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Sample records for calculated vaporized volume

  1. The one year outcome after KTP laser vaporization of the prostate according to the calculated vaporized volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Ja Hyeon; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Cho, Sung Yong; Kim, Soo Woong; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new simple method for measuring the vaporized volume and to evaluate the outcome of high-power potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP) photoselective laser vaporization. A total of 65 patients, with a mean age of 67.7 yr (range 53 to 85), were included in the primary analysis. The vaporized volume was calculated as the pre-operative volume minus the immediate post-operative volume plus the volume of the defect. For all patients, the subjective and objective parameters improved significantly after surgery. Six and 12 months after surgery, the group with a smaller vaporized volume (vaporized volume (>or=15 g). There were no differences in the change of the maximum flow rate and post-void residual based on the vaporized volume. Our findings suggest that the subjective improvement, after a high-power KTP laser vaporization, may be dependent on the vaporized volume obtained after the procedure.

  2. Calculated Atomic Volumes of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H.; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1979-01-01

    The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium.......The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium....

  3. Calculation of the transport and relaxation properties of dilute water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Robert; Bich, Eckard; Vogel, Eckhard; Dickinson, Alan S.; Vesovic, Velisa

    2009-07-01

    Transport properties of dilute water vapor have been calculated in the rigid-rotor approximation using four different potential energy hypersurfaces and the classical-trajectory method. Results are reported for shear viscosity, self-diffusion, thermal conductivity, and volume viscosity in the dilute-gas limit for the temperature range of 250-2500 K. Of these four surfaces the CC-pol surface of Bukowski et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 128, 094314 (2008)] is in best accord with the available measurements. Very good agreement is found with the most accurate results for viscosity in the whole temperature range of the experiments. For thermal conductivity the deviations of the calculated values from the experimental data increase systematically with increasing temperature to around 5% at 1100 K. For both self-diffusion and volume viscosity, the much more limited number of available measurements are generally consistent with the calculated values, apart from the lower temperature isotopically labeled diffusion measurements.

  4. Calculation of collision integrals and computation of diffusion coefficients in metal vapor mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref'ev, K. M.; Guseva, M. A.; Novikov, A. A.

    1992-06-01

    Results of numerical calculations of diffusion coefficients are presented for binary mixtures of metal vapors with gases and different metal vapors. The calculations have been performed by using a program for computing collision integrals for potential functions defined in arbitrary form. A table of integrals for the Buckingham-Corner potential is presented.

  5. Vapor-liquid (VLE) and liquid-liquid (LLE) phase equilibria calculations for polystyrene plus methyleyclohexane and polystyrene plus cyclohexane solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilczura-Wachnik, H.; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the vapor-liquid (VLE) and liquid-liquid (LLE) phase equilibria predictions for polystyrene in two theta solvents: cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane. VLE calculations were performed with the Elbro free volume method and a modified version of the PC-SAFT method, as well...... as with three UNIFAC type group contribution models: Entropic Free Volume + UNIFAC VLE 1 coeff., Entropic Free Volume + UNIFAC VLE 2coeff., and Oishi-Prausnitz + UNIFAC VLE 2coeff. Solvent activities were calculated for the polystyrene + cyclohexane and polystyrene + methylcyclohcxane solutions, and compared...

  6. Calculation Of Residual Volume By Spirometric Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hashemi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The current practice to measure RV is either by BPG or helium dilution methods which may not be available in all clinics due to their cost. Methods: This paper outlines a method for both direct and indirect calculation of RV via PFT with acceptable sensitivity (81 %, 60% , specificity (71 %, 94% and validity (76%, 78% for obstructive and restrictive lung disease respectively at a much lower cost.

  7. Calculation of Liquid Water-Hydrate-Methane Vapor Phase Equilibria from Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for determining fluid- and crystal-phase chemical potentials are used for the first time to calculate liquid water-methane hydrate-methane vapor phase equilibria from knowledge of atomistic interaction potentials alone. The water and methane molecules are modeled...... potential of the zero-occupancy hydrate system using thermodynamic integration from an Einstein crystal reference state, and (iii) thermodynamic integration to obtain the water and guest molecules' chemical potentials as a function of the hydrate occupancy. The three-phase equilibrium curve is calculated...... value at corresponding conditions. While computationally intensive, simulations such as these are essential to map the thermodynamically stable conditions for hydrate systems....

  8. Metal vapors in gas tungsten arcs: part ii. theoretical calculations of transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, G. J.; Eagar, T. W.

    1986-10-01

    Theoretical calculations of gas tungsten arc transport properties have revealed that small amounts of low ionization potential elements such as aluminum or calcium do not have as great an effect on the electrical and thermal conductivities as has been previously reported, if the presence of other metal vapors such as iron or manganese is also considered. It is therefore concluded that the effects of minor elements on arc properties may be less important than has previously been believed in explaining the variable penetration often associated with minor element additions to the base metal, and that weld pool convection effects such as surface tension modifications are probably more important. However, the effects of vapors emitted by the tungsten electrode may have a great effect on arc properties, as the shielding gas is otherwise free of contaminants in the upper regions of the arc.

  9. Ice-wedge volume calculation in Yedoma and thermokarst deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich, Mathias; Grosse, Guido; Strauss, Jens; Schirrmeister, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Detailed calculations of ground-ice volumes in permafrost deposits are necessary to understand and quantify the response of permafrost landscapes to thermal disturbance and thawing. Ice wedges with their polygonal surface expression are a widespread ground-ice component of permafrost lowlands. Therefore, the wedge-ice volume (WIV) is one of the major factors to be considered, both for assessing permafrost vulnerability and for quantifying deep permafrost soil carbon inventories. Here, a strai...

  10. "Raw" Formula for Calculating Maintenance Fluid Volumes in Low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Fluid management of low birth weight and preterm babies can be challenging, as the determination of maintenance fluid volumes have to be calculated to suit the demands of this delicate neonates in order to avoid fluid over-load or dehydration. It is on this background that this study to derive an easy to use ...

  11. Formula for Calculating Maintenance Fluid Volumes in Low Birth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    2007-08-14

    Aug 14, 2007 ... BACKGROUND. Fluid management of low birth weight and preterm babies can be challenging, as the determination of maintenance fluid volumes have to be calculated to suit the demands of this delicate neonates in order to avoid fluid over-load or dehydration. It is on this background that this study to ...

  12. 3D Surface Reconstruction and Volume Calculation of Rills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brings, Christine; Gronz, Oliver; Becker, Kerstin; Wirtz, Stefan; Seeger, Manuel; Ries, Johannes B.

    2015-04-01

    We use the low-cost, user-friendly photogrammetric Structure from Motion (SfM) technique, which is implemented in the Software VisualSfM, for 3D surface reconstruction and volume calculation of an 18 meter long rill in Luxembourg. The images were taken with a Canon HD video camera 1) before a natural rainfall event, 2) after a natural rainfall event and before a rill experiment and 3) after a rill experiment. Recording with a video camera results compared to a photo camera not only a huge time advantage, the method also guarantees more than adequately overlapping sharp images. For each model, approximately 8 minutes of video were taken. As SfM needs single images, we automatically selected the sharpest image from 15 frame intervals. The sharpness was estimated using a derivative-based metric. Then, VisualSfM detects feature points in each image, searches matching feature points in all image pairs, recovers the camera positions and finally by triangulation of camera positions and feature points the software reconstructs a point cloud of the rill surface. From the point cloud, 3D surface models (meshes) are created and via difference calculations of the pre and post models a visualization of the changes (erosion and accumulation areas) and quantification of erosion volumes are possible. The calculated volumes are presented in spatial units of the models and so real values must be converted via references. The outputs are three models at three different points in time. The results show that especially using images taken from suboptimal videos (bad lighting conditions, low contrast of the surface, too much in-motion unsharpness), the sharpness algorithm leads to much more matching features. Hence the point densities of the 3D models are increased and thereby clarify the calculations.

  13. Cálculo do volume na equação de van der Waals pelo método de cardano Volume calculation in van der Waals equation by the cardano method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson H. T. Lemes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Analytical solutions of a cubic equation with real coefficients are established using the Cardano method. The method is first applied to simple third order equation. Calculation of volume in the van der Waals equation of state is afterwards established. These results are exemplified to calculate the volumes below and above critical temperatures. Analytical and numerical values for the compressibility factor are presented as a function of the pressure. As a final example, coexistence volumes in the liquid-vapor equilibrium are calculated. The Cardano approach is very simple to apply, requiring only elementary operations, indicating an attractive method to be used in teaching elementary thermodynamics.

  14. Determination of saturation pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of semi-volatile aerosols: the integrated volume mentod

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study presents the integrated volume method for estimating saturation pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of a whole aerosol distribution. We measure the change of total volume of an aerosol distribution between a reference state and several heated states, with the heating...

  15. FOREST STEM VOLUME CALCULATION USING AIRBORNE LIDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Büyüksalih

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Airborne LiDAR data have been collected for the city of Istanbul using Riegl laser scanner Q680i with 400 kHz and an average flight height of 600 m. The flight campaign was performed by a helicopter and covers an area of 5400 km2. According to a flight speed of 80 knot a point density of more than 16 points/m2 and a laser footprint size of 30 cm could be achieved. As a result of bundle adjustment, in total, approximately 17,000 LAS files with the file size of 500 m by 700 m have been generated for the whole city. The main object classes Ground, Building, Vegetation (medium, high were derived from these LAS files using the macros in Terrasolid software. The forest area under investigation is located northwest of the city of Istanbul, main tree species occurring in the test site are pine (pinus pinaster, oak (quercus and beech (fagus. In total, 120 LAS tiles covering the investigation area have been analysed using the software IMPACT of Joanneum Research Forschungsgesellschaft, Graz, Austria. First of all, the digital terrain model (DTM and the digital surface models (DSM were imported and converted into a raster file from the original laser point clouds with a spatial resolution of 50 cm. Then, a normalized digital surface model (nDSM was derived as the difference between DSM and the DTM. Tree top detection was performed by multi – resolution filter operations and tree crowns were segmented by a region growing algorithms develop specifically for this purpose. Breast Height Diameter (BHD was calculated on the base of tree height and crown areas derived from image segmentation applying allometric functions found in literature. The assessment of stem volume was then calculated as a function of tree height and BHD. A comparison of timber volume estimated from the LiDAR data and field plots measured by the Forest Department of Istanbul showed R2 of 0.46. The low correlation might arise either from the low quality of the field plots or

  16. Forest STEM Volume Calculation Using Airborne LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyüksalih, I.; Bayburt, S.; Schardt, M.; Büyüksalih, G.

    2017-05-01

    Airborne LiDAR data have been collected for the city of Istanbul using Riegl laser scanner Q680i with 400 kHz and an average flight height of 600 m. The flight campaign was performed by a helicopter and covers an area of 5400 km2. According to a flight speed of 80 knot a point density of more than 16 points/m2 and a laser footprint size of 30 cm could be achieved. As a result of bundle adjustment, in total, approximately 17,000 LAS files with the file size of 500 m by 700 m have been generated for the whole city. The main object classes Ground, Building, Vegetation (medium, high) were derived from these LAS files using the macros in Terrasolid software. The forest area under investigation is located northwest of the city of Istanbul, main tree species occurring in the test site are pine (pinus pinaster), oak (quercus) and beech (fagus). In total, 120 LAS tiles covering the investigation area have been analysed using the software IMPACT of Joanneum Research Forschungsgesellschaft, Graz, Austria. First of all, the digital terrain model (DTM) and the digital surface models (DSM) were imported and converted into a raster file from the original laser point clouds with a spatial resolution of 50 cm. Then, a normalized digital surface model (nDSM) was derived as the difference between DSM and the DTM. Tree top detection was performed by multi - resolution filter operations and tree crowns were segmented by a region growing algorithms develop specifically for this purpose. Breast Height Diameter (BHD) was calculated on the base of tree height and crown areas derived from image segmentation applying allometric functions found in literature. The assessment of stem volume was then calculated as a function of tree height and BHD. A comparison of timber volume estimated from the LiDAR data and field plots measured by the Forest Department of Istanbul showed R2 of 0.46. The low correlation might arise either from the low quality of the field plots or from the inadequacy of the

  17. UNCERTAINTY AND THE JOHNSON-ETTINGER MODEL FOR VAPOR INTRUSION CALCULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Johnson-Ettinger Model is widely used for assessing the impacts of contaminated vapors on residential air quality. Typical use of this model relies on a suite of estimated data, with few site-specific measurements. Software was developed to provide the public with automate...

  18. A new and validated CT-Based method for the calculation of orbital soft tissue volumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regensburg, Noortje I.; Kok, Pauline H. B.; Zonneveld, Frans W.; Baldeschi, Lelio; Saeed, Peerooz; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Mourits, Maarten P.

    PURPOSE. There is no consensus as how to calculate orbital soft tissue volume based on CT or MRI scans. The authors sought to validate their technique and to assess the intraobserver and interobserver variability of their calculations of bony orbital volume (OV), orbital fat volume (FV), and

  19. On the accuracy of HITEMP-2010 calculated emissivities of Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberti, M.; Weber, R.; Mancini, M.

    Nowadays, spectral Line-by-Line calculations using either HITRAN or HITEMP data bases are frequently used for calculating gas radiation properties like absorption coefficients or emissivities. Such calculations are computationally very expensive because of the vast number of spectral lines and...

  20. Comparison of molecular models of carbon monoxide for calculation of vapor-liquid equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibian Alonso Hoyos-Madrigal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Existen varios modelos moleculares para el monóxido de carbono desarrollados a partir de diferentes mediciones experimentales. El objetivo de este trabajo es comparar los resultados que varios de estos modelos producen en el cálculo del equilibrio líquido-vapor en busca de recomendar qué modelo debe ser usado de acuerdo la propiedad y la fase que se desea calcular. Los modelos seleccionados corresponden a cuatro modelos no polares, con uno o dos sitios Lennard-Jones, y cuatro modelos polares, con dipolos o cargas parciales para representar la polaridad del monóxido de carbono. Simulaciones Monte Carlo en la versión Gibbs canónica (NVT-GEMC se emplearon para determinar las densidades de las fases en equilibrio, la presión de vapor y la entalpia de vaporización entre 80 y 130 K con cada uno de los modelos seleccionados. Se encontró que los modelos más complejos SVH, ANC y PGB, son los que mejor describen la densidad del líquido saturado (alrededor de 7% de desviación promedio, pero estos modelos generan desviaciones mayores al 40% para las propiedades del vapor y al 20% para la entalpia de vaporización. Por otro lado, el modelo no- polar BLF generó las menores desviaciones para la presión de saturación y la densidad del vapor (6.8 y 21.5%, respectivamente. Este modelo, al igual que el modelo HCB, produce desviaciones aceptables para la densidad del líquido y la entalpia de vaporización (entre 10 y 12%. Los modelos no polares BLF y HCB, que no requieren el cálculo de las interacciones de largo alcance, se pueden considerar como los modelos moleculares que presentan un balance satisfactorio entre desviaciones en los resultados y complejidad de cálculo.

  1. Calculation of ternary Si-Fe-Al phase equilibrium in vacuum distillation by molecular interaction volume model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vacuum distillation of aluminum from Si-Fe-Al ternary alloy with high content of Al is studied by a molecular interaction volume model (MIVM in this paper. The vapor-liquid phase equilibrium of the Si-Fe-Al system in vacuum distillation has been calculated using only the properties of pure components and the activity coefficients. A significant advantage of the model lies in its ability to predict the thermodynamic properties of liquid alloys using only binary infinite dilution activity coefficients. The thermodynamic activities and activity coefficients of components of the related Si-Fe, Si- Al and Fe-Al binary and the Si-Fe-Al ternary alloy systems are calculated based on the MIVM. The computational activity values are presented graphically, and evaluated with the reported experiment data in the literature, which shows that the prediction effect of the proposed model is of stability and reliability.

  2. On the accuracy of HITEMP-2010 calculated emissivities of Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberti, Michael; Weber, Roman; Mancini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Line-by-line (LbL) calculations using either HITRAN or HITEMP spectral data bases are often used for predicting gas radiation properties like absorption coefficients or emissivities. Due to the large size of these data bases, calculations are computationally too expensive to be used in regular CFD...

  3. Calculation of the thermodynamic properties of fuel-vapor species from spectroscopic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.

    1980-09-01

    Measured spectroscopic data, estimated molecular parameters, and a densty-of-states model for electronic structure have been used to calculate thermodynamic functions for gaseous ThO, ThO/sub 2/, UO, UO/sub 2/, UO/sub 3/, PuO, and PuO/sub 2/. Various methods for estimating parameters have been considered and numerically evaluated. The sensitivity of the calculated thermodynamic functions to molecular parameters has been examined quantitatively. New values of the standard enthalpies of formation at 298.15/sup 0/K have been derived from the best available ..delta..G/sup 0//sub f/ equations and the calculated thermodynamic functions. Estimates of the uncertainties have been made for measured and estimated data as well as for various mathematical and physical approximations. Tables of the thermodynamic functions to 6000/sup 0/K are recommended for gaseous thorium, uranium, and plutonium oxides.

  4. First vapor explosion calculations performed with MC3D thermal-hydraulic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brayer, C.; Berthoud, G. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the first calculations performed with the `explosion` module of the multiphase computer code MC3D, which is devoted to the fine fragmentation and explosion phase of a fuel coolant interaction. A complete description of the physical laws included in this module is given. The fragmentation models, taking into account two fragmentation mechanisms, a thermal one and an hydrodynamic one, are also developed here. Results to some calculations to test the numerical behavior of MC3D and to test the explosion models in 1D or 2D are also presented. (author)

  5. Vapor-phase Raman spectra, theoretical calculations, and the vibrational and structural properties of cis- and trans-stilbene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Toru; Shinashi, Kiyoaki; Ueda, Toyotoshi; Ocola, Esther J; Chiang, Whe-Yi; Laane, Jaan

    2014-02-13

    The vapor-phase Raman spectra of cis- and trans-stilbene have been collected at high temperatures and assigned. The low-frequency skeletal modes were of special interest. The molecular structures and vibrational frequencies of both molecules have also been obtained using MP2/cc-pVTZ and B3LYP/cc-pVTZ calculations, respectively. The two-dimensional potential map for the internal rotations around the two Cphenyl-C(═C) bonds of cis-stilbene was generated by using a series of B3LYP/cc-pVTZ calculations. It was confirmed that the molecule has only one conformer with C2 symmetry. The energy level calculation with a two-dimensional Hamiltonian was carried out, and the probability distribution for each level was obtained. The calculation revealed that the "gearing" internal rotation in which the two phenyl rings rotate with opposite directions has a vibrational frequency of 26 cm(-1), whereas that of the "antigearing" internal rotation in which the phenyl rings rotate with the same direction is about 52 cm(-1). In the low vibrational energy region the probability distribution for the gearing internal rotation is similar to that of a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator, and in the higher region the motion behaves like that of a free rotor.

  6. CALCULATED VOLUMES DETERMINATION OF WORK FOR MAIN-LINE AND INDUSTRIAL RAILWAY STATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kozachenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose.This article aims to improve the evaluation of irregularity of freight transport and calculated volumes determination of work for railway stations and sidings of industrial enterprises. Methodology. The methods of mathematical statistics are used as research methods for estimation of calculated volumes of traffic and loaded traffic, in particular, the methods of time series analysis; the methods of mathematical modeling are used to evaluate the calculated volumes of empty traffic. Findings. Calculated volumes of the main-line and industrial railway stations activity are determined according to the monthly and daily irregularity. Monthly irregularity is proposed to evaluate against the trend of the indicator over the last 3-5 years, constructed using the method of weighted moving average. The 30-day period in the previous year with the largest total amount of work is proposed to use as the calculation period for the assessment of daily irregularity. The computation size of empty traffic volumes is proposed to be determined on the basis of loaded traffic volumes with the probability matrix of cars usage for dual operations. The proposed method is verified by the work volume calculation for the year 2014 according to previous time periods. The test results showed that the proposed method as compared with traditional one provides higher stability of the results when changing time periods, used for analysis, as well as a more accurate assessment of the calculated volumes of work. Originality. Authors have improved determination methods for the calculated volumes of work to railway stations through the using time series analysis methods. Practical value. The proposed methodology allows assessing more accurately the prospective volumes of work and, through this, reduce the amount of capital expenditures associated with the development of stations and operating costs associated with their operation. The method can be used to improve the

  7. Study of vapor control methods for gasoline marketing operations: Volume II. Appendix. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkin, C.E.; Cavanaugh, E.C.; Dickerman, J.C.; Fernandes, S.R.

    1975-04-01

    Background information is given on the size and extent of the gasoline marketing industry and the magnitude of hydrocarbon vapor emissions. The principal sources of emissions, tank truck filling at bulk terminals, service station storage tank filling and vehicle refueling are characterized. Vapor control techniques for bulk terminals are described: compression, refrigeration, absorption, adsorption, incineration, and combinations of these techniques. The two types of control systems for service stations are evaluated, vapor balance systems and vacuum assist/secondary processing systems. Test data are given. (GRA)

  8. Transport coefficients for electrons in water vapor: definition, measurement, and calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, R E; White, R D; Ness, K F

    2011-02-14

    Comparison of experimental and theoretical transport data for electron swarms in water vapour over a wide range of fields provides a rigorous test of (e(-), H(2)O) scattering cross sections over a correspondingly broad range of energies. That like should be compared with like is axiomatic, but the definition of transport coefficients at high fields, when non-conservative processes are significant, has long been contentious. This paper revisits and distills the most essential aspects of the definition and calculation of transport coefficients, giving numerical results for the drift velocity and ionisation coefficient of electrons in water vapour. In particular, the relationship between the theoretically calculated bulk drift velocities of [K. F. Ness and R. E. Robson, Phys. Rev. A 38, 1446 (1988)] and the experimental "arrival time spectra" drift velocity data of Hasegawa et al. [J. Phys. D 40(8), 2495 (2007)] is established. This enables the Hasegawa et al. data to be reconciliated with the previous literature, and facilitates selection of the best (e(-), H(2)O) cross section set.

  9. CALCULATED VOLUMES DETERMINATION OF WORK FOR MAIN-LINE AND INDUSTRIAL RAILWAY STATIONS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D. M. Kozachenko; A. I. Verlan; O. V. Horbova

    2015-01-01

    Purpose.This article aims to improve the evaluation of irregularity of freight transport and calculated volumes determination of work for railway stations and sidings of industrial enterprises. Methodology...

  10. Volume calculation of CT lung lesions based on Halton low-discrepancy sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shusheng; Wang, Liansheng; Li, Shuo

    2017-03-01

    Volume calculation from the Computed Tomography (CT) lung lesions data is a significant parameter for clinical diagnosis. The volume is widely used to assess the severity of the lung nodules and track its progression, however, the accuracy and efficiency of previous studies are not well achieved for clinical uses. It remains to be a challenging task due to its tight attachment to the lung wall, inhomogeneous background noises and large variations in sizes and shape. In this paper, we employ Halton low-discrepancy sequences to calculate the volume of the lung lesions. The proposed method directly compute the volume without the procedure of three-dimension (3D) model reconstruction and surface triangulation, which significantly improves the efficiency and reduces the complexity. The main steps of the proposed method are: (1) generate a certain number of random points in each slice using Halton low-discrepancy sequences and calculate the lesion area of each slice through the proportion; (2) obtain the volume by integrating the areas in the sagittal direction. In order to evaluate our proposed method, the experiments were conducted on the sufficient data sets with different size of lung lesions. With the uniform distribution of random points, our proposed method achieves more accurate results compared with other methods, which demonstrates the robustness and accuracy for the volume calculation of CT lung lesions. In addition, our proposed method is easy to follow and can be extensively applied to other applications, e.g., volume calculation of liver tumor, atrial wall aneurysm, etc.

  11. Antarctic ice volume for the last 740 ka calculated with a simple ice sheet model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluctuations in the volume of the Antarctic ice sheet for the last 740 ka are calculated by forcing a simple ice sheet model with a sea-level history (from a composite deep sea δ18O record) and a temperature history (from the Dome C deuterium record). Antarctic ice volume reaches maximum values of

  12. Lung volume calculations from 81Krm SPECT for the quantification of regional ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenburg, A.; Klumper, A.; Roos, C. M.; Jansen, H. M.; van der Schoot, J. B.; van Zandwijk, N.; Marcuse, H. R.

    1988-01-01

    Lung volumes, calculated from 81Krm single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the lungs, were compared with functional residual capacity (FRC), measured with the helium dilution technique in controls and in patients with various pulmonary diseases. SPECT volume was greater than FRC,

  13. Historical volume estimation and a structured method for calculating habitable volume for in-space and surface habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M.; Bobskill, M. R.; Wilhite, A.

    2012-11-01

    Habitable volume is an important spacecraft design figure of merit necessary to determine the required size of crewed space vehicles, or habitats. In order to design habitats for future missions and properly compare the habitable volumes of future habitat designs with historical spacecraft, consistent methods of both defining the required amount of habitable volume and estimating the habitable volume for a given layout are required. This paper provides a brief summary of historical habitable volume requirements and describes the appropriate application of requirements to various types of missions, particularly highlighting the appropriate application for various gravity environments. Then the proposed "Marching Grid Method", a structured automatic, numerical method to calculate habitable volume for a given habitat design, is described in detail. This method uses a set of geometric Boolean tests applied to a discrete set of points within the pressurized volume to numerically estimate the functionally usable and accessible space that comprises the habitable volume. The application of this method to zero gravity and nonzero gravity environments is also discussed. This proposed method is then demonstrated by calculating habitable volumes using two conceptual-level layouts of habitat designs, one for each type of gravity environment. These include the US Laboratory Module on ISS and the Scenario 12.0 Pressurized Core Module from the recent NASA Lunar Surface Systems studies. Results of this study include a description of the effectiveness of this method for various resolutions of the investigated grid, and commentary highlighting the use of this method to determine the overall utility of interior configurations for automatically evaluating interior layouts.

  14. VOFTools - A software package of calculation tools for volume of fluid methods using general convex grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, J.; Hernández, J.; Gómez, P.; Faura, F.

    2018-02-01

    The VOFTools library includes efficient analytical and geometrical routines for (1) area/volume computation, (2) truncation operations that typically arise in VOF (volume of fluid) methods, (3) area/volume conservation enforcement (VCE) in PLIC (piecewise linear interface calculation) reconstruction and(4) computation of the distance from a given point to the reconstructed interface. The computation of a polyhedron volume uses an efficient formula based on a quadrilateral decomposition and a 2D projection of each polyhedron face. The analytical VCE method is based on coupling an interpolation procedure to bracket the solution with an improved final calculation step based on the above volume computation formula. Although the library was originally created to help develop highly accurate advection and reconstruction schemes in the context of VOF methods, it may have more general applications. To assess the performance of the supplied routines, different tests, which are provided in FORTRAN and C, were implemented for several 2D and 3D geometries.

  15. Slope excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation in hydraulic projects based on laser scanning technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Slope excavation is one of the most crucial steps in the construction of a hydraulic project. Excavation project quality assessment and excavated volume calculation are critical in construction management. The positioning of excavation projects using traditional instruments is inefficient and may cause error. To improve the efficiency and precision of calculation and assessment, three-dimensional laser scanning technology was used for slope excavation quality assessment. An efficient data acquisition, processing, and management workflow was presented in this study. Based on the quality control indices, including the average gradient, slope toe elevation, and overbreak and underbreak, cross-sectional quality assessment and holistic quality assessment methods were proposed to assess the slope excavation quality with laser-scanned data. An algorithm was also presented to calculate the excavated volume with laser-scanned data. A field application and a laboratory experiment were carried out to verify the feasibility of these methods for excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation. The results show that the quality assessment indices can be obtained rapidly and accurately with design parameters and scanned data, and the results of holistic quality assessment are consistent with those of cross-sectional quality assessment. In addition, the time consumption in excavation project quality assessment with the laser scanning technology can be reduced by 70%−90%, as compared with the traditional method. The excavated volume calculated with the scanned data only slightly differs from measured data, demonstrating the applicability of the excavated volume calculation method presented in this study.

  16. Slope excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation in hydraulic projects based on laser scanning technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Slope excavation is one of the most crucial steps in the construction of a hydraulic project. Excavation project quality assessment and excavated volume calculation are critical in construction management. The positioning of excavation projects using traditional instruments is inefficient and may cause error. To improve the efficiency and precision of calculation and assessment, three-dimensional laser scanning technology was used for slope excavation quality assessment. An efficient data acquisition, processing, and management workflow was presented in this study. Based on the quality control indices, including the average gradient, slope toe elevation, and overbreak and underbreak, cross-sectional quality assessment and holistic quality assessment methods were proposed to assess the slope excavation quality with laser-scanned data. An algorithm was also presented to calculate the excavated volume with laser-scanned data. A field application and a laboratory experiment were carried out to verify the feasibility of these methods for excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation. The results show that the quality assessment indices can be obtained rapidly and accurately with design parameters and scanned data, and the results of holistic quality assessment are consistent with those of cross-sectional quality assessment. In addition, the time consumption in excavation quality assessment with the laser scanning technology can be reduced by 70%–90%, as compared with the traditional method. The excavated volume calculated with the scanned data only slightly differs from measured data, demonstrating the applicability of the excavated volume calculation method presented in this study.

  17. Hydrogen Bonding in Ion-pair Molecules in Vapors over ionic liquids, studied by Raman Spectroscopy and ab initio Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    The hydrogen bonding interactions in selected archetypal vapor molecules formed in the gas phase over protic ionic liquids are discussed, based on Raman spectroscopy assisted with ab initio molecular orbital DFT-type quantum mechanical calculations (B3LYP with 6-311+G(d,p) basis sets) on assumed......-O distances in the N-H…O bond were found as 1.730 and 1.005 Å. The comparable H-O distance in solid ethanoic acid is ~1.011 Å (neutron diffraction). [1] R. W. Berg, A. Riisager & R. Fehrmann, Formation of an ion pair molecule with a single NH+…Cl- hydrogen bond: Raman spectra of 1,1,3,3-Tetramethylguanidin...... of 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidinium chloride. The optimized N-H distance in the N-H…Cl bond was 1.099 Å. The H-Cl distance was 1.832 Å to compare with the ~1.27 Å in HCl gas. The bromide behaved similarly [ref 2]. Fig. 2. Not so likely 1-methylimidazolium ethanoate gas molecule. The optimized N-H and H...

  18. Algorithm for the calculation of a steam generator efficiency; Algoritmo para el calculo de la eficiencia de un generador de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, David; Ambriz, Juan Jose; Romero Paredes, Hernando [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    The efficiency calculation of steam generators is not always simple. The purpose of this paper is to propose an algorithm for the calculation of steam generators efficiency, easy to understand and carry out, in the form of a series of steps to be followed. It takes as starting point that the person in charge of applying these calculations has knowledge of the combustion processes and thermodynamic principles that rule such processes. [Espanol] El calculo de la eficiencia de los generadores de vapor no siempre es sencillo, el presente trabajo tiene como objetivo el de proponer un algoritmo de calculo de eficiencia de generadores de vapor, el cual sea facil de entender y de llevar a cabo, en forma de una serie de pasos a seguir. Se toma como punto de partida, que la persona encargada de aplicar estos calculos tenga el conocimiento de los procesos de combustion y principios termodinamicos que rigen tales procesos.

  19. Fast Near-Field Calculation for Volume Integral Equations for Layered Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Meincke, Peter; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2005-01-01

    An efficient technique based on the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) for calculating near-field scattering by dielectric objects in layered media is presented. A higher or-der method of moments technique is employed to solve the volume integral equation for the unknown induced volume current density....... Afterwards, the scattered electric field can be easily computed at a regular rectangular grid on any horizontal plane us-ing a 2-dimensional FFT. This approach provides significant speedup in the near-field calculation in comparison to a straightforward numerical evaluation of the ra-diation integral since...

  20. Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses: 1958 to 1982. Volume 1. Lookup tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1982-10-21

    This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains - in chronological order - the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41.

  1. New reference charts for testicular volume in Dutch children and adolescents allow the calculation of standard deviation scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joustra, S.D.; Plas, E.M. van der; Goede, J.; Oostdijk, W.; Delemarre-van de Waal, H.A.; Hack, W.W.M.; Buuren, S. van; Wit, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Accurate calculations of testicular volume standard deviation (SD) scores are not currently available. We constructed LMS-smoothed age-reference charts for testicular volume in healthy boys. Methods The LMS method was used to calculate reference data, based on testicular volumes from

  2. Effect of tidal volume and respiratory rate on the power of breathing calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalini, G; Marchesini, M; Tessadrelli, A; Rosano, A; Candiani, A; Bernardini, A

    2005-05-01

    The power of breathing (PoB) is used to estimate the mechanical workload of the respiratory system. Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different tidal volume-respiratory rate combinations on the PoB when the elastic load is constant. In order to assure strict control of the experimental conditions, the PoB was calculated on an airway pressure-volume curve in mechanically ventilated patients. Ten patients received three different tidal volume-respiratory rate combinations while minute ventilation was constant. Respiratory mechanics, PoB and its elastic and resistive components were calculated. Alternative methods to estimate the elastic workload were assessed: elastic work of breathing per litre per minute, elastic workload index (the square root of elastic work of breathing multiplied by respiratory rate) and elastic double product of the respiratory system (the elastic pressure multiplied by respiratory rate). Despite constant elastance and minute ventilation, the elastic PoB showed an increment greater than 200% from the lower to the greater tidal volume, accounting for approximately 80% of the whole PoB increment. On the contrary, elastic work of breathing per litre per minute, elastic workload index and elastic double product did not change. Changes in breathing pattern markedly affect the PoB despite constant mechanical load. Other indexes could assess the elastic workload without tidal volume dependence. Power of breathing use should be avoided to compare different mechanical loads or efficiencies of the respiratory muscles when tidal volume is variable.

  3. A Nomogram for Calculation of Maximum Recommended Dose by Volume of Local Anesthetic in Pediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Splaver, Theodore; Walker, Jason

    2017-03-15

    Calculation of maximum recommended doses for local anesthetic agents and added vasopressors is complex and error-prone with potentially fatal consequences. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a nomogram to calculate the maximum recommended doses, expressed as volumes (number of cartridges or ml) of local anesthetic for healthy U.S. pediatric dental patients based on body weight, and test its accuracy and reproducibility. Standard mathematical techniques were used to draft the nomogram. Validation was performed using simulated patient data, and Bland-Altman analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy and repeatability of the nomogram. The nomogram was found to have a bias of 0.01 ml, with limits of agreement -0.04ml to 0.06ml and, thus, was considered to be within an acceptable range for clinical use. Our nomogram rapidly calculated the maximum recommended doses by volume of local anesthetic agents in common use to a high degree of accuracy and repeatability.

  4. Improving the Volume Dependence of Two-Body Binding Energies Calculated with Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Davoudi, Zohreh

    2011-01-01

    Volume modifications to the binding of two-body systems in large cubic volumes of extent L depend upon the total momentum and exponentially upon the ratio of L to the size of the boosted system. Recent work by Bour et al determined the momentum dependence of the leading volume modifications to nonrelativistic systems with periodic boundary conditions imposed on the single-particle wavefunctions, enabling them to numerically determine the scattering of such bound states using a low-energy effective field theory and Luschers finite-volume method. The calculation of bound nuclear systems directly from QCD using Lattice QCD has begun, and it is important to reduce the systematic uncertainty introduced into such calculations by the finite spatial extent of the gauge-field configurations. We extend the work of Bour et al from nonrelativistic quantum mechanics to quantum field theory by generalizing the work of Luscher and of Gottlieb and Rummukainen to boosted two-body bound states. The volume modifications to bind...

