measurements by neutron diffractions. Considering the thermal electronic contribution to Helmholtz free energy, the calculated entropy, enthalpy, heat capacity and linear thermal expansion co- efficient from the first-principle are consistent well with the experimental data. At 2600 K, the electronic heat capacity accounts for 17% of the total heat capacity at constant pressure, thus the thermal electronic contribution to Helmholtz free energy is very important. The predicted elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus and Young's modulus at room temperature are also in agreement with the available measurements and increase with the increasing temperature. (authors)

  6. Structural, electronic and elastic properties of potassium hexatitanate crystal from first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Manyu; Li Yimin; Long Chunguang; Li Xia

    2012-01-01

    The structural, electronic and elastic properties of potassium hexatitanate (K 2 Ti 6 O 13 ) whisker were investigated using first-principles calculations. The calculated cell parameters of K 2 Ti 6 O 13 including lattice constants and atomic positions are in good agreement with the experimental data. The obtained formation enthalpy (-61.1535 eV/atom) and cohesive energy (-137.4502 eV/atom) are both negative, showing its high structural stability. Further analysis of the electronic structures shows that the potassium hexatitanate is a wide-band semiconductor. Within K 2 Ti 6 O 13 crystal, the Ti---O bonding interactions are stronger than that of K---O, while no apparent K---Ti bonding interactions can be observed. The structural stability of K 2 Ti 6 O 13 was closely associated with the covalent bond interactions between Ti (d) and O (p) orbits. Further calculations on elastic properties show that K 2 Ti 6 O 13 is a high stiffness and brittle material with small anisotropy in shear and compression.

  7. Microscopic calculations of elastic scattering between light nuclei based on a realistic nuclear interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohet-Eraly, Jeremy [F.R.S.-FNRS (Belgium); Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Baye, Daniel, E-mail: jdoheter@ulb.ac.be, E-mail: jmspar@ulb.ac.be, E-mail: dbaye@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucleaire et Physique Quantique, CP229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-09-16

    The elastic phase shifts for the {alpha} + {alpha} and {alpha} + {sup 3}He collisions are calculated in a cluster approach by the Generator Coordinate Method coupled with the Microscopic R-matrix Method. Two interactions are derived from the realistic Argonne potentials AV8' and AV18 with the Unitary Correlation Operator Method. With a specific adjustment of correlations on the {alpha} + {alpha} collision, the phase shifts for the {alpha} + {alpha} and {alpha} + {sup 3}He collisions agree rather well with experimental data.

  8. Calculating Effective Elastic Properties of Berea Sandstone Using Segmentation-less Method without Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, K.; Goldfarb, E. J.; Tisato, N.

    2017-12-01

    Digital rock physics (DRP) allows performing common laboratory experiments on numerical models to estimate, for example, rock hydraulic permeability. The standard procedure of DRP involves turning a rock sample into a numerical array using X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT). Each element of the array bears a value proportional to the X-ray attenuation of the rock at the element (voxel). However, the traditional DRP methodology, which includes segmentation, over-predicts rock moduli by significant amounts (e.g., 100%). Recently, a new methodology - the segmentation-less approach - has been proposed leading to more accurate DRP estimate of elastic moduli. This new method is based on homogenization theory. Typically, segmentation-less approach requires calibration points from known density objects, known as targets. Not all micro-CT datasets have these reference points. Here, we describe how we perform segmentation- and target-less DRP to estimate elastic properties of rocks (i.e., elastic moduli), which are crucial parameters to perform subsurface modeling. We calculate the elastic properties of a Berea sandstone sample that was scanned at a resolution of 40 microns per voxel. We transformed the CT images into density matrices using polynomial fitting curve with four calibration points: the whole rock, the center of quartz grains, the center of iron oxide grains, and the center of air-filled volumes. The first calibration point is obtained by assigning the density of the whole rock to the average of all CT-numbers in the dataset. Then, we locate the center of each phase by finding local extrema point in the dataset. The average CT-numbers of these center points are assigned the density equal to either pristine minerals (quartz and iron oxide) or air. Next, density matrices are transformed to porosity and moduli matrices by means of an effective medium theory. Finally, effective static bulk and shear modulus are numerically calculated by using a Matlab code

  9. A first principle calculation of anisotropic elastic, mechanical and electronic properties of TiB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junqin; Zhao, Bin; Ma, Huihui; Wei, Qun; Yang, Yintang

    2018-04-01

    The structural, mechanical and electronic properties of the NaCl-type structure TiB are theoretically calculated based on the first principles. The density of states of TiB shows obvious density peaks at -0.70eV. Furthermore, there exists a pseudogap at 0.71eV to the right of the Fermi level. The calculated structural and mechanical parameters (i.e., bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and universal elastic anisotropy index) were in good agreement both with the previously reported experimental values and theoretical results at zero pressure. The mechanical stability criterion proves that TiB at zero pressure is mechanistically stable and exhibits ductility. The universal anisotropic index and the 3D graphics of Young's modulus are also given in this paper, which indicates that TiB is anisotropy under zero pressure. Moreover, the effects of applied pressures on the structural, mechanical and anisotropic elastic of TiB were studied in the range from 0 to 100GPa. It was found that ductility and anisotropy of TiB were enhanced with the increase of pressure.

  10. Elastic and elastic-plastic behaviour of a piping system during blowdown - Comparison of measurement and calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petruschke, W.; Strunk, G.

    1987-01-01

    The investigations according to the system identification show that the piping model using beam theory and flexibility factors according to the Karman theory are adequate for evaluating natural frequencies, mode shapes, static displacements and stresses. The same accuracy can be seen by comparing the piping response due to blowdown within the elastic range. The simplified elastic-plastic analysis in general overestimates the maximum amplitudes while the frequency content is not simulated very well. For practical purposes, it can be an adequate tool in many cases. The elastic-plastic analysis is the most expensive procedure but gives also the best results. The use of beam elements with multilinear moment-curvature relationships results in a good approximation for the global behaviour (displacements). The strains according to this theory only include the beam deformation modes

  11. Elasticity, electronic properties and hardness of MoC investigated by first principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, YangZhen; Jiang, YeHua; Feng, Jing; Zhou, Rong

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure, cohesive energy, formation enthalpy, mechanical anisotropy, electronic properties and hardness of α−MoC, β−MoC and γ−MoC are investigated by the first-principles calculations. The elastic constants and the bulk moduli, shear moduli, Young's moduli are calculated. The Young's modulus values of α−MoC, β−MoC and γ−MoC are 395.6 GPa, 551.2 GPa and 399.5 GPa, respectively. The surface constructions of Young's moduli identify the mechanical anisotropy of molybdenum carbide, and the results show that anisotropy of α−MoC is stronger than others. The electronic structure indicates that the bonding behaviors of MoC are the combinations of covalent and metallic bonds. The hardness of β−MoC is obviously higher than those of α−MoC and γ−MoC

  12. The reactive content of the proton-nucleus impulse - approximation Dirac optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, B.V.; Isidro Filho, M.P.; Hussein, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    The total reaction cross sections for intermediate energy proton scattering on 40 Ca and 208 Pb are calculated within the Dirac-Eikonal formalism. Comparison with data indicate that the recently proposed impulse-approximation Dirac optical potential for nucleon-nucleus scattering, is not absorptive enough. (Author) [pt

  13. Target fragmentation in proton-nucleus and /sup 16/O-nucleus reactions at 60 and 200 GeVnucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H R; Albrecht, R; Awes, T C; Baktash, C; Beckmann, P; Claesson, G; Berger, F; Bock, R; Dragon, L; Ferguson, R L; Franz, A; Garpman, S; Glasow, R; Gustafsson, H A; Gutbrod, H H; Kampert, K H; Kolb, B W; Kristiansson, P; Lee, I Y; Loehner, H; Lund, I; Obenshain, F E; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Peitzmann, T; Persson, S; Plasil, F; Poskanzer, A M; Purschke, M; Ritter, H G; Santo, R; Siemiarczuk, T; Sorensen, S P; Stenlund, E; Young, G R

    1987-01-01

    Target remnants with Z<3 from proton-nucleus and /sup 16/O-nulceus reactions at 60 and 200 GeVnucleon were measured in the angular range from 30)degree) to 160)degree) (-1.7<)eta)1.3) employing the Plastic Ball detector. The excitation energy of the target spectator matter in central oxygen-induced collisions is found to be high enough to allow for complete disintegration of the target nucelus into fragments with Z<3. The average longtitudinal momentum transfer per proton to the target in central collisions is considerably higher in the case of /sup 16/O-induced reactions (approx.300 MeVc) than in proton-induced reactions (approx.130 MeVc). The baryon rapidity distributions are roughly in agreement with one-fluid hydrodynamical calcualtions at 60 GeVnucleon /sup 16/O)plus)Au but are in disagreement at 200 GeVnucleon, indicating the higher degree of transparency at the higher bombarding energy. Both, the transverse moments of target spectators and the entropy produced in the target gfragmentation region are compared to those attained in head-on collisions of two heavy nuclei at Bevalac energies. They are found to be comparable or do even exceed the values for the participant matter at beam energies of about 1-2 GeVnucleon. 18 refs., 112 figs

  14. Probing gluon saturation with next-to-leading order photon production at central rapidities in proton-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benić, Sanjin [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb,Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo,7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Fukushima, Kenji [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo,7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Garcia-Montero, Oscar [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg,Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Venugopalan, Raju [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory,Bldg. 510A, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2017-01-26

    We compute the cross section for photons emitted from sea quarks in proton-nucleus collisions at collider energies. The computation is performed within the dilute-dense kinematics of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) effective field theory. Albeit the result obtained is formally at next-to-leading order in the CGC power counting, it provides the dominant contribution for central rapidities. We observe that the inclusive photon cross section is proportional to all-twist Wilson line correlators in the nucleus. These correlators also appear in quark-pair production; unlike the latter, photon production is insensitive to hadronization uncertainties and therefore more sensitive to multi-parton correlations in the gluon saturation regime of QCD. We demonstrate that k{sub ⊥} and collinear factorized expressions for inclusive photon production are obtained as leading twist approximations to our result. In particular, the collinearly factorized expression is directly sensitive to the nuclear gluon distribution at small x. Other results of interest include the realization of the Low-Burnett-Kroll soft photon theorem in the CGC framework and a comparative study of how the photon amplitude is obtained in Lorenz and light-cone gauges.

  15. The First Asymmetry Measurements in High-Energy Polarized Proton-Nucleus Collision at PHENIX-RHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakagawa Itaru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The single spin asymmetries in very forward neutron production had been first observed about a decade ago at RHIC in transversely polarized proton + proton collision at √s = 200 GeV. Although neutron production near zero degrees is well described by the one-pion exchange (OPE framework, the OPE appeared to be not satisfactory to describe the observed analyzing power AN. The absorptive correction to the OPE generates the asymmetry as a consequence of a phase shift between the spin flip and non-spin flip amplitudes. However the amplitude predicted by the OPE is too small to explain the large observed asymmetries. Only the model which introduces interference between major pion and small a1-Reggeon exchange amplitudes has been successful in reproducing the experimental data. During RHIC Run-15, RHIC delivered polarized proton collisions with Au and Al for the first time, enabling the exploration of the mechanism of transverse single-spin asymmetries with nuclear collisions. A very striking A-dependence was discovered in very forward neutron production at PHENIX in transversely polarized proton + nucleus collision at √s = 200 GeV. Such a dependence has not been predicted from the existing framework which has been succesful in proton + proton collision. In this report, experimental and theoretical efforts are discussed to disentangle the mysterious A-dependence in the very forward neutron asymmetry.

  16. Centrality dependence of baryon and meson momentum distributions in proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwa, Rudolph C.; Yang, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    The proton and neutron inclusive distributions in the projectile fragmentation region of pA collisions are studied in the valon model. Momentum degradation and flavor changes due to the nuclear medium are described at the valon level using two parameters. Particle production is treated by means of the recombination subprocess. The centrality dependences of the net proton and neutron spectra of the NA49 data are satisfactorily reproduced. The effective degradation length is determined to be 17 fm. Pion inclusive distributions can be calculated without any adjustable parameters

  17. Transverse-energy distribution in proton-nucleus collisions at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, F.H.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the model of nuclear-collision geometry, the independent N - N collision picture and participant contribution picture are used to describe the transverse-energy distribution in p-A collisions at high energy. In the independent N - N collision picture, the energy loss of leading proton in each p-N collision is considered. The calculated results are in agreement with the experimental data of p-Al, p-Cu, p-U collisions at 200 GeV/c. (author)

  18. Mechanical strength calculation of the disk type windings with elastic couplings by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivkova, G.N.; Spirchenko, Yu.V.; Chvartatskij, P.V.

    1981-01-01

    Stressed-deformed state of toroidal field coils of the disc type with elastic couplings of the tokamaks has been investigated with provision for the effect of the central core pliability by means of the two-dimensional version of the finite element method. Numerical solution of the finite element method is performed by means of the ES 1040 computer according to the computer code permitting taking account of boundary conditions of elastic support. The calculation has been performed using as the example the project of T-20 facility coil of the disc type. Consideration of pliability of the central core of the facility inductor is accomplished by the introduction of additional rigidities to the complete matrix of rigidity. Scheme of the structure distretization includes 141 units, 211 elements. The accuracy of solution depends on the reduction accuracy of the volume load to unit forces and on the number of finite elements. Analysis of the solution convergence is performed by the comparison of solutions obtained for three different schemes of the disk discretization without regard for the inductor pliability. The comparative analysis of the results shows that transfer epures for all the three discretization versions practically coincide and stresses differ not more than by 10%. On the whole the above investigation has demonstrated good convergence of the problem solution [ru

  19. In-medium ϕ meson width extracted from proton-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roca L.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The inclusive production of ϕ mesons at small angles in proton collisions with C, Cu, Ag, and Au targets has been measured at an incident energy of 2.83 GeV at the ANKE-COSY facility. The ϕ mesons were registered via the ϕ → K+K− decay. The momentum dependence of the nuclear transparency ratio, the in-medium ϕ width, and the differential cross section for ϕ production have been determined in the momentum region pϕ = 0.6 − 1.6 GeV/c. Comparison with different model calculations suggests a significant broadening of the in-medium ϕ width for normal nuclear density with evidence for a momentum dependence.

  20. On the representation of electron multiple elastic-scattering distributions for Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawrakow, I.; Bielajew, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    A new representation of elastic electron-nucleus (Coulomb) multiple-scattering distributions is developed. Using the screened Rutherford cross section with the Moliere screening parameter as an example, a simple analytic angular transformation of the Goudsmit-Saunderson multiple-scattering distribution accounts for most of the structure of the angular distribution leaving a residual 3-parameter (path-length, transformed angle and screening parameter) function that is reasonably slowly varying and suitable for rapid, accurate interpolation in a computer-intensive algorithm. The residual function is calculated numerically for a wide range of Moliere screening parameters and path-lengths suitable for use in a general-purpose condensed-history Monte Carlo code. Additionally, techniques are developed that allow the distributions to be scaled to account for energy loss. This new representation allows ''''on-the-fly'''' sampling of Goudsmit-Saunderson angular distributions in a screened Rutherford approximation suitable for class II condensed-history Monte Carlo codes. (orig.)

  1. Hauser-Feshbach cross-section calculations for elastic and inelastic scattering of alpha particles-program CORA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, A.; Siemaszko, M.; Zipper, W.

    1975-01-01

    The program CORA was prepared on the basis of Hauser and Feshbach compound reaction formalism. It allows the differential cross-section distributions for the elastic and inelastic scattering of alpha particles (via compound nucleus state) to be calculated. The transmission coefficients are calculated on the basis of a four parameter optical model. The search procedure is also included. (author)

  2. An elastic elements calculation in the construction of electrical connectors based on flexible printed cables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yefimenko A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we consider the method of constructive parameters calculation of the elastic elements, which are used in electrical connectors of flexible printed cables. Electrical connectors characterized by the fact that the contact pair is needed to provide pressure. It is also important to know the optimum ratio between stability of the contact connection and the necessary value of the transition resistance. These ratios are studied sufficiently for discrete electrical connectors, however for connectors of flexible printed cables this theme is not explored enough. The purpose of this work is to develop methods that will allow to carry out calculations for elastic elements, which provide communication, and to determine the size of case elements for electrical connectors. We consider two types of connectors. First are removable electrical connections where it is necessary to find a compromise between the resistance value and the separating (engaging force. Second are permanent connections, where counts only the value of the transition resistance. For the first type of connectors were considered a simple form of the liner, in the shape of a rubber block, as in this case, the pressure should be created only by the compression of the liner and fixing it. It is important to get accurate results of the pressure calculation for removable electrical connections, because in this case we consider especial shape of elastomeric liner, which allows to create the pressure not only by compression of the liner, but by deformation it as a spring. For this task, the engaging force was specified on the basis of already known facts. It was important to set the amount of deformation that defines the shape and size of the liner and the case. We solved the problem of transition from the units of measuring hardness, specified in the technical specifications of rubber, to the value of the Young's modulus used in the calculations of constructive parameters of

  3. ψ (2 S ) versus J /ψ suppression in proton-nucleus collisions from factorization violating soft color exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan-Qing; Venugopalan, Raju; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2018-01-01

    We argue that the large suppression of the ψ (2 S ) inclusive cross section relative to the J /ψ inclusive cross section in proton-nucleus (p+A) collisions can be attributed to factorization breaking effects in the formation of quarkonium. These factorization breaking effects arise from soft color exchanges between charm-anticharm pairs undergoing hadronization and comoving partons that are long lived on time scales of quarkonium formation. We compute the short distance pair production of heavy quarks in the color glass condensate (CGC) effective field theory and employ an improved color evaporation model (ICEM) to describe their hadronization into quarkonium at large distances. The combined CGC+ICEM model provides a quantitative description of J /ψ and ψ (2 S ) data in proton-proton (p+p) collisions from both RHIC and the LHC. Factorization breaking effects in hadronization, due to additional parton comovers in the nucleus, are introduced heuristically by imposing a cutoff Λ , representing the average momentum kick from soft color exchanges, in the ICEM. Such soft exchanges have no perceptible effect on J /ψ suppression in p+A collisions. In contrast, the interplay of the physics of these soft exchanges at large distances, with the physics of semihard rescattering at short distances, causes a significant additional suppression of ψ (2 S ) yields relative to that of the J /ψ . A good fit of all RHIC and LHC J /ψ and ψ (2 S ) data, for transverse momenta P⊥≤5 GeV in p+p and p+A collisions, is obtained for Λ ˜10 MeV.

  4. Baryon, charged hadron, Drell-Yan and J/ψ production in high energy proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, Charles; Jeon, Sangyong; Kapusta, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    We show that the distributions of outgoing protons and charged hadrons in high energy proton-nucleus collisions are described rather well by a linear extrapolation from proton-proton collisions. The only adjustable parameter required is the shift in rapidity of a produced charged meson when it encounters a target nucleon. Its fitted value is 0.16. Next, we apply this linear extrapolation to precisely measured Drell-Yan cross sections for 800 GeV protons incident on a variety of nuclear targets which exhibit a deviation from linear scaling in the atomic number A. We show that this deviation can be accounted for by energy degradation of the proton as it passes through the nucleus if account is taken of the time delay of particle production due to quantum coherence. We infer an average proper coherence time of 0.4±0.1 fm/c, corresponding to a coherence path length of 8±2 fm in the rest frame of the nucleus. Finally, we apply the linear extrapolation to measured J/ψ production cross sections for 200 and 450 GeV/c protons incident on a variety of nuclear targets. Our analysis takes into account energy loss of the beam proton, the time delay of particle production due to quantum coherence, and absorption of the J/ψ on nucleons. The best representation is obtained for a coherence time of 0.5 fm/c, which is consistent with Drell-Yan production, and an absorption cross section of 3.6 mb, which is consistent with the value deduced from photoproduction of the J/ψ on nuclear targets

  5. On the application of the procedure of dynamic relaxation for the calculation of an elastical bedded hushy sperical shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiede, R.

    1980-01-01

    In the treatment of elastically embeded shells by finite element methods, a calculation of the rigid body deformations before each iteration essentially improves the convergence of the method. This is also the case when calculating with fictitions densities instead of the real material densities. Some evidence has been obtained for the choice of a damping factor by empirical evaluation of several model calculations. (GL) [de

  6. TO THE SOLUTION OF PROBLEMS ABOUT THE RAILWAYS CALCULATION FOR STRENGTH TAKING INTO ACCOUNT UNEQUAL ELASTICITY OF THE SUBRAIL BASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kurhan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The module of elasticity of the subrail base is one of the main characteristics for an assessment intense the deformed condition of a track. Need for different cases to consider unequal elasticity of the subrail base repeatedly was considered, however, results contained rather difficult mathematical approaches and the obtained decisions didn't keep within borders of standard engineering calculation of a railway on strength. Therefore the purpose of this work is obtaining the decision within this document. Methodology. It is offered to consider a rail model as a beam which has the distributed loading of such outline corresponding to value of the module of elasticity that gives an equivalent deflection at free seating on bearing parts. Findings. The method of the accounting of gradual change of the module of elasticity of the subrail base by means of the correcting coefficient in engineering calculation of a way on strength was received. Expansion of existing calculation of railways strength was developed for the accounting of sharp change of the module of elasticity of the subrail base (for example, upon transition from a ballast design of a way on the bridge. The characteristic of change of forces operating from a rail on a basis, depending on distance to the bridge on an approach site from a ballast design of a way was received. The results of the redistribution of forces after a sudden change in the elastic modulus of the base under the rail explain the formation of vertical irregularities before the bridge. Originality. The technique of engineering calculation of railways strength for performance of calculations taking into account unequal elasticity of the subrail base was improved. Practical value. The obtained results allow carrying out engineering calculations for an assessment of strength of a railway in places of unequal elasticity caused by a condition of a way or features of a design. The solution of the return task on

  7. Numerical Calculation of Effect of Elastic Deformation on Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith K. Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The application and workflow of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD/Computational Structure Dynamics (CSD on solving the static aeroelastic problem of a slender rocket are introduced. To predict static aeroelastic behavior accurately, two-way coupling and inertia relief methods are used to calculate the static deformations and aerodynamic characteristics of the deformed rocket. The aerodynamic coefficients of rigid rocket are computed firstly and compared with the experimental data, which verified the accuracy of CFD output. The results of the analysis for elastic rocket in the nonspinning and spinning states are compared with the rigid ones. The results highlight that the rocket deformation aspects are decided by the normal force distribution along the rocket length. Rocket deformation becomes larger with increasing the flight angle of attack. Drag and lift force coefficients decrease and pitching moment coefficients increase due to rocket deformations, center of pressure location forwards, and stability of the rockets decreases. Accordingly, the flight trajectory may be affected by the change of these aerodynamic coefficients and stability.

  8. Inclusive proton spectra and total reaction cross sections for proton-nucleus scattering at 800 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGill, J.A.

    1981-08-01

    Current applications of multiple scattering theory to describe the elastic scattering of medium energy protons from nuclei have been shown to be quite successful in reproducing the experimental cross sections. These calculations use the impulse approximation, wherein the scattering from individual nucleons in the nucleus is described by the scattering amplitude for a free nucleon. Such an approximation restricts the inelastic channels to those initiated by nucleon-nucleon scattering. As a first step in determining the nature of p + nucleus scattering at 800 MeV, both total reaction cross sections and (p,p') inclusive cross sections were measured and compared to the free p + p cross sections for hydrogen, deuterium, calcium 40, carbon 12, and lead 208. It is concluded that as much as 85% of all reactions in a nucleus proceed from interactions with a single nucleon in the nucleus, and that the impulse approximation is a good starting point for a microscopic description of p + nucleus interactions at 800 MeV

  9. Observation of correlation between two fast protons in proton-nucleus interactions at 640 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, V.I.; Kosarev, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    The measurements have been performed to observe correlations between backward emitted protons (BEP) and forward outgoing protons from quasi-free scattering of the incident proton of 640 MeV on a nucleons pair [pN] within Be, C, Al, Cu and Pb nucleus at the angles 12 deg and 122 deg: p 0 + pN → p 1 + N + p 3 . Here p 1 is a proton detected in coincidence with BEP p 3 and N is a nucleon unobserved under the conditions of this experiment. The differential cross sections for the BEP of energies from 50 to 145 MeV have been measured in coincidence with forward outgoing protons (255 to 330 MeV) by scintillation counter method. The inclusive BEP spectra have been explained by the quasi-elastic backscattering on clusters which do not break up during the interaction. The calculated distribution are remarkably narrower than the experimental anes. The measurements point out that the discussed production of two fast protons is observable with all the targets and the cross section per target nucleon decreases with increasing the target mass number

  10. Some practical results for calculating the elastic properties of cubic polycrystals with texture measured by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lychagina, T.A.; Brokmeier, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. It is well known that the elastic properties of a polycrystalline material are strongly dependent on the one hand the single crystal elastic properties and on the other hand its crystallographic texture [1]. The calculation of these properties needs the quantitative texture given by the orientation distribution function (ODF), which represents texture mathematically. By a given set of experimental pole figures a number of programs are available to calculate the ODF, which might have an influence on the resulting properties. The aim of this work is to compare elastic properties of cubic materials calculated with ODFs obtained by different methods. The calculations were carried out on a cold rolled Al-6%Mg alloy sheet and on a copper rod. Experimental pole figures were obtained by means of neutron diffraction [2] and used for ODF calculation. The conformity between different results will be discussed. (author) [1] H.J. Bunge 1982, Texture Analysis in Material Science - Mathematical Methods, Butterworth, London.; [2] H.G. Brokmeier, U. Zink, R. Schnieber, B. Witassek, Material Science Forum (1998), 273-275, 277

  11. Atomistic calculation of size effects on elastic coefficients in nanometre-sized tungsten layers and wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villain, P.; Beauchamp, P.; Badawi, K.F.; Goudeau, P.; Renault, P.-O.

    2004-01-01

    Equilibrium state and elastic coefficients of nanometre-sized single crystal tungsten layers and wires are investigated by atomistic simulations. The variations of the equilibrium distances as a function of the layer thickness or wire cross-section are mainly due to elastic effects of surface tension forces. A strong decrease of the Young's modulus is observed when the transverse dimensions are reduced below 2-3 nm

  12. Microscopic model analyses of the elastic scattering of 25, 30, and 40 MeV protons from targets of diverse mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, P.K.; Amos, K.; Karataglidis, S.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive survey and analysis of cross section and analysing power data from proton elastic scattering at energies 25 to 40 MeV is presented. The data are compared with predictions obtained from a full folding specification of the proton-nucleus optical potentials. Isotope and energy variation of the data is explained

  13. The estimation of production rates of $\\pi^+K^-, \\pi^-K^+$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atoms in proton-nucleus interactions at 450 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Gorchakov, O

    2015-01-01

    Short-lived (τ ∼ 3 × 10 − 15 s) π+ K− , K+ π− and π+ π− atoms as well as long- lived (τ ≥ 1 × 10 − 11 s) π+ π− atoms produced in proton-nucleus interactions at 24 GeV/c are observed and studied in the DIRAC experiment at the CERN PS. The purpose of this paper is to show that the yields of the short-lived π+ K−, K+ π− and π+ π− atoms in proton-nucleus interactions at 450 GeV/c and θ lab = 4◦ are estimated to be, respectively, 17, 38 and 16 times higher per time unit. This may allow significantly improving the precision of their lifetime measurement and ππ and πK scattering length combinations |a0 − a2| and |a 1/2 − a3/2| . The yields of the long-lived π+ K− , K+ π− and π+ π− atoms at 450 GeV/c are estimated to be 370, 1600 and 750 times higher than at 24 GeV/c. This may allow the resonance method to be used for measuring the Lamb shift in the ππ atom and a new ππ scattering length combination 2 a0 + a2 to be obtained.

  14. First-principles calculations for the elastic properties of Ni-base model superalloys: Ni/Ni3Al multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun-Jiang, Wang; Chong-Yu, Wang

    2009-01-01

    A model system consisting of Ni[001](100)/Ni 3 Al[001](100) multi-layers are studied using the density functional theory in order to explore the elastic properties of single crystal Ni-based superalloys. Simulation results are consistent with the experimental observation that rafted Ni-base superalloys virtually possess a cubic symmetry. The convergence of the elastic properties with respect to the thickness of the multilayers are tested by a series of multilayers from 2γ'+2γ to 10γ'+10γ atomic layers. The elastic properties are found to vary little with the increase of the multilayer's thickness. A Ni/Ni 3 Al multilayer with 10γ'+10γ atomic layers (3.54 nm) can be used to simulate the mechanical properties of Ni-base model superalloys. Our calculated elastic constants, bulk modulus, orientation-dependent shear modulus and Young's modulus, as well as the Zener anisotropy factor are all compatible with the measured results of Ni-base model superalloys R1 and the advanced commercial superalloys TMS-26, CMSX-4 at a low temperature. The mechanical properties as a function of the γ' phase volume fraction are calculated by varying the proportion of the γ and γ' phase in the multilayers. Besides, the mechanical properties of two-phase Ni/Ni 3 Al multilayer can be well predicted by the Voigt–Reuss–Hill rule of mixtures. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  15. First-principles calculations of the electronic, vibrational, and elastic properties of the magnetic laminate Mn2GaC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thore, A.; Dahlqvist, M.; Alling, B.; Rosén, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report the by first-principles predicted properties of the recently discovered magnetic MAX phase Mn 2 GaC. The electronic band structure and vibrational dispersion relation, as well as the electronic and vibrational density of states, have been calculated. The band structure close to the Fermi level indicates anisotropy with respect to electrical conductivity, while the distribution of the electronic and vibrational states for both Mn and Ga depend on the chosen relative orientation of the Mn spins across the Ga sheets in the Mn–Ga–Mn trilayers. In addition, the elastic properties have been calculated, and from the five elastic constants, the Voigt bulk modulus is determined to be 157 GPa, the Voigt shear modulus 93 GPa, and the Young's modulus 233 GPa. Furthermore, Mn 2 GaC is found relatively elastically isotropic, with a compression anisotropy factor of 0.97, and shear anisotropy factors of 0.9 and 1, respectively. The Poisson's ratio is 0.25. Evaluated elastic properties are compared to theoretical and experimental results for M 2 AC phases where M = Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Ta, and A = Al, S, Ge, In, Sn.

  16. Structural, elastic, electronic and dynamical properties of OsB and ReB: Density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanling; Zeng, Zhi; Lin, Haiqing

    2010-06-01

    The structural, elastic, electronic and dynamical properties of ReB and OsB are investigated by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. It turns out that ReB and OsB are metallic ultra-incompressible solids with small elastic anisotropy and high hardness. The change of c/ a ratio in OsB indicates that there is a structural phase transition at about 31 GPa. Phonon spectra calculations show that both OsB and ReB are stable dynamically and there are abnormal phonon dispersions along special directions in Brillouin zone. OsB and ReB do not show superconductivity due to very weak electron-phonon interactions in them.

  17. First-Principle Calculations for Elastic and Thermodynamic Properties of Diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhijian; Chen Xiangrong; Gou Qingquan; Ji Guangfu

    2009-01-01

    The elastic constants and thermodynamic properties of diamond are investigated by using the CRYSTAL03 program. The lattice parameters, the bulk modulus, the heat capacity, the Grueneisen parameter, and the Debye temperature are obtained. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental and theoretical data. Moreover, the relationship between V/V 0 and pressure, the elastic constants under high pressure are successfully obtained. Especially, the elastic constants of diamond under high pressure are firstly obtained theoretically. At the same time, the variations of the thermal expansion α with pressure P and temperature Tare obtained systematically in the ranges of 0-870 GPa and 0-1600 K. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  18. Measurement of the elastic tensor of SmScO3 and NdScO3 using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy with ab initio calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Pestka II

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The complete elastic tensors of SmScO3 and NdScO3 were measured using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS in combination with ab-initio calculations. Measurement of the elastic tensor of these recently synthesized single crystal RE scandates is essential for understanding dynamic lattice applications including phonon confinement, strain induced thin film growth and superlattice construction. On average, the experimental elastic constants differed by less than 5% of the theoretical values, further validating the accuracy of modern ab-initio calculations as a means of estimating the initial elastic constants used in RUS measurements.

  19. An Laudau-Lifschitz theory based algorithm on calculating post-buckling configuration of a rod buckling in elastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shicheng; Tan, Likun; Hu, Nan; Grover, Hannah; Chu, Kevin; Chen, Zi

    This reserach introduces a new numerical approach of calculating the post-buckling configuration of a thin rod embedded in elastic media. The theoretical base is the governing ODEs describing the balance of forces and moments, the length conservation, and the physics of bending and twisting by Laudau and Lifschitz. The numerical methods applied in the calculation are continuation method and Newton's method of iteration in combination with spectrum method. To the authors' knowledge, it is the first trial of directly applying the L-L theory to numerically studying the phenomenon of rod buckling in elastic medium. This method accounts for nonlinearity of geometry, thus is capable of calculating large deformation. The stability of this method is another advantage achieved by expressing the governing equations in a set of first-order derivative form. The wave length, amplitude, and decay effect all agree with the experiment without any further assumptions. This program can be applied to different occasions with varying stiffness of the elastic medai and rigidity of the rod.

  20. The effect of the new nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering data in LAHET trademark Version 2.8 on neutron displacement cross section calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; Russell, G.J.; Prael, R.E.; Madland, D.G.; Court, J.D.; Daemen, L.L.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    The latest release of the medium-energy Monte Carlo transport code LAHET includes a new nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering treatment based on a global medium-energy phenomenological optical-model potential. Implementation of this new model in LAHET allows nuclear elastic scattering for neutrons with energies greater than 15 MeV and for protons with energies greater than 50 MeV. Previous investigations on the impact of the new elastic scattering data revealed that the addition of the proton elastic scattering channel can lead to a significant increase in the calculated damage energy under certain conditions. The authors report here results on the impact of the new elastic scattering data on calculated displacement cross sections in various elements for neutrons with energies in the range 16 to 3,160 MeV. Calculated displacement cross sections at 20 MeV in low-mass materials are in better agreement with SPECTER-calculated cross sections

  1. Contact area calculation between elastic solids bounded by mound rough surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G

    In this work, we investigate the influence of mound roughness on the contact area between elastic bodies. The mound roughness is described by the r.m.s. roughness amplitude w, the average mound separation Lambda, and the system correlation length xi. In general, the real contact area has a complex

  2. Elastic deformations of floaters for offshore wind turbines: Dynamic modelling and sectional load calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Michael; Bredmose, Henrik; Hansen, Anders Melchior

    2017-01-01

    To achieve economically and technically viable floating support structures for large 10MW+ wind turbines, structural flexibility may increase to the extent that becomes relevant to incorporate along with the corresponding physical effects within aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation tools. Previous...

  3. Structural stability and elastic properties of L12 Co3(Ga,W) precipitate from first-principle calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Qiang; Zhu Yuhong; Wang Yan

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasoft pseudopotential within a generalized gradient approximation was employed to study the structural stability, electronic structure, and elastic properties of ternary Co 3 (Ga,W) precipitate. The Young's and shear moduli of the polycrystals containing the Co 3 (Ga,W) precipitate were calculated using the Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging scheme. Results show that the stable ternary Co 3 (Ga,W) compound has the L1 2 structure, and is ductile in nature. The structural stability of the Co 3 (Ga,W) compound is discussed together with the calculated electronic structure.

  4. ELSEPA—Dirac partial-wave calculation of elastic scattering of electrons and positrons by atoms, positive ions and molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvat, Francesc; Jablonski, Aleksander; Powell, Cedric J.

    2005-01-01

    The FORTRAN 77 code system ELSEPA for the calculation of elastic scattering of electrons and positrons by atoms, positive ions and molecules is presented. These codes perform relativistic (Dirac) partial-wave calculations for scattering by a local central interaction potential V(r). For atoms and ions, the static-field approximation is adopted, with the potential set equal to the electrostatic interaction energy between the projectile and the target, plus an approximate local exchange interaction when the projectile is an electron. For projectiles with kinetic energies up to 10 keV, the potential may optionally include a semiempirical correlation-polarization potential to describe the effect of the target charge polarizability. Also, for projectiles with energies less than 1 MeV, an imaginary absorptive potential can be introduced to account for the depletion of the projectile wave function caused by open inelastic channels. Molecular cross sections are calculated by means of a single-scattering independent-atom approximation in which the electron density of a bound atom is approximated by that of the free neutral atom. Elastic scattering by individual atoms in solids is described by means of a muffin-tin model potential. Partial-wave calculations are feasible on modest personal computers for energies up to about 5 MeV. The ELSEPA code also implements approximate factorization methods that allow the fast calculation of elastic cross sections for much higher energies. The interaction model adopted in the calculations is defined by the user by combining the different options offered by the code. The nuclear charge distribution can be selected among four analytical models (point nucleus, uniformly charged sphere, Fermi's distribution and Helm's uniform-uniform distribution). The atomic electron density is handled in numerical form. The distribution package includes data files with electronic densities of neutral atoms of the elements hydrogen to lawrencium ( Z=1

  5. Structural, electronic, elastic and thermal properties of Li{sub 2}AgSb. First-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ji-Hong [Sichuan Univ., Chengdu (China). Inst. of Atomic and Molecular Physics; Longdong Univ., Qingyang (China). College of Physics and Electronic Engineering; Zhu, Xu-Hui [Sichuan Univ., Chengdu (China). Inst. of Atomic and Molecular Physics; Cheng, Yan [Sichuan Univ., Chengdu (China). Inst. of Atomic and Molecular Physics; Sichuan Univ., Chengdu (China). Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education; Ji, Guang-Fu [Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China). National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics

    2015-07-01

    Based on the first-principles density functional theory calculations combined with the quasi-harmonic Debye model, the pressure dependencies of the structural, elastic, electronic and thermal properties of Li{sub 2}AgSb were systematically investigated. The calculated lattice parameters and unit cell volume of Li{sub 2}AgSb at the ground state were in good agreement with the available experimental data. The obtained elastic constants, the bulk modulus and the shear modulus revealed that Li{sub 2}AgSb is mechanically stable and behaves in a ductile manner under the applied pressure. The elasticity-relevant properties, the Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio showed that pressure can enhance the stiffness of Li{sub 2}AgSb and that Li{sub 2}AgSb is mechanically stable up to 20 GPa. The characteristics of the band structure and the partial density of states of Li{sub 2}AgSb were analysed, showing that Li{sub 2}AgSb is a semiconductor with a direct band gap of 217 meV at 0 GPa and that the increasing pressure can make the band structure of Li{sub 2}AgSb become an indirect one. Studies have shown that, unlike temperature, pressure has little effect on the heat capacity and the thermal expansion coefficient of Li{sub 2}AgSb.

  6. Constrained Nudged Elastic Band calculation of the Peierls barrier with atomic relaxations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gröger, Roman; Vitek, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2012), 035019 ISSN 0965-0393 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0255; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : dislocation * Peierls barrier * Nudged Elastic Band Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.932, year: 2012

  7. First-principle calculations of the electronic, optical and elastic properties of ZnSiP2 semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Tripathy, S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Optical properties of ZnSiP 2 studied under different pressure for stable structure. • Birefringence has been calculated at different wavelengths. • Lattice constants, ħω p , bulk modulus and its derivative have been calculated. • C ij , Y, υ and Zener anisotropic factor have also been estimated. • Our calculated values are relative more close to the experimental values. -- Abstract: The plane wave pseudo-potential method within density functional theory (DFT) has been used to investigate the structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties of ZnSiP 2 chalcopyrite semiconductor. The lattice constants are calculated from the optimized unit cells and compare with the experimental value. The band structure, total density of states (TDOS) and partial density of states (PDOS) have been discussed. The energy gap has been calculated along the Γ direction found to be 1.383 eV, which shows that ZnSiP 2 is pseudo-direct in nature. We have also analyzed the frequency dependent dielectric constant ε(ω) and calculated the birefringence (Δn). The optical properties under three different hydrostatic pressures of 0 GPa, 10 GPa and 20 GPa have been described for the first time in the energy range 0–20 eV. The values of bulk modulus (B), pressure derivative of bulk modulus (B ∗ ), elastic constants (C ij ), Young’s modulus (Y), anisotropic factor (A) and Poisson’s ratio (ν) have been calculated. The calculated values of all above parameters are compared with the available experimental values and the values reported by different workers. A fairly good agreement has been found between them

  8. New high resolution measurements of open and hidden charm production in proton-nucleus collisions at √{ s} = 110GeV with LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Émilie; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    Open and hidden charm production in nucleus-nucleus collisions is considered as a key probe of Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) formation. In the search of specific QGP effects, proton-nucleus collisions are used as the reference as they account for the corresponding Cold Nuclear Matter (CNM) effects. The LHCb experiment, thanks to its System for Measuring Overlap with Gas (SMOG) can be operated in a fixed target mode with the LHC beams, at an intermediate center-of-mass energy between nominal SPS and RHIC energies. In 2015, for the first time, reactions of incident LHC proton beams on noble gas targets have been recorded by the LHCb experiment at a center-of-mass energy of 110 GeV and within the center-of-mass rapidity range - 2.77

  9. The effect of boron concentration on the structure and elastic properties of Ru-Ir alloys: first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolong; Zhou, Zhaobo; Hu, Riming; Zhou, Xiaolong; Yu, Jie; Liu, Manmen

    2018-04-01

    The Phase stability, electronic structure, elastic properties and hardness of Ru-Ir alloys with different B concentration were investigated by first principles calculations. The calculated formation enthaplies and cohesive energies show that these compounds are all thermodynamically stable. Information on electronic structure indicates that they possess metallic characteristic and Ru-Ir-B alloys were composed of the Ru-B and Ir-B covalent bond. The elastic properties were calculated, which included bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio and hardness. The calculated results reveal that the plastic of Ru-Ir-B alloys increase with the increase of the content of B atoms, but the hardness of Ru-Ir-B alloys have no substantial progress with the increase of the content of B atoms. However, it is interesting that the hardness of the Ru-Ir-B compound was improved obviously as the B content was higher than 18 atoms because of a phase structure transition.

  10. Calculations of single crystal elastic constants for yttria partially stabilised zirconia from powder diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, A. J. G.; Xie, M. Y.; Baimpas, N.; Zhang, S. Y.; Kabra, S.; Kelleher, J.; Neo, T. K.; Korsunsky, A. M.

    2014-08-01

    Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) is a tough, phase-transforming ceramic that finds use in a wide range of commercial applications from dental prostheses to thermal barrier coatings. Micromechanical modelling of phase transformation can deliver reliable predictions in terms of the influence of temperature and stress. However, models must rely on the accurate knowledge of single crystal elastic stiffness constants. Some techniques for elastic stiffness determination are well-established. The most popular of these involve exploiting frequency shifts and phase velocities of acoustic waves. However, the application of these techniques to YSZ can be problematic due to the micro-twinning observed in larger crystals. Here, we propose an alternative approach based on selective elastic strain sampling (e.g., by diffraction) of grain ensembles sharing certain orientation, and the prediction of the same quantities by polycrystalline modelling, for example, the Reuss or Voigt average. The inverse problem arises consisting of adjusting the single crystal stiffness matrix to match the polycrystal predictions to observations. In the present model-matching study, we sought to determine the single crystal stiffness matrix of tetragonal YSZ using the results of time-of-flight neutron diffraction obtained from an in situ compression experiment and Finite Element modelling of the deformation of polycrystalline tetragonal YSZ. The best match between the model predictions and observations was obtained for the optimized stiffness values of C11 = 451, C33 = 302, C44 = 39, C66 = 82, C12 = 240, and C13 = 50 (units: GPa). Considering the significant amount of scatter in the published literature data, our result appears reasonably consistent.