  5. Respiratory influence on left atrial volume calculation with 3D-echocardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørgaard, Mathias; Linde, Jesper J; Ismail, Hafsa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Left atrial volume (LAV) estimation with 3D echocardiography has been shown to be more accurate than 2D volume calculation. However, little is known about the possible effect of respiratory movements on the accuracy of the measurement. METHODS: 100 consecutive patients admitted...... with chest pain were examined with 3D echocardiography and LAV was quantified during inspiratory breath hold, expiratory breath hold and during free breathing. RESULTS: Of the 100 patients, only 65 had an echocardiographic window that allowed for 3D echocardiography in the entire respiratory cycle. Mean...

  6. Vapor-phase infrared and Raman spectra and ab-initio calculations of the axial and equatorial forms of cyclohexane-d1 and d11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Hye Jin; Ocola, Esther J.; Laane, Jaan

    2016-11-01

    The vapor-phase infrared and Raman spectra of cyclohexane-d11 in the C-H stretching region show two bands at 2891 and 2921 cm-1 corresponding to the axial and equatorial C-H stretching modes respectively. Similarly, cyclohexane-d1 has two C-D stretching modes at 2145 and 2164 cm-1 (Mátrai and Gal, 1984) corresponding to the two forms. Force constants were calculated for these vibrations and these confirm the theoretical calculations, which show the equatorial bonds to be shorter and stronger. The force constant for the equatorial C-H stretching is 2% higher than for the axial.

  7. Comparison of Photoselective Vaporization versus Holmium Laser Enucleation for Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Small Prostate Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kang Sup; Choi, Jin Bong; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Su Yeon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes < 40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters-such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications-were compared between the groups. PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at 1 month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P< 0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume.

  8. Comparison of Photoselective Vaporization versus Holmium Laser Enucleation for Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Small Prostate Volume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Sup Kim

    Full Text Available Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH. We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume.Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes < 40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters-such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, quality of life (QoL, maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax, post-void residual urine volume (PVR, and complications-were compared between the groups.PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at 1 month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P< 0.001. There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups.Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume.

  9. Impact of Corrections to the Spallings Volume Calculation on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment [Poster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kicker, Dwayne Curtis; Herrick, Courtney G; Zeitler, Todd

    2016-01-01

    The numerical code DRSPALL (from direct release spallings) is written to calculate the volume of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant solid waste subject to material failure and transport to the surface (i.e., spallings) as a result of a hypothetical future inadvertent drilling intrusion into the repository. An error in the implementation of the DRSPALL finite difference equations was discovered and documented in a software problem report in accordance with the quality assurance procedure for software requirements. This paper describes the corrections to DRSPALL and documents the impact of the new spallings data from the modified DRSPALL on previous performance assessment calculations. Updated performance assessments result in more simulations with spallings, which generally translates to an increase in spallings releases to the accessible environment. Total normalized radionuclide releases using the modified DRSPALL data were determined by forming the summation of releases across each potential release pathway, namely borehole cuttings and cavings releases, spallings releases, direct brine releases, and transport releases. Because spallings releases are not a major contributor to the total releases, the updated performance assessment calculations of overall mean complementary cumulative distribution functions for total releases are virtually unchanged. Therefore, the corrections to the spallings volume calculation did not impact Waste Isolation Pilot Plant performance assessment calculation results.

  10. Impact of Corrections to the Spallings Volume Calculation on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kicker, Dwayne Curtis [Stoller Newport News Nuclear, Inc., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Herrick, Courtney G [Sandia National Laboratories., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Zeitler, Todd [Sandia National Laboratories., Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The numerical code DRSPALL (from direct release spallings) is written to calculate the volume of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant solid waste subject to material failure and transport to the surface (i.e., spallings) as a result of a hypothetical future inadvertent drilling intrusion into the repository. An error in the implementation of the DRSPALL finite difference equations was discovered and documented in a software problem report in accordance with the quality assurance procedure for software requirements. This paper describes the corrections to DRSPALL and documents the impact of the new spallings data from the modified DRSPALL on previous performance assessment calculations. Updated performance assessments result in more simulations with spallings, which generally translates to an increase in spallings releases to the accessible environment. Total normalized radionuclide releases using the modified DRSPALL data were determined by forming the summation of releases across each potential release pathway, namely borehole cuttings and cavings releases, spallings releases, direct brine releases, and transport releases. Because spallings releases are not a major contributor to the total releases, the updated performance assessment calculations of overall mean complementary cumulative distribution functions for total releases are virtually unchanged. Therefore, the corrections to the spallings volume calculation did not impact Waste Isolation Pilot Plant performance assessment calculation results.

  11. Development of computerized stocktaking system in mine surveying for ore mineral volume calculation in covered storehouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdman, V. V.; Gridnev, S. O.

    2017-10-01

    The article examines into the vital issues of measuring and calculating the raw stock volumes in covered storehouses at mining and processing plants. The authors bring out two state-of-the-art high-technology solutions: 1 – to use the ground-based laser scanning system (the method is reasonably accurate and dependable, but costly and time consuming; it also requires the stoppage of works in the storehouse); 2 – to use the fundamentally new computerized stocktaking system in mine surveying for the ore mineral volume calculation, based on the profile digital images. These images are obtained via vertical projection of the laser plane onto the surface of the stored raw materials.

  12. Calculating Study of the Turbine at Last Stage Flow Field in the Small Volume Flow Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Tieliu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on basic equation and boundary layer theory of pneumodynamics, the thesis conducts numerical modeling and theoretical analysis on the last stage of turbine characteristics at a small volume flow by using FLUENT, gives an emphasized analysis on the position of first occurrence of backflow and its expansion direction and comes up with flow structure of the turbine flow field at last stage in the small volume flow condition. In connection with specific experiments, it puts forward the flow model of backflow occurring in the last stage field and the solution to the model. The flow field at last stage for a 100MW turbine in the small volume flow condition that is calculated by using the model is basically in conformity to the actual result.

  13. Calculation of electric fields in a multiple cylindrical volume conductor induced by magnetic coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, V; Struijk, J J

    2001-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the electric field, that is induced in a cylindrical volume conductor by an alternating electrical current through a magnetic coil of arbitrary shape and position. The volume conductor is modeled as a set of concentric, infinitely long, homogeneous cylinders embedded in an outer space that extends to infinity. An analytic expression of the primary electric field induced by the magnetic coil, assuming quasi-static conditions, is combined with the analytic solution of the induced electric scalar potential due to the inhomogeneities of the volume conductor at the cylindrical interfaces. The latter is obtained by the method of separation of variables based on expansion with modified Bessel functions. Numerical results are presented for the case of two cylinders representing a nerve bundle with perineurium. An active cable model of a myelinated nerve fiber is included, and the effect of the nerve fiber's undulation is shown.

  14. New conformity indices based on the calculation of distances between the target volume and the volume of reference isodose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J M; Park, S-Y; Ye, S-J; Kim, J H; Carlson, J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present conformity indices (CIs) based on the distance differences between the target volume (TV) and the volume of reference isodose (VRI). Methods: The points on the three-dimensional surfaces of the TV and the VRI were generated. Then, the averaged distances between the points on the TV and the VRI were calculated (CIdistance). The performance of the presented CIs were evaluated by analysing six situations, which were a perfect match, an expansion and a reduction of the distance from the centroid to the VRI compared with the distance from the centroid to the TV by 10%, a lateral shift of the VRI by 3 cm, a rotation of the VRI by 45° and a spherical-shaped VRI having the same volume as the TV. The presented CIs were applied to the clinical prostate and head and neck (H&N) plans. Results: For the perfect match, CIdistance was 0 with 0 as the standard deviation (SD). When expanding and reducing, CIdistance was 10 and −10 with SDs 11. The average value of the CIdistance in the prostate and H&N plans was 0.13 ± 7.44 and 6.04 ± 23.27, respectively. Conclusion: The performance of the CIdistance was equal or better than those of the conventional CIs. Advances in knowledge: The evaluation of target conformity by the distances between the surface of the TV and the VRI could be more accurate than evaluation with volume information. PMID:25225915

  15. Assessing the feasibility of separating a stoichiometric mixture of zinc vapor and oxygen by a fast quench. Model calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alxneit, Ivo [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    An aerosol kinetic model is applied to evaluate the feasibility of separating a stoichiometric mixture of zinc vapor and oxygen by a fast quench as proposed in the solar thermochemical Zn/ZnO cycle. The model is able to explain the experimental evidence collected so far in our laboratory: high zinc yields are only obtained if the zinc/oxygen mixture is strongly diluted with inert gas. This behavior can be understood because the desired condensation of zinc is slow compared to its oxidation when liquid zinc is involved due of its high vapor pressure. The oxidation reaction, however, is not limited by this as the equilibrium partial pressures of zinc and oxygen above ZnO are both negligible. For the same reason, the oxidation reaction continues even if the zinc saturation drops below S = 1. Here, initially condensed zinc begins to evaporate further decreasing the zinc yield. The model predicts that increasing the quench rate has a negligible effect even at an initial zinc vapor pressure of 11,000 Pa but that higher zinc yields can be expected if the quench is applied to more dilute mixtures. (author)

  16. Is the Ellipsoid Formula the New Standard for 3-Tesla MRI Prostate Volume Calculation without Endorectal Coil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Matthias; Günzel, Karsten; Miller, Kurt; Hamm, Bernd; Cash, Hannes; Asbach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Prostate volume in multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) is of clinical importance. For 3-Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil, there is no distinctive standard for volume calculation. We tested the accuracy of the ellipsoid formula with planimetric volume measurements as reference and investigated the correlation of gland volume and cancer detection rate on MRI/ultrasound (MRI/US) fusion-guided biopsy. One hundred forty-three patients with findings on 3-Tesla mpMRI suspicious of cancer and subsequent MRI/US fusion-guided targeted biopsy and additional systematic biopsy were analyzed. T2-weighted images were used for measuring the prostate diameters and for planimetric volume measurement by a segmentation software. Planimetric and calculated prostate volumes were compared with clinical data. The median prostate volume was 48.1 ml (interquartile range (IQR) 36.9-62.1 ml). Volume calculated by the ellipsoid formula showed a strong concordance with planimetric volume, with a tendency to underestimate prostate volume (median volume 43.1 ml (IQR 31.2-58.8 ml); r = 0.903, p Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil. It allows a fast, valid volume calculation in prostate MRI datasets. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Usage of Geoprocessing Services in Precision Forestry for Wood Volume Calculation and Wind Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Mikita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the idea of a precision forestry tool for optimizing clearcut size and shape within the process of forest recovery and its publishing in the form of a web processing service for forest owners on the Internet. The designed tool titled COWRAS (Clearcut Optimization and Wind Risk Assessment is developed for optimization of clearcuts (their location, shape, size, and orientation with subsequent wind risk assessment. The tool primarily works with airborne LiDAR data previously processed to the form of a digital surface model (DSM and a digital elevation model (DEM. In the first step, the growing stock on the planned clearcut determined by its location and area in feature class is calculated (by the method of individual tree detection. Subsequently tree heights from canopy height model (CHM are extracted and then diameters at breast height (DBH and wood volume using the regressions are calculated. Information about wood volume of each tree in the clearcut is exported and summarized in a table. In the next step, all trees in the clearcut are removed and a new DSM without trees in the clearcut is generated. This canopy model subsequently serves as an input for evaluation of wind risk damage by the MAXTOPEX tool (Mikita et al., 2012. In the final raster, predisposition of uncovered forest stand edges (around the clearcut to wind risk is calculated based on this analysis. The entire tool works in the background of ArcGIS server as a spatial decision support system for foresters.

  18. The Implementation of Cumulative Learning Theory in Calculating Triangular Prism and Tube Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muklis, M.; Abidin, C.; Pamungkas, M. D.; Masriyah

    2018-01-01

    This study aims at describing the application of cumulative learning theory in calculating the volume of a triangular prism and a tube as well as revealing the students’ responses toward the learning. The research method used was descriptive qualitative with elementary school students as the subjects of the research. Data obtained through observation, field notes, questionnaire, tests, and interviews. The results from the application of cumulative learning theory obtained positive students’ responses in following the learning and students’ learning outcomes was dominantly above the average. This showed that cumulative learning could be used as a reference to be implemented in learning, so as to improve the students’ achievement.

  19. An automatic system using mobile-agent software to model the calculation process of a chemical vapor deposition film deposition simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Fukui, Noriyuki; Arakawa, Masamoto; Funatsu, Kimito; Ema, Yoshinori

    2011-09-01

    We have developed an automatic modeling system for calculation processes of the simulator to reproduce experimental results of chemical vapor deposition (CVD), in order to decrease the calculation cost of the simulator. Replacing the simulator by the mathematical models proposed by the system will contribute towards decreasing the calculation costs for predicting the experimental results. The system consists of a mobile agent and two software resources in computer networks, that is, generalized modeling software and a simulator reproducing cross-sections of the deposited films on the substrates with the micrometer- or nanometer-sized trenches. The mobile agent autonomously creates appropriate models by moving to and then operating the software resources. The models are calculated by partial least squares regression (PLS), quadratic PLS (QPLS) and error back propagation (BP) methods using artificial neural networks (ANN) and expresses by mathematical formulas to reproduce the calculated results of the simulator. The models show good reproducibility and predictability both for uniformity and filling properties of the films calculated by the simulator. The models using the BP method yield the best performance. The filling property data are more suitable to modeling than film uniformity.

  20. Approximate scheme for calculating van der Waals interactions between finite cylindrical volume elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Ravi P; Beaudoin, Stephen P

    2012-06-05

    A successful approach to calculating van der Waals (vdW) forces between irregular bodies is to divide the bodies into small cylindrical volume elements and integrate the vdW interactions between opposing elements. In this context it has been common to use Hamaker's expression for parallel plates to approximate the vdW interactions between the opposing elements. This present study shows that Hamaker's vdW expression for parallel plates does not accurately describe the vdW interactions for co-axial cylinders having a ratio of cylinder radius to separation distance (R/D) of 10 or less. This restricts the systems that can be simulated using this technique and explicitly excludes consideration of topographical or compositional variations at the nanoscale for surfaces that are in contact or within a few nm of contact. To address this limitation, approximate analytical expressions for nonretarded vdW forces between finite cylinders in different orientations are derived and are shown to produce a high level of agreement with forces calculated using full numerical solutions of the corresponding Hamaker's equations. The expressions developed here allow accurate calculation of vdW forces in systems where particles are in contact or within a few nm of contact with surfaces and the particles and/or surfaces have heterogeneous nanoscale morphology or composition. These calculations can be performed at comparatively low computational cost compared to the full numerical solution of Hamaker's equations.

  1. Finite Volume Numerical Methods for Aeroheating Rate Calculations from Infrared Thermographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of multi-dimensional finite volume heat conduction techniques for calculating aeroheating rates from measured global surface temperatures on hypersonic wind tunnel models was investigated. Both direct and inverse finite volume techniques were investigated and compared with the standard one-dimensional semi-infinite technique. Global transient surface temperatures were measured using an infrared thermographic technique on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air tunnel. In these tests the effectiveness of vortices generated via gas injection for initiating hypersonic transition on the Hyper-X forebody was investigated. An array of streamwise-orientated heating striations was generated and visualized downstream of the gas injection sites. In regions without significant spatial temperature gradients, one-dimensional techniques provided accurate aeroheating rates. In regions with sharp temperature gradients caused by striation patterns multi-dimensional heat transfer techniques were necessary to obtain more accurate heating rates. The use of the one-dimensional technique resulted in differences of 20% in the calculated heating rates compared to 2-D analysis because it did not account for lateral heat conduction in the model.

  2. Matching excluded-volume hadron-resonance gas models and perturbative QCD to lattice calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, M.; Kapusta, J.; Young, C.

    2014-08-01

    We match three hadronic equations of state at low energy densities to a perturbatively computed equation of state of quarks and gluons at high energy densities. One of them includes all known hadrons treated as point particles, which approximates attractive interactions among hadrons. The other two include, in addition, repulsive interactions in the form of excluded volumes occupied by the hadrons. A switching function is employed to make the crossover transition from one phase to another without introducing a thermodynamic phase transition. A χ2 fit to accurate lattice calculations with temperature 100coupling and the hard core radius of protons and neutrons, which turns out to be 0.62±0.04 fm. The most physically reasonable models include the excluded-volume effect. Not only do they include the effects of attractive and repulsive interactions among hadrons, but they also achieve better agreement with lattice QCD calculations of the equation of state. The equations of state constructed in this paper do not result in a phase transition, at least not for the temperatures and baryon chemical potentials investigated. It remains to be seen how well these equations of state will represent experimental data on high-energy heavy-ion collisions when implemented in hydrodynamic simulations.

  3. Recording and Calculating Gunshot Sound—Change of the Volume in Reference to the Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaos, Tsiatis E.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in an open practice ground (shooting range) regarding the recording of the sound of gunshots. Shots were fired using various types of firearms (seven pistols, five revolvers, two submachine guns, one rifle, and one shotgun) in different calibers, from several various distances with reference to the recording sources. Both, a conventional sound level meter (device) and a measurement microphone were used, having been placed in a fixed point behind the shooting line. The sound of each shot was recorded (from the device). At the same time the signal received by the microphone was transferred to a connected computer through an appropriate audio interface with a pre-amplifier. Each sound wave was stored and depicted as a wave function. After the physic-mathematical analysis of these depictions, the volume was calculated in the accepted engineering units(Decibels or dB) of Sound Pressure Level (SPL). The distances from the recording sources were 9.60 meters, 14.40 m, 19.20 m, and 38.40 m. The experiment was carried out by using the following calibers: .22 LR, 6.35 mm(.25 AUTO), 7.62 mm Tokarev(7,62×25), 7.65 mm(.32 AUTO), 9 mm Parabellum(9×19), 9 mm Short(9×17), 9 mm Makarov(9×18), .45 AUTO, .32 S&W, .38 S&W, .38 SPECIAL, .357 Magnum, 7,62 mm Kalashnikov(7,62×39) and 12 GA. Tables are given for the environmental conditions (temperature, humidity, altitude & barometric pressure), the length of the barrel of each gun, technical characteristics of the used ammunition, as well as for the volume taken from the SLM. The data for the sound intensity were collected after 168 gunshots (158 single shot & 10 bursts). According to the results, a decreasing of the volume, equivalent to the increasing of the distance, was remarked, as it was expected. Values seem to follow the Inverse square Law. For every doubling of the distance from the sound source, the sound intensity diminishes by 5.9904±0.2325 decibels (on average). In addition, we have the

  4. Volumic activities measurements and equivalent doses calculation of indoor 222Rn in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmajid Choukri

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As a way of prevention, we have measured the volumic activities of indoor 222Rn and we have calculated the corresponding effective dose in some dwellings and enclosed areas in Morocco. Seasonal variation of Radon activities and Relationships between variation of these activities and some parameters such height, depth and type of construction were also established in this work.Methods: The passive time-integrated method of using a solid state nuclear track detector (LR-115 type II was employed. These films, cut in pieces of 3.4 ´ 2.5 cm2, were placed in detector holders and enclosed in heat-scaled polyethylene bags.Results: The measured volumic activities of radon vary in houses, between 31 and 136 Bq/m3 (0.55 and 2.39 mSv/year with an average value of 80 Bq/m3 (1.41 mSv/year. In enclosed work area, they vary between 60 Bq/m3 (0.38 mSv/year in an ordinary area to 1884 Bq/m3 (11.9 mSv/year at not airy underground level of 12 m. the relatively higher volumic activities of 222Rn in houses were measured in Youssoufia and khouribga towns situated in regions rich in phosphate deposits. Measurements at the geophysical observatory of Berchid show that the volumic activity of radon increases with depth, this is most probably due to decreased ventilation. Conclusion: The obtained results show that the effective dose calculated for indoor dwellings are comparable to those obtained in other regions in the word. The risks related to the volumic activities of indoor radon could be avoided by simple precautions such the continuous ventilation. The reached high value of above 1884 Bq/m3 don't present any risk for workers health in the geophysical observatory of Berchid because workers spend only a few minutes by day in the cellar to control and reregister data.

  5. Modeling Atmospheric Emissions and Calculating Mortality Rates Associated with High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Alyssa

    Emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are a growing pollution concern throughout the global community, as they have been linked to numerous health issues. The freight transportation sector is a large source of these emissions and is expected to continue growing as globalization persists. Within the US, the expanding development of the natural gas industry is helping to support many industries and leading to increased transportation. The process of High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing (HVHF) is one of the newer advanced extraction techniques that is increasing natural gas and oil reserves dramatically within the US, however the technique is very resource intensive. HVHF requires large volumes of water and sand per well, which is primarily transported by trucks in rural areas. Trucks are also used to transport waste away from HVHF well sites. This study focused on the emissions generated from the transportation of HVHF materials to remote well sites, dispersion, and subsequent health impacts. The Geospatial Intermodal Freight Transport (GIFT) model was used in this analysis within ArcGIS to identify roadways with high volume traffic and emissions. High traffic road segments were used as emissions sources to determine the atmospheric dispersion of particulate matter using AERMOD, an EPA model that calculates geographic dispersion and concentrations of pollutants. Output from AERMOD was overlaid with census data to determine which communities may be impacted by increased emissions from HVHF transport. The anticipated number of mortalities within the impacted communities was calculated, and mortality rates from these additional emissions were computed to be 1 in 10 million people for a simulated truck fleet meeting stricter 2007 emission standards, representing a best case scenario. Mortality rates due to increased truck emissions from average, in-use vehicles, which represent a mixed age truck fleet, are expected to be higher (1 death per 341,000 people annually).

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Volume 1, Calculations, Final design for construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Volume one contains calculations for: embankment design--embankment material properties; Union Carbide site--bedrock contours; vicinity properties--origin of contamination; North Continent and Union Carbide sites contaminated materials--excavation quantities; and demolition debris--quantity estimate.

  7. Does size really matter? The impact of prostate volume on the efficacy and safety of GreenLight HPS™ laser photoselective vaporization of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiao; Vricella, Gino J; Spaliviero, Massimiliano; Wong, Carson

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of GreenLight HPS™ laser photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in patients with different prostate volumes. Between July 2006 and February 2011, 207 consecutive patients were identified from a prospectively maintained urologic database. Based on preoperative prostate volume measured by transrectal ultrasonography, patients were stratified into two groups: ≥ 80 cc (group 1, n=57) and 0.05) between groups. Significant differences (P0.05). The incidence of adverse events was low and similar in both cohorts. These results suggest that prostate volume has little effect on the efficacy and safety of GreenLight HPS laser PVP, and that this technique remains a viable surgical option for BPH, irrespective of preoperative prostate volume.

  8. Volume calculation of subsurface structures and traps in hydrocarbon exploration — a comparison between numerical integration and cell based models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavinić Petra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The volume calculation of geological structures is one of the primary goals of interest when dealing with exploration or production of oil and gas in general. Most of those calculations are done using advanced software packages but still the mathematical workflow (equations has to be used and understood for the initial volume calculation process. In this paper a comparison is given between bulk volume calculations of geological structures using trapezoidal and Simpson’s rule and the ones obtained from cell-based models. Comparison in calculation is illustrated with four models; dome ‐ 1/2 of ball/sphere, elongated anticline, stratigraphic trap due to lateral facies change and faulted anticline trap. Results show that Simpson’s and trapezoidal rules give a very accurate volume calculation even with a few inputs(isopach areas ‐ ordinates. A test of cell based model volume calculation precision against grid resolution is presented for various cases. For high accuracy, less the 1% of an error from coarsening, a cell area has to be 0.0008% of the reservoir area

  9. A finite-volume numerical method to calculate fluid forces and rotordynamic coefficients in seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athavale, M. M.; Przekwas, A. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical method to calculate rotordynamic coefficients of seals is presented. The flow in a seal is solved by using a finite-volume formulation of the full Navier-Stokes equations with appropriate turbulence models. The seal rotor is perturbed along a diameter such that the position of the rotor is a sinusoidal function of time. The resulting flow domain changes with time, and the time-dependent flow in the seal is solved using a space conserving moving grid formulation. The time-varying fluid pressure reaction forces are then linked with the rotor center displacement, velocity and acceleration to yield the rotordynamic coefficients. Results for an annular seal are presented, and compared with experimental data and other more simplified numerical methods.

  10. Metodología de cálculo de la eficiencia térmica de generadores de vapor Methodology to calculate thermal efficiency of steam boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos A. Golato

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Se desarrolló un método matemático determinístico de procesamiento de registros experimentales, aplicable a un sistema generador de vapor-precalentador de aire en estado estacionario, que opere con uno o dos combustibles simultáneamente, para determinar la eficiencia térmica del mismo y la eficiencia con la que se oxida el combustible, como así también el rendimiento del intercambiador de calor. La mecánica de procesamiento se basa en la resolución de los balances de materia y energía sobre los diferentes equipos que conforman el sistema. Esta metodología es aplicable a aquellos generadores de vapor que empleen, como combustible, bagazo, gas natural o ambos (caldera mixta. Se ilustran, como ejemplos de aplicación, los resultados del cálculo de la eficiencia térmica de diferentes generadores de vapor para cada tipo de combustible procesado, empleando para ello datos de diversos ensayos experimentales. La resolución de los balances de materia y energía en una caldera que quema bagazo, dio como resultado un rendimiento térmico del 53,2% y un índice de generación de 1,38 kg de vapor/ kg de bagazo. Para una caldera cuyo combustible es gas natural, se obtuvo un rendimiento térmico del 76,7% y un índice de generación de 9,8 kg de vapor/ Nm³ de gas natural. Para una caldera que quema en forma simultánea bagazo y gas natural, se determinó un rendimiento del 68,3% y un índice de generación de 1,87 kg de vapor/ kg de bagazo equivalente. Como validación de esta metodología, se contrastan estos valores de eficiencia con los obtenidos según el código propuesto por la American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME.A deterministic mathematical method for processing experimental data, applied to a steam generator-air heater system in stationary state which operates with one or two fuels simultaneously, was developed to determine the thermal of the system, as well as fuel combustion and heat exchanger efficiency. The methodology is

  11. Transurethral bipolar plasmakinetic resection combined with 2 μm continuous wave laser vaporization: a new method for the treatment of large volume benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Naikai; Yu, JianJun

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficiency of transurethral bipolar plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (PKRP) combined with 2 μm laser vaporization in the management of large prostates (>80 mL). The safety and efficiency of transurethral vaporesection of the prostate with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), using a 2 μm laser system, have been verified. However, this method does still not manage large volume prostates efficiently. From October 2009 to June 2010, 120 BPH patients with a median prostatic volume of 106.7 (±16.7) mL (range, 82.5-156.8 mL) were randomized for surgical treatment with PKRP combined with 2 μm laser vaporization (n=58) or PKRP only (n=62). All patients were preoperatively assessed with subjective symptoms score. Preoperative and perioperative parameters at 3-, 6-, and 9-month follow-up were also evaluated. All complications were recorded. PKRP combined with 2 μm laser vaporization was significantly superior to PKRP alone in terms of operative time, irrigation time, catheterization time, hospital stay, and hemoglobin decrease. The blood transfusion and urinary tract infection observed in the PKRP combined with 2 μm laser vaporization group was significantly less than that of the groups that received PKRP only. Both groups were similar with respect to resected tissue weight, transient incontinence, urethral stricture and retrograde ejaculation in the postoperative period. Both groups showed a significant improvement from baseline in terms of International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QOL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), and pulmonary vascular resistance unit (PVRU) values. However, no significant difference was found between them. PKRP combined with 2 μm laser vaporization, which combines the advantages of both PKRP and 2 μm laser, is superior for its shorter operation time, less bleeding, and better efficiency. It may be a safer and more effective method for the

  12. Radiation Field Characterization for the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor. Volume I. Baseline Measurements and Evaluation of Calculational Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    CHARACTERIZATION FOR THE AFRRI TRIGA REACTOR Volume I-Baseline Measurements and Evaluation rŘ of Calculational Data Science Applications, Incorporated...KEY WORDS (Cmehum an re. aide af necoew and Id..ad& by’ Week mbahe) Radiation Neutron-Spectral Mieasurements Samma-Ray Reactor AFRRI TRIGA 26...Characteristics . . . . . . . .. 10 2. Threshold Foil Activations for AFRRI TRIGA ..... .. 18 3. Calculated and Measured Neutron Flux Per Group Per Kilowatt

  13. Physical model for vaporization

    OpenAIRE

    Garai, Jozsef

    2006-01-01

    Based on two assumptions, the surface layer is flexible, and the internal energy of the latent heat of vaporization is completely utilized by the atoms for overcoming on the surface resistance of the liquid, the enthalpy of vaporization was calculated for 45 elements. The theoretical values were tested against experiments with positive result.

  14. Considerations on the calculation of volumes in two planning systems; Consideraciones sobre el calculo de volumenes en dos sistemas de planificacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Tenedor Alonso, S.; Rincon Perez, M.; Penedo Cobos, J. M.; Garcia Castejon, M. A.

    2011-07-01

    The discrepancies in the calculation of the same volume between different planning systems impact on dose-volume histograms and therefore clinical assessment of dosimetry for patients. The transfer, by a local network, tomographic study (CT) and contours of critical organs of patients, between our two planning systems allows us to evaluate the calculation of identical volumes.

  15. Numerical simulation of superheated vapor bubble rising in stagnant liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkhaniani, N.; Ansari, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    In present study, the rising of superheated vapor bubble in saturated liquid is simulated using volume of fluid method in OpenFOAM cfd package. The surface tension between vapor-liquid phases is considered using continuous surface force method. In order to reduce spurious current near interface, Lafaurie smoothing filter is applied to improve curvature calculation. Phase change is considered using Tanasawa mass transfer model. The variation of saturation temperature in vapor bubble with local pressure is considered with simplified Clausius-Clapeyron relation. The couple velocity-pressure equation is solved using PISO algorithm. The numerical model is validated with: (1) isothermal bubble rising and (2) one-dimensional horizontal film condensation. Then, the shape and life time history of single superheated vapor bubble are investigated. The present numerical study shows vapor bubble in saturated liquid undergoes boiling and condensation. It indicates bubble life time is nearly linear proportional with bubble size and superheat temperature.

  16. A stable algorithm for calculating phase equilibria with capillarity at specified moles, volume and temperature using a dynamic model

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2017-09-30

    Capillary pressure can significantly affect the phase properties and flow of liquid-gas fluids in porous media, and thus, the phase equilibrium calculation incorporating capillary pressure is crucial to simulate such problems accurately. Recently, the phase equilibrium calculation at specified moles, volume and temperature (NVT-flash) becomes an attractive issue. In this paper, capillarity is incorporated into the phase equilibrium calculation at specified moles, volume and temperature. A dynamical model for such problem is developed for the first time by using the laws of thermodynamics and Onsager\\'s reciprocal principle. This model consists of the evolutionary equations for moles and volume, and it can characterize the evolutionary process from a non-equilibrium state to an equilibrium state in the presence of capillarity effect at specified moles, volume and temperature. The phase equilibrium equations are naturally derived. To simulate the proposed dynamical model efficiently, we adopt the convex-concave splitting of the total Helmholtz energy, and propose a thermodynamically stable numerical algorithm, which is proved to preserve the second law of thermodynamics at the discrete level. Using the thermodynamical relations, we derive a phase stability condition with capillarity effect at specified moles, volume and temperature. Moreover, we propose a stable numerical algorithm for the phase stability testing, which can provide the feasible initial conditions. The performance of the proposed methods in predicting phase properties under capillarity effect is demonstrated on various cases of pure substance and mixture systems.

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1, Volume 4. Calculations, Final design for construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Volume four contains calculations for: Borrow areas--site evaluation; temporary facilities--material quantities; embankment quantities--excavation and cover materials; Burro Canyon site excavation quantities--rippable and unrippable materials; site restoration--earthwork quantities and seeding; and bid schedule quantities and material balance.

  18. Determining the number of isomers in X-, XY-, XYZ-, and XYZU-substituted D2 d allenes: Additive schemes for calculating enthalpies of vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilov, D. Yu.; Smolyakov, V. M.

    2015-02-01

    Using Pólya's theorem, cycle indices are derived that identify the chiral and achiral substitution isomers of an allene (1,2-propadiene). Equations of symmetry that allow us to determine the number of isomers in a series and arrange the isomers according to families, depending on the number of substitution sites, are obtained. Eight- and nine-constant additive schemes based on the similarity between subgraphs in the molecular graphs (MGs) of a series of 120 molecules of X-, XY-, XYZ-, and XYZU-substituted allenes and the expansion of polygonal numbers (triangular, tetrahedral, and others) of a Pascal triangle are devised. Enthalpies of vaporization L NBP are calculated for 21 XY- and 120 XYZU-substituted allenes, respectively, not yet studied experimentally. It is shown that each coefficient of the scheme (the number of ways for superpositioning subgraphs with lengths i 1, i 2, ⋯ on molecular graphs of allene) is a result of partitioning triangular, tetrahedral, or four-dimensional tetrahedral numbers of a Pascal triangle.

  19. VAPOR PRESSURES, LIQUID MOLAR VOLUMES, VAPOR NON- IDEALITIES, AND CRITICAL PROPERTIES OF SOME FLUORINATED ETHERS: CF3OCF2OCF3, CF3OCF2 CF2H, c-CF2CF2CF2O, CF3OCF2H, AND CF3OCH3; AND OF CCl3F AND CF2ClH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapor pressures, compressibilities, expansivities, and molar volumes of the liquid phase have been measured between room temperature and the critical temperature for a series of fluorinated ethers: CF3OCF2OCF3, CF3OCF2CF2H, c-CF2CF2CF2O, CF3OCF2H, and CF3OCH3. Vapor-phase non-ide...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1407 - How are the Renewable Volume Obligations calculated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... biofuel for calendar year i, determined by EPA pursuant to § 80.1405, in percent. GVi = The non-renewable..., in gallons. DVi = The non-renewable diesel volume, determined in accordance with paragraphs (d), (e..., determined by EPA pursuant to § 80.1405, in percent. GVi = The non-renewable gasoline volume, determined in...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1107 - How is the Renewable Volume Obligation calculated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... non-renewable gasoline volume, determined in accordance with paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this... = Renewable fuel deficit carryover from the previous year, per § 80.1127(b), in gallons. (b) The non-renewable... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is the Renewable Volume Obligation...

  2. Vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of azides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verevkin, Sergey P., E-mail: sergey.verevkin@uni-rostock.de [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Rostock, Dr-Lorenz-Weg 1, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Emel' yanenko, Vladimir N. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Rostock, Dr-Lorenz-Weg 1, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Algarra, Manuel [Centro de Geologia do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Manuel Lopez-Romero, J. [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Malaga. Campus de Teatinos s/n, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Aguiar, Fabio; Enrique Rodriguez-Borges, J.; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C.G. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica (CIQ-UP), Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > We prepared and measured vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies of 7 azides. > We examined consistency of new and available in the literature data. > Data for geminal azides and azido-alkanes selected for thermochemical calculations. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of some azides have been determined by the transpiration method. The molar enthalpies of vaporization {Delta}{sub l}{sup g}H{sub m} of these compounds were derived from the temperature dependencies of vapor pressures. The measured data sets were successfully checked for internal consistency by comparison with vaporization enthalpies of similarly structured compounds.

  3. Application of the sodium dilution principle to calculate extracellular fluid volume changes in horses during dehydration and rehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, C Langdon; Magdesian, K Gary; Carlson, Gary P; Rhodes, Diane M; Ruby, Rebecca E

    2008-11-01

    To apply the principle of sodium dilution to calculate the changes in the extracellular fluid (ECF) volume (ECFV) and intracellular fluid volume (ICFV) that occur during dehydration and rehydration in horses. 8 healthy horses of various breeds. Horses were dehydrated over 4 hours by withholding water and administering furosemide. Saline (0.9% NaCl) solution was administered IV during the next 2 hours (20 mL/kg/h; total 40 mL/kg). Horses were monitored for an additional hour following IV fluid administration. Initial ECFV was determined by use of multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis, and serum sodium concentration was used to calculate total ECF sodium content. Sodium and fluid volume losses were monitored and calculated throughout the study and used to estimate changes in ECFV and ICFV during fluid balance alterations. Changes during dehydration and rehydration primarily occurred in the ECFV. The sodium dilution principle estimated an overexpansion of the ECFV beyond the volume of fluid administered, indicating a small contraction of the ICFV in response to fluid administration. Serum and urinary electrolyte changes were recorded and were consistent with those of previous reports. The sodium dilution principle provided a simple method that can be used to estimate the changes in ECFV and ICFV that occur during fluid administration. Results suggested an overexpansion of the ECFV in response to IV saline solution administration. The sodium dilution principle requires further validation in healthy and clinically ill horses, which could provide clinical applications similar to those in other species.

  4. Calculation of Lung Cancer Volume of Target Based on Thorax Computed Tomography Images using Active Contour Segmentation Method for Treatment Planning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra Yosandha, Fiet; Adi, Kusworo; Edi Widodo, Catur

    2017-06-01

    In this research, calculation process of the lung cancer volume of target based on computed tomography (CT) thorax images was done. Volume of the target calculation was done in purpose to treatment planning system in radiotherapy. The calculation of the target volume consists of gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR). The calculation of the target volume was done by adding the target area on each slices and then multiply the result with the slice thickness. Calculations of area using of digital image processing techniques with active contour segmentation method. This segmentation for contouring to obtain the target volume. The calculation of volume produced on each of the targets is 577.2 cm3 for GTV, 769.9 cm3 for CTV, 877.8 cm3 for PTV, 618.7 cm3 for OAR 1, 1,162 cm3 for OAR 2 right, and 1,597 cm3 for OAR 2 left. These values indicate that the image processing techniques developed can be implemented to calculate the lung cancer target volume based on CT thorax images. This research expected to help doctors and medical physicists in determining and contouring the target volume quickly and precisely.

  5. Calculation of the rockfall scar volume distribution using a Terrestrial Laser Scanner in the Montsec Area (Eastern Pyrenees, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domènech, Guillem; Mavrouli, Olga; Corominas, Jordi; Abellán, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Magnitude-frequency relations are a key issue when evaluating the rockfall hazard. It is a common practice to calculate them using databases of past events. However, in some cases, they are not available or complete. Alternatively, the analysis of the scar volume distribution on the wall face provides useful information on the slope's rockfall activity. The Montsec range, located in the Eastern Pyrenees, Spain, is a limestone cliff from upper cretaceous. In some parts, clear evidences of rockfall activities are present: Large recent rockfall scars are distinguished by their orange colour in comparison with grey non active surfaces on the slope face. To identify the scars and analyse their volume distribution, a methodology has been carried out (Santana et al. 2011) which is based on the elaboration of data from a high resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) obtained with Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS). This methodology requires a point cloud of the slope and it includes the following steps: a) identification of discontinuity sets b) generation of discontinuity surfaces c) calculation of areas of the exposed discontinuity surfaces and rockfall scar heights, and d) calculation of the rockfall scar volume distribution. Three discontinuity sets were identified on the point cloud. To generate the discontinuity surfaces, SEFL software was used. The input data for accepting that two neighbouring points of the point cloud belong to the same surface, was a minimum spacing of 0.4m. The resulting planes were visually checked. Assuming that the discontinuities of set 1 preserve the basal shape of the rockfall scars and the altitude is parallel to the discontinuities of set 2, the volume can be calculated as the product of the area of surfaces of set 1 with the length of the surfaces of set 2 using the afore mentioned SEFL software. Areas were found to follow a Lognormal distribution and lengths a Pearson6 one. The volume calculation was then made probabilistically by means

  6. Monte Carlo calculations of coincidence-summing corrections for volume sources in gamma-ray spectrometry with Ge detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Torano, Eduardo [Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda Complutense 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: E.garciatorano@ciemat.es; Pozuelo, Milagros [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental, DIAE, CIEMAT (Spain); Salvat, Francesc [Facultat de Fisica (ECM), Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-06-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation approach to solve the problem of measuring volume sources in gamma-ray spectrometry is described. The simulation package PENELOPE, with a cylindrical geometry tool was used to model two measurement systems and to calculate the detection efficiency for volume sources of {gamma} emitters affected by coincidence-summing effects. {gamma}-Ray spectra and experimental detection efficiencies from multi-{gamma} emitting nuclides as {sup 60}Co, {sup 88}Y, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 166m}Ho are compared to the simulation results.

  7. A new formula for calculating standard liver volume for living donor liver transplantation without using body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokudo, Takashi; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Uldry, Emilie; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Kaneko, Junichi; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Aoki, Taku; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Demartines, Nicolas; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro; Halkic, Nermin

    2015-10-01

    The standard liver volume (SLV) is widely used in liver surgery, especially for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). All the reported formulas for SLV use body surface area or body weight, which can be influenced strongly by the general condition of the patient. We analyzed the liver volumes of 180 Japanese donor candidates and 160 Swiss patients with normal livers to develop a new formula. The dataset was randomly divided into two subsets, the test and validation sample, stratified by race. The new formula was validated using 50 LDLT recipients. Without using body weight-related variables, age, thoracic width measured using computed tomography, and race independently predicted the total liver volume (TLV). A new formula: 203.3-(3.61×age)+(58.7×thoracic width)-(463.7×race [1=Asian, 0=Caucasian]), most accurately predicted the TLV in the validation dataset as compared with any other formulas. The graft volume for LDLT was correlated with the postoperative prothrombin time, and the graft volume/SLV ratio calculated using the new formula was significantly better correlated with the postoperative prothrombin time than the graft volume/SLV ratio calculated using the other formulas or the graft volume/body weight ratio. The new formula derived using the age, thoracic width and race predicted both the TLV in the healthy patient group and the SLV in LDLT recipients more accurately than any other previously reported formulas. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Piping calculations. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-24

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The objective of this calculation is to perform the hydraulic analysis on the slurry line and the supernate line for W-320. This calculation will use the As-Built conditions of the slurry line and the supernate line. Booster Pump Curves vs System Curves shall be generated for the supernate system and the slurry system.

  9. 3D Pathology Volumetric Technique: A Method for Calculating Breast Tumour Volume from Whole-Mount Serial Section Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Clarke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour size, most commonly measured by maximum linear extent, remains a strong predictor of survival in breast cancer. Tumour volume, proportional to the number of tumour cells, may be a more accurate surrogate for size. We describe a novel “3D pathology volumetric technique” for lumpectomies and compare it with 2D measurements. Volume renderings and total tumour volume are computed from digitized whole-mount serial sections using custom software tools. Results are presented for two lumpectomy specimens selected for tumour features which may challenge accurate measurement of tumour burden with conventional, sampling-based pathology: (1 an infiltrative pattern admixed with normal breast elements; (2 a localized invasive mass separated from the in situ component by benign tissue. Spatial relationships between key features (tumour foci, close or involved margins are clearly visualized in volume renderings. Invasive tumour burden can be underestimated using conventional pathology, compared to the volumetric technique (infiltrative pattern: 30% underestimation; localized mass: 3% underestimation for invasive tumour, 44% for in situ component. Tumour volume approximated from 2D measurements (i.e., maximum linear extent, assuming elliptical geometry, was seen to overestimate volume compared to the 3D volumetric calculation (by a factor of 7x for the infiltrative pattern; 1.5x for the localized invasive mass.

  10. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing HVAC calculations, Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-30

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. The report contains the following design calculations: Cooling load in pump pit 241-AY-102; Pressure relief seal loop design; Process building piping stress analysis; Exhaust skid maximum allowable leakage criteria; and Recirculation heat, N509 duct requirements.

  11. Fluorescence exclusion: A simple versatile technique to calculate cell volumes and local heights (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, A. Claude

    2017-02-01

    Understanding volume regulation during mitosis is technically challenging. Indeed, a very sensitive non invasive imaging over time scales ranging from seconds to hours and over large fields is required. Therefore, Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) would be a perfect tool for such a project. However, because of asymmetric protein segregation during mitosis, an efficient separation of the refractive index and the height in the phase signal is required. Even though many strategies to make such a separation have been developed, they usually are difficult to implement, have poor sensitivity, or cannot be performed in living cells, or in a single shot. In this paper, we will discuss the use of a new technique called fluorescence exclusion to perform volume measurements. By coupling such technique with a simultaneous phase measurement, we were also able to recover the refractive index inside the cells. Fluorescence exclusion is a versatile and powerful technique that allows the volume measurement of many types of cells. A fluorescent dye, which cannot penetrate inside the cells, is mixed with the external medium in a confined environment. Therefore, the fluorescent signal depends on the inverse of the object's height. We could demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that fluorescence exclusion can accurately measure cell volumes, even for cells much higher than the depth of focus of the objective. A local accurate height and RI measurement can also be obtained for smaller cells. We will also discuss the way to optimize the confinement of the observation chamber, either mechanically or optically.

  12. Lung volume calculated from electrical impedance tomography in ICU patients at different PEEP levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.G. Bikker (Ido); S. Leonhardt (Steffen); J. Bakker (Jan); D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To study and compare the relationship between end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and changes in end-expiratory lung impedance (EELI) measured with electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at the basal part of the lung at different PEEP levels in a mixed ICU population. Methods:

  13. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing HVAC calculations, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-08-07

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. The report contains the following calculations: Exhaust airflow sizing for Tank 241-C-106; Equipment sizing and selection recirculation fan; Sizing high efficiency mist eliminator; Sizing electric heating coil; Equipment sizing and selection of recirculation condenser; Chiller skid system sizing and selection; High efficiency metal filter shielding input and flushing frequency; and Exhaust skid stack sizing and fan sizing.

  14. Radiation heat transfer calculations using a control-angle, control-volume-based discrete ordinates method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, J.C.; Lee, H.S.; Patankar, S.V. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis (United States) NASA, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1993-01-01

    A control-angle, control-volume-based discrete ordinates method (CA - CV DOM) is presented in this paper. A detailed formulation of the discretization equation is presented in two-dimensional Cartesian coordinate system. The procedure can be extended to curvilinear coordinate system with minor modifications. The step and modified-exponential schemes are used in this study. Present results converged to the grid independent solutions quickly and compared favorably against other published results for six test problems. 27 refs.

  15. Comparison of matching by body volume or gestational age for calculation of observed to expected total lung volume in fetuses with isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawapun, K; Sandaite, I; Dekoninck, P; Claus, F; Richter, J; De Catte, L; Deprest, J

    2014-12-01

    To determine the bias induced by matching fetuses according to gestational age (GA) or fetal body volume (FBV) when calculating the observed to expected total fetal lung volume (o/e TFLV) in cases of isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). This was a single-center, retrospective study on archived magnetic resonance (MR) images of fetuses with isolated CDH over a 10-year period. We retrieved the TFLV, GA and o/e TFLVGA , and delineated FBV to obtain TFLVFBV in each case. We evaluated the relationship between o/e TFLVFBV and o/e TFLVGA by Bland-Altman analysis. All outliers were manually identified, and their specific clinical features were retrieved. Records of a total of 377 MR examinations of 225 fetuses were identified and included in the analysis. The mean ( ± SD) time spent on FBV measurement was 16.12 ± 4.95 min. On reproducibility analysis of FBV measurement (n = 10), the intraobserver intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.998 and the interobserver ICC was 0.999. FBV was highly correlated with GA (R(2)  = 0.899; P  90(th) centile (+14.7%). Discrepancies in matching by FBV and GA when calculating o/e TFLV are more likely in fetuses with an abnormal EFW or in fetuses carried by overweight women. The clinical relevance of using FBV rather than GA for calculation of the o/e TFLV might be limited, as there was no discrepancy between the two methods in fetuses with small lungs ( lung volume assessment. Copyright © 2014 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Piping calculations. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-24

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The objective of this calculation is to perform the structural analysis of the Pipe Supports designed for Slurry and Supernate transfer pipe lines in order to meet the requirements of applicable ASME codes. The pipe support design loads are obtained from the piping stress calculations W320-27-I-4 and W320-27-I-5. These loads are the total summation of the gravity, pressure, thermal and seismic loads. Since standard typical designs are used for each type of pipe support such as Y-Stop, Guide and Anchors, each type of support is evaluated for the maximum loads to which this type of supports are subjected. These loads are obtained from the AutoPipe analysis and used to check the structural adequacy of these supports.

  17. Optimal laser fiber rotational movement during photoselective vaporization of the prostate in a bovine ex-vivo animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterberg, E Charles; Kauffman, Eric C; Kang, Hyun Wook; Koullick, Ed; Choi, Benjamin B

    2011-07-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) has emerged as an effective debulking procedure for prostatic urinary obstruction. Surgical technique for the most efficient vaporization has, however, received little scientific investigation. We used an ex-vivo bovine prostate model to investigate how variation in the angle of laser fiber rotational movement ("sweeping") affects prostate tissue vaporization efficiency. Experiments were conducted using the GreenLight™ HPS 120W laser system. A single surgeon performed a clinical PVP video analysis, forming the basis of our study design. Sixty bovine prostate specimens were vaporized using an ex-vivo chamber equipped with computer-assisted axial movements. Specimens were vaporized at a fixed sweeping speed (0.5 sweeps/sec) and variable sweeping angles (0, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 degrees). The volume of tissue vaporized was calculated from cross sections and compared by a two-sample t test. Clinical PVP video analysis of a single experienced surgeon showed a mean angle of 47.7 degrees with 25% of vaporization between 0 and 30 degrees. Ex-vivo analysis showed larger sweeping angles generated wider but more superficial vaporization defects, leading to smaller vaporized volumes. Specifically, vaporization volumes with angles of 0, 15, or 30 degrees were significantly greater than those with rotational angles of 45, 60, and 90 degrees (1.5-3.0 X; Pvaporization efficiency.

  18. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Piping calculations. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-25

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The objectives of this calculation are (1) To perform static and Safety Class 2 dynamic stress analysis of the Slurry and Supernate Process (inner) piping connecting Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 in order to be in compliance with the Code requirements; (2) To assure the thermal expansion of the process pipe not be strained by the outer encasement pipe; and (3) To furnish process pipe support to the Civil Engineering group.

  19. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing civil/structural calculations, Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-24

    The structural skid supporting the Process Building and equipment is designed based on the criteria, codes and standards, referenced in the calculation. The final members and the associated elements satisfy the design requirements of the structure. Revision 1 incorporates vendor data for the weight of the individual equipment components. The updated information does not affect the original conclusion of the calculation, since the overall effect is a reduction in the total weight of the equipment and a nominal relocation of the center of gravity for the skid assembly.

  20. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing piping calculations, Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-29

    The object of this report is to calculate the hydraulic forces imposed at the sluicer nozzle. This is required by Project W-320 waste retrieval for tank 241-C-106. The method of analysis used is Bernoulli`s momentum equation for stead flow.

  1. Volume and surface photoemission from tungsten. I. Calculation of band structure and emission spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N. Egede; Feuerbacher, B.

    1974-01-01

    The electronic energy-band structure of tungsten has been calculated by means of the relativistic-augmented-plane-wave method. A series of mutually related potentials are constructed by varying the electronic configuration and the amount of Slater exchange included. The best band structure...

  2. A Study to Analyze the Permeation of High Density Gases and Propellant Vapors Through Single Layer Teflon or Teflon Structure Materials and Laminations. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. L.; Young, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1967-01-01

    This report contains the results of a fifteen month analytical and experimental study of the leakage rate of the pressurant gases (N2, He) and the propellant vapors (N2O4,N2H4) through bladder structures consisting of two layers of Teflon separated by a metallic foil diffusion barrier containing microscopic or larger holes. Results were obtained for the steady state leakage rate through circular holes and long rectangular openings in the barrier for arbitrary thicknesses of the two Teflon layers. The effect of hole shape and relative hole position on the leakage rate were studied. The transient problem was analyzed and it was shown that steady state calculations are adequate for estimating the leakage rate. A computer program entitled "Diffusion Analyzer Program" was developed to calculate the leakage rate, both transient and steady state. Finally, the analytical results were compared to experimentally determined values of the leakage rate through a model laminated bladder structure. The results of the analysis are in good agreement with experiment. The experimental effort (Part II of the Bladder Permeation Program) measured the solubility, diffusion coefficient and permeability of helium, nitrogen and nitrogen tetroxide vapor through Teflon TFE and FEP membranes. Data were obtained in the temperature range of 25 to 100 C at pressures ranging from near vacuum to about 20 atmospheres. Results of the experimental effort were compared with the limited data previously reported. As a verification to the applicability of results to actual bladder systems, counter diffusion tests were performed with a laminated sample containing aluminum foil with a selected group of holes.

  3. Variation in Number of Doses, Bottle Volume, and Calculated Yearly Cost of Generic and Branded Latanoprost for Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Joanna H; Feldman, Robert M; Lee, David A

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate discrepancies in doses per bottle, bottle fill volume, and cost among branded and generic formulations of latanoprost. Comparative economic analysis. This study was conducted at the Ruiz Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Four regionally available latanoprost formulations were measured. Number of drops per bottle and actual bottle fill volume were measured for a calculated sample size (10 bottles). Annual cost (using average wholesale price), days use per bottle, drops per milliliter, and number of bottles used per year were calculated. Data were summarized using mean and standard deviation; 1-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey's studentized range test were used for comparing means among manufacturers. Pfizer's branded lantanoprost, Xalatan (New York, New York, USA), had the largest fill volume (P Levene 0.14). Annual cost and number of doses per bottle, factors important to patients, vary significantly depending on the manufacturer of latanoprost. Practitioners can better advise patients by being aware of these differences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing electrical calculations, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-08-07

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. These calculations are required: To determine the power requirements needed to power electrical heat tracing segments contained within three manufactured insulated tubing assemblies; To verify thermal adequacy of tubing assembly selection by others; To size the heat tracing feeder and branch circuit conductors and conduits; To size protective circuit breaker and fuses; and To accomplish thermal design for two electrical heat tracing segments: One at C-106 tank riser 7 (CCTV) and one at the exhaust hatchway (condensate drain). Contents include: C-Farm electrical heat tracing; Cable ampacity, lighting, conduit fill and voltage drop; and Control circuit sizing and voltage drop analysis for the seismic shutdown system.

  5. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Empirical Testing. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K. Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. In this paper, the results of empirical tests intended to assess the accuracy of acceptance sampling plan calculators implemented for six variable distributions are presented.

  6. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume IV. United States: WYEC data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities using Weather Year for Energy Calculations (WYEC) source weather data. Considerable overlap is present in cities (21) covered by both the TRY and WYEC data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  7. Floating substructure flexibility of large-volume 10MW offshore wind turbine platforms in dynamic calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Michael; Melchior Hansen, Anders; Bredmose, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Designing floating substructures for the next generation of 10MW and larger wind turbines has introduced new challenges in capturing relevant physical effects in dynamic simulation tools. In achieving technically and economically optimal floating substructures, structural flexibility may increase to the extent that it becomes relevant to include in addition to the standard rigid body substructure modes which are typically described through linear radiation-diffraction theory. This paper describes a method for the inclusion of substructural flexibility in aero-hydro-servo-elastic dynamic simulations for large-volume substructures, including wave-structure interactions, to form the basis of deriving sectional loads and stresses within the substructure. The method is applied to a case study to illustrate the implementation and relevance. It is found that the flexible mode is significantly excited in an extreme event, indicating an increase in predicted substructure internal loads.

  8. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume III. Western United States: TRY data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 24 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  9. Generalization techniques to reduce the number of volume elements for terrain effect calculations in fully analytical gravitational modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Judit; Papp, Gábor; Kalmár, János

    2017-10-01

    Beyond rectangular prism polyhedron, as a discrete volume element, can also be used to model the density distribution inside 3D geological structures. The calculation of the closed formulae given for the gravitational potential and its higher-order derivatives, however, needs twice more runtime than that of the rectangular prism computations. Although the more detailed the better principle is generally accepted it is basically true only for errorless data. As soon as errors are present any forward gravitational calculation from the model is only a possible realization of the true force field on the significance level determined by the errors. So if one really considers the reliability of input data used in the calculations then sometimes the "less" can be equivalent to the "more" in statistical sense. As a consequence the processing time of the related complex formulae can be significantly reduced by the optimization of the number of volume elements based on the accuracy estimates of the input data. New algorithms are proposed to minimize the number of model elements defined both in local and in global coordinate systems. Common gravity field modelling programs generate optimized models for every computation points (dynamic approach), whereas the static approach provides only one optimized model for all. Based on the static approach two different algorithms were developed. The grid-based algorithm starts with the maximum resolution polyhedral model defined by 3-3 points of each grid cell and generates a new polyhedral surface defined by points selected from the grid. The other algorithm is more general; it works also for irregularly distributed data (scattered points) connected by triangulation. Beyond the description of the optimization schemes some applications of these algorithms in regional and local gravity field modelling are presented too. The efficiency of the static approaches may provide even more than 90% reduction in computation time in favourable

  10. Short term outcomes of GreenLight vapor incision technique (VIT) of the prostate: comparison of outcomes to standard GreenLight 120W HPS vaporization in prostate volumes greater than 80 cc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Tal; Hueber, Pierre-Alain; Abdollah, Firas; Liberman, Daniel; Bhojani, Naeem; Gautam, Gagan; Zorn, Kevin C

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate a hybrid technique involving GreenLight 120W HPS vapor incision tissue removal in prostate glands > 80 cc. Vapor incision technique (VIT) was performed in 25 consecutive men with a prostate > 80 cc by a single surgeon from May 2010 until September 2010. VIT involved adenoma incisions at 5 and 7-o'clock positions followed by 3, 9 and 12 o'clock down to the surgical capsule. Side-fire vaporization along the capsule excised transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) like tissue strips for later retrieval. Functional evaluations were performed at 1 and 3 months. Outcomes and complications were compared retrospectively to baseline and a size matched- cohort of 25 men who previously underwent standard vaporization-only photoselective vaporization prostatectomy (PVP). The VIT and control subgroups were comparable. Mean laser time, operative time and energy usage were reduced in the VIT group compared to controls (35 min versus 48 min; 63 min versus 80 min; and 227 k versus 325 kJ respectively; all p 80 cc. VIT appears to be more time-efficient, consumes less energy and obtains tissue for pathological evaluation. Further follow up is required to assess the durability of GreenLight HPS-VIT to PVP vaporization-only for large prostate glands.

  11. Volume 1: Calculating potential to emit releases and doses for FEMP's and NOCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-07-27

    The purpose of this document is to provide Hanford Site facilities a handbook for estimating potential emissions and the subsequent offsite doses. General guidelines and information are provided to assist personnel in estimating emissions for use with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) and regulatory notices of construction (NOCs), per 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Subpart H, and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247 requirements. This document replaces Unit Dose Calculation Methods and Summary of Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan Determinations (WHC-EP-0498). Meteorological data from 1983 through 1996, 13-year data set, was used to develop the unit dose factors provided by this document, with the exception of two meteorological stations. Meteorological stations 23 and 24, located at Gable Mountain and the 100-F Area, only have data from 1986 through 1996, 10-year data set. The scope of this document includes the following: Estimating emissions and resulting effective dose equivalents (EDE) to a facility's nearest offsite receptor (NOR) for use with NOCs under 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H, requirements Estimating emissions and resulting EDEs to a facility's or emission unit's NOR for use with NOCs under the WAC Chapter 246-247 requirements Estimating emissions and resulting EDEs to a facility's or emission unit's NOR for use with FEMPs and FEMP determinations under DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 requirements.

  12. Role of co-vapors in vapor deposition polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Younghee; Ahn, Ki-Jin; Huh, Jinyoung; Shim, Hyeon Woo; Sampath, Gayathri; Im, Won Bin; Huh, Yang-Il; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2015-02-12

    Polypyrrole (PPy)/cellulose (PPCL) composite papers were fabricated by vapor phase polymerization. Importantly, the vapor-phase deposition of PPy onto cellulose was assisted by employing different co-vapors namely methanol, ethanol, benzene, water, toluene and hexane, in addition to pyrrole. The resulting PPCL papers possessed high mechanical flexibility, large surface-to-volume ratio, and good redox properties. Their main properties were highly influenced by the nature of the co-vaporized solvent. The morphology and oxidation level of deposited PPy were tuned by employing co-vapors during the polymerization, which in turn led to change in the electrochemical properties of the PPCL papers. When methanol and ethanol were used as co-vapors, the conductivities of PPCL papers were found to have improved five times, which was likely due to the enhanced orientation of PPy chain by the polar co-vapors with high dipole moment. The specific capacitance of PPCL papers obtained using benzene, toluene, water and hexane co-vapors was higher than those of the others, which is attributed to the enlarged effective surface area of the electrode material. The results indicate that the judicious choice and combination of co-vapors in vapor-deposition polymerization (VDP) offers the possibility of tuning the morphological, electrical, and electrochemical properties of deposited conducting polymers.

  13. Comparison of distinctive models for calculating an interlobar emphysema heterogeneity index in patients prior to endoscopic lung volume reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theilig D

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dorothea Theilig,1 Felix Doellinger,1 Alexander Poellinger,1 Vera Schreiter,1 Konrad Neumann,2 Ralf-Harto Hubner31Department of Radiology, Charité Campus Virchow Klinikum, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 2Institute of Biometrics and Clinical Epidemiology, Charité Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3Department of Pneumology, Charité Campus Virchow Klinikum, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, GermanyBackground: The degree of interlobar emphysema heterogeneity is thought to play an important role in the outcome of endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR therapy of patients with advanced COPD. There are multiple ways one could possibly define interlobar emphysema heterogeneity, and there is no standardized definition.Purpose: The aim of this study was to derive a formula for calculating an interlobar emphysema heterogeneity index (HI when evaluating a patient for ELVR. Furthermore, an attempt was made to identify a threshold for relevant interlobar emphysema heterogeneity with regard to ELVR.Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 50 patients who had undergone technically successful ELVR with placement of one-way valves at our institution and had received lung function tests and computed tomography scans before and after treatment. Predictive accuracy of the different methods for HI calculation was assessed with receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, assuming a minimum difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 100 mL to indicate a clinically important change.Results: The HI defined as emphysema score of the targeted lobe (TL minus emphysema score of the ipsilateral nontargeted lobe disregarding the middle lobe yielded the best predicative accuracy (AUC =0.73, P=0.008. The HI defined as emphysema score of the TL minus emphysema score of the lung without the TL showed a similarly good predictive accuracy (AUC =0.72, P=0.009. Subgroup

  14. Safety assessment of in-vessel vapor explosion loads in next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Kwang Hyun; Cho, Jong Rae; Choi, Byung Uk; Kim, Ki Yong; Lee, Kyung Jung [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea); Park, Ik Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    A safety assessment of the reactor vessel lower head integrity under in-vessel vapor explosion loads has been performed. The premixing and explosion calculations were performed using TRACER-II code. Using the calculated explosion pressures imposed on the lower head inner wall, strain calculations were performed using ANSYS code. The explosion analyses show that the explosion impulses are not altered significantly by the uncertain parameters of triggering location and time, fuel and vapor volume fractions in uniform premixture bounding calculations within the conservative ranges. Strain analyses using the calculated pressure loads on the lower head inner wall show that the vapor explosion-induced lower head failure is physically unreasonable. The static analysis using the conservative explosion-end pressure of 7,246 psia shows that the maximum equivalent strain is 4.3% at the bottom of lower head, which is less than the allowable threshold value of 11%. (author). 24 refs., 40 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. A volume of intersection approach for on-the-fly system matrix calculation in 3D PET image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougovski, A.; Hofheinz, F.; Maus, J.; Schramm, G.; Will, E.; van den Hoff, J.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of on-the-fly volume of intersection computation for system’s geometry modelling in 3D PET image reconstruction. For this purpose we propose a simple geometrical model in which the cubic image voxels on the given Cartesian grid are approximated with spheres and the rectangular tubes of response (ToRs) are approximated with cylinders. The model was integrated into a fully 3D list-mode PET reconstruction for performance evaluation. In our model the volume of intersection between a voxel and the ToR is only a function of the impact parameter (the distance between voxel centre to ToR axis) but is independent of the relative orientation of voxel and ToR. This substantially reduces the computational complexity of the system matrix calculation. Based on phantom measurements it was determined that adjusting the diameters of the spherical voxel size and the ToR in such a way that the actual voxel and ToR volumes are conserved leads to the best compromise between high spatial resolution, low noise, and suppression of Gibbs artefacts in the reconstructed images. Phantom as well as clinical datasets from two different PET systems (Siemens ECAT HR+ and Philips Ingenuity-TF PET/MR) were processed using the developed and the respective vendor-provided (line of intersection related) reconstruction algorithms. A comparison of the reconstructed images demonstrated very good performance of the new approach. The evaluation showed the respective vendor-provided reconstruction algorithms to possess 34-41% lower resolution compared to the developed one while exhibiting comparable noise levels. Contrary to explicit point spread function modelling our model has a simple straight-forward implementation and it should be easy to integrate into existing reconstruction software, making it competitive to other existing resolution recovery techniques.

  16. The use of stochastic method for the calculation of liquid-vapor multicomponent equilibrium and the contribution of groups theory for the evaluation of fugacity coefficient; Uso de um metodo estocastico para calculo do equilibrio liquido-vapor de sistemas multicomponentes e avaliacao de uma abordagem por contribuicao de grupos para o calculo do coeficiente de fugacidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti, Rafaelly L.; Oliveira, Jackson A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Rojas, Leopoldo O.A. [Centro de Tecnologias do Gas (CTGAS), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work has the main objective of evaluating the mathematical model developed by Jaubert e Mutelet (2004) in terms of the prediction capacity for the calculation of the vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). This model is based on Peng-Robinson equation of state (EOS) and it considers the binary interaction parameters (Kij(T)) estimated by a contribution group method and dependent of the temperature. The model proposed by Jaubert e Mutelet (2004), named PPR78 (Predictive Peng-Robinson), was implemented in this work by using the Fortran language. An optimization approach based on the stochastic algorithm of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) was used in order to calculate the vapor-liquid equilibrium. Simulations were accomplished for several binary systems and the results were concordant with some experimental data of the investigated systems. However, for some systems different from those presented by Jaubert and Mutelet (2004), the model presented low prediction capacity. In spite of the great demand of computational performance, the algorithm PSO demonstrated robustness during the calculation of VLE and it assured convergence in most of the cases. (author)

  17. Calculation of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from dynamic cardiac-gated 15O-water PET/CT: 5D-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonny Nordström

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative measurement of myocardial blood flow (MBF is of increasing interest in the clinical assessment of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD. 15O-water positron emission tomography (PET is considered the gold standard for non-invasive MBF measurements. However, calculation of left ventricular (LV volumes and ejection fraction (EF is not possible from standard 15O-water uptake images. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the possibility of calculating LV volumes and LVEF from cardiac-gated parametric blood volume (V B 15O-water images and from first pass (FP images. Sixteen patients with mitral or aortic regurgitation underwent an eight-gate dynamic cardiac-gated 15O-water PET/CT scan and cardiac MRI. V B and FP images were generated for each gate. Calculations of end-systolic volume (ESV, end-diastolic volume (EDV, stroke volume (SV and LVEF were performed with automatic segmentation of V B and FP images, using commercially available software. LV volumes and LVEF were calculated with surface-, count-, and volume-based methods, and the results were compared with gold standard MRI. Results Using V B images, high correlations between PET and MRI ESV (r = 0.89, p  0.86, p < 0.001. Conclusion Calculation of LV volumes and LVEF from dynamic 15O-water PET is feasible and shows good correlation with MRI. However, the analysis method is laborious, and future work is needed for more automation to make the method more easily applicable in a clinical setting.

  18. Estimated vapor pressure for WTP process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-01

    Design assumptions during the vacuum refill phase of the Pulsed Jet Mixers (PJMs) in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) equate the vapor pressure of all process streams to that of water when calculating the temperature at which the vacuum refill is reduced or eliminated. WTP design authority asked the authors to assess this assumption by performing calculations on proposed feed slurries to calculate the vapor pressure as a function of temperature. The vapor pressure was estimated for each WTP waste group. The vapor pressure suppression caused by dissolved solids is much greater than the increase caused by organic components such that the vapor pressure for all of the waste group compositions is less than that of pure water. The vapor pressure for each group at 145°F ranges from 81% to 98% of the vapor pressure of water. If desired, the PJM could be operated at higher temperatures for waste groups with high dissolved solids that suppress vapor pressure. The SO4 group with the highest vapor pressure suppression could be operated up to 153°F before reaching the same vapor pressure of water at 145°F. However, most groups would reach equivalent vapor pressure at 147 to 148°F. If any of these waste streams are diluted, the vapor pressure can exceed the vapor pressure of water at mass dilution ratios greater than 10, but the overall effect is less than 0.5%.

  19. Passive Vaporizing Heat Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, TImothy R.; Ashford, Victor A.; Carpenter, Michael G.; Bier, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A passive vaporizing heat sink has been developed as a relatively lightweight, compact alternative to related prior heat sinks based, variously, on evaporation of sprayed liquids or on sublimation of solids. This heat sink is designed for short-term dissipation of a large amount of heat and was originally intended for use in regulating the temperature of spacecraft equipment during launch or re-entry. It could also be useful in a terrestrial setting in which there is a requirement for a lightweight, compact means of short-term cooling. This heat sink includes a hermetic package closed with a pressure-relief valve and containing an expendable and rechargeable coolant liquid (e.g., water) and a conductive carbon-fiber wick. The vapor of the liquid escapes when the temperature exceeds the boiling point corresponding to the vapor pressure determined by the setting of the pressure-relief valve. The great advantage of this heat sink over a melting-paraffin or similar phase-change heat sink of equal capacity is that by virtue of the =10x greater latent heat of vaporization, a coolant-liquid volume equal to =1/10 of the paraffin volume can suffice.

  20. Application of artificial neural network for vapor liquid equilibrium calculation of ternary system including ionic liquid: Water, ethanol and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazlali, Alireza; Koranian, Parvaneh [Arak University, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Beigzadeh, Reza [Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, Masoud [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    A feed forward three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed for VLE prediction of ternary systems including ionic liquid (IL) (water+ethanol+1-butyl-3- methyl-imidazolium acetate), in a relatively wide range of IL mass fractions up to 0.8, with the mole fractions of ethanol on IL-free basis fixed separately at 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 0.98. The output results of the ANN were the mole fraction of ethanol in vapor phase and the equilibrium temperature. The validity of the model was evaluated through a test data set, which were not employed in the training case of the network. The performance of the ANN model for estimating the mole fraction and temperature in the ternary system including IL was compared with the non-random-two-liquid (NRTL) and electrolyte non-random-two- liquid (eNRTL) models. The results of this comparison show that the ANN model has a superior performance in predicting the VLE of ternary systems including ionic liquid.