  11. Calculations of single crystal elastic constants for yttria partially stabilised zirconia from powder diffraction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunt, A. J. G., E-mail: alexander.lunt@eng.ox.ac.uk; Xie, M. Y.; Baimpas, N.; Korsunsky, A. M. [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Zhang, S. Y.; Kabra, S.; Kelleher, J. [ISIS Neutron and Muon Source, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Neo, T. K. [Specialist Dental Group, Mount Elizabeth Orchard, 3 Mount Elizabeth, #08-03/08-08/08-10, Singapore 228510 (Singapore)

    2014-08-07

    Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) is a tough, phase-transforming ceramic that finds use in a wide range of commercial applications from dental prostheses to thermal barrier coatings. Micromechanical modelling of phase transformation can deliver reliable predictions in terms of the influence of temperature and stress. However, models must rely on the accurate knowledge of single crystal elastic stiffness constants. Some techniques for elastic stiffness determination are well-established. The most popular of these involve exploiting frequency shifts and phase velocities of acoustic waves. However, the application of these techniques to YSZ can be problematic due to the micro-twinning observed in larger crystals. Here, we propose an alternative approach based on selective elastic strain sampling (e.g., by diffraction) of grain ensembles sharing certain orientation, and the prediction of the same quantities by polycrystalline modelling, for example, the Reuss or Voigt average. The inverse problem arises consisting of adjusting the single crystal stiffness matrix to match the polycrystal predictions to observations. In the present model-matching study, we sought to determine the single crystal stiffness matrix of tetragonal YSZ using the results of time-of-flight neutron diffraction obtained from an in situ compression experiment and Finite Element modelling of the deformation of polycrystalline tetragonal YSZ. The best match between the model predictions and observations was obtained for the optimized stiffness values of C11 = 451, C33 = 302, C44 = 39, C66 = 82, C12 = 240, and C13 = 50 (units: GPa). Considering the significant amount of scatter in the published literature data, our result appears reasonably consistent.

  12. Improved adiabatic calculation of muonic-hydrogen-atom cross sections. I. Isotopic exchange and elastic scattering in asymmetric collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.S.; Struensee, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The improved adiabatic representation is used in calculations of elastic and isotopic-exchange cross sections for asymmetric collisions of pμ, dμ, and tμ with bare p, d, and t nuclei and with H, D, and T atoms. This formulation dissociates properly, correcting a well-known deficiency of the standard adiabatic method for muonic-atom collisions, and includes some effects at zeroth order that are normally considered nonadiabatic. The electronic screening is calculated directly and precisely within the improved adiabatic description; it is found to be about 30% smaller in magnitude than the previously used value at large internuclear distances and to deviate considerably from the asymptotic form at small distances. The reactance matrices, needed for calculations of molecular-target effects, are given in tables

  13. Elasticity and wave velocity in fcc iron (austenite) at elevated temperatures - Experimental verification of ab-initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Bevis; Malmström, Mikael; Lönnqvist, Johan; Bate, Pete; Ehteshami, Hossein; Korzhavyi, Pavel A

    2018-07-01

    High temperature crystal elasticity constants for face centred cubic austenite are important for interpreting the ultrasonic properties of iron and steels but cannot be determined by normal single crystal methods. Values of these constants have recently been calculated using an ab-initio approach and the present work was carried out to test their applicability using laser-ultrasonic measurements. Steel samples having a known texture were examined at temperatures between 800 °C and 1100 °C to measure the velocity of longitudinal P-waves which were found to be in good agreement with modelled values. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A fluctuation method to calculate the third order elastic constants in crystalline solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zimu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Qu, Jianmin, E-mail: j-qu@northwestern.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    This paper derives exact expressions of the isothermal third order elastic constants (TOE) in crystalline solids in terms of the kinetic and potential energies of the system. These expressions reveal that the TOE constants consist of a Born component and a relaxation component. The Born component is simply the third derivative of the system's potential energy with respect to the deformation, while the relaxation component is related to the non-uniform rearrangements of the atoms when the system is subject to a macroscopic deformation. Further, based on the general expressions derived here, a direct (fluctuation) method of computing the isothermal TOE constants is developed. Numerical examples of using this fluctuation method are given to compute the TOE constants of single crystal iron.

  15. Elastic properties and electronic structure of WS{sub 2} under pressure from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Li [Sichuan Univ., Chengdu (China). Inst. of Atomic and Molecular Physics; Civil Aviation Flight Univ. of China, Guanghan (China). Dept. of Physics; Zeng, Zhao-Yi [Chongqing Normal Univ., Chongqing (China). College of Physics and Electronic Engineering; Liang, Ting; Tang, Mei; Cheng, Yan [Sichuan Univ., Chengdu (China). Inst. of Atomic and Molecular Physics

    2017-07-01

    The influence of pressure on the elastic and mechanical properties of the hexagonal transition-metal dichalcogenide WS{sub 2} is investigated using the first-principles calculations. With the increase in pressure, the lattice parameters and the volume of WS{sub 2} decrease, which is exactly in agreement with the available experimental data and other calculated results. The elastic constants C{sub ij}, bulk modulus B, shear modulus G, Young's modulus E, and Poisson's ratio σ of WS{sub 2} also increase with pressure. At last, for the first time, the band gaps of energy, the partial density of states, and the total density of states under three different pressures are obtained and analysed. It is found that the band gap of WS{sub 2} decreases from 0.843 to 0 eV when the external pressure varies from 0 to 20 GPa, which implies that WS{sub 2} may transform from semiconductors to semimetal phase at a pressure about 20 GPa.

  16. Site preference and elastic properties of ternary alloying additions in B2 YAg alloys by first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yurong, E-mail: winwyr@126.com [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiantang 411201 (China); Hu Wangyu [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Xu Longshan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen 361024 (China)

    2012-09-15

    First-principles calculations were preformed to study the site preference behavior and elastic properties of 3d (Ti-Cu) transition-metal elements in B2 ductility YAg alloy. In YAg, Ti is found to occupy the Y sublattice whereas V, Cr, Co, Fe, Ni and Cu tend to substitute for Ag sublattice. Due to the addition of 3d transition metals, the lattice parameters of YAg is decreased in the order: Vcalculated elastic constants show that Cr, Fe, Co and Cu can improve the ductility of YAg alloy, and Fe is the most effective element to improve the ductility of YAg, while Ti, Ni and V alloying elements can reduce the ductility of YAg alloy, especially, V transforms ductile into brittle for YAg alloy. In addition, both V and Ni alloying elements can increase the hardness of YAg alloy, and Y{sub 8}Ag{sub 7}V is harder than Y{sub 8}Ag{sub 7}Ni.

  17. First-principles calculation on the thermodynamic and elastic properties of precipitations in Al-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongqiang; Wang, Yongxin; Zhang, Xinyi; Zhang, Minyu; Niu, Yanfei

    2016-12-01

    First-principles calculations based on density functional theory was used to investigate the structural, thermodynamic and elastic properties of precipitations, θ″, θ‧ and θ, in Al-Cu alloys. The values of lattice constants accord with experimental results well. The structural stability of θ is the best, followed by θ‧ and θ″. In addition, due to the highest bulk modulus, shear modulus and Young's modulus, θ possesses the best reinforcement effect in precipitation hardening process considered only from mechanical properties of perfect crystal. According to the values of B/G, Poisson's ratio and C11-C12, θ‧ has the worst ductility, while θ″ has the best ductility, the ductility of θ is in the middle. The ideal tensile strength of θ″, θ‧ and θ calculated along [100] and [001] directions are 20.87 GPa, 23.11 GPa and 24.70 GPa respectively. The analysis of electronic structure suggests that three precipitations all exhibit metallic character, and number of bonding electrons and bonding strength are the nature of different thermodynamic and elastic properties for θ″, θ‧ and θ.

  18. First-principles calculations of structural, elastic, and electronic properties of trigonal ZnSnO{sub 3} under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi-Jun, E-mail: qijunliu@home.swjtu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education of China, Chengdu 610031 (China); Bond and Band Engineering Group, Sichuan Provincial Key Laboratory (for Universities) of High Pressure Science and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Qin, Han; Jiao, Zhen; Liu, Fu-Sheng [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education of China, Chengdu 610031 (China); Bond and Band Engineering Group, Sichuan Provincial Key Laboratory (for Universities) of High Pressure Science and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Liu, Zheng-Tang [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China)

    2016-09-01

    First-principles calculations of the structural, elastic, mechanical and electronic properties of ilmenite-type ZnSnO{sub 3} under pressure have been investigated in the present paper. Our calculated lattice constants at zero pressure are in agreement with the published theoretical and experimental data. The elastic constants at zero and high pressure have been obtained, which are used to discuss the mechanical stability of ilmenite-type ZnSnO{sub 3}. The mechanical properties such as bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio under pressure have been studied. Electronic properties show that ilmenite-type ZnSnO{sub 3} is shown to be a direct bandgap of 1.063 (GGA-PW91)/3.977 (PBE0) eV. The bandgap increases with the increasing pressure. Moreover, the partial density of states has been analyzed to explain the increased bandgap. - Highlights: • Physical properties of ilmenite-type ZnSnO{sub 3} under pressure have been investigated. • Ilmenite-type ZnSnO{sub 3} behaves in a ductile manner. • Ilmenite-type ZnSnO{sub 3} is a direct bandgap compound with 3.977 eV. • Bandgap of Ilmenite-type ZnSnO{sub 3} increases with the increasing pressure.

  19. Pion- and proton-nucleus interactions at intermediate energy: Progress report, 1 June 1988--31 May 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehnard, D.

    1989-01-01

    Data were taken for elastic scattering of π + and π/sup /minus// at far forward angles as part of our continuing study of this system near [3,3] resonance energies. The work on data reduction of the 4 He (π/sup +-/,π/sup +-/,p) and 12 C(π/sup +-/,π/sup +-/,p) reactions was completed. Comparisons with DWIA predictions for quasifree knockout yield evidence for an interference of two processes: quasifree knockout, and formation and decay of states of good isospin in the giant resonance region. The replay and analysis of our 4 He(p,p') data at 500 and 800 MeV were continued and gave new information on the monopole strength in 4 He. Preparations were made for the pion scattering experiments on polarized 13 C which is scheduled for the summer of 1989

  20. Structure and spectroscopy of the oxygen-24 drip-line nucleus from elastic and inelastic proton scattering using MUST2 detectors at Riken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissinot, S.

    2013-01-01

    The studies of structure and spectroscopy performed on radioactive nuclei during the last three decades have shown that the nuclear shell structure changes towards the drip-line and local magic numbers may appear. Doubly-magic nuclei are very rare but represent stringent tests for theories and their modelling of the nuclear interaction. In this context, we have investigated the structure and spectroscopy of the drip-line doubly-magic nucleus 24 O via proton elastic and inelastic scattering (p,p'). The experiment was performed at Riken in the BigRIPS line, using the 24 O beam produced at 263 MeV/n with RIBF with a high intensity (1780/s), and the state-of-the-art MUST2 charged particle detector. The analysis of the data gives the reconstruction of: the 24 O excitation energy spectrum up to 35 MeV with the scattered proton kinematics using the missing mass method, and the angular distribution of exclusive (p,p) elastic cross section between 4 and 30 degrees c.m. via a triple coincidence nucleus-proton-nucleus. Below the two-neutron separation threshold (S2n) the statistics is too low to obtain the two excited states measured by previous experiments done at lower incident energies. Above the S 2n structures are observed for the first time due to the large excitation energy range of the excitation spectra. The measurement of the excited states located at these energies would allow to test theoretical studies of low-energy dipole excitation in light neutron-rich nuclei. The statistics obtained for proton elastic scattering is sufficient to extract the exclusive (p,p) angular distributions of the 24 , 23 , 22 , 21 O isotopes. These results constitute a new benchmark to explore proton-nucleus interaction potential features around 260 MeV/n. The comparison of elastic data set to the reaction calculations done with the microscopic reaction approach based on the G-matrix density-dependent potential indicates that this potential is suitable. However, it remains to include

  1. An efficient Matlab script to calculate heterogeneous anisotropically elastic wave propagation in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, O.S.

    2006-01-01

    We have created a second-order finite-difference solution to the anisotropic elastic wave equation in three dimensions and implemented the solution as an efficient Matlab script. This program allows the user to generate synthetic seismograms for three-dimensional anisotropic earth structure. The code was written for teleseismic wave propagation in the 1-0.1 Hz frequency range but is of general utility and can be used at all scales of space and time. This program was created to help distinguish among various types of lithospheric structure given the uneven distribution of sources and receivers commonly utilized in passive source seismology. Several successful implementations have resulted in a better appreciation for subduction zone structure, the fate of a transform fault with depth, lithospheric delamination, and the effects of wavefield focusing and defocusing on attenuation. Companion scripts are provided which help the user prepare input to the finite-difference solution. Boundary conditions including specification of the initial wavefield, absorption and two types of reflection are available. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Constrained nudged elastic band calculation of the Peierls barrier with atomic relaxations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gröger, R; Vitek, V

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that the straightforward application of the nudged elastic band (NEB) method does not determine the correct Peierls barrier of 1/2〈1 1 1〉 screw dislocations in bcc metals. Although this method guarantees that the states (images) of the system are distributed uniformly along the minimum energy path, it does not imply that the dislocation positions are distributed uniformly along this path. In fact, clustering of dislocation positions near potential minima occurs which leads to an overestimate of both the slope of the Peierls barrier and the Peierls stress. We propose a modification in which the NEB method is applied only to a small number of degrees of freedom that determine the position of the dislocation, while all other coordinates of atoms are relaxed by molecular statics as in any atomistic study. This modified NEB method with relaxations gives the Peierls barrier that increases smoothly with the dislocation position and the corresponding Peierls stress agrees well with that evaluated by the direct application of stress in the atomistic modeling of the dislocation glide. (paper)

  3. Microscopic model analyses of proton elastic scattering from diverse targets in the energy range 65 to 400 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dortmans, P.J.; Amos, K.

    1997-01-01

    Two nucleon (NN) effective interactions based upon two-nucleon g matrices have been used in fully microscopic calculations of nonlocal proton-nucleus optical potentials for protons with energies between 65 and 400 MeV. Excellent predictions of the differential cross sections, analysing powers and spin rotations for scattering angles to 60 deg result. (authors)

  4. Hybrid Numerical-Analytical Scheme for Calculating Elastic Wave Diffraction in Locally Inhomogeneous Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, E. V.; Glushkova, N. V.; Evdokimov, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    Numerical simulation of traveling wave excitation, propagation, and diffraction in structures with local inhomogeneities (obstacles) is computationally expensive due to the need for mesh-based approximation of extended domains with the rigorous account for the radiation conditions at infinity. Therefore, hybrid numerical-analytic approaches are being developed based on the conjugation of a numerical solution in a local vicinity of the obstacle and/or source with an explicit analytic representation in the remaining semi-infinite external domain. However, in standard finite-element software, such a coupling with the external field, moreover, in the case of multimode expansion, is generally not provided. This work proposes a hybrid computational scheme that allows realization of such a conjugation using a standard software. The latter is used to construct a set of numerical solutions used as the basis for the sought solution in the local internal domain. The unknown expansion coefficients on this basis and on normal modes in the semi-infinite external domain are then determined from the conditions of displacement and stress continuity at the boundary between the two domains. We describe the implementation of this approach in the scalar and vector cases. To evaluate the reliability of the results and the efficiency of the algorithm, we compare it with a semianalytic solution to the problem of traveling wave diffraction by a horizontal obstacle, as well as with a finite-element solution obtained for a limited domain artificially restricted using absorbing boundaries. As an example, we consider the incidence of a fundamental antisymmetric Lamb wave onto surface and partially submerged elastic obstacles. It is noted that the proposed hybrid scheme can also be used to determine the eigenfrequencies and eigenforms of resonance scattering, as well as the characteristics of traveling waves in embedded waveguides.

  5. Evaluating variability with atomistic simulations: the effect of potential and calculation methodology on the modeling of lattice and elastic constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Lucas M.; Trautt, Zachary T.; Becker, Chandler A.

    2018-07-01

    Atomistic simulations using classical interatomic potentials are powerful investigative tools linking atomic structures to dynamic properties and behaviors. It is well known that different interatomic potentials produce different results, thus making it necessary to characterize potentials based on how they predict basic properties. Doing so makes it possible to compare existing interatomic models in order to select those best suited for specific use cases, and to identify any limitations of the models that may lead to unrealistic responses. While the methods for obtaining many of these properties are often thought of as simple calculations, there are many underlying aspects that can lead to variability in the reported property values. For instance, multiple methods may exist for computing the same property and values may be sensitive to certain simulation parameters. Here, we introduce a new high-throughput computational framework that encodes various simulation methodologies as Python calculation scripts. Three distinct methods for evaluating the lattice and elastic constants of bulk crystal structures are implemented and used to evaluate the properties across 120 interatomic potentials, 18 crystal prototypes, and all possible combinations of unique lattice site and elemental model pairings. Analysis of the results reveals which potentials and crystal prototypes are sensitive to the calculation methods and parameters, and it assists with the verification of potentials, methods, and molecular dynamics software. The results, calculation scripts, and computational infrastructure are self-contained and openly available to support researchers in performing meaningful simulations.

  6. Coupled-channel optical calculation of electron-atom scattering: elastic scattering from sodium at 20 to 150 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, Igor; Konovalov, D.A.; McCarthy, I.E.

    1991-04-01

    A coupled-channel optical method for electron-atom scattering is applied to elastic electron-sodium scattering at energies of 20, 22.1, 54.4, 100, and 150 eV. It is demonstrated that the effect of all the inelastic channels on elastic scattering may be well reproduced by the 'ab initio' calculated complex non-local polarization potential. Whilst the experiments generally agree at small angles and therefore agree on the total elastic cross section, there is considerable discrepancy at intermediate and backward angles. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  7. Calculations of intersection cross-slip activation energies in fcc metals using nudged elastic band method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.I.; Dimiduk, D.M.; Parthasarathy, T.A.; El-Awady, J.; Woodward, C.; Uchic, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    The nudged elastic band (NEB) method is used to evaluate activation energies for dislocation intersection cross-slip in face-centered cubic (fcc) nickel and copper, to extend our prior work which used an approximate method. In this work we also extend the study by including Hirth locks (HL) in addition to Lomer-Cottrell locks and glide locks (GL). Using atomistic (molecular statics) simulations with embedded atom potentials we evaluated the activation barrier for a dislocation to transform from fully residing on the glide plane to fully residing on the cross-slip plane when intersecting a 120 o forest dislocation in both Ni and Cu. The initial separation between the screw and the intersecting dislocation on the (1 1 1) glide plane is varied to find a minimum in the activation energy. The NEB method gives energies that are ∼10% lower than those reported in our prior work. It is estimated that the activation energies for cross-slip from the fully glide plane state to the partially cross-slipped state at the 120 o intersection forming GL in Ni and Cu are ∼0.47 and ∼0.65 eV, respectively, and from the fully cross-slip plane state to the partially cross-slipped state forming LC are ∼0.68 and ∼0.67 eV. The activation energies for cross-slip from the fully glide plane state to the partially cross-slipped state at the 120 o intersection forming HL in Ni and Cu are estimated to be ∼0.09 and ∼0.31 eV, respectively. These values are a factor of 3-20 lower than the activation energy for bulk cross-slip in Ni and, a factor of 2-6 lower than the activation energy for cross-slip in Cu estimated by Friedel-Escaig analysis. These results suggest that cross-slip should nucleate preferentially at selected screw dislocation intersections in fcc materials and the activation energies for such mechanisms are also a function of stacking fault energy.

  8. First-principles calculations of the elastic constants of the cubic, orthorhombic and hexagonal phases of BaF{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyawere, P.W.O., E-mail: otienop98@yahoo.ca [Computational Materials Science Group, Department of Physics, University of Eldoret, P.O. Box 1125-30100 Eldoret (Kenya); Department of Computing, Kabarak University, P.O. - Private Bag - 20157 Kabarak (Kenya); The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Makau, N.W., E-mail: wanimak@yahoo.com [Computational Materials Science Group, Department of Physics, University of Eldoret, P.O. Box 1125-30100 Eldoret (Kenya); Amolo, G.O., E-mail: georgeamolo862@gmail.com [Computational Materials Science Group, Department of Physics, University of Eldoret, P.O. Box 1125-30100 Eldoret (Kenya)

    2014-02-01

    All the elastic constants of cubic, orthorhombic and hexagonal phases of BaF{sub 2} have been calculated using first principles methods. We have employed density-functional theory within generalized gradient approximation (GGA) using a plane-wave pseudopotentials method and a plane-wave basis set. The calculated elastic constant values for a cubic phase compare well with recent theoretical and experimental calculations. The bulk modulus derived from the elastic constant calculations of orthorhombic phase of BaF{sub 2} is 94.5 GPa and those of hexagonal phase is 161 GPa. These values are in good agreement with experimental data available. Stability of these phases of BaF{sub 2} is also estimated in different crystallographic directions.

  9. Numerical Calculation of Effect of Elastic Deformation on Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Rocket

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Laith K.; Chen, Dongyang; Rui, Xiaoting

    2014-01-01

    The application and workflow of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)/Computational Structure Dynamics (CSD) on solving the static aeroelastic problem of a slender rocket are introduced. To predict static aeroelastic behavior accurately, two-way coupling and inertia relief methods are used to calculate the static deformations and aerodynamic characteristics of the deformed rocket. The aerodynamic coefficients of rigid rocket are computed firstly and compared with the experimental data, which ver...

  10. Calculation of Ground Shock Motion Produced by Airburst Explosions Using Cagniard Elastic Propagation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    de.tona1Uted1 over a mass;ive Kayenta sandstone formation. Thes- e.ventsl- provi ic data for checking, the calculations for motion in :1 s;trong1...53 ~ l Z Kayenta ;andst-ne depOsit similar to thit, of CUNSf 1. The thickness of the soil was v,ried from 0 to 6 ft. Measurements of vertical and

  11. The K + - Nucleus Microscopic Optical Potential and Calculations of the Corresponding Differential Elastic and Total Reaction Cross Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemlyanaya, E.V.; Lukyanov, K.V.; Lukyanov, V.K.; Hanna, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    The microscopic optical potential (OP) is calculated for the K+-meson scattering on the 12 C and 40 Ca nuclei at intermediate energies. This potential has no free parameters and based on the known kaon-nucleon amplitude and nuclear density distribution functions. Then, the Klein-Gordon equation is written in the form of the relativistic Schrodinger equation where terms quadratic in the potential was estimated can be neglected. The latter equations adapted to the considered task and solved numerically. The effect of revitalization is shown to play a significant role. A good agreement with the experimental data on differential elastic cross sections is obtained. However, to explain the data on total reaction cross sections the additional surface term of OP was introduced to account for influence of the peripheral nuclear reaction channels

  12. A measurement of the {psi}' to J/{psi} production ratio in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Werner-Heisenberg-Institut, Muenchen (Germany); Adams, M. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Agari, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (DE)] (and others)

    2006-07-15

    Ratios of the {psi}' over the J/{psi} production cross sections in the dilepton channel for C, Ti and W targets have been measured in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions with the HERA-B detector at the HERA storage ring. The {psi}' and J/{psi} states were reconstructed in both the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and the e{sup +}e{sup -} decay modes. The measurements covered the kinematic range -0.35{<=}x{sub F}{<=}0.1 with transverse momentum p{sub T}{<=}4.5 GeV/c. The {psi}' to J/{psi} production ratio is almost constant in the covered x{sub F} range and shows a slow increase with p{sub T}. The angular dependence of the ratio has been used to measure the difference of the {psi}' and J/{psi} polarization. All results for the muon and electron decay channels are in good agreement: their ratio, averaged over all events, is R{sub {psi}}{sub '}({mu})/R{sub {psi}}{sub '}(e)=1.00{+-}0.08{+-}0.04. This result constitutes a new, direct experimental constraint on the double ratio of branching fractions, (B'({mu}).B(e))/(B({mu}).B'(e)), of {psi}'' and J/{psi} in the two channels. (orig.)

  13. Towards an automated tool to evaluate the impact of the nuclear modification of the gluon density on quarkonium, D and B meson production in proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe

    2016-12-27

    We propose a simple and model-independent procedure to account for the impact of the nuclear modification of the gluon density as encoded in nuclear collinear PDF sets on two-to-two partonic hard processes in proton-nucleus collisions. This applies to a good approximation to quarkonium, D and B meson production, generically referred to H. Our procedure consists in parametrising the square of the parton scattering amplitude, A_{gg -> H X} and constraining it from the proton-proton data. Doing so, we have been able to compute the corresponding nuclear modification factors for J/psi, Upsilon and D^0 as a function of y and P_T at sqrt(s_NN)=5 and 8 TeV in the kinematics of the various LHC experiments in a model independent way. It is of course justified since the most important ingredient in such evaluations is the probability of each kinematical configuration. Our computations for D mesons can also be extended to B meson production. To further illustrate the potentiality of the tool, we provide --for the first t...

  14. Backward emission mechanism of energetic protons studied from two-particle correlations in 800 MeV proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miake, Yasuo

    1982-07-01

    The production mechanism of backward energetic protons was studied in 800 MeV proton-nucleus collision from the measurement of two-particle correlation over a wide range of kinematic regions. The backward energetic protons at 118 deg were measured in coincidence with the particles emitted in the angular range from 15 deg to 100 deg. Both in-plane and out-of-plane coincidences were measured. The backward energetic protons were detected with a delta E-E counter in a momentum region from 350 to 750 MeV/c, whereas the coincident particles were detected with a magnetic spectrometer in the momentum region from 450 to 2000 MeV/c. The reaction process of the backward protons were decomposed into six categories by the measurement of the associated particles, p or d. The momentum spectra, angular distribution and the target mass dependence of these components were studied. The component of p-p QES was well reproduced by the PW1A model, but the backward energetic protons were not from this process. The momenta of two nucleons inside the quasi-deuteron are highly correlated. The components of p-p non-QES and p-p out-of-plane are the main components of the backward energetic proton production. (Kako, I.)

  15. On the dependance of the ''normalized multiplicity'' of particles produced in proton-nucleus interactions on the primary energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babecki, J.

    1975-01-01

    The mean ''normalized multiplicities'' of particles produced in p-nucleus interactions: with the leading particles (R 1 ) and without them (R 2 ) were calculated from the emulsion data. The independence of R 2 of the primary energy E 0 were stated in very wide interval of E 0 from 6.2 to thousands of GeV. R 2 is approximately equal to the mean number of collisions of the primary particle in the nucleus. (author)

  16. Elastic scattering of protons on 8Li nucleus in inverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhusupov, M.A.; Ibraeva, E.T.; Sanfirova, A.B.; Imambekov, O.

    2002-01-01

    In the present paper the proton elastic scattering on 8 Li in inverse kinematics is studies. The inverse kinematics means that a beam of radioactive nuclei is scattered on a stable hydrogen target. Proton as a target has an advantage during the interaction since it is stable and mechanism of proton-nucleus scattering is quite simple. 8 Li nucleus is considered in the three-body αtn-model with realistic potential of inter-cluster interactions. The wave function of this nucleus is calculated in the work where it was shown that such model well describes the main spectroscopic characteristics of the nucleus, root-mean square radius, binding energy, location of low laying energy levels, magnetic momentum and also total cross section and 7 Li(n, γ) 8 Li reaction rate at a wide energy region. Within Glauber-Sitenko multiply scattering theory, the differential cross section of elastic p 8 Li-scattering has been calculated. The first and the second multiplicities of scattering on nucleons and clusters of the nucleus were taken into account in Ω multiply scattering operator. There were considered several cases when as the initial parameters both amplitudes of nucleon-nucleon and nucleon-cluster scattering were taken. Sensitivity of the differential cross section both to the different wave functions of the target-nucleus and to the parameters of the elementary amplitudes and sensitivity to the scattering multiplicities at several beam energies has been investigated. Comparison with differential cross sections of elastic p 6 Li- and p 7 Li scattering has been carried out

  17. Pressure dependence of elastic and dynamical properties of zinc-blende ZnS and ZnSe from first principle calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Y. Wang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The density-functional theory (DFT and density-functional perturbation theory (DFPT are employed to study the pressure dependence of elastic and dynamical properties of zinc-blende ZnS and ZnSe. The calculated elastic constants and phonon spectra from 0 GPa to 15 GPa are compared with the available experimental data. Generally, our calculated values are overestimated with experimental data, but agree well with recent other theoretical values. The discrepancies with experimental data are due to the use of local density approximation (LDA and effect of temperature. In this work, in order to compare with experimental data, we calculated and discussed the pressure derivatives of elastic constants, the pressure dependence of dynamical effect charge, and mode Grüneisen parameter at Γ.

  18. Dipole response of the odd-proton nucleus 205Tl up to the neutron-separation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benouaret, N.; Beller, J.; Pai, H.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu; Romig, C.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Zweidinger, M.; Scheck, M.; Isaak, J.; Savran, D.; Sonnabend, K.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H. R.; Kelley, J. H.

    2016-11-01

    The low-lying electromagnetic dipole strength of the odd-proton nuclide 205Tl has been investigated up to the neutron separation energy exploiting the method of nuclear resonance fluorescence. In total, 61 levels of 205Tl have been identified. The measured strength distribution of 205Tl is discussed and compared to those of even-even and even-odd mass nuclei in the same mass region as well as to calculations that have been performed within the quasi-particle phonon model.

  19. Theoretical study of intermediate-mass fragments in proton-nucleus reactions at 200 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabra, Mohammad S. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, USRA Space Science Department, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    2017-03-15

    We have analyzed energy spectra, angular distributions, and mass and charge distributions of intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs) from the interaction of {sup 27}Al, {sup 59}Co, and {sup 197}Au with 200 MeV protons. Calculations within the modified statistical model with final-state interaction were performed using SAPTON code. Within the experimental uncertainty and constraint, SAPTON shows good agreement with the data, and suggests that the IMFs are produced after the intra-nuclear cascade stage, and during the surface coalescence, as well as the evaporation/fission stages. (orig.)

  20. Dipole response of the odd-proton nucleus 205Tl up to the neutron-separation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benouaret, N; Beller, J; Pai, H; Pietralla, N; Ponomarev, V Yu; Romig, C; Schnorrenberger, L; Zweidinger, M; Scheck, M; Isaak, J; Savran, D; Sonnabend, K; Raut, R; Rusev, G; Tonchev, A P; Tornow, W; Weller, H R; Kelley, J H

    2016-01-01

    The low-lying electromagnetic dipole strength of the odd-proton nuclide 205 Tl has been investigated up to the neutron separation energy exploiting the method of nuclear resonance fluorescence. In total, 61 levels of 205 Tl have been identified. The measured strength distribution of 205 Tl is discussed and compared to those of even–even and even–odd mass nuclei in the same mass region as well as to calculations that have been performed within the quasi-particle phonon model. (paper)

  1. Elastic and thermo-physical properties of TiC, TiN, and their intermediate composition alloys using ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jiwoong; Kang, Shinhoo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Elastic properties of TiC, TiN and their alloys were calculated by ab initio calculations. ► Debye temperature and Gruneisen constant of TiC, TiN and their alloys were calculated as a function of nitrogen content. ► Thermo-physical properties were calculated as a function of nitrogen content. ► Thermal expansion of the alloys was fitted in different temperature range. - Abstract: The equilibrium lattice parameters, elastic properties, material brittleness, heat capacities, and thermal expansion coefficients of TiC, TiN, and their intermediate composition alloys (Ti(C 1−x N x ), x = 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75) were calculated using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods. We employed the Debye–Gruneisen model to calculate a finite temperature heat capacity and thermal expansion coefficient. The calculated elastic moduli and thermal expansion coefficients agreed well with the experimental data and with other DFT calculations. Accurate heat capacities of TiC, TiN, and their intermediate composition alloys were obtained by calculating not only the phonon contributions but also the electron contributions to the heat capacity. Our calculations indicated that the heat capacity differences between each composition originated mainly from the electronic contributions.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations to calculate glass transition temperature and elastic constants of novel polyethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangapani, Radhakrishnan; Reddy, Sreekantha T; Sikder, Arun K

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations studies are carried out on hydroxyl terminated polyethers that are useful in energetic polymeric binder applications. Energetic polymers derived from oxetanes with heterocyclic side chains with different energetic substituents are designed and simulated under the ensembles of constant particle number, pressure, temperature (NPT) and constant particle number, volume, temperature (NVT). Specific volume of different amorphous polymeric models is predicted using NPT-MD simulations as a function of temperature. Plots of specific volume versus temperature exhibited a characteristic change in slope when amorphous systems change from glassy to rubbery state. Several material properties such as Young's, shear, and bulk modulus, Poisson's ratio, etc. are predicted from equilibrated structures and established the structure-property relations among designed polymers. Energetic performance parameters of these polymers are calculated and results reveal that the performance of the designed polymers is comparable to the benchmark energetic polymers like polyNIMMO, polyAMMO and polyBAMO. Overall, it is worthy remark that this molecular simulations study on novel energetic polyethers provides a good guidance on mastering the design principles and allows us to design novel polymers of tailored properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anisotropic kernel p(μ → μ') for transport calculations of elastically scattered neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, B.

    1985-01-01

    Literature in the area of anisotropic neutron scattering is by no means lacking. Attention, however, is usually devoted to solution of some particular neutron transport problem and the model employed is at best approximate. The present approach to the problem in general is classically exact and may be of some particular value to individuals seeking exact numerical results in transport calculations. For attempts neutrons originally directed toward the unit vector Omega, it attempts the evaluation of p(theta'), defined such that p(theta') d theta' is that fraction of scattered neutrons that emerges in the vicinity of a cone i.e., having been scattered to between angles theta' and theta' + d theta' with the axis of preferred orientation i; Omega makes an angle theta with i. The relative simplicity of the final form of the solution for hydrogen, in spite of the complicated nature of the limits involved, is a trade-off that truly is not necessary. The exact general solution presented here in integral form, has exceedingly simple limits, i.e., 0 ≤ theta' ≤ π regardless of the material involved; but the form of the final solution is extraordinarily complicated

  4. The structural, elastic, electronic and dynamical properties of chalcopyrite semiconductor BeGeAs{sub 2} from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftci, Yasemin Oe. [Gazi University Teknikokullar, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara (Turkey); Evecen, Meryem; Aldirmaz, Emine [Amasya University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Amasya (Turkey)

    2017-01-15

    First-principles calculations for the structural, elastic, electronic and vibrational properties of BeGeAs{sub 2} with chalcopyrite structure have been reported in the frame work of the density functional theory. The calculated ground state properties are in good agreement with the available data. By considering the electronic band structure and electronic density of states calculation, it is found that this compound is a semiconductor which confirmed the previous work. Single-crystal elastic constants and related properties such as Young's modulus, Poisson ratio, shear modulus and bulk modulus have been predicted using the stress-finite strain technique. It can be seen from the calculated elastic constants that this compound is mechanically stable in the chalcopyrite structure. Pressure dependences of elastic constants and band gap are also reported. Finally, the phonon dispersion curves and total and partial density of states were calculated and discussed. The calculated phonon frequencies BeGeAs{sub 2} are positive, indicating the dynamical stability of the studied compound. (orig.)

  5. Crystal structures, stability, electronic and elastic properties of 4d and 5d transition metal monoborides: First-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Liu, H.Y.; Ding, Z.H.; Ma, Y.M.; Wang, X.D.; Cao, Q.P.; Jiang, J.Z.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Changes from NaCl-, WC- to anti-NiAs-type structures are for 4d and 5d metal monoborides. ► Vickers hardnesses of monoborides are relatively low. ► B-vacancies cause the difference in lattice parameters for IrB and PtB. ► Nonstoichiometric IrB and PtB phases synthesized. - Abstract: The crystal structures, stability, electronic and elastic properties of 4d and 5d transition metal monoborides have been studied by first principles calculations. It is found that NaCl-type ZrB, NbB, MoB, HfB, TaB and WB, WC-type TcB, RuB, ReB, OsB and IrB, and anti-NiAs-type RhB and PdB are thermodynamically stable at zero pressure. They all are metallic. The Vickers hardnesses of these monoborides are relatively low as compared with monocarbides and mononitrides. It is clarified that the presence of B-vacancies is the origin for the difference of lattice parameters between theoretical and experimental results for WC-type IrB and anti-NiAs-type PtB while IrB and PtB with stoichiometry from calculations are revealed to be mechanically unstable and dynamically unstable, respectively.

  6. Crystal structures, stability, electronic and elastic properties of 4d and 5d transition metal monoborides: First-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Chen, W. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Zhejiang University, and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chen, X.; Liu, H.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Ding, Z.H.; Ma, Y.M. [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang, X.D.; Cao, Q.P. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Zhejiang University, and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Jiang, J.Z., E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Zhejiang University, and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changes from NaCl-, WC- to anti-NiAs-type structures are for 4d and 5d metal monoborides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vickers hardnesses of monoborides are relatively low. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer B-vacancies cause the difference in lattice parameters for IrB and PtB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nonstoichiometric IrB and PtB phases synthesized. - Abstract: The crystal structures, stability, electronic and elastic properties of 4d and 5d transition metal monoborides have been studied by first principles calculations. It is found that NaCl-type ZrB, NbB, MoB, HfB, TaB and WB, WC-type TcB, RuB, ReB, OsB and IrB, and anti-NiAs-type RhB and PdB are thermodynamically stable at zero pressure. They all are metallic. The Vickers hardnesses of these monoborides are relatively low as compared with monocarbides and mononitrides. It is clarified that the presence of B-vacancies is the origin for the difference of lattice parameters between theoretical and experimental results for WC-type IrB and anti-NiAs-type PtB while IrB and PtB with stoichiometry from calculations are revealed to be mechanically unstable and dynamically unstable, respectively.

  7. Calculations of elastic, ionization and total cross sections for inert gases upon electron impact: threshold to 2 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinodkumar, Minaxi [V P and R P T P Science College, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, Gujarat (India); Limbachiya, Chetan [P S Science College, Kadi 382 715, Gujarat (India); Antony, Bobby [Department of Environmental, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 265 Riverside Street, Lowell, MA 01854-5045 (United States); Joshipura, K N [Department of Physics, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, Gujarat (India)

    2007-08-28

    In this paper we report comprehensive calculations of total elastic (Q{sub el}), total ionization (Q{sub ion}) and total (complete) cross sections (Q{sub T}) for the impact of electrons on inert gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) at energies from about threshold to 2000 eV. We have employed the spherical complex optical potential (SCOP) formalism to evaluate Q{sub el} and Q{sub T} and used the complex spherical potential-ionization contribution (CSP-ic) method to derive Q{sub ion}. The dependence of Q{sub T} on polarizability and incident energy is presented for these targets through an analytical formula. Mutual comparison of various cross sections is provided to show their relative contribution to the total cross sections Q{sub T}. Comparison of Q{sub T} for all these targets is carried out to present a general theoretical picture of collision processes. The present calculations also provide information, hitherto sparse, on the excitation processes of these atomic targets. These results are compared with available experimental and other theoretical data and overall good agreement is observed.

  8. A comparison of three time-dependent wave packet methods for calculating electron--atom elastic scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson, R.S.; McGarrah, D.B.; Sharafeddin, O.A.; Kouri, D.J.; Hoffman, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    We compare three time-dependent wave packet methods for performing elastic scattering calculations from screened Coulomb potentials. The three methods are the time-dependent amplitude density method (TDADM), what we term a Cayley-transform method (CTM), and the Chebyshev propagation method of Tal-Ezer and Kosloff. Both the TDADM and the CTM are based on a time-dependent integral equation for the wave function. In the first, we propagate the time-dependent amplitude density, |ζ(t)right-angle=U|ψ(t)right-angle, where U is the interaction potential and |ψ(t)right-angle is the usual time-dependent wave function. In the other two, the wave function is propagated. As a numerical example, we calculate phase shifts and cross sections using a screened Coulomb, Yukawa type potential over the range 200--1000 eV. One of the major advantages of time-dependent methods such as these is that we get scattering information over this entire range of energies from one propagation. We find that in most cases, all three methods yield comparable accuracy and are about equally efficient computationally. However for l=0, where the Coulomb well is not screened by the centrifugal potential, the TDADM requires smaller grid spacings to maintain accuracy

  9. Target fragmentation in proton-nucleus and 16O-nucleus reactions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.R.; Albrecht, R.; Claesson, G.; Bock, R.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Kolb, B.W.; Lund, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Awes, T.C.; Baktash, C.; Ferguson, R.L.; Lee, I.Y.; Obenshain, F.E.; Plasil, F.; Sorensen, S.P.; Young, G.R.; Beckmann, P.; Berger, F.; Dragon, L.; Glasow, R.; Kampert, K.H.; Loehner, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Purschke, M.; Santo, R.; Franz, A.; Kristiansson, P.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Ritter, H.G.; Garpman, S.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Persson, S.; Stenlund, E.

    1988-01-01

    Target remnants with Z 16 O-nucleus reactions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon were measured in the angular range from 30 0 to 160 0 (-1.7 16 O-induced reactions (≅ 300 MeV/c) than in proton-induced reactions (≅ 130 MeV/c). The baryon rapidity distributions are roughly in agreement with one-fluid hydrodynamical calculations at 60 GeV/nucleon 16 O+Au but are in disagreement at 200 GeV/nucleon, indicating the higher degree of transparency at the higher bombarding energy. Both, the transverse momenta of target spectators and the entropy produced in the target fragmentation region are compared to those attained in head-on collisions of two heavy nuclei at Bevalac energies. They are found to be comparable or do even exceed the values for the participant matter at beam energies of about 1-2 GeV/nucleon. (orig.)

  10. Target fragmentation in proton-nucleus and 16O-nucleus reactions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.R.; Albrecht, R.; Claesson, G.; Bock, R.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Kolb, B.W.; Lund, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Awes, T.C.; Baktash, C.; Ferguson, R.L.; Lee, I.Y.; Obenshain, F.E.; Plasil, F.; Sorensen, S.P.; Young, G.R.; Beckmann, P.; Berger, F.; Dragon, L.; Glasow, R.; Kampert, K.H.; Loehner, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Purschke, M.; Santo, R.; Franz, A.; Kristiansson, P.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Ritter, H.G.; Garpman, S.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Persson, S.; Stenlund, E.

    1988-01-01

    Target remnants with Z 16 O-nucleus reactions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon were measured in the angular range from 30 0 to 160 0 (-1.7 16 O-induced reactions (= 300 MeV/c) than in proton-induced reactions (= 130 MeV/c). The baryon rapidity distributions are roughly in agreement with one-fluid hydrodynamical calculations at 60 GeV/nucleon 16 O+Au but are in disagreement at 200 GeV/nucleon, indicating the higher degree of transparency at the higher bombarding energy. Both, the transverse momenta of target spectators and the entropy produced in the target fragmentation region are compared to those attained in head-on collisions of two heavy nuclei at Bevalac energies. They are found to be comparable or do even exceed the values for the participant matter at beam energies of about 1-2 GeV/nucleon. (orig.)

  11. Elastic properties of fcc Fe–Mn–X (X = Cr, Co, Ni, Cu) alloys studied by the combinatorial thin film approach and ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeh, S; Kasprzak, M; Klusmann, C D; Stalf, F; Music, D; Schneider, J M; Ekholm, M; Abrikosov, I A

    2013-01-01

    The elastic properties of fcc Fe–Mn–X (X = Cr, Co, Ni, Cu) alloys with additions of up to 8 at.% X were studied by combinatorial thin film growth and characterization and by ab initio calculations using the disordered local moments (DLM) approach. The lattice parameter and Young’s modulus values change only marginally with X. The calculations and experiments are in good agreement. We demonstrate that the elastic properties of transition metal alloyed Fe–Mn can be predicted by the DLM model. (paper)

  12. Elastic properties of fcc Fe-Mn-X (X = Cr, Co, Ni, Cu) alloys studied by the combinatorial thin film approach and ab initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeh, S; Kasprzak, M; Klusmann, C D; Stalf, F; Music, D; Ekholm, M; Abrikosov, I A; Schneider, J M

    2013-06-19

    The elastic properties of fcc Fe-Mn-X (X = Cr, Co, Ni, Cu) alloys with additions of up to 8 at.% X were studied by combinatorial thin film growth and characterization and by ab initio calculations using the disordered local moments (DLM) approach. The lattice parameter and Young's modulus values change only marginally with X. The calculations and experiments are in good agreement. We demonstrate that the elastic properties of transition metal alloyed Fe-Mn can be predicted by the DLM model.