  1. Micro- and nano-volume samples by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction using removable, interchangeable and portable rhenium coiled-filament assemblies and axially-viewed inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; Lai, Bryant; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-11-01

    An electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction for micro- or nano-volume samples is described. Samples were pipetted onto coiled-filament assemblies that were purposely developed to be removable and interchangeable and were dried and vaporized into a small-volume vaporization chamber that clips onto any ICP torch with a ball joint. Interchangeable assemblies were also constructed to be small-size (e.g., less than 3 cm long with max diameter of 0.65 cm) and light-weight (1.4 g) so that they can be portable. Interchangeable assemblies with volume-capacities in three ranges (i.e., operated NTV sample introduction was interfaced to an axially-viewed ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry) system and NTV was optimized using ICP-AES and 8 elements (Pb, Cd, Zn, V, Ba, Mg, Be and Ca). Precision was 1.0-2.3% (peak height) and 1.1-2.4% (peak area). Detection limits (obtained using 5 μL volumes) expressed in absolute-amounts ranged between 4 pg for Pb to 0.3 fg (~ 5 million atoms) for Ca. Detection limits expressed in concentration units (obtained using 100 μL volumes of diluted, single-element standard solutions) were: 50 pg/mL for Pb; 10 pg/mL for Cd; 9 pg/mL for Zn; 1 pg/mL for V; 0.9 pg/mL for Ba; 0.5 pg/mL for Mg; 50 fg/mL for Be; and 3 fg/mL for Ca. Analytical capability and utility was demonstrated using the determination of Pb in pg/mL levels of diluted natural water Certified Reference Material (CRM) and the determination of Zn in 80 nL volumes of the liquid extracted from an individual vesicle. It is shown that portable and interchangeable assemblies with dried sample residues on them can be transported without analyte loss (for the concentrations tested), thus opening up the possibility for "taking part of the lab to the sample" applications, such as testing for Cu concentration-compliance with the lead-copper rule of the Environmental Protection Agency. It is also shown that interchangeable assemblies with volume

  2. Comparison of Quantitative Analysis of Image Logs for Shale Volume and Net to Gross Calculation of a Thinly Laminated Reservoir between VNG-NERGE and LAGIA-EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Z. Nooh

    2017-09-01

    The gamma ray log data resolution is considerably lower than the FMI log to reflect accurate lithology changes in thinly bedded reservoirs. It has been found afterthought some calibrations and corrections on the FMI resistivity log, the new processed log is used for clay volume and net to gross calculation of the reservoir, indicating the potential of this log for analysis of thin beds. A comparison between VNG-NERGE, NORTH SEA WELL, NERWING and LAGIA-8, LAGIA, EGYPT indicates the calculation for shale volume at different intervals using FMI tools.

  3. Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses - 1958 to 1982. Volume 2. Summaries. Complilation of papers from the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1982-10-21

    This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains-in chronological order-the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41.

  4. Vapor Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, H. M.; Garrard, G. C.; Houston, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Detector eliminates need for removing covers to take samples. Detector is canister consisting of screw-in base and clear plastic tube that contains two colors of silica gel. Monoethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide vapors are visually monitored with canister containing color-changing gels.

  5. Clinical application of calculated split renal volume using computed tomography-based renal volumetry after partial nephrectomy: Correlation with technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scan data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan Ho; Park, Young Joo; Ku, Ja Yoon; Ha, Hong Koo

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical application of computed tomography-based measurement of renal cortical volume and split renal volume as a single tool to assess the anatomy and renal function in patients with renal tumors before and after partial nephrectomy, and to compare the findings with technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scan. The data of 51 patients with a unilateral renal tumor managed by partial nephrectomy were retrospectively analyzed. The renal cortical volume of tumor-bearing and contralateral kidneys was measured using ImageJ software. Split estimated glomerular filtration rate and split renal volume calculated using this renal cortical volume were compared with the split renal function measured with technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scan. A strong correlation between split renal function and split renal volume of the tumor-bearing kidney was observed before and after surgery (r = 0.89, P < 0.001 and r = 0.94, P < 0.001). The preoperative and postoperative split estimated glomerular filtration rate of the operated kidney showed a moderate correlation with split renal function (r = 0.39, P = 0.004 and r = 0.49, P < 0.001). The correlation between reductions in split renal function and split renal volume of the operated kidney (r = 0.87, P < 0.001) was stronger than that between split renal function and percent reduction in split estimated glomerular filtration rate (r = 0.64, P < 0.001). The split renal volume calculated using computed tomography-based renal volumetry had a strong correlation with the split renal function measured using technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scan. Computed tomography-based split renal volume measurement before and after partial nephrectomy can be used as a single modality for anatomical and functional assessment of the tumor-bearing kidney. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  6. Preoperative volume calculation of the hepatic venous draining areas with multi-detector row CT in adult living donor liver transplantation: impact on surgical procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frericks, Bernd B.J. [Hanover Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Surgery, Hannover (Germany); University of Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Kirchhoff, Timm D.; Shin, Hoen-Oh; Stamm, Georg; Merkesdal, Sonja; Abe, Takehiko; Galanski, Michael [Hanover Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Surgery, Hannover (Germany); Hanover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Schenk, Andrea; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto [Hanover Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Surgery, Hannover (Germany); MeVis - Center for Medical Diagnostic Systems and Visualization, Bremen (Germany); Klempnauer, Juergen [Hanover Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Surgery, Hannover (Germany); Hanover Medical School, Department of Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, Hannover (Germany); Nashan, Bjoern [Hanover Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Surgery, Hannover (Germany); Hanover Medical School, Department of Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, Hannover (Germany); Dalhousie University, Multi Organ Transplant Program, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2006-12-15

    The purpose was to assess the volumes of the different hepatic territories and especially the drainage of the right paramedian sector in adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT). CT was performed in 40 potential donors of whom 28 underwent partial living donation. Data sets of all potential donors were postprocessed using dedicated software for segmentation, volumetric analysis and visualization of liver territories. During an initial period, volumes and shapes of liver parts were calculated based on the individual portal venous perfusion areas. After partial hepatic congestion occurring in three grafts, drainage territories with special regard to MHV tributaries from the right paramedian sector, and the IRHV were calculated additionally. Results were visualized three-dimensionally and compared to the intraoperative findings. Calculated graft volumes based on hepatic venous drainage and graft weights correlated significantly (r=0.86,P<0.001). Mean virtual graft volume was 930 ml and drained as follows: RHV: 680 ml, IRHV: 170 ml (n=11); segment 5 MHV tributaries: 100 ml (n=16); segment 8 MHV tributaries: 110 ml (n=20). When present, the mean aberrant venous drainage fraction of the right liver lobe was 28%. The evaluated protocol allowed a reliable calculation of the hepatic venous draining areas and led to a change in the hepatic venous reconstruction strategy at our institution. (orig.)

  7. GIS (Geographic Information Systems) based calculation on hydrocarbon generated volume: Amazon Basin example; O uso de SIG no calculo de hidrocarbonetos gerados: exemplo da Bacia do Amazonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrinha, Saulo; Simoes, Leonardo; Goncalves, Felix T.T.; Carneiro, Jason T.G. [Petroleum Geoscience Technology Ltda. (PGT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The calculation of the volume of hydrocarbons generated from a particular source rock a sedimentary basin provides numerical data that help to better describe the petroleum system, and evaluate its potential. Among the various methodologies developed for calculating the volume of oil there is a proposal by Schmoker (1994), which has the advantage to take into account the occurrence of the source rock area in the basin, and the spatial variations in the main geological parameters. Using the tools of a GIS, through the manipulation of georeferred maps, it is possible to calculate the volume of oil generated in a way that would be virtually impossible by using punctual data, only. Even the discretiation maps in minors areas allows, via attribute table in the GIS, the application of a Monte Carlo simulation, which allows to incorporate all the uncertainties related to the input data in the calculation, obtaining distributions of volumes associated with various parts of the final map being integrated throughout the basin. Isopac and maturation maps (Gonzaga et al., 2000), along with TOC data from Barreirinha formation, Amazon Basin, have been scanned and georeferred and, once in the GIS database, were treated in order to spatially distribute the geological properties of the source rock. Then, such maps were handled in accordance with Schmoker (1994) method, leading to a map of mass and distribution of oil generated in the basin at the regional scale. (author)

  8. A novel mathematical model to predict the severity of postoperative functional reduction before partial nephrectomy: the importance of calculating resected and ischemic volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Tae Young; Komninos, Christos; Kim, Dong Wook; So, Keum Sook; Bang, Ki Seok; Jeong, Heon-Jae; Han, Woong Kyu; Hong, Sung Jun; Jung, Byung Ha; Lim, Sey Kiat; Lee, Sang Kon; Lee, Won Ki; Rha, Koon Ho

    2015-02-01

    Preoperatively predicting postoperative kidney function is an essential step to achieve improved renal function and prevent chronic kidney disease. We introduce a novel formula especially to calculate resected and ischemic volume before partial nephrectomy. We examined whether resected and ischemic volume would have value for predicting postoperative renal function. We performed a retrospective cohort study in 210 patients who underwent robotic partial nephrectomy between September 2006 and October 2013 at a tertiary cancer care center. Based on abdominopelvic computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging we calculated resected and ischemic volume by the novel mathematical formula using integral calculus. We comparatively analyzed resected and ischemic volume, and current nephrometry systems to determine the degree of association and predictability regarding the severity of the postoperative functional reduction. On multivariable analysis resected and ischemic volume showed a superior association with the absolute change in estimated glomerular filtration rate/percent change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (B = 6.5, p = 0.005/B = 6.35, p = 0.009). The ROC AUC revealed accurate predictability of resected and ischemic volume on the stratified event of an absolute change in estimated glomerular filtration rate/event of percent change in estimated glomerular filtration rate compared to 3 representative nephrometry systems. The calibration plot of this model was excellent (close to the 45-degree line) within the whole range of predicted probabilities. We report a method of preoperatively calculating resected and ischemic volume with a novel formula. This method has superior correlation with the absolute and percent change in estimated glomerular filtration rate compared to current nephrometry systems. The predictive model achieved a strong correlation for the absolute and percent change in estimated glomerular filtration rate. Copyright © 2015 American

  9. Main effects and interactions of cerebral hemispheres, gender, and age in the calculation of volumes and asymmetries of selected structures of episodic memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Carmona, Rocio; Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Dominguez-Corrales, Brenda; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of anatomical (cerebral hemisphere) and demographic (age and gender) variables on the gray matter (GM) volumes and volumetric asymmetry indices (VAIs) of selected structures involved in episodic memory. A cross-sectional study was performed in 47 healthy volunteers. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed similar IQs across the sample. Using SPM-based software, brain segmentation, labeling and volume measurements of the hippocampus, amygdala, middle temporal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus were performed in each cerebral hemisphere. A two-way between-groups multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was applied to GM volumes and VAIs. The main effects of gender and cerebral hemisphere on GM volumes were significant (p < .001), while there was no significant interaction effect between gender and cerebral hemisphere. VAI measurements showed a non-significant effect of gender, but a significant influence of age (p = .015). The linear model of interactions and main effects explained 33% of the variance influencing the GM volume quantification. While cerebral hemisphere and gender were found to affect the volumes of brain structures involved in episodic memory, the calculation of VAIs was affected only by age. A comprehensive understanding of the main effects and interaction effects of cerebral hemisphere, gender and age on the volumes and asymmetries of structures related to episodic memory might help neurologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians and other neuroscientists in the study of degenerative brain diseases. PMID:28072386

  10. Main effects and interactions of cerebral hemispheres, gender, and age in the calculation of volumes and asymmetries of selected structures of episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Carmona, Rocio; Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Dominguez-Corrales, Brenda; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of anatomical (cerebral hemisphere) and demographic (age and gender) variables on the gray matter (GM) volumes and volumetric asymmetry indices (VAIs) of selected structures involved in episodic memory. A cross-sectional study was performed in 47 healthy volunteers. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed similar IQs across the sample. Using SPM-based software, brain segmentation, labeling and volume measurements of the hippocampus, amygdala, middle temporal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus were performed in each cerebral hemisphere. A two-way between-groups multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was applied to GM volumes and VAIs. The main effects of gender and cerebral hemisphere on GM volumes were significant (p gender and cerebral hemisphere. VAI measurements showed a nonsignificant effect of gender, but a significant influence of age (p = .015). The linear model of interactions and main effects explained 33% of the variance influencing the GM volume quantification. While cerebral hemisphere and gender were found to affect the volumes of brain structures involved in episodic memory, the calculation of VAIs was affected only by age. A comprehensive understanding of the main effects and interaction effects of cerebral hemisphere, gender and age on the volumes and asymmetries of structures related to episodic memory might help neurologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians and other neuroscientists in the study of degenerative brain diseases.

  11. Cerebral blood volume calculated by dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging: preliminary correlation study with glioblastoma genetic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inseon Ryoo

    Full Text Available To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC enhanced perfusion MR imaging in predicting major genetic alterations in glioblastomas.Twenty-five patients (M:F = 13∶12, mean age: 52.1±15.2 years with pathologically proven glioblastoma who underwent DSC MR imaging before surgery were included. On DSC MR imaging, the normalized relative tumor blood volume (nTBV of the enhancing solid portion of each tumor was calculated by using dedicated software (Nordic TumorEX, NordicNeuroLab, Bergen, Norway that enabled semi-automatic segmentation for each tumor. Five major glioblastoma genetic alterations (epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN, Ki-67, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT and p53 were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and analyzed for correlation with the nTBV of each tumor. Statistical analysis was performed using the unpaired Student t test, ROC (receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and Pearson correlation analysis.The nTBVs of the MGMT methylation-negative group (mean 9.5±7.5 were significantly higher than those of the MGMT methylation-positive group (mean 5.4±1.8 (p = .046. In the analysis of EGFR expression-positive group, the nTBVs of the subgroup with loss of PTEN gene expression (mean: 10.3±8.1 were also significantly higher than those of the subgroup without loss of PTEN gene expression (mean: 5.6±2.3 (p = .046. Ki-67 labeling index indicated significant positive correlation with the nTBV of the tumor (p = .01.We found that glioblastomas with aggressive genetic alterations tended to have a high nTBV in the present study. Thus, we believe that DSC-enhanced perfusion MR imaging could be helpful in predicting genetic alterations that are crucial in predicting the prognosis of and selecting tailored treatment for glioblastoma patients.

  12. Human dental age estimation by calculation of pulp-tooth volume ratios yielded on clinically acquired cone beam computed tomography images of monoradicular teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, Hazha; Thevissen, Patrick; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Fieuws, Steffen; Solheim, Tore; Willems, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Secondary dentine is responsible for a decrease in the volume of the dental pulp cavity with aging. The aim of this study is to evaluate a human dental age estimation method based on the ratio between the volume of the pulp and the volume of its corresponding tooth, calculated on clinically taken cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images from monoradicular teeth. On the 3D images of 111 clinically obtained CBCT images (Scanora(®) 3D dental cone beam unit) of 57 female and 54 male patients ranging in age between 10 and 65 years, the pulp-tooth volume ratio of 64 incisors, 32 canines, and 15 premolars was calculated with Simplant(®) Pro software. A linear regression model was fit with age as dependent variable and ratio as predictor, allowing for interactions of specific gender or tooth type. The obtained pulp-tooth volume ratios were the strongest related to age on incisors. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Influence of the choice of parameters of the TAC in the calculation of volumes for different planners; Influencia de la eleccion de los parametros del TAC en el calculo de volumenes para distintos planificadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Mazon, J.; Raba Diez, J. L.; Vazquez Rodriguez, J. A.; Pacheco Baldor, M. T.; Mendiguren Santiago, M. A.

    2011-07-01

    In the Protocol for the control treatment planning systems with ionizing radiation of the proposed SEFM tests to verify proper operation of the calculation in the evaluation of DVH (Dose Volume Histogram). The calculation of the volume that makes a planner may have important implications because it can trigger an overestimation of the dose or otherwise. We present a comparison of the calculation of volumes estimated with 4 different planners.

  14. Calculation of hydraulic conductivities and capillary rise in peat soils from bulk density and solid matter volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated how unsaturated hydraulic conductivities of soils can be calculated from granular composition and organic matter content (BLOEMEN, 1980a). This type of calculations has to be restricted to mineral soils because the capillary properties of organic soils will not be

  15. An analytic solution for calculating the beam intensity profiles useful to irradiate target volumes with bi-concave outlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Neve, W.; Derycke, S.; De Wagter, C. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde

    1995-12-01

    A heuristic planing procedure allowing to obtain a 3-dimensional conformal dose distribution in radiotherapy for target volumes with a bi-concave or multi-concave shape has been developed. The described method is tested on a phantom simulating a pelvic target, described by Brahme.

  16. Ab initio calculation of the interaction potentials of helium, neon, and methane as well as theoretical studies on their thermophysical properties and those of water vapor; Ab initio-Berechnung der Wechselwirkungspotentiale von Helium, Neon und Methan sowie theoretische Untersuchungen zu ihren thermophysikalischen Eigenschaften und denen von Wasserdampf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellmann, Robert

    2009-06-16

    Thermophysical properties of the pure gases helium, neon, methane and water vapor were calculated for low densities over wide temperature ranges. Statistical thermodynamics was used for the determination of the pressure virial coefficients. The kinetic theory of gases was utilized for the calculation of the transport and relaxation properties. So far kinetic theory was limited to linear molecules and has now been extended to molecules of arbitrary geometry to enable calculations on methane and water vapor. The interaction potentials, which are needed for all computations, were determined for helium, neon and methane from the supermolecular approach using quantum chemical ab initio methods. For water the interaction potentials were taken from the literature. The calculated values of the thermophysical properties for the four gases show very good agreement with the best experimental data. At very low and very high temperatures the theoretical values are more accurate than experimental data. (orig.)

  17. A Monte-Carlo code for neutron efficiency calculations for large volume Gd-loaded liquid scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzcinski, A.; Zwieglinski, B. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Lynen, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Pochodzalla, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    This paper reports on a Monte-Carlo program, MSX, developed to evaluate the performance of large-volume, Gd-loaded liquid scintillation detectors used in neutron multiplicity measurements. The results of simulations are presented for the detector intended to count neutrons emitted by the excited target residue in coincidence with the charged products of the projectile fragmentation following relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The latter products could be detected with the ALADIN magnetic spectrometer at GSI-Darmstadt. (orig.) 61 refs.

  18. Atomic vapor density monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewall, N.; Harris, W.; Beeler, R.; Wooldridge, J.; Chen, H.L.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents information on the Atomic Vapor Density Monitor (AVDM) system that measures the density of a vapor by measuring the absorption of light from a swept-wavelength laser that passes through an atomic vapor stream.

  19. Petroleum Vapor Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    One type of vapor intrusion is PVI, in which vapors from petroleum hydrocarbons such as gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel enter a building. Intrusion of contaminant vapors into indoor spaces is of concern.

  20. On the accuracy of calculation of the mean residence time of drug in the body and its volumes of distribution based on the assumption of central elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M

    2016-01-01

    1. The steady state and terminal volumes of distribution, as well as the mean residence time of drug in the body (Vss, Vβ, and MRT) are the common pharmacokinetic parameters calculated using the drug plasma concentration-time profile (Cp(t)) following intravenous (iv bolus or constant rate infusion) drug administration. 2. These traditional calculations are valid for the linear pharmacokinetic system with central elimination (i.e. elimination rate being proportional to drug concentration in plasma). The assumption of central elimination is not valid in general, so that the accuracy of the traditional calculation of these parameters is uncertain. 3. The comparison of Vss, Vβ, and MRT calculated by the derived exact equations and by the commonly used ones was made considering a physiological model. It turned out that the difference between the exact and simplified calculations does not exceed 2%. 4. Thus the calculations of Vss, Vβ, and MRT, which are based on the assumption of central elimination, may be considered as quite accurate. Consequently it can be used as the standard for comparisons with kinetic and in silico models.

  1. The Issue of Calculating the Final Temperature of the Products of Rapid Exothermic Chemical Reactions with Significant Energy Release in a Closed Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, V.; Geidmanis, D.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical problem solved in this article is the calculation of thermodynamic parameters such as final temperature, distribution of the liquid and dry saturated vapour phases of the substance that are considered to be in thermodynamic equilibrium, and pressure of the system of several reaction products after adding to the system a certain amount of heat or the thermal effect released during rapid exothermic reaction in a closed volume that occurs so fast that it can be considered to be adiabatic, and when the volume of liquid reagents is several orders of magnitude less than the volume of the reactor. The general multi-substance problem is reduced to a theoretical problem for one substance of calculation thermodynamic parameters of system after adding a certain amount of heat that gives theoretically rigorous isochoric calculation. In this article, we substantiate our view that isochoric pass of calculation is more robust compared to seemingly more natural isobaric pass of calculation, if the later involves quite not trivial calculation of the adiabatic compression of a two-phase system (liquid - dry saturated vapour) that can pass itself into another kind of state (liquid - wet saturated vapour), which requires, apparently, more complex descriptions compared with isochoric calculation because the specific heat capacity of wet saturated vapour can be negative. The solved theoretical problem relates to a practical problem that has been a driver for our research as part of a design of the reactor of the titanium reduction from magnesium and titanium tetrachloride supplied into atmosphere of the reactor at high temperatures when both reagents are in gaseous state. The reaction is known to be exothermic with a high thermal effect, and estimate of the final temperature and pressure of the products of reaction, for instance, designing the reactor allows eliminating the possibility of the reaction products to penetrate backwards into supply tracts of the reagents

  2. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 7: Metal vapor Rankine topping-steam bottoming cycles. [energy conversion efficiency in electric power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    Adding a metal vapor Rankine topper to a steam cycle was studied as a way to increase the mean temperature at which heat is added to the cycle to raise the efficiency of an electric power plant. Potassium and cesium topping fluids were considered. Pressurized fluidized bed or pressurized (with an integrated low-Btu gasifier) boilers were assumed. Included in the cycles was a pressurizing gas turbine with its associated recuperator, and a gas economizer and feedwater heater. One of the ternary systems studied shows plant efficiency of 42.3% with a plant capitalization of $66.7/kW and a cost of electricity of 8.19 mills/MJ (29.5 mills/kWh).

  3. A Lithium Vapor Box Divertor Similarity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert A.; Emdee, Eric D.; Goldston, Robert J.; Jaworski, Michael A.; Schwartz, Jacob A.

    2017-10-01

    A lithium vapor box divertor offers an alternate means of managing the extreme power density of divertor plasmas by leveraging gaseous lithium to volumetrically extract power. The vapor box divertor is a baffled slot with liquid lithium coated walls held at temperatures which increase toward the divertor floor. The resulting vapor pressure differential drives gaseous lithium from hotter chambers into cooler ones, where the lithium condenses and returns. A similarity experiment was devised to investigate the advantages offered by a vapor box divertor design. We discuss the design, construction, and early findings of the vapor box divertor experiment including vapor can construction, power transfer calculations, joint integrity tests, and thermocouple data logging. Heat redistribution of an incident plasma-based heat flux from a typical linear plasma device is also presented. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 and The Princeton Environmental Institute.

  4. Neutronics Benchmarks for the Utilization of Mixed-Oxide Fuel: Joint US/Russian Progress Report for Fiscal 1997. Volume 3 - Calculations Performed in the Russian Federation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    This volume of the progress report provides documentation of reactor physics and criticality safety studies conducted in the Russian Federation during fiscal year 1997 and sponsored by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program of the US Department of Energy. Descriptions of computational and experimental benchmarks for the verification and validation of computer programs for neutron physics analyses are included. All benchmarks include either plutonium, uranium, or mixed uranium and plutonium fuels. Calculated physics parameters are reported for all of the contaminated benchmarks that the United States and Russia mutually agreed in November 1996 were applicable to mixed-oxide fuel cycles for light-water reactors.

  5. Calibrated vapor generator source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  6. On proper linearization, construction and analysis of the Boyle-van't Hoff plots and correct calculation of the osmotically inactive volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkov, Igor I

    2011-06-01

    The Boyle-van't Hoff (BVH) law of physics has been widely used in cryobiology for calculation of the key osmotic parameters of cells and optimization of cryo-protocols. The proper use of linearization of the Boyle-vant'Hoff relationship for the osmotically inactive volume (v(b)) has been discussed in a rigorous way in (Katkov, Cryobiology, 2008, 57:142-149). Nevertheless, scientists in the field have been continuing to use inappropriate methods of linearization (and curve fitting) of the BVH data, plotting the BVH line and calculation of v(b). Here, we discuss the sources of incorrect linearization of the BVH relationship using concrete examples of recent publications, analyze the properties of the correct BVH line (which is unique for a given v(b)), provide appropriate statistical formulas for calculation of v(b) from the experimental data, and propose simplistic instructions (standard operation procedure, SOP) for proper normalization of the data, appropriate linearization and construction of the BVH plots, and correct calculation of v(b). The possible sources of non-linear behavior or poor fit of the data to the proper BVH line such as active water and/or solute transports, which can result in large discrepancy between the hyperosmotic and hypoosmotic parts of the BVH plot, are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative evaluation of hemodynamic and respiratory parameters during mechanical ventilation with two tidal volumes calculated by demi-span based height and measured height in normal lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Mousavi Seresht

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Appropriate determination of tidal volume (VT is important for preventing ventilation induced lung injury. We compared hemodynamic and respiratory parameters in two conditions of receiving VTs calculated by using body weight (BW, which was estimated by measured height (HBW or demi-span based body weight (DBW. Materials and Methods : This controlled-trial was conducted in St. Alzahra Hospital in 2009 on American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA I and II, 18-65-years-old patients. Standing height and weight were measured and then height was calculated using demi-span method. BW and VT were calculated with acute respiratory distress syndrome-net formula. Patients were randomized and then crossed to receive ventilation with both calculated VTs for 20 min. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were analyzed with SPSS version 20.0 using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results : Forty nine patients were studied. Demi-span based body weight and thus VT (DTV were lower than Height based body weight and VT (HTV (P = 0.028, in male patients (P = 0.005. Difference was observed in peak airway pressure (PAP and airway resistance (AR changes with higher PAP and AR at 20 min after receiving HTV compared with DTV. Conclusions : Estimated VT based on measured height is higher than that based on demi-span and this difference exists only in females, and this higher VT results higher airway pressures during mechanical ventilation.

  8. Constraints on geothermal reservoir volume change calculations from InSAR surface displacements and injection and production data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaven, J. Ole; Barbour, Andrew J.; Ali, Tabrez

    2017-04-01

    Continual production of geothermal energy at times leads to significant surface displacement that can be observed in high spatial resolution using InSAR imagery. The surface displacement can be analyzed to resolve volume change within the reservoir revealing the often-complicated patterns of reservoir deformation. Simple point source models of reservoir deformation in a homogeneous elastic or poro-elastic medium can be superimposed to provide spatially varying, kinematic representations of reservoir deformation. In many cases, injection and production data are known in insufficient detail; but, when these are available, the same Green functions can be used to constrain the reservoir deformation. Here we outline how the injection and production data can be used to constrain bounds on the solution by posing the inversion as a quadratic programming with inequality constraints and regularization rather than a conventional least squares solution with regularization. We apply this method to InSAR-derived surface displacements at the Coso and Salton Sea Geothermal Fields in California, using publically available injection and production data. At both geothermal fields the available surface deformation in conjunction with the injection and production data permit robust solutions for the spatially varying reservoir deformation. The reservoir deformation pattern resulting from the constrained quadratic programming solution is more heterogeneous when compared to a conventional least squares solution. The increased heterogeneity is consistent with the known structural controls on heat and fluid transport in each geothermal reservoir.

  9. Vaporization Would Cool Primary Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Miyake, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature of discharging high-power-density primary battery maintained below specified level by evaporation of suitable liquid from jacket surrounding battery, according to proposal. Pressure-relief valve regulates pressure and boiling temperature of liquid. Less material needed in cooling by vaporization than in cooling by melting. Technique used to cool batteries in situations in which engineering constraints on volume, mass, and location prevent attachment of cooling fins, heat pipes, or like.

  10. A photothermal model of selective photothermolysis with dynamically changing vaporization temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji Zhuang; Zhang, Xue Xue; Audette, Michel

    2011-09-01

    The theory of selective photothermolysis (SP) is used in many fields of laser surgery and medicine. As several parameters and a number of complicated photothermal interactions are involved in SP, numerical simulations have been providing an important and effective way in SP studies. However, with different photothermal models of SP, simulated results differ considerably. In addition, insufficient attention has been paid to tissue pressure variation during SP in these models, so that vessel rupture and other clinical phenomena cannot be explained. A novel photothermal model of SP was proposed using a Monte Carlo method to simulate the laser transport in the tissue, a heat transfer equation with dynamically changing vaporization temperature to calculate the temperature distribution, and the Arrhenius equation to predict the thermal damage. A factor of trapped vaporized tissue water k was introduced to describe the effects on tissue pressure, temperature, and other related parameters. It was shown that the simulation results are affected significantly by k. Temperature and thermal damage volume are almost identical, respectively, to those obtained with models with vaporization at 100°C and models without vaporization when k = 0 and 1, while thermal damage volume is close to that obtained with models of vaporization at 110°C and 130°C, respectively, when k = 0.022 and k = 0.18. To some extent, the current models without vaporization and models with vaporization at constant temperature can be regarded as special cases at specific situations of this new photothermal model of SP. In addition, more descriptive simulation results, such as temperature, thermal damage, and pressure, are accessible with this model, although the accuracy depends on the value of k, the estimation of which is planned as future work.

  11. CALCULATION OF EFFICIENCY OF PROCESS OF FRACTIONATION OF LOOSE MIX IN THE WORKING VOLUME OF A PNEUMATIC SEPARATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Semenov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The process of separation bulk mixtures in the air stream is widespread in production associated with the cleaning of grain from impurity. In doing so, in order to effectively use the force of gravity appropriate cleaning grain in vertical air stream. Quantitative analysis of the separation process considering based on the model of the motion of an isolated particles in the stream. We used law of conservation of impulse in the form of the second law of Newton. Movement of particles in the air stream develops in conditions of large of number Reynolds. Therefore, the resistance force particles chosen by quadratic depending on its relative speed. Based on the quantitative analysis of the equations of motion of a particle moving on a specific trajectory, determine the critical diameter of the particles. As a process control setting chosen by the speed of the airflow. Based on the dispersion factor mixture of granular calculated coefficient of lightening. A specific example of equipment based on geometrical and physical-mechanical parameters of the process graphically presents the results of a qualitative and meaningful analysis on trajectories and velocities of the particles, the critical diameter of particle, coefficient of lightening.

  12. The Influence of Chemical Composition on LNG Pool Vaporization

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Zhidong

    2017-01-01

    A model is used to examine the influence of chemical composition on the vaporization rate of LNG during spreading. Calculations have been performed whereby the vaporization rate of the LNG mixtures has been compared to the vaporization of pure methane under the initial conditions. The detailed results indicate that the vaporization rate LNG mixture is different to that of pure methane. LNG as the liquid mixture gets rich in ethane and isobaric latent heat increases rapidly, leading to the rat...

  13. Convective vaporization of particles in an electromagnetic radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, P. V.; Kurochkin, V. I.

    1987-03-01

    The heating and vaporization of spherical particles in the case of the arbitrary relative concentration of vapor and gas are studied on the basis of the exact equations of multicomponent gas dynamics with allowance for the temperature dependence of the transport coefficients. The proposed method makes possible an easy computation of the vaporization rate and temperature in a wide range of particle sizes and radiation flux densities. The results obtained can be used to calculate laser-induced breakdown in metal vapors.

  14. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Brink, Ingo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15{+-}9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256{+-}80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses

  15. Use of kilovoltage X-ray volume imaging in patient dose calculation for head-and-neck and partial brain radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weigang; Ye, Jinsong; Wang, Jiazhou; Ma, Xuejun; Zhang, Zhen

    2010-04-19

    To evaluate the accuracy of using kilovoltage x-ray cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) imaging for in vivo dose calculations. A Region-of-Interest (ROI) CT number mapping method was developed to generate the cone-beam CT number vs. relative electron density calibration curve for 3D dose calculations. The stability of the results was validated for three consecutive months. The method was evaluated on three brain tumors and three head-and-neck tumor cases. For each patient, kV-CBCT images were acquired on the first treatment day and two-week intervals on the Elekta XVI system. The delivered dose distributions were calculated by applying the patients' treatment plans to the kV-CBCT images. The resulting dose distributions and dose volume histograms (DVHs) of the tumor and critical structures were compared to the original treatment plan. The kV-CBCT electron density calibration was stable within 1.5% over a three-month period. The DVH and dose distribution comparison based on the planning CT and the initial kV-CBCT showed good agreements for majority of cases. The doses calculated from the planning CT and kV-CBCT were compared on planes perpendicular to the beam axes and passing through the isocenter. Using gamma analysis with a criterion of 2 mm/2% and a threshold of 10%, more than 99.5% of the points on the iso-planes exhibited gamma head-and-neck and brain tumor patients. Dose variations as monitored using kV-CBCT imaging suggest that some patients can benefit from adaptive treatment plan re-optimization.

  16. Calculation of the Electric Field and of the Parameters Of Controlled Self Compensating Power Lines 110 kV Line Using the Finite Volume Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patsyuk V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the problem of calculating the electric field of the 110kV electric lines of CSCPL (Controlled Self Compensating Power Lines type. The potential of electrical conductors is determined by a system of equations for voltages taking into account there phase shift at every moment of time. set of values of the voltages in the system, taking into account the phase shift of the voltage vectors in time. We dispose the possibilities that ensure to calculate the linear values of capacity and inductance of the line knowing the electric field characteristics for a given geometry. The electric line with the horizontal placement of wires is studied. The repartition of the electric field for the limited domain of a square with sides of 100x100 m, the edges of which have zero values of potential is determined. To obtain a numerical solution of Dirichlet formulated problem we will consider the domain as a set of small triangles. As the approximate solution of the formulated problem, we will consider the piecewise-defined function , which must be continuous in the domain and of linear nature on each triangle . To calculate the electric fields when changing the phase shifting angle for voltages of conductors displaced close to each other in the 0-1800 frequency band and of different values of discretization time on the period of fundamental wave of voltage, the method of finite volumes has been used. The results of numerical calculation of the character of repartition of the potential in the field of the line for different values of time and of a phase shift of the vectors of applied voltages to the conductors of close phases for the 110 kV line of CSCPL type have been showed.

  17. Impact of preoperative calculation of nephron volume loss on future of partial nephrectomy techniques; planning a strategic roadmap for improving functional preservation and securing oncological safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rha, Koon H; Abdel Raheem, Ali; Park, Sung Y; Kim, Kwang H; Kim, Hyung J; Koo, Kyo C; Choi, Young D; Jung, Byung H; Lee, Sang K; Lee, Won K; Krishnan, Jayram; Shin, Tae Y; Cho, Jin-Seon

    2017-11-01

    To assess the correlation of the resected and ischaemic volume (RAIV), which is a preoperatively calculated volume of nephron loss, with the amount of postoperative renal function (PRF) decline after minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (PN) in a multi-institutional dataset. We identified 348 patients from March 2005 to December 2013 at six institutions. Data on all cases of laparoscopic (n = 85) and robot-assisted PN (n = 263) performed were retrospectively gathered. Univariable and multivariable linear regression analyses were used to identify the associations between various time points of PRF and the RAIV, as a continuous variable. The mean (sd) RAIV was 24.2 (29.2) cm3 . The mean preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the eGFRs at postoperative day 1, 6 and 36 months after PN were 91.0 and 76.8, 80.2 and 87.7 mL/min/1.73 m2 , respectively. In multivariable linear regression analysis, the amount of decline in PRF at follow-up was significantly correlated with the RAIV (β 0.261, 0.165, 0.260 at postoperative day 1, 6 and 36 months after PN, respectively). This study has the limitation of its retrospective nature. Preoperatively calculated RAIV significantly correlates with the amount of decline in PRF during long-term follow-up. The RAIV could lead our research to the level of prediction of the amount of PRF decline after PN and thus would be appropriate for assessing the technical advantages of emerging techniques. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Esquema de análisis para el cálculo del equilibrio líquido vapor de sistemas binarios asimétricos que contienen dióxido de carbono a altas presiones = Schematic analysis for the calculation of vapor liquid equilibrium for asymmetric binary systems containing carbon dioxide at high pressures

    OpenAIRE

    Trejos Montoya, Victor Manuel

    2010-01-01

    El presente trabajo establece el desarrollo de un esquema de análisis del equilibrio líquido vapor de sistemas binarios asimétricos que contienen dióxido de carbono a altas presiones. Dicho esquema integra el ajuste de parámetros del equilibrio líquido vapor, análisis de funciones objetivo, reglas de mezclado EOS-Gex y consistencia termodinámica de este tipo de mezclas con el fin de mejorar las etapas de diseño y la puesta en marcha de equipos que operan con fluidos supercríticos / Abstrac...