  13. Target fragmentation in proton-nucleus and16O-nucleus reactions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, R.; Awes, T. C.; Baktash, C.; Beckmann, P.; Claesson, G.; Berger, F.; Bock, R.; Dragon, L.; Ferguson, R. L.; Franz, A.; Garpman, S.; Glasow, R.; Gustafsson, H. Å.; Gutbrod, H. H.; Kampert, K. H.; Kolb, B. W.; Kristiansson, P.; Lee, I. Y.; Löhner, H.; Lund, I.; Obenshain, F. E.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Peitzmann, T.; Persson, S.; Plasil, F.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Purschke, M.; Ritter, H. G.; Santo, R.; Schmidt, H. R.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sorensen, S. P.; Stenlund, E.; Young, G. R.

    1988-03-01

    Target remnants with ZPlastic Ball detector. The excitation energy of the target spectator matter in central oxygen-induced collisions is found to be high enough to allow for complete disintegration of the target nucleus into fragments with Z<3. The average longitudinal momentum transfer per proton to the target in central collisions is considerably higher in the case of16O-induced reactions (≈300 MeV/c) than in proton-induced reactions (≈130 MeV/c). The baryon rapidity distributions are roughly in agreement with one-fluid hydrodynamical calculations at 60 GeV/nucleon16O+Au but are in disagreement at 200 GeV/nucleon, indicating the higher degree of transparency at the higher bombarding energy. Both, the transverse momenta of target spectators and the entropy produced in the target fragmentation region are compared to those attained in head-on collisions of two heavy nuclei at Bevalac energies. They are found to be comparable or do even exceed the values for the participant matter at beam energies of about 1 2 GeV/nucleon.

  14. Top-quark production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David; Paukkunen, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Single and pair top-quark production in proton-lead (p-Pb) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and future circular collider (FCC) energies, are studied with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations including nuclear parton distribution functions. At the LHC, the pair-production cross sections amount to sigma(t-tbar) = 3.4 mub in Pb-Pb at sqrt(s) = 5.5 TeV, and sigma(t-tbar) = 60 nb in p-Pb at sqrt(s) = 8.8 TeV. At the FCC energies of sqrt(s) = 39 and 63 TeV, the same cross sections are factors of 90 and 55 times larger respectively. In the leptonic final-state t-tbar --> W+b W-bbar --> b bbar l+l- nu+nu-, after typical acceptance and efficiency cuts, one expects about 90 and 300 top-quarks per nominal LHC-year and 4.7 10^4 and 10^5 per FCC-year in Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions respectively. The total t-tbar cross sections, dominated by gluon fusion processes, are enhanced by 3--8% in nuclear compared to p-p collisions due to an overall net gluon antishadowing, altho...

  15. Comparative first-principles calculations of the electronic, optical, elastic and thermodynamic properties of XCaF{sub 3} (X = K, Rb, Cs) cubic perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Li; Wang, Y.-J. [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 2 Chongwen Road, Nan' an District, Chongqing 400065 (China); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Liu, D.-X.; Ma, C.-G. [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 2 Chongwen Road, Nan' an District, Chongqing 400065 (China); Brik, M.G., E-mail: mikhail.brik@ut.ee [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 2 Chongwen Road, Nan' an District, Chongqing 400065 (China); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwald Str. 1, Tartu 50411 (Estonia); Institute of Physics, Jan Długosz University, Armii Krajowej 13/15, PL-42200 Częstochowa (Poland); Suchocki, A. [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 2 Chongwen Road, Nan' an District, Chongqing 400065 (China); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Physics, Kazimierz Wielki University, Weyssenhoffa 11, 85-072 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Piasecki, M. [Institute of Physics, Jan Długosz University, Armii Krajowej 13/15, PL-42200 Częstochowa (Poland); Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies – Research Centre, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2017-02-15

    Three fluoroperovskites with the general formula XCaF{sub 3} (X = K, Rb, Cs) have been systematically studied using the first-principles methods. The structural, electronic, optical, elastic and thermodynamic properties of these three compounds were calculated at the ambient and elevated hydrostatic pressure. Variation of all these properties with pressure was analyzed; it was shown that the structural and elastic constants change linearly with increased pressure, whereas the calculated band gaps follow the quadratic dependence on pressure. Influence of the first cation variation (K – Rb – Cs) on these properties was discussed. Elastic anisotropy (directional dependence of the Young moduli) of these compounds was modeled and analyzed for the first time. - Highlights: • Three cubic perovskites XCaF{sub 3} (X = K, Rb, Cs) were studied by ab initio methods. • Systematic variation of physical properties with the first cation change was traced. • Pressure effects on physical properties were calculated and modeled. • Debye temperature and Grüneisen constant for all materials were calculated for the first time. • Elastic anisotropy was visualized by plotting Young moduli directional dependences.

  16. Neutron Elastic Scattering Cross Sections Experimental Data and Optical Model Cross Section Calculations. A Compilation of Neutron Data from the Studsvik Neutron Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmqvist, B; Wiedling, T

    1969-06-15

    Neutron elastic scattering cross section measurements have been going on for a long period at the Studsvik Van de Graaff laboratory. The cross sections of a range of elements have been investigated in the energy interval 1.5 to 8 MeV. The experimental data have been compared with cross sections calculated with the optical model when using a local nuclear potential.

  17. Full-potential calculations of structural, elastic and electronic properties of MgAl2O4 and ZnAl2O4 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khenata, R.; Sahnoun, M.; Baltache, H.; Rerat, M.; Reshak, Ali H.; Al-Douri, Y.; Bouhafs, B.

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical studies of structural, elastic and electronic properties of spinel MgAl 2 O 4 and ZnAl 2 O 4 oxides are presented, using the full-potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method as implemented in the WIEN97 code. In this approach the local density approximation (LDA) is used for the exchange-correlation (XC) potential. Results are given for lattice constant, bulk modulus, and its pressure derivative. The band structure, density of states, pressure coefficients of energy gaps and elastic constants are also given. We present a detailed comparison with available experimental data and previous calculations. Good agreement is found

  18. Structural, electronic, elastic, and thermodynamic properties of CaSi, Ca2Si, and CaSi2 phases from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. D.; Li, K.; Wei, C. H.; Han, W. D.; Zhou, N. G.

    2018-06-01

    The structural, electronic, elastic, and thermodynamic properties of CaSi, Ca2Si, and CaSi2 are systematically investigated by using first-principles calculations method based on density functional theory (DFT). The calculated formation enthalpies and cohesive energies show that CaSi2 possesses the greatest structural stability and CaSi has the strongest alloying ability. The structural stability of the three phases is compared according to electronic structures. Further analysis on electronic structures indicates that the bonding of these phases exhibits the combinations of metallic, covalent, and ionic bonds. The elastic constants are calculated, and the bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and anisotropy factor of polycrystalline materials are deduced. Additionally, the thermodynamic properties were theoretically predicted and discussed.

  19. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: First-principles calculations for the elastic properties of Ni-base model superalloys: Ni/Ni3Al multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Jiang; Wang, Chong-Yu

    2009-10-01

    A model system consisting of Ni[001](100)/Ni3Al[001](100) multi-layers are studied using the density functional theory in order to explore the elastic properties of single crystal Ni-based superalloys. Simulation results are consistent with the experimental observation that rafted Ni-base superalloys virtually possess a cubic symmetry. The convergence of the elastic properties with respect to the thickness of the multilayers are tested by a series of multilayers from 2γ'+2γ to 10γ'+10γ atomic layers. The elastic properties are found to vary little with the increase of the multilayer's thickness. A Ni/Ni3Al multilayer with 10γ'+10γ atomic layers (3.54 nm) can be used to simulate the mechanical properties of Ni-base model superalloys. Our calculated elastic constants, bulk modulus, orientation-dependent shear modulus and Young's modulus, as well as the Zener anisotropy factor are all compatible with the measured results of Ni-base model superalloys R1 and the advanced commercial superalloys TMS-26, CMSX-4 at a low temperature. The mechanical properties as a function of the γ' phase volume fraction are calculated by varying the proportion of the γ and γ' phase in the multilayers. Besides, the mechanical properties of two-phase Ni/Ni3Al multilayer can be well predicted by the Voigt-Reuss-Hill rule of mixtures.

  20. First-principle calculations of the structural, elastic and bonding properties of Cs{sub 2}NaLnCl{sub 6} (Ln=La–Lu) cubic elpasolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C.G.; Liu, D.X.; Feng, B.; Tian, Y.; Li, L. [College of Sciences, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Brik, M.G., E-mail: mikhail.brik@ut.ee [College of Sciences, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14C, Tartu 50411 (Estonia); Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Armii Krajowej 13/15, PL-42200 Czestochowa (Poland)

    2016-01-15

    For the first time the structural, elastic and bonding properties of 15 elpasolite crystals Cs{sub 2}NaLnCl{sub 6} (Ln denotes all lanthanides from La to Lu) were calculated systematically using the CRYSTAL09 program. Several trends in the variation of these properties in relation to the atomic number Z of the Ln ions were found; in particular, the lattice parameter of these compounds decreases with Z (which can lead to the increased crystal field splittings of the 5d states for the heavier Ln ions), whereas the elastic constants and Debye temperature increase. The degree of covalency of the Ln–Cl chemical bonds is increased toward the end of the lanthanide series. - Highlights: • Structural, elastic and bonding properties of 15 cubic elpasolites Cs{sub 2}NaLnCl{sub 6} (Ln=La,…,Lu) are calculated. • Relations between these quantities and Ln atomic number were found. • Possible correlation between the elastic properties and Stokes shift is proposed.

  1. FP-LAPW calculations of the elastic, electronic and thermoelectric properties of the filled skutterudite CeRu4Sb12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, A.; Rai, D.P.; Chettri, Sandeep; Khenata, R.; Thapa, R.K.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure, elastic and thermoelectric properties of the filled skutterudite CeRu 4 Sb 12 using the density functional theory (DFT). The full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within a framework of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) approach is used to perform the calculations presented here. The electronic structure calculation suggests an indirect band gap semiconducting nature of the material with energy band gap of 0.08 eV. The analysis of the elastic constants at relaxed positions reveals the ductile nature of the sample material with covalent contribution in the inter-atomic bonding. The narrow band gap semiconducting nature with high value of Seebeck coefficient suggests the possibility of the thermoelectric application of the material. The analysis of the thermal transport properties confirms the result obtained from the energy band structure of the material with high thermopower and dimensionless figure of merit 0.19 at room temperature.

  2. Intermixing in heteroepitaxial islands: fast, self-consistent calculation of the concentration profile minimizing the elastic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, R; UhlIk, F; Montalenti, F

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel computational method for finding the concentration profile which minimizes the elastic energy stored in heteroepitaxial islands. Based on a suitable combination of continuum elasticity theory and configurational Monte Carlo, we show that such profiles can be readily found by a simple, yet fully self-consistent, iterative procedure. We apply the method to SiGe/Si islands, considering realistic three-dimensional shapes (pyramids, domes and barns), finding strongly non-uniform distributions of Si and Ge atoms, in qualitative agreement with several experiments. Moreover, our simulated selective-etching profiles display, in some cases, a remarkable resemblance to the experimental ones, opening intriguing questions on the interplay between kinetic, entropic and elastic effects

  3. Coupled-channel optical calculation of electron-hydrogen scattering: elastic scattering from 0.5 to 30 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, I.; Konovalov, D.A.; McCarthy, I.E.

    1991-01-01

    A coupled-channel optical method for electron-atomic hydrogen scattering is presented in a form that treats both the projectile and the target electrons symmetrically. Elastic differential cross sections are calculated at a range of energies from 0.5 to 30 eV and are found to be in complete agreement with the absolute measurements, previously reported. Total and total ionization cross sections are also presented. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  4. Structural, elastic and electronic Properties of isotropic cubic crystals of carbon and silicon nanotubes : Density functional based tight binding calculations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Ivanovskii

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic models of cubic crystals (CC of carbon and graphene-like Si nanotubes are offered and their structural, cohesive, elastic and electronic properties are predicted by means of the DFTB method. Our main findings are that the isotropic crystals of carbon nanotubes adopt a very high elastic modulus B and low compressibility β, namely B = 650 GPa, β = 0.0015 1/GPa. In addition, these crystals preserve the initial conductivity type of their “building blocks”, i.e. isolated carbon and Si nanotubes. This feature may be important for design of materials with the selected conductivity type.

  5. Elastic, electronic properties and intra-atomic bonding in orthorhombic and tetragonal polymorphs of BaZn2As2 from first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shein, I.R.; Ivanovskii, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • α and β polymorphs of BaZn 2 As 2 as a parent phase of the new DMSs are examined. • Structural, elastic, electronic properties are evaluated from first principles. • Inter-atomic bonding picture is discussed. -- Abstract: Very recently, on the example of hole- and spin-doped BaZn 2 As 2 , quite an unexpected area of potential applications of 122-like phases was proposed as a promising platform for searching the new diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) (2013; K. Zhao, et al, Nature Commun. 4:1442). Herein, by means of the first-principles calculations, we have examined in detail the basic structural, elastic, electronic properties and the peculiarities of the inter-atomic bonding in α and β polymorphs of 122-like BaZn 2 As 2 – a parent phase of the new DMSs. Our characterization of these materials covers the optimized structural parameters, the main elastic parameters (elastic constants, bulk, shear, and Young’s moduli, Poisson’s ratio, anisotropy indexes, and Pugh’s criterion), as well as electronic bands and densities of electronic states

  6. Structural, elastic, and electronic properties of new 211 MAX phase Nb{sub 2}GeC from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shein, I.R. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Ivanovskii, A.L., E-mail: ivanovskii@ihim.uran.ru [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-01

    Very recently (2012, Phys. Rev Lett., 109, 035502) a new hexagonal (s.g. P63/mmc, Music-Sharp-Sign 194) ternary phase Nb{sub 2}GeC, which belongs to so-called 211-like MAX phases, was discovered. In order to get a systematic insight into the structural, elastic, and electronic properties of Nb{sub 2}GeC, we used two complementary DFT-based first-principles approaches (as implemented in the VASP and Wien2k packages) to calculate the optimized structural parameters, band structure, densities of state, Fermi surface, and a set of elastic parameters: elastic constants (C{sub ij}), bulk modulus (B), compressibility ({beta}), shear modulus (G), Young's modulus (Y), and elastic anisotropy indexes, which were discussed in comparison with available data. Besides, the inter-atomic bonding picture for Nb{sub 2}GeC was discussed using electron density maps and Bader's charge analysis.

  7. The estimation of production rates of $π^+ K^−, π^− K^+$ and $π^+π^−$ atoms in proton-nucleus interactions at 24 and 450 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Gorchakov, O

    2016-01-01

    Short-lived ( τ ∼ 3 × 10 − 15 s ) π + K − , K + π − and π + π − atoms as well as long-lived ( τ ≥ 1 × 10 − 11 s) π + π − atoms produced in proton-nucleus interactions at 24 GeV/c are observed and studied in the DIRAC experiment at the CERN P S. The purpose of this paper is to show that the yields of the short-lived π + K − , K + π − and π + π − atoms in proton-nucleus interactions at 450 GeV/c and θ lab = 4 ◦ are estimated to be, respectively, 17, 38 and 16 times higher. This may allow sign ificantly improving the precision of their lifetime measurement and ππ and πK scattering length combinations | a 0 − a 2 | and | a 1 / 2 − a 3 / 2 | . The yields of the long-lived π + K − , K + π − and π + π − atoms at 450 GeV/c are estimated to be 180,800 and 370 times higher p er time unit than at 24 GeV/c. This may allow the resonance method to be used for measuring the Lamb shift in the ππ atom and a new ππ scattering length combination 2a0 + a2 to be obtaine...

  8. Development and validation of an elastic and inelastic calculation method for tubes, based on beam models and taking into account the thermal stresses on the wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowiak, C.

    1989-11-01

    A simplified model for the elastic-plastic calculations of thin and flexible tubes submitted to thermal stresses is presented. The method is based on beam models and provides satisfactory results concerning the displacement of the whole tube system. These results can be justified by the fact that the modifications of the tube cross sections (from circular to elliptical), the flexibility of the elbow joints and the radial temperature profile are included in the calculations. The thermoplasticity analysis is performed by defining independent and general flow directions and determining the corresponding behavior laws. The model is limited to proportional monotonous charging, however the obtained results are promissing [fr

  9. Foundation calculation for buildings and structures with two elastic characteristics of the foundation using features of Fourier transformsfor finite functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurbatskiy Evgeniy Nikolaevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of a beam resting on elastic foundation often occurs in the analysis of building, geotechnical, highway, and railroad structures. Its solution demands modeling of the mechanical behavior of the beam, the mechanical behavior of the soil as elastic subgrade and the form of interaction between the beam and the soil. The oldest, most famous and most frequently used mechanical model is the one devised by Winkler (1867, in which the beam-supporting soil is modeled as a series of closely spaced, mutually independent, linear elastic vertical springs, which, evidently, provide resistance in direct proportion to the deflection of the beam.The solution is presented for the problem of an Euler–Bernoulli beam supported by an infinite two-parameter Pasternak foundation. The beam is subjected to arbitrarily distributed or concentrated vertical loading along its length. Static response of a beam on an elastic foundation characterized by two parameters is investigated assuming, that the beam is subjected to external loads and two concentrated edge load. The governing equations of the problem are obtained and solved by pointing out that there is a concentrated edge foundation reaction in addition to a continuous foundation reaction along the beam axis in the case of complete contact in the foundation reactions of the two-parameter foundation model. The proposed method is based on the properties of Fourier transforms of the finite functions. Particular attention is paid to the problem, taking into account the deformation of soil areas outside the beam. The beam model with two foundation coefficients more realistically describes the behavior of strip footings under loading.

  10. Electronic, elastic, thermodynamic properties and structure disorder of {gamma}-AlON solid solution from ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuezhong, E-mail: wyzphysics@163.com [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Tianjin Jinhang Institute of Technical Physics, Tianjin 300192 (China); Lu, Tiecheng, E-mail: lutiecheng@scu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); International Center for Material Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110015 (China); Zhang, Rongshi [Tianjin Jinhang Institute of Technical Physics, Tianjin 300192 (China); Jiang, Shengli; Qi, Jianqi; Wang, Ying [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Chen, Qingyun [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); National Defense Key Discipline Laboratory of Nuclear Waste and Environmental Safety, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Miao, Naihua [Physique Theorique des Materiaux, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B-4000 (Belgium); He, Duanwei [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We reassess the chemical bonding character of {gamma}-AlON which shows strong ionicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma}-AlON single-crystals exhibit highly elastic anisotropy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermodynamic properties are investigated in a wider temperature/pressure range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma}-AlON is an O/N partially disordered structure. - Abstract: Spinel aluminium oxynitride ({gamma}-AlON), as a kind of transparent ceramic material expectable, is studied using the ab initio density functional method, in terms of electronic, elastic, thermodynamic properties and structure disorder. The results show that {gamma}-AlON exhibits strong ionicity, as quantitatively expressed by (Al{sub O}{sup 2.43+}){sub 15}(Al{sub T}{sup 2.41+}){sub 8}(O{sup 1.64-}){sub 27}(N{sup 2.27-}){sub 5} from our reassessment of the ionic character. We summarize and speculate that the considered oxynitride single-crystals exhibit highly elastic anisotropy. The interpretation of the thermodynamic properties of {gamma}-AlON according to quasi-harmonic Debye model confirm the available experiments and are extended to a wider temperature/pressure range. This material holds high elastic strength under extreme environments, where dB/dT absolute value is less than 0.03 GPa/K, independent of the pressure. Finally, we study the O/N structure disorder character of {gamma}-AlON solid solution by investigating nine possible crystal structures. It is found that {gamma}-AlON should be partially disordered, and in fact, the O/N ordering has a significant effect on the properties.

  11. Electronic, elastic, thermodynamic properties and structure disorder of γ-AlON solid solution from ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yuezhong; Lu, Tiecheng; Zhang, Rongshi; Jiang, Shengli; Qi, Jianqi; Wang, Ying; Chen, Qingyun; Miao, Naihua; He, Duanwei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We reassess the chemical bonding character of γ-AlON which shows strong ionicity. ► γ-AlON single-crystals exhibit highly elastic anisotropy. ► The thermodynamic properties are investigated in a wider temperature/pressure range. ► γ-AlON is an O/N partially disordered structure. - Abstract: Spinel aluminium oxynitride (γ-AlON), as a kind of transparent ceramic material expectable, is studied using the ab initio density functional method, in terms of electronic, elastic, thermodynamic properties and structure disorder. The results show that γ-AlON exhibits strong ionicity, as quantitatively expressed by (Al O 2.43+ ) 15 (Al T 2.41+ ) 8 (O 1.64- ) 27 (N 2.27- ) 5 from our reassessment of the ionic character. We summarize and speculate that the considered oxynitride single-crystals exhibit highly elastic anisotropy. The interpretation of the thermodynamic properties of γ-AlON according to quasi-harmonic Debye model confirm the available experiments and are extended to a wider temperature/pressure range. This material holds high elastic strength under extreme environments, where dB/dT absolute value is less than 0.03 GPa/K, independent of the pressure. Finally, we study the O/N structure disorder character of γ-AlON solid solution by investigating nine possible crystal structures. It is found that γ-AlON should be partially disordered, and in fact, the O/N ordering has a significant effect on the properties.

  12. Monte Carlo calculations of the elastic moduli and pressure-volume-temperature equation of state for hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewell, Thomas D.; Bennett, Carl M.

    2000-01-01

    Isothermal-isobaric Monte Carlo calculations were used to obtain predictions of the elastic coefficients and derived engineering moduli and Poisson ratios for crystalline hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The elastic coefficients were computed using the strain fluctuation formula due to Rahman and Parrinello [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 2662 (1982)]. Calculations were performed as a function of temperature (218 K≤T≤333 K) and hydrostatic pressure (0 GPa≤p≤4 GPa). The predicted values of the moduli and Poisson ratios under ambient conditions are in accord with general expectations for molecular crystals and with a very recent, unpublished determination for RDX. The moduli exhibit a sensitive pressure dependence whereas the Poisson ratios are relatively independent of pressure. The temperature dependence of the moduli is comparable to the precision of the results. However, the crystal does exhibit thermal softening for most pressures. An additional product of the calculations is information about the pressure-volume-temperature (pVT) equation of state. We obtain near-quantitative agreement with experiment for the case of hydrostatic compression and reasonable, but not quantitative, correspondence for thermal expansion. The results indicate a significant dependence of the thermal expansion coefficients on hydrostatic pressure. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  13. First-principles calculation of the structural, electronic, elastic, and optical properties of sulfur-doping ε -GaSe crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chang-Bao; Wu Hai-Xin; Ni You-Bao; Wang Zhen-You; Qi Ming; Zhang Chun-Li

    2016-01-01

    The structural, electronic, mechanical properties, and frequency-dependent refractive indexes of GaSe 1–x S x (x = 0, 0.25, and 1) are studied by using the first-principles pseudopotential method within density functional theory. The calculated results demonstrate the relationships between intralayer structure and elastic modulus in GaSe 1–x S x (x = 0, 0.25, and 1). Doping of ε -GaSe with S strengthens the Ga– X bonds and increases its elastic moduli of C 11 and C 66 . Born effective charge analysis provides an explanation for the modification of cleavage properties about the doping of ε -GaSe with S. The calculated results of band gaps suggest that the distance between intralayer atom and substitution of S Se , rather than interlayer force, is a key factor influencing the electronic exciton energy of the layer semiconductor. The calculated refractive indexes indicate that the doping of ε -GaSe with S reduces its refractive index and increases its birefringence. (paper)

  14. First-principles calculation of the elastic constants, the electronic density of states and the ductility mechanism of the intermetallic compounds: YAg, YCu and YRh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yurong [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiantang 411201 (China); Hu Wangyu [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)], E-mail: wangyuhu2001cn@yahoo.com.cn; Han Shaochang [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2008-10-01

    First-principles calculations have been used to study the elastic and electronic properties of ductility rare-earth alloy YM (M=Ag, Cu, Rh) systems. The ductility mechanism for these alloys is studied from microscopic aspect, via electronic density of states (DOS). The Fermi energy lies near a local minimum, and the hybridization is stronger than that of the common NiAl alloy, demonstrating that the ductility of these alloys is much better than that of NiAl alloy. Elastic modulus, namely, shear modulus C'=(C{sub 11}-C{sub 12})/2, bulk modulus B and C{sub 44} are calculated by volume-conserving orthorhombic, hydrostatic pressure and tri-axial shear strain, respectively. Moreover, lattice parameters, antiphase boundary (APB) energies and unstable stacking fault energies of these alloys are also studied. The APB energies are greater than the unstable stacking fault energies for these alloy systems, and this is a characteristic of the ductility rare-earth alloy. The APB energies of YRh are the highest ones in these three YM alloys, which make dislocation dissociation difficult. The DOS and APB energy results show that the ductility of YRh may be worst in these three YM systems.

  15. Comparisons of vector analyzing-power data and calculations for neutron-deuteron elastic scattering from 10 to 14 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, C.R.; Tornow, W.; Murphy, K.; Pfuetzner, H.G.; Roberts, M.L.; Li, A.; Felsher, P.D.; Walter, R.L.; Slaus, I.; Treado, P.A.; Koike, Y.

    1987-01-01

    High-accuracy analyzing-power A y (θ) data for n-d elastic scattering at 12 MeV have been measured using the polarized-neutron facilities at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). The present data have been combined with previous n-d measurements at 10, 12, and 14.1 MeV to form the highest-accuracy A y (θ) data set for n-d elastic scattering below 20 MeV. These data are compared to recent Faddeev-based neutron-deuteron (n-d) calculations which use the Paris and Bonn equivalent separable potentials PEST and BEST, as well as Doleschall's representation of the P- and D-wave nucleon-nucleon interactions. None of these models adequately describe the data in the angular region around the maximum of A y (θ). Possible reasons for the discrepancies are discussed. The sensitivity of the present Faddeev-based calculations to various angular momentum components of the nucleon-nucleon interaction are examined. (Auth.)

  16. FP-LAPW calculations of the elastic, electronic and thermoelectric properties of the filled skutterudite CeRu{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, A., E-mail: amitshan2009@gmail.com [Condensed Matter Theory Group, Department of Physics, Mizoram University, 796004 (India); Rai, D.P. [Department of Physics, Pachhunga University College, Aizawl 796001 (India); Chettri, Sandeep [Condensed Matter Theory Group, Department of Physics, Mizoram University, 796004 (India); Khenata, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modélisation Mathématique (LPQ3M), Département de Technologie, Université de Mascara, 29000 (Algeria); Thapa, R.K. [Condensed Matter Theory Group, Department of Physics, Mizoram University, 796004 (India)

    2016-08-15

    We have investigated the electronic structure, elastic and thermoelectric properties of the filled skutterudite CeRu{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} using the density functional theory (DFT). The full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within a framework of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) approach is used to perform the calculations presented here. The electronic structure calculation suggests an indirect band gap semiconducting nature of the material with energy band gap of 0.08 eV. The analysis of the elastic constants at relaxed positions reveals the ductile nature of the sample material with covalent contribution in the inter-atomic bonding. The narrow band gap semiconducting nature with high value of Seebeck coefficient suggests the possibility of the thermoelectric application of the material. The analysis of the thermal transport properties confirms the result obtained from the energy band structure of the material with high thermopower and dimensionless figure of merit 0.19 at room temperature.

  17. First-principles calculation of the elastic constants, the electronic density of states and the ductility mechanism of the intermetallic compounds: YAg, YCu and YRh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yurong; Hu Wangyu; Han Shaochang

    2008-01-01

    First-principles calculations have been used to study the elastic and electronic properties of ductility rare-earth alloy YM (M=Ag, Cu, Rh) systems. The ductility mechanism for these alloys is studied from microscopic aspect, via electronic density of states (DOS). The Fermi energy lies near a local minimum, and the hybridization is stronger than that of the common NiAl alloy, demonstrating that the ductility of these alloys is much better than that of NiAl alloy. Elastic modulus, namely, shear modulus C'=(C 11 -C 12 )/2, bulk modulus B and C 44 are calculated by volume-conserving orthorhombic, hydrostatic pressure and tri-axial shear strain, respectively. Moreover, lattice parameters, antiphase boundary (APB) energies and unstable stacking fault energies of these alloys are also studied. The APB energies are greater than the unstable stacking fault energies for these alloy systems, and this is a characteristic of the ductility rare-earth alloy. The APB energies of YRh are the highest ones in these three YM alloys, which make dislocation dissociation difficult. The DOS and APB energy results show that the ductility of YRh may be worst in these three YM systems

  18. GEO-MIX-SELF calculations of the elastic properties of a textured graphite sample at different hydrostatic pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthies, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed GEO-MIX-SELF approximation (GMS) is applied to interpret the pressure dependence of the longitudinal ultrasonic wave velocities in a polycrystalline graphite sample that has already been investigated in a wide range of experimental contexts. Graphite single crystals have extremely anisotropic elastic properties, making this sample a challenging test to demonstrate the potential of the GMS method. GMS combines elements of well known self-consistent algorithms and of the geometric mean approximation. It is able to consider mixtures of different polycrystalline phases, each with its own nonspherical grain shape and preferred orientation (texture). Pores and 'cracks', typical for bulk graphite, are modeled as phases with 'empty' grains. The pressure dependence (up to 150 MPa) of the experimental wave velocities can be well explained using the known texture of the sample by fitting the shape parameters and volume fractions of the graphite grains, cracks and spherical pores. The pressure dependence of these parameters describes a reasonable scenario for the closing of the cracks and pores with increasing pressure. (orig.)

  19. Study of Higgs boson production and its b-b(bar) decay in gamma-gamma processes in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Enterria, David; /ICC, Barcelona U. /ICREA, Barcelona; Lansberg, Jean-Philippe; /Ecole Polytechnique, CPHT /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    We explore for the first time the possibilities to measure an intermediate-mass (m{sub H} = 115-140 GeV/c{sup 2}) Standard-Model Higgs boson in electromagnetic proton-lead (p Pb) interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) via its b{bar b} decay. Using equivalent Weizsacker-Williams photon fluxes and Higgs effective field theory for the coupling {gamma}{gamma} {yields} H, we obtain a leading-order cross section of the order of 0.3 pb for exclusive Higgs production in elastic (p Pb {yields} {gamma}{gamma} p H Pb) and semielastic (p Pb {yields} {gamma}{gamma} X H Pb) processes at {radical}S{sub NN} = 8.8 TeV. After applying various kinematics cuts to remove the main backgrounds ({gamma}{gamma} {yields} b{bar b} and misidentified {gamma}{gamma} {yields} q{bar q} events), we find that a Higgs boson with m{sub H} = 120 GeV/c{sup 2} could be observed in the b{bar b} channel with a 3{sigma}-significance integrating 300 pb{sup -1} with an upgraded pA luminosity of 10{sup 31} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. We also provide for the first time semielastic Higgs cross sections, along with elastic t{bar t} cross sections, for electromagnetic pp, pA and AA collisions at the LHC.

  20. Structure of 14C via elastic and inelastic neutron scattering from 13C: Measurement, R-matrix analysis, and shell model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resler, D.A.

    1987-03-01

    The specific purpose of this work is to provide a better understanding of the 14 C level structure; the general purpose is to provide the details for using shell model calculations in R-matrix analyses. Using the TOF facilities of the Ohio University Accelerator Laboratory, the elastic and first 3 inelastic differential scattering cross sections for 13 C + n were measured at 69 energies for 4.5 ≤ E/sub n/ ≤ 11 MeV. A multiple scattering code was developed which provided a simulation of the experimental scattering process allowing accurate corrections to the small inelastic data. The integrated 13 C(n,α) 10 Be cross section is estimated. The sequential 2n-decay of 14 C states populated by 13 C + n was observed. A shell model code was developed. Normal and nonnormal parity calculations were made for the lithium isotopes using a new two-body interaction. The results for 5 Li predict the 2s/sub 1/2/ and 1d/sub 5/2/ single-particle states to be located below the 3/2 + state. Similar calculations were made for 13 C, 13 N, and 14 C. Results for 13 C and 13 N show for E/sub x/ 7 Li and 14 C, 2 h-barω calculations were done. Shell model calculations generated the R-matrix parameters for the elastic and first 3 inelastic channels of 13 C + n. After adjusting some energies, the predicted structure generally agrees with experiment for E/sub n/ 13 C + n data were refit to replace R 0 background terms by more realistic broad states and to get better agreement with model calculations. R-matrix fitting of the full data set produced new 14 C level information. For E/sub n/ > 4 MeV (E/sub x/ > 12 MeV), 5 states are given definite J/sup π/ assignments; 3, tentative assignments. 122 refs., 91 figs., 30 tabs

  1. Close coupling calculations of magnetic transitions for He + H/sub 2/ in an uncoupled space frame. [Cross sections, T matrices, orbital angular momentum, elastic and inelastic transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoni, Y; Kouri, D J; Kumar, A [Houston Univ., Tex. (USA). Dept. of Physics

    1977-12-01

    Full close coupling calculations of magnetic transitions in He + H/sub 2/ collisions are reported. The results are analyzed using the coupling space frame approach of Kouri and Shimoni. This enables one to study the magnetic transition T-matrices as a function of orbital angular momentum number l. The results for transitions which are elastic in rotor state j are found to be dominated by j/sub z/-conserving transitions. Those which are inelastic in j are dominated by j/sub z/-conserving transitions for very low l but at higher l values, the non-j/sub z/-conserving transitions dominate. The results for He + H/sub 2/ are consistent with the recent studies of Shimoni and Kouri of the coupled states approximation.

  2. Calculation of the RPA response function of nuclei to quasi-elastic electron scattering with a density-dependent NN interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillon, J-C.; Labarsouque, J.

    1997-01-01

    So far, the non-relativistic longitudinal and transverse functions in electron quasi-elastic scattering on the nuclei failed in reproducing satisfactorily the existent experimental data. The calculations including relativistic RPA correlations utilize until now the relativistic Hartree approximation to describe the nuclear matter. But, this provides an incompressibility module two times higher than its experimental value what is an important drawback for the calculation of realistic relativistic RPA correlations. Hence, we have determined the RPA response functions of nuclei by utilising a description of the relativistic nuclear matter leading to an incompressibility module in agreement with the empirical value. To do that we have utilized an interaction in the relativistic Hartree approximation in which we have determined the coupling constants σ-N and ω-N as a function of the density in order to reproduce the saturation curve obtained by a Dirac-Brueckner calculation. The results which we have obtained show that the longitudinal response function and the Coulomb sum generally overestimated when one utilizes the pure relativistic Hartree approximation, are here in good agreement with the experimental data for several nuclei

  3. Structural, phase stability, electronic, elastic properties and hardness of IrN{sub 2} and zinc blende IrN: First-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhaobo [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Yunnan Province & Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Non-Ferrous and Precious Rare Metals Ministry of Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Zhou, Xiaolong, E-mail: kmzxlong@163.com [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Yunnan Province & Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Non-Ferrous and Precious Rare Metals Ministry of Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Zhang, Kunhua [State Key Laboratory of Rare Precious Metals Comprehensive Utilization of New Technologies, Kunming Institute of Precious Metals, Kunming 650106 (China)

    2016-12-15

    First-principle calculations were performed to investigate the structural, phase stability, electronic, elastic properties and hardness of monoclinic structure IrN{sub 2} (m-IrN{sub 2}), orthorhombic structure IrN{sub 2} (o-IrN{sub 2}) and zinc blende structure IrN (ZB IrN). The results show us that only m-IrN{sub 2} is both thermodynamic and dynamic stability. The calculated band structure and density of states (DOS) curves indicate that o-IrN{sub 2} and ZB Ir-N compounds we calculated have metallic behavior while m-IrN{sub 2} has a small band gap of ~0.3 eV, and exist a common hybridization between Ir-5d and N-2p states, which forming covalent bonding between Ir and N atoms. The difference charge density reveals the electron transfer from Ir atom to N atom for three Ir-N compounds, which forming strong directional covalent bonds. Notable, a strong N-N bond appeared in m-IrN{sub 2} and o-IrN{sub 2}. The ratio of bulk to shear modulus (B/G) indicate that three Ir-N compounds we calculated are ductile, and ZB IrN possesses a better ductility than two types IrN{sub 2}. m-IrN{sub 2} has highest Debye temperature (736 K), illustrating it possesses strongest covalent bonding. The hardness of three Ir-N compounds were also calculated, and the results reveal that m-IrN{sub 2} (18.23 GPa) and o-IrN{sub 2} (18.02 GPa) are ultraincompressible while ZB IrN has a negative value, which may be attributed to phase transition at ca. 1.98 GPa.

  4. Lattice dynamics, thermodynamics and elastic properties of C22-Zr{sub 6}FeSn{sub 2} from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xuan-Kai [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Shi, Siqi, E-mail: sqshi@shu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Materials Genome Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Shen, Jian-Yun [General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Shang, Shun-Li [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Yao, Mei-Yi, E-mail: yaomeiyi@shu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Liu, Zi-Kui [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Since Zr-Fe-Sn is one of the key ternary systems for cladding and structural materials in nuclear industry, it is of significant importance to understand physicochemical properties related to Zr-Fe-Sn system. In order to design the new Zr alloys with advanced performance by CALPHAD method, the thermodynamic model for the lower order systems is required. In the present work, first-principles calculations are employed to obtain phonon, thermodynamic and elastic properties of Zr{sub 6}FeSn{sub 2} with C22 structure and the end-members (C22-Zr{sub 6}FeFe{sub 2}, C22-Zr{sub 6}SnSn{sub 2} and C22-Zr{sub 6}SnFe{sub 2}) in the model of (Zr){sub 6}(Fe, Sn){sub 2}(Fe, Sn){sub 1}. It is found that the imaginary phonon modes are absent for C22-Zr{sub 6}FeSn{sub 2} and C22-Zr{sub 6}SnSn{sub 2}, indicating they are dynamically stable, while the other two end-members are unstable. Gibbs energies of C22-Zr{sub 6}FeSn{sub 2} and C22-Zr{sub 6}SnSn{sub 2} are obtained from the quasiharmonic phonon approach and can be added in the thermodynamic database: Nuclearbase. The C22-Zr{sub 6}FeSn{sub 2}’s single-crystal elasticity tensor components along with polycrystalline bulk, shear and Young’s moduli are computed with a least-squares approach based upon the stress tensor computed from first-principles method. The results indicate that distortion is more difficult in the directions normal the c-axis than along to it.

  5. First–principle calculation of the elastic, band structure, electronic states, and optical properties of Cu–doped ZnS nanolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahiji, Mohammadreza Askaripour, E-mail: m.a.lahijiii@gmail.com [Department of applied mathematics, Astaneh Ashrafieh Branch, Islamic Azad University, Astaneh Ashrafieh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ziabari, Ali Abdolahzadeh, E-mail: ali.abd.ziabari@gmail.com [Nano Research Lab, Lahijan Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box: 1616, Lahijan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The structural, elastic, electronic, and optical properties of undoped and Cu–doped ZnS nanostructured layers have been studied in the zincblende (ZB) phase, by first–principle approach. Density functional theory (DFT) has been employed to calculate the fundamental properties of the layers using full–potential linearized augmented plane–wave (FPLAPW) method. Mechanical analysis revealed that the bulk modulus increases with the increase of Cu content. Cu doping was found to reduce the band gap value of the material. In addition, DOS effective mass of the electrons and heavy holes was evaluated. Adding Cu caused the decrement/increment of transmission/reflectance of nanolayers in the UV–vis region. The substitution by Cu increased the intensity of the peaks, and a slight red shift was observed in the absorption peak. Moreover, the static dielectric constant, and static refractive index increased with Cu content. The optical conductivity also followed a similar trend to that of the dielectric constants. Energy loss function of the modeled compounds was also evaluated. All calculated parameters were compared with the available experimental and other theoretical results.

  6. Revisiting elastic anisotropy of biotite gneiss from the Outokumpu scientific drill hole based on new texture measurements and texture-based velocity calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, H.-R.; Vasin, R. N.; Kern, H.; Matthies, S.; Vogel, S. C.; Ivankina, T. I.

    2012-10-01

    A sample of biotite gneiss from the Outokumpu deep drilling project in Finland was investigated by Kern et al. (2008) for crystal preferred orientation and elastic anisotropy. Considerable differences between measured acoustic velocities and velocities calculated on the basis of texture patterns were observed. Measured P-wave anisotropy was 15.1% versus a Voigt average yielding 7.9%. Here we investigate the same sample with different methods and using different averaging techniques. Analyzing time-of-flight neutron diffraction data from Dubna-SKAT and LANSCE-HIPPO diffractometers with the Rietveld technique, much stronger preferred orientation for biotite is determined, compared to conventional pole-figure analysis reported previously. The comparison reveals important differences: HIPPO has much better counting statistics but pole figure coverage is poor. SKAT has better angular resolution. Using the new preferred orientation data and applying a self-consistent averaging method that takes grain shapes into account, close agreement of calculated and measured P-wave velocities is observed (12.6%). This is further improved by adding 0.1 vol.% flat micropores parallel to the biotite platelets in the simulation (14.9%).

  7. Large magnetic coils-design accompanying calculation and optimization. Regarding orthotropic interlayers, temperature and elastic supports-derivation of a special finite element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelzer, J.F.; Sievers, A.; Welzel, R.

    1976-10-01

    This paper deals with finite element calculations of large coils as they are used as main coils in Tokamaks. They consist of copper layers with glass fibre reinforced resin interlayers inbedded in a strong steel ring. In a first analysis model the several epoxy layers are condensed to only one the tickness of which is equal to the sum of the single sizes. This fictitious layer is assumed to lie in the middle of the copper and is treated as an orthotropic material. In a following changed model the epoxy layer is situated between the steel ring and the copper. In this location the epoxy was suspected to suffer from the highest shear stresses. Both models employ springy trusses as supporting features which simulate the real elastic behaviour of a sustaining vault. Special attentions are given a) to the shear stresses in the epoxy, b) to the hot and cold states of the coils, and c) to the forces transferred from the coils to the sustaining vault. An optimal structure design is carried out concerning the steel ring. (orig./GG) [de

  8. Dimuon production in proton-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Results from the Fermilab experiments E772 and E789 on the Drell-Yan cross sections, quarkonia production, and open-charm production are presented. These data provide information on the parton distributions in the nucleons and nuclei. They also shed light on the origin of the J/Ψ suppression observed in heavy ion collisions. The physics motivation and the proposed measurements for a new experiment to probe the sea quark distributions in the proton are also discussed

  9. The ratio Rdp of the quasi-elastic nd → p(nn) to the elastic np → pn charge-exchange process yields at 0 deg over 0.55-2.0 GeV neutron beam energy region: 2. Comparison of the results with the model dependent calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharov, V.I.; Morozov, A.A.; Shindin, R.A.; Chernykh, E.V.; Nomofilov, A.A.; Strunov, L.N.

    2008-01-01

    In our previous paper, the new experimental results on ratio R dp of the quasi-elastic charge-exchange yield at 0 Lab d eg for the nd → p + (nn) reaction to the elastic np → pn charge-exchange yield, were presented. The measurements were carried out at the Nuclotron of the Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energies of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research at the neutron beam kinetic energies of 0.55, 0.8, 1.0,1.2, 1.4, 1.8 and 2.0 GeV. In this paper, the comparison of these R dp data with the R dp calculations obtained within the impulse approximation by using the invariant amplitude sets from the GW/VPI phase-shift analysis, is made. The calculated R dp values with the set of invariant amplitude data for the elastic np → pn charge exchange at θ p,CM = 0 deg are in a good agreement with the experimental data. It has been confirmed that at θ p,CM = 0 deg the nd → pnn process is caused by the elastic np → pn charge-exchange reaction. Thus, it has been shown that the obtained experimental R dp results can be used for the Delta-Sigma experimental programme to reduce the total ambiguity in the extraction of the amplitude parts

  10. Elastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter investigates the following five aspects of engineering-material solid-state elastic constants: general properties, interrelationships, relationships to other physical properties, changes during cooling from ambient to near-zero temperature, and near-zero-temperature behavior. Topics considered include compressibility, bulk modulus, Young's modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, Hooke's law, elastic-constant measuring methods, thermodynamic potentials, higher-order energy terms, specific heat, thermal expansivity, magnetic materials, structural phase transitions, polymers, composites, textured aggregates, and other-phenomena correlations. Some of the conclusions concerning polycrystalline elastic properties and their temperature dependence are: elastic constants are physical, not mechanical, properties which relate thermodynamically to other physical properties such as specific heat and thermal expansivity; elastic constants at low temperatures are nearly temperature independent, as required by the third law of thermodynamics; and elastic constants can be used to study directional properties of materials, such as textured aggregates and composites

  11. FP-APW plus lo calculations of the elastic properties in zinc-blende III-P compounds under pressure effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouhemadou, A.; Khenata, R.; Kharoubi, M.; Seddik, R.; Al-Douri, Y.; Reshak, Ali H

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 2 (2009), s. 474-479 ISSN 0927-0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : III-P compounds * Elastic moduli * Pressure effect Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.522, year: 2009

  12. Stress relaxation and creep on living cells with the atomic force microscope: a means to calculate elastic moduli and viscosities of cell components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Flores, Susana; Toca-Herrera, Jose Luis; Benitez, Rafael; Vivanco, Maria dM

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present a unified method to study the mechanical properties of cells using the atomic force microscope. Stress relaxation and creep compliance measurements permitted us to determine, the relaxation times, the Young moduli and the viscosity of breast cancer cells (MCF-7). The results show that the mechanical behaviour of MCF-7 cells responds to a two-layered model of similar elasticity but differing viscosity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with an actin-depolymerising agent results in an overall decrease in both cell elasticity and viscosity, however to a different extent for each layer. The layer that undergoes the smaller decrease (36-38%) is assigned to the cell membrane/cortex while the layer that experiences the larger decrease (70-80%) is attributed to the cell cytoplasm. The combination of the method presented in this work, together with the approach based on stress relaxation microscopy (Moreno-Flores et al 2010 J. Biomech. 43 349-54), constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study cell mechanics. This methodology can also be extended to study the mechanical properties of biomaterials in general.

  13. First-principles calculation of the structural and elastic properties of ternary metal nitrides TaxMo1-xN and TaxW1-xN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouamama, Kh.; Djemia, P.; Benhamida, M.

    2015-09-01

    First-principles pseudo-potentials calculations of the mixing enthalpy, of the lattice constants a0 and of the single-crystal elastic constants cij for ternary metal nitrides TaxMe1-xN (Me=Mo or W) alloys considering the cubic B1-rocksalt structure is carried out. For disordered ternary alloys, we employ the virtual crystal approximation VCA in which the alloy pseudopotentials are constructed within a first-principles VCA scheme. The supercell method SC is also used for ordered structures in order to evaluate clustering effects. We find that the mixing enthalpy still remains negative for TaxMe1-xN alloys in the whole composition range which implies these cubic TaxMo1-xN and TaxW1-xN ordered solid solutions are stable. We investigate the effect of Mo and W alloying on the trend of the mechanical properties of TaN. The effective shear elastic constant c44, the Cauchy pressure (c12-c44), and the shear to bulk modulus G/B ratio are used to discuss, respectively, the mechanical stability of the ternary structure and the brittle/ductile behavior in reference to TaN, MeN alloys. We determine the onset transition from the unstable structure to the stable one B1-rocksalt from the elastic stability criteria when alloying MeN with Ta. In a second stage, in the frame of anisotropic elasticity, we estimate by one homogenization method the averaged constants of the polycrystalline TaxMe1-xN alloys considering the special case of an isotropic medium with no crystallographic texture.

  14. Hybrid elastic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yun

    2011-06-26

    Metamaterials can exhibit electromagnetic and elastic characteristics beyond those found in nature. In this work, we present a design of elastic metamaterial that exhibits multiple resonances in its building blocks. Band structure calculations show two negative dispersion bands, of which one supports only compressional waves and thereby blurs the distinction between a fluid and a solid over a finite frequency regime, whereas the other displays super anisotropy-in which compressional waves and shear waves can propagate only along different directions. Such unusual characteristics, well explained by the effective medium theory, have no comparable analogue in conventional solids and may lead to novel applications. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  15. Hybrid elastic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yun; Wu, Ying; Sheng, Ping; Zhang, Zhaoqing

    2011-01-01

    Metamaterials can exhibit electromagnetic and elastic characteristics beyond those found in nature. In this work, we present a design of elastic metamaterial that exhibits multiple resonances in its building blocks. Band structure calculations show two negative dispersion bands, of which one supports only compressional waves and thereby blurs the distinction between a fluid and a solid over a finite frequency regime, whereas the other displays super anisotropy-in which compressional waves and shear waves can propagate only along different directions. Such unusual characteristics, well explained by the effective medium theory, have no comparable analogue in conventional solids and may lead to novel applications. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  16. Quasi-experimental taxation elasticities of US gasoline demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Taxation elasticities provide inputs in public policy aimed at raising revenues. Using the quasi-experimental method, this paper calculates gasoline taxation elasticities for the USA over 1952-86. The medium (mean) elasticity over this period is found to be -0.075 (-0.122). However, the elasticity following the oil shock of 1973 is found to be statistically different from the pre-shock elasticity. Reasons for this change in elasticity are discussed. The implication of this analysis is that tax policies based on price elasticities, rather than on tax elasticities, might be using an inappropriate elasticity estimate and consequently misinterpreting the government's ability to raise tax revenues. (author)

  17. Strain fluctuations and elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1982-03-01

    It is shown that the elastic strain fluctuations are a direct measure of elastic compliances in a general anisotropic medium; depending on the ensemble in which the fluctuation is measured either the isothermal or the adiabatic compliances are obtained. These fluctuations can now be calculated in a constant enthalpy and pressure, and hence, constant entropy, ensemble due to recent develpments in the molecular dynamics techniques. A calculation for a Ni single crystal under uniform uniaxial 100 tensile or compressive load is presented as an illustration of the relationships derived between various strain fluctuations and the elastic modulii. The Born stability criteria and the behavior of strain fluctuations are shown to be related.

  18. Elastic Beanstalk

    CERN Document Server

    Vliet, Jurg; Wel, Steven; Dowd, Dara

    2011-01-01

    While it's always been possible to run Java applications on Amazon EC2, Amazon's Elastic Beanstalk makes the process easier-especially if you understand how it works beneath the surface. This concise, hands-on book not only walks you through Beanstalk for deploying and managing web applications in the cloud, you'll also learn how to use this AWS tool in other phases of development. Ideal if you're a developer familiar with Java applications or AWS, Elastic Beanstalk provides step-by-step instructions and numerous code samples for building cloud applications on Beanstalk that can handle lots

  19. Program POD; A computer code to calculate nuclear elastic scattering cross sections with the optical model and neutron inelastic scattering cross sections by the distorted-wave born approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihara, Akira; Kunieda, Satoshi; Chiba, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Osamu; Shibata, Keiichi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo; Fukahori, Tokio; Katakura, Jun-ichi

    2005-07-01

    The computer code, POD, was developed to calculate angle-differential cross sections and analyzing powers for shape-elastic scattering for collisions of neutron or light ions with target nucleus. The cross sections are computed with the optical model. Angle-differential cross sections for neutron inelastic scattering can also be calculated with the distorted-wave Born approximation. The optical model potential parameters are the most essential inputs for those model computations. In this program, the cross sections and analyzing powers are obtained by using the existing local or global parameters. The parameters can also be inputted by users. In this report, the theoretical formulas, the computational methods, and the input parameters are explained. The sample inputs and outputs are also presented. (author)

  20. Production cross-sections of pions and kaons in proton-nucleus collisions around 1 GeV - Measurement of the production cross-sections of light charged particles in collisions between 62.9 GeV protons and "2"0"8Pb nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guertin, A.

    2001-01-01

    A charged kaon includes a strange anti-quark that cannot be re-absorbed by matter which make kaons an interesting probe of nuclear matter. The first part of this work is dedicated to the production cross-sections of pions and kaons in proton-nucleus collision around 1 GeV. The molecular quantum dynamic model used for simulating proton-nucleus is presented and the total cross-sections of the reactions implemented in the model are described. Then, the impact of the neutron's spectral function on pion and kaon production is assessed in double differential cross-sections. The consequences of the correlations observed between nucleons are discussed. The simple phenomenological approach we have developed to take into account 2 nucleon correlations gives good results for the doubly differential production cross-section of pions and kaons whatever the target nucleus. The second part of this work is dedicated to the measurement of the production of light charged particles (p, d, t, "3He, α) and neutron production in collisions between 62,9 MeV protons with "2"0"8Pb nuclei. The experimental setting is installed on the S2 line of the CYCLONE cyclotron (Belgium), the detection system is composed of 7 triple telescopes (Si, Si and CsI(Tl)). The separation and identification of particles is made through 2 methods: the E-ΔE method based on the energy losses in the different detectors and the discrimination method based on the different shapes of the quick and slow signals of the CsI crystal. The extraction of the cross-section values is detailed. We have compared the values obtained with 3 theoretical models: the exciton model (GNASH code), the F.K.K. (Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin) theory (MINGUS code) and a more phenomenological model able to simulate hadron reactions on nuclei for a very broad range of energy (FLUKA code)

  1. Elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leader, Elliot

    1991-01-01

    With very few unexplained results to challenge conventional ideas, physicists have to look hard to search for gaps in understanding. An area of physics which offers a lot more than meets the eye is elastic and diffractive scattering where particles either 'bounce' off each other, emerging unscathed, or just graze past, emerging relatively unscathed. The 'Blois' workshops provide a regular focus for this unspectacular, but compelling physics, attracting highly motivated devotees

  2. Li-ion conduction in the LiBH4:LiI system from Density Functional Theory calculations and Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myrdal, Jon Steinar Gardarsson; Blanchard, Didier; Sveinbjörnsson, Dadi Þorsteinn

    2013-01-01

    The hexagonal high-temperature polymorph of LiBH4 is stabilized by solid solution with LiI to exhibit superionic Li+ ionic conductivity at room temperature. Herein, the mechanisms for the Li+ diffusion are investigated for the first time by density functional theory (DFT) calculations coupled...

  3. Spectral dimension of elastic Sierpinski gaskets with general elastic forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S.H.; Liu, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectral dimension is calculated for a Sierpinski gasket with the most general elastic restoring forces allowed by symmetry. The elastic forces consist of bond-stretching and angle-bending components. The spectral dimension is the same as that for the bond-stretching-force (central-force) model. This demonstrates that on the Sierpinski gasket the two types of forces belong to the same universality class

  4. On Elasticity Measurement in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elasticity is the foundation of cloud performance and can be considered as a great advantage and a key benefit of cloud computing. However, there is no clear, concise, and formal definition of elasticity measurement, and thus no effective approach to elasticity quantification has been developed so far. Existing work on elasticity lack of solid and technical way of defining elasticity measurement and definitions of elasticity metrics have not been accurate enough to capture the essence of elasticity measurement. In this paper, we present a new definition of elasticity measurement and propose a quantifying and measuring method using a continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC model, which is easy to use for precise calculation of elasticity value of a cloud computing platform. Our numerical results demonstrate the basic parameters affecting elasticity as measured by the proposed measurement approach. Furthermore, our simulation and experimental results validate that the proposed measurement approach is not only correct but also robust and is effective in computing and comparing the elasticity of cloud platforms. Our research in this paper makes significant contribution to quantitative measurement of elasticity in cloud computing.

  5. Nonlinear Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y. B.; Ogden, R. W.

    2001-05-01

    This collection of papers by leading researchers in the field of finite, nonlinear elasticity concerns itself with the behavior of objects that deform when external forces or temperature gradients are applied. This process is extremely important in many industrial settings, such as aerospace and rubber industries. This book covers the various aspects of the subject comprehensively with careful explanations of the basic theories and individual chapters each covering a different research direction. The authors discuss the use of symbolic manipulation software as well as computer algorithm issues. The emphasis is placed firmly on covering modern, recent developments, rather than the very theoretical approach often found. The book will be an excellent reference for both beginners and specialists in engineering, applied mathematics and physics.

  6. Experimental determination of third-order elastic constants of diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J M; Gupta, Y M

    2011-03-25

    To determine the nonlinear elastic response of diamond, single crystals were shock compressed along the [100], [110], and [111] orientations to 120 GPa peak elastic stresses. Particle velocity histories and elastic wave velocities were measured by using laser interferometry. The measured elastic wave profiles were used, in combination with published acoustic measurements, to determine the complete set of third-order elastic constants. These constants represent the first experimental determination, and several differ significantly from those calculated by using theoretical models.

  7. Towards an elastic model of wurtzite AlN nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrushchenkov, A; Chambaud, G; Yvonnet, J; He, Q-C

    2010-01-01

    Starting with ab initio calculations of AlN wurtzite [0001] nanowires with diameters up to 4 nm, a finite element method is developed to deal with larger nanostructures/nanoparticles. The ab initio calculations show that the structure of the nanowires can be well represented by an internal part with AlN bulk elastic properties, and one atomic surface layer with its own elastic behavior. The proposed finite element method includes surface elements with their own elastic properties using surface elastic coefficients deduced from the ab initio calculations. The elastic properties obtained with the finite element model compare very well with those obtained with the full ab initio calculations.

  8. Computational Elastic Knots

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Elastic rods have been studied intensively since the 18th century. Even now the theory of elastic rods is still developing and enjoying popularity in computer graphics and physical-based simulation. Elastic rods also draw attention from architects

  9. Elastic electron scattering from the DNA bases: cytosine and thymine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colyer, C J; Bellm, S M; Lohmanny, B; Blanco, F; Garcia, G

    2012-01-01

    Relative elastic differential cross sections for elastic scattering from cytosine and thymine have been measured using the crossed beam method. The experimental data are compared with theoretical cross sections calculated by the screen corrected additivity rule method.

  10. Stability, elastic properties and fracture toughness of Al0.75X0.75B14 (X=Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo) investigated using ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerlich, Jens; Thieme, Niklas; To Baben, Moritz; Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the transition metal valence electron concentration on the energy of formation, effective charge of B icosahedra, elastic properties, surface energy and fracture toughness was calculated using density functional theory for icosahedral transition metal borides of AlXB 14 (X=Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo). Consistent with previous work on AlYB 14 (Kölpin et al 2009 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 355006) it is shown that phase stability is generally dependent on the effective charge of the icosahedral transition metal borides. Also, ionization potential and electronegativity are identified as parameters affecting the effective charge of B icosahedra suitable for use in predicting the phase stability. Al 0.75 Y 0.75 B 14 , Al 0.75 Sc 0.75 B 14 and Al 0.75 Zr 0.75 B 14 have been identified as promising phases for application as protective coatings as they exhibit high phase stability and stiffness combined with a comparatively high fracture toughness. (paper)

  11. The visco-elastic multilayer program VEROAD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    The mathematical principles and derivation of a linear visco-elastic multilayer computer program are described. The mathematical derivation is based on Fourier Transformation. The program is called VEROAD, which is an acronym for Visco-Elastic ROad Analysis Delft. The program allows calculation of

  12. Heavy ion elastic scattering of code : OPTHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.; Divatia, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A computer code, OPTHI has been designed to calculate nuclear optical model elastic cross sections for the scattering of heavy ions. The program has been designed to be utilitarian rather than capable of giving an exact description of elastic scattering. Input format is described and the program listing is given. (M.G.B.)

  13. Computational Elastic Knots

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Xin

    2013-05-01

    Elastic rods have been studied intensively since the 18th century. Even now the theory of elastic rods is still developing and enjoying popularity in computer graphics and physical-based simulation. Elastic rods also draw attention from architects. Architectural structures, NODUS, were constructed by elastic rods as a new method of form-finding. We study discrete models of elastic rods and NODUS structures. We also develop computational tools to find the equilibria of elastic rods and the shape of NODUS. Applications of elastic rods in forming torus knot and closing Bishop frame are included in this thesis.

  14. Elastic scattering of slow positrons by helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Cherepkov, N.A.; Chernysheva, L.V.; Shapiro, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    The s-, p-, d- and f-wave phaseshifts for elastic scattering of slow positrons by He are calculated using a simplified version of the random phase approximation with exchange, with virtual positronium formation effect taken into account. (author)

  15. Positron interactions with water–total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tattersall, Wade; Chiari, Luca; Machacek, J. R.; Anderson, Emma; Sullivan, James P.; White, Ron D.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, Stephen J.; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions

  16. Elastic interactions between hydrogen atoms in metals. II. Elastic interaction energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, A.I.; Hall, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    The fully harmonic lattice approximation derived in a previous paper is used to calculate the elastic interaction energies in the niobium-hydrogen system. The permanent-direct, permanent-indirect, induced-direct, and induced-indirect forces calculated previously each give rise to a corresponding elastic interaction between hydrogen atoms. The latter three interactions have three- and four-body terms in addition to the usual two-body terms. These quantities are calculated and compared with the corresponding two-body permanent elastic interactions obtained in the harmonic-approximation treatment of Horner and Wagner. The results show that the total induced elastic energy is approximately (1/3) the size of the total permanent elastic energy and opposite to it in sign. The total elastic energy due to three-body interactions is approximately (1/4) the size of the total two-body elastic energy, while the total four-body elastic energy is approximately 5% of the total two-body energy. These additional elastic energies are expected to have a profound effect on the thermodynamic and phase-change behavior of a metal hydride

  17. Equivalence of Stress and Energy Calculations of Mean Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Bøcker; Brown, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    Calculations of the mean stress in a plastically deformed matrix containing randomly distributed elastic inclusions are considered. The mean stress for an elastically homogeneous material is calculated on the basis of an energy consideration which completely accounts for elastic interactions....... The result is shown to be identical to that obtained from a stress calculation. The possibility of including elastic interactions in the case of elastic inhomogeneity is discussed....

  18. The CEASEMT system (Calculation and Analysis of Structures in Mechanics and Thermics). Program TRICO. Analysis of tridimensionnal structures made of shells and beams. Statics - Dynamics - Elasticity - Plasticity - Collapse - Large displacements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Alain; Jeanpierre, Francoise.

    1976-01-01

    The TRICO subroutine of the CEASEMT system is especially intended for elastic or plastic computation of structures made of thin shells and beams. TRICO involves the finite element method for shells and beams, and is also suitable for a dynamic structural analysis: eigenmode and eigenfrequency analysis, and analysis of the response to various sinusoidal excitations, or time dependent elastic and plastic loading. Structures may have various shapes composed of a number of materials. Data are distributed between different optional commands having a precise physical sense, corresponding to a sequential program. A dynamic memory control provides the adaptation of the size of the program to that of the problem to be solved [fr

  19. Consumer brand choice: individual and group analyses of demand elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Castro, Jorge M; Foxall, Gordon R; Schrezenmaier, Teresa C

    2006-03-01

    Following the behavior-analytic tradition of analyzing individual behavior, the present research investigated demand elasticity of individual consumers purchasing supermarket products, and compared individual and group analyses of elasticity. Panel data from 80 UK consumers purchasing 9 product categories (i.e., baked beans, biscuits, breakfast cereals, butter, cheese, fruit juice, instant coffee, margarine and tea) during a 16-week period were used. Elasticity coefficients were calculated for individual consumers with data from all or only 1 product category (intra-consumer elasticities), and for each product category using all data points from all consumers (overall product elasticity) or 1 average data point per consumer (interconsumer elasticity). In addition to this, split-sample elasticity coefficients were obtained for each individual with data from all product categories purchased during weeks 1 to 8 and 9 to 16. The results suggest that: 1) demand elasticity coefficients calculated for individual consumers purchasing supermarket food products are compatible with predictions from economic theory and behavioral economics; 2) overall product elasticities, typically employed in marketing and econometric research, include effects of interconsumer and intraconsumer elasticities; 3) when comparing demand elasticities of different product categories, group and individual analyses yield similar trends; and 4) individual differences in demand elasticity are relatively consistent across time, but do not seem to be consistent across products. These results demonstrate the theoretical, methodological, and managerial relevance of investigating the behavior of individual consumers.

  20. Dynamic elasticity measurement for prosthetic socket design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yujin; Kim, Junghoon; Son, Hyeryon; Choi, Youngjin

    2017-07-01

    The paper proposes a novel apparatus to measure the dynamic elasticity of human limb in order to help the design and fabrication of the personalized prosthetic socket. To take measurements of the dynamic elasticity, the desired force generated as an exponential chirp signal in which the frequency increases and amplitude is maintained according to time progress is applied to human limb and then the skin deformation is recorded, ultimately, to obtain the frequency response of its elasticity. It is referred to as a Dynamic Elasticity Measurement Apparatus (DEMA) in the paper. It has three core components such as linear motor to provide the desired force, loadcell to implement the force feedback control, and potentiometer to record the skin deformation. After measuring the force/deformation and calculating the dynamic elasticity of the limb, it is visualized as 3D color map model of the limb so that the entire dynamic elasticity can be shown at a glance according to the locations and frequencies. For the visualization, the dynamic elasticities measured at specific locations and frequencies are embodied using the color map into 3D limb model acquired by using 3D scanner. To demonstrate the effectiveness, the visualized dynamic elasticities are suggested as outcome of the proposed system, although we do not have any opportunity to apply the proposed system to the amputees. Ultimately, it is expected that the proposed system can be utilized to design and fabricate the personalized prosthetic socket in order for releasing the wearing pain caused by the conventional prosthetic socket.

  1. Elastic scattering and quasi-elastic transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermaz, M.C.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments are presented which it will be possible to carry out at GANIL on the elastic scattering of heavy ions: diffraction phenomena if the absorption is great, refraction phenomena if absorption is low. The determination of the optical parameters can be performed. The study of the quasi-elastic transfer reactions will make it possible to know the dynamics of the nuclear reactions, form exotic nuclei and study their energy excitation spectrum, and analyse the scattering and reaction cross sections [fr

  2. Elastic and inelastic psi production by muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loken, S.C.

    1981-06-01

    Results are presented on the elastic and inelastic production of psi (3.1). The elastic data are qualitative agreement with the predictions of photon-gluon fusion but have a steeper dependence on Q 2 than the model predicts. A QCD calculation accounts well for the shape of the inelastic data in inelasticity, Q 2 and E/sub γ/, but fails to account for the absolute cross section. At 209 GeV, the cross-section for elastic psi production is 0.36 +- 0.07 nb; for inelastic, 0.28 +- 0.06nb

  3. Laboratory Tests of Bitumen Samples Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziganshin, E. R.; Usmanov, S. A.; Khasanov, D. I.; Khamidullina, G. S.

    2018-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the elastic and acoustic properties of bitumen core samples. The travel velocities of the ultrasonic P- and S-waves were determined under in-situ simulation conditions. The resulting data were then used to calculate dynamic Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. The authors studied the correlation between the elasticity and the permeability and porosity. In addition, the tests looked into how the acoustic properties had changed with temperature rise.

  4. Observation of top quark production in proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00507411

    2017-01-01

    The multi-TeV energies available at LHC have opened up the possibility to measure, for the first time, various large-mass elementary particles in nuclear collisions. The current study presents the first observation of top quark--the heaviest elementary particle in the standard model--using proton-lead collisions. The measurement is based on a data set whose integrated luminosity amounts to 174~nb$^{-1}$, as recorded by CMS at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 8.16 TeV. The pair production process is measured using events with exactly one isolated lepton, electron or muon, and at least four jets, leading to a cross section of $45\\pm8\\ \\rm{nb}$. This is well compatible with theoretical predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-next-to-leading order with soft gluon resummation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The statistical significance of the signal against the background-only hypothesis is above five standard deviations.

  5. Rapidity distributions of hadrons in proton-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirner, H. J.; Kopeliovich, B. Z.

    2018-05-01

    We study proton-lead collisions with a new model for the Fock states of the incoming proton. The number of collisions that the proton experiences selects the appropriate Fock state of the proton, which generates a multiple of p p -like rapidity distributions. We take as input the p p maximum entropy distributions, shifting the respective center-of-mass rapidities and reducing the available energies. A comparison with existing data at 5 TeV is made, and results for 8 TeV are presented. We also explore the high multiplicity data in this model.

  6. Inclusive jet production in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Perepelitsa, Dennis

    High-$p_\\mathrm{T}$ processes in proton- and deuteron-nucleus collisions at TeV energies are the best presently available way to study the partonic structure of the nucleus in a high-density regime. Jet production over a wide range of phase space can significantly constrain the current knowledge of nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs), which are substantially less well understood than the corresponding PDFs in protons and which have only recently begun to be treated in a spatially-dependent way. An accurate knowledge of nPDFs is crucial for a definitive control of perturbative processes in a cold nuclear environment, since high-$p_\\mathrm{T}$ probes are used to quantitatively investigate the hot QCD matter created in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Furthermore, jets from low Bjorken-$x$ partons can probe the transition from the dilute to saturated nuclear regimes. Jet production is investigated in $d$+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 200$ GeV with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Hea...

  7. Suppression of soft nuclear bremsstrahlung in proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, M.J. van; Bacelar, J.C.S.; Hoefman, M.; Huisman, H.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Ostendorf, R.W.; Schadmand, S.; Siemssen, R.H.; Turrisi, R.; Volkerts, M.; Wilschut, H.W.; Aphecetche, L.; Delagrange, H.; D'Enterria, D.; Martinez, G.; Schutz, Y.; Diaz, J.; Holzmann, R.

    2002-01-01

    Photon energy spectra up to the kinematic limit have been measured in 190 MeV proton reactions with light and heavy nuclei to investigate the influence of the multiple-scattering process on the photon production. Relative to the predictions of models based on a quasifree production mechanism, a strong suppression of bremsstrahlung is observed in the low-energy region of the photon spectrum. We attribute this effect to the interference of photon amplitudes due to multiple scattering of nucleons in the nuclear medium

  8. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Written in an engaging, easy-to-follow style, the recipes will help you to extend the capabilities of ElasticSearch to manage your data effectively.If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications, manage data, or have decided to start using ElasticSearch, this book is ideal for you. This book assumes that you've got working knowledge of JSON and Java

  9. A first-principles approach to finite temperature elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J J; Zhang, H; Manga, V R; Shang, S L; Chen, L-Q; Liu, Z-K [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-06-09

    A first-principles approach to calculating the elastic stiffness coefficients at finite temperatures was proposed. It is based on the assumption that the temperature dependence of elastic stiffness coefficients mainly results from volume change as a function of temperature; it combines the first-principles calculations of elastic constants at 0 K and the first-principles phonon theory of thermal expansion. Its applications to elastic constants of Al, Cu, Ni, Mo, Ta, NiAl, and Ni{sub 3}Al from 0 K up to their respective melting points show excellent agreement between the predicted values and existing experimental measurements.

  10. A first-principles approach to finite temperature elastic constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J J; Zhang, H; Manga, V R; Shang, S L; Chen, L-Q; Liu, Z-K

    2010-01-01

    A first-principles approach to calculating the elastic stiffness coefficients at finite temperatures was proposed. It is based on the assumption that the temperature dependence of elastic stiffness coefficients mainly results from volume change as a function of temperature; it combines the first-principles calculations of elastic constants at 0 K and the first-principles phonon theory of thermal expansion. Its applications to elastic constants of Al, Cu, Ni, Mo, Ta, NiAl, and Ni 3 Al from 0 K up to their respective melting points show excellent agreement between the predicted values and existing experimental measurements.

  11. Elastic interaction energies of defect structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, E.; de Fontaine, D.

    1976-01-01

    The elastic strain energy between point defects and small disk-shaped clusters of defects are calculated to determine stable configurations. A distortion tensor of tetragonal symmetry is assigned to each impurity atom. The tetragonality ratio t is varied to cover needle-type (t greater than 1), spherical (t = 1) and disk-type (t less than 0) strain fields. To vary the elastic properties of the host material, Fe, Cu, Al, and V were chosen as examples. Computer calculations are based on the microscopic theory of elasticity which emphasizes calculations in discrete Fourier space. Pairs of point defects order along [001] for t less than 1 and along (001) for t = 1 for all host elements. For t greater than 1 fcc lattices and bcc lattices behave differently. It is shown that only certain three dimensional periodic arrangements of parallel and perpendicular disk-like defect clusters are realized for given tetragonality ratio t and host element

  12. Microstructural evolution in inhomogeneous elastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jou, H.J.; Leo, P.H.; Lowengrub, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    We simulate the diffusional evolution of microstructures produced by solid state diffusional transformations in elastically stressed binary alloys in two dimensions. The microstructure consists of arbitrarily shaped precipitates embedded coherently in an infinite matrix. The precipitate and matrix are taken to be elastically isotropic, although they may have different elastic constants (elastically inhomogeneous). Both far-field applied strains and mismatch strains between the phases are considered. The diffusion and elastic fields are calculated using the boundary integral method, together with a small scale preconditioner to remove ill-conditioning. The precipitate-matrix interfaces are tracked using a nonstiff time updating method. The numerical method is spectrally accurate and efficient. Simulations of a single precipitate indicate that precipitate shapes depend strongly on the mass flux into the system as well as on the elastic fields. Growing shapes (positive mass flux) are dendritic while equilibrium shapes (zero mass flux) are squarish. Simulations of multiparticle systems show complicated interactions between precipitate morphology and the overall development of microstructure (i.e., precipitate alignment, translation, merging, and coarsening). In both single and multiple particle simulations, the details of the microstructural evolution depend strongly o the elastic inhomogeneity, misfit strain, and applied fields. 57 refs., 24 figs

  13. Corrugated Membrane Nonlinear Deformation Process Calculation

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Nikolaeva; S. A. Podkopaev

    2015-01-01

    Elastic elements are widely used in instrumentation. They are used to create a particular interference between the parts, for accumulating mechanical energy, as the motion transmission elements, elastic supports, and sensing elements of measuring devices. Device reliability and quality depend on the calculation accuracy of the elastic elements. A corrugated membrane is rather common embodiment of the elastic element.The corrugated membrane properties depend largely on its profile i.e. a gener...

  14. Size effect of the elastic modulus of rectangular nanobeams: Surface elasticity effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Hai-Yan; Fan Wen-Liang; Yun Guo-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The size-dependent elastic property of rectangular nanobeams (nanowires or nanoplates) induced by the surface elasticity effect is investigated by using a developed modified core-shell model. The effect of surface elasticity on the elastic modulus of nanobeams can be characterized by two surface related parameters, i.e., inhomogeneous degree constant and surface layer thickness. The analytical results show that the elastic modulus of the rectangular nanobeam exhibits a distinct size effect when its characteristic size reduces below 100 nm. It is also found that the theoretical results calculated by a modified core-shell model have more obvious advantages than those by other models (core-shell model and core-surface model) by comparing them with relevant experimental measurements and computational results, especially when the dimensions of nanostructures reduce to a few tens of nanometers. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  15. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications and want to sharpen your understanding of the core elements and applications, this is the book for you. It is assumed that you've got working knowledge of JSON and, if you want to extend ElasticSearch, of Java and related technologies.

  16. In Silico Measurement of Elastic Moduli of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidky, Hythem; de Pablo, Juan J.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments on confined droplets of the nematic liquid crystal 5CB have questioned long-established bounds imposed on the elastic free energy of nematic systems. This elasticity, which derives from molecular alignment within nematic systems, is quantified through a set of moduli which can be difficult to measure experimentally and, in some cases, can only be probed indirectly. This is particularly true of the surfacelike saddle-splay elastic term, for which the available experimental data indicate values on the cusp of stability, often with large uncertainties. Here, we demonstrate that all nematic elastic moduli, including the saddle-splay elastic constant k24, may be calculated directly from atomistic molecular simulations. Importantly, results obtained through in silico measurements of the 5CB elastic properties demonstrate unambiguously that saddle-splay elasticity alone is unable to describe the observed confined morphologies.

  17. Elasticity theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saada, Adel S; Hartnett, James P; Hughes, William F

    2013-01-01

    Elasticity: Theory and Applications reviews the theory and applications of elasticity. The book is divided into three parts. The first part is concerned with the kinematics of continuous media; the second part focuses on the analysis of stress; and the third part considers the theory of elasticity and its applications to engineering problems. This book consists of 18 chapters; the first of which deals with the kinematics of continuous media. The basic definitions and the operations of matrix algebra are presented in the next chapter, followed by a discussion on the linear transformation of points. The study of finite and linear strains gradually introduces the reader to the tensor concept. Orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are examined in detail, along with the similarities between stress and strain. The chapters that follow cover torsion; the three-dimensional theory of linear elasticity and the requirements for the solution of elasticity problems; the method of potentials; and topics related to cylinders, ...

  18. Effect of reorientation of anisotropic point defects on relaxation of crystal elastic coefficients of high order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topchyan, I.I.; Dokhner, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of reorientation of anisotropic point defects in uniform fields of elastic stresses on the relaxation of the elastic coefficients of a crystal was investigated in the nonlinear elasticity theory approximation. In calculating the interaction of point defects with elastic-stress fields was taken into consideration. The expression for the relaxations of the elasticity coefficients are obtained in an analytical form. The relaxation of the second-order elasticity coefficients is due to the dimentional interaction of a point defect with an applied-stress field, whereas the relaxation of the higher-order elasticity coefficients is determined both by dimentional and module effects

  19. Elastic scattering at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspar, Jan; Deile, M

    The seemingly simple elastic scattering of protons still presents a challenge for the theory. In this thesis we discuss the elastic scattering from theoretical as well as experimental point of view. In the theory part, we present several models and their predictions for the LHC. We also discuss the Coulomb-hadronic interference, where we present a new eikonal calculation to all orders of alpha, the fine-structure constant. In the experimental part we introduce the TOTEM experiment which is dedicated, among other subjects, to the measurement of the elastic scattering at the LHC. This measurement is performed primarily with the Roman Pot (RP) detectors - movable beam-pipe insertions hundreds of meters from the interaction point, that can detect protons scattered to very small angles. We discuss some aspects of the RP simulation and reconstruction software. A central point is devoted to the techniques of RP alignment - determining the RP sensor positions relative to each other and to the beam. At the end we pres...

  20. Elastic properties of some transition metal arsenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Vikas; Verma, U. P.; Bisht, P. S.

    2018-05-01

    The elastic properties of transition metal arsenides (TMAs) have been studied by employing Wien2K package based on density functional theory in the zinc blende (ZB) and rock salt (RS) phase treating valance electron scalar relativistically. Further, we have also treated them non-relativistically to find out the relativistic effect. We have calculated the elastic properties by computing the volume conservative stress tensor for small strains, using the method developed by Charpin. The obtained results are discussed in paper. From the obtained results, it is clear that the values of C11 > C12 and C44 for all the compounds. The values of shear moduli of these compounds are also calculated. The internal parameter for these compounds shows that ZB structures of these compounds have high resistance against bond order. We find that the estimated elastic constants are in good agreement with the available data.

  1. Income Elasticity Literature Review | Science Inventory | US ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following advice from the SAB Council, when estimating the economic value of reductions in air pollution-related mortality and morbidity risk, EPA accounts for the effect of personal income on the willingness to pay to reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes. These income growth adjustment factors are calculated using a combination of income elasticity estimates and income growth projections, both of which have remained essentially unchanged since 1999. These income elasticity estimates vary according to the severity of illness. EPA recently received advice from the SAB regarding the range of income elasticities to apply as well as the research standards to use when selecting income elasticity estimates. Following this advice, EPA consulted with a contractor to update its income elasticity and income growth projections, and generate new income growth adjustment factors. The SAB would evaluate the income elasticity estimates identified in the EPA-provided literature review, determining the extent to which these estimates are appropriate to use in human health benefits assessments.

  2. Statistical mechanics of elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Weiner, JH

    2012-01-01

    Advanced, self-contained treatment illustrates general principles and elastic behavior of solids. Topics include thermoelastic behavior of crystalline and polymeric solids, interatomic force laws, behavior of solids, and thermally activated processes. 1983 edition.

  3. Elasticity of energy consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stam, M.

    2004-01-01

    Insight is given into the price elasticities of several energy carriers. Next, attention is paid to the impact of the discussion on changes of the Regulating Energy Levy (REB, abbreviated in Dutch) in the Netherlands [nl

  4. Elastic Modulus at High Frequency of Polymerically Stabilized Suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nommensen, P.A.; Duits, Michael H.G.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mellema, J.

    2000-01-01

    The elastic moduli of polymerically stabilized suspensions consisting of colloidal silica particles coated with endgrafted PDMS (Mn = 80 000) in heptane, were measured as a function of concentration. And the elastic modulus at high frequency G'.. was quantitatively described by model calculations

  5. Indentation of elastically soft and plastically compressible solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Needleman, A.; Tvergaard, V.; Van der Giessen, E.

    The effect of soft elasticity, i.e., a relatively small value of the ratio of Young's modulus to yield strength and plastic compressibility on the indentation of isotropically hardening elastic-viscoplastic solids is investigated. Calculations are carried out for indentation of a perfectly sticking

  6. Mastering ElasticSearch

    CERN Document Server

    Kuc, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    A practical tutorial that covers the difficult design, implementation, and management of search solutions.Mastering ElasticSearch is aimed at to intermediate users who want to extend their knowledge about ElasticSearch. The topics that are described in the book are detailed, but we assume that you already know the basics, like the query DSL or data indexing. Advanced users will also find this book useful, as the examples are getting deep into the internals where it is needed.

  7. Numerical method to calculate flow-induced vibration in turbulent flow. 3rd Report. Analysis of vortex-induced vibration in an array of elastically supported tubes; Ranryuba ni okeru ryutai kozotai rensei shindo kaiseki shuho no kaihatsu. 3. Kangun ni okeru uzu reiki shindo kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadaoka, N.; Umegaki, K. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-01-25

    A vortex-induced vibration of an array of elastically supported tubes is simulated in two-dimension by using a flow-induced vibration analysis program, which was developed in order to evaluate flow-induced vibration in various components such as heat exchangers. From a comparison of calculated results and experimental data, the following points are observed. (1) For the calculated results in a 5 {times} 5 square array, the flow pattern surrounding the first-row tubes is markedly different from that observed in the second-row or third-row tubes. This flow pattern is the same as that obtained from the experiment. (2) All tubes begin to oscillate due to unsteady fluid force and the oscillating mode is different for each row of tubes. These oscillation patterns show the same tendency in the experiments and it is concluded that the developed method can simulate vortex-induced vibration in an array of elastically supported tubes. 19 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  8. On the K+-nucleus elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, P.; Men, D.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper conventional and unconventional nuclear medium effects in the K + scattering are briefly reviewed. Microscopic calculations of the K + elastic scattering on 4 He, 12 C, 40 Ca, 120 Sn at 800 MeV/c are performed and then possible swellings of nucleons in nuclei are discussed

  9. Elastic and optical behaviour of some europium monochalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, A.K.M.A.; Shahdatullah, M.S.

    1994-11-01

    A study of the elastic and optical properties of some Eu-monochalcogenides with NaCl structure has been carried out in this paper. Various anharmonic properties e.g. thermal expansion, third order elastic constants, Grueneisen parameter, and the pressure and temperature derivatives of second order elastic constants of EuS and EuO are also studied. A comparison of the calculated elastic and dielectric properties with the available experimental results and other theoretical estimates gives an indication of the applicability of the methods applied. (author). 49 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Non-linear theory of elasticity and optimal design

    CERN Document Server

    Ratner, LW

    2003-01-01

    In order to select an optimal structure among possible similar structures, one needs to compare the elastic behavior of the structures. A new criterion that describes elastic behavior is the rate of change of deformation. Using this criterion, the safe dimensions of a structure that are required by the stress distributed in a structure can be calculated. The new non-linear theory of elasticity allows one to determine the actual individual limit of elasticity/failure of a structure using a simple non-destructive method of measurement of deformation on the model of a structure while presently it

  11. Nonlinear elastic waves in materials

    CERN Document Server

    Rushchitsky, Jeremiah J

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of the book is a coherent treatment of the theory of propagation in materials of nonlinearly elastic waves of displacements, which corresponds to one modern line of development of the nonlinear theory of elastic waves. The book is divided on five basic parts: the necessary information on waves and materials; the necessary information on nonlinear theory of elasticity and elastic materials; analysis of one-dimensional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement – longitudinal, vertically and horizontally polarized transverse plane nonlinear elastic waves of displacement; analysis of one-dimensional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement – cylindrical and torsional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement; analysis of two-dimensional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement – Rayleigh and Love nonlinear elastic surface waves. The book is addressed first of all to people working in solid mechanics – from the students at an advanced undergraduate and graduate level to the scientists, professional...

  12. Indentation of elastically soft and plastically compressible solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Needleman, A.; Tvergaard, Viggo; Van der Giessen, E.

    2015-01-01

    rapidly for small deviations from plastic incompressibility and then decreases rather slowly for values of the plastic Poisson's ratio less than 0.25. For both soft elasticity and plastic compressibility, the main reason for the lower values of indentation hardness is related to the reduction......The effect of soft elasticity, i.e., a relatively small value of the ratio of Young's modulus to yield strength and plastic compressibility on the indentation of isotropically hardening elastic-viscoplastic solids is investigated. Calculations are carried out for indentation of a perfectly sticking...... rigid sharp indenter into a cylinder modeling indentation of a half space. The material is characterized by a finite strain elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation that allows for plastic as well as elastic compressibility. Both soft elasticity and plastic compressibility significantly reduce...

  13. Estudio teórico de las propiedades elásticas de los minerales Cu3TMSe4 (TM = V, Nb, Ta por medio de cálculos atomísticos de primeros principios Theoretical study of the elastic properties of the minerals Cu3TMSe4 (TM = V, Nb, Ta by means of atomistic first-principles calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Mario Ruiz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Las propiedades elásticas de la familia de los minerales isoestructurales Cu3VSe4, Cu3NbSe4 y Cu3TaSe4 han sido calculadas por primera vez usandoel estado del arte en cálculos atomísticos de primeros-principios, utilizandola Teoría de los Funcionales de la Densidad y la Aproximación del Gradiente Generalizado para el funcional de la energía de intercambio-correlación. Laspropiedades elásticas calculadas son el módulo volumétrico (B, las constantes elásticas (c11, c12 y c44, el factor de anisotropía de Zener (A, el módulo de cizalladura isotrópico (G, el módulo de Young (Y, y la razón de Poisson(ν. A través de estas cantidades también hemos calculado otras propiedades termodinámicas tales como la velocidad promedio del sonido transversal (st y longitudinal (sl y la temperatura de Debye (ΘD. Los valores calculados de B, c11, c12 y c44, G, Y , y ν nos llevan a la conclusión que estos compuestosson compresibles, frágiles y quebradizos.The elastic properties of the family of isostructural minerals Cu3VSe4, Cu3NbSe4 and Cu3TaSe4 have been calculated for the first time using the state of the art in first-principles atomistic calculations, using Density Functional Theory and the Generalized Gradient Approximation for the exchangecorrelation energy functional. The elastic properties calculated are bulk modulus (B, the elastic constants (c11, c12 and c44, the Zener anisotropy factor (A, the isotropic shear modulus (G, the Young modulus (Y , and the Poisson ratio (. By means of these quantities we also computed other thermodynamic properties such as the average transversal (st and longitudinal (sl sound velocities and the Debye temperature (D. The calculated values of B, c11, c12 and c44, G, Y and lead us to the conclusion that these compounds are compressible, fragile and brittle.