  19. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, Edwin A

    2013-10-29

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor-crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from (119)Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium.

  20. Simultaneous determination of the Cd and Zn total body burden of individual, nearly microscopic, nanoliter-volume aquatic organisms (Hyalella azteca) by rhenium-cup in-torch vaporization (ITV) sample introduction and axially viewed ICP-AES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Andrea T.; Badiei, Hamid R.; Karanassios, Vassili [University of Waterloo, Department of Chemistry, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Evans, J. Catherine [University of Waterloo, Department of Biology, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2004-09-01

    The Cd and Zn total body burden of individual, up to 7-day-old aquatic organisms (Hyalella aztecabenthic amphipod) with an average volume of approximately 100 nL was determined simultaneously by using rhenium-cup (Re-cup) in-torch vaporization (ITV) sample introduction and an axially viewed inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) system. The direct elemental analysis capabilities of this system (i.e., no sample digestion) reduced sample preparation time, eliminated contamination concerns from the digestion reagent and, owing to its detection limits (e.g., in the low pg range for Cd and Zn), vit enabled simultaneous determinations of Cd and Zn in individual, neonate and young juvenile specimens barely visible to the unaided eye (e.g., nearly microscopic). As for calibration, liquid standards and the standard additions method were tested. Both methods gave comparable results, thus indicating that in this case liquid standards can be employed for calibration, and in the process making use of the standard additions method unnecessary. Overall, the ITV-ICP-AES approach by-passed the time-consuming acid digestions, eliminated the potential for contamination from the digestion reagents, improved considerably the speed of acquisition of analytical information and enabled simultaneous determinations of two elements using individual biological specimens. (orig.)

  1. Vapor degreasing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Fresne, Eugene R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A vapor degreasing method and apparatus wherein a second cooling coil is used to prevent escape of solvent or solvent vapor from a degreaser. Gaseous refrigerant from the second coil can be released to the freeboard space above the solvent vapor zone to provide a barrier layer.

  2. PACER -- A fast running computer code for the calculation of short-term containment/confinement loads following coolant boundary failure. Volume 2: User information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienicki, J.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Engineering Div.

    1997-06-01

    A fast running and simple computer code has been developed to calculate pressure loadings inside light water reactor containments/confinements under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. PACER was originally developed to calculate containment/confinement pressure and temperature time histories for loss-of-coolant accidents in Soviet-designed VVER reactors and is relevant to the activities of the US International Nuclear Safety Center. The code employs a multicompartment representation of the containment volume and is focused upon application to early time containment phenomena during and immediately following blowdown. PACER has been developed for FORTRAN 77 and earlier versions of FORTRAN. The code has been successfully compiled and executed on SUN SPARC and Hewlett-Packard HP-735 workstations provided that appropriate compiler options are specified. The code incorporates both capabilities built around a hardwired default generic VVER-440 Model V230 design as well as fairly general user-defined input. However, array dimensions are hardwired and must be changed by modifying the source code if the number of compartments/cells differs from the default number of nine. Detailed input instructions are provided as well as a description of outputs. Input files and selected output are presented for two sample problems run on both HP-735 and SUN SPARC workstations.

  3. SU-F-J-217: Accurate Dose Volume Parameters Calculation for Revealing Rectum Dose-Toxicity Effect Using Deformable Registration in Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, X; Chen, H; Liao, Y; Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Hrycushko, B; Albuquerque, K; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of employing deformable registration methods for accurate rectum dose volume parameters calculation and their potentials in revealing rectum dose-toxicity between complication and non-complication cervical cancer patients with brachytherapy treatment. Method and Materials: Data from 60 patients treated with BT including planning images, treatment plans, and follow-up clinical exam were retrospectively collected. Among them, 12 patients complained about hematochezia were further examined with colonoscopy and scored as Grade 1–3 complication (CP). Meanwhile, another 12 non-complication (NCP) patients were selected as a reference group. To seek for potential gains in rectum toxicity prediction when fractional anatomical deformations are account for, the rectum dose volume parameters D0.1/1/2cc of the selected patients were retrospectively computed by three different approaches: the simple “worstcase scenario” (WS) addition method, an intensity-based deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm-Demons, and a more accurate, recent developed local topology preserved non-rigid point matching algorithm (TOP). Statistical significance of the differences between rectum doses of the CP group and the NCP group were tested by a two-tailed t-test and results were considered to be statistically significant if p < 0.05. Results: For the D0.1cc, no statistical differences are found between the CP and NCP group in all three methods. For the D1cc, dose difference is not detected by the WS method, however, statistical differences between the two groups are observed by both Demons and TOP, and more evident in TOP. For the D2cc, the CP and NCP cases are statistically significance of the difference for all three methods but more pronounced with TOP. Conclusion: In this study, we calculated the rectum D0.1/1/2cc by simple WS addition and two DIR methods and seek for gains in rectum toxicity prediction. The results favor the claim that accurate dose

  4. A microprocessor-controlled anaesthetic vaporizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, C E; Palayiwa, E; Sugg, B R; Lindsay-Scott, D

    1986-10-01

    A microprocessor-controlled anaesthetic vaporizer is described. Fresh gas is mixed in the correct proportions using two pulsed solenoid valves and a proportion of this passes through a third pulsed solenoid valve and is bubbled through liquid halothane. The temperature of the liquid agent is measured and the pulse frequency is modified to give the correct vapour concentration for the set flow rate and measured temperature. Initially, the vapour was produced by bubbling fresh gas through the agent in a conventional halothane bottle. However, because of the large liquid volume available, nitrous oxide was found to dissolve in large quantities in the halothane. A small volume vaporizer which was continually replenished from a reservoir was designed. Measurements of the vapour concentrations emerging from such a vaporizer were made and were found to agree with the set values +/- 0.1% v/v.

  5. Effect of vaporization on cryogenic spray dropsize measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    The fluid mechanics of multi-phase flow breakup of liquid nitrogen, LN2, jets injected into sonic velocity nitrogen gasflow, was experimentally investigated. A scattered-light scanning instrument was used to measure the characteristic dropsize, D(sub v.5), of LN2 sprays and to determine the effect of droplet vaporization on experimental dropsize measurements. Under sonic gas-velocity conditions, liquid-jet breakup occurred in the regime of aerodynamic stripping. As a result, the following correlation of volume-median drop diameter, D(sub v.5), with atomizing gas flowrate, W(sub g), was derived for two-fluid atomizers: (D(sub v.5)) (exp -1) = k(sub c) (W(sub g)) (sup n), where proportionally constant k(sub c) and exponent n are functions of droplet vaporization rate. Partially vaporized sprays were investigated and it was found that n = 1.11, which is considerably less than the value of 1.33 that is predicted by atomization theory. This was attributed to the evaporative loss of very small droplets. As a result, the following expression was obtained experimentally: (D(sub v.5e)) (exp -1) = 301 (W(sub g)) (sub 1.11). Values of D(sub v.5), that existed prior to partial vaporization of the LN2 sprays, were calculated and the following expression was derived for originally unvaporized LN2 sprays: (D(sub v.5)) (exp -1) = 285 (W(sub g)) (sub 1.33). This expression agrees well with atomization theory that predicts n = 1.33, for liquid jet breakup in high-velocity gasflow.

  6. A method for calculating the gas volume proportions and inhalation temperature of inert gas mixtures allowing reaching normothermic or hypothermic target body temperature in the awake rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques H Abraini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The noble gases xenon (Xe and helium (He are known to possess neuroprotective properties. Xe is considered the golden standard neuroprotective gas. However, Xe has a higher molecular weight and lower thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, the main diluent of oxygen (O2 in air, conditions that could impair or at least reduce the intrinsic neuroprotective properties of Xe by increasing the critical care patient's respiratory workload and body temperature. In contrast, He has a lower molecular weight and higher thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, but is unfortunately far less potent than Xe at providing neuroprotection. Therefore, combining Xe with He could allow obtaining, depending on the gas inhalation temperature and composition, gas mixtures with neutral or hypothermic properties, the latter being advantageous in term of neuroprotection. However, calculating the thermal properties of a mixture, whatever the substances – gases, metals, rubbers, etc. – is not trivial. To answer this question, we provide a graphical method to assess the volume proportions of Xe, He and O2 that a gas mixture should contain, and the inhalation temperature to which it should be administered to allow a clinician to maintain the patient at a target body temperature.

  7. Heat and mass transfer and friction resistance of forced superheated vapor flow in tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebennikov, V.N.

    This paper describes a procedure used for calculating the heat/mass transfer and friction resistance of a forced superheated vapor flow in tubes of separators-vapor superheaters and direct-flow vapor generators under equilibrium conditions and also under conditions where the flow is in a thermodynamic nonequilibrium state. Using the Reynolds analogy-based concept, an analysis of the process is carried out. Recommendations for calculating the heat/mass transfer and the hydraulic characteristics of vapor- superheating sections in separators-vapor superheaters and direct-flow vapor generators are made.

  8. Bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation in a canine model of emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuck SA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie A Tuck1, Vanessa Lopes-Berkas2, Sheree Beam3, Joseph C Anderson11Uptake Medical Corp, Seattle, WA, 2American Preclinical Services, Coon Rapids, MN, 3Preclinical Pathology Consulting Services, Ham Lake, MN, USAAbstract: Clinical studies indicate the potential of bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation to result in clinically relevant improvements in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema. However, the mechanisms by which vapor ablation results in lung volume reduction are not fully known. This study determined the 3-month safety and efficacy of vapor ablation in a canine model of emphysema and described the histopathological changes in the lung. The cranial lobes of papain-exposed dogs were treated with a vapor dose of ten calories per gram of lung tissue (n = 8 or were sham treated (n = 3. Safety was monitored peri- and postoperatively for 3 months. Animals were then sacrificed, estimates of lung volume reduction performed, and the lungs processed for histology. Vapor ablation was associated with an average of 20% volume reduction of the treated lobes and an absence of serious adverse events. The amount of lobar volume reduction was correlated with the amount of fibrosis and atelectasis in the treated lobe. Bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation at a dose of 10 cal/g results in lobar volume reduction associated with remodeling of the targeted tissue characterized by mature collagen formation in the absence of major adverse events.Keywords: animal models, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchoscopy, lung volume reduction

  9. Metal vapor condensation under high pressure (mercury vapor to 500 psia). [Heat transfer coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, S.; Bonilla, C.F.

    1975-01-01

    Mercury vapor up to 500 psia was condensed outside a cylindrical tube in both horizontal and vertical positions. Results show consistently low heat transfer coefficients compared to Nusselt's theory. Two auxiliary mercury vapor condensers downstream of the boiler vent were used to control and safeguard the system. Constantan wires were spot welded on the surface inside the test condenser tube. The heat flux ranged from 20,000 to 45,000 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/ and the temperature differences between vapor and condensing wall from 6 to 50/sup 0/F. The condensation heat transfer coefficients, ranging from 850 to 3,500 Btu/h-/sup 0/F-ft/sup 2/, are only about 3 to 9 percent of those predicted by Nusselt's theory. Due to the positive pressure in the system for most test runs, the chance of any in-leakage of noncondensable gases into the boiler is extremely small. Since no substantial change of heat transfer rate resulted from wide variations in the heat load on the reflux condenser at some specific heat flux on the test condenser tube, the low heat transfer rate of mercury vapor condensation was not due to the presence of any non-condensable gas. The test data for high vapor pressure up to 500 psia reveal that the heat transfer coefficient is independent of the vapor pressure level. The condensation coefficients calculated based on kinetic theory are much smaller than unity and decreasewith vapor pressure. It is hypothesized that dimer content in the metal vapor phase might behave as non-condensable or semi-condensable gas and create a diffusional barrier at the vapor-liquid interface near the condensate film. This dimer vapor could be the main cause of interfacial resistance during metal vapor condensation process. 41 figures, 7 tables, 58 references. (DLC)

  10. Calcul des paramètres de l'équation de Wilson. Analyse comparative des représentations d'équilibres liquide-vapeur isothermes par les modèles de Wilson et NRTL Computing Parameters in the Wilson Equation. Comparatrice Analysis of Representations of Isothermal Liquid-Vapor Equilibria by Wilson and Nrtl Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desplanches H.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Un programme de calcul des paramètres de l'équation de Wilson est mis au point. II utilise une méthode itérative de minimisation des écarts sur la pression et la composition de vapeur ou sur chaque grandeur prise séparément. Les méthodes utilisées sont testées sur neuf équilibres liquide-vapeur isothermes de mélanges binaires à déviations positives ou négatives. Les écarts moyens entre les valeurs expérimentales : - de la pression; - de la composition de la vapeur; - de l'enthalpie libre d'excès; et les valeurs calculées à partir des paramètres de Wilson sont comparés à ceux obtenus d'après le modèle NRTL. A program has been developed for computing the parameters in the Wilson equation. It uses an iterative method of minimizing the differences in pressure and steam composition or in each magnitude token separately. The methods used are tried out on nine isothermal liquid-vapor equilibria of binary mixtures with positive or negative deviations. The mean differences between experimental values of the : - pressure; - vapor composition; - excess free enthalpy; and values computed from Wilson parameters are compared with those obtained from an NRTL model.

  11. The vertical distribution of Mars water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of observations made from the Viking 1 Orbiter indicates that the water vapor over the Viking 1 landing site is uniformly mixed with the atmosphere and not concentrated near the surface. The analysis incorporates the effects of atmospheric scattering and explains why previous earth-based observations showed a strong diurnal variation in water content. It also explains the lack of an early morning fog and removes the necessity of daily exchange of large amounts of water between the surface and the atmosphere. A water vapor volume mixing ratio of 1.5 x 10 to the -4th is inferred for the Viking 1 site in late summer.

  12. Liquid-Vapor Argon Isotope Fractionation from the Triple Point to the Critical Point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, J. T.; Linderstrøm-Lang, C. U.; Bigeleisen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The statistical thermodynamic treatment of the equilibrium between a nonideal liquid mixture of isotopes and a vapor phase is extended to include isotope effects on the equation of state of the gas. The result is particularly simple when the isotopic partition functions in a given phase are compa......The statistical thermodynamic treatment of the equilibrium between a nonideal liquid mixture of isotopes and a vapor phase is extended to include isotope effects on the equation of state of the gas. The result is particularly simple when the isotopic partition functions in a given phase...... are compared at the same molar volume. The isotope fractionation factor α for 36Ar∕40Ar between liquid and vapor has been measured from the triple point to the critical temperature. The results are compared with previous vapor pressure data, which cover the range 84–102°K. Although the agreement is within....... The fractionation factor approaches zero at the critical temperature with a nonclassical critical index equal to 0.42±0.02.〈∇2Uc〉/ρc in liquid argon is derived from the experimental fractionation data and calculations of 〈∇2Ug〉/ρg for a number of potential functions for gaseous argon....

  13. Recommended reference materials for realization of physicochemical properties pressure-volume-temperature relationships

    CERN Document Server

    Herington, E F G

    1977-01-01

    Recommended Reference Materials for Realization of Physicochemical Properties presents recommendations of reference materials for use in measurements involving physicochemical properties, namely, vapor pressure; liquid-vapor critical temperature and critical pressure; orthobaric volumes of liquid and vapor; pressure-volume-temperature properties of the unsaturated vapor or gas; and pressure-volume-temperature properties of the compressed liquid. This monograph focuses on reference materials for vapor pressures at temperatures up to 770 K, as well as critical temperatures and critical pressures

  14. Bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation in a canine model of emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Stephanie A; Lopes-Berkas, Vanessa; Beam, Sheree; Anderson, Joseph C

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate the potential of bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation to result in clinically relevant improvements in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema. However, the mechanisms by which vapor ablation results in lung volume reduction are not fully known. This study determined the 3-month safety and efficacy of vapor ablation in a canine model of emphysema and described the histopathological changes in the lung. The cranial lobes of papain-exposed dogs were treated with a vapor dose of ten calories per gram of lung tissue (n = 8) or were sham treated (n = 3). Safety was monitored peri- and postoperatively for 3 months. Animals were then sacrificed, estimates of lung volume reduction performed, and the lungs processed for histology. Vapor ablation was associated with an average of 20% volume reduction of the treated lobes and an absence of serious adverse events. The amount of lobar volume reduction was correlated with the amount of fibrosis and atelectasis in the treated lobe. Bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation at a dose of 10 cal/g results in lobar volume reduction associated with remodeling of the targeted tissue characterized by mature collagen formation in the absence of major adverse events.

  15. Impact of preoperative haemoglobin concentrations on the efficiency of KTP-laser vaporization of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Stephan; Gilfrich, Christian; Hatiboglu, Gencay; Huber, Johannes; Bedke, Jens; Pfitzenmaier, Jesco; Haferkamp, Axel; Hohenfellner, Markus

    2009-06-01

    The potassium-titanyl-phoshate laser (KTP laser) device produces light (wavelength of 532 nm) that is absorbed by haemoglobin, thus releasing thermal energy. This reaction causes vaporization of the tissue. We tested whether preoperative haemoglobin concentrations (Hb) affect the efficiency of the 80 W KTP laser, thus affecting the energy applied. We assessed 164 patients undergoing KTP-laser vaporization for benign prostate hyperplasia from January 2005 to July 2006 at Heidelberg University Hospital. We prospectively collected data on patients' demographics, urodynamics, Hb, prostate volume, and energy applied. We calculated the correlation between preoperative Hb and surgery energy applied and we adjusted it for prostate volume. We further compared the postoperative urinary flow and residual volume results in non-low-Hb and in low-Hb patients. The mean age was 68.8 (+/-8.8 years), the median prostate volume 50.0 mL (interquartile range 40-80), the median preoperative urinary flow 10.1 mL/s (interquartile range 7.1-14.0), the median surgery duration 70.0 min (interquartile range 50-92.75), the median preoperative Hb 144.5 g/L (interquartile range 132-151), and the median applied energy 209.5 kJ (interquartile range 156.5-272.75). The unadjusted correlation between preoperative Hb and applied energy was -0.089 (P 0.05). Functional results did not differ between low-Hb and non-low-Hb patients (P > 0.05 for urinary flow and postvoid volume). Haemoglobin concentrations, in the range of clinically encountered values, do not affect the efficiency of 80 W KTP-laser vaporization of the prostate. This laser technique is thus applicable in patients with low haemoglobin concentrations without concerns about efficiency.

  16. Vaporizers for medical marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirken, B

    1999-09-17

    A major concern about the medical use of marijuana is the harmful effects that come from smoking it. Vaporizers are designed to release the active ingredients in marijuana without burning it, and therefore do not release the harmful substances found in the marijuana smoke. The Institute of Medicine recommends against the long-term medical use of smoked marijuana because of carcinogens and other chemicals in the smoke. Several vaporizers are on the market, but they have not been tested in the laboratory yet. A review of two vaporizers is given. Contact information is provided.

  17. Vaporization of droplets in premixing chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, A. J.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed measurements were made of the structures of turbulent fuel sprays vaporizing in heated airstreams. The measurements show the size dependent vaporization and dispersion of the droplets and the important influence of the large eddies in the turbulence. The measurements form a data base for the development of models of fuel spray vaporization. Two laser techniques were specially developed for the investigation. A laser tomography technique converts line-of-sight light scattering measurements into time averaged 'point' measurements of droplet size distribution and volume concentration. A laser anemometer particle sizing technique was further developed to permit accurate measurements of individual particle sizes and velocities, with backscatter collection of light. The experiments are combined with heat transfer models to analyze the performance of miniature thermocouples in liquid sprays.

  18. A Review of Vapor Intrusion Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    A complete vapor intrusion (VI) model, describing vapor entry of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) into buildings located on contaminated sites, generally consists of two main parts-one describing vapor transport in the soil and the other its entry into the building. Modeling the soil vapor transport part involves either analytically or numerically solving the equations of vapor advection and diffusion in the subsurface. Contaminant biodegradation must often also be included in this simulation, and can increase the difficulty of obtaining a solution, especially when explicitly considering coupled oxygen transport and consumption. The models of contaminant building entry pathway are often coupled to calculations of indoor air contaminant concentration, and both are influenced by building construction and operational features. The description of entry pathway involves consideration of building foundation characteristics, while calculation of indoor air contaminant levels requires characterization of building enclosed space and air exchange within this. This review summarizes existing VI models, and discusses the limits of current screening tools commonly used in this field. PMID:23360069

  19. Second Vapor-Level Sensor For Vapor Degreaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Nance M.; Burley, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Second vapor-level sensor installed at lower level in vapor degreaser makes possible to maintain top of vapor at that lower level. Evaporation reduced during idle periods. Provides substantial benefit, without major capital cost of building new vapor degreaser with greater freeboard height.

  20. Vapor Control Layer Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-09-08

    This information sheet describes the level of vapor control required on the interior side of framed walls with typical fibrous cavity insulation (fibreglass, rockwool, or cellulose, based on DOE climate zone of construction.

  1. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  2. Using Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures to Determine the Vapor Pressure of a Volatile Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgeman, Fred R.; Bertrand, Gary; Wilson, Brent

    2007-01-01

    This experiment, designed for a general chemistry laboratory, illustrates the use of Dalton's law of partial pressures to determine the vapor pressure of a volatile liquid. A predetermined volume of air is injected into a calibrated tube filled with a liquid whose vapor pressure is to be measured. The volume of the liquid displaced is greater than…

  3. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac–Hartree–Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor–crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from 119Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium

  4. Volumetric analysis of lung nodules in computed tomography (CT): comparison of two different segmentation algorithm softwares and two different reconstruction filters on automated volume calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Andreas; Brönnimann, Alain; Vock, Peter

    2014-02-01

    A precise detection of volume change allows for better estimating the biological behavior of the lung nodules. Postprocessing tools with automated detection, segmentation, and volumetric analysis of lung nodules may expedite radiological processes and give additional confidence to the radiologists. To compare two different postprocessing software algorithms (LMS Lung, Median Technologies; LungCARE®, Siemens) in CT volumetric measurement and to analyze the effect of soft (B30) and hard reconstruction filter (B70) on automated volume measurement. Between January 2010 and April 2010, 45 patients with a total of 113 pulmonary nodules were included. The CT exam was performed on a 64-row multidetector CT scanner (Somatom Sensation, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) with the following parameters: collimation, 24x1.2 mm; pitch, 1.15; voltage, 120 kVp; reference tube current-time, 100 mAs. Automated volumetric measurement of each lung nodule was performed with the two different postprocessing algorithms based on two reconstruction filters (B30 and B70). The average relative volume measurement difference (VME%) and the limits of agreement between two methods were used for comparison. At soft reconstruction filters the LMS system produced mean nodule volumes that were 34.1% (P LMS and 1.6% for LungCARE®, respectively (both with P LMS measured greater volumes with both filters, 13.6% for soft and 3.8% for hard filters, respectively (P  0.05). There is a substantial inter-software (LMS/LungCARE®) as well as intra-software variability (B30/B70) in lung nodule volume measurement; therefore, it is mandatory to use the same equipment with the same reconstruction filter for the follow-up of lung nodule volume.

  5. Calculation of absorbed doses in sphere volumes around the Mammosite using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNPX; Calculo de dosis absorbida en volumenes esfericos alrededor del Mammosite utilizando el codigo de simulacion Monte Carlo MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E. L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the changes observed in the absorbed doses in mammary gland tissue when irradiated with a equipment of high dose rate known as Mammosite and introducing material resources contrary to the tissue that constitutes the mammary gland. The modeling study is performed with the code MCNPX, 2005 version, the equipment and the mammary gland and calculating the absorbed doses in tissue when introduced small volumes of air or calcium in the system. (Author)

  6. Cálculo do volume de sangue necessário para a correção da anemia fetal em gestantes isoimunizadas Blood volume calculation required for the correction of fetal anemia in pregnant women with alloimmunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Deolindo Santiago

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: obter uma equação capaz de estimar o volume de concentrado de hemácias a ser infundido para correção da anemia em fetos de gestantes portadoras de isoimunização pelo fator Rh, baseado em parâmetros alcançados durante a cordocentese prévia à transfusão intra-uterina. MÉTODOS: em estudo transversal, foram analisadas 89 transfusões intra-uterinas para correção de anemia em 48 fetos acompanhados no Centro de Medicina Fetal do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. A idade gestacional mediana, no momento da cordocentese, foi de 29 semanas e a média de procedimentos por feto foi de 2,1. A hemoglobina fetal foi dosada antes e após a cordocentese, sendo verificado o volume de concentrado de hemácias transfundido. Para determinação de uma fórmula para estimar o volume sanguíneo necessário para correção da anemia fetal, tomou-se como base o volume necessário para elevar em 1 g% a hemoglobina fetal (diferença entre a concentração de hemoglobina final e a inicial, dividida pelo volume transfundido e o volume de quanto seria necessário para se atingir 14 g%, em análise de regressão múltipla. RESULTADOS: a concentração da hemoglobina pré-transfusional variou entre 2,3 e 15,7 g%. A prevalência de anemia fetal (HbPURPOSE: to obtain an equation to estimate the volume of red blood cells concentrate to be infused to correct anemia in fetuses of pregnant women with Rh factor isoimmunization, based in parameters obtained along the cordocentesis previous to intrauterine transfusion. METHODS: a transversal study analyzing 89 intrauterine transfusions to correct anemia in 48 fetuses followed-up in the Centro de Medicina Fetal do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de Minas Gerais. The median gestational age at the cordocentesis was 29 weeks and the average number of procedures was 2.1. Fetal hemoglobin was assayed before and after cordocentesis, leading to the volume of transfused red blood

  7. Fuel Vaporization Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosque, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the effects of fuel-air preparation characteristics on combustor performance and emissions at temperature and pressure ranges representative of actual gas turbine combustors is discussed. The effect of flameholding devices on the vaporization process and NOx formation is discussed. Flameholder blockage and geometry are some of the elements that affect the recirculation zone characteristics and subsequently alter combustion stability, emissions and performance. A water cooled combustor is used as the test rig. Preheated air and Jet A fuel are mixed at the entrance of the apparatus. A vaporization probe is used to determine percentage of vaporization and a gas sample probe to determine concentration of emissions in the exhaust gases. The experimental design is presented and experimental expected results are discussed.

  8. Absorption of irrigation fluid occurs frequently during high power 532 nm laser vaporization of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Thomas; Grossmann, Nico C; Wettstein, Marian S; Fankhauser, Christian D; Capol, Janine C; Poyet, Cédric; Hefermehl, Lukas J; Zimmermann, Matthias; Sulser, Tullio; Müller, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Absorption of irrigation fluid was not detected during GreenLight™ laser vaporization of the prostate using the first generation 80 W laser. However, data are lacking on intraoperative irrigation fluid absorption using the second generation 120 W high power laser. We assessed whether fluid absorption occurs during high power laser vaporization of the prostate. We performed this prospective investigation at a tertiary referral center in patients undergoing 120 W laser vaporization for prostatic bladder outlet obstruction. Normal saline containing 1% ethanol was used for intraoperative irrigation. The expired breath ethanol concentration was measured periodically during the operation using an alcometer. The volume of saline absorption was calculated from these concentrations. Intraoperative changes in hematological and biochemical blood parameters were also recorded. Of 50 investigated patients 22 (44%) had a positive breath ethanol test. Median absorption volume in the absorber group was 725 ml (range 138 to 3,452). Ten patients absorbed more than 1,000 ml. Absorbers had a smaller prostate, more capsular perforation, higher bleeding intensity and more laser energy applied during the operation. Three patients (13%) had symptoms potentially related to fluid absorption. Hemoglobin, hematocrit and serum chloride were the only blood parameters that changed significantly in the absorber group. The changes were significantly different than those in nonabsorbers. Fluid absorption occurs frequently during high power laser vaporization of the prostate. This should be considered in patients who present with cardiopulmonary or neurological symptoms during or after the procedure. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vapor concentration monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  10. Incorporating surface indicators of reservoir permeability into reservoir volume calculations: Application to the Colli Albani caldera and the Central Italy Geothermal Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Guido; De Benedetti, Arnaldo Angelo; Bonamico, Andrea; Ramazzotti, Paolo; Mattei, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The Quaternary Roman Volcanic Province extends for over 200 km along the Tyrrhenian margin of the Italian peninsula and is composed of several caldera complexes with significant associated geothermal potential. In spite of the massive programs of explorations conducted by the then state-owned ENEL and AGIP companies between the 1970s and 1990s, and the identification of several high enthalpy fields, this resource remains so far unexploited, although it occurs right below the densely populated metropolitan area of Roma capital city. The main reason for this failure is that deep geothermal reservoirs are associated with fractured rocks, the secondary permeability of which has been difficult to predict making the identification of the most productive volumes of the reservoirs and the localisation of productive wells uncertain. As a consequence, almost half of the many exploration deep bore-holes drilled in the area reached a dry target. This work reviews available data and re-assesses the geothermal potential of caldera-related systems in Central Italy, by analysing in detail the case of the Colli Albani caldera system, the closest to Roma capital city. A GIS based approach identifies the most promising reservoir volumes for geothermal exploitation and uses an improved volume method approach for the evaluation of geothermal potential. The approach is based on a three dimensional matrix of georeferenced spatial data; the A axis accounts for the modelling of the depth of the top of the reservoirs based on geophysical and direct data; the B axis accounts for the thermal modelling of the crust (i.e. T with depth) based on measured thermal gradients. Both A and B data are necessary but not sufficient to identify rock volumes actually permeated by geothermal fluids in fractured reservoirs. We discuss the implementation of a C axis that evaluates all surface data indicating permeability in the reservoir and actual geothermal fluid circulation. We consider datasets on: i

  11. Interfacial instability of a condensing vapor bubble in a subcooled liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, I.; Ando, J.; Koiwa, Y.; Saiki, T.; Kaneko, T.

    2015-03-01

    A special attention is paid to the condensing and collapsing processes of vapor bubble injected into a subcooled pool. We try to extract the vapor-liquid interaction by employing a vapor generator that supplies vapor to the subcooled pool through an orifice instead of using a immersed heating surface to realize vapor bubbles by boiling phenomenon. This system enables ones to detect a spatio-temporal behavior of a single bubble of superheated vapor exposed to a subcooled liquid. In the present study, vapor of water is injected through an orifice at constant flow rate to the subcooled pool of water at the designated degree of subcooling under the atmospheric pressure. The degree of subcooling of the pool is ranged from 0 K to 70 K, and the vapor temperature is kept constant at 101 ∘C. The behaviors of the injected vapor are captured by high-speed camera at frame rate up to 0.3 million frame per second (fps) to track the temporal variation of the vapor bubble shape. It is found that the abrupt collapse of the vapor bubble exposed to the subcooled pool takes place under the condition that the degree of subcooling is greater than around 30 K, and that the abrupt collapse always takes place accompanying the fine disturbances or instability emerged on the free surface. We then evaluate a temporal variation of the apparent `volume' of the bubble V under the assumption of the axisymmetric shape of the vapor bubble. It is also found that the instability emerges slightly after the volume of the vapor bubble reaches the maximum value. It is evaluated that the second derivative of the corresponding `radius' R of the vapor bubble is negative when the instability appears on the bubble surface, where R = 3√ 3V/4π. We also illustrate that the wave number of the instability on the liquid-vapor interface increases as the degree of subcooling.

  12. Vaporization of comet nuclei - Light curves and life times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, J. J.; Ahearn, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of vaporization from the nucleus of a comet are examined and it is shown that a latitude dependence of vaporization can explain the asymmetries in cometary light curves. An attempt is made to explain the observed variation in molecular production rates with heliocentric distance when employing CO2 and clathrate hydrate ice as cometary nuclei substances. The energy balance equation and the vapor pressure equations of water and CO2 are used in calculating the vaporization from a surface. Calculations were carried out from both dry-ice and water-ice nuclei, using a variety of different effective visual albedos, but primarily for a thermal infrared of 0 (emission). Attention is given to cometary lifetimes and light curves and it was determined that the asymmetry in light curves occurs (occasionally) as a 'seasonal' effect due to a variation in the angle between the comet's rotation axis and the sun-comet line.

  13. Investigation of odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities in atomic vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yaqi [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Teaching and Research Section of Maths and Physics, Guangzhou Commanding Academy of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force, Guangzhou, 510440 (China); Wu, Zhenkun; Si, Jinhai; Yan, Lihe; Zhang, Yiqi; Yuan, Chenzhi; Sun, Jia [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, Yanpeng, E-mail: ypzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2013-06-15

    We theoretically deduce the macroscopic symmetry constraints for arbitrary odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities in homogeneous media including atomic vapors for the first time. After theoretically calculating the expressions using a semiclassical method, we demonstrate that the expressions for third- and fifth-order nonlinear susceptibilities for undressed and dressed four- and six-wave mixing (FWM and SWM) in atomic vapors satisfy the macroscopic symmetry constraints. We experimentally demonstrate consistence between the macroscopic symmetry constraints and the semiclassical expressions for atomic vapors by observing polarization control of FWM and SWM processes. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations. -- Highlights: •The macroscopic symmetry constraints are deduced for homogeneous media including atomic vapors. •We demonstrate that odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities satisfy the constraints. •We experimentally demonstrate the deduction in part.

  14. Adsorption and Desorption of Nitrogen and Water Vapor by clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Deshan; Chen, Qiong; Xiang, Wei; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption and desorption of nitrogen and water vapor by clay has a significant impact on unsaturated soil physical and mechanical properties. In order to study the adsorption and desorption characteristics of nitrogen and water vapor by montmorillonite, kaolin and sliding zone soils, the Autosorb-iQ specific surface area and pore size analyzer instrument of United State was taken to carry out the analysis test. The adsorption and desorption of nitrogen at 77K and water vapor at 293K on clay sample were conducted. The theories of BET, FHH and hydration energy were taken to calculate the specific surface, surface fractal dimension and adsorption energy. The results show that the calculated specific surface of water vapor by clay is bigger than nitrogen adsorption test because clay can adsorb more water vapor molecule than nitrogen. Smaller and polar water vapor molecule can access the micropore and then adsorb on the mineral surface and mineral intralayer, which make the mineral surface cations hydrate and the mineral surface smoother. Bigger and nonpolar nitrogen molecule can not enter into the micropore as water vapor molecule and has weak interaction with clay surface.