  14. The elastic response of composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laws, N.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of linear elasticity is used to study the elastic response of composite materials. The main concern is the prediction of overall moduli. Some attention is paid to the problem of deciding upon when the idea of an overall modulus is meaningful. In addition it is shown how to calculate some rigorous bounds on the overall moduli, and some predictions of the self-consistent method are discussed. The paper mainly concentrates on isotropic dispersions of spheres, unidirectional fibre-reinforced materials and laminates. (author)

  15. Elastic constants of diamond from molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Guangtu; Van Workum, Kevin; Schall, J David; Harrison, Judith A

    2006-01-01

    The elastic constants of diamond between 100 and 1100 K have been calculated for the first time using molecular dynamics and the second-generation, reactive empirical bond-order potential (REBO). This version of the REBO potential was used because it was redesigned to be able to model the elastic properties of diamond and graphite at 0 K while maintaining its original capabilities. The independent elastic constants of diamond, C 11 , C 12 , and C 44 , and the bulk modulus were all calculated as a function of temperature, and the results from the three different methods are in excellent agreement. By extrapolating the elastic constant data to 0 K, it is clear that the values obtained here agree with the previously calculated 0 K elastic constants. Because the second-generation REBO potential was fit to obtain better solid-state force constants for diamond and graphite, the agreement with the 0 K elastic constants is not surprising. In addition, the functional form of the second-generation REBO potential is able to qualitatively model the functional dependence of the elastic constants and bulk modulus of diamond at non-zero temperatures. In contrast, reactive potentials based on other functional forms do not reproduce the correct temperature dependence of the elastic constants. The second-generation REBO potential also correctly predicts that diamond has a negative Cauchy pressure in the temperature range examined

  16. A Note on the Teaching of Arc Elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, James R.

    1986-01-01

    Maintains that the Aba P. Lerner alternative for calculating arc elasticity is superior to the commonly used mean prices and quantities method typically used in intermediate microeconomics courses. (JDH)

  17. Key Elasticities in Job Search Theory : International Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Addison, John T.; Centeno, Mário; Portugal, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    This paper exploits the informational value of search theory, after Lancaster and Chesher (1983), in conjunction with survey data on the unemployed to calculate key reservation wage and duration elasticities for most EU-15 nations.

  18. Uzawa algorithm to solve elastic and elastic-plastic fretting wear problems within the bipotential framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Po; Feng, Zhi-Qiang; Quintero, Juan Antonio Rojas; Zhou, Yang-Jing; Peng, Lei

    2018-03-01

    This paper deals with elastic and elastic-plastic fretting problems. The wear gap is taken into account along with the initial contact distance to obtain the Signorini conditions. Both the Signorini conditions and the Coulomb friction laws are written in a compact form. Within the bipotential framework, an augmented Lagrangian method is applied to calculate the contact forces. The Archard wear law is then used to calculate the wear gap at the contact surface. The local fretting problems are solved via the Uzawa algorithm. Numerical examples are performed to show the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed approach. The influence of plasticity has been discussed.

  19. Elastic field of approaching dislocation loop in isotropic bimaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Wenwang; Xu, Shucai; Zhang, Jinhuan; Xia, Re; Qian, Guian

    2015-01-01

    A semi-analytical solution is developed for calculating interface traction stress (ITS) fields due to elastic modulus mismatch across the interface plane of isotropic perfectly bounded bimaterial system. Based on the semi-analytical approaches developed, ITS is used to correct the bulk elastic field of dislocation loop within infinite homogenous medium, and to produce continuous displacement and stress fields across the perfectly-bounded interface. Firstly, calculation examples of dislocation loops in Al–Cu bimaterial system are performed to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed semi-analytical approach; Then, the elastic fields of dislocation loops in twinning Cu and Cu–Nb bimaterial are analyzed; Finally, the effect of modulus mismatch across interface plane on the elastic field of bimaterial system is investigated, it is found that modulus mismatch has a drastic impact on the elastic fields of dislocation loops within bimaterial system. (paper)

  20. Elastic interaction of hydrogen atoms on graphene: A multiscale approach from first principles to continuum elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branicio, Paulo S.; Vastola, Guglielmo; Jhon, Mark H.; Sullivan, Michael B.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Srolovitz, David J.

    2016-10-01

    The deformation of graphene due to the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms on its surface and the long-range elastic interaction between hydrogen atoms induced by these deformations are investigated using a multiscale approach based on first principles, empirical interactions, and continuum modeling. Focus is given to the intrinsic low-temperature structure and interactions. Therefore, all calculations are performed at T =0 , neglecting possible temperature or thermal fluctuation effects. Results from different methods agree well and consistently describe the local deformation of graphene on multiple length scales reaching 500 Å . The results indicate that the elastic interaction mediated by this deformation is significant and depends on the deformation of the graphene sheet both in and out of plane. Surprisingly, despite the isotropic elasticity of graphene, within the linear elastic regime, atoms elastically attract or repel each other depending on (i) the specific site they are chemisorbed; (ii) the relative position of the sites; (iii) and if they are on the same or on opposite surface sides. The interaction energy sign and power-law decay calculated from molecular statics agree well with theoretical predictions from linear elasticity theory, considering in-plane or out-of-plane deformations as a superposition or in a coupled nonlinear approach. Deviations on the exact power law between molecular statics and the linear elastic analysis are evidence of the importance of nonlinear effects on the elasticity of monolayer graphene. These results have implications for the understanding of the generation of clusters and regular formations of hydrogen and other chemisorbed atoms on graphene.

  1. Elastic anisotropy of crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kube

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An anisotropy index seeks to quantify how directionally dependent the properties of a system are. In this article, the focus is on quantifying the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. Previous elastic anisotropy indices are reviewed and their shortcomings discussed. A new scalar log-Euclidean anisotropy measure AL is proposed, which overcomes these deficiencies. It is based on a distance measure in a log-Euclidean space applied to fourth-rank elastic tensors. AL is an absolute measure of anisotropy where the limiting case of perfect isotropy yields zero. It is a universal measure of anisotropy applicable to all crystalline materials. Specific examples of strong anisotropy are highlighted. A supplementary material provides an anisotropy table giving the values of AL for 2,176 crystallite compounds.

  2. Shells on elastic foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Y.C.; Kedia, K.K.

    1977-01-01

    No realistic analytical work in the area of Shells on Elastic Foundations has been reported in the literature. Various foundation models have been proposed by several authors. These models involve one or more than one parameters to characterise the foundation medium. Some of these models cannot be used to derive the basic equations governing the behaviour of shells on elastic foundations. In the present work, starting from an elastic continuum hypothesis, a mathematical model for foundation has been derived in curvilinear orthogonal coordinates by the help of principle of virtual displacements, treating one of the virtual displacements as known to satisfy certain given conditions at its edge surfaces. In this model, several foundation parameters can be considered and it can also be used for layered medium of both finite and infinite thickness. (Auth.)

  3. Facies Constrained Elastic Full Waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Z.

    2017-05-26

    Current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion (FWI) as a tool beyond acoustic imaging applications, for example for reservoir analysis, face inherent limitations on resolution and also on the potential trade-off between elastic model parameters. Adding rock physics constraints does help to mitigate these issues. However, current approaches to add such constraints are based on averaged type rock physics regularization terms. Since the true earth model consists of different facies, averaging over those facies naturally leads to smoothed models. To overcome this, we propose a novel way to utilize facies based constraints in elastic FWI. A so-called confidence map is calculated and updated at each iteration of the inversion using both the inverted models and the prior information. The numerical example shows that the proposed method can reduce the cross-talks and also can improve the resolution of inverted elastic properties.

  4. Facies Constrained Elastic Full Waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Z.; Zabihi Naeini, E.; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion (FWI) as a tool beyond acoustic imaging applications, for example for reservoir analysis, face inherent limitations on resolution and also on the potential trade-off between elastic model parameters. Adding rock physics constraints does help to mitigate these issues. However, current approaches to add such constraints are based on averaged type rock physics regularization terms. Since the true earth model consists of different facies, averaging over those facies naturally leads to smoothed models. To overcome this, we propose a novel way to utilize facies based constraints in elastic FWI. A so-called confidence map is calculated and updated at each iteration of the inversion using both the inverted models and the prior information. The numerical example shows that the proposed method can reduce the cross-talks and also can improve the resolution of inverted elastic properties.

  5. Anisotropic elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Hwu, Chyanbin

    2010-01-01

    As structural elements, anisotropic elastic plates find wide applications in modern technology. The plates here are considered to be subjected to not only in plane load but also transverse load. In other words, both plane and plate bending problems as well as the stretching-bending coupling problems are all explained in this book. In addition to the introduction of the theory of anisotropic elasticity, several important subjects have are discussed in this book such as interfaces, cracks, holes, inclusions, contact problems, piezoelectric materials, thermoelastic problems and boundary element a

  6. The law of elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cesare Masin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight-a cognitive law analogous to Hooke¿s law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined either in series or in parallel. This total elongation was longer for serial than for parallel springs, and increased proportionally to the number of serial springs and inversely proportionally to the number of parallel springs. The results suggest that participants integrated load weight with imagined elasticity rather than with spring length.

  7. ElasticSearch server

    CERN Document Server

    Rogozinski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    This book is a detailed, practical, hands-on guide packed with real-life scenarios and examples which will show you how to implement an ElasticSearch search engine on your own websites.If you are a web developer or a user who wants to learn more about ElasticSearch, then this is the book for you. You do not need to know anything about ElastiSeach, Java, or Apache Lucene in order to use this book, though basic knowledge about databases and queries is required.

  8. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L.A.

    1978-07-01

    The application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to crack stability in brittle structures is now well understood and widely applied. However, in many structural materials, crack propagation is accompanied by considerable crack-tip plasticity which invalidates the use of LEFM. Thus, present day research in fracture mechanics is aimed at developing parameters for predicting crack propagation under elastic-plastic conditions. These include critical crack-opening-displacement methods, the J integral and R-curve techniques. This report provides an introduction to these concepts and gives some examples of their applications. (author)

  9. Probing hysteretic elasticity in weakly nonlinear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haupert, Sylvain [UPMC UNIV PARIS; Renaud, Guillaume [UPMC UNIV PARIS; Riviere, Jacques [UPMC UNIV PARIS; Talmant, Maryline [UPMC UNIV PARIS; Laugier, Pascal [UPMC UNIV PARIS

    2010-12-07

    Our work is aimed at assessing the elastic and dissipative hysteretic nonlinear parameters' repeatability (precision) using several classes of materials with weak, intermediate and high nonlinear properties. In this contribution, we describe an optimized Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) measuring and data processing protocol applied to small samples. The protocol is used to eliminate the effects of environmental condition changes that take place during an experiment, and that may mask the intrinsic elastic nonlinearity. As an example, in our experiments, we identified external temperature fluctuation as a primary source of material resonance frequency and elastic modulus variation. A variation of 0.1 C produced a frequency variation of 0.01 %, which is similar to the expected nonlinear frequency shift for weakly nonlinear materials. In order to eliminate environmental effects, the variation in f{sub 0} (the elastically linear resonance frequency proportional to modulus) is fit with the appropriate function, and that function is used to correct the NRUS calculation of nonlinear parameters. With our correction procedure, we measured relative resonant frequency shifts of 10{sup -5} , which are below 10{sup -4}, often considered the limit to NRUS sensitivity under common experimental conditions. Our results show that the procedure is an alternative to the stringent control of temperature often applied. Applying the approach, we report nonlinear parameters for several materials, some with very small nonclassical nonlinearity. The approach has broad application to NRUS and other Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy approaches.

  10. On the concept of elasticity used in some fast reactor accident analysis codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmberg, T.

    1975-01-01

    The analysis to be presented will restrict attention to the elastic part of the elastic-plastic constitutive equation used in several Fast Reactor Accident Analysis Codes and originally applied by M.L. Wilkins: Calculation of Elastic-Plastic Flow, UCRL-7322, Rev. 1, Jan. 1969. It is shown that the used elasticity concept is within the frame of hypo-elasticity. On the basis of a test found by Bernstein it is proven that the state of stress is generally depending on the path of deformation. Therefore this concept of elasticity is not compatible with finite elasticity. For several simple deformation processes this special hypo-elastic constitutive equation is integrated to give a stress-strain relation. The path-dependence of this relation is demonstrated. Further the phenomenon of hypo-elastic yield under shear deformation is pointed out. The relevance to modelling material behaviour in primary containment analysis is discussed

  11. On the concept of elasticity used in some fast reactor accident analysis codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmberg, T.

    1975-01-01

    The analysis presented restricts attention to the elastic part of the elastic-plastic equation used in several Fast Reactor Accident Analysis Codes and originally applied by M.L. Wilkins: Calculation of Elastic-Plastic Flow, UCRL-7322, Rev. 1, Jan 1969. It is shown that the used elasticity concept is within the frame of hypo-elasticity. On the basis of a test found by Bernstein it is proven that the state of stress is generally depending on the path of deformation. Therefore this concept of elasticity is not compatible with finite elasticity. For several deformation processes this special hypo-elastic constitutive equation is integrated to give a stress-strain relation. The path-dependence of this relation is demonstrated. Further the phenomenon of hypo-elastic yield under shear deformation is pointed out. The relevance to modelling material behaviour in primary containment analysis is discussed. (Auth.)

  12. Calcul des propriétés élastiques des tissus utilisés dans les matériaux composites Computation of Elastic Properties of Fabrics Used in Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dal Maso F.

    2006-12-01

    elastic moduli. The other provide a rough estimate of moduli only.

  13. Stressed-deformed state of mountain rocks in elastic stage and between elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samedov A.M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The problems of the stress-strain state of rocks in the elastic stage and beyond the elastic limits, and the ways of schematizing the tension and compression diagrams were reviewed in the article. To simplify calculations outside the elastic range, the tension (compression diagrams are usually schematized, i.e. are replaced by curved smooth lines having a fairly simple mathematical expression and at the same time well coinciding with the experimentally obtained diagrams. When diagram is to be schematized, it is necessary to take a constant temperature of superheated water steam if a rock test is planned in a relaxed form. Note that when the diagram is schematizing, the difference between the limits of proportionality and fluidity is erased. This allows the limit of proportionality to be considered the limit of fluidity. Schematicization can be carried out in the area where the tensile strength (compression is planned to be destroyed with the established weakening of rocks by exposure to water steam or chemical reagents. Samples of rocks in natural form were tested and weakened by means of superheated water steam (220 °C and more and chemical reagents for tension and compression. The data are obtained, the diagrams of deformation are constructed and schematized in the elastic stage and beyond the elastic limit. Based on the schematic diagrams of deformation, the components of stress and strain were composed in the elastic stage and beyond the elastic limit. It is established in the publication that rocks under compression and stretching deform, both within the elastic stage, and beyond the limits of elasticity. This could be seen when the samples, both in natural and in weakened state, with superheated water steam (more than 220 °C or chemical reagents were tested. In their natural form, they are mainly deformed within the elastic stage and are destroyed as a brittle material, and in a weakened form they can deform beyond the elastic stage and

  14. Fracton-Elasticity Duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretko, Michael; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by recent studies of fractons, we demonstrate that elasticity theory of a two-dimensional quantum crystal is dual to a fracton tensor gauge theory, providing a concrete manifestation of the fracton phenomenon in an ordinary solid. The topological defects of elasticity theory map onto charges of the tensor gauge theory, with disclinations and dislocations corresponding to fractons and dipoles, respectively. The transverse and longitudinal phonons of crystals map onto the two gapless gauge modes of the gauge theory. The restricted dynamics of fractons matches with constraints on the mobility of lattice defects. The duality leads to numerous predictions for phases and phase transitions of the fracton system, such as the existence of gauge theory counterparts to the (commensurate) crystal, supersolid, hexatic, and isotropic fluid phases of elasticity theory. Extensions of this duality to generalized elasticity theories provide a route to the discovery of new fracton models. As a further consequence, the duality implies that fracton phases are relevant to the study of interacting topological crystalline insulators.

  15. The Law of Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Alberto; Masin, Sergio Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight--a cognitive law analogous to Hooke's law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined…

  16. Method of determining elastic and plastic mechanical properties of ceramic materials using spherical indenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    The invention pertains a method of determining elastic and plastic mechanical properties of ceramics, intermetallics, metals, plastics and other hard, brittle materials which fracture prior to plastically deforming when loads are applied. Elastic and plastic mechanical properties of ceramic materials are determined using spherical indenters. The method is most useful for measuring and calculating the plastic and elastic deformation of hard, brittle materials with low values of elastic modulus to hardness.

  17. Autonomic Vertical Elasticity of Docker Containers with ElasticDocker

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Dhuraibi , Yahya; Paraiso , Fawaz; Djarallah , Nabil; Merle , Philippe

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Elasticity is the key feature of cloud computing to scale computing resources according to application workloads timely. In the literature as well as in industrial products, much attention was given to the elasticity of virtual machines, but much less to the elasticity of containers. However, containers are the new trend for packaging and deploying microservices-based applications. Moreover, most of approaches focus on horizontal elasticity, fewer works address vertica...

  18. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  19. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.; Yoon, S.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  20. Non-linear elastic deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Ogden, R W

    1997-01-01

    Classic in the field covers application of theory of finite elasticity to solution of boundary-value problems, analysis of mechanical properties of solid materials capable of large elastic deformations. Problems. References.

  1. Designing interactively with elastic splines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Fisker, Ann-Sofie

    2018-01-01

    We present an algorithm for designing interactively with C1 elastic splines. The idea is to design the elastic spline using a C1 cubic polynomial spline where each polynomial segment is so close to satisfying the Euler-Lagrange equation for elastic curves that the visual difference becomes neglig...... negligible. Using a database of cubic Bézier curves we are able to interactively modify the cubic spline such that it remains visually close to an elastic spline....

  2. Elastic/Inelastic Measurement Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, Steven; Hicks, Sally; Vanhoy, Jeffrey; McEllistrem, Marcus

    2015-12-01

    The work scope involves the measurement of neutron scattering from natural sodium ( 23 Na) and two isotopes of iron, 56 Fe and 54 Fe. Angular distributions, i.e., differential cross sections, of the scattered neutrons will be measured for 5 to 10 incident neutron energies per year. The work of the first year concentrates on 23 Na, while the enriched iron samples are procured. Differential neutron scattering cross sections provide information to guide nuclear reaction model calculations in the low-@@energy (few MeV) fast-@@neutron region. This region lies just above the isolated resonance region, which in general is well studied; however, model calculations are difficult in this region because overlapping resonance structure is evident and direct nuclear reactions are becoming important. The standard optical model treatment exhibits good predictive ability for the wide-@@region average cross sections but cannot treat the overlapping resonance features. In addition, models that do predict the direct reaction component must be guided by measurements to describe correctly the strength of the direct component, e.g., @@ 2 must be known to describe the direct component of the scattering to the first excited state. Measurements of the elastic scattering differential cross sections guide the optical model calculations, while inelastic differential cross sections provide the crucial information for correctly describing the direct component. Activities occurring during the performance period are described.

  3. Elastic/Inelastic Measurement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, Steven [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Hicks, Sally [Univ. of Dallas, TX (United States); Vanhoy, Jeffrey [U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); McEllistrem, Marcus [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The work scope involves the measurement of neutron scattering from natural sodium (23Na) and two isotopes of iron, 56Fe and 54Fe. Angular distributions, i.e., differential cross sections, of the scattered neutrons will be measured for 5 to 10 incident neutron energies per year. The work of the first year concentrates on 23Na, while the enriched iron samples are procured. Differential neutron scattering cross sections provide information to guide nuclear reaction model calculations in the low-­energy (few MeV) fast-­neutron region. This region lies just above the isolated resonance region, which in general is well studied; however, model calculations are difficult in this region because overlapping resonance structure is evident and direct nuclear reactions are becoming important. The standard optical model treatment exhibits good predictive ability for the wide-­region average cross sections but cannot treat the overlapping resonance features. In addition, models that do predict the direct reaction component must be guided by measurements to describe correctly the strength of the direct component, e.g., β2 must be known to describe the direct component of the scattering to the first excited state. Measurements of the elastic scattering differential cross sections guide the optical model calculations, while inelastic differential cross sections provide the crucial information for correctly describing the direct component. Activities occurring during the performance period are described.

  4. Approximation by planar elastic curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Gravesen, Jens; Nørbjerg, Toke Bjerge

    2016-01-01

    We give an algorithm for approximating a given plane curve segment by a planar elastic curve. The method depends on an analytic representation of the space of elastic curve segments, together with a geometric method for obtaining a good initial guess for the approximating curve. A gradient......-driven optimization is then used to find the approximating elastic curve....

  5. Elasticity in Elastics-An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisetty, Supradeep Kumar; Nimagadda, Chakrapani; Begam, Madhoom Ponnachi; Nalamotu, Raghuveer; Srivastav, Trilok; Gs, Shwetha

    2014-04-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement results from application of forces to teeth. Elastics in orthodontics have been used both intra-orally and extra- orally to a great effect. Their use, combined with good patient co-operation provides the clinician with the ability to correct both anteroposterior and vertical discrepancies. Force decay over a period of time is a major problem in the clinical usage of latex elastics and synthetic elastomers. This loss of force makes it difficult for the clinician to determine the actual force transmitted to the dentition. It's the intent of the clinician to maintain optimal force values over desired period of time. The majority of the orthodontic elastics on the market are latex elastics. Since the early 1990s, synthetic products have been offered in the market for latex-sensitive patients and are sold as nonlatex elastics. There is limited information on the risk that latex elastics may pose to patients. Some have estimated that 0.12-6% of the general population and 6.2% of dental professionals have hypersensitivity to latex protein. There are some reported cases of adverse reactions to latex in the orthodontic population but these are very limited to date. Although the risk is not yet clear, it would still be inadvisable to prescribe latex elastics to a patient with a known latex allergy. To compare the in-vitro performance of latex and non latex elastics. Samples of 0.25 inch, latex and non latex elastics (light, medium, heavy elastics) were obtained from three manufacturers (Forestadent, GAC, Glenroe) and a sample size of ten elastics per group was tested. The properties tested included cross sectional area, internal diameter, initial force generated by the elastics, breaking force and the force relaxation for the different types of elastics. Force relaxation testing involved stretching the elastics to three times marketed internal diameter (19.05 mm) and measuring force level at intervals over a period of 48 hours. The data were

  6. Introduction to linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Phillip L

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to Linear Elasticity, 3rd Edition, provides an applications-oriented grounding in the tensor-based theory of elasticity for students in mechanical, civil, aeronautical, and biomedical engineering, as well as materials and earth science. The book is distinct from the traditional text aimed at graduate students in solid mechanics by introducing the subject at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students. The author's presentation allows students to apply the basic notions of stress analysis and move on to advanced work in continuum mechanics, plasticity, plate and shell theory, composite materials, viscoelasticity and finite method analysis. This book also:  Emphasizes tensor-based approach while still distilling down to explicit notation Provides introduction to theory of plates, theory of shells, wave propagation, viscoelasticity and plasticity accessible to advanced undergraduate students Appropriate for courses following emerging trend of teaching solid mechan...

  7. Zirconium elasticity modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavra, G.

    1978-01-01

    Considered are the limit and the intermediate values of the Young modulus E, modulus of shear G and of linear modulus of compression K obtainable at various temperatures (4.2 to 1133 K) for single crystals of α-zirconium. Determined and presented are the corrected isotropic elasticity characteristics of E, G, K over the above range of temperatures of textured and non-textured α-Zr

  8. Thermal elastic deformations of the planet Mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1972-01-01

    The variation in solar heating due to the resonance rotation of Mercury produces periodic elastic deformations on the surface of the planet. The thermal stress and strain fields under Mercury's surface are calculated after certain simplifications. It is found that deformations penetrate to a greater depth than the variation of solar heating, and that the thermal strain on the surface of the planet pulsates with an amplitude of .004 and a period of 176 days.

  9. Area distribution of an elastic Brownian motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajabpour, M A

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the excursion and meander area distributions of the elastic Brownian motion by using the self-adjoint extension of the Hamiltonian of the free quantum particle on the half line. We also give some comments on the area of the Brownian motion bridge on the real line with the origin removed. We will focus on the power of self-adjoint extension to investigate different possible boundary conditions for the stochastic processes. We also discuss some possible physical applications.

  10. pp-elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E; Cantale, G; Degli-Agosti, S; Hausammann, R; Heer, E; Hess, R; Lechanoine-LeLuc, C; Leo, W; Morenzoni, S; Onel, Y [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the elastic pp experimental program at SIN was to measure enough spin dependent parameters in order to do a direct experimental reconstruction of the elastic scattering amplitudes at a few energies between 400 and 600 MeV and at several angles between 38/sup 0/ cm and 90/sup 0/ cm. This reconstruction was not possible until recently due to lack of experimental data. Information instead has come mainly from phase shift analysis (PSA). The only way to extract the elastic scattering amplitudes without any hypotheses except those of basic symmetries, is to measure a sufficient set of spin dependent parameters at a given angle and energy. With this in view, the authors have measured at 448, 494, 515, 536 and 579 MeV, the polarization, the spin correlation parameters Asub(00nn), Asub(00ss), Asub(00kk), Asub(00ks), the 2-spin parameters Dsub(n0n0), Ksub(n00n), Dsub(s'0s0), Dsub(s'0k0) and the 3-spin parameters Msub(s'0sn), Msub(s'0kn) between 34/sup 0/ cm and 118/sup 0/ cm. A few of these parameters have also been measured at 560 and 470 MeV and at a few energies below 448 MeV. The indices refer to the polarization orientation of the scattered, recoil, beam and target particle respectively.

  11. Anomalous elasticity, fluctuations and disorder in elastic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by freely suspended graphene and polymerized membranes in soft and biological matter we present a detailed study of a tensionless elastic sheet in the presence of thermal fluctuations and quenched disorder. The manuscript is based on an extensive draft dating back to 1993, that was circulated privately. It presents the general theoretical framework and calculational details of numerous results, partial forms of which have been published in brief Letters (Le Doussal and Radzihovsky, 1992; 1993). The experimental realization atom-thin graphene sheets (Novoselov et al., 2004) have driven a resurgence in this fascinating subject, making our dated predictions and their detailed derivations timely. To this end we analyze the statistical mechanics of a generalized D-dimensional elastic "membrane" embedded in d dimensions using a self-consistent screening approximation (SCSA), that has proved to be unprecedentedly accurate in this system, exact in three complementary limits: (i) d → ∞, (ii) D → 4, and (iii) D = d. Focusing on the critical "flat" phase, for a homogeneous two-dimensional (D = 2) membrane embedded in three dimensions (d = 3), we predict its universal roughness exponent ζ = 0 . 590, length-scale dependent elastic moduli exponents η = 0 . 821 and ηu = 0 . 358, and an anomalous Poisson ratio, σ = - 1 / 3. In the presence of random uncorrelated heterogeneity the membrane exhibits a glassy wrinkled ground state, characterized by ζ‧ = 0 . 775 ,η‧ = 0 . 449, ηu‧ = 1 . 101 and a Poisson ratio σ‧ = - 1 / 3. Motivated by a number of physical realizations (charged impurities, disclinations and dislocations) we also study power-law correlated quenched disorder that leads to a variety of distinct glassy wrinkled phases. Finally, neglecting self-avoiding interaction we demonstrate that at high temperature a "phantom" sheet undergoes a continuous crumpling transition, characterized by a radius of gyration exponent, ν = 0 . 732 and η = 0

  12. Shear Elasticity and Shear Viscosity Imaging in Soft Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiqun

    In this thesis, a new approach is introduced that provides estimates of shear elasticity and shear viscosity using time-domain measurements of shear waves in viscoelastic media. Simulations of shear wave particle displacements induced by an acoustic radiation force are accelerated significantly by a GPU. The acoustic radiation force is first calculated using the fast near field method (FNM) and the angular spectrum approach (ASA). The shear waves induced by the acoustic radiation force are then simulated in elastic and viscoelastic media using Green's functions. A parallel algorithm is developed to perform these calculations on a GPU, where the shear wave particle displacements at different observation points are calculated in parallel. The resulting speed increase enables rapid evaluation of shear waves at discrete points, in 2D planes, and for push beams with different spatial samplings and for different values of the f-number (f/#). The results of these simulations show that push beams with smaller f/# require a higher spatial sampling rate. The significant amount of acceleration achieved by this approach suggests that shear wave simulations with the Green's function approach are ideally suited for high-performance GPUs. Shear wave elasticity imaging determines the mechanical parameters of soft tissue by analyzing measured shear waves induced by an acoustic radiation force. To estimate the shear elasticity value, the widely used time-of-flight method calculates the correlation between shear wave particle velocities at adjacent lateral observation points. Although this method provides accurate estimates of the shear elasticity in purely elastic media, our experience suggests that the time-of-flight (TOF) method consistently overestimates the shear elasticity values in viscoelastic media because the combined effects of diffraction, attenuation, and dispersion are not considered. To address this problem, we have developed an approach that directly accounts for all

  13. Elastic properties of Gum Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Shigeru; Furuta, Tadahiko; Hwang, Junghwan; Nishino, Kazuaki; Saito, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction measurements under tensile loading and dynamic mechanical analysis were performed to investigate the mechanisms of elastic deformation in Gum Metal. Tensile stress-strain curves for Gum Metal indicate that cold working substantially decreases the elastic modulus while increasing the yield strength, thereby confirming nonlinearity in the elastic range. The gradient of each curve decreased continuously to about one-third its original value near the elastic limit. As a result of this decrease in elastic modulus and nonlinearity, elastic deformability reaches 2.5% after cold working. Superelasticity is attributed to stress-induced martensitic transformations, although the large elastic deformation in Gum Metal is not accompanied by a phase transformation

  14. Elastic constants of a Laves phase compound: C15 NbCr2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormeci, A.; Chu, F.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.P.; Albers, R.C.; Thoma, D.J.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1997-01-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of C15 NbCr 2 have been computed by using a first-principles, self-consistent, full-potential total energy method. From these single-crystal elastic constants the isotropic elastic moduli are calculated using the Voigt and Reuss averages. The calculated values are in fair agreement with the experimental values. The implications of the results are discussed with regards to Poisson's ratio and the direction dependence of Young's modulus

  15. Measurement of Conjectural Variations Elasticity in an Oligopoly Structure (Using Iwata Approach for Iranians Food and Beverage Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nabishahyakitash

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate Conjectural Variations elasticity in Iranians Food and Beverage industry using Iwata approach, The conjectural variation function is extracted from demand and supply information also optimization process on producers’ behavior. The experimental estimates of conjectural variation elasticities were obtained based on price elasticity of demand, cost elasticity and marginal cost elasticity for the selected industries. In this research demand function AIDS was used to obtain the price elasticity. The AIDS function was estimated using SUR and the demand price elasticity is calculated by calfent. The results show that "Vegetable oils and animal" industry with 19.37 have the most conjectural variation elasticity among the selected industries (The more divergent the conjectural variation elasticity is from zero the more likely the monopoly exists. In addition, dairy, sugar and malt industries have the most conjectural variation elasticity with 18.01, 17.18, and 10.51 respectively.

  16. Prediction of fretting fatigue behavior under elastic-plastic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ki Su

    2009-01-01

    Fretting fatigue generally leads to the degradation of the fatigue strength of a material due to cyclic micro-slip between two contacting materials. Fretting fatigue is regarded as an important issue in designing aerospace structures. While many studies have evaluated fretting fatigue behavior under elastic deformation conditions, few have focused on fretting fatigue behavior under elastic-plastic deformation conditions, especially the crack orientation and fatigue life prediction for Ti-6Al-4V. The primary goal of this study was to characterize the fretting fatigue crack initiation behavior in the presence of plasticity. Experimental tests were performed using pad configurations involving elastic-plastic deformations. To calculate stress distributions under elastic-plastic fretting fatigue conditions, FEA was also performed. Several parametric approaches were used to predict fretting fatigue life along with stress distribution resulting from FEA. However, those parameters using surface stresses were unable to establish an equivalence between elastic fretting fatigue data and elastic-plastic fretting fatigue data. Based on this observation, the critical distance methods, which are commonly used in notch analysis, were applied to the fretting fatigue problem. In conclusion, the effective strain range method when used in conjunction with the SMSSR parameter showed a good correlation of data points between the pad configurations involving elastic and elastic plastic deformations

  17. NONLINEAR SPECTRAL IMAGING OF ELASTIC CARTILAGE IN RABBIT EARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JING CHEN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Elastic cartilage in the rabbit external ear is an important animal model with attractive potential value for researching the physiological and pathological states of cartilages especially during wound healing. In this work, nonlinear optical microscopy based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation were employed for imaging and quantifying the intact elastic cartilage. The morphology and distribution of main components in elastic cartilage including cartilage cells, collagen and elastic fibers were clearly observed from the high-resolution two-dimensional nonlinear optical images. The areas of cell nuclei, a parameter related to the pathological changes of normal or abnormal elastic cartilage, can be easily quantified. Moreover, the three-dimensional structure of chondrocytes and matrix were displayed by constructing three-dimensional image of cartilage tissue. At last, the emission spectra from cartilage were obtained and analyzed. We found that the different ratio of collagen over elastic fibers can be used to locate the observed position in the elastic cartilage. The redox ratio based on the ratio of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH over flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD fluorescence can also be calculated to analyze the metabolic state of chondrocytes in different regions. Our results demonstrated that this technique has the potential to provide more accurate and comprehensive information for the physiological states of elastic cartilage.

  18. Modeling Pseudo-elastic Behavior of Springback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Z. Cedric

    2005-01-01

    One of the principal foundations of mathematical theory of conventional plasticity for rate-independent metals is that there exists a well-defined yield surface in stress space for any material point under deformation. A material point can undergo further plastic deformation if the applied stresses are beyond current yield surface which is generally referred as 'plastic loading'. On the other hand, if the applied stress state falls within or on the yield surface, the metal will deform elastically only and is said to be undergoing 'elastic unloading'. Although it has been always recognized throughout the history of development of plasticity theory that there is indeed inelastic deformation accompanying elastic unloading, which leads to metal's hysteresis behavior, its effects were thought to be negligible and were largely ignored in the mathematical treatment.Recently there have been renewed interests in the study of unloading behavior of sheet metals upon large plastic deformation and its implications on springback prediction. Springback is essentially an elastic recovery process of a formed sheet metal blank when it is released from the forming dies. Its magnitude depends on the stress states and compliances of the deformed sheet metal if no further plastic loading occurs during the relaxation process. Therefore the accurate determination of material compliances during springback and its effective incorporation into simulation software are important aspects for springback calculation. Some of the studies suggest that the unloading curve might deviate from linearity, and suggestions were made that a reduced elastic modulus be used for springback simulation.The aim of this study is NOT to take a position on the debate of whether elastic moduli are changed during sheet metal forming process. Instead we propose an approach of modeling observed psuedoelastic behavior within the context of mathematical theory of plasticity, where elastic moduli are treated to be

  19. AERODYNAMIC LOAD OF AN AIRCRAFT WITH A HIGHLY ELASTIC WING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Schoř

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a method for calculation of air loads of an aircraft with an elastic wing is presented. The method can predict a redistribution of air loads when the elastic wing deforms. Unlike the traditional Euler or Navier-Stokes CFD to FEM coupling, the method uses 3D panel method as a source of aerodynamic data. This makes the calculation feasible on a typical recent workstation. Due to a short computational time and low hardware demands this method is suitable for both the preliminary design stage and the load evaluation stage. A case study is presented. The study compares a glider wing performing a pull maneuver at both rigid and and elastic state. The study indicates a significant redistribution of air load at the elastic case.

  20. Tensor polarization in pion-deuteron elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.; Freeman, W.S.; Geesaman, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    During this year the analysis of measurements of t 20 in π-d elastic scattering was completed and a final summary manuscript was prepared for publication. The results consists of angular distributions of the deuteron tensor polarization in π-d elastic scattering at pion energies of 140, 180, 220 and 256 MeV. Theoretical calculations in which the effects of pion absorption on the elastic channel are small reproduce the data. No rapid angular or energy dependence was found near a pion energy of 134 MeV, where another experiment at SIN has suggested the existence of dibaryon resonances

  1. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trugman, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, C H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, J N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramos, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroe, I [WORXESTER, MA

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  2. [Aortic elastic properties and its clinical significance in intracranial aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Zhao-xia; You, Xiang-dong; Weng, Wen-chao; Wang, Jian-an; Shi, Jian

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the aortic elastic properties and its clinical significance in intracranial aneurysms (IAs). One hundred and seven IAs patients (57 with hypertension) and 108 healthy subjects were recruited. The internal aortic diameters in systole and diastole were measured by the M-mode echocardiography, the aortic elasticity indexes were calculated and compared. The aortic distensibility (DIS) was lower and the aortic stiffness index (SI) was higher in IAs patients than those in controls (both P IAs patients with hypertension (IAs-HP) than those in IAs with no hypertension (P IAs patients and hypertension is closely related to the severity of aortic elasticity.

  3. Singlet channel coupling in deuteron elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Khalili, J.S.; Tostevin, J.A.; Johnson, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Intermediate energy deuteron elastic scattering is investigated in a three-body model incorporating relativistic kinematics. The effects of deuteron breakup to singlet spin intermediate states, on the elastic scattering observables for the 58 Ni(d vector, d) 58 Ni reaction at 400 and 700 MeV, are studied quantitatively. The singlet-breakup contributions to the elastic amplitude are estimated within an approximate two-step calculation. The calculation makes an adiabatic approximation in the intermediate states propagator which allows the use of closure over the np intermediate states continuum. The singlet channel coupling is found to produce large effects on the calculated reaction tensor analysing power A yy , characteristic of a dynamically induced second-rank tensor interaction. By inspection of the calculated breakup amplitudes we show this induced interaction to be of the T L tensor type. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of single crystal coefficients from mechanical and x-ray elastic constants of the polycrystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauk, V.; Kockelmann, H.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of calculation are developed for determination of single crystal elastic compliance or stiffness constants of cubic and hexagonal materials from mechanical and X-ray elastic constants of polycrystals. The calculations are applied to pure, cubic iron and hexagonal WC. There are no single crystal constants in the literature for WC, because no single crystals suitable for measurement are available. (orig.) [de

  5. Exchange interpretation of anomalous back angle heavy ion elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1977-10-01

    Anomalous back angle oscillations in the angular distributions obtained in the elastic scattering of 16 O + 28 Si and 12 C + 28 Si have been interpreted in terms of an elastic cluster transfer comparable to that observed in other heavy ion reactions. The calculations appear to at least qualitatively explain the data with respect to the existence and phase of the back angle oscillations. The results indicate that an exchange mechanism may play an important role in the oscillations

  6. Forward elastic scattering of electrons by hydrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibotti, C.R. (Instituto de Fisica Teorica, R. Pamplona 145, Sao Paulo (Brazil)); Massaro, P.A. (Bari Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica)

    1978-01-11

    The available theoretical and experimental values for the elastic, inelastic and ionization cross-sections of electrons by hydrogen atoms are used to obtain the total cross-section. The optical theorem and a dispersion relation are used to calculate the forward e-H scattering amplitude for medium and high energies. Using this quantity the reliability of the Born expansion for elastic e-H scattering is tested.

  7. On liquid vibration in elastic containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priehn, F.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical methods of calculation for containers made of circular rings of any crossection are derived for containers which are filled with incompressible and also with compressible liquids. This is done neglecting the formation of waves on the liquid surface, and by using a simplified mechanical model for calculations for the elastic walls. Using a developed Fourier series in the circumferential direction, this leads to a plane model and one obtains a very compact system of equations, which give an opportunity of studying the individual effects very economically. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Form finding in elastic gridshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Changyeob; Sageman-Furnas, Andrew O.; Jawed, Mohammad K.; Reis, Pedro M.

    2018-01-01

    Elastic gridshells comprise an initially planar network of elastic rods that are actuated into a shell-like structure by loading their extremities. The resulting actuated form derives from the elastic buckling of the rods subjected to inextensibility. We study elastic gridshells with a focus on the rational design of the final shapes. Our precision desktop experiments exhibit complex geometries, even from seemingly simple initial configurations and actuation processes. The numerical simulations capture this nonintuitive behavior with excellent quantitative agreement, allowing for an exploration of parameter space that reveals multistable states. We then turn to the theory of smooth Chebyshev nets to address the inverse design of hemispherical elastic gridshells. The results suggest that rod inextensibility, not elastic response, dictates the zeroth-order shape of an actuated elastic gridshell. As it turns out, this is the shape of a common household strainer. Therefore, the geometry of Chebyshev nets can be further used to understand elastic gridshells. In particular, we introduce a way to quantify the intrinsic shape of the empty, but enclosed regions, which we then use to rationalize the nonlocal deformation of elastic gridshells to point loading. This justifies the observed difficulty in form finding. Nevertheless, we close with an exploration of concatenating multiple elastic gridshell building blocks.

  9. Mathematical foundations of elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, Jerrold E

    1994-01-01

    This advanced-level study approaches mathematical foundations of three-dimensional elasticity using modern differential geometry and functional analysis. It is directed to mathematicians, engineers and physicists who wish to see this classical subject in a modern setting with examples of newer mathematical contributions. Prerequisites include a solid background in advanced calculus and the basics of geometry and functional analysis.The first two chapters cover the background geometry ― developed as needed ― and use this discussion to obtain the basic results on kinematics and dynamics of con

  10. Elastic and viscoplastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebensohn, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we review crystal elasticity and plasticity-based self-consistent theories and apply them to the determination of the effective response of polycrystalline aggregates. These mean-field formulations, which enable the prediction of the mechanical behaviour of polycrystalline aggregates based on the heterogeneous and/or directional properties of their constituent single crystal grains and phases, are ideal tools to establish relationships between microstructure and properties of these materials, ubiquitous among fuels and structural materials for nuclear systems. (author)

  11. Mathematical methods in elasticity imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Ammari, Habib; Garnier, Josselin; Kang, Hyeonbae; Lee, Hyundae; Wahab, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first to comprehensively explore elasticity imaging and examines recent, important developments in asymptotic imaging, modeling, and analysis of deterministic and stochastic elastic wave propagation phenomena. It derives the best possible functional images for small inclusions and cracks within the context of stability and resolution, and introduces a topological derivative-based imaging framework for detecting elastic inclusions in the time-harmonic regime. For imaging extended elastic inclusions, accurate optimal control methodologies are designed and the effects of uncertainties of the geometric or physical parameters on stability and resolution properties are evaluated. In particular, the book shows how localized damage to a mechanical structure affects its dynamic characteristics, and how measured eigenparameters are linked to elastic inclusion or crack location, orientation, and size. Demonstrating a novel method for identifying, locating, and estimating inclusions and cracks in elastic...

  12. Prediction study of structural, elastic and electronic properties of FeMP (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanto, A.; Chihi, T.; Ghebouli, M. A.; Reffas, M.; Fatmi, M.; Ghebouli, B.

    2018-06-01

    First principles calculations are applied in the study of FeMP (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) compounds. We investigate the structural, elastic, mechanical and electronic properties by combining first-principles calculations with the CASTEP approach. For ideal polycrystalline FeMP (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) the shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, elastic anisotropy indexes, Pugh's criterion, elastic wave velocities and Debye temperature are also calculated from the single crystal elastic constants. The shear anisotropic factors and anisotropy are obtained from the single crystal elastic constants. The Debye temperature is calculated from the average elastic wave velocity obtained from shear and bulk modulus as well as the integration of elastic wave velocities in different directions of the single crystal.