  15. Determination of the optimal statistical uncertainty to perform electron-beam Monte Carlo absorbed dose estimation in the target volume; Determination de l'incertitude statistique optimale pour realiser un calcul de dose dans le volume cible en utilisant la methode de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isambert, A.; Lefkopoulos, D. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Medical Physics Dept., 94 - Villejuif (France); Brualla, L. [NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitatsklinikum Essen (Germany); Benkebil, M. [DOSIsoft, 94 - Cachan (France)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose of study Monte Carlo based treatment planning system are known to be more accurate than analytical methods for performing absorbed dose estimation, particularly in and near heterogeneities. However, the required computation time can still be an issue. The present study focused on the determination of the optimum statistical uncertainty in order to minimise computation time while keeping the reliability of the absorbed dose estimation in treatments planned with electron-beams. Materials and methods Three radiotherapy plans (medulloblastoma, breast and gynaecological) were used to investigate the influence of the statistical uncertainty of the absorbed dose on the target volume dose-volume histograms (spinal cord, intra-mammary nodes and pelvic lymph nodes, respectively). Results The study of the dose-volume histograms showed that for statistical uncertainty levels (1 S.D.) above 2 to 3%, the standard deviation of the mean dose in the target volume calculated from the dose-volume histograms increases by at least 6%, reflecting the gradual flattening of the dose-volume histograms. Conclusions This work suggests that, in clinical context, Monte Carlo based absorbed dose estimations should be performed with a maximum statistical uncertainty of 2 to 3%. (authors)

  16. Vaporization in Comets; outbursts from Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, J. J.; Ahearn, M. F.

    1982-01-01

    Revised estimates are presented which show that the total mass and kinetic energy in a typical Comet P/Schassmann-Wachmann 1 outburst are lower than previously estimated, and that this mass is comparable to the mass of gas vaporized, as inferred from recent observations of CO(+) in this comet. The storage of energy suggested by many authors is therefore not neccessary. A simple equilibrium vaporization of CO2 or CO which is suddenly exposed, on a nucleus that is otherwise primarily composed of H2O, is proposed. Under these conditions, calculations of the variation of vaporization with rotational phase indicate that the mechanism can quantitatively produce outbursts of the size observed.

  17. Neutronics Benchmarks for the Utilization of Mixed-Oxide Fuel: Joint U.S./Russian Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1997 Volume 2-Calculations Performed in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm III, RT

    2002-05-29

    This volume of the progress report provides documentation of reactor physics and criticality safety studies conducted in the US during fiscal year 1997 and sponsored by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program of the US Department of Energy. Descriptions of computational and experimental benchmarks for the verification and validation of computer programs for neutron physics analyses are included. All benchmarks include either plutonium, uranium, or mixed uranium and plutonium fuels. Calculated physics parameters are reported for all of the computational benchmarks and for those experimental benchmarks that the US and Russia mutually agreed in November 1996 were applicable to mixed-oxide fuel cycles for light-water reactors.

  18. Water vaporization on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Feldman, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    A search is presently conducted for OH generated by the photodissociation of atmospheric water vapor in long-exposure IUE spectra of the region around Ceres. A statistically significant detection of OH is noted in an exposure off the northern limb of Ceres after perihelion. The amount of OH is consistent with a polar cap that might be replenished during winter by subsurface percolation, but which dissipates in summer.

  19. Degree of Vaporization in Bipolar and Monopolar Resection

    OpenAIRE

    Fagerstrom, Tim; Nyman, Claes R.; Hahn, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the in vitro degree of vaporization in bipolar and monopolar resection. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMaterials and Methods: Using either a bipolar system or a monopolar system, samples of chicken muscle and lamb kidney were resected in an isolated basin and then desiccated in an incubator. The percentual degree of vaporization for each sample was obtained as a difference between the total fresh weight of the sample and the calculated fresh weights of the ...

  20. Development of a computer code for calculating the steady super/hypersonic inviscid flow around real configurations. Volume 1: Computational technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, F.; Salas, M.; Yaeger, L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to compute the inviscid super/hypersonic flow field about complex vehicle geometries accurately and efficiently. A second order accurate finite difference scheme is used to integrate the three dimensional Euler equations in regions of continuous flow, while all shock waves are computed as discontinuities via the Rankine Hugoniot jump conditions. Conformal mappings are used to develop a computational grid. The effects of blunt nose entropy layers are computed in detail. Real gas effects for equilibrium air are included using curve fits of Mollier charts. Typical calculated results for shuttle orbiter, hypersonic transport, and supersonic aircraft configurations are included to demonstrate the usefulness of this tool.

  1. A novel vaporization-enucleation technique for benign prostate hyperplasia using 120-W HPS GreenLight™ laser: Seoul technique II in comparison with vaporization and previously reported modified vaporization-resection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sangjun; Park, Juhyun; Cho, Sung Yong; Cho, Min Chul; Jeong, Hyeon; Son, Hwancheol

    2017-12-01

    We developed a novel vaporization-enucleation technique (Seoul II), which consists of vaporization-enucleation of the prostate using 120-W HPS GreenLight laser, and enucleated prostate resection using bipolar devices for tissue removal. We compared the outcomes of the Seoul II with vaporization and a previously reported modified vaporization-resection technique (Seoul I). Among patients with benign prostate hyperplasia who underwent transurethral surgery using GreenLight laser at our institute, 347 patients with prostate volume ≥ 40 ml were included. The impact of surgical techniques on efficacy and postoperative functional outcomes was compared. No difference was found in baseline characteristics, although the prostate volume was marginally greater in Seoul II (p = 0.051). Prostate volume reduction per operation time (p techniques. In multivariate analysis, postoperative 12-month I-PSS for Seoul II was significantly superior to vaporization (p vaporization (p = 0.014) and Seoul I (p = 0.048). Seoul II showed improved efficacy and voiding functional maintenance over postoperative 12 months in patients with prostate volume ≥ 40 ml compared with vaporization and Seoul I. This technique could be easily accepted by clinicians who are familiar with GreenLight lasers and add flexibility to surgery without additional equipment.

  2. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  3. Logarithmic radiative effect of water vapor and spectral kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani Shahabadi, Maziar; Huang, Yi

    2014-05-01

    Radiative kernels have become a useful tool in climate analysis. A set of spectral kernels is calculated using a moderate resolution atmospheric transmission code MODTRAN and implemented in diagnosing spectrally decomposed global outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) changes. It is found that the effect of water vapor on the OLR is in proportion to the logarithm of its concentration. Spectral analysis discloses that this logarithmic dependency mainly results from water vapor absorption bands (0-560 cm-1 and 1250-1850 cm-1), while in the window region (800-1250 cm-1), the effect scales more linearly to its concentration. The logarithmic and linear effects in the respective spectral regions are validated by the calculations of a benchmark line-by-line radiative transfer model LBLRTM. The analysis based on LBLRTM-calculated second-order kernels shows that the nonlinear (logarithmic) effect results from the damping of the OLR sensitivity to layer-wise water vapor perturbation by both intra- and inter-layer effects. Given that different scaling approaches suit different spectral regions, it is advisable to apply the kernels in a hybrid manner in diagnosing the water vapor radiative effect. Applying logarithmic scaling in the water vapor absorption bands where absorption is strong and linear scaling in the window region where absorption is weak can generally constrain the error to within 10% of the overall OLR change for up to eightfold water vapor perturbations.

  4. DosedPet application for Nuclear Medicine: Calculation of the volume of medication needed for PET/CT patient; Aplicativo DosedPet para uso em Medicina Nuclear: calculo do volume de medicamento necessario para paciente de PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Pedro Augusto do; Rodrigues, Araken dos S. Werneck, E-mail: pedroan88@gmail.com [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Programa de Pos Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnologias em Saude

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the application (APP) DosePet that calculates the amount of medicament for PET / CT in patients according to the predetermined radiation dose. The software has been designed using the web MIT App Inventor2 tool for Android platform. The application allows the workers to simulate the amount of radiation still existing in the facilities after the applications, increasing security and reducing exposures, and enable greater efficiency in the use of the radiopharmaceutical. (author)

  5. Development of a computer code for calculating the steady super/hypersonic inviscid flow around real configurations. Volume 2: Code description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, F.; Yaeger, L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed to compute the inviscid super/hypersonic flow field about complex vehicle geometries accurately and efficiently. A second-order accurate finite difference scheme is used to integrate the three-dimensional Euler equations in regions of continuous flow, while all shock waves are computed as discontinuities via the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. Conformal mappings are used to develop a computational grid. The effects of blunt nose entropy layers are computed in detail. Real gas effects for equilibrium air are included using curve fits of Mollier charts. Typical calculated results for shuttle orbiter, hypersonic transport, and supersonic aircraft configurations are included to demonstrate the usefulness of this tool.

  6. Three-dimensional calculation of pollutant migration via compressible two-phase flow, for analysis of the methods of in situ air sparging and soil vapor extraction; Raeumliche Berechnung des Schadstofftransportes mit einer kompressiblen Zweiphasenstroemung zur Untersuchung der Drucklufteinblasung und Bodenluftabsaugung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuepper, S.

    1997-12-01

    In this study an analysis method is presented which allows numerical simulation of in situ air sparging coupled with soil vapor extraction. The improved FE-program takes the following phenomena into account: - Two-phase flow of compressible air and incompressible water - convective-dispersive contamination migration with air and water - transfer of volatile components from liquid phase to gas and water phase - sorption of contaminants onto soil - transfer of contaminants between air and water phase - biological processes. By means of back calculations of the results of laboratory experiments made by Eisele (1989) it was shown that with the developed program GWLCOND some of the necessary parameters for the numerical simulation of remedial systems can be determined. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] In dieser Arbeit wird ein Verfahren vorgestellt, mit dem eine numerische Simulation der Drucklufteinblasung und Bodenluftabsaugung durchgefuehrt werden kann. Das weiterentwickelte FE-Programmsystem beinhaltet folgende Ablaeufe: - Zweiphasenstroemung der kompressiblen Luft- und der inkompressiblen Wasserphase - Konvektiv-dispersiver Schadstofftransport mit der Gas- und der Wasserphase - Uebergang fluessiger Schadstoffe in die Gas- und in die Wasserphase - Sorption der Schadstoffe an der Feststoffphase - Uebergang der Schadstoffe zwischen der Gas- und der Wasserphase - Biologischer Abbau. Anhand der Nachrechnung eines Laborversuches von Eisele (1989) wird gezeigt, wie mit dem entwickelten Transportprogramm GWLCOND ein Teil der fuer die numerische Simulation des Sanierungsverfahrens benoetigten Kennwerte ermittelt werden kann. (orig./SR)

  7. Acetone vapor sensing using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser diode coated with polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2009-01-01

    We report theoretical and experimental on a new vapor sensor, using a single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coated with a polymer sensor coating, which can detect acetone vapor at a volume fraction of 2.5%. The sensor provides the advantage of standard packaging, small form...

  8. Water vapor mass balance method for determining air infiltration rates in houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. DeWalle; Gordon M. Heisler

    1980-01-01

    A water vapor mass balance technique that includes the use of common humidity-control equipment can be used to determine average air infiltration rates in buildings. Only measurements of the humidity inside and outside the home, the mass of vapor exchanged by a humidifier/dehumidifier, and the volume of interior air space are needed. This method gives results that...

  9. Declination Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Declination is calculated using the current International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model. Declination is calculated using the current World Magnetic Model...

  10. Corollary from the Exact Expression for Enthalpy of Vaporization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sobko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A problem on determining effective volumes for atoms and molecules becomes actual due to rapidly developing nanotechnologies. In the present study an exact expression for enthalpy of vaporization is obtained, from which an exact expression is derived for effective volumes of atoms and molecules, and under certain assumptions on the form of an atom (molecule it is possible to find their linear dimensions. The accuracy is only determined by the accuracy of measurements of thermodynamic parameters at the critical point.

  11. The influence of hepatic transport on the distribution volumes and mean residence time of drug in the body and the accuracy of estimating these parameters by the traditional pharmacokinetic calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M

    2011-11-01

    The influence of hepatic uptake and efflux, which includes passive diffusion and transporter-mediated component, on drug distribution volumes [steady-state volume of distribution (V(ss)) and terminal volume of distribution (V(β))], mean residence time (MRT), clearance, and terminal half-life is considered using a simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. To account for hepatic uptake, liver is treated as two-compartmental unit with drug transfer from extracellular water into hepatocytes. The exactly calculated distribution volumes and MRT are compared with that obtained by the traditional equations based on the assumption of central elimination. It was found that V(ss) may increase more than 10-fold and V(β) more than 100-fold due to the contribution of transporter-mediated uptake. The terminal half-life may be substantially shortened (more than 100-fold) due to transporters. It may also decrease significantly due to the increase of intrinsic hepatic clearance (CL(int)), whereas hepatic clearance has already reached saturation (and stays close to the possible maximum value). It is shown that in case of transporter-mediated uptake of compound into hepatocytes, in the absence of efflux and passive diffusion (unidirectional uptake), hepatic clearance is independent of CL(int) and is determined by hepatic blood flow and uptake rate constant. The effects of transporter-mediated uptake are mostly pronounced for hydrophilic acidic compounds and moderately lipophilic neutral compounds. For basic compounds and lipophilic neutral compounds the change of distribution volumes due to transporters is rather unlikely. It was found that the traditional equations provide very accurate values of V(ss), V(β), and MRT in the absence of transporter action even for very low rates of passive diffusion. On the other hand, the traditional equations fail to provide the correct values of these parameters when the increase of distribution volumes due to transporters takes

  12. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, G. M.; McRae, T. G.

    1983-06-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote IR gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote IR sensor which measures the gas composition.

  13. CONDENSATION OF WATER VAPOR IN A VERTICAL TUBE CONDENSER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Havlík

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of heat transfer in the process of condensation of water vapor in a vertical shell-and-tube condenser. We analyze the use of the Nusselt model for calculating the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC inside a vertical tube and the Kern, Bell-Delaware and Stream-flow analysis methods for calculating the shell-side HTC from tubes to cooling water. These methods are experimentally verified for a specific condenser of waste process vapor containing air. The operating conditions of the condenser may be different from the assumptions adopted in the basic Nusselt theory. Modifications to the Nusselt condensation model are theoretically analyzed.

  14. A Burst Mode, Ultrahigh Temperature UF4 Vapor Core Reactor Rankine Cycle Space Power System Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, E. T.; Kahook, S. D.; Diaz, N. J.

    1996-01-01

    Static and dynamic neutronic analyses have been performed on an innovative burst mode (100's of MW output for a few thousand seconds) Ulvahigh Temperature Vapor Core Reactor (UTVR) space nuclear power system. The NVTR employs multiple, neutronically-coupled fissioning cores and operates on a direct, closed Rankine cycle using a disk Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generater for energy conversion. The UTVR includes two types of fissioning core regions: (1) the central Ultrahigh Temperature Vapor Core (UTVC) which contains a vapor mixture of highly enriched UF4 fuel and a metal fluoride working fluid and (2) the UF4 boiler column cores located in the BeO moderator/reflector region. The gaseous nature of the fuel the fact that the fuel is circulating, the multiple coupled fissioning cores, and the use of a two phase fissioning fuel lead to unique static and dynamic neutronic characteristics. Static neutronic analysis was conducted using two-dimensional S sub n, transport theory calculations and three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport theory calculations. Circulating-fuel, coupled-core point reactor kinetics equations were used for analyzing the dynamic behavior of the UTVR. In addition to including reactivity feedback phenomena associated with the individual fissioning cores, the effects of core-to-core neutronic and mass flow coupling between the UTVC and the surrounding boiler cores were also included in the dynamic model The dynamic analysis of the UTVR reveals the existence of some very effectlve inherent reactivity feedback effects that are capable of quickly stabilizing this system, within a few seconds, even when large positive reactivity insertions are imposed. If the UTVC vapor fuel density feedback is suppressed, the UTVR is still inherently stable because of the boiler core liquid-fuel volume feedback; in contrast, suppression of the vapor fuel density feedback in 'conventional" gas core cavity reactors causes them to become inherently unstable. Due to the

  15. Melt-vapor phase transition in the lead-selenium system at atmospheric and low pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodin, V. N.; Burabaeva, N. M.; Trebukhov, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    The boiling temperature and the corresponding vapor phase composition in the existence domain of liquid solutions were calculated from the partial pressures of saturated vapor of the components and lead selenide over liquid melts in the lead-selenium system. The phase diagram was complemented with the liquid-vapor phase transition at atmospheric pressure and in vacuum of 100 Pa, which allowed us to judge the behavior of the components during the distillation separation.

  16. Student Exposure to Mercury Vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Joyce

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the problem of mercury vapors caused by spills in high school and college laboratories. Describes a study which compared the mercury vapor levels of laboratories in both an older and a newer building. Concludes that the mercurial contamination of chemistry laboratories presents minimal risks to the students. (TW)

  17. Metal vaporization from weld pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block-Bolten, A.; Eagar, T. W.

    1984-09-01

    Experimental studies of alloy vaporization from aluminum and stainless steel weld pools have been made in order to test a vaporization model based on thermodynamic data and the kinetic theory of gases. It is shown that the model can correctly predict the dominant metal vapors that form but that the absolute rate of vaporization is not known due to insufficient knowledge of the surface temperature distribution and subsequent condensation of the vapor in the cooler regions of the metal. Values of the net evaporation rates for different alloys have been measured and are found to vary by two orders of magnitude. Estimated maximum weld pool temperatures based upon the model are in good agreement with previous experimental measurements of electron beam welds.

  18. Collapsing criteria for vapor film around solid spheres as a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, Roy [Nuclear Research Center - Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)], E-mail: freud@bgu.ac.il; Harari, Ronen [Nuclear Research Center - Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Sher, Eran [Pearlstone Center for Aeronautical Studies, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2009-04-15

    Following a partial fuel-melting accident, a Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) can result with the fragmentation of the melt into tiny droplets. A vapor film is then formed between the melt fragments and the coolant, while preventing a contact between them. Triggering, propagation and expansion typically follow the premixing stage. In the triggering stage, vapor film collapse around one or several of the fragments occurs. This collapse can be the result of fragments cooling, a sort of mechanical force, or by any other means. When the vapor film collapses and the coolant re-establishes contact with the dry surface of the hot melt, it may lead to a very rapid and rather violent boiling. In the propagation stage the shock wave front leads to stripping of the films surrounding adjacent droplets which enhance the fragmentation and the process escalates. During this process a large quantity of liquid vaporizes and its expansion can result in destructive mechanical damage to the surrounding structures. This multiphase thermal detonation in which high pressure shock wave is formed is regarded as 'vapor explosion'. The film boiling and its possible collapse is a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion. If the interaction of the melt and the coolant does not result in a film boiling, no explosion occurs. Many studies have been devoted to determine the minimum temperature and heat flux that is required to maintain a film boiling. The present experimental study examines the minimum temperature that is required to maintain a film boiling around metal spheres immersed into a liquid (subcooled distilled water) reservoir. In order to simulate fuel fragments that are small in dimension and has mirror-like surface, small spheres coated with anti-oxidation layer were used. The heat flux from the spheres was calculated from the sphere's temperature profiles and the sphere's properties. The vapor film collapse was associated with a sharp rise of the heat flux

  19. Vaporization of perfluorocarbon droplets using optical irradiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strohm, Eric; Rui, Min; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael

    2011-01-01

    .... Droplet vaporization has been previously demonstrated using acoustic methods. We propose using laser irradiation as a means to induce PFC droplet vaporization using a method we term optical droplet vaporization (ODV...

  20. A Citizen's Guide to Vapor Intrusion Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide describes how vapor intrusion is the movement of chemical vapors from contaminated soil and groundwater into nearby buildings.Vapors primarily enter through openings in the building foundation or basement walls.

  1. New expressions to describe solution nonideal osmotic pressure, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, G D; Zimmerman, R J; Cantu, C; Cameron, I L

    1992-12-01

    New empirical expressions for osmotic pressure, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure are proposed based on the concepts of volume occupancy and (or) hydration force. These expressions are in general inverse relationships in comparison to the standard ideal expressions for the same properties. The slopes of the new equations are determined by the molecular weight of the solute and known constants. The accuracy and precision of the molecular weights calculated from the slope are identical and approximately 1% for the experiments reported here. The nonideality of all three colligative expressions is described by a dimensionless constant called the solute-solvent interaction parameter I. The results on sucrose have the same I = 0.26 for all three solution properties. The nonideality parameter I increased from 0.26 on sucrose to 1.7 on hemoglobin to successfully describe the well-known nonideal response of macromolecules.

  2. MEMS Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  3. Condensation of HFE-7100 vapor in a loop heat pipe having a curvilinear fin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyulin Yuriy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vapor condensation of the HFE-7100 in loop heat pipe was studied experimentally and theoretically. Numerical calculations of the vapor condensation on the curvilinear fin have been performed. Numerical, theoretical and experimental data are in a good agreement. Minimal condensate film thickness on the top of the fin has been determined and increases monotonously with the increase in the temperature drop.

  4. Design, demonstration and evaluation of a thermal enhanced vapor extraction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelan, J.; Reavis, B.; Swanson, J. [and others

    1997-08-01

    The Thermal Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES), which combines powerline frequency heating (PLF) and radio frequency (RF) heating with vacuum soil vapor extraction, was used to effectively remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from a pit in the chemical waste landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) within a two month heating period. Volume average temperatures of 83{degrees}C and 112{degrees}C were reached for the PLF and RF heating periods, respectively, within the 15 ft x 45 ft x 18.5 ft deep treated volume. This resulted in the removal of 243 lb of measured toxic organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs), 55 gallons of oil, and 11,000 gallons of water from the site. Reductions of up to 99% in total chromatographic organics (TCO) was achieved in the heated zone. Energy balance calculations for the PLF heating period showed that 36.4% of the heat added went to heating the soil, 38.5% went to evaporating water and organics, 4.2% went to sensible heat in the water, 7.1% went to heating the extracted air, and 6.6% was lost. For the RF heating period went to heating the soil, 23.5% went to evaporating water and organics, 2.4% went to sensible heat in the water, 7.5% went to heating extracted air, and 9.7% went to losses. Energy balance closure was 92.8% for the PLF heating and 98% for the RF heating. The energy input requirement per unit soil volume heated per unit temperature increase was 1.63 kWH/yd{sup 3}-{degrees}C for PLF heating and 0.73 kWH/yd{sup 3}{degrees}C for RF heating.

  5. 46 CFR 154.438 - Design vapor pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Independent Tank Type A § 154.438 Design vapor pressure. (a) If the surface of an independent tank type A are mostly flat surfaces,the Po must not exceed 69 kPa gauge (10 psig). (b) If the surfaces of an independent tank type A are formed by bodies of revolution, the design calculation of the Po must be specially...

  6. Supercritical microgravity droplet vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartfield, J.; Curtis, E.; Farrell, P.

    1990-01-01

    Supercritical droplet vaporization is an important issue in many combustion systems, such as liquid fueled rockets and compression-ignition (diesel) engines. In order to study the details of droplet behavior at these conditions, an experiment was designed to provide a gas phase environment which is above the critical pressure and critical temperature of a single liquid droplet. In general, the droplet begins as a cold droplet in the hot, high pressure environment. In order to eliminate disruptions to the droplet by convective motion in the gas, forced and natural convection gas motion are required to be small. Implementation of this requirement for forced convection is straightforward, while reduction of natural convection is achieved by reduction in the g-level for the experiment. The resulting experiment consists of a rig which can stably position a droplet without restraint in a high-pressure, high temperature gas field in microgravity. The microgravity field is currently achieved by dropping the device in the NASA Lewis 2.2 second drop tower. The performance of the experimental device and results to date are presented.

  7. A new generalized correlation for accurate vapor pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Cardona Palacio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a new generalized correlation for pure substances is proposed for the estimation of vapor pressure, applicable in wide temperature range. Was used equilibrium liquid-vapor data with 28 refrigerants and minimizing the sum of the squares of the relative deviation in liquid-vapour pressure were determined the parameters and constants characteristics of the new equation and generalized for any pure substance using the acentric factor. Vapor pressure predictions were made for 45 pure substances who they didn´t not participate in the minimization, generated percent relative average deviation of 1.6073%. The results were compared with others equations for calculating the vapor pressure and  the  comparison  indicates  that  the  proposed  method provide  more  accurate  results  than  other  methods  used  in  this  work. Finally, the calculations of enthalpies of vaporization were done with deviations of 0.880% and the Waring criterion was applied to check the constants presed in this paper

  8. Understanding Latent Heat of Vaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Ed

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple exercise for students to do in the kitchen at home to determine the latent heat of vaporization of water using typical household materials. Designed to stress understanding by sacrificing precision for simplicity. (JRH)

  9. Microenvironmental exposure to mercury vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopford, W.; Bundy, S.D.; Goldwater, L.J.; Bittikofer, J.A.

    1978-05-01

    Work area and breathing zone samples were collected in a factory utilizing metallic mercury and analyzed for mercury vapor content. Breathing zone samples averaged several fold higher in concentration than concurrent area samples, reflecting a ''microenvironmental'' exposure to mercury vapor, presumably from contaminated clothing and hands. Blood and corrected total urine mercury values correlated well with the average microenvironmental exposure level for each worker. Measurements of unbound mercury in urine samples were sensitive at picking up minimal exposures. Excessive amounts of unbound mercury were not found in the urine, even with wide day-to-day swings in microenvironmental mercury vapor levels, suggesting that the human body can adapt to a chronic, moderate exposure to mercury vapor.

  10. Dynamics and Energetics of the Explosive Vaporization of Fog Droplets by a 10.6-microm Laser Pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafalas, P; Herrmann, J

    1973-04-01

    The explosive vaporization of individual water droplets (5 microm to 25 microm radius) by a 10.6-microm laser pulse has been observed with a high speed schlieren photography system. The hot vapor and the shock wave produced by the explosive vaporization can be clearly seen in the schlieren photographs. The expansion rate of the heated air mass has been measured. Factors affecting the shape of the volume of heated air are discussed, and the energy balance of the process is considered.

  11. Computer codes used in the calculation of high-temperature thermodynamic properties of sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.K.

    1979-12-01

    Three computer codes - SODIPROP, NAVAPOR, and NASUPER - were written in order to calculate a self-consistent set of thermodynamic properties for saturated, subcooled, and superheated sodium. These calculations incorporate new critical parameters (temperature, pressure, and density) and recently derived single equations for enthalpy and vapor pressure. The following thermodynamic properties have been calculated in these codes: enthalpy, heat capacity, entropy, vapor pressure, heat of vaporization, density, volumetric thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and thermal pressure coefficient. In the code SODIPROP, these properties are calculated for saturated and subcooled liquid sodium. Thermodynamic properties of saturated sodium vapor are calculated in the code NAVAPOR. The code NASUPER calculates thermodynamic properties for super-heated sodium vapor only for low (< 1644 K) temperatures. No calculations were made for the supercritical region.

  12. Calculation and analysis of hydrogen volume concentrations in the vent pipe rigid proposed for NPP-L V; Calculo y analisis de concentraciones volumetricas de hidrogeno en el tubo de venteo rigido propuesto para la CNLV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez T, A. M.; Xolocostli M, V. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Lopez M, R.; Filio L, C. [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose Ma. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Royl, P., E-mail: armando.gomez@inin.gob.mx [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz I, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    In 2012 was modeled of primary and secondary container of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) for the CFD Gas-Flow code. These models were used to calculate hydrogen volume concentrations run release the reactor building in case of a severe accident. The results showed that the venting would produce detonation conditions in the venting level (level 33) and flammability at ground level of reload. One of the solutions to avoid reaching critical concentrations (flammable or detonable) inside the reactor building and thus safeguard the contentions is to make a rigid venting. The rigid vent is a pipe connected to the primary container could go to the level 33 of the secondary container and style fireplace climb to the top of the reactor building. The analysis of hydrogen transport inside the vent pipe can be influenced by various environmental criteria and factors vent, so a logical consequence of the 2012 analysis is the analysis of the gases transport within said pipe to define vent ideal conditions. For these evaluations the vent pipe was modeled with a fine mesh of 32 radial interior nodes and a coarse mesh of 4 radial interior nodes. With three-dimensional models were realized calculations that allow observing the influence of heat transfer in the long term, i.e. a complete analysis of exhaust (approx. 700 seconds). However, the most interesting results focus on the first milliseconds, when the H{sub 2} coming from the atmosphere of the primary container faces the air in the vent pipe. These first milliseconds besides allowing evaluating the detonation criteria in great detail in the different tubular sections similarly allow evaluating the pressure wave that occurs in the pipe and that at some point slows to the fluid on the last tubular section and could produce a detonation inside the pipe. Results are presented for venting fixed conditions, showing possible detonations into the pipe. (Author)

  13. An Inexpensive Microscale Method for Measuring Vapor Pressure, Associated Thermodynamic Variables, and Molecular Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuro, Jason C.; Margarian, Hovanes; Mkhikian, Artavan; No, Kwang Hi; Peterson, Andrew R.

    1999-08-01

    Existing methods for measuring vapor pressure are too expensive or not quantitative enough for chemistry classes in secondary schools. Our method measures the vapor pressure inside a bubble trapped in a graduated microtube made from a disposable 1-mL glass pipet. Vapor pressures of water, methanol, and ethanol are measured over temperature ranges of 4-90 °C. The enthalpy and entropy of vaporization and boiling points, calculated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, agree well with published values. The vapor pressures of aqueous solutions of ethanol and methanol plotted against mole fractions of water give positive deviations from Raoult's law, but concentrations were identified from which molecular weights of the alcohols could be calculated. These molecular weights are not significantly different from published values. Sources of error in the method are analyzed. A procedure for use in secondary schools is outlined.

  14. How do organic vapors contribute to new-particle formation?

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Neil M; Chuang, Wayne; Riipinen, Ilona; Riccobono, Francesco; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Dommen, Josef; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Vehkamaki, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Highly oxidised organic vapors can effectively stabilize sulphuric acid in heteronuclear clusters and drive new-particle formation. We present quantum chemical calculations of cluster stability, showing that multifunctional species can stabilize sulphuric acid and also present additional polar functional groups for subsequent cluster growth. We also model the multi-generation oxidation of vapors associated with secondary organic aerosol formation using a two-dimensional volatility basis set. The steady-state saturation ratios and absolute concentrations of extremely low volatility products are sufficient to drive new-particle formation with sulphuric acid at atmospherically relevant rates.

  15. Daytime Raman lidar for water vapor and ozone concentration measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Duk Hyeon; Cha, Hyung Ki; Lee, Jong Min [Laboratory for QuantumOptics, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Veselovskii, I. [Physcis Instrumentation Center of General Physcis Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-11-15

    A Raman lidar system based on a quadrupled Nd : Yagi laser monitors the Raman signals from N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O molecules. To suppress the elastic backscatter, a specially designed liquid absorption edge filter is used. The water vapor concentration is calculated from the radio of water and nitrogen Raman signals. Ozone concentration is evaluated from nitrogen and oxygen Raman returns by applying Dial technique. The obtained ozone profiles can be used for water vapor data correction.

  16. Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of lung volume reduction surgery in clinical practice is limited by high postoperative morbidity and stringent selection criteria. This has been the impetus for the development of bronchoscopic approaches to lung volume reduction. A range of different techniques such as endobronchial blockers, airway bypass, endobronchial valves, thermal vapor ablation, biological sealants, and airway implants have been employed on both homogeneous as well as heterogeneous emphysema. The currently available data on efficacy of bronchoscopic lung volume reduction are not conclusive and subjective benefit in dyspnoea scores is a more frequent finding than improvements on spirometry or exercise tolerance. Safety data are more promising with rare procedure-related mortality, few serious complications, and short hospital length of stay. The field of bronchoscopic lung volume reduction continues to evolve as ongoing prospective randomized trials build on earlier feasibility data to clarify the true efficacy of such techniques.

  17. Calculation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    MathSoft Plus 5.0 is a calculation software package for electrical engineers and computer scientists who need advanced math functionality. It incorporates SmartMath, an expert system that determines a strategy for solving difficult mathematical problems. SmartMath was the result of the integration into Mathcad of CLIPS, a NASA-developed shell for creating expert systems. By using CLIPS, MathSoft, Inc. was able to save the time and money involved in writing the original program.

  18. Image quality of mean temporal arterial and mean temporal portal venous phase images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT datasets in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X. [Radiology Department, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Henzler, T., E-mail: thomas.henzler@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Gawlitza, J.; Diehl, S. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Wilhelm, T. [Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Jin, Z.Y.; Xue, H.D. [Radiology Department, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Smakic, A. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: Dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) provides valuable information on tissue perfusion in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and pancreatic cancer. However, currently dVPCT is often performed in addition to conventional CT acquisitions due to the limited morphologic image quality of dose optimized dVPCT protocols. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare objective and subjective image quality, lesion detectability and radiation dose between mean temporal arterial (mTA) and mean temporal portal venous (mTPV) images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) datasets with linearly blended 120-kVp arterial and portal venous datasets in patients with HCC and pancreatic cancer. Materials and methods: All patients gave written informed consent for this institutional review board–approved HIPAA compliant study. 27 consecutive patients (18 men, 9 women, mean age, 69.1 years ± 9.4) with histologically proven HCC or suspected pancreatic cancer were prospectively enrolled. The study CT protocol included a dVPCT protocol performed with 70 or 80 kVp tube voltage (18 spiral acquisitions, 71.2 s total acquisition times) and standard dual-energy (90/150 kVpSn) arterial and portal venous acquisition performed 25 min after the dVPCT. The mTA and mTPV images were manually reconstructed from the 3 to 5 best visually selected single arterial and 3 to 5 best single portal venous phases dVPCT dataset. The linearly blended 120-kVp images were calculated from dual-energy CT (DECT) raw data. Image noise, SNR, and CNR of the liver, abdominal aorta (AA) and main portal vein (PV) were compared between the mTA/mTPV and the linearly blended 120-kVp dual-energy arterial and portal venous datasets, respectively. Subjective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists regarding subjective image noise, sharpness and overall diagnostic image quality using a 5-point Likert Scale. In addition, liver lesion detectability was performed for each liver

  19. Assessment of radionuclide vapor-phase transport in unsaturated tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.M.; Updegraff, C.D.; Bonano, E.J.; Randall, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    This report describes bounding calculations performed to investigate the possibility of radionuclide migration in a vapor phase associated with the emplacement of high-level waste canister in unsaturated tuff formations. Two potential radionuclide transport mechanisms in the vapor phase were examined: aerosol migration and convection/diffusion of volatile species. The former may have significant impact on the release of radionuclides to the accessible environment as the concentration in the aerosols will be equal to that in the ground water. A conservative analysis of air diffusion in a stagnant liquid film indicated that for all expected repository conditions, aerosol formation is not possible. The migration of volatile species was examined both in the vicinity of a waste canister and outside the thermally disturbed zone. Two-dimensional (radial) and three-dimensional (radial-vertical) coupled heat transfer-gas flow-liquid flow simulations were performed using the TOUGH computer code. The gas flow rate relative to the liquid flow rate predicted from the simulations allowed calculations of mobility ratios due to convection which led to the conclusion that, except for the immediate region near the canister, transport in the liquid phase will be dominant for radionuclides heavier than radon. Near the waste canister, iodine transport may also be important in the vapor phase. Bounding calculations for vertical mobility ratios were carried out as a function of saturation. These calculations are conservative and agree well with the two-dimensional simulations. Based on this analysis, it is clear that vapor-phase transport will not be important for radionuclides such as cesium and heavier species. Vapor transport for iodine may play a role in the overall release scenario depending on the particular repository conditions.

  20. Calculator calculus

    CERN Document Server

    McCarty, George

    1982-01-01

    How THIS BOOK DIFFERS This book is about the calculus. What distinguishes it, however, from other books is that it uses the pocket calculator to illustrate the theory. A computation that requires hours of labor when done by hand with tables is quite inappropriate as an example or exercise in a beginning calculus course. But that same computation can become a delicate illustration of the theory when the student does it in seconds on his calculator. t Furthermore, the student's own personal involvement and easy accomplishment give hi~ reassurance and en­ couragement. The machine is like a microscope, and its magnification is a hundred millionfold. We shall be interested in limits, and no stage of numerical approximation proves anything about the limit. However, the derivative of fex) = 67.SgX, for instance, acquires real meaning when a student first appreciates its values as numbers, as limits of 10 100 1000 t A quick example is 1.1 , 1.01 , 1.001 , •••• Another example is t = 0.1, 0.01, in the functio...

  1. Degree of vaporization in bipolar and monopolar resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerström, Tim; Nyman, Claes R; Hahn, Robert G

    2012-11-01

    To compare the in vitro degree of vaporization in bipolar and monopolar resection. Using either a bipolar system or a monopolar system, samples of chicken muscle and lamb kidney were resected in an isolated basin and then desiccated in an incubator. The percentual degree of vaporization for each sample was obtained as a difference between the total fresh weight of the sample and the calculated fresh weights of the resected tissue and remains. Reference samples showed that the water content was 73% in muscle and 77% in kidney. More muscle (mean 52%) than kidney (32%; Pvaporized. The fraction of vaporized tissue was significantly higher in the bipolar technique. In muscle, the differences between monopolar and bipolar were 17% (Pvaporization when using the bipolar resection showed that the choice of loop (Pvaporization. This study indicated that vaporization removes 50% more tissue than the weight of the resected tissue during conventional tissue resection. Bipolar standard loop resection resulted in a significantly higher degree of vaporization in both muscle and kidney than did monopolar technique. Bipolar resection worked satisfactorily in Ringer's acetate.

  2. Thermogravimetric study of vapor pressure of TATP synthesized without recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbah, Jonathan; Knott, Debra; Steward, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at characterizing the vapor pressure signatures generated by triacetone triperoxide (TATP) that was synthesized without recrystallization by thermogravimmetric analysis (TGA) for exploitation by standoff detection technologies of explosive devices. The thermal behavior of the nonrecrystallized sample was compared with reported values. Any phase change, melting point and decomposition identification were studied by differential scanning calorimeter. Vapor pressures were estimated by the Langmuir method of evaporation from an open surface in a vacuum. Vapor pressures of TATP at different temperatures were calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained from benzoic acid reference standard. Sublimation of TATP was found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics and sublimes at steady rates at 298 K and above. While the enthalpy of sublimation found, 71.7 kJ mol(-1), is in agreement with reported values the vapor pressures deviated significantly. The differences in the vapor pressures behavior are attributable to the synthesis pathway chosen in this study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Medicinal Cannabis: In Vitro Validation of Vaporizers for the Smoke-Free Inhalation of Cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanz, Christian; Mattsson, Johan; Soydaner, Umut; Brenneisen, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation by vaporization is a promising application mode for cannabis in medicine. An in vitro validation of 5 commercial vaporizers was performed with THC-type and CBD-type cannabis. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine recoveries of total THC (THCtot) and total CBD (CBDtot) in the vapor. High-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection was used for the quantitation of acidic cannabinoids in the residue and to calculate decarboxylation efficiencies. Recoveries of THCtot and CBDtot in the vapor of 4 electrically-driven vaporizers were 58.4 and 51.4%, 66.8 and 56.1%, 82.7 and 70.0% and 54.6 and 56.7% for Volcano Medic®, Plenty Vaporizer®, Arizer Solo® and DaVinci Vaporizer®, respectively. Decarboxylation efficiency was excellent for THC (≥ 97.3%) and CBD (≥ 94.6%). The gas-powered Vape-or-Smoke™ showed recoveries of THCtot and CBDtot in the vapor of 55.9 and 45.9%, respectively, and a decarboxylation efficiency of ≥ 87.7 for both cannabinoids. However, combustion of cannabis was observed with this device. Temperature-controlled, electrically-driven vaporizers efficiently decarboxylate inactive acidic cannabinoids and reliably release their corresponding neutral, active cannabinoids. Thus, they offer a promising application mode for the safe and efficient administration of medicinal cannabis.

  4. Medicinal Cannabis: In Vitro Validation of Vaporizers for the Smoke-Free Inhalation of Cannabis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Lanz

    Full Text Available Inhalation by vaporization is a promising application mode for cannabis in medicine. An in vitro validation of 5 commercial vaporizers was performed with THC-type and CBD-type cannabis. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine recoveries of total THC (THCtot and total CBD (CBDtot in the vapor. High-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection was used for the quantitation of acidic cannabinoids in the residue and to calculate decarboxylation efficiencies. Recoveries of THCtot and CBDtot in the vapor of 4 electrically-driven vaporizers were 58.4 and 51.4%, 66.8 and 56.1%, 82.7 and 70.0% and 54.6 and 56.7% for Volcano Medic®, Plenty Vaporizer®, Arizer Solo® and DaVinci Vaporizer®, respectively. Decarboxylation efficiency was excellent for THC (≥ 97.3% and CBD (≥ 94.6%. The gas-powered Vape-or-Smoke™ showed recoveries of THCtot and CBDtot in the vapor of 55.9 and 45.9%, respectively, and a decarboxylation efficiency of ≥ 87.7 for both cannabinoids. However, combustion of cannabis was observed with this device. Temperature-controlled, electrically-driven vaporizers efficiently decarboxylate inactive acidic cannabinoids and reliably release their corresponding neutral, active cannabinoids. Thus, they offer a promising application mode for the safe and efficient administration of medicinal cannabis.

  5. Reliability Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kurt Erling

    1986-01-01

    Risk and reliability analysis is increasingly being used in evaluations of plant safety and plant reliability. The analysis can be performed either during the design process or during the operation time, with the purpose to improve the safety or the reliability. Due to plant complexity and safety...... and availability requirements, sophisticated tools, which are flexible and efficient, are needed. Such tools have been developed in the last 20 years and they have to be continuously refined to meet the growing requirements. Two different areas of application were analysed. In structural reliability probabilistic...... approaches have been introduced in some cases for the calculation of the reliability of structures or components. A new computer program has been developed based upon numerical integration in several variables. In systems reliability Monte Carlo simulation programs are used especially in analysis of very...

  6. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40[degrees]C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54[degrees]C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  7. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40{degrees}C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54{degrees}C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  8. Microstructure of vapor deposited coatings on curved substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, Theron M.; Zhao, Hengbei; Wadley, Haydn N. G., E-mail: haydn@virginia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, 395 McCormick Rd., P.O. Box 400745, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Thermal barrier coating systems consisting of a metallic bond coat and ceramic over layer are widely used to extend the life of gas turbine engine components. They are applied using either high-vacuum physical vapor deposition techniques in which vapor atoms rarely experience scattering collisions during propagation to a substrate, or by gas jet assisted (low-vacuum) vapor deposition techniques that utilize scattering from streamlines to enable non-line-of-sight deposition. Both approaches require substrate motion to coat a substrate of complex shape. Here, direct simulation Monte Carlo and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation methods are combined to simulate the deposition of a nickel coating over the concave and convex surfaces of a model airfoil, and the simulation results are compared with those from experimental depositions. The simulation method successfully predicted variations in coating thickness, columnar growth angle, and porosity during both stationary and substrate rotated deposition. It was then used to investigate a wide range of vapor deposition conditions spanning high-vacuum physical vapor deposition to low-vacuum gas jet assisted vapor deposition. The average coating thickness was found to increase initially with gas pressure reaching a maximum at a chamber pressure of 8–10 Pa, but the best coating thickness uniformity was achieved under high vacuum deposition conditions. However, high vacuum conditions increased the variation in the coatings pore volume fraction over the surface of the airfoil. The simulation approach was combined with an optimization algorithm and used to investigate novel deposition concepts to tailor the local coating thickness.

  9. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Supporting MELCOR calculations, Volume 6, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Brown, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01

    To gain a better understanding of the risk significance of low power and shutdown modes of operation, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research at the NRC established programs to investigate the likelihood and severity of postulated accidents that could occur during low power and shutdown (LP&S) modes of operation at commercial nuclear power plants. To investigate the likelihood of severe core damage accidents during off power conditions, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) were performed for two nuclear plants: Unit 1 of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, which is a BWR-6 Mark III boiling water reactor (BWR), and Unit 1 of the Surry Power Station, which is a three-loop, subatmospheric, pressurized water reactor (PWR). The analysis of the BWR was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories while the analysis of the PWR was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This multi-volume report presents and discusses the results of the BWR analysis. The subject of this part presents the deterministic code calculations, performed with the MELCOR code, that were used to support the development and quantification of the PRA models. The background for the work documented in this report is summarized, including how deterministic codes are used in PRAS, why the MELCOR code is used, what the capabilities and features of MELCOR are, and how the code has been used by others in the past. Brief descriptions of the Grand Gulf plant and its configuration during LP&S operation and of the MELCOR input model developed for the Grand Gulf plant in its LP&S configuration are given.

  10. Water vapor adsorption on goethite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaowei; Boily, Jean-François

    2013-07-02

    Goethite (α-FeOOH) is an important mineral contributing to processes of atmospheric and terrestrial importance. Their interactions with water vapor are particularly relevant in these contexts. In this work, molecular details of water vapor (0.0-19.0 Torr; 0-96% relative humidity at 25 °C) adsorption at surfaces of synthetic goethite nanoparticles reacted with and without HCl and NaCl were resolved using vibrational spectroscopy. This technique probed interactions between surface (hydr)oxo groups and liquid water-like films. Molecular dynamics showed that structures and orientations adopted by these waters are comparable to those adopted at the interface with liquid water. Particle surfaces reacted with HCl accumulated less water than acid-free surfaces due to disruptions in hydrogen bond networks by chemisorbed waters and chloride. Particles reacted with NaCl had lower loadings below ∼10 Torr water vapor but greater loadings above this value than salt-free surfaces. Water adsorption reactions were here affected by competitive hydration of coexisting salt-free surface regions, adsorbed chloride and sodium, as well as precipitated NaCl. Collectively, the findings presented in this study add further insight into the initial mechanisms of thin water film formation at goethite surfaces subjected to variations in water vapor pressure that are relevant to natural systems.

  11. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  12. VAPOR MIXER FOR GELATINIZATION OF STARCH IN LIQUEFYING STATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ananskikh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Starch hydrolysis is main technological process in production of starch sweeteners. Acid hydrolysis of starch using hydrochloric acid is carried out very fast but it does not allow to carry out full hydrolysis and to produce products with given carbohydrate composition. Bioconversion of starch allows to eliminate these limitations. At production of starch sweeteners from starch using enzymes starch hydrolysis is carried out in two stages At first starch – starch liquefaction the rapid increase of viscosity takes place which requires intensive mixing. Liquefying station consists of jet-cooker, holder, pressure regulator and evaporator. Jet-cooker of starch is its main part, starch is quickly turns into soluble (gelatinized state and it is partially liquefied by injection of starch suspension by flow of water vapor under pressure not less than 0,8 MPa. Heat and hydraulic calculation were carried out in order to determine constructive sizes of mixer for cooking of starch. The main hydraulic definable parameters are pressure drop in mixer, vapor pressure at mixer inlet, daily capacity of station by glucose syrup M, product consumption (starch suspension, diameter of inlet section of vapor nozzle. The goal of calculation was to determine vapor consumption M1, diameter d2 of outlet section of confuser injector, length l2 of gelatinization section. For heat calculation there was used Shukhov’s formula along with heat balance equation for gelatinization process. The numerical solution obtained with adopted assumptions given in applied mathematical package MATHCAD, for M = 50 t/day gives required daily vapor consumption M1 = 14,446 т. At hydraulic calculation of pressure drop in mixer there was used Bernoulli’s theorem. Solving obtained equations using MATHCAD found diameter of outlet section of consufer d2 = 0,023 м, vapor pressure inside of mixer p2 = 3,966·105 Па, l2 = 0,128 м. Developed method of calculation is used to determine

  13. Atmospheric solar heating rate in the water vapor bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1986-01-01

    The total absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in clear atmospheres is parameterized as a simple function of the scaled water vapor amount. For applications to cloudy and hazy atmospheres, the flux-weighted k-distribution functions are computed for individual absorption bands and for the total near-infrared region. The parameterization is based upon monochromatic calculations and follows essentially the scaling approximation of Chou and Arking, but the effect of temperature variation with height is taken into account in order to enhance the accuracy. Furthermore, the spectral range is extended to cover the two weak bands centered at 0.72 and 0.82 micron. Comparisons with monochromatic calculations show that the atmospheric heating rate and the surface radiation can be accurately computed from the parameterization. Comparisons are also made with other parameterizations. It is found that the absorption of solar radiation can be computed reasonably well using the Goody band model and the Curtis-Godson approximation.

  14. Interaction of aerosol particles composed of protein and saltswith water vapor: hygroscopic growth and microstructural rearrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mikhailov

    2004-01-01

    efflorescence threshold of NaCl-BSA particles decreased with increasing BSA dry mass fraction, i.e. the protein inhibited the formation of salt crystals and enhanced the stability of supersaturated solution droplets. The H-TDMA and TEM results indicate that the protein was enriched at the surface of the mixed particles and formed an envelope, which inhibits the access of water vapor to the particle core and leads to kinetic limitations of hygroscopic growth, phase transitions, and microstructural rearrangement processes. The Köhler theory calculations performed with different types of models demonstrate that the hygroscopic growth of particles composed of inorganic salts and proteins can be efficiently described with a simple volume additivity approach, provided that the correct dry solute mass equivalent diameter and composition are known. A parameterisation for the osmotic coefficient of macromolecular substances has been derived from an osmotic pressure virial equation. For its application only the density and molar mass of the substance have to be known or estimated, and it is fully compatible with traditional volume additivity models for salt mixtures.

  15. 78 FR 42595 - Marine Vapor Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... clarified the location of the gas injection and mixing arrangement relative to the vapor processing unit or... Parts 35 and 39 Marine Vapor Control Systems; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 136... Parts 154, 155, and 156 46 CFR Parts 35 and 39 RIN 1625-AB37 Marine Vapor Control Systems AGENCY: Coast...

  16. Evaluating the Impact of Ambient Benzene Vapor Concentrations on Product Water of Condensation Water from Air Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-07

    benzene vapor concentrations representing average outdoor polluted (50 µg/m3) and indoor industrial (640 µg/m3) settings as well as two temperatures...Henry Law calculations estimate. Benzene vapor concentrations representing a polluted outdoor environment resulted in benzene product water...Agency for Toxic Substances and Diseases Registry ATM Atmosphere C Celsius CWFA Condensation Water From Air ECBC Edgewood Chemical

  17. Framework for simulating droplet vaporization in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    A framework for performing direct numerical simulations of droplet vaporization is presented. The work is motivated by spray combustion in engines wherein fuel droplets vaporize in a turbulent gas flow. The framework is built into a conservative finite volume code for simulating low Mach number turbulent multiphase flows. Phase tracking is performed using a discretely conservative geometric volume of fluid method, while the transport of mass fraction and temperature is performed using the BQUICK scheme. Special attention is given to the implementation of transport equations near the interface to ensure the consistency between fluxes of mass, momentum, and scalars. The effect of evaporation on the flow appears as a system of coupled source terms which depend on the local thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases. The sources are implemented implicitly using an unconditionally stable, monotone scheme. Two methodologies for resolving the system's thermodynamic equilibrium are compared for their accuracy, robustness, and computational expense. Verification is performed by comparing results to known solutions in one and three dimensions. Finally, simulations of droplets vaporizing in turbulence are demonstrated, and trends for mass fraction and temperature fields are discussed.

  18. Investigating the Droplet Formation in a Nucleonic Vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Ogul, R

    2003-01-01

    The droplet formation in a supersaturated vapor which may occur during the expansion of an excited blob of nuclear matter in the metastable region at subnuclear densities is investigated. The free energy change accompanying the formation of a drop is calculated as a function of droplet radius for various saturation ratios on the basis of Fisher's model. The results are related to the experimental data

  19. Surface potential of the water liquid-vapor interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of an extended molecular dynamics calculation of the surface potential (SP) of the water liquid-vapor interface is presented. The SP predicted by the TIP4P model is -(130 + or - 50) mV. This value is of reasonable magnitude but of opposite sign to the expectations based on laboratory experiments. The electrostatic potential shows a nonmonotonic variation with depth into the liquid.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition coating for micromachines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LAWRENCE W.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.

    2000-04-21

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. The selective W deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially solve both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}, which results in a self-limiting reaction. The selective deposition of W only on polysilicon surfaces prevents electrical shorts. Further, the self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. Selective tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize process integration problems. This tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. Results from tungsten deposition on MEMS structures with dimples will be presented. The effect of wet and vapor phase cleanings prior to the deposition will be discussed along with other process details. The W coating improved wear by orders of magnitude compared to uncoated parts. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable.

  1. Profiles of electrostatic potential across the water-vapor, ice-vapor and ice-water interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bryk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ice-water, water-vapor interfaces and ice surface are studied by molecular dynamics simulations with the SPC/E model of water molecules having the purpose to estimate the profiles of electrostatic potential across the interfaces. We have proposed a methodology for calculating the profiles of electrostatic potential based on a trial particle, which showed good agreement for the case of electrostatic potential profile of the water-vapor interface of TIP4P model calculated in another way. The measured profile of electrostatic potential for the pure ice-water interface decreases towards the liquid bulk region, which is in agreement with simulations of preferential direction of motion of Li^{+} and F^{-} solute ions at the liquid side of the ice-water interface. These results are discussed in connection with the Workman-Reynolds effect.

  2. Determination of water vapor and aerosol densities in the tropospheric atmosphere from nitrogen and water vapor raman signals

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D H; Lee, J M; Yeon, K H; Choi, S C

    1998-01-01

    A Raman lidar system has been developed for the measurement of the water-vapor mixing ratio and the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. To suppress the elastic scattering from the XeCl excimer laser, an acetone edge filter and narrow-band interference filters are used. By using independently calculated backscatter and extinction coefficients, we calculate the lidar ratios (extinction coefficient divided by the backscatter coefficient). The obtained ratios between 30 and 50 sr explain the special characteristics of the aerosol existing in the atmosphere. These ratios are also used as important parameters in the lidar inversion program. We have also obtained the water-vapor mixing ratio and find that big differences exist between the ratios inside the boundary layer and those of other regions.

  3. Quantitative soil vapor as an alternative to traditional soil sampling for VOCs: Characterization and remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preslo, L.M.; Estes, T. (ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Rancho Cordova, CA (United States)); Kraemer, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    This paper will present the results of a Soil Vapor Demonstration Project that compared pairs of soils and adjacent soil vapor samples. This study was conducted at the Aerojet General Corporation site in Rancho Cordova, CA. The author will describe the use of soil vapor sampling as a better alternative to traditional soil sampling and analysis for volatile organic compounds, and as a tool to locate possible DNAPL. The paper will present how the Demonstration Project was performed to substantiate to the U.S. EPA and state agencies that soil vapor is a viable and quantitative sampling methodology. This approach utilized various soil properties including measured soil partitioning coefficients, to calculate VOC mass in soils based on soil vapor data and equilibrium conditions. The results showed that traditional soil samples underestimated the mass of VOCs present in over 90 percent of the soil/soil vapor pairs. The paper also will include observations of other physical parameters which were monitored during the program to assess the effect on the soil vapor concentrations. In addition, the flexibility, speed, and cost-effectiveness of sampling allowed for more comprehensive characterization with a higher level of confidence. The data collected demonstrated that the soil vapor technique provides a more comprehensive evaluation of VOC distribution in the vadose zone than traditional soil sampling.

  4. Heats of vaporization of room temperature ionic liquids by tunable vacuum ultraviolet photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambreau, Steven D.; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L.; To, Albert; Koh, Christine; Strasser, Daniel; Kostko, Oleg; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-11-25

    The heats of vaporization of the room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bistrifluorosulfonylimide, N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide, and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide are determined using a heated effusive vapor source in conjunction with single photon ionization by a tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron source. The relative gas phase ionic liquid vapor densities in the effusive beam are monitored by clearly distinguished dissociative photoionization processes via a time-of-flight mass spectrometer at a tunable vacuum ultraviolet beamline 9.0.2.3 (Chemical Dynamics Beamline) at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron facility. Resulting in relatively few assumptions, through the analysis of both parent cations and fragment cations, the heat of vaporization of N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bistrifluorosulfonylimide is determined to be Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 195+-19 kJ mol-1. The observed heats of vaporization of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 174+-12 kJ mol-1) and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide (Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 171+-12 kJ mol-1) are consistent with reported experimental values using electron impact ionization. The tunable vacuum ultraviolet source has enabled accurate measurement of photoion appearance energies. These appearance energies are in good agreement with MP2 calculations for dissociative photoionization of the ion pair. These experimental heats of vaporization, photoion appearance energies, and ab initio calculations corroborate vaporization of these RTILs as intact cation-anion ion pairs.

  5. High temperature vapors science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hastie, John

    2012-01-01

    High Temperature Vapors: Science and Technology focuses on the relationship of the basic science of high-temperature vapors to some areas of discernible practical importance in modern science and technology. The major high-temperature problem areas selected for discussion include chemical vapor transport and deposition; the vapor phase aspects of corrosion, combustion, and energy systems; and extraterrestrial high-temperature species. This book is comprised of seven chapters and begins with an introduction to the nature of the high-temperature vapor state, the scope and literature of high-temp

  6. Recent advances in vapor intrusion site investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Thomas; Loll, Per; Eklund, Bart

    2017-12-15

    Our understanding of vapor intrusion has evolved rapidly since the discovery of the first high profile vapor intrusion sites in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Research efforts and field investigations have improved our understanding of vapor intrusion processes including the role of preferential pathways and natural barriers to vapor intrusion. This review paper addresses recent developments in the regulatory framework and conceptual model for vapor intrusion. In addition, a number of innovative investigation methods are discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of crude oil vapor pressures at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudeen, David Keith (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Lord, David L.

    2005-08-01

    Crude oil storage caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are solution-mined from subsurface salt domes along the U.S. Gulf Coast. While these salt domes exhibit many attractive characteristics for large-volume, long-term storage of oil such as low cost for construction, low permeability for effective fluids containment, and secure location deep underground, they also present unique technical challenges for maintaining oil quality within delivery standards. The vapor pressures of the crude oils stored at SPR tend to increase with storage time due to the combined effects of geothermal heating and gas intrusion from the surrounding salt. This presents a problem for oil delivery offsite because high vapor-pressure oil may lead to excessive atmospheric emissions of hydrocarbon gases that present explosion hazards, health hazards, and handling problems at atmospheric pressure. Recognizing this potential hazard, the U.S. Department of Energy, owner and operator of the SPR, implemented a crude oil vapor pressure monitoring program that collects vapor pressure data for all the storage caverns. From these data, DOE evaluates the rate of change in vapor pressures of its oils in the SPR. Moreover, DOE implemented a vapor pressure mitigation program in which the oils are degassed periodically and will be cooled immediately prior to delivery in order to reduce the vapor pressure to safe handling levels. The work described in this report evaluates the entire database since its origin in 1993, and determines the current levels of vapor pressure around the SPR, as well as the rate of change for purposes of optimizing both the mitigation program and meeting safe delivery standards. Generally, the rate of vapor pressure increase appears to be lower in this analysis than reported in the past and, problematic gas intrusion seems to be limited to just a few caverns. This being said, much of the current SPR inventory exceeds vapor pressure delivery guidelines and must be

  8. Oxidation of trichloroethylene, toluene, and ethanol vapors by a partially saturated permeable reactive barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba G.; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid; Hartog, Niels; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    The mitigation of volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors in the unsaturated zone largely relies on the active removal of vapor by ventilation. In this study we considered an alternative method involving the use of solid potassium permanganate to create a horizontal permeable reactive barrier for oxidizing VOC vapors. Column experiments were carried out to investigate the oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE), toluene, and ethanol vapors using a partially saturated mixture of potassium permanganate and sand grains. Results showed a significant removal of VOC vapors due to the oxidation. We found that water saturation has a major effect on the removal capacity of the permeable reactive layer. We observed a high removal efficiency and reactivity of potassium permanganate for all target compounds at the highest water saturation (Sw = 0.6). A change in pH within the reactive layer reduced oxidation rate of VOCs. The use of carbonate minerals increased the reactivity of potassium permanganate during the oxidation of TCE vapor by buffering the pH. Reactive transport of VOC vapors diffusing through the permeable reactive layer was modeled, including the pH effect on the oxidation rates. The model accurately described the observed breakthrough curve of TCE and toluene vapors in the headspace of the column. However, miscibility of ethanol in water in combination with produced water during oxidation made the modeling results less accurate for ethanol. A linear relationship was found between total oxidized mass of VOC vapors per unit volume of permeable reactive layer and initial water saturation. This behavior indicates that pH changes control the overall reactivity and longevity of the permeable reactive layer during oxidation of VOCs. The results suggest that field application of a horizontal permeable reactive barrier can be a viable technology against upward migration of VOC vapors through the unsaturated zone.

  9. Vaporization chambers and associated methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.; McKellar, Michael G.; Shunn, Lee P.

    2017-02-21

    A vaporization chamber may include at least one conduit and a shell. The at least one conduit may have an inlet at a first end, an outlet at a second end and a flow path therebetween. The shell may surround a portion of each conduit and define a chamber surrounding the portion of each conduit. Additionally, a plurality of discrete apertures may be positioned at longitudinal intervals in a wall of each conduit, each discrete aperture of the plurality of discrete apertures sized and configured to direct a jet of fluid into each conduit from the chamber. A liquid may be vaporized by directing a first fluid comprising a liquid into the inlet at the first end of each conduit, directing jets of a second fluid into each conduit from the chamber through discrete apertures in a wall of each conduit and transferring heat from the second fluid to the first fluid.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W.

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition are described. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200/sup 0/C; and impinging a gas containing N/sub 2/, SiCl/sub 4/, and AlCl/sub 3/ on the surface.

  11. Importance Profiles for Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Brian; Chandra, Arunchandra S.; Kuang, Zhiming; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by the scientific desire to align observations with quantities of physical interest, we survey how scalar importance functions depend on vertically resolved water vapor. Definitions of importance begin from familiar examples of water mass I m and TOA clear-sky outgoing longwave flux I OLR, in order to establish notation and illustrate graphically how the sensitivity profile or "kernel" depends on whether specific humidity S, relative humidity R, or ln(R) are used as measures of vapor. Then, new results on the sensitivity of convective activity I con to vapor (with implied knock-on effects such as weather prediction skill) are presented. In radiative-convective equilibrium, organized (line-like) convection is much more sensitive to moisture than scattered isotropic convection, but it exists in a drier mean state. The lesson for natural convection may be that organized convection is less susceptible to dryness and can survive and propagate into regions unfavorable for disorganized convection. This counterintuitive interpretive conclusion, with respect to the narrow numerical result behind it, highlights the importance of clarity about what is held constant at what values in sensitivity or susceptibility kernels. Finally, the sensitivities of observable radiance signals I sig for passive remote sensing are considered. While the accuracy of R in the lower free troposphere is crucial for the physical importance scalars, this layer is unfortunately the most difficult to isolate with passive remote sensing: In high emissivity channels, water vapor signals come from too high in the atmosphere (for satellites) or too low (for surface radiometers), while low emissivity channels have poor altitude discrimination and (in the case of satellites) are contaminated by surface emissions. For these reasons, active ranging (LiDAR) is the preferred observing strategy.

  12. Importance Profiles for Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Brian; Chandra, Arunchandra S.; Kuang, Zhiming; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by the scientific desire to align observations with quantities of physical interest, we survey how scalar importance functions depend on vertically resolved water vapor. Definitions of importance begin from familiar examples of water mass I m and TOA clear-sky outgoing longwave flux I OLR, in order to establish notation and illustrate graphically how the sensitivity profile or "kernel" depends on whether specific humidity S, relative humidity R, or ln( R) are used as measures of vapor. Then, new results on the sensitivity of convective activity I con to vapor (with implied knock-on effects such as weather prediction skill) are presented. In radiative-convective equilibrium, organized (line-like) convection is much more sensitive to moisture than scattered isotropic convection, but it exists in a drier mean state. The lesson for natural convection may be that organized convection is less susceptible to dryness and can survive and propagate into regions unfavorable for disorganized convection. This counterintuitive interpretive conclusion, with respect to the narrow numerical result behind it, highlights the importance of clarity about what is held constant at what values in sensitivity or susceptibility kernels. Finally, the sensitivities of observable radiance signals I sig for passive remote sensing are considered. While the accuracy of R in the lower free troposphere is crucial for the physical importance scalars, this layer is unfortunately the most difficult to isolate with passive remote sensing: In high emissivity channels, water vapor signals come from too high in the atmosphere (for satellites) or too low (for surface radiometers), while low emissivity channels have poor altitude discrimination and (in the case of satellites) are contaminated by surface emissions. For these reasons, active ranging (LiDAR) is the preferred observing strategy.

  13. Performance Analysis of Organic Rankine-vapor Compression Ice Maker Utilizing Food Industry Waste Heat

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Hu; Yuanshu Cao; Weibin Ma

    2015-01-01

    To develop the organic Rankine-vapor compression ice maker driven by food industry exhaust gases and engine cooling water, an organic Rankine-vapor compression cycle system was employed for ice making and a thermodynamic model was developed and the effects of working fluid types, hot water temperature and condensation temperature on the system performance were analyzed and the ice making capacity from unit mass hot water and unit power waste heat were evaluated. The calculated results show th...

  14. Resistances for heat and mass transfer through a liquid–vapor interface in a binary mixture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glavatskiy, K.S.; Bedeaux, D.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the interfacial resistances to heat and mass transfer through a liquid–vapor interface in a binary mixture. We use two methods, the direct calculation from the actual nonequilibrium solution and integral relations, derived earlier. We verify, that integral relations, being

  15. Water vapor pressure versus environmental lapse rate near the tropopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Antonio; Castanheira, Jose; Gimeno, Luis

    2010-05-01

    The relationship between water vapor pressure and temperature lapse rate in the vicinity of the tropopause was investigated using in situ observations. The water vapor partial pressures and the lapse rates within a vertical distance of ±1.5 km around the first thermal tropopause were calculated from the vertical soundings conducted by the NOAA/CMDL at several locations in the last few decades (GMD Data Archive). A positive non-linear relationship between the two quantities was found to hold across the studied tropopause region at mid-latitudes and polar latitudes. A similar analysis was performed on the 300 and 250 hPa pressure levels (which often intercept the tropopause region), by collecting temperature and humidity observations within 1979-2008 from the Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA). A relationship having almost the same shape was detected for statically stable lapse rates at all latitude zones. Given the relevance of water vapor in the radiative transfer in the upper troposphere, the results are an indication of a local influence of water vapor on the thermal structure of the transition layer between the troposphere and stratosphere

  16. Modified vaporization-resection for photoselective vaporization of the prostate using a GreenLight high-performance system 120-W Laser: the Seoul technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hwancheol; Ro, Yun Kwan; Min, Sun Ho; Choo, Min Soo; Kim, Jung Kwon; Lee, Chang Ju

    2011-02-01

    The most popular technique of photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) involves vaporization only. We developed a modified vaporization-resection technique that consists of vaporizing a prostate along outlined margins and retrieving the wedge-shaped prostate tissue. We report the operative procedure and clinical outcomes of our technique with the GreenLight high performance system (HPS). A total of 104 patients with a prostate volume greater than 40 mL who underwent PVP were included in this retrospective study. Forty patients were treated with the vaporization-only technique (Group non-S) and 64 patients with the Seoul technique (group S). The clinical outcomes were assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL) score, maximum flow rate (Q(max.)), and postvoid residual urine volume (PVR). The Q(max.), PVR, IPSS, and QoL scores improved significantly from 1 to 12 months after the PVP compared with the baseline in both groups (P technique for PVP showed good short-term efficacy and safety for the treatment of BPH. With this technique, we can conserve on the operative time, lasing time, and energy, and obtain prostatic tissue for pathologic evaluation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Applying the Water Vapor Radiometer to Verify the Precipitable Water Vapor Measured by GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ta-Kang Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan is located at the land-sea interface in a subtropical region. Because the climate is warm and moist year round, there is a large and highly variable amount of water vapor in the atmosphere. In this study, we calculated the Zenith Wet Delay (ZWD of the troposphere using the ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS. The ZWD measured by two Water Vapor Radiometers (WVRs was then used to verify the ZWD that had been calculated using GPS. We also analyzed the correlation between the ZWD and the precipitation data of these two types of station. Moreover, we used the observational data from 14 GPS and rainfall stations to evaluate three cases. The offset between the GPS-ZWD and the WVR-ZWD ranged from 1.31 to 2.57 cm. The correlation coefficient ranged from 0.89 to 0.93. The results calculated from GPS and those measured using the WVR were very similar. Moreover, when there was no rain, light rain, moderate rain, or heavy rain, the flatland station ZWD was 0.31, 0.36, 0.38, or 0.40 m, respectively. The mountain station ZWD exhibited the same trend. Therefore, these results have demonstrated that the potential and strength of precipitation in a region can be estimated according to its ZWD values. Now that the precision of GPS-ZWD has been confirmed, this method can eventually be expanded to the more than 400 GPS stations in Taiwan and its surrounding islands. The near real-time ZWD data with improved spatial and temporal resolution can be provided to the city and countryside weather-forecasting system that is currently under development. Such an exchange would fundamentally improve the resources used to generate weather forecasts.

  18. Water vapor sorption properties of cellulose nanocrystals and nanofibers using dynamic vapor sorption apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin; Wu, Yiqiang; Xie, Xinfeng

    2017-10-27

    Hygroscopic behavior is an inherent characteristic of nanocellulose which strongly affects its applications. In this study, the water vapor sorption behavior of four nanocellulose samples, such as cellulose nanocrystals and nanofibers with cellulose I and II structures (cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) I, CNC II, cellulose nanofibers (CNF) I, and CNF II) were studied by dynamic vapor sorption. The highly reproducible data including the running time, real-time sample mass, target relative humidity (RH), actual RH, and isotherm temperature were recorded during the sorption process. In analyzing these data, significant differences in the total running time, equilibrium moisture content, sorption hysteresis and sorption kinetics between these four nanocellulose samples were confirmed. It was important to note that CNC I, CNC II, CNF I, and CNF II had equilibrium moisture contents of 21.4, 28.6, 33.2, and 38.9%, respectively, at a RH of 95%. Then, the sorption kinetics behavior was accurately described by using the parallel exponential kinetics (PEK) model. Furthermore, the Kelvin-Voigt model was introduced to interpret the PEK behavior and calculate the modulus of these four nanocellulose samples.

  19. Calculations of absorbed fractions in small water spheres for low-energy monoenergetic electrons and the Auger-emitting radionuclides (123)Ι and (125)Ι.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousis, Christos; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2012-12-01

    To calculate the absorbed fraction (AF) of low energy electrons in small tissue-equivalent spherical volumes by Monte Carlo (MC) track structure simulation and assess the influence of phase (liquid water versus density-scaled water vapor) and of the continuous-slowing-down approximation (CSDA) used in semi-analytic calculations. An event-by-event MC code simulating the transport of electrons in both the vapor and liquid phase of water using appropriate electron-water interaction cross sections was used to quantify the energy deposition of low-energy electrons in spherical volumes. Semi-analytic calculations within the CSDA using a convolution integral of the Howell range-energy expressions are also presented for comparison. The AF for spherical volumes of radii from 10-1000 nm are presented for monoenergetic electrons over the energy range 100-10,000 eV and the two Auger-emitting radionuclides (125)I and (123)I. The MC calculated AF for the liquid phase are found to be smaller than those of the (density scaled) gas phase by up to 10-20% for the monoenergetic electrons and 10% for the two Auger-emitters. Differences between the liquid-phase MC results and the semi-analytic CSDA calculations are up to ∼ 55% for the monoenergetic electrons and up to ∼ 35% for the two Auger-emitters. Condensed-phase effects in the inelastic interaction of low-energy electrons with water have a noticeable but relatively small impact on the AF for the energy range and target sizes examined. Depending on the electron energies, the semi-analytic approach may lead to sizeable errors for target sizes with linear dimensions below 1 micron.