  13. Elastic emission polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  14. Heavy ion elastic scatterings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermaz, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    Diffraction and refraction play an important role in particle elastic scattering. The optical model treats correctly and simultaneously both phenomena but without disentangling them. Semi-classical discussions in terms of trajectories emphasize the refractive aspect due to the real part of the optical potential. The separation due to to R.C. Fuller of the quantal cross section into two components coming from opposite side of the target nucleus allows to understand better the refractive phenomenon and the origin of the observed oscillations in the elastic scattering angular distributions. We shall see that the real part of the potential is responsible of a Coulomb and a nuclear rainbow which allows to determine better the nuclear potential in the interior region near the nuclear surface since the volume absorption eliminates any effect of the real part of the potential for the internal partial scattering waves. Resonance phenomena seen in heavy ion scattering will be discussed in terms of optical model potential and Regge pole analysis. Compound nucleus resonances or quasi-molecular states can be indeed the more correct and fundamental alternative

  15. Elastic versus acoustic inversion for marine surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Peter; Wu, Zedong

    2018-04-01

    Full Wavefield Inversion (FWI) is a powerful and elegant approach for seismic imaging that is on the way to becoming the method of choice when processing exploration or global seismic data. In the case of processing marine survey data, one may be tempted to assume acoustic FWI is sufficient given that only pressure waves exist in the water layer. In this paper, we pose the question as to whether or not in theory - at least for a hard water bottom case - it should be possible to resolve the shear modulus or S-wave velocity in a marine setting using large offset data. We therefore conduct numerical experiments with idealized marine data calculated with the elastic wave equation. We study two cases, FWI of data due to a diffractor model, and FWI of data due to a fault model. We find that at least in idealized situation, elastic FWI of hard waterbottom data is capable of resolving between the two Lamé parameters λ and μ. Another numerical experiment with a soft waterbottom layer gives the same result. In contrast, acoustic FWI of the synthetic elastic data results in a single image of the first Lamé parameter λ which contains severe artefacts for diffraction data and noticable artefacts for layer reflection data. Based on these results, it would appear that at least, inversions of large offset marine data should be fully elastic rather than acoustic unless it has been demonstrated that for the specific case in question (offsets, model and water depth, practical issues such as soft sediment attenuation of shear waves or computational time), that an acoustic only inversion provides a reasonably good quality of image comparable to that of an elastic inversion. Further research with real data is required to determine the degree to which practical issues such as shear wave attenuation in soft sediments may affect this result.

  16. Elastic versus acoustic inversion for marine surveys

    KAUST Repository

    Mora, Peter

    2018-04-24

    Full Wavefield Inversion (FWI) is a powerful and elegant approach for seismic imaging that is on the way to becoming the method of choice when processing exploration or global seismic data. In the case of processing marine survey data, one may be tempted to assume acoustic FWI is sufficient given that only pressure waves exist in the water layer. In this paper, we pose the question as to whether or not in theory – at least for a hard water bottom case – it should be possible to resolve the shear modulus or S-wave velocity in a marine setting using large offset data. We therefore conduct numerical experiments with idealized marine data calculated with the elastic wave equation. We study two cases, FWI of data due to a diffractor model, and FWI of data due to a fault model. We find that at least in idealized situation, elastic FWI of hard waterbottom data is capable of resolving between the two Lamé parameters λ and μ. Another numerical experiment with a soft waterbottom layer gives the same result. In contrast, acoustic FWI of the synthetic elastic data results in a single image of the first Lamé parameter λ which contains severe artefacts for diffraction data and noticable artefacts for layer reflection data. Based on these results, it would appear that at least, inversions of large offset marine data should be fully elastic rather than acoustic unless it has been demonstrated that for the specific case in question (offsets, model and water depth, practical issues such as soft sediment attenuation of shear waves or computational time), that an acoustic only inversion provides a reasonably good quality of image comparable to that of an elastic inversion. Further research with real data is required to determine the degree to which practical issues such as shear wave attenuation in soft sediments may affect this result.

  17. Design guidance for elastic followup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naugle, F.V.

    1983-01-01

    The basic mechanism of elastic followup is discussed in relation to piping design. It is shown how mechanistic insight gained from solutions for a two-bar problem can be used to identify dominant design parameters and to determine appropriate modifications where elastic followup is a potential problem. It is generally recognized that quantitative criteria are needed for elastic followup in the creep range where badly unbalanced lines can pose potential problems. Approaches for criteria development are discussed

  18. Income Elasticity of Environmental Amenities

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Miles; Andrés Pereyra; Máximo Rossi

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the estimation of income elasticities of environmental amenities. The novelty is the application of econometric methods that take into account the problem of measurement errors when estimating these elasticities, which are common in microeconomic data and are not usually considered in the applied literature related with this issue. Our aim is to discuss whether the measurement error has signi…cant e¤ects on the elasticities. Data from the Expenditure Budget...

  19. H + Ar collisions. II. Differential scattering calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, H.; Le, T.Q.; van Zyl, B.

    1977-01-01

    Differential elastic scattering cross-section calculations have been made for H + Ar collisions using classical and eikonal techniques. The calculation procedures are described and compared with existing experimental data. It is shown that the angular distribution of the elastic cross section is similar to that obtained for proton production in such collisions at energies above about 200 eV. By combining the angular dependence of the computed elastic cross section with experimental measurements described in the preceding paper, absolute differential cross sections for proton production have been determined

  20. Use of a running coupling in the NLO calculation of forward hadron production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducloué, B.; Iancu, E.; Lappi, T.; Mueller, A. H.; Soyez, G.; Triantafyllopoulos, D. N.; Zhu, Y.

    2018-03-01

    We address and solve a puzzle raised by a recent calculation [1] of the cross section for particle production in proton-nucleus collisions to next-to-leading order: the numerical results show an unreasonably large dependence upon the choice of a prescription for the QCD running coupling, which spoils the predictive power of the calculation. Specifically, the results obtained with a prescription formulated in the transverse coordinate space differ by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude from those obtained with a prescription in momentum space. We show that this discrepancy is an artifact of the interplay between the asymptotic freedom of QCD and the Fourier transform from coordinate space to momentum space. When used in coordinate space, the running coupling can act as a fictitious potential which mimics hard scattering and thus introduces a spurious contribution to the cross section. We identify a new coordinate-space prescription, which avoids this problem, and leads to results consistent with those obtained with the momentum-space prescription.

  1. Measurement and calculation of characteristic prompt gamma ray spectra emitted during proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polf, J C; Peterson, S; Beddar, S [M D Anderson Cancer Center, Univeristy of Texas, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); McCleskey, M; Roeder, B T; Spiridon, A; Trache, L [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)], E-mail: jcpolf@mdanderson.org

    2009-11-21

    In this paper, we present results of initial measurements and calculations of prompt gamma ray spectra (produced by proton-nucleus interactions) emitted from tissue equivalent phantoms during irradiations with proton beams. Measurements of prompt gamma ray spectra were made using a high-purity germanium detector shielded either with lead (passive shielding), or a Compton suppression system (active shielding). Calculations of the spectra were performed using a model of both the passive and active shielding experimental setups developed using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit. From the measured spectra it was shown that it is possible to distinguish the characteristic emission lines from the major elemental constituent atoms (C, O, Ca) in the irradiated phantoms during delivery of proton doses similar to those delivered during patient treatment. Also, the Monte Carlo spectra were found to be in very good agreement with the measured spectra providing an initial validation of our model for use in further studies of prompt gamma ray emission during proton therapy. (note)

  2. Calculation of single chain cellulose elasticity using fully atomistic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiawa Wu; Robert J. Moon; Ashlie Martini

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals, a potential base material for green nanocomposites, are ordered bundles of cellulose chains. The properties of these chains have been studied for many years using atomic-scale modeling. However, model predictions are difficult to interpret because of the significant dependence of predicted properties on model details. The goal of this study is...

  3. Automatic estimation of elasticity parameters in breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerl, Katrin; Cochran, Sandy; Evans, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE), a novel ultrasound imaging technique, can provide unique information about cancerous tissue. To estimate elasticity parameters, a region of interest (ROI) is manually positioned over the stiffest part of the shear wave image (SWI). The aim of this work is to estimate the elasticity parameters i.e. mean elasticity, maximal elasticity and standard deviation, fully automatically. Ultrasonic SWI of a breast elastography phantom and breast tissue in vivo were acquired using the Aixplorer system (SuperSonic Imagine, Aix-en-Provence, France). First, the SWI within the ultrasonic B-mode image was detected using MATLAB then the elasticity values were extracted. The ROI was automatically positioned over the stiffest part of the SWI and the elasticity parameters were calculated. Finally all values were saved in a spreadsheet which also contains the patient's study ID. This spreadsheet is easily available for physicians and clinical staff for further evaluation and so increase efficiency. Therewith the efficiency is increased. This algorithm simplifies the handling, especially for the performance and evaluation of clinical trials. The SWE processing method allows physicians easy access to the elasticity parameters of the examinations from their own and other institutions. This reduces clinical time and effort and simplifies evaluation of data in clinical trials. Furthermore, reproducibility will be improved.

  4. Questions about elastic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbrecht, Jüri

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses the modelling of mechanical waves by asking the right questions about them and trying to find suitable answers. The questions follow the analytical sequence from elementary understandings to complicated cases, following a step-by-step path towards increased knowledge. The focus is on waves in elastic solids, although some examples also concern non-conservative cases for the sake of completeness. Special attention is paid to the understanding of the influence of microstructure, nonlinearity and internal variables in continua. With the help of many mathematical models for describing waves, physical phenomena concerning wave dispersion, nonlinear effects, emergence of solitary waves, scales and hierarchies of waves as well as the governing physical parameters are analysed. Also, the energy balance in waves and non-conservative models with energy influx are discussed. Finally, all answers are interwoven into the canvas of complexity.

  5. SIMULATION OFTHERMO-ELASTICS PROPERTIESOFTHERMALBARRIERCOATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.Ferouani M. Ferouani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings are used to protect different parts in compressors and turbines from heat. They are generally composed of two layers, one metallic layer providing resistance to heat corrosion and oxidation, and one thermally insulating ceramic layer. Two different techniques are industrially used. Plasma spray results in a lamellar structure granting a low thermal conductivity, but with a low thermal expansion compliance. Electron Beam Physical Vapour Deposition generates a columnar structure allowing a better accommodation of the thermal expansion stresses, entailing improved lifetime of the coating, but with a higher thermal conductivity. The aim of the paper presented here is to develop a procedure of analysis based on the micro structural observation for the prediction of the properties of new coatings in court of industrial development and to predict the effect of the posterior thermal treatment on the properties of the coatings carried out. For a given coating, one has to calculate linear elasticity and its evolution with the temperature as well as thermal expansion, aiming at predicting different parameters related to the in service deterioration.  

  6. Energy and depth resolution in elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, E., E-mail: szilagyi@rmki.kfki.h [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-06-15

    Elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry was implemented into the analytical ion beam simulation program DEPTH. In the calculations, effective detector geometry and multiple scattering effects are considered. Mott's cross section for the identical, spin zero particles is included. Spectra based on the individual detector signal and summing the energy of the recoiled and scattered particles originating from the same scattering events can also be calculated. To calculate this latter case, the dependency of the energy spread contributions had to be reconsidered.

  7. Energy and depth resolution in elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, E.

    2010-01-01

    Elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry was implemented into the analytical ion beam simulation program DEPTH. In the calculations, effective detector geometry and multiple scattering effects are considered. Mott's cross section for the identical, spin zero particles is included. Spectra based on the individual detector signal and summing the energy of the recoiled and scattered particles originating from the same scattering events can also be calculated. To calculate this latter case, the dependency of the energy spread contributions had to be reconsidered.

  8. Nonlinear Elasticity of Doped Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2016-0206 NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS Mark Dykman and Kirill Moskovtsev Michigan State University...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-16-1-7600 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...vibration amplitude. 15. SUBJECT TERMS semiconductors , microresonators, microelectromechanical 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  9. Elasticity theory of ultrathin nanofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiangang; Yun, Guohong; Narsu, B; Yao, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    A self-consistent theoretical scheme for describing the elastic behavior of ultrathin nanofilms (UTNFs) was proposed. Taking into account the lower symmetry of an UTNF compared to its bulk counterpart, additional elastic and magnetoelastic parameters were introduced to model the elasticity rigorously. The applications of current theory to several elastic and magnetoelastic systems gave excellent agreement with experiments. More importantly, the surface elastic and magnetoelastic parameters used to fit the experimental results are physically reasonable and in close agreement with those obtained from experiment and simulation. This fact suggests that the additional elastic (magnetoelastic) constants due to symmetry breaking are of great importance in theoretical description of the mechanical properties of UTNFs. And we proved that the elasticity of UTNFs should be described by a three-dimensional model just including the intrinsic surface and bulk parameters, but not the effective surface parameters. It is believed that the theory reported here is a universal strategy for elasticity and magnetoelasticity of ultrathin films. (paper)

  10. Elastic properties of uniaxial-fiber reinforced composites - General features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subhendu; Ledbetter, Hassel; Lei, Ming

    The salient features of the elastic properties of uniaxial-fiber-reinforced composites are examined by considering the complete set of elastic constants of composites comprising isotropic uniaxial fibers in an isotropic matrix. Such materials exhibit transverse-isotropic symmetry and five independent elastic constants in Voigt notation: C(11), C(33), C(44), C(66), and C(13). These C(ij) constants are calculated over the entire fiber-volume-fraction range 0.0-1.0, using a scattered-plane-wave ensemple-average model. Some practical elastic constants such as the principal Young moduli and the principal Poisson ratios are considered, and the behavior of these constants is discussed. Also presented are the results for the four principal sound velocities used to study uniaxial-fiber-reinforced composites: v(11), v(33), v(12), and v(13).

  11. Proposal of Design Formulae for Equivalent Elasticity of Masonry Structures Made with Bricks of Low Modulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ridwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bricks of low elastic modulus are occasionally used in some developing countries, such as Indonesia and India. Most of the previous research efforts focused on masonry structures built with bricks of considerably high elastic modulus. The objective of this study is to quantify the equivalent elastic modulus of lower-stiffness masonry structures, when the mortar has a higher modulus of elasticity than the bricks, by employing finite element (FE simulations and adopting the homogenization technique. The reported numerical simulations adopted the two-dimensional representative volume elements (RVEs using quadrilateral elements with four nodes. The equivalent elastic moduli of composite elements with various bricks and mortar were quantified. The numerically estimated equivalent elastic moduli from the FE simulations were verified using previously established test data. Hence, a new simplified formula for the calculation of the equivalent modulus of elasticity of such masonry structures is proposed in the present study.

  12. Dislocations, the elastic energy momentum tensor and crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, Chi-wei

    1979-07-01

    Based upon dislocation theory, some stress intensity factors can be calculated for practical cases. The results obtained by this method have been found to agree fairly well with the results obtained by the conventional fracture mechanics. The elastic energy momentum tensor has been used to calculate the force acting on the crack tip. A discussion on the kinetics of migration of impurities to the crack tip was given. It seems that the crack tip sometimes may be considered as a singularity in an elastic field and the fundamental law of classical field theory is applicable on the problem in fracture of materials. (author)

  13. Elastic scattering of positronium: Application of the confined variational method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Junyi

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that the phase shift in elastic positronium-atom scattering can be precisely determined by the confined variational method, in spite of the fact that the Hamiltonian includes an unphysical confining potential acting on the center of mass of the positron and one of the atomic electrons. As an example, we study the S-wave elastic scattering for the positronium-hydrogen scattering system, where the existing 4% discrepancy between the Kohn variational calculation and the R-matrix calculation is resolved. © Copyright EPLA, 2012.

  14. Elastic scattering of positronium: Application of the confined variational method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Junyi; Yan, Zong-Chao; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that the phase shift in elastic positronium-atom scattering can be precisely determined by the confined variational method, in spite of the fact that the Hamiltonian includes an unphysical confining potential acting on the center of mass of the positron and one of the atomic electrons. As an example, we study the S-wave elastic scattering for the positronium-hydrogen scattering system, where the existing 4% discrepancy between the Kohn variational calculation and the R-matrix calculation is resolved. © Copyright EPLA, 2012.

  15. Cell Elasticity Determines Macrophage Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Naimish R.; Bole, Medhavi; Chen, Cheng; Hardin, Charles C.; Kho, Alvin T.; Mih, Justin; Deng, Linhong; Butler, James; Tschumperlin, Daniel; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Koziel, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function. PMID:23028423

  16. Cell elasticity determines macrophage function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naimish R Patel

    Full Text Available Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function.

  17. Multipurpose hooks for elastic attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Shashidhar Revankar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As certain bracket systems do not include hooks on premolar brackets for elastic attachment, Kobayashi or custom made ligature hooks have proven as an alternative. However, these hooks tend to bend labially when used with heavy elastics and these elastics can even pop loose from the hooks on mouth opening. The following article describes an innovative multipurpose hook which is simple, stiff and inexpensive and can be used for engagement of class II elastics on premolars in case of missing molars as well as engagement of intermaxillary elastics for settling of occlusion in finishing stages. As the hooks can be prefabricated, this saves a lot of chair side time and is more practical for use in day-to-day orthodontic practice.

  18. Blocky inversion of multichannel elastic impedance for elastic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozayan, Davoud Karami; Gholami, Ali; Siahkoohi, Hamid Reza

    2018-04-01

    Petrophysical description of reservoirs requires proper knowledge of elastic parameters like P- and S-wave velocities (Vp and Vs) and density (ρ), which can be retrieved from pre-stack seismic data using the concept of elastic impedance (EI). We propose an inversion algorithm which recovers elastic parameters from pre-stack seismic data in two sequential steps. In the first step, using the multichannel blind seismic inversion method (exploited recently for recovering acoustic impedance from post-stack seismic data), high-resolution blocky EI models are obtained directly from partial angle-stacks. Using an efficient total-variation (TV) regularization, each angle-stack is inverted independently in a multichannel form without prior knowledge of the corresponding wavelet. The second step involves inversion of the resulting EI models for elastic parameters. Mathematically, under some assumptions, the EI's are linearly described by the elastic parameters in the logarithm domain. Thus a linear weighted least squares inversion is employed to perform this step. Accuracy of the concept of elastic impedance in predicting reflection coefficients at low and high angles of incidence is compared with that of exact Zoeppritz elastic impedance and the role of low frequency content in the problem is discussed. The performance of the proposed inversion method is tested using synthetic 2D data sets obtained from the Marmousi model and also 2D field data sets. The results confirm the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method for inversion of pre-stack seismic data.

  19. Surface phonons and elastic surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büscher, H.; Klein-Heßling, W.; Ludwig, W.

    Theoretical investigations on the dynamics of the (001), (110) and (111) surfaces of some cubic metals (Ag, Cu, Ni) will be reviewed. Both, lattice dynamical and continuum theoretical results are obtained via a Green's function formalism. The main attitude of this paper is the comparison of our results with experiments and with results obtained via slab-calculations. The calculation of elastic surface waves has been performed using a modified surface-green-function-matching method. We have used two different approaches of calculation the bulk Green's function (a) using the spectral representation and (b) a method, what works on residues. The investigations are carried out using shortrange phenomenological potentials. The atomic force constants in the first surface layers are modified to describe surface phonon anomalies, observed by experiments. In the case of Ag (100) and Ag(110) we conclude that the detection of odd symmetry shear modes by Erskine et al. [1 a, b] was not very accurate.

  20. Surface phonons and elastic surface waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, H.; Klein-Hessling, W.; Ludwig, W.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical investigations on the dynamics of the (001), (110) and (111) surfaces of some cubic metals (Ag, Cu, Ni) will be reviewed. Both, lattice dynamical and continuum theoretical results are obtained via a Green's function formalism. The main attitude of this paper is the comparison of our results with experiments and with results obtained via slab-calculations. The calculation of elastic surface waves has been performed using a modified surface-green-function-matching method. We have used two different approaches of calculation the bulk Green's function (a) using the spectral representation and (b) a method, what works on residues. The investigations are carried out using shortrange phenomenological potentials. The atomic force constants in the first surface layers are modified to describe surface phonon anomalies, observed by experiments. In the case of Ag(100) and Ag(110) we conclude that the detection of odd symmetry shear modes by Erskine et al. was not very accurate. (orig.)

  1. Elastic Properties and Stability of Physisorbed Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lambin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Graphene is an ultimate membrane that mixes both flexibility and mechanical strength, together with many other remarkable properties. A good knowledge of the elastic properties of graphene is prerequisite to any practical application of it in nanoscopic devices. Although this two-dimensional material is only one atom thick, continuous-medium elasticity can be applied as long as the deformations vary slowly on the atomic scale and provided suitable parameters are used. The present paper aims to be a critical review on this topic that does not assume a specific pre-knowledge of graphene physics. The basis for the paper is the classical Kirchhoff-Love plate theory. It demands a few parameters that can be addressed from many points of view and fitted to independent experimental data. The parameters can also be estimated by electronic structure calculations. Although coming from diverse backgrounds, most of the available data provide a rather coherent picture that gives a good degree of confidence in the classical description of graphene elasticity. The theory can than be used to estimate, e.g., the buckling limit of graphene bound to a substrate. It can also predict the size above which a scrolled graphene sheet will never spontaneously unroll in free space.

  2. Elastic Anisotropy of Basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, K.; Shapiro, S.; Stanchits, S.; Dresen, G.; Kaselow, A.; Vinciguerra, S.

    2005-12-01

    Elastic properties of rocks are sensitive to changes of the in-situ stress and damage state. In particular, seismic velocities are strongly affected by stress-induced formation and deformation of cracks or shear-enhanced pore collapse. The effect of stress on seismic velocities as a result of pore space deformation in isotropic rock at isostatic compression may be expressed by the equation: A+K*P-B*exp (-D*P) (1), where P=Pc-Pp is the effective pressure, the pure difference between confining pressure and pore pressure. The parameter A, K, B and D describe material constants determined using experimental data. The physical meaning of the parameters is given by Shapiro (2003, in Geophysics Vol.68(Nr.2)). Parameter D is related to the stress sensitivity of the rock. A similar relation was derived by Shapiro and Kaselow (2005, in Geophysics in press) for weak anisotropic rocks under arbitrary load. They describe the stress dependent anisotropy in terms of Thomson's (1986, in Geophysics, Vol. 51(Nr.10)) anisotropy parameters ɛ and γ as a function of stress in the case of an initially isotropic rock: ɛ ∝ E2-E3, γ ∝ E3-E2 (2) with Ei=exp (D*Pi). The exponential terms Ei are controlled by the effective stress components Pi. To test this relation, we have conducted a series of triaxial compression tests on dry samples of initially isotropic Etnean Basalt in a servo-controlled MTS loading frame equipped with a pressure cell. Confining pressure was 60, 40 and 20 MPa. Samples were 5 cm in diameter and 10 cm in length. Elastic anisotropy was induced by axial compression of the samples through opening and growth of microcracks predominantly oriented parallel to the sample axis. Ultrasonic P- and S- wave velocities were monitored parallel and normal to the sample axis by an array of 20 piezoceramic transducers glued to the surface. Preamplified full waveform signals were stored in two 12 channel transient recorders. According to equation 2 the anisotropy parameters are

  3. Hydrogen analysis by elastic recoil spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirira, J.; Trocellier, P.

    1989-01-01

    An absolute, quantitative procedure was developed to determine the hydrogen content and to describe its concentration profile in the near-surface region of solids. The experimental technique used was the elastic recoil detection analysis of protons induced by 4 He beam bombardment in the energy range <=1.8 MeV. The hydrogen content was calculated using a new recoil cross section expression. The analyses were performed in silicon crystals implanted with hydrogen at 10 keV. The implantation dose was evaluated with an accuracy of 10% and the hydrogen depth profile with that of +-10 nm around 200 nm. (author) 10 refs.; 3 figs

  4. Constitutive relations for non-elastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    A new class of constitutive equations is described for non-elastic deformation of metals. The relations are embodied in a model that has had considerable experimental investigation. The model employs two deformation state variables of which one is a scalar hardness variable and the other is a stored anelastic strain. The description is entirely in terms of real time strain rates. The model and its experimental background is discussed. The relationship to mechanical calculations and a possible extension to radiation environment is also considered. (Auth.)

  5. bessel functions for axisymmetric elasticity problems of the elastic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    2, 3DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA, NSUKKA. ENUGU STATE. ... theory of elasticity and in the case of vertical applied loads, was first ... partial differential equations in bodies having cylindrical symmetry.

  6. Elastic constants of stressed and unstressed materials in the phase-field crystal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Le; Huang, Zhi-Feng; Liu, Zhirong

    2018-04-01

    A general procedure is developed to investigate the elastic response and calculate the elastic constants of stressed and unstressed materials through continuum field modeling, particularly the phase-field crystal (PFC) models. It is found that for a complete description of system response to elastic deformation, the variations of all the quantities of lattice wave vectors, their density amplitudes (including the corresponding anisotropic variation and degeneracy breaking), the average atomic density, and system volume should be incorporated. The quantitative and qualitative results of elastic constant calculations highly depend on the physical interpretation of the density field used in the model, and also importantly, on the intrinsic pressure that usually pre-exists in the model system. A formulation based on thermodynamics is constructed to account for the effects caused by constant pre-existing stress during the homogeneous elastic deformation, through the introducing of a generalized Gibbs free energy and an effective finite strain tensor used for determining the elastic constants. The elastic properties of both solid and liquid states can be well produced by this unified approach, as demonstrated by an analysis for the liquid state and numerical evaluations for the bcc solid phase. The numerical calculations of bcc elastic constants and Poisson's ratio through this method generate results that are consistent with experimental conditions, and better match the data of bcc Fe given by molecular dynamics simulations as compared to previous work. The general theory developed here is applicable to the study of different types of stressed or unstressed material systems under elastic deformation.

  7. High energy elastic hadron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearnly, T.A.

    1986-04-01

    The paper deals with the WA7 experiment at the CERN super proton synchrotron (SPS). The elastic differential cross sections of pion-proton, kaon-proton, antiproton-proton, and proton-proton at lower SPS energies over a wide range of momentum transfer were measured. Some theoretical models in the light of the experimental results are reviewed, and a comprehensive impact parameter analysis of antiproton-proton elastic scattering over a wide energy range is presented. A nucleon valence core model for high energy proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is described

  8. CONCERNING THE ELASTIC ORTHOTROPIC MODEL APPLIED TO WOOD ELASTIC PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Tadeu Mascia,Nilson

    2003-01-01

    Among the construction materials, wood reveals an orthotropic pattern, because of unique characteristics in its internal structure with three axes of wood biological directions (longitudinal, tangential and radial). elastic symmetry: longitudinal, tangential and radial, reveals an orthotropic pattern. The effect of grain angle orientation onin the elastic modulus constitutes the fundamental cause forof wood anisotropy. It is responsible for the greatest changes in the values of the constituti...

  9. Burial stress and elastic strain of carbonate rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Burial stress on a sediment or sedimentary rock is relevant for predicting compaction or failure caused by changes in, e.g., pore pressure in the subsurface. For this purpose, the stress is conventionally expressed in terms of its effect: “the effective stress” defined as the consequent elastic...... strain multiplied by the rock frame modulus. We cannot measure the strain directly in the subsurface, but from the data on bulk density and P‐wave velocity, we can estimate the rock frame modulus and Biot's coefficient and then calculate the “effective vertical stress” as the total vertical stress minus...... the product of pore pressure and Biot's coefficient. We can now calculate the elastic strain by dividing “effective stress” with the rock frame modulus. By this procedure, the degree of elastic deformation at a given time and depth can be directly expressed. This facilitates the discussion of the deformation...

  10. Exploring the Local Elastic Properties of Bilayer Membranes Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pieffet, Gilles; Botero, Alonso; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane mechanical elastic properties regulate a variety of cellular processes involving local membrane deformation, such as ion channel function and vesicle fusion. In this work, we used molecular dynamics simulations to estimate the local elastic properties of a membrane. For this, we calculated...... the stretching process in molecular detail, allowing us to fit this profile to a previously proposed continuum elastic model. Through this approach, we calculated an effective membrane spring constant of 42 kJ-2.mol-1, which is in good agreement with the PMF calculation. Furthermore, the solvation energy we...

  11. Effect of different electron elastic-scattering cross sections on inelastic mean free paths obtained from elastic-backscattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonskiz, A.; Salvatz, F.; Powellz, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) of electrons with energies between 100 eV and 5,000 eV have been frequently obtained from measurements of elastic-backscattering probabilities for different specimen materials. A calculation of these probabilities is also required to determine IMFPs. We report calculations of elastic-backscattering probabilities for gold at energies of 100 eV and 500 eV with differential elastic-scattering cross sections obtained from the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac potential and the more reliable Dirac-Hartree-Fock potential. For two representative experimental configurations, the average deviation between IMFPs obtained with cross sections from the two potentials was 11.4 %. (author)

  12. Astronomical optics and elasticity theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaitre, Gerard Rene

    2008-01-01

    Astronomical Optics and Elasticity Theory provides a very thorough and comprehensive account of what is known in this field. After an extensive introduction to optics and elasticity, the book discusses variable curvature and multimode deformable mirrors, as well as, in depth, active optics, its theory and applications. Further, optical design utilizing the Schmidt concept and various types of Schmidt correctors, as well as the elasticity theory of thin plates and shells are elaborated upon. Several active optics methods are developed for obtaining aberration corrected diffraction gratings. Further, a weakly conical shell theory of elasticity is elaborated for the aspherization of grazing incidence telescope mirrors. The very didactic and fairly easy-to-read presentation of the topic will enable PhD students and young researchers to actively participate in challenging astronomical optics and instrumentation projects.

  13. Uniqueness theorems in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Knops, Robin John

    1971-01-01

    The classical result for uniqueness in elasticity theory is due to Kirchhoff. It states that the standard mixed boundary value problem for a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic material in equilibrium and occupying a bounded three-dimensional region of space possesses at most one solution in the classical sense, provided the Lame and shear moduli, A and J1 respectively, obey the inequalities (3 A + 2 J1) > 0 and J1>O. In linear elastodynamics the analogous result, due to Neumann, is that the initial-mixed boundary value problem possesses at most one solution provided the elastic moduli satisfy the same set of inequalities as in Kirchhoffs theorem. Most standard textbooks on the linear theory of elasticity mention only these two classical criteria for uniqueness and neglect altogether the abundant literature which has appeared since the original publications of Kirchhoff. To remedy this deficiency it seems appropriate to attempt a coherent description ofthe various contributions made to the study of uniquenes...

  14. Wrinkling of Pressurized Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic; Ajdari, Amin; Vaziri, Ashkan; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2011-01-01

    We study the formation of localized structures formed by the point loading of an internally pressurized elastic shell. While unpressurized shells (such as a ping-pong ball) buckle into polygonal structures, we show that pressurized shells

  15. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Alan

    1989-09-15

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago.

  16. A Labor Supply Elasticity Accord?

    OpenAIRE

    Lars Ljungqvist; Thomas J. Sargent

    2011-01-01

    A dispute about the size of the aggregate labor supply elasticity has been fortified by a contentious aggregation theory used by real business cycle theorists. The replacement of that aggregation theory with one more congenial to microeconomic observations opens possibilities for an accord about the aggregate labor supply elasticity. The new aggregation theory drops features to which empirical microeconomists objected and replaces them with life-cycle choices. Whether the new aggregation theo...

  17. Integrodifferential relations in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Kostin, Georgy V

    2012-01-01

    This work treats the elasticity of deformed bodies, including the resulting interior stresses and displacements.It also takes into account that some of constitutive relations can be considered in a weak form. To discuss this problem properly, the method of integrodifferential relations is used, and an advanced numerical technique for stress-strain analysis is presented and evaluated using various discretization techniques. The methods presented in this book are of importance for almost all elasticity problems in materials science and mechanical engineering.

  18. Elasticity of stishovite at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baosheng; Rigden, Sally M.; Liebermann, Robert C.

    1996-08-01

    The elastic-wave velocities of stishovite, the rutile-structured polymorph of SiO 2, were measured to 3 GPa at room temperature in a piston cylinder apparatus using ultrasonic interferometry on polycrystalline samples. These polycrystalline samples (2-3 mm in length and diameter) were hot-pressed at 14 GPa and 1050°C in a 2000 ton uniaxial split-sphere apparatus (USSA-2000) using fused silica rods as starting material. They were characterized as low porosity (less than 1%), single phase, fine grained, free of cracks and preferred orientation, and acoustically isotropic by using density measurement, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and bench-top velocity measurements. On the basis of subsequent in situ X-ray diffraction study at high P and T on peak broadening on similar specimens, it is evident that the single crystal grains within these polycrystalline aggregates are well equilibrated and that these specimens are free of residual strain. P- and S-wave velocities measured at 1 atm are within 1.5% of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds calculated from single-crystal elastic moduli. Measured pressure derivatives of the bulk and shear moduli, K' 0 = 5.3 ± 0.1 and G' 0 = 1.8 ± 0.1, are not unusual compared with values measured for other transition zone phases such as silicate spinel and majorite garnet. Isothermal compression curves calculated with the measured values of K0 and K' 0 agree well with experimental P-V data to 16 GPa. The experimental value of dG /dP is in excellent agreement with predictions based on elasticity systematics. Theoretical models are not yet able to replicate the measured values of K' 0 and G' 0.

  19. Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of bi-alkali ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structural parameters, elastic constants, electronic and optical properties of the bi-alkali ... and efficient method for the calculation of the ground-state ... Figure 2. Optimization curve (E–V) of the bi-alkali antimonides: (a) Na2KSb, (b) Na2RbSb, (c) Na2CsSb, .... ical shape of the charge distributions in the contour plots.

  20. Elastic scattering of surface plasmon polaritons: Modeling and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Coello, V.

    1998-01-01

    excitation wavelengths (594 and 633 nm) and different metal (silver and gold) films. The near-field optical images obtained are related to the calculated SPP intensity distributions demonstrating that the model developed can be successfully used in studies of SPP elastic scattering, e.g., to design...

  1. Generation of discrete inelastic and elastic transfer matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.D.M.; Santina, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    A technique developed for the calculation of the isotropic and linearly anisotropic components components of elastic and discrete inelastic transfer matrices is presented in this work. The implementation of the technique is discussed in detail and numerical results obtained for some examples are compared with results reported in the literature or generated with the use of several processing codes. (author) [pt

  2. Alpha-deuteron elastic scattering around 40 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, A.; Karmakar, S.; Roychaudhury, T.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.; Ismail, M.; Banerjee, S.R.; Divatia, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Differential cross section for alpha-deuteron elastic scattering has been measured at several energies around 40 MeV incident alpha. General behaviour of angular distributions remaining close to that predicted by Faddeev type calculations, a sharp energy dependence is observed. (author). 8 refs

  3. Elastic scattering of low energy γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittingham, I.B.

    1978-01-01

    The current status of the theory of the elastic scattering of low energy γ rays is reviewed and a detailed analysis of the theoretical background to the recent calculation of Rayleigh scattering by W.R.Johnson and co-workers is presented

  4. Quasi-elastic neutron line broadening in nematic liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvikl, B.; Dimic, V.; Dusic, M.; Kristof, E.; Srebotnjak, E.

    1979-01-01

    On the basis of a new random walk torsional oscillations model of the amplitude φ 0 of rigid flat molecules a quasi-elastic neutron line broadening has been calculated and the results compared to the measurements obtained on the sample of cholesteryl propionate. A good agreement was obtained. (author)

  5. In Situ elastic property sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olness, D.; Hirschfeld, T.; Kishiyama, K.; Steinhaus, R.

    1987-01-01

    Elasticity is an important property of many materials. Loss of elasticity can have serious consequences, such as when a gasket deteriorates and permits leakage of an expensive or hazardous material, or when a damping system begins to go awry. Loss of elasticity can also provide information related to an ancillary activity such as degradation of electrical insulation, loss of plasticizer in a plastic, or changes in permeability of a thin film. In fact, the mechanical properties of most organic compounds are altered when the compound degrades. Thus, a sensor for the mechanical properties can be used to monitor associated characteristics as well. A piezoelectric material in contact with an elastomer forms an oscillating system that can provide real-time elasticity monitoring. This combination constitutes a forced harmonic oscillator with damping provided by the elastomer. A ceramic oscillator with a total volume of a few mm 3 was used as an elasticity sensor. It was placed in intimate contact with an elastomer and then monitored remotely with a simple oscillator circuit and standard frequency counting electronics. Resonant frequency shifts and changes in Q value were observed corresponding to changes in ambient temperature and/or changes in pressure applied to the sample. Elastomer samples pretreated with ozone (to simulate aging) showed changes in Q value and frequency response, even though there were no visible changes in the elastic samples

  6. Declination Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Declination is calculated using the current International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model. Declination is calculated using the current World Magnetic Model...

  7. First principles calculations for analysis martensitic transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, B.N.; Zhao, G.L.; Ho, K.M.; Chan, C.T.; Ye, Y.Y.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, B.L.

    1993-01-01

    The change in crystal energy is calculated for atomic displacements corresponding to phonons, elastic shears, and lattice transformations. Anomalies in the phonon dispersion curves of NiAl and NiTi are analyzed and recent calculations for TiPd alloys are presented

  8. Online Identification and Verification of the Elastic Coupling Torsional Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanyou Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the torsional vibration of a diesel engine shaft, the torsional stiffness of the flexible coupling is a key kinetic parameter. Since the material properties of the elastic element of the coupling might change after a long-time operation due to the severe working environment or improper use and the variation of such properties will change dynamic feature of the coupling, it will cause a relative large calculation error of torsional vibration to the shaft system. Moreover, the torsional stiffness of the elastic coupling is difficult to be determined, and it is inappropriate to measure this parameter by disassembling the power unit while it is under normal operation. To solve these problems, this paper comes up with a method which combines the torsional vibration test with the calculation of the diesel shafting and uses the inherent characteristics of shaft torsional vibration to identify the dynamic stiffness of the elastic coupling without disassembling the unit. Analysis results show that it is reasonable and feasible to identify the elastic coupling dynamic torsional stiffness with this method and the identified stiffness is accurate. Besides, this method provides a convenient and practical approach to examine the dynamic behavior of the long running elastic coupling.

  9. Structural aspects of elastic deformation of a metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hufnagel, T. C.; Ott, R. T.; Almer, J.

    2006-01-01

    We report the use of high-energy x-ray scattering to measure strain in a Zr 57 Ti 5 Cu 20 Ni 8 Al 10 bulk metallic glass in situ during uniaxial compression in the elastic regime up to stresses of approximately 60% of the yield stress. The strains extracted in two ways--directly from the normalized scattering data and from the pair correlation functions--are in good agreement with each other for length scales greater than 4 A. The elastic modulus calculated on the basis of this strain is in good agreement with that reported for closely related amorphous alloys based on macroscopic measurements. The strain measured for atoms in the nearest-neighbor shell, however, is smaller than that for more distant shells, and the effective elastic modulus calculated from the strain on this scale is therefore larger, comparable to crystalline alloys of similar composition. These observations are in agreement with previously proposed models in which the nominally elastic deformation of a metallic glass has a significant anelastic component due to atomic rearrangements in topologically unstable regions of the structure. We also observe that the distribution of the atomic-level stresses in the glass becomes more uniform during loading. This implies that the stiffness of metallic glasses may have an entropic contribution, analogous to the entropic contribution in rubber elasticity

  10. Elastic models application for thorax image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa Prado, Lorena S; Diaz, E Andres Valdez; Romo, Raul

    2007-01-01

    This work consist of the implementation and evaluation of elastic alignment algorithms of biomedical images, which were taken at thorax level and simulated with the 4D NCAT digital phantom. Radial Basis Functions spatial transformations (RBF), a kind of spline, which allows carrying out not only global rigid deformations but also local elastic ones were applied, using a point-matching method. The applied functions were: Thin Plate Spline (TPS), Multiquadric (MQ) Gaussian and B-Spline, which were evaluated and compared by means of calculating the Target Registration Error and similarity measures between the registered images (the squared sum of intensity differences (SSD) and correlation coefficient (CC)). In order to value the user incurred error in the point-matching and segmentation tasks, two algorithms were also designed that calculate the Fiduciary Localization Error. TPS and MQ were demonstrated to have better performance than the others. It was proved RBF represent an adequate model for approximating the thorax deformable behaviour. Validation algorithms showed the user error was not significant

  11. Elastic buckling of ellipsoids of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solal, Roger; Hoffmann, Alain; Roche, Roland.

    1976-02-01

    The CEASEMT system of calculation by finite elements is used to determine critical internal pressures on a flattened ellipsoid of revolution. This case resembles that of an ellipsoidal head of a thin pressure vessel fitted onto a flexible colla. The calculations are performed assuming the geometry perfect, the deformations slight and the behaviour of the material perfectly elastic. The results obtained are presented favourably by plotting a reduced pressure p* against the geometry. A good definition of p* would be: p*=pπ 2 E/1-μ 2 .e 2 b 2 /a 4 (p* critical pressure, E Young's modulus, μ Poisson's coefficient, e thickness, a half large axis, b half small axis). When a/b is above 2 the p value remains close to 1. For lower a/b values the p value rises considerably with a/b [fr

  12. Temperature dependence of elastic properties of paratellurite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestrova, I.M.; Pisarevskii, Y.V.; Senyushenkov, P.A.; Krupny, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    New data are presented on the temperature dependence of the elastic wave velocities, elastic stiffness constants, and thermal expansion of paratellurite. It is shown that the external pressure appreciably influences the elastic properties of TeO 2 , especially the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus connected with the crystal soft mode. (author)

  13. Elasticity of fluorite at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, J.; Tennakoon, S.; Mookherjee, M.

    2017-12-01

    Fluorite (CaF2) is a simple halide with cubic space group symmetry (Fm-3m) and is often used as an internal pressure calibrant in moderate high-pressure/high-temperature experiments [1]. In order to gain insight into the elastic behavior of fluorite, we have conducted Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) on a single crystal of fluorite with rectangular parallelepiped geometry. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction, we aligned the edges of the rectangular parallelepiped with [-1 1 1], [-1 1 -2], and [-1 -1 0] crystallographic directions. We conducted the RUS measurements up to 620 K. RUS spectra are influenced by the geometry, density, and the full elastic moduli tensor of the material. In our high-temperature RUS experiments, the geometry and density were constrained using thermal expansion from previous studies [2]. We determined the elasticity by minimizing the difference between observed resonance and calculated Eigen frequency using Rayleigh-Ritz method [3]. We found that at room temperature, the single crystal elastic moduli for fluorite are 170, 49, and 33 GPa for C11, C12, and C44 respectively. At room temperatures, the aggregate bulk modulus (K) is 90 GPa and the shear modulus (G) is 43 GPa. We note that the elastic moduli and sound wave velocities decrease linearly as a function of temperature with dVP /dT and dVS /dT being -9.6 ×10-4 and -5.0 ×10-4 km/s/K respectively. Our high-temperature RUS results are in good agreement with previous studies on fluorite using both Ultrasonic methods and Brillouin scattering [4,5]. Acknowledgement: This study is supported by US NSF awards EAR-1639552 and EAR-1634422. References: [1] Speziale, S., Duffy, T. S. 2002, Phys. Chem. Miner., 29, 465-472; [2] Roberts, R. B., White, G. K., 1986, J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys., 19, 7167-7172. [3] Migliori, A., Maynard, J. D., 2005, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 76, 121301. [4] Catlow, C. R. A., Comins, J. D., Germano, F. A., Harley, R. T., Hayes, W., 1978, J. Phys. C Solid State Phys

  14. Fast Neutron Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmqvist, B; Johansson, S G; Lodin, G; Wiedling, T

    1969-11-15

    Fast neutron scattering interactions with vanadium were studied using time-of-flight techniques at several energies in the interval 1.5 to 8.1 MeV. The experimental differential elastic scattering cross sections have been fitted to optical model calculations and the inelastic scattering cross sections have been compared with Hauser-Feshbach calculations, corrected for the fluctuation of compound-nuclear level widths.

  15. Proton-4He elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, J.P.; Gillespie, J.; Lombard, R.J.

    1975-12-01

    Differential elastic cross sections and polarizations are calculated in a multiple scattering formalism for proton- 4 He scattering for energies in the range 0.6-24GeV and for momentum transfers up to 4.0fmsup(-1). The calculations include Coulomb and spin effects. Corrections due to target-nucleon overlap and charge exchange are estimated. The results are compared with experimental data [fr

  16. The Elastic Constants Measurement of Metal Alloy by Using Ultrasonic Nondestructive Method at Different Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eryi Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonic nondestructive method is introduced into the elastic constants measurement of metal material. The extraction principle of Poisson’s ratio, elastic modulus, and shear modulus is deduced from the ultrasonic propagating equations with two kinds of vibration model of the elastic medium named ultrasonic longitudinal wave and transverse wave, respectively. The ultrasonic propagating velocity is measured by using the digital correlation technique between the ultrasonic original signal and the echo signal from the bottom surface, and then the elastic constants of the metal material are calculated. The feasibility of the correlation algorithm is verified by a simulation procedure. Finally, in order to obtain the stability of the elastic properties of different metal materials in a variable engineering application environment, the elastic constants of two kinds of metal materials in different temperature environment are measured by the proposed ultrasonic method.

  17. Sensitivity of the elastic scattering matrix elements to the range of the inelastic potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawitscher, G.H.; Rasoanaivo, R.Y.

    1983-01-01

    The solution to a system of coupled equations is examined with regard to the effect of the long range part of the inelastic potentials upon the elastic phase shifts. It is found that those parts of the inelastic potentials which occur beyond the range of the elastic to inelastic transition potentials affect the elastic phase shifts in only a minor way. The proof is given theoretically by means of a Green's function formulation which includes the long range part of the inelastic potentials perturbatively. When applied to the calculation of the effect of breakup on the deuteron-nucleus elastic scattering, the argument confirms the finding that errors in the long range part of the potentials in the breakup channels do not sensitively affect the elastic deuteron scattering cross section. This result explains why the elastic scattering is not very sensitive to the choice of the discretization procedure of the breakup space

  18. The Morishima Gross elasticity of substitution

    OpenAIRE

    Blackorby, Charles; Primont, Daniel; Russell, R. Robert

    2007-01-01

    We show that the Hotelling-Lau elasticity of substitution, an extension of the Allen-Uzawa elasticity to allow for optimal output-quantity (or utility) responses to changes in factor prices, inherits all of the failings of the Allen-Uzawa elasticity identified by Blackorby and Russell [1989 AER]. An analogous extension of the Morishima elasticity of substitution to allow for output quantity changes preserves the salient properties of the original Hicksian notion of elasticity of substitution.

  19. Influence of Elastic Anisotropy on Extended Dislocation Nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, B

    1971-09-15

    The interaction forces between the partial dislocations forming an extended dislocation node are calculated using elasticity theory for anisotropic media.s are carried out for nodes of screw, edge and mixed character in Ag, which has an anisotropy ratio A equal to 3, and in a hypothetic material with A = 1 and the same shear modulus as Ag. The results are compared with three previous theories using isotropic elasticity theory. As expected, in Ag the influence of anisotropy is of the same order as the uncertainty due to the dislocation core energy

  20. Tensor polarization in pion-deuteron elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The angular dependence of the tensor polarization t 20 /sup lab/ of recoiling deuterons in π-d elastic scattering was measured as a function of incident pion energy in the range 134 to 256 MeV. No evidence was found for rapid energy or angular dependences in t 20 /sup lab/. The results agree most favorably with theoretical calculations in which the P 11 π-N amplitude has been removed altogether. This agreement is consistent with a small effect of pion absorption on the elastic channel. 14 references

  1. Elastic properties of terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spichkin, Y.I.; Bohr, Jakob; Tishin, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Young modulus along the crystallographic axes b and c (E(b) and E(c)), and the internal friction of a terbium single crystal have been measured. At 4.2 K, E(b) and E(c) are equal to 38 and 84.5 GPa, respectively. The lattice part of the Young modulus and the Debye...... temperature has been calculated. The origin of the Young modulus anomalies arising at the transition to the magnetically ordered state is discussed....

  2. First principles study of electronic, elastic and thermal properties of lutetium intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagare, Gitanjali; Chouhan, Sunil Singh; Soni, Pooja; Sanyal, S.P.; Rajagopalan, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, the electronic, elastic and thermal properties of lutetium intermetallics LuX have been studied theoretically by using first principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) with the generalized gradient approximation (GCA)

  3. Contribution of alpha cluster exchange to elastic and inelastic 16O--20Ne scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, R.; Schneider, W.F.W.; Jahnke, U.; Hendrie, D.L.; Mahoney, J.; Maguire, C.F.; Scott, D.K.; Wolschin, G.

    1975-01-01

    The cluster structure of the ground state rotational band of 20 Ne was studied via the elastic and inelastic scattering of 50 MeV 20 Ne from 16 O. Angular distributions are compared with microscopic calculations

  4. A first-principles study of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) and its alloyed counterparts: Elastic constants, elastic anisotropies, and isotropic elastic moduli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, G., E-mail: g-ghosh@northwestern.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    A comprehensive computational study of elastic properties of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) and its alloyed counterparts (M{sub 3}C (M = Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ta, Ti, V, W, Zr, Cr{sub 2}FeC and CrFe{sub 2}C) having the crystal structure of Fe{sub 3}C is carried out employing electronic density-functional theory (DFT), all-electron PAW pseudopotentials and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy (GGA). Specifically, as a part of our systematic study of cohesive properties of solids and in the spirit of materials genome, following properties are calculated: (i) single-crystal elastic constants, C{sub ij}, of above M{sub 3}Cs; (ii) anisotropies of bulk, Young’s and shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratio based on calculated C{sub ij}s, demonstrating their extreme anisotropies; (iii) isotropic (polycrystalline) elastic moduli (bulk, shear, Young’s moduli and Poisson’s ratio) of M{sub 3}Cs by homogenization of calculated C{sub ij}s; and (iv) acoustic Debye temperature, θ{sub D}, of M{sub 3}Cs based on calculated C{sub ij}s. We provide a critical appraisal of available data of polycrystalline elastic properties of alloyed cementite. Calculated single crystal properties may be incorporated in anisotropic constitutive models to develop and test microstructure-processing-property-performance links in multi-phase materials where cementite is a constituent phase.

  5. Phason elasticity and surface roughening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Leihan; Jaric, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    The phason elasticity of two-dimensional (2D) equilibrium quasicrystals is discussed in analogy with surface roughening phenomena. Taking a Penrose tiling model as an example, we show that the phason elastic energy is linear in the phason strain at zero temperature (T = 0), but becomes quadratic at any T > 0 and sufficiently small strain. Heuristic and real-space renormalization group arguments are given for the thermal roughening of the hyper-surface which represents quasicrystal tiling. Monte Carlo method is applied to illustrate the logarithmically diverging phason fluctuations and power-law diffraction intensities at T > 0. For three-dimensional systems, we present arguments which suggest a finite temperature transition between two quasicrystal phases, characterized by linear and quadratic phason elastic energy, respectively. (author). 17 refs, 12 figs

  6. Appraisal of elastic follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.

    1981-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide indications to choose what fraction of a self limiting stress can be considered as secondary. At first, considerations are given to a simple structure which could be called ''creep relaxation tensile test''. A bar (with constant cross section) is loaded by an elastic spring in order to obtain a given elongation of the assembly. The stress evolution is studied. Then the creep damage is computed, and compared to the damage corresponding to the elastic computed stress. This comparison gives the fraction of the self limiting stress which must be considered as primary. This involve the structural parameter 0 which is the initial value of the ratio of elastic energy to dissipating power. Extension of the rule is made with the help of KACHANOV approximation. As a conclusion a procedure is described which determines what fraction of a self limiting stress must be considered as primary

  7. Improved measurements of elastic properties at acoustic resonant frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, H.E.; Ritchie, I.G.; Shillinglaw, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    The choice of specimens of rectangular cross section for determination of dynamic elastic moduli by the resonant bar technique is often dictated by specimen fabrication problems. The specimen of rectangular cross section lends itself to accurate determination of elastic vibration shapes by a method in which a simple noncontacting optical transducer is used. The unequivocal indexing of the various vibration modes obtained in this way more than compensates for the added computational difficulties associated with rectangular geometry. The approximations used in the calculations of Young's modulus and the shear modulus for bars of rectangular cross section are tested experimentally and it is shown that high precision can be obtained. Determinations of changes in dynamic elastic moduli with temperature or stress are also described. (author)

  8. Investor response to consumer elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenaa Jensen, Stine; Meibom, Peter; Ravn, H.F.; Straarup, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    In the Nordic electricity system there is considerable uncertainty with respect to the long-term development in production capacity. The process towards liberalisation of the electricity sector started in a situation with a large reserve margin, but this margin is gradually vanishing. Since the potential investors in new production capacity are unaccustomed with investments under the new regime it is unknown if and when investments will take place. The electricity price is the key market signal to potential investors. The price is settled as a balance between supply and demand, and it is generally assumed that the demand side has an important role in this, and increasingly so. However, since consumers have not earlier had the incentive to respond to electricity prices, no reliable estimate of demand elasticity is known. The purpose of the present study is to analyse the role of electricity demand elasticity for investments in new electricity production capacity. Electricity price scenarios generated with a partial equilibrium model (Balmorel) are combined with a model of investment decisions. In this, various scenarios concerning the development in the demand elasticity are used. The simulated investment decisions are taken in a stochastic, dynamic setting, where a key point is the timing of the investment decision in relation to the gathering of new information relative to the stochastic elements. Based on this, the consequences of the development in consumer price elasticity for investments in a base load and a peak load plant are investigated. The main result of the analysis is that peak load investments can be made unprofitable by the development in consumer price elasticity, such that an investor will tend to wait with his peak load investment, until the development in consumer price elasticity has been revealed. (au)

  9. Linear analysis using secants for materials with temperature dependent nonlinear elastic modulus and thermal expansion properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepi, John W.

    2017-08-01

    Thermally induced stress is readily calculated for linear elastic material properties using Hooke's law in which, for situations where expansion is constrained, stress is proportional to the product of the material elastic modulus and its thermal strain. When material behavior is nonlinear, one needs to make use of nonlinear theory. However, we can avoid that complexity in some situations. For situations in which both elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion vary with temperature, solutions can be formulated using secant properties. A theoretical approach is thus presented to calculate stresses for nonlinear, neo-Hookean, materials. This is important for high acuity optical systems undergoing large temperature extremes.

  10. Elastic constants of a Laves phase compound: C15 NbCr{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormeci, A. [Koc Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chu, F.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.P.; Albers, R.C.; Thoma, D.J.; Mitchell, T.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of C15 NbCr{sub 2} have been computed by using a first-principles, self-consistent, full-potential total energy method. From these single-crystal elastic constants the isotropic elastic moduli are calculated using the Voigt and Reuss averages. The calculated values are in fair agreement with the experimental values. The implications of the results are discussed with regards to Poisson`s ratio and the direction dependence of Young`s modulus.

  11. Change of elastic constants induced by point defects in hop crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tome, C.

    1979-10-01

    An approximate model is developed to calculate the change of elastic constants induced by point defects in hcp metals, supposed the defect configuration is known. General expressions relating the change of elastic moduli to the final atomic coordinates and to the defect force field are derived using the specific symmetry of the defect. Explicit calculations are done for Mg. The predicted change of elastic moduli turns out to be negative for vacancies and trigonal interstitials while for hexagonal interstitials a positive change is predicted. Compatibility with experimental data would suggest that the trigonal configuration is the stable one. (author)

  12. Substrate-dependent cell elasticity measured by optical tweezers indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad S.; Ndoye, Fatou; Coceano, Giovanna; Niemela, Joseph; Bonin, Serena; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, cell elasticity has been widely investigated as a potential label free indicator for cellular alteration in different diseases, cancer included. Cell elasticity can be locally measured by pulling membrane tethers, stretching or indenting the cell using optical tweezers. In this paper, we propose a simple approach to perform cell indentation at pN forces by axially moving the cell against a trapped microbead. The elastic modulus is calculated using the Hertz-model. Besides the axial component, the setup also allows us to examine the lateral cell-bead interaction. This technique has been applied to measure the local elasticity of HBL-100 cells, an immortalized human cell line, originally derived from the milk of a woman with no evidence of breast cancer lesions. In addition, we have studied the influence of substrate stiffness on cell elasticity by performing experiments on cells cultured on two substrates, bare and collagen-coated, having different stiffness. The mean value of the cell elastic modulus measured during indentation was 26±9 Pa for the bare substrate, while for the collagen-coated substrate it diminished to 19±7 Pa. The same trend was obtained for the elastic modulus measured during the retraction of the cell: 23±10 Pa and 13±7 Pa, respectively. These results show the cells adapt their stiffness to that of the substrate and demonstrate the potential of this setup for low-force probing of modifications to cell mechanics induced by the surrounding environment (e.g. extracellular matrix or other cells).

  13. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago

  14. Water hammer in elastic pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, J.; Tiselj, I.

    2002-01-01

    One dimensional two-fluid six-equation model of two-phase flow, that can be found in computer codes like RELAP5, TRAC, and CATHARE, was upgraded with additional terms, which enable modelling of the pressure waves in elastic pipes. It is known that pipe elasticity reduces the propagation velocity of the shock and other pressure waves in the piping systems. Equations that include the pipe elasticty terms are used in WAHA code, which is being developed within the WAHALoads project of 5't'h EU research program.(author)

  15. Dependence of elastic hadron collisions on impact parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházka, Jiří; Lokajíček, Miloš V.; Kundrát, Vojtěch

    2016-05-01

    Elastic proton-proton collisions represent probably the greatest ensemble of available measured data, the analysis of which may provide a large amount of new physical results concerning fundamental particles. It is, however, necessary to analyze first some conclusions concerning pp collisions and their interpretations differing fundamentally from our common macroscopic experience. It has been argued, e.g., that elastic hadron collisions have been more central than inelastic ones, even if any explanation of the existence of so different processes, i.e., elastic and inelastic (with hundreds of secondary particles) collisions, under the same conditions has not been given until now. The given conclusion has been based on a greater number of simplifying mathematical assumptions (already done in earlier calculations), without their influence on physical interpretation being analyzed and entitled; the corresponding influence has started to be studied in the approach based on the eikonal model. The possibility of a peripheral interpretation of elastic collisions will be demonstrated and the corresponding results summarized. The arguments will be given on why no preference may be given to the mentioned centrality against the standard peripheral behaviour. The corresponding discussion on the contemporary description of elastic hadronic collision in dependence on the impact parameter will be summarized and the justification of some important assumptions will be considered.

  16. Texture and Elastic Anisotropy of Mantle Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, A. N.; Ivankina, T. I.; Bourilitchev, D. E.; Klima, K.; Locajicek, T.; Pros, Z.

    Eight olivine rock samples from different European regions were collected for neu- tron texture analyses and for P-wave velocity measurements by means of ultrasonic sounding at various confining pressures. The orientation distribution functions (ODFs) of olivine were determined and pole figures of the main crystallographic planes were calculated. The spatial P-wave velocity distributions were determined at confining pressures from 0.1 to 400 MPa and modelled from the olivine textures. In dependence upon the type of rock (xenolith or dunite) different behavior of both the P-wave veloc- ity distributions and the anisotropy coefficients with various confining pressures was observed. In order to explain the interdependence of elastic anisotropy and hydrostatic pressure, a model for polycrystalline olivine rocks was suggested, which considers the influence of the crystallographic and the mechanical textures on the elastic behaviour of the polycrystal. Since the olivine texture depends upon the active slip systems and the deformation temperature, neutron texture analyses enable us to estimate depth and thermodynamical conditions during texture formation.

  17. Nonlinear theory of elastic shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Junior, J.A.

    1979-08-01

    Nonlinear theory of elastic shells is developed which incorporates both geometric and physical nonlinearities and which does not make use of the well known Love-Kirchhoff hypothesis. The resulting equations are formulated in tensorial notation and are reduced to the ones of common use when simplifying assumptions encountered in the especific litterature are taken. (Author) [pt

  18. CONTAIN calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholtyssek, W.

    1995-01-01

    In the first phase of a benchmark comparison, the CONTAIN code was used to calculate an assumed EPR accident 'medium-sized leak in the cold leg', especially for the first two days after initiation of the accident. The results for global characteristics compare well with those of FIPLOC, MELCOR and WAVCO calculations, if the same materials data are used as input. However, significant differences show up for local quantities such as flows through leakages. (orig.)

  19. DYNAMICS OF VIBRATION FEEDERS WITH A NONLINEAR ELASTIC CHARACTERISTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Dyrda

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Subject to the smooth and efficient operation of each production line, is the use of vehicles transporting high specification. It worked well in practice for transporting construction machines, which are used during the vibration. The use of vibration machines requires optimization of their operation modes. In the form of elastic link in them are increasingly using rubber-metallic elements, which are characterized by nonlinear damping properties. So it is necessary to search for new, more modern, methods of calculation of dynamic characteristics of the vibration machines on the properties of rubber as a cushioning material. Methodology. The dynamics of vibration machine that is as elastic rubber block units and buffer shock absorbers limiting the amplitude of the vibrations of the working body. The method of determining amplitude-frequency characteristics of the vibrating feeder is based on the principle of Voltaire, who in the calculations of the damping properties of the dampers will allow for elastic-hereditary properties of rubber. When adjusting the basic dynamic stiffness of the elastic ties and vibratory buffers, using the principle of heredity rubber properties, determine the dependence of the amplitude of the working body of the machine vibrations. This method is called integro-operator using the fractional-exponential kernels of relaxation. Findings. Using the derived formula for determining the amplitude of the resonance curve is constructed one-mass nonlinear system. It is established that the use of the proposed method of calculation will provide a sufficiently complete description of the damping parameters of rubber-metallic elements and at the same time be an effective means of calculating the amplitude-frequency characteristics of nonlinear vibration systems. Originality. The authors improved method of determining damping characteristics of rubber-metallic elements and the amplitude-frequency characteristics of nonlinear

  20. Measurement of the elastic cross section for positive pions on carbon at 142 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyer, A.T.

    1976-12-01

    A measurement of the elastic cross section dsigma/dΩ was made for the reaction π + + 12 C → π + + 12 C with 142 MeV pions at ten angles ranging from 35 to 85 0 in the laboratory. This experiment was done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. A double focusing magnetic spectrometer observed a cylindrical styrofoam target. The resulting momentum spectra were recorded by an array of nineteen totally depleted surface barrier detectors located at the spectrometer's focal plane. The spectra from the styrofoam were composed of peaks representing proton elastic, carbon elastic, carbon inelastic, and carbon quasi-elastic channels. A function made of Gaussians representing the two body channels and a distribution representing the quasi-elastic channel was fit to the data using a nonlinear least squares algorithm. The ratio of the carbon elastic to proton elastic cross sections was calculated from the areas of the corresponding Gaussians and then multiplied by the proton elastic cross section of Bugg et al eliminating several sources of systematic errors such as beam normalization. The differential cross sections were found to have the usual diffraction structure with a forward peak and a minimum near 55 0 . Finally, the carbon elastic cross sections were compared to similar π - + 12 C cross sections of Binon et al using the optical model

  1. Measurement of the elastic cross section for positive pions on carbon at 142 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyer, A.T.

    1976-12-01

    A measurement of the elastic cross section dsigma/d..cap omega.. was made for the reaction ..pi../sup +/ + /sup 12/C ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/ + /sup 12/C with 142 MeV pions at ten angles ranging from 35 to 85/sup 0/ in the laboratory. This experiment was done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. A double focusing magnetic spectrometer observed a cylindrical styrofoam target. The resulting momentum spectra were recorded by an array of nineteen totally depleted surface barrier detectors located at the spectrometer's focal plane. The spectra from the styrofoam were composed of peaks representing proton elastic, carbon elastic, carbon inelastic, and carbon quasi-elastic channels. A function made of Gaussians representing the two body channels and a distribution representing the quasi-elastic channel was fit to the data using a nonlinear least squares algorithm. The ratio of the carbon elastic to proton elastic cross sections was calculated from the areas of the corresponding Gaussians and then multiplied by the proton elastic cross section of Bugg et al eliminating several sources of systematic errors such as beam normalization. The differential cross sections were found to have the usual diffraction structure with a forward peak and a minimum near 55/sup 0/. Finally, the carbon elastic cross sections were compared to similar ..pi../sup -/ + /sup 12/C cross sections of Binon et al using the optical model.

  2. Modeling of a light elastic beam by a system of rigid bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šalinić Slaviša

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has shown that a light elastic beam, in the case of small elastic deformations, can be modeled by a kinematic chain without branching composed of rigid bodies which are connected by passive revolute or prismatic joints with corresponding springs in them. Elastic properties of the beam are modeled by the springs introduced. The potential energy of the elastic beam is expressed as a function of components of the vector of elastic displacement and the vector of elastic rotation calculated for the elastic centre of the beam, which results in the diagonal stiffness matrix of the beam. As the potential energy of the introduced system of bodies with springs is expressed in the function of relative joint displacements, the diagonal stiffness matrix is obtained. In addition, these two stiffness matrices are equal. The modeling process has been demonstrated on the example of an elastic beam rotating about a fixed vertical axis, with a rigid body whose mass is considerably larger than the beam mass fixed to its free end. Differential equations of motion have been formed for this mechanical system. The modeling technique described here aims at expanding of usage of well developed methods of dynamics of systems of rigid bodies to the analysis of systems with elastic bodies. .

  3. Measurement of the elastic cross section for positive pions on carbon at 142 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyer, A.T.

    1976-01-01

    A measurement of the elastic cross section dsigma/dOMEGA was made for the reaction π + + 12 C yields π + + 12 C with 142 MeV pions at ten angles ranging from 35 to 85 0 in the laboratory. This experiment was done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. A double focusing magnetic spectrometer observed a cylindrical styrofoam target. The resulting momentum spectra were recorded by an array of nineteen totally depleted surface barrier detectors located at the spectrometers focal plane. The spectra from the styrofoam were composed of peaks representing proton elastic, carbon elastic, carbon inelastic and carbon quasi-elastic channels. A function made of Gaussians representing the two body channels and a distribution representing the quasi-elastic channel was fit to the data using a nonlinear least squares algorithm. The ratio of the carbon elastic to proton elastic cross sections was calculated from the areas of the corresponding Gaussians and then multiplied by the proton elastic cross section of Bugg et al., eliminating several sources of systematic errors such as beam normalization. The differential cross sections were found to have the usual diffraction structure with a forward peak and a minimum near 55 0 . Finally, the carbon elastic cross sections were compared to similar π - + 12 C cross sections of Binon et al., using the optical model

  4. The elasticity and failure of fluid-filled cellular solids: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, M; Thiel, B L; Donald, A M

    2000-02-15

    We extend and apply theories of filled foam elasticity and failure to recently available data on foods. The predictions of elastic modulus and failure mode dependence on internal pressure and on wall integrity are borne out by photographic evidence of distortion and failure under compressive loading and under the localized stress applied by a knife blade, and by mechanical data on vegetables differing only in their turgor pressure. We calculate the dry modulus of plate-like cellular solids and the cross over between dry-like and fully fluid-filled elastic response. The bulk elastic properties of limp and aging cellular solids are calculated for model systems and compared with our mechanical data, which also show two regimes of response. The mechanics of an aged, limp beam is calculated, thus offering a practical procedure for comparing experiment and theory. This investigation also thereby offers explanations of the connection between turgor pressure and crispness and limpness of cellular materials.

  5. The elasticity and failure of fluid-filled cellular solids: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, M.; Thiel, B. L.; Donald, A. M.

    2000-02-01

    We extend and apply theories of filled foam elasticity and failure to recently available data on foods. The predictions of elastic modulus and failure mode dependence on internal pressure and on wall integrity are borne out by photographic evidence of distortion and failure under compressive loading and under the localized stress applied by a knife blade, and by mechanical data on vegetables differing only in their turgor pressure. We calculate the dry modulus of plate-like cellular solids and the cross over between dry-like and fully fluid-filled elastic response. The bulk elastic properties of limp and aging cellular solids are calculated for model systems and compared with our mechanical data, which also show two regimes of response. The mechanics of an aged, limp beam is calculated, thus offering a practical procedure for comparing experiment and theory. This investigation also thereby offers explanations of the connection between turgor pressure and crispness and limpness of cellular materials.

  6. Estimation of macroscopic elastic characteristics for hierarchical anisotropic solids based on probabilistic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolina, Irina Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical properties of a cable are of great importance in design and strength calculation of flexible cables. The problem of determination of elastic properties and rigidity characteristics of a cable modeled by anisotropic helical elastic rod is considered. These characteristics are calculated indirectly by means of the parameters received from statistical processing of experimental data. These parameters are considered as random quantities. With taking into account probable nature of these parameters the formulas for estimation of the macroscopic elastic moduli of a cable are obtained. The calculating expressions for macroscopic flexural rigidity, shear rigidity and torsion rigidity using the macroscopic elastic characteristics obtained before are presented. Statistical estimations of the rigidity characteristics of some cable grades are adduced. A comparison with those characteristics received on the basis of deterministic approach is given.

  7. Systematic study of the elastic properties of Mn3AC antiperovskite with A = Zn, Al, Ga, In, Tl, Ge and Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medkour, Y.; Roumili, A.; Maouche, D.; Saoudi, A.; Louail, L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Single crystal elastic constants C 11 , C 12 and C 44 were calculated. ► Elastic moduli for polycrystalline aggregate were obtained. ► Increasing the atomic number of A element reduces B, G′, Y and v. ► Mn 3 AlC has a high melting point and light weight. - Abstract: First principle calculations were made to investigate the elastic properties of Mn 3 AC antiperovskites, A = Zn, Al, Ga, In, Tl, Ge and Sn. The estimated equilibrium lattice parameters are in agreement with the experimental ones. From the single crystal elastic constants we have calculated the polycrystalline elastic moduli: the bulk modulus B, shear modulus G, tetragonal shear modulus G′, Young’s modulus Y, Cauchy’s pressure CP, Poisson’s ratio v, elastic anisotropy factor and Pugh’s criterion G/B. Using Debye’s approximation we have deduced the elastic wave velocities and Debye’s temperature.

  8. The generalized successive approximation and Padé Approximants method for solving an elasticity problem of based on the elastic ground with variable coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bayram

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have applied a generalized successive numerical technique to solve the elasticity problem of based on the elastic ground with variable coefficient. In the first stage, we have calculated the generalized successive approximation of being given BVP and in the second stage we have transformed it into Padé series. At the end of study a test problem has been given to clarify the method.

  9. Elastic dipoles of point defects from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvenne, Céline; Clouet, Emmanuel

    2017-12-01

    The interaction of point defects with an external stress field or with other structural defects is usually well described within continuum elasticity by the elastic dipole approximation. Extraction of the elastic dipoles from atomistic simulations is therefore a fundamental step to connect an atomistic description of the defect with continuum models. This can be done either by a fitting of the point-defect displacement field, by a summation of the Kanzaki forces, or by a linking equation to the residual stress. We perform here a detailed comparison of these different available methods to extract elastic dipoles, and show that they all lead to the same values when the supercell of the atomistic simulations is large enough and when the anharmonic region around the point defect is correctly handled. But, for small simulation cells compatible with ab initio calculations, only the definition through the residual stress appears tractable. The approach is illustrated by considering various point defects (vacancy, self-interstitial, and hydrogen solute atom) in zirconium, using both empirical potentials and ab initio calculations.

  10. Determination of corneal elasticity coefficient using the ORA database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisov, Sergei E; Novikov, Ivan A; Bubnova, Irina A; Antonov, Alexei A; Siplivyi, Vladimir I

    2010-07-01

    To propose a new approach for the study of corneal biomechanics using the Reichert Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) database, which is based on changes in velocity retardation in the central cornea at the peak of flattening. The ORA applanation curve was analyzed using a mathematical technique, which allowed calculation of the elasticity coefficient (Ke), which is primarily characteristic of the elastic properties of the cornea. Elasticity coefficient values were obtained in patients with presumably different biomechanical properties of the cornea: "normal" cornea (71 eyes, normal group), keratoconus (34 eyes, keratoconus group), LASIK (36 eyes, LASIK group), and glaucoma with elevated and compensated intraocular pressure (lOP) (38 eyes, glaucoma group). The mean Ke value in the normal group was 11.05 +/- 1.6, and the corneal thickness correlation coefficient r2 was 0.48. In the keratoconus group, the mean Ke value was 4.91 +/- 1.87 and the corneal thickness correlation coefficient r2 was 0.47. In the LASIK group, Ke and r2 were 5.99 +/- 1.18 and 0.39, respectively. In the glaucoma group, the same eyes that experienced a two-fold reduction in lOP developed a statistically significant reduction in the Ke (1.06 times lower), whereas their corneal hysteresis value increased 1.25 times. The elasticity coefficient calculated using the ORA applanation curve can be used in the evaluation of corneal biomechanical properties.

  11. Heart transplantation and arterial elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colvin-Adams M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Monica Colvin-Adams,1 Nonyelum Harcourt,1 Robert LeDuc,2 Ganesh Raveendran,1 Yassir Sonbol,3 Robert Wilson,1 Daniel Duprez11Cardiovascular Division, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Division of Biostatistics University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Cardiovascular Division, St Luke's Hospital System, Sugar Land, TX, USAObjective: Arterial elasticity is a functional biomarker that has predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in nontransplant populations. There is little information regarding arterial elasticity in heart transplant recipients. This study aimed to characterize small (SAE and large (LAE artery elasticity in heart transplant recipients in comparison with an asymptomatic population free of overt cardiovascular disease. A second goal was to identify demographic and clinical factors associated with arterial elasticity in this unique population.Methods: Arterial pulse waveform was registered noninvasively at the radial artery in 71 heart transplant recipients between 2008 and 2010. SAEs and LAEs were derived from diastolic pulse contour analysis. Comparisons were made to a healthy cohort of 1,808 participants selected from our prevention clinic database. Multiple regression analyses were performed to evaluate associations between risk factors and SAE and LAE within the heart transplant recipients.Results: LAE and SAE were significantly lower in heart transplant recipients than in the normal cohort (P <0.01 and P < 0.0001, respectively. Female sex and history of ischemic cardiomyopathy were significantly associated with reduced LAE and SAE. Older age and the presence of moderate cardiac allograft vasculopathy were also significantly associated with reduced SAE. Transplant duration was associated with increased SAE.Conclusion: Heart transplants are associated with peripheral endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness, as demonstrated by a significant reduction in SAE and LAE when compared with a

  12. Thermodynamic effect of elastic stress on grain boundary segregation of phosphorus in a low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Lei; Lejček, Pavel; Song, Shenhua; Schmitz, Guido; Meng, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Grain boundary (GB) segregation of P in 2.25Cr1Mo steel induced by elastic stress shows that the P equilibrium concentration, after reaching the non-equilibrium concentration maximum at critical time, returns to its initial thermal equilibrium level. This finding confirms the interesting phenomenon that the effect of elastic stress on GB segregation of P is significant in kinetics while slight in thermodynamics. Through extending the “pressure” in classical theory of chemical potential to the “elastic stress”, the thermodynamic effect of elastic stress on GB segregation is studied, and the relationship between elastic stress and segregation Gibbs energy is formulated. The formulas reveal that the difference in the segregation Gibbs energy between the elastically-stressed and non-stressed states depends on the excess molar volume of GB segregation and the magnitude of elastic stress. Model calculations in segregation Gibbs energy confirm that the effect of elastic stress on the thermodynamics of equilibrium GB segregation is slight, and the theoretical analyses considerably agree with the experimental results. The confirmation indicates that the nature of the thermodynamic effect is well captured. - Highlights: • GB segregation of P after stress aging returns to its initial thermal equilibrium level. • Relationship between elastic stress and segregation energy is formulated. • Thermodynamic effect relies on excess molar volume and magnitude of elastic stress. • Effect of elastic stress on Gibbs energy of GB segregation is estimated to be slight. • Complete theory of the effect of elastic stress on grain boundary segregation is setup

  13. The first principles study of elastic and thermodynamic properties of ZnSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatta, Swati; Kaur, Veerpal; Tripathi, S. K.; Prakash, Satya

    2018-05-01

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of ZnSe are investigated using thermo_pw package implemented in Quantum espresso code within the framework of density functional theory. The pseudopotential method within the local density approximation is used for the exchange-correlation potential. The physical parameters of ZnSe bulk modulus and shear modulus, anisotropy factor, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, Pugh's ratio and Frantsevich's ratio are calculated. The sound velocity and Debye temperature are obtained from elastic constant calculations. The Helmholtz free energy and internal energy of ZnSe are also calculated. The results are compared with available theoretical calculations and experimental data.

  14. Molecular bonding in SF6 measured by elastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.D.; Fink, M.

    1992-01-01

    Elastic differential cross-section measurements of gaseous SF 6 were made with 30 keV electrons in the range of 0.25 bohrs -1 ≤s≤10 bohrs -1 . Structural parameters derived in this study closely matched those found in an earlier total (elastic plus inelastic) scattering investigation. Multiple-scattering effects were incorporated in the structural refinement. The discrepancies between the independent atom model and the measured differential cross section reproduce earlier total scattering results for momentum transfers of greater than 5 bohrs -1 . By extending the measurements to smaller s values, a closer examination of a Hartree--Fock calculation for SF 6 was possible. It was found that the difference curve obtained from the Hartree--Fock calculation matched the experimental data in this region. A more quantitative analysis was performed using the analytic expressions of Bonham and Fink to compute moments of the molecular charge distribution from the differential cross-section data. Comparison of these results with similar fits to the Hartree--Fock calculation confirmed the good agreement between the Hartree--Fock calculation and the current elastic data

  15. Elastic properties of LaSnxNi5-x compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeheskel, O.; Nattrass, C.E.; Leisure, R.G.; Jacob, I.; Bowman, R.C. Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasonic methods were used to measure the room-temperature elastic moduli of polycrystalline LaSn x Ni 5-x compounds for 0≤x≤0.5. These materials are of great importance for their hydrogen storage properties. The samples, prepared by a hot isostatic pressing method, had near-theoretical densities with calculated porosities ranging from 0 to 1.5%. The porosity-corrected moduli decreased with increasing x. Poisson's ratio was approximately constant at 0.314 for all the compounds. The Debye temperature, calculated from the RT polycrystalline moduli, decreased from 359 to 344 K as x increased from 0 to 0.5. The results were used to calculate the elastic interaction energy of an interstitial hydrogen atom with the strain fields of all the other interstitial hydrogen. This energy was in turn used to calculate the critical temperature below which phase separation occurs in LaM x Ni 5-x H y compounds (M=Sn or Al). It was found that the critical temperature decreases with increasing x, confirming in a more general way a conclusion drawn for a specific case from earlier thermodynamic measurements. It is suggested that the lowering of the critical temperature plays a role in limiting the width of the plateaus in pressure-composition isotherms for the two-phase regions of these compounds. This suggestion implies a relation between the elastic properties and the maximum hydrogen capacity

  16. Collusion and the elasticity of demand

    OpenAIRE

    David Collie

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of collusion in infinitely repeated Cournot oligopoly games has generally assumed that demand is linear, but this note uses constant-elasticity demand functions to investigate how the elasticity of demand affects the sustainability of collusion.

  17. Mechanical behaviour of nanoparticles: Elasticity and plastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-03

    Jun 3, 2015 ... Mechanical behaviour of nanoparticles: Elasticity and plastic deformation mechanisms ... The main results in terms of elasticity and plastic deformation mechanisms are then reported ... Pramana – Journal of Physics | News.

  18. Third-order elastic moduli for alkali-halide crystals possessing the sodium chloride structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, U.

    2010-01-01

    The values of third-order elastic moduli for alkali halides, having NaCl-type crystal structure are calculated according to the Born-Mayer potential model, considering the repulsive interactions up to the second nearest neighbours and calculating the values of the potential parameters for each crystal, independently, from the compressibility data. This work presents the first published account of the calculation of the third-order elastic moduli taking the actual value of the potential parameter unlike the earlier works. Third-order elastic constants have been computed for alkali halides at 0 and 300 K. The results of the third-order elastic constants are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. Very good agreement between experimental and theoretical third-order elastic constant data (except C 123 ) is found. We have also computed the values of the pressure derivatives of second-order elastic constants and Anderson-Grueneisen parameter for alkali halides, which agree reasonably well with the experimental values, indicating the satisfactory nature of our computed data for third-order elastic constants.

  19. Corrugated Membrane Nonlinear Deformation Process Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Nikolaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastic elements are widely used in instrumentation. They are used to create a particular interference between the parts, for accumulating mechanical energy, as the motion transmission elements, elastic supports, and sensing elements of measuring devices. Device reliability and quality depend on the calculation accuracy of the elastic elements. A corrugated membrane is rather common embodiment of the elastic element.The corrugated membrane properties depend largely on its profile i.e. a generatrix of the meridian surface.Unlike other types of pressure elastic members (bellows, tube spring, the elastic characteristics of which are close to linear, an elastic characteristic of the corrugated membrane (typical movement versus external load is nonlinear. Therefore, the corrugated membranes can be used to measure quantities, nonlinearly related to the pressure (e.g., aircraft air speed, its altitude, pipeline fluid or gas flow rate. Another feature of the corrugated membrane is that significant movements are possible within the elastic material state. However, a significant non-linearity of membrane characteristics leads to severe complicated calculation.This article is aimed at calculating the corrugated membrane to obtain the elastic characteristics and the deformed shape of the membrane meridian, as well as at investigating the processes of buckling. As the calculation model, a thin-walled axisymmetric shell rotation is assumed. The material properties are linearly elastic. We consider a corrugated membrane of sinusoidal profile. The membrane load is a uniform pressure.The algorithm for calculating the mathematical model of an axisymmetric corrugated membrane of constant thickness, based on the Reissner’s theory of elastic thin shells, was realized as the author's program in C language. To solve the nonlinear problem were used a method of changing the subspace of control parameters, developed by S.S., Gavriushin, and a parameter marching method

  20. Elastic least-squares reverse time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Zongcai; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    Elastic least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) is used to invert synthetic particle-velocity data and crosswell pressure field data. The migration images consist of both the P- and Svelocity perturbation images. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data illustrate the advantages of elastic LSRTM over elastic reverse time migration (RTM). In addition, elastic LSRTM images are better focused and have better reflector continuity than do the acoustic LSRTM images.

  1. Elastic least-squares reverse time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Zongcai

    2016-09-06

    Elastic least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) is used to invert synthetic particle-velocity data and crosswell pressure field data. The migration images consist of both the P- and Svelocity perturbation images. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data illustrate the advantages of elastic LSRTM over elastic reverse time migration (RTM). In addition, elastic LSRTM images are better focused and have better reflector continuity than do the acoustic LSRTM images.

  2. Thermodynamic parameters of elasticity and electrical conductivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thermodynamic parameters (change in free energy of elasticity, DGe; change in enthalpy of elasticity, DHe; and change in entropy of elasticity, DSe) and the electrical conductivity of natural rubber composites reinforced separately with some agricultural wastes have been determined. Results show that the reinforced ...

  3. Self-consistent Modeling of Elastic Anisotropy in Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Wenk, H.; Matthies, S.; Vasin, R.

    2012-12-01

    Elastic anisotropy in clay-rich sedimentary rocks has increasingly received attention because of significance for prospecting of petroleum deposits, as well as seals in the context of nuclear waste and CO2 sequestration. The orientation of component minerals and pores/fractures is a critical factor that influences elastic anisotropy. In this study, we investigate lattice and shape preferred orientation (LPO and SPO) of three shales from the North Sea in UK, the Qusaiba Formation in Saudi Arabia, and the Officer Basin in Australia (referred to as N1, Qu3, and L1905, respectively) to calculate elastic properties and compare them with experimental results. Synchrotron hard X-ray diffraction and microtomography experiments were performed to quantify LPO, weight proportions, and three-dimensional SPO of constituent minerals and pores. Our preliminary results show that the degree of LPO and total amount of clays are highest in Qu3 (3.3-6.5 m.r.d and 74vol%), moderately high in N1 (2.4-5.6 m.r.d. and 70vol%), and lowest in L1905 (2.3-2.5 m.r.d. and 42vol%). In addition, porosity in Qu3 is as low as 2% while it is up to 6% in L1605 and 8% in N1, respectively. Based on this information and single crystal elastic properties of mineral components, we apply a self-consistent averaging method to calculate macroscopic elastic properties and corresponding seismic velocities for different shales. The elastic model is then compared with measured acoustic velocities on the same samples. The P-wave velocities measured from Qu3 (4.1-5.3 km/s, 26.3%Ani.) are faster than those obtained from L1905 (3.9-4.7 km/s, 18.6%Ani.) and N1 (3.6-4.3 km/s, 17.7%Ani.). By making adjustments for pore structure (aspect ratio) and single crystal elastic properties of clay minerals, a good agreement between our calculation and the ultrasonic measurement is obtained.

  4. Extrapolation of bulk rock elastic moduli of different rock types to high pressure conditions and comparison with texture-derived elastic moduli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullemeyer, Klaus; Lokajíček, Tomás; Vasin, Roman N.; Keppler, Ruth; Behrmann, Jan H.

    2018-02-01

    In this study elastic moduli of three different rock types of simple (calcite marble) and more complex (amphibolite, micaschist) mineralogical compositions were determined by modeling of elastic moduli using texture (crystallographic preferred orientation; CPO) data, experimental investigation and extrapolation. 3D models were calculated using single crystal elastic moduli, and CPO measured using time-of-flight neutron diffraction at the SKAT diffractometer in Dubna (Russia) and subsequently analyzed using Rietveld Texture Analysis. To define extrinsic factors influencing elastic behaviour, P-wave and S-wave velocity anisotropies were experimentally determined at 200, 400 and 600 MPa confining pressure. Functions describing variations of the elastic moduli with confining pressure were then used to predict elastic properties at 1000 MPa, revealing anisotropies in a supposedly crack-free medium. In the calcite marble elastic anisotropy is dominated by the CPO. Velocities continuously increase, while anisotropies decrease from measured, over extrapolated to CPO derived data. Differences in velocity patterns with sample orientation suggest that the foliation forms an important mechanical anisotropy. The amphibolite sample shows similar magnitudes of extrapolated and CPO derived velocities, however the pattern of CPO derived velocity is closer to that measured at 200 MPa. Anisotropy decreases from the extrapolated to the CPO derived data. In the micaschist, velocities are higher and anisotropies are lower in the extrapolated data, in comparison to the data from measurements at lower pressures. Generally our results show that predictions for the elastic behavior of rocks at great depths are possible based on experimental data and those computed from CPO. The elastic properties of the lower crust can, thus, be characterized with an improved degree of confidence using extrapolations. Anisotropically distributed spherical micro-pores are likely to be preserved, affecting

  5. Nonlinear Elasticity of Borocarbide Superconductor YNi2B2C: A First-Principles Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available First-principles calculations combined with homogeneous deformation methods are used to investigate the second- and third-order elastic constants of YNi2B2C with tetragonal structure. The predicted lattice constants and second-order elastic constants of YNi2B2C agree well with the available data. The effective second-order elastic constants are obtained from the second- and third-order elastic constants for YNi2B2C. Based on the effective second-order elastic constants, Pugh’s modulus ratio, Poisson’s ratio, and Vickers hardness of YNi2B2C under high pressure are further investigated. It is shown that the ductility of YNi2B2C increases with increasing pressure.

  6. Stress Distribution in Layered Elastic Creeping Array with a Vertical Cylindrical Shaft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobyleva Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction should be taking into account the influence of time factor on the stability of the structures. In the paper hereditary creep and homogenization theories are used to determine stresses in the layered elastic creeping array with a vertical shaft. Volterra correspondence principle was applied. As a result, the reduction of a time-dependent elastic creeping problem to a corresponding elastic problem became possible. The method proposes a way to determine average (effective elastic creeping properties and homogenized stress field from known properties of the layers’ components. Creep kernels are of a convolution type and are taken in the exponential form. The problem of heterogeneous elastic creeping environment is reduced to a problem of homogeneous transversely isotropic medium. Different boundary conditions on the cylindrical shaft’s surface were considered. An analytical solution was obtained. These explicit expressions can be useful for the necessary calculations in the construction practice.

  7. Design and Vibration Suppression Control of a Modular Elastic Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel mechatronic design philosophy is introduced to develop a compact modular rotary elastic joint for a humanoid manipulator. The designed elastic joint is mainly composed of a brushless direct current (DC motor, harmonic reducer, customized torsional spring, and fail-safe brake. The customized spring considerably reduces the volume of the elastic joint and facilitates the construction of a humanoid manipulator which employs this joint. The large central hole along the joint axis brings convenience for cabling and the fail-safe brake can guarantee safety when the power is off. In order to reduce the computational burden on the central controller and simplify system maintenance, an expandable electrical system, which has a double-layer control structure, is introduced. Furthermore, a robust position controller for the elastic joint is proposed and interpreted in detail. Vibration of the elastic joint is suppressed by means of resonance ratio control (RRC. In this method, the ratio between the resonant and anti-resonant frequency can be arbitrarily designated according to the feedback of the nominal spring torsion. Instead of using an expensive torque sensor, the spring torque can be obtained by calculating the product of spring stiffness and deformation, due to the high linearity of the customized spring. In addition, to improve the system robustness, a motor-side disturbance observer (DOb and an arm-side DOb are employed to estimate and compensate for external disturbances and system uncertainties, such as model variation, friction, and unknown external load. Validity of the DOb-based RRC is demonstrated in the simulation results. Experimental results show the performance of the modular elastic joint and the viability of the proposed controller further.

  8. Elastic Coulomb breakup of 34Na

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; Shubhchintak, Chatterjee, R.

    2016-08-01

    Background: 34Na is conjectured to play an important role in the production of seed nuclei in the alternate r -process paths involving light neutron rich nuclei very near the β -stability line, and as such, it is important to know its ground state properties and structure to calculate rates of the reactions it might be involved in, in the stellar plasma. Found in the region of `island of inversion', its ground state might not be in agreement with normal shell model predictions. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to study the elastic Coulomb breakup of 34Na on 208Pb to give us a core of 33Na with a neutron and in the process we try and investigate the one neutron separation energy and the ground state configuration of 34Na. Method: A fully quantum mechanical Coulomb breakup theory within the architecture of post-form finite range distorted wave Born approximation extended to include the effects of deformation is used to research the elastic Coulomb breakup of 34Na on 208Pb at 100 MeV/u. The triple differential cross section calculated for the breakup is integrated over the desired components to find the total cross-section, momentum, and angular distributions as well as the average momenta, along with the energy-angular distributions. Results: The total one neutron removal cross section is calculated to test the possible ground state configurations of 34Na. The average momentum results along with energy-angular calculations indicate 34Na to have a halo structure. The parallel momentum distributions with narrow full widths at half-maxima signify the same. Conclusion: We have attempted to analyze the possible ground state configurations of 34Na and in congruity with the patterns in the `island of inversion' conclude that even without deformation, 34Na should be a neutron halo with a predominant contribution to its ground state most probably coming from 33Na(3 /2+)⊗ 2 p3 /2ν configuration. We also surmise that it would certainly be useful and rewarding to test our

  9. Elasticity of Relativistic Rigid Bodies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2013-10-01

    In the classical Twin Paradox, according to the Special Theory of Relativity, when the traveling twin blasts off from the Earth to a relative velocity v =√{/3 } 2 c with respect to the Earth, his measuring stick and other physical objects in the direction of relative motion shrink to half their lengths. How is that possible in the real physical world to have let's say a rigid rocket shrinking to half and then later elongated back to normal as an elastic material when it stops? What is the explanation for the traveler's measuring stick and other physical objects, in effect, return to the same length to their original length in the Stay-At-Home, but there is no record of their having shrunk? If it's a rigid (not elastic) object, how can it shrink and then elongate back to normal? It might get broken in such situation.

  10. Elasticity of Long Distance Travelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mette Aagaard

    2011-01-01

    With data from the Danish expenditure survey for 12 years 1996 through 2007, this study analyses household expenditures for long distance travelling. Household expenditures are examined at two levels of aggregation having the general expenditures on transportation and leisure relative to five other...... aggregated commodities at the highest level, and the specific expenditures on plane tickets and travel packages at the lowest level. The Almost Ideal Demand System is applied to determine the relationship between expenditures on transportation and leisure and all other purchased non-durables within...... packages has higher income elasticity of demand than plane tickets but also higher than transportation and leisure in general. The findings within price sensitiveness are not as sufficient estimated, but the model results indicate that travel packages is far more price elastic than plane tickets which...

  11. Pipeline robots with elastic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Matuliauskas

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available In the article constructions of the pipeline robots with elastic elements are reviewed and the scheme of new original construction is presented. The mathematical models of a robot with one-dimensional vibration exciter with two degrees of freedom were developed and the equations of movement were formed and written. The mathematical model of the pipeline robot with circular elements is formed and its motion equations are presented.

  12. The poverty elasticity of growth

    OpenAIRE

    Heltberg, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    How much does economic growth contribute to poverty reduction? I discuss analytical and empirical approches to assess the poverty elasticity of growth, and emphasize that the relationship between growth and poverty change is non-constant. For a given poverty measure, it depends on initial inequality and on the location of the poverty line relative to mean income. In most cases, growth is more important for poverty reduction than changes in inequality, but this does not tender inequality unimp...

  13. Polarized deuteron elastic scattering from a polarized proton target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelzer, R.; Kuiper, H.; Schoeberl, M.; Berber, S.; Hilmert, H.; Koeppel, R.; Pferdmenges, R. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Physikalisches Inst.); Zankel, H. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1983-01-13

    Measurements are reported of the spin correlation parameter Cy,y for the elastic scattering of 10.0 MeV vector polarized deuterons from a polarized proton target at five CM angles (76/sup 0/,85/sup 0/,98/sup 0/,115/sup 0/,132/sup 0/). The experimental results are compared with different predictions. A Faddeev type calculation on the basis of local potentials also including approximate Coulomb distortion is favoured by our experimental results.

  14. Polarized deuteron elastic scattering from a polarized proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, R.; Kuiper, H.; Schoeberl, M.; Berber, S.; Hilmert, H.; Koeppel, R.; Pferdmenges, R.; Zankel, H.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements are reported of the spin correlation parameter Cy,y for the elastic scattering of 10.0 MeV vector polarized deuterons from a polarized proton target at five CM angles (76 0 ,85 0 ,98 0 ,115 0 ,132 0 ). The experimental results are compared with different predictions. A Faddeev type calculation on the basis of local potentials also including approximate Coulomb distortion is favoured by our experimental results. (orig.)

  15. Algorithm of constructing hybrid effective modules for elastic isotropic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetashkov, A. A.; Miciński, J.; Kupriyanov, N. A.; Barashkov, V. N.; Lushnikov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    The algorithm of constructing of new effective elastic characteristics of two-component composites based on the superposition of the models of Reiss and Voigt, Hashin and Strikman, as well as models of the geometric average for effective modules. These effective characteristics are inside forks Voigt and Reiss. Additionally, the calculations of the stress-strain state of composite structures with new effective characteristics give more accurate prediction than classical models do.

  16. Measurement of elastic modules of structural ceramic by acoustic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Bong Young; Lee Seong Suck; Kim, Young Gil

    1993-01-01

    Elastic moduli of structural ceramic materials, Al 2 O 3 , SiC, Si 3 N 4 , were measured by acoustic resonance method. Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio were calculated from the torsional and flexural resonant frequencies, densities, and the dimensions of the specimen. The results by acoustic resonance method were compared with the results by ultrasonic method and the differences were less than 4%.

  17. Matlab implementation of LASSO, LARS, the elastic net and SPCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    There are a number of interesting variable selection methods available beside the regular forward selection and stepwise selection methods. Such approaches include LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator), least angle regression (LARS) and elastic net (LARS-EN) regression. There al...... exists a method for calculating principal components with sparse loadings. This software package contains Matlab implementations of these functions. The standard implementations of these functions are available as add-on packages in S-Plus and R....

  18. Transient waves in visco-elastic media

    CERN Document Server

    Ricker, Norman

    1977-01-01

    Developments in Solid Earth Geophysics 10: Transient Waves in Visco-Elastic Media deals with the propagation of transient elastic disturbances in visco-elastic media. More specifically, it explores the visco-elastic behavior of a medium, whether gaseous, liquid, or solid, for very-small-amplitude disturbances. This volume provides a historical overview of the theory of the propagation of elastic waves in solid bodies, along with seismic prospecting and the nature of seismograms. It also discusses the seismic experiments, the behavior of waves propagated in accordance with the Stokes wave

  19. Teaching nonlinear dynamics through elastic cords

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, R; Galan, C A; Sanchez-Bajo, F

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally studied the restoring force of a length of stretched elastic cord. A simple analytical expression for the restoring force was found to fit all the experimental results for different elastic materials. Remarkably, this analytical expression depends upon an elastic-cord characteristic parameter which exhibits two limiting values corresponding to two nonlinear springs with different Hooke's elastic constants. Additionally, the simplest model of elastic cord dynamics is capable of exhibiting a great diversity of nonlinear phenomena, including bifurcations and chaos, thus providing a suitable alternative model system for discussing the basic essentials of nonlinear dynamics in the context of intermediate physics courses at university level.

  20. Elastic interaction between surface and spherical pore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganeev, G.Z.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Kislitsyn, S.B.; Turkebaev, T.Eh.

    2000-01-01

    The energy of elastic interaction of a gas-filled spherical cavity with a boundary of an elastic isotropic half-space is determined. The elastic field of a system of a spherical cavity - boundary is represented as an expansion in series of potential functions. The factors of expansions are determined by boundary conditions on a free surface of an elastic half-space and on a spherical surface of a cavity with pressure of gas P. Function of a Tresca-Miesesa on a surface of elastic surface is defined additionally with purpose creep condition determination caused by gas pressure in the cavity. (author)

  1. Biomimetic heterogenous elastic tissue development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kai Jen; Dixon, Simon; Hale, Luke Richard; Darbyshire, Arnold; Martin, Daniel; de Mel, Achala

    2017-01-01

    There is an unmet need for artificial tissue to address current limitations with donor organs and problems with donor site morbidity. Despite the success with sophisticated tissue engineering endeavours, which employ cells as building blocks, they are limited to dedicated labs suitable for cell culture, with associated high costs and long tissue maturation times before available for clinical use. Direct 3D printing presents rapid, bespoke, acellular solutions for skull and bone repair or replacement, and can potentially address the need for elastic tissue, which is a major constituent of smooth muscle, cartilage, ligaments and connective tissue that support organs. Thermoplastic polyurethanes are one of the most versatile elastomeric polymers. Their segmented block copolymeric nature, comprising of hard and soft segments allows for an almost limitless potential to control physical properties and mechanical behaviour. Here we show direct 3D printing of biocompatible thermoplastic polyurethanes with Fused Deposition Modelling, with a view to presenting cell independent in-situ tissue substitutes. This method can expeditiously and economically produce heterogenous, biomimetic elastic tissue substitutes with controlled porosity to potentially facilitate vascularisation. The flexibility of this application is shown here with tubular constructs as exemplars. We demonstrate how these 3D printed constructs can be post-processed to incorporate bioactive molecules. This efficacious strategy, when combined with the privileges of digital healthcare, can be used to produce bespoke elastic tissue substitutes in-situ, independent of extensive cell culture and may be developed as a point-of-care therapy approach.

  2. Magnetic and elastic properties of the antiferromagnet uranium mononitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Doorn, C.F.

    1976-10-01

    The magnetic and elastic properties of antiferromagnetic uranium mononitride single crystals are studied in the thesis from the measurements of the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity and elastic constants. The elastic constants C 11 , C 12 and C 44 were determined in the temperature interval 4 to 300 K by ultrasonic measurements of the five possible wave velocities in the [100] and [110] directions. A test for internal consistency was also made. A dip of about 9 percent occurs in C 11 at a temperature of 5 to 6 K lower than the Neel temperature T(N) (equals about 53 K). Starting at T(N), a renormalization in C 44 is proportional to the square of the sublattice magnetization also occurs. Both these results agree with model calculations which include spin-phonon interactions. The investigation of this anomaly was extended by measuring the electrical resistivity of a sample cut from the same crystal as that on which the elasticity was measured. No anomalous behavior was observed at the temperature where C 11 displays its anomaly. However, a discontinuity in the temperature derivative of the resistance was found at T(N). The possible effect of a magnetic field on the resistivity, as well as on the elasticity, was investigated without any measurable effect. The magnetic susceptibility was measured with a Foner magnetometer between 4 and 1 000 K. It was found that above the Neel temperature the paramagnetic susceptibility followed a revised Curie-Weiss law. In an attempt to ascertain the ionic state of the 5f-uranium ion in UN, use was made of the experimentally determined Weiss constant, spin disorder resistivity and Knight shift. A calculation was made that gave a good representation of the ratio of the experimental susceptibilities along the [100] and [110] directions in the ordered region [af

  3. Burnout calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.

    1980-01-01

    Reviewed is the effect of heat flux of different system parameters on critical density in order to give an initial view on the value of several parameters. A thorough analysis of different equations is carried out to calculate burnout is steam-water flows in uniformly heated tubes, annular, and rectangular channels and rod bundles. Effect of heat flux density distribution and flux twisting on burnout and storage determination according to burnout are commended [ru

  4. Applying the elastic model for various nucleus-nucleus fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HASSAN, G.S.; RAGAB, H.S.; SEDDEEK, M.K.

    2000-01-01

    The Elastic Model of two free parameters m,d given by Scalia has been used for wider energy regions to fit the available experimental data for potential barriers and cross sections. In order to generalize Scalia's formula in both sub- and above-barrier regions, we calculated m, d for pairs rather than those given by Scalia and compared the calculated cross sections with the experimental data. This makes a generalization of the Elastic Model in describing fusion process. On the other hand, Scalia's range of interacting systems was 24 ≤ A ≤194 where A is the compound nucleus mass number. Our extension of that model includes an example of the pairs of A larger than his final limit aiming to make it as a general formula for any type of reactants: light, intermediate or heavy systems. A significant point is the comparison of Elastic Model calculations with the well known methods studying complete fusion and compound nucleus formation, namely with the resultants of using Proximity potential with either Sharp or Smooth cut-off approximations

  5. Electron-He+ P-wave elastic scattering and photoabsorption in two-electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, A. K.

    2006-01-01

    In a previous paper [A. K. Bhatia, Phys. Rev. A 69, 032714 (2004)], electron-hydrogen P-wave scattering phase shifts were calculated using the optical potential approach based on the Feshbach projection operator formalism. This method is now extended to the singlet and triplet electron-He + P-wave scattering in the elastic region. Phase shifts are calculated using Hylleraas-type correlation functions with up to 220 terms. Results are rigorous lower bounds to the exact phase shifts, and they are compared to phase shifts obtained from the method of polarized orbitals and close-coupling calculations. The continuum functions calculated here are used to calculate photoabsorption cross sections. Photoionization cross sections of He and photodetachment cross sections of H - are calculated in the elastic region--i.e., leaving He + and H in their respective ground states--and compared with previous calculations. Radiative attachment rates are also calculated

  6. Motivation and compliance with intraoral elastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeroo, Helen J; Cunningham, Susan J; Newton, Jonathon Timothy; Travess, Helen C

    2014-07-01

    Intraoral elastics are commonly used in orthodontics and require regular changing to be effective. Unfortunately, poor compliance with elastics is often encountered, especially in adolescents. Intention for an action and its implementation can be improved using "if-then" plans that spell out when, where, and how a set goal, such as elastic wear, can be put into action. Our aim was to determine the effect of if-then plans on compliance with elastics. To identify common barriers to compliance with recommendations concerning elastic wear, semistructured interviews were carried out with 14 adolescent orthodontic patients wearing intraoral elastics full time. Emerging themes were used to develop if-then plans to improve compliance with elastic wear. A prospective pilot study assessed the effectiveness of if-then planning aimed at overcoming the identified barriers on compliance with elastic wear. Twelve participants were randomized equally into study and control groups; the study group received information about if-then planning. The participants were asked to collect used elastics, and counts of these were used to assess compliance. A wide range of motivational and volitional factors were described by the interviewed participants, including the perceived benefits of elastics, cues to remember, pain, eating, social situations, sports, loss of elastics, and breakages. Compliance with elastic wear was highly variable among patients. The study group returned more used elastics, suggesting increased compliance, but the difference was not significant. The use of if-then plans might improve compliance with elastic wear when compared with routine clinical instructions. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Theoretical studies of the pressure-induced phase transition and elastic properties of BeS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Xu [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Yu, Yang, E-mail: yuyang@scu.edu.cn [Department of Logistics Management, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Ji, Junyi [College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Long, Jianping [College of Materials and Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China); Chen, Jianjun; Liu, Daijun [College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2015-02-25

    Highlights: • Transition pressure from B3 to B8 of BeS is 58.86 GPa. • Elastic properties of BeS under pressure are predicted for the first time. • Elastic moduli of BeS increase monotonically with increasing pressure. • Elastic anisotropy of BeS has been investigated. - Abstract: First-principles calculations were performed to investigate the structural, electronic and elastic properties of BeS in both B3 and B8 structures. The structural phase transition from B3 to B8 occurs at 58.86 GPa with a volume decrease of 10.74%. The results of the electronic band structure show that the energy gap is indirect for B3 and B8 phases. The pressure dependence of the direct and indirect band gaps for BeS has been investigated. Especially, the elastic constants of B8 BeS under high pressure have been studied for the first time. The mechanical stability of the two phases has been discussed based on the pressure dependence of the elastic constants. In addition, the pressure dependence of bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, elastic wave velocities and brittle–ductile behavior of BeS are all successfully obtained. Finally, the elastic anisotropy has been investigated by using two different methods.

  8. Hydrogen diffusion in the elastic fields of dislocations in iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivak, A. B., E-mail: Sivak-AB@nrcki.ru; Sivak, P. A. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Romanov, V. A.; Chernov, V. M. [National Research Tomsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The effect of dislocation stress fields on the sink efficiency thereof is studied for hydrogen interstitial atoms at temperatures of 293 and 600 K and at a dislocation density of 3 × 10{sup 14} m{sup –2} in bcc iron crystal. Rectilinear full screw and edge dislocations in basic slip systems 〈111〉(110), 〈111〉(112), 〈100〉(100), and 〈100〉(110) are considered. Diffusion of defects is simulated by means of the object kinetic Monte Carlo method. The energy of interaction between defects and dislocations is calculated using the anisotropic theory of elasticity. The elastic fields of dislocations result in a less than 25% change of the sink efficiency as compared to the noninteracting linear sink efficiency at a room temperature. The elastic fields of edge dislocations increase the dislocation sink efficiency, whereas the elastic fields of screw dislocations either decrease this parameter (in the case of dislocations with the Burgers vector being 1/2〈111〉) or do not affect it (in the case of dislocations with the Burgers vector being 〈100〉). At temperatures above 600 K, the dislocations affect the behavior of hydrogen in bcc iron mainly owing to a high binding energy between the hydrogen atom and dislocation cores.

  9. Variation of the energy release rate as a crack approaches and passes through an elastic inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongshun; Chudnovsky, A.

    1993-01-01

    The variation of the energy release rate (ERP) at the tip of a crack penetrating an elastic inclusion is analyzed using an approach involving modeling the random array of microcracks or other defects by an elastic inclusion with effective elastic properties. Computations are carried out using a finite element procedure. The eight-noded isoparametric serendipity element with the shift of the midpoint to the quarter-point is used to simulate the singularity at the crack tip, and the crack growth is accommodated by implementing a mesh regeneration technique. The ERP values were calculated for various crack tip positions which simulate the process of the crack approaching and penetrating the inclusion.

  10. 7Li neutron-induced elastic scattering cross section measurement using a slowing-down spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heusch M.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A new integral measurement of the 7Li neutron induced elastic scattering cross section was determined in a wide neutron energy range. The measurement was performed on the LPSC-PEREN experimental facility using a heterogeneous graphite-LiF slowing-down time spectrometer coupled with an intense pulsed neutron generator (GENEPI-2. This method allows the measurement of the integral elastic scattering cross section in a slowing-down neutron spectrum. A Bayesian approach coupled to Monte Carlo calculations was applied to extract naturalC, 19F and 7Li elastic scattering cross sections.

  11. comparison of elastic-plastic FE method and engineering method for RPV fracture mechanics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yingxue; Zheng Bin; Zhang Fenggang

    2009-01-01

    This paper described the FE analysis of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics for a crack in RPV belt line using ABAQUS code. It calculated and evaluated the stress intensity factor and J integral of crack under PTS transients. The result is also compared with that by engineering analysis method. It shows that the results using engineering analysis method is a little larger than the results using FE analysis of 3D elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, thus the engineering analysis method is conservative than the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics method. (authors)

  12. Elastic energy and metastable phase equilibria for coherent mixtures in cubic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.O.

    1979-02-01

    Expressions were derived for the elastic energy due to coherency for cubic systems for an isotropic structure and for (100) or (111) habit planes for a lamellar structure. For the metastable equilibria the usual tangent compositions are replaced by compositions that are tangent to the elastic energy curve. For a loss of coherency there is an energy decrease due to the elastic effects and a further decrease associated with compositional changes. Information contained within this treatment permits calculation of the x-ray diffraction effects for such structures

  13. Elastic π-d scattering at momentum of 552 MeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dakhno, L.G.; Kravtsov, A.V.; Makarov, M.M.; Medvedev, V.I.; Obrant, G.Z.; Poromov, V.I.; Sarantsev, V.V.; Sokolov, G.L.; Sherman, S.G.

    1980-01-01

    The differential cross-section of the elastic π - d-scattering at the momentum of 552 MeV/c has been measured in the range of angles 20-180 deg in the L.s. by a deuterium 35-cm bubble chamber placed in a 14.8 kgf magnetic field. The total cross section of the elastic scattering is 7.9+-0.7 mbn. The results of calculations of the pion elastic scattering by deuteron performed by the Glauber theory are discussed

  14. Nonlinear elastic inclusions in isotropic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Yavari, A.

    2013-10-16

    We introduce a geometric framework to calculate the residual stress fields and deformations of nonlinear solids with inclusions and eigenstrains. Inclusions are regions in a body with different reference configurations from the body itself and can be described by distributed eigenstrains. Geometrically, the eigenstrains define a Riemannian 3-manifold in which the body is stress-free by construction. The problem of residual stress calculation is then reduced to finding a mapping from the Riemannian material manifold to the ambient Euclidean space. Using this construction, we find the residual stress fields of three model systems with spherical and cylindrical symmetries in both incompressible and compressible isotropic elastic solids. In particular, we consider a finite spherical ball with a spherical inclusion with uniform pure dilatational eigenstrain and we show that the stress in the inclusion is uniform and hydrostatic. We also show how singularities in the stress distribution emerge as a consequence of a mismatch between radial and circumferential eigenstrains at the centre of a sphere or the axis of a cylinder.

  15. Determination of kinetic coefficients for proton-nucleus collisions at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzato, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    From the effective proton dynamics, the approximations in the context of high energy collisions which lead to the Boltzmann equation, are established. From this equation, general expressions for the kinetic coefficients are deduced. Using a simple model, analytical expressions for kinetic coefficients are obtained. The importance of the effect of Pauli blocking is also shown. (author) [pt

  16. Magnetic dipole moment of the doubly closed-shell plus one proton nucleus $^{49}$Sc

    CERN Multimedia

    Gaulard, C V; Walters, W; Nishimura, K; Muto, S; Bingham, C R

    It is proposed to measure the magnetic moment of $^{49}$Sc by the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance on Oriented Nuclei (NMR-ON) method using the NICOLE on-line nuclear orientation facility. $^{49}$Sc is the neutron rich, doubly closed-shell, nucleus $^{48}$Ca plus one proton. Results will be used to deduce the effective g-factors in the $^{48}$Ca region with reference to nuclear structure and meson exchange current effects.

  17. Proton-nucleus interactions at 640 MeV accompanied by backward emission of energetic protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, V.I.; Kosarev, E.G.; Mueller, H.; Netzband, D.; Toneev, V.D.; Stiehler, T.; Tesch, S.; Gudima, K.K.; Mashnik, S.G.

    1979-03-01

    Spectra of protons of energies between 50 and 145 MeV emitted from carbon have been measured at angles from 105 0 to 160 0 with respect to the 640 MeV proton beam. The measurements have been carried out both inclusively and in coincidence with protons emitted at forward angles up to +- 40 0 with energies from 255 to 330 MeV. This energy interval has been chosen in accordance with the kinematics of quasifree scattering on two-nucleon groups. Inclusive differential cross sections at 140 0 and coincidence cross sections at the angle pair (-12 0 , 122 0 ) have also been measured with Be, Al, Cu and Pb targets. The data have been compared with the predictions of several models. (author)

  18. Multiparticle Collectivity from Initial State Correlations in High Energy Proton-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusling, Kevin; Mace, Mark; Venugopalan, Raju

    2018-01-01

    Qualitative features of multiparticle correlations in light-heavy ion (p +A ) collisions at RHIC and LHC are reproduced in a simple initial state model of partons in the projectile coherently scattering off localized domains of color charge in the heavy nuclear target. These include (i) the ordering of the magnitudes of the azimuthal angle n th Fourier harmonics of two-particle correlations vn{2 }, (ii) the energy and transverse momentum dependence of the four-particle Fourier harmonic v2{4 }, and (iii) the energy dependence of four-particle symmetric cumulants measuring correlations between different Fourier harmonics. Similar patterns are seen in an Abelian version of the model, where we observe v2{2 }>v2{4 }≈v2{6 }≈v2{8 } of two, four, six, and eight particle correlations. While such patterns are often interpreted as signatures of collectivity arising from hydrodynamic flow, our results provide an alternative description of the multiparticle correlations seen in p +A collisions.

  19. Charged kaon and pion production at midrapidity in proton nucleus and sulphur nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Boggild, H.; Dodd, J.; Esumi, S.; Fabjan, C.W.; Fields, D.E.; Franz, A.; Hansen, K.H.; Humanic, T.J.; Jacak, B.V.; Kalechofsky, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Leltchouk, M.; Lorstad, B.; Maeda, N.; Miyabayashi, A.; Murray, M.; Nishimura, S.; Pandey, S.U.; Piuz, F.; Polychronakos, V.; Potekhin, M.; Poulard, G.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sarabura, M.; Simon-Gillo, J.; Schmidt-Sorensen, J.; Sondheim, W.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J.P.; Sumi, Y.; van Hecke, H.; Willis, W.J.; Wolf, K.

    1999-01-01

    The NA44 collaboration has measured charged kaon and pion distributions at midrapidity in sulphur and proton collisions with nuclear targets at 200 and 450 GeV/c per nucleon, respectively. The inverse slopes of kaons are larger than those of pions. The difference in the inverse slopes of pions, kaons and protons, all measured in our spectrometer, increases with system size and is consistent with the buildup of collective flow for larger systems. The target dependence of both the yields and inverse slopes is stronger for the sulphur beam suggesting the increased importance of secondary rescattering for SA reactions. The rapidity density, dN/dy, of both K+ and K- increases more rapidly with system size than for pi+ in a similar rapidity region. This trend continues with increasing centrality, and according to RQMD, it is caused by secondary reactions between mesons and baryons. The K-/K+ ratio falls with increasing system size but more slowly than the pbar/p ratio. The pi-/pi+ ratio is close to unity for all sy...

  20. Dilepton and dihadron production in proton-nucleus collisions at 800 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, C.S.

    1990-05-01

    A high statistics measurement of the atomic mass dependence of Drell-Yan, J/ψ, ψ' and Υ production induced by 800 GeV protons on deuterium, carbon, calcium, iron and tungsten targets has been performed at FermiLab (E772). The data consist of about 700,000 muon pairs covering the mass region 3 GeV ≤Mμμ 2 2 < 0.1 is slightly less than unity for heavy nuclei. J/ψ and ψ' production are strongly suppressed in heavy nuclei. An upgraded version on the spectrometer designed to measure two-body decays of neutral c and b-quark hadrons (E789) will be discussed. 17 refs., 8 figs

  1. Measuring centrality with slow protons in proton-nucleus collisions at 18 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernow, R.; Gushue, S.; Kirk, H.; Morrison, D.; Remsberg, L.; Rosati, M.; Torun, Y.; Chemakin, I.; Cole, B.A.; Hiejima, H.; Moulson, M.; Winter, D.; Yang, X.; Zajc, W.A.; Zhang, Y.; Frawley, A.; Maeda, N.; Rosati, M.; Justice, M.; Rai, G.; Thomas, J.; Cianciolo, V.; Hartouni, E.P.; Namboodiri, M.N.; Soltz, R.A.; Thomas, J.; Cianciolo, V.; Gilkes, M.; McGrath, R.L.; Torun, Y.; Mioduszewski, S.; Morrison, D.; Read, K.; Sorensen, S.; Kang, J.H.; Shin, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Experiment E910 has measured slow protons and deuterons from collisions of 18 GeV/c protons with Be, Cu, and Au targets at the BNL AGS. These correspond to the 'grey tracks' first observed in emulsion experiments. We report on their momentum and angular distributions and investigate their use in measuring the centrality of a collision, as defined by the mean number of projectile-nucleon interactions. The relation between the measured N grey and the mean number of interactions bar ν(N grey ) is studied using several simple models, one newly proposed, as well as the RQMD event generator. RQMD is shown to reproduce the N grey distribution, and exhibits a dependence of N grey on centrality that is similar to the behavior of the simple models. We find a strong linear dependence of N grey on ν, with a constant of proportionality that varies with target. For the Au target, we report a relative systematic error for extracting bar ν(N grey ) that lies between 10 and 20;% over all N grey . copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  2. Z-scaling in proton-nucleus collisions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zborovsky, I.; Tokarev, M.V.; Panebrattsev, Yu.A.; Skoro, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    New scaling, z-scaling, in the inclusive particle production in pA collisions is studied. The scaling function H A (z) is expressed via the inclusive cross section of particle production Ed 3 σ/dq 3 and the particle multiplicity density dN/dη at pseudorapidity η=0 in the corresponding nucleon-nucleon (NN) center-of-mass (CMS) system. The dependence of H A (z) on scaling variable z, the center-of-mass energy √, and the detection angle θ is investigated. The available experimental data on inclusive particle production (π ± , K ± ) in pA interactions at high energies are used to verify the universality of z-scaling found in hadron-hadron collisions. The A-dependence of H A (z) for π + -meson production is studied. It is shown that the experimental data >from pd collisions confirm the scaling properties of the function H d (z). Some predictions for H au (z) concerning production of π + -mesons in pAu interaction using the HIJING Monte Carlo code have been made. The obtained results can be of interest for future experiments at RHI and LHC in searching the signals of quark-gluon plasma formation

  3. Elastic properties of zinc, cadmium, bismuth, thallium, tin, lead and their binary alloys with indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magomedov, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Rates of propagation of longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves in samples as well as density of Tl, Pb, Sn, Bi, Cd, Zn and their binary alloys with indium are determined. The results obtained are used for calculation of elasticity constants of these materials. It is stated that concentration dependences of elasticity constants for indium alloys have non-linear character; negative deflection from the additive line is observed

  4. Odhad cenové elasticity poptávky po ropě

    OpenAIRE

    Jonák, Ondřej

    2009-01-01

    Objective of this diploma thesis is estimation of price elasticity of crude oil demand. In order to calculation of such elasticity crude oil demand is estimated with econometrical methods. The choice of suitable model, which sufficiently and accurately models crude oil demand, is initial position of analysis. Consequently, crude oil demand is estimated from market data obtainable from public sources. This estimated model is verified from economic, statistic and econometric point of view. Cons...

  5. An evaluation of diverse methods of obtaining effective Schroedinger interaction potentials for elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, K.; Allen, L.J.; Steward, C.; Hodgson, P.E.; Sofianos, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Direct solution of the Schroedinger equation and inversion methods of analysis of elastic scattering data are considered to evaluate the information that they can provide about the physical interaction between colliding nuclear particles. It was found that both optical model and inversion methods based upon inverse scattering theories are subject to ambiguities. Therefore, it is essential that elastic scattering data analyses are consistent with microscopic calculations of the potential. 25 refs

  6. An evaluation of diverse methods of obtaining effective Schroedinger interaction potentials for elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, K.; Allen, L.J.; Steward, C. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Hodgson, P.E. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Sofianos, S.A. [University of South Africa (UNISA), Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Physics

    1995-10-01

    Direct solution of the Schroedinger equation and inversion methods of analysis of elastic scattering data are considered to evaluate the information that they can provide about the physical interaction between colliding nuclear particles. It was found that both optical model and inversion methods based upon inverse scattering theories are subject to ambiguities. Therefore, it is essential that elastic scattering data analyses are consistent with microscopic calculations of the potential. 25 refs.

  7. 14O+p elastic scattering in a microscopic cluster model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descouvemont, P.; Baye, D.; Leo, F.

    2006-01-01

    The 14O+p elastic scattering is analyzed in a fully microscopic cluster model. With the Resonating Group Method associated with the microscopic R-matrix theory, phase shifts and cross sections are calculated. Data on 16O+p are used to test the precision of the model. For the 14O+p elastic scattering, an excellent agreement is found with recent experimental data. Resonances properties in 15F are discussed

  8. Quarkonia propagation in QGP: study of elastic and inelastic scattering processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrehrah, H; Aichelin, J; Gossiaux, P B

    2011-01-01

    We propose to study the quarkonia (φ) propagation in the QGP. We are especially interested in the elastic and inelastic scattering process of these quarkonia in the medium. We developed the Bethe-Salpeter formalism to calculate the elastic cross section (σ elas ) for φ - gluon/hadron. Results obtained in this work show that σ elas (φ - gluon/hadron) might have non negligible effects in the study of Q Q-bar propagation.

  9. Mesonic effects in the elastic electron deuteron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopka, G.

    1981-01-01

    The present thesis was concerned with the study of the electromagnetic structure of the deuteron in the framework of the OBE model using elastic electron-deuteron scattering with high momentum transfer. In the framework of the S-matrix formalism the differential cross sections was derived in first Born approximation. The calculation of the invariant amplitude led to the introduction of the electric and magnetic structure functions. From these structure functions the electromagnetic form factor was calculated. Furthermore the effective OBE-potential was derived in the framework of a projection procedure on the base of unitary transformations. (orig./HSI). [de

  10. Spin asymmetry in resonant electron-hydrogen elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.; Shang, Bo.

    1993-02-01

    Differential cross sections and asymmetries at 90 deg. and 30 deg are calculated for electron-hydrogen elastic scattering over the energies of the lowest 1 S and 3 P resonances using a nine-state coupled-channels calculation with and without continuum effects, which are represented by an equivalent-local polarization potential. The polarization potential improves agreement with experiment in general for the spin-averaged cross sections. It is suggested that continuum effects would be critically tested by asymmetry measurement at 30 deg over the 1 S resonance. 7 refs., 4 figs

  11. Reliability calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, K.E.

    1986-03-01

    Risk and reliability analysis is increasingly being used in evaluations of plant safety and plant reliability. The analysis can be performed either during the design process or during the operation time, with the purpose to improve the safety or the reliability. Due to plant complexity and safety and availability requirements, sophisticated tools, which are flexible and efficient, are needed. Such tools have been developed in the last 20 years and they have to be continuously refined to meet the growing requirements. Two different areas of application were analysed. In structural reliability probabilistic approaches have been introduced in some cases for the calculation of the reliability of structures or components. A new computer program has been developed based upon numerical integration in several variables. In systems reliability Monte Carlo simulation programs are used especially in analysis of very complex systems. In order to increase the applicability of the programs variance reduction techniques can be applied to speed up the calculation process. Variance reduction techniques have been studied and procedures for implementation of importance sampling are suggested. (author)

  12. Calculator calculus

    CERN Document Server

    McCarty, George

    1982-01-01

    How THIS BOOK DIFFERS This book is about the calculus. What distinguishes it, however, from other books is that it uses the pocket calculator to illustrate the theory. A computation that requires hours of labor when done by hand with tables is quite inappropriate as an example or exercise in a beginning calculus course. But that same computation can become a delicate illustration of the theory when the student does it in seconds on his calculator. t Furthermore, the student's own personal involvement and easy accomplishment give hi~ reassurance and en­ couragement. The machine is like a microscope, and its magnification is a hundred millionfold. We shall be interested in limits, and no stage of numerical approximation proves anything about the limit. However, the derivative of fex) = 67.SgX, for instance, acquires real meaning when a student first appreciates its values as numbers, as limits of 10 100 1000 t A quick example is 1.1 , 1.01 , 1.001 , •••• Another example is t = 0.1, 0.01, in the functio...

  13. Elastic constants and Debye temperature of wz-AlN and wz-GaN ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DOI: 10.1007/s12043-014-0785-7; ePublication: 5 September 2014. Abstract. First-principles calculations .... For calculating elastic stiffness constants, C11, C12, C13, C33 and C44, we have taken ..... 89, 5815 (2001). [2] G Chris, Van de Walle ...

  14. Forces and torques on rigid inclusions in an elastic environment: Resulting matrix-mediated interactions, displacements, and rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puljiz, Mate; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2017-05-01

    Embedding rigid inclusions into elastic matrix materials is a procedure of high practical relevance, for instance, for the fabrication of elastic composite materials. We theoretically analyze the following situation. Rigid spherical inclusions are enclosed by a homogeneous elastic medium under stick boundary conditions. Forces and torques are directly imposed from outside onto the inclusions or are externally induced between them. The inclusions respond to these forces and torques by translations and rotations against the surrounding elastic matrix. This leads to elastic matrix deformations, and in turn results in mutual long-ranged matrix-mediated interactions between the inclusions. Adapting a well-known approach from low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics, we explicitly calculate the displacements and rotations of the inclusions from the externally imposed or induced forces and torques. Analytical expressions are presented as a function of the inclusion configuration in terms of displaceability and rotateability matrices. The role of the elastic environment is implicitly included in these relations. That is, the resulting expressions allow a calculation of the induced displacements and rotations directly from the inclusion configuration, without having to explicitly determine the deformations of the elastic environment. In contrast to the hydrodynamic case, compressibility of the surrounding medium is readily taken into account. We present the complete derivation based on the underlying equations of linear elasticity theory. In the future, the method will, for example, be helpful to characterize the behavior of externally tunable elastic composite materials, to accelerate numerical approaches, as well as to improve the quantitative interpretation of microrheological results.

  15. Investigation on the elastic properties of Gd-Sc-Al garnet by the Mandelstam-Brillouin light scattering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharikov, E.V.; Zagumennyj, A.I.; Kitaeva, V.F.; Lutts, G.B.; Terskov, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The Gd-Sc-Al garnet (GSAG) crystals grown from the melt with composition Gd 2.88 Sc 1.89 Al 3.23 O 12 , were investigated. The GSAG doped with chromium was also studied. The Mandelstam-Brillouin (MB) light scattering in the GSAG crystals was observed. The garnet elastic components were determined using the data on the MB component shifts, the products of the elastic constants by molar volume were calculated as well. The GSAG is elastically anisotropic. The doping addition introduction do not cause noticeable change in the elastic properties. The obtained values of elastic constants and their combinations for GSAG were compared with the data for aluminium and gallium garnets. The comparison has shown that the values of elastic constants for GSAG is closer to those for Gd-Sc-Ga garnet than to the corresponding values for the Y-Al one

  16. Effect of interface/surface stress on the elastic wave band structure of two-dimensional phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Jiwei; Liu, Yongquan; Su, Xianyue

    2012-01-01

    In the present Letter, the multiple scattering theory (MST) for calculating the elastic wave band structure of two-dimensional phononic crystals (PCs) is extended to include the interface/surface stress effect at the nanoscale. The interface/surface elasticity theory is employed to describe the nonclassical boundary conditions at the interface/surface and the elastic Mie scattering matrix embodying the interface/surface stress effect is derived. Using this extended MST, the authors investigate the interface/surface stress effect on the elastic wave band structure of two-dimensional PCs, which is demonstrated to be significant when the characteristic size reduces to nanometers. -- Highlights: ► Multiple scattering theory including the interface/surface stress effect. ► Interface/surface elasticity theory to describe the nonclassical boundary conditions. ► Elastic Mie scattering matrix embodying the interface/surface stress effect. ► Interface/surface stress effect would be significant at the nanoscale.

  17. Modular correction method of bending elastic modulus based on sliding behavior of contact point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Qixun; Liu, Changyi

    2015-01-01

    During the three-point bending test, the sliding behavior of the contact point between the specimen and supports was observed, the sliding behavior was verified to affect the measurements of both deflection and span length, which directly affect the calculation of the bending elastic modulus. Based on the Hertz formula to calculate the elastic contact deformation and the theoretical calculation of the sliding behavior of the contact point, a theoretical model to precisely describe the deflection and span length as a function of bending load was established. Moreover, a modular correction method of bending elastic modulus was proposed, via the comparison between the corrected elastic modulus of three materials (H63 copper–zinc alloy, AZ31B magnesium alloy and 2026 aluminum alloy) and the standard modulus obtained from standard uniaxial tensile tests, the universal feasibility of the proposed correction method was verified. Also, the ratio of corrected to raw elastic modulus presented a monotonically decreasing tendency as the raw elastic modulus of materials increased. (technical note)

  18. Comparison of Static and Dynamic Elastic Modules of Different Strength Concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanık, Osman; Sabbaǧ, Nevbahar

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the static and dynamic elastic (Young) modules of concrete with different strength was intended to compare. For this purpose 150mm dimensions 9 for each design cubic samples prepared and they were subjected to water cure during 28 days. After Seismic Ultrasonic P and S wave travel time measurements of samples, P and S wave velocities and taking advantage of elasticity theory the dynamic elastic modules were calculated. Concrete strength was obtained from the uniaxial compression tests in order to calculate the static elastic modules of the samples. The static elastic modulus is calculated by using the empirical relationships used in international standards. The obtained static and dynamic elastic modules have been associated. A curve was obtained from this association result that approximately similar to the stress-strain curve of obtaining at failure criterion of the sample. This study was supported with OYP05277-DR-14 Project No. by SDU and State Hydraulic Works 13th Regional/2012-01 Project No. Keywords: Concrete Strength, P and S wave Velocities, Static, Dynamic, Young Modules

  19. Wave motion in elastic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Graff, Karl F

    1991-01-01

    This highly useful textbook presents comprehensive intermediate-level coverage of nearly all major topics of elastic wave propagation in solids. The subjects range from the elementary theory of waves and vibrations in strings to the three-dimensional theory of waves in thick plates. The book is designed not only for a wide audience of engineering students, but also as a general reference for workers in vibrations and acoustics. Chapters 1-4 cover wave motion in the simple structural shapes, namely strings, longitudinal rod motion, beams and membranes, plates and (cylindrical) shells. Chapter

  20. Elastic Moduli of Carbon Nanohorns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube is a special case of carbon nanohorns or carbon nanocones with zero apex angle. Research into carbon nanohorns started almost at the same time as the discovery of nanotubes in 1991. Most researchers focused on the investigation of nanotubes, and the exploration of nanohorns attracted little attention. To model the carbon nanohorns, we make use of a more reliable second-generation reactive empirical bond-order potential by Brenner and coworkers. We investigate the elastic moduli and conclude that these nanohorns are equally strong and require in-depth investigation. The values of Young's and Shear moduli decrease with apex angle.