  20. Update on Greenlight laser vaporization (PVP) 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieken, Malte; Bachmann, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    To asses the (1) outcomes and (2) intraoperative, perioperative, and long-term complications of photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) with Greenlight laser. A systematic review of outcomes and complications of PVP was conducted. The article selection process was performed according to PRISMA guidelines and included publications published between 2009 and 2014. All generations of PVP (80, 120, 180 W) lead to a significant improvement of micturition symptoms (IPSS, QoL) and voiding parameters (Q max, PVR volume) during follow-up. Data on sexual function are heterogeneous and suggest a trend toward decline in erectile function in men with sustained preoperative erection. The rate of intraoperative complications is low. Data on peri- and postoperative complications show a large variation that mainly can be attributed to heterogeneity in documentation. PVP leads to a statistically significant and clinically relevant improvement of voiding parameters and micturition symptoms in patients with prostates technique is characterized by a high degree of intra- and perioperative safety. Long-term evidence on functional outcomes and complications beyond 3 years from RCTs is currently missing for all generations of the Greenlight laser.

  1. Overview of chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Lowden, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is developing into a commercially important method for the fabrication of continuous filament ceramic composites. Current efforts are focused on the development of an improved understanding of the various processes in CVI and its modeling. New approaches to CVI are being explored, including pressure pulse infiltration and microwave heating. Material development is also proceeding with emphasis on improving the oxidation resistance of the interfacial layer between the fiber and matrix. This paper briefly reviews these subjects, indicating the current state of the science and technology.

  2. Lamellar Diblock Copolymer Thin Films during Solvent Vapor Annealing Studied by GISAXS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jianqi; Posselt, Dorthe; Smilgies, Detlef-M.

    2014-01-01

    The reorientation of lamellae and the dependence of the lamellar spacing, Dlam, on polymer volume fraction, ϕP, Dlam ∝ ϕP–β, in diblock copolymer thin films during solvent vapor annealing (SVA) are examined by combining white light interferometry (WLI) and grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scat...

  3. Colorimetric Detection of Water Vapor Using Metal-Organic Framework Composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Purpose: Water vapor trapped in encapsulation materials or enclosed volumes leads to corrosion issues for critical NW components. Sandia National Laboratories has created a new diagnostic to indicate the presence of water in weapon systems. Impact: Component exposure to water now can be determined instantly, without need for costly, time-consuming analytical methods.

  4. Droplet Vaporization in a Supercritical Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, E. W.; Farrell, P. V.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented which describes single liquid droplet vaporization at nearly critical liquid pressures and temperatures. A modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state is used to evaluate the fugacities and liquid and vapor mole fractions at the interface under the assumption of interface equilibrium. Results obtained for different droplet sizes and conditions indicate significant differences in behavior in comparison with low-pressure quasi-steady droplet vaporization.

  5. Vapor Pressure Data Analysis and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    there were flaws in the original data prior to its publication. 3. FITTING METHODS Our process for correlating experimental vapor pressure ...2. Penski, E.C. Vapor Pressure Data Analysis Methodology, Statistics, and Applications; CRDEC-TR-386; U.S. Army Chemical Research, Development, and... Chemical Biological Center: Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 2006; UNCLASSIFIED Report (ADA447993). 11. Kemme, H.R.; Kreps, S.I. Vapor Pressure of

  6. Mars water vapor, near-surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.; Lucich, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous paper we concluded that the temperature sensors aboard the Viking landers (VL-1 and VL-2) were detecting the water vapor frost point. Analysis of one Mars year of data at both lander sites substantiates this conclusion. At VL-1 it is found that the water vapor mixing ratio is constant with height through the bulk of the atmosphere, most of the time. Exceptions are during the onset phases of the two major dust storms when temporary enhancement of near-surface vapor occurs (the same phenomenon is observed at VL-2), and some depletion of near-surface vapor during the decay phase of the first storm, possibly the second storm as well. The former suggests near-surface, northward transport of water vapor with the storms. The latter suggests adsorption of vapor on dust particles followed by surface deposition. At VL-2, severe near-surface depletion of water vapor occurs during northern autumn and winter. The residual vapor is in equilibrium with the surface condensate observed at the site during this period, indicating that the source region for the condensate must be aloft with downward transport by dust fall-out. Since the near-surface water vapor mixing ratio and concentration at VL-1 generally parallels the column abundance over VL-1 obtained by the orbiters, this suggests that VL-1 can be used to give a measure of column abundance for as long as the temperature sensors remain operational.

  7. Adsorption characteristics of water vapor on ferroaluminophosphate for desalination cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Youngdeuk

    2014-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of microporous ferroaluminophosphate adsorbent (FAM-Z01, Mitsubishi Plastics) are evaluated for possible application in adsorption desalination and cooling (AD) cycles. A particular interest is its water vapor uptake behavior at assorted adsorption temperatures and pressures whilst comparing them to the commercial silica gels of AD plants. The surface characteristics are first carried out using N2 gas adsorption followed by the water vapor uptake analysis for temperature ranging from 20°C to 80°C. We propose a hybrid isotherm model, composing of the Henry and the Sips isotherms, which can be integrated to satisfactorily fit the experimental data of water adsorption on the FAM-Z01. The hybrid model is selected to fit the unusual isotherm shapes, that is, a low adsorption in the initial section and followed by a rapid vapor uptake leading to a likely micropore volume filling by hydrogen bonding and cooperative interaction in micropores. It is shown that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of FAM-Z01 can be up to 5 folds higher than that of conventional silica gels. Owing to the quantum increase in the adsorbate uptake, the FAM-Z01 has the potential to significantly reduce the footprint of an existing AD plant for the same output capacity. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Tank 241-S-107: Results from samples collected on 06/18/96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L. [and others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-107 (Tank S-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National. Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, on sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  9. Distribution of Vapor Pressure in the Vacuum Freeze-Drying Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the big vacuum freeze-drying equipment, the drying rate of materials is uneven at different positions. This phenomenon can be explained by the uneven distribution of vapor pressure in chamber during the freeze-drying process. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to describe the vapor flow in the passageways either between material plates and in the channel between plate groups. The distribution of vapor pressure along flow passageway is given. Two characteristic factors of passageways are defined to express the effects of structural and process parameters on vapor pressure distribution. The affecting factors and their actions are quantitatively discussed in detail. Two examples are calculated and analyzed. The analysis method and the conclusions are useful to estimate the difference of material drying rate at different parts in equipment and to direct the choice of structural and process parameters.

  10. Self-tuning method for monitoring the density of a gas vapor component using a tunable laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagans, K.; Berzins, L.; Galkowski, J.; Seng, R.

    1996-08-27

    The present invention relates to a vapor density monitor and laser atomic absorption spectroscopy method for highly accurate, continuous monitoring of vapor densities, composition, flow velocity, internal and kinetic temperatures and constituent distributions. The vapor density monitor employs a diode laser, preferably of an external cavity design. By using a diode laser, the vapor density monitor is significantly less expensive and more reliable than prior art vapor density monitoring devices. In addition, the compact size of diode lasers enables the vapor density monitor to be portable. According to the method of the present invention, the density of a component of a gas vapor is calculated by tuning the diode laser to a frequency at which the amount of light absorbed by the component is at a minimum or a maximum within about 50 MHz of that frequency. Laser light from the diode laser is then transmitted at the determined frequency across a predetermined pathlength of the gas vapor. By comparing the amount of light transmitted by the diode laser to the amount of light transmitted after the laser light passes through the gas vapor, the density of the component can be determined using Beer`s law. 6 figs.

  11. Investigating the effects of methanol-water vapor mixture on a PBI-based high temperature PEM fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Nielsen, Heidi Venstrup

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of methanol and water vapor on the performance of a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC). A H3PO4-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane electrode assembly (MEA), Celtec P2100 of 45 cm2 of active surface area from BASF was employed....... A long-term durability test of around 1250 h was performed, in which the concentrations of methanol-water vapor mixture in the anode feed gas were varied. The fuel cell showed a continuous performance decay in the presence of vapor mixtures of methanol and water of 5% and 8% by volume in anode feed...

  12. Optical Sensor for Diverse Organic Vapors at ppm Concentration Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora M. Paolucci

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A broadly responsive optical organic vapor sensor is described that responds to low concentrations of organic vapors without significant interference from water vapor. Responses to several classes of organic vapors are highlighted, and trends within classes are presented. The relationship between molecular properties (vapor pressure, boiling point, polarizability, and refractive index and sensor response are discussed.

  13. [Transurethral vapor enucleation and resection of prostate with TURis button electrode].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li-ping; Qin, Jie; Zheng, Xiang-yi; Mao, Qi-qi; Zhang, Peng; Huang, Xiao; Tan, Fu-qing; Liu, Ben

    2012-06-12

    To describe an efficient and effective method of using Olympus TURis button plasma vaporization electrode plus loop electrode for transurethral vapor enucleation and resection of prostate. Between July 2011 and October 2011, the investigators performed transurethral vapor enucleation and resection of prostate using Olympus TURis button plasma vaporization electrode plus loop electrode in 16 consecutive patients at our institution. The parameters of prostate weight, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QOL), operative duration, blood loss volume, catheterization period, duration of hospitalization, perioperative complications and the weight of enucleated tissue were evaluated. IPSS and QOL were recorded during the follow-up. No patient had significant blood loss or signs of transurethral resection syndrome. The mean patient age was 67.3 ± 8.1 years. Mean preoperative prostate weight was 49 ± 24 g (range: 19 - 91) and mean resected tissue weight 36 ± 16 g (range: 10 - 50). Serious complications were not observed. Operative duration was 116 ± 31 minutes, mean catheter time 4.9 ± 1.8 days and the duration of hospitalization was 16.6 ± 5.5 days. Transurethral vapor enucleation and resection of prostate induced significant, pronounced, immediate and lasting improvement in IPSS (15.6 ± 6.8 vs 6.7 ± 2.4, P Transurethral vapor enucleation and resection of prostate with Olympus TURis plasma button electrode is a safe, effective and thorough surgical method in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  14. LNG fire and vapor control system technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

    1982-06-01

    This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

  15. Mechanics of gas-vapor bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, Yue; Zhang, Yuhang; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Most bubbles contain a mixture of vapor and incondensible gases. While the limit cases of pure vapor and pure gas bubbles are well studied, much less is known about the more realistic case of a mixture. The bubble contents continuously change due to the combined effects of evaporation and

  16. Condensation of vapor bubble in subcooled pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, K.; Koiwa, Y.; Kaneko, T.; Ueno, I.

    2017-02-01

    We focus on condensation process of vapor bubble exposed to a pooled liquid of subcooled conditions. Two different geometries are employed in the present research; one is the evaporation on the heated surface, that is, subcooled pool boiling, and the other the injection of vapor into the subcooled pool. The test fluid is water, and all series of the experiments are conducted under the atmospheric pressure condition. The degree of subcooling is ranged from 10 to 40 K. Through the boiling experiment, unique phenomenon known as microbubble emission boiling (MEB) is introduced; this phenomenon realizes heat flux about 10 times higher than the critical heat flux. Condensation of the vapor bubble is the key phenomenon to supply ambient cold liquid to the heated surface. In order to understand the condensing process in the MEB, we prepare vapor in the vapor generator instead of the evaporation on the heated surface, and inject the vapor to expose the vapor bubble to the subcooled liquid. Special attention is paid to the dynamics of the vapor bubble detected by the high-speed video camera, and on the enhancement of the heat transfer due to the variation of interface area driven by the condensation.

  17. Vapor Pressures of Several Commercially Used Alkanolamines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepacova, Katarina; Huttenhuis, Patrick J. G.; Derks, Peter W. J.; Versteeg, Geert F.; Klepáčová, Katarína

    For the design of acid gas treating processes, vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data must be available of the solvents to be applied. In this study the vapor pressures of seven frequently industrially used alkanolamines (diethanolamine, N-methylethanolamine, N,N-dimethylethanolamine,

  18. Soil vapor extraction with dewatering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, N.R. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-08-01

    The physical treatment technology of soil vapor extraction (SVE) is reliable, safe, robust, and able to remove significant amounts of mass at a relatively low cost. SVE combined with a pump-and-treat system to create a dewatered zone has the opportunity to remove more mass with the added cost of treating the extracted groundwater. Various limiting processes result in a significant reduction in the overall mass removal rates from a SVE system in porous media. Only pilot scale, limited duration SVE tests conducted in low permeability media have been reported in the literature. It is expected that the presence of a fracture network in low permeability media will add another complexity to the limiting conditions surrounding the SVE technology. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization for the Enhancement of Ultrasound Thermal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Man; Fabiilli, Mario; Carson, Paul; Padilla, Frederic; Swanson, Scott; Kripfgans, Oliver; Fowlkes, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is an ultrasound method for converting biocompatible microdroplets into microbubbles. The objective is to demonstrate that ADV bubbles can enhance high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy by controlling and increasing energy absorption at the focus. Thermal phantoms were made with or without droplets. Compound lesions were formed in the phantoms by 5-second exposures with 5-second delays. Center to center spacing of individual lesions was 5.5 mm in either a linear pattern or a spiral pattern. Prior to the HIFU, 10 cycle tone bursts with 0.25% duty cycle were used to vaporize the droplets, forming an “acoustic trench” within 30 seconds. The transducer was then focused in the middle of the back bubble wall to form thermal lesions in the trench. All lesions were imaged optically and with 2T MRI. With the use of ADV and the acoustic trench, a uniform thermal ablation volume of 15 cm3 was achieved in 4 minutes; without ADV only less than 15% of this volume was filled. The commonly seen tadpole shape characteristic of bubble-enhanced HIFU lesions was not evident with the acoustic trench. In conclusion, ADV shows promise for the spatial control and dramatic acceleration of thermal lesion production by HIFU. PMID:21804749

  20. Numerical studies of the effects of jet-induced mixing on liquid-vapor interface condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Shun

    1989-01-01

    Numerical solutions of jet-induced mixing in a partially full cryogenic tank are presented. An axisymmetric laminar jet is discharged from the central part of the tank bottom toward the liquid-vapor interface. Liquid is withdrawn at the same volume flow rate from the outer part of the tank. The jet is at a temperature lower than the interface, which is maintained at a certain saturation temperature. The interface is assumed to be flat and shear-free and the condensation-induced velocity is assumed to be negligibly small compared with radial interface velocity. Finite-difference method is used to solve the nondimensional form of steady state continuity, momentum, and energy equations. Calculations are conducted for jet Reynolds numbers ranging from 150 to 600 and Prandtl numbers ranging from 0.85 to 2.65. The effects of above stated parameters on the condensation Nusselt and Stanton numbers which characterize the steady-state interface condensation process are investigated. Detailed analysis to gain a better understanding of the fundamentals of fluid mixing and interface condensation is performed.

  1. Self-heating probe instrument and method for measuring high temperature melting volume change rate of material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junwei; Wang, Zhiping; Lu, Yang; Cheng, Bo

    2013-03-01

    The castings defects are affected by the melting volume change rate of material. The change rate has an important effect on running safety of the high temperature thermal storage chamber, too. But the characteristics of existing measuring installations are complex structure, troublesome operation and low precision. In order to measure the melting volume change rate of material accurately and conveniently, a self-designed measuring instrument, self-heating probe instrument, and measuring method are described. Temperature in heating cavity is controlled by PID temperature controller; melting volume change rate υ and molten density are calculated based on the melt volume which is measured by the instrument. Positive and negative υ represent expansion and shrinkage of the sample volume after melting, respectively. Taking eutectic LiF+CaF2 for example, its melting volume change rate and melting density at 1 123 K are -20.6% and 2 651 kg·m-3 measured by this instrument, which is only 0.71% smaller than literature value. Density and melting volume change rate of industry pure aluminum at 973 K and analysis pure NaCl at 1 123 K are detected by the instrument too. The measure results are agreed with report values. Measuring error sources are analyzed and several improving measures are proposed. In theory, the measuring errors of the change rate and molten density which are measured by the self-designed instrument is nearly 1/20-1/50 of that measured by the refitted mandril thermal expansion instrument. The self-designed instrument and method have the advantages of simple structure, being easy to operate, extensive applicability for material, relatively high accuracy, and most importantly, temperature and sample vapor pressure have little effect on the measurement accuracy. The presented instrument and method solve the problems of complicated structure and procedures, and large measuring errors for the samples with high vapor pressure by existing installations.

  2. Vapor-barrier Vacuum Isolation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor); Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system includes a collimated beam source within a vacuum chamber, a condensable barrier gas, cooling material, a pump, and isolation chambers cooled by the cooling material to condense the barrier gas. Pressure levels of each isolation chamber are substantially greater than in the vacuum chamber. Coaxially-aligned orifices connect a working chamber, the isolation chambers, and the vacuum chamber. The pump evacuates uncondensed barrier gas. The barrier gas blocks entry of atmospheric vapor from the working chamber into the isolation chambers, and undergoes supersonic flow expansion upon entering each isolation chamber. A method includes connecting the isolation chambers to the vacuum chamber, directing vapor to a boundary with the working chamber, and supersonically expanding the vapor as it enters the isolation chambers via the orifices. The vapor condenses in each isolation chamber using the cooling material, and uncondensed vapor is pumped out of the isolation chambers via the pump.

  3. Vaporization response of evaporating drops with finite thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, V. D.; Hammer, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    A numerical computing procedure was developed for calculating vaporization histories of evaporating drops in a combustor in which travelling transverse oscillations occurred. The liquid drop was assumed to have a finite thermal conductivity. The system of equations was solved by using a finite difference method programmed for solution on a high speed digital computer. Oscillations in the ratio of vaporization of an array of repetitivity injected drops in the combustor were obtained from summation of individual drop histories. A nonlinear in-phase frequency response factor for the entire vaporization process to oscillations in pressure was evaluated. A nonlinear out-of-phase response factor, in-phase and out-of-phase harmonic response factors, and a Princeton type 'n' and 'tau' were determined. The resulting data was correlated and is presented in graphical format. Qualitative agreement with the open literature is obtained in the behavior of the in-phase response factor. Quantitatively the results of the present finite conductivity spray analysis do not correlate with the results of a single drop model.

  4. Measurement of AC loss of superconductors by vaporizing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Isono, Takaaki; Matsui, Kunihiro; Fujisaki, Reishi; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1995-07-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the development of superconducting pulse conductors for next period nuclear fusion reactors has been carried out. For these conductors, the rated current of 46 kA and the rated magnetic field of 13T are demanded. When the pulse excitation of superconductors is carried out, AC loss arises, and the temperature of the superconductors rises, and when it exceeds a certain value, the superconducting state cannot be maintained. Therefore, the AC loss of pulse conductors must be limited to a low value. It is difficult to evaluate the AC loss of superconductors by calculation, therefore, it is evaluated by actual measurement. There are magnetizing method and vaporizing method for measuring the AC loss. This time, the equipment for measuring the AC loss of 40 kA class superconductors by vaporizing method which measures the helium gas quantity vaporizing at the time of AC loss occurrence was designed and manufactured for the first time. The method of measuring the AC loss, the structure of the measuring equipment, the helium gas recovering part and the measuring part, the countermeasures for preventing helium gas leakage, the resistance heater for calibration, and the results of measurement are reported. (K.I.)

  5. Development of a simplified model for droplet vaporization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Helin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Droplet vaporization is an essential sub-process of fuel spray in diesel engines,which has important effects on combustion and emissions performance. Development of a simplified droplet vaporization model is necessary to simulate gas mixture formation in cylinder for lower computational costs, and it is also applicable in practical multi-dimension spray calculations for diesel engines. An empirical exponential equation is introduced in this paper to approximate the internal temperature profile of droplet instead of solving the partial differential equation for temperature distribution. Results indicate that the computational cost has been reduced by almost thirty percent in total. Also, the concept of effective diffusion is introduced by using an enlarged diffusivity to take account of the effect of internal circulations inside droplets. The calculated result of the simplified evaporation model has been compared with that of the infinite diffusivity model and one-dimensional model respectively. It shows that the calculation precision of the simplified model is among those two models.

  6. A Concise Handbook of Mathematics, Volume 2,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The document is part two of a two volume handbook of mathematics . The volume contains chapters on integral calculation, differential equations, mathematical analysis, data evaluation, and an appendix on integral equations.

  7. Carbon vaporization into a nonequilibrium, stagnation-point boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T.

    1978-01-01

    The heat transfer to the stagnation point of an ablating carbonaceous heat shield, where both the gas-phase boundary layer and the heterogeneous surface reactions are not in chemical equilibrium, is examined. Specifically, the nonequilibrium changes in the mass fraction profiles of carbon species calculated for frozen flow are studied. A set of equations describing the steady-state, nonequilibrium laminar boundary layer in the axisymmetric stagnation region, over an ablating graphite surface, is solved, with allowance for the effects of finite rate of carbon vaporization.

  8. NUMERICAL STUDY ON COOLING EFFECT POTENTIAL FROM VAPORIZER DEVICE OF LPG VEHICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUJI SETIYO

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Over fuel consumption and increased exhaust gas due to the A/C system have become a serious problem. On the other hand, the LPG-fueled vehicle provides potential cooling from LPG phase changes in the vaporizer. Therefore, this article presents the potential cooling effect calculation from 1998 cm3 spark ignition (SI engine. A numerical study is used to calculate the potential heat absorption of latent and sensible heat transfer during LPG is expanded in the vaporizer. Various LPG compositions are also simulated through the engine speed range from 1000 to 6000 rpm. The result shows that the 1998 cm3 engine capable of generating the potential cooling effect of about 1.0 kW at 1000 rpm and a maximum of up to 1.8 kW at 5600 rpm. The potential cooling effects from the LPG vaporizer contributes about 26% to the A/C system works on eco-driving condition.

  9. Additional facilities to handle PUREX tank farm vapor wastes. Project CG-719

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, V.W.

    1957-01-07

    The liquid high-level radioactive wastes from the separations plant are stored in large underground tanks where radioactive decay of the fission products in storage gives off heat. In the case of the 241-A underground storage tank farm, for Purex wastes, advantage is taken of this heat to self-concentrate the wastes. The present practice is to permit boiling and concentration in the storage tanks. The vapors given off from the boiling wastes are collected in a vapor header and passed through a deentrainment vessel and on to two contact condensers where the vapors are condensed and intermixed with waste cooling water. Samples taken of the waste vapors have shown a considerable amount of cesium{sup 137} present as well as other types of radioactive material carry over from the waste tanks. For this reason the contact condenser effluent is discharged to an underground crib 216-A-8. Underground disposal of the increasing volume of condenser effluent as larger waste volumes are accumulated in the underground tanks presents a critical problem which is further complicated by the desirability to transfer the condensate waste to new disposal facilities near the 200 West area. The intent of this report is to present the scope of the facilities required to reduce the volume of potentially radioactive condensate waste from the 241-A tank farm and to dispose of this waste through supplemental cribbing. An analysis of the 216-A-8 crib capabilities in relation to the projected flows clearly indicates that if other facilities to reduce the contaminated waste stream volume are not provided, an extensive and costly crib system will be required. The economical solution to the problem is to provide surface condensers to permit segregation of the condensed waste vapors from the cooling water, condensate collection and transfer facilities, and a new condensate disposal crib near the 200 West Area. Data which support this solution are provided in this report.

  10. CFD Modeling of LNG Spill: Humidity Effect on Vapor Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannissi, S. G.; Venetsanos, A. G.; Markatos, N.

    2015-09-01

    The risks entailed by an accidental spill of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) should be indentified and evaluated, in order to design measures for prevention and mitigation in LNG terminals. For this purpose, simulations are considered a useful tool to study LNG spills and to understand the mechanisms that influence the vapor dispersion. In the present study, the ADREA-HF CFD code is employed to simulate the TEEX1 experiment. The experiment was carried out at the Brayton Fire Training Field, which is affiliated with the Texas A&M University system and involves LNG release and dispersion over water surface in open- obstructed environment. In the simulation the source was modeled as a two-phase jet enabling the prediction of both the vapor dispersion and the liquid pool spreading. The conservation equations for the mixture are solved along with the mass fraction for natural gas. Due to the low prevailing temperatures during the spill ambient humidity condenses and this might affect the vapor dispersion. This effect was examined in this work by solving an additional conservation equation for the water mass fraction. Two different models were tested: the hydrodynamic equilibrium model which assumes kinetic equilibrium between the phases and the non hydrodynamic equilibrium model, in order to assess the effect of slip velocity on the prediction. The slip velocity is defined as the difference between the liquid phase and the vapor phase and is calculated using the algebraic slip model. Constant droplet diameter of three different sizes and a lognormal distribution of the droplet diameter were applied and the results are discussed and compared with the measurements.

  11. Vaporization of perfluorocarbon droplets using optical irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric; Rui, Min; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Micron-sized liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets are currently being investigated as activatable agents for medical imaging and cancer therapy. After injection into the bloodstream, superheated PFC droplets can be vaporized to a gas phase for ultrasound imaging, or for cancer therapy via targeted drug delivery and vessel occlusion. Droplet vaporization has been previously demonstrated using acoustic methods. We propose using laser irradiation as a means to induce PFC droplet vaporization using a method we term optical droplet vaporization (ODV). In order to facilitate ODV of PFC droplets which have negligible absorption in the infrared spectrum, optical absorbing nanoparticles were incorporated into the droplet. In this study, micron-sized PFC droplets loaded with silica-coated lead sulfide (PbS) nanoparticles were evaluated using a 1064 nm laser and ultra-high frequency photoacoustic ultrasound (at 200 and 375 MHz). The photoacoustic response was proportional to nanoparticle loading and successful optical droplet vaporization of individual PFC droplets was confirmed using photoacoustic, acoustic, and optical measurements. A minimum laser fluence of 1.4 J/cm(2) was required to vaporize the droplets. The vaporization of PFC droplets via laser irradiation can lead to the activation of PFC agents in tissues previously not accessible using standard ultrasound-based techniques.

  12. Calculation of Precipitable Water for Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy Aircraft (SOFIA): Airplane in the Night Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Pey Chun; Busby, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, is the new generation airborne observatory station based at NASA s Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility, Palmdale, CA, to study the universe. Since the observatory detects infrared energy, water vapor is a concern in the atmosphere due to its known capacity to absorb infrared energy emitted by astronomical objects. Although SOFIA is hoping to fly above 99% of water vapor in the atmosphere it is still possible to affect astronomical observation. Water vapor is one of the toughest parameter to measure in the atmosphere, several atmosphere modeling are used to calculate water vapor loading. The water vapor loading, or Precipitable water, is being calculated by Matlab along the planned flight path. Over time, these results will help SOFIA to plan flights to regions of lower water vapor loading and hopefully improve the imagery collection of these astronomical features.

  13. Vaporization thermodynamics of K2S and K2SO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennet, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The vaporization reactions, vapor pressures, and thermodynamics of potassium sulfide and potassium sulfite were studied for purposes of providing fundamental data for the seed cycle in magnetohydrodynamic electric power generation. Rate of effusion studies, supported by tube furnace experiments, X-ray powder diffraction, mass spectrometry and appropriate chemical analyses and tests, revealed that potassium sulfite disproportionates at high temperatures to form potassium sulfide and potassium sulfate. Potassium sulfide was observed to vaporize incongruently, the initial vapors beng predominantly potassium atoms, with minor species being S2 and various K-S molecules. The ratio of K/S2 in the vapor is very large initially and decreases steadily with prolonged heating. Several materials were evaluated for purposes of containing K2S/K2SO3 at temperatures or = 800 C: Pt, Mo, W, quartz, machinable glass, BN, high density graphite, pyrolytic coated graphite, and alumina. Of these, only alumina was observed to be chemically inert to both K2S but reacted with K2SO3. The other materials were not suitable for either substance. Thermodynamic calculations based on measured vapor pressures and approximate free energy functions are described. Results from isothermal total mass loss experiments and from thermogravimetric experiments are also included.

  14. Radiative transfer code: Application to the calculation of PAR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Radiative transfer code: Application to the calculation of PAR. DEVRED EMMANUEL, DUBUISSON .... water vapor from Leckner (1978), with absorption coefficients for these gases taken from Gregg and. Carder (1990). ... law for the size distribution. The particle size ranges from 0.01 "m to 50 "m. 3. Validation of the code.

  15. An Analytical Formula for Potential Water Vapor in an Atmosphere of Constant Lapse Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Varmaghani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate calculation of precipitable water vapor (PWV in the atmosphere has always been a matter of importance for meteorologists. Potential water vapor (POWV or maximum precipitable water vapor can be an appropriate base for estimation of probable maximum precipitation (PMP in an area, leading to probable maximum flood (PMF and flash flood management systems. PWV and POWV have miscellaneously been estimated by means of either discrete solutions such as tables, diagrams or empirical methods; however, there is no analytical formula for POWV even in a particular atmospherical condition. In this article, fundamental governing equations required for analytical calculation of POWV are first introduced. Then, it will be shown that this POWV calculation relies on a Riemann integral solution over a range of altitude whose integrand is merely a function of altitude. The solution of the integral gives rise to a series function which is bypassed by approximation of saturation vapor pressure in the range of -55 to 55 degrees Celsius, and an analytical formula for POWV in an atmosphere of constant lapse rate is proposed. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the suggested equation, exact calculations of saturated adiabatic lapse rate (SALR at different surface temperatures were performed. The formula was compared with both the diagrams from the US Weather Bureau and SALR. The results demonstrated unquestionable capability of analytical solutions and also equivalent functions.

  16. Conversion function between the Linke turbidity and the atmospheric water vapor and aerosol content

    OpenAIRE

    Ineichen, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    This technical note presents a conversion function between the widely used Linke turbidity coefficient TL, the atmospheric water vapor and urban aerosol content. It takes into account the altitude of the application site. The function is based on radiative transfer calculations and validated with the help of an independent clear sky model. Its precision is around 0.12 units of TL.

  17. Isobaric (vapor + liquid) equilibria of the binary system maleic anhydride and diethyl phthalate at p = (2.67, 5.33, and 8.00) kPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Wei [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu Zhihua [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tian Yiling [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)]. E-mail: sdwfliu@yahoo.com.cn; Zhu Rongjiao [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2006-11-15

    Saturated vapor pressures of pure diethyl phthalate were measured with the ebulliometer. And isobaric (vapor + liquid) equilibrium data for the binary system (maleic anhydride + diethyl phthalate) at p = (2.67, 5.33, and 8.00) kPa were determined using the ebulliometric method. The parameters of the NRTL model for the binary system were obtained by calculating equilibrium compositions of the liquid and vapor phase with the experimental equilibrium temperatures, pressures and feed compositions. Moreover (vapor + liquid) equilibrium data for the binary system were predicted by use of the UNIFAC model. Predicted results were compared with those from the ebulliometric method, and showed good agreement.

  18. Water Vapor Permeation in Plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Paul E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Polyvinyl toluene (PVT) and polystyrene (PS) (referred to as “plastic scintillator”) are used for gamma ray detectors. A significant decrease in radiation detection performance has been observed in some PVT-based gamma-ray detectors in systems in outdoor environments as they age. Recent studies have revealed that plastic scintillator can undergo an environmentally related material degradation that adversely affects gamma ray detection performance under certain conditions and histories. A significant decrease in sensitivity has been seen in some gamma-ray detectors in some systems as they age. The degradation of sensitivity of plastic scintillator over time is due to a variety of factors, and the term “aging” is used to encompass all factors. Some plastic scintillator samples show no aging effects (no significant change in sensitivity over more than 10 years), while others show severe aging (significant change in sensitivity in less than 5 years). Aging effects arise from weather (variations in heat and humidity), chemical exposure, mechanical stress, light exposure, and loss of volatile components. The damage produced by these various causes can be cumulative, causing observable damage to increase over time. Damage may be reversible up to some point, but becomes permanent under some conditions. The objective of this report is to document the phenomenon of permeability of plastic scintillator to water vapor and to derive the relationship between time, temperature, humidity and degree of water penetration in plastic. Several conclusions are documented about the properties of water permeability of plastic scintillator.

  19. [The use of laser vaporization for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, D V; Kholtobin, D P; Kul'chavenia, E V; Aĭzikovich, B I

    2013-01-01

    Results of use of UroBeam laser diode in 72 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were analyzed. Average prostate volume was 67.29 +/- 26.72 cm3, the duration of vaporization--69.2 +/- 23.7 min. Blood loss was minimal. In the period from 2 weeks to 4 months after surgery, 9 patients have developed acute urinary retention. In the early postoperative period, acute prostatitis was diagnosed in 7 patients and was jugulated using drug treatment. The laser vaporization of BPH led to a three-fold reduction in the severity of urinary disorders and increase the urinary flow rate. The combination of laser vaporization of the prostate with transurethral resection of the prostate allow to improve the recovery of urination after surgery.

  20. Vapor-liquid equilibria for acetone + chloroform + methanol and constituent binary systems at 101. 3 kPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiaki, Toshihiko (Nihon Univ., Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry); Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Kojima, Kazuo (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry)

    1994-10-01

    Vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) and azeotropic data, which are useful for the design and operation of separation processes, have been observed for many systems. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for acetone + chloroform + methanol and for the constituent binary systems chloroform + methanol and chloroform + acetone were measured at 101.3 kPa using a liquid-vapor ebullition-type equilibrium still. The experimental data were correlated with the extended Redlich-Kister and Wilson equations. The data were best correlated and completely calculated for the ternary and three binary azeotropic data using the extended Redlich-Kister equation.

  1. Modeling of the vapor cycle of Laguna Verde with the PEPSE code to conditions of thermal power licensed at present (2027 MWt); Modelado del ciclo de vapor de Laguna Verde con el codigo PEPSE a condiciones de potencia termica actualmente licenciada (2027 MWt)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda G, M. A.; Maya G, F.; Medel C, J. E.; Cardenas J, J. B.; Cruz B, H. J.; Mercado V, J. J., E-mail: miguel.castaneda01@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    By means of the use of the performance evaluation of power system efficiencies (PEPSE) code was modeled the vapor cycle of the nuclear power station of Laguna Verde to reproduce the nuclear plant behavior to conditions of thermal power, licensed at present (2027 MWt); with the purpose of having a base line before the implementation of the project of extended power increase. The model of the gauged vapor cycle to reproduce the nuclear plant conditions makes use of the PEPSE model, design case of the vapor cycle of nuclear power station of Laguna Verde, which has as main components of the model the great equipment of the vapor cycle of Laguna Verde. The design case model makes use of information about the design requirements of each equipment for theoretically calculating the electric power of exit, besides thermodynamic conditions of the vapor cycle in different points. Starting from the design model and making use of data of the vapor cycle measured in the nuclear plant; the adjustment factors were calculated for the different equipment s of the vapor cycle, to reproduce with the PEPSE model the real vapor cycle of Laguna Verde. Once characterized the model of the vapor cycle of Laguna Verde, we can realize different sensibility studies to determine the effects macros to the vapor cycle by the variation of certain key parameters. (Author)

  2. Vaporization of trace element species from coal under gasification and combustion conditions: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1989-03-01

    The objective of this project was to establish the chemical forms and relative abundance of trace inorganic vapor species in coal during combustion and gasification. A joint experimental and calculational program to observe the vaporization of Illinois No. 6 bituminous and Wyodak subbituminous was performed. Experimental studies were performed by Knudsen cell mass spectroscopy on samples of each coal that were ashed at low temperature by an oxygen plasma. To simulate actual coal more closely, some samples were only partially ashed to retain more of the original organic components. Vapor species were identified and their abundances measured over the temperature range 300-1700 K. In the first year of the program, vaporization from the coal ash alone was studied. Dynamic partial pressures were measured against temperature and time. Vapor species of 32 major or trace elements were identified. During the second year of the program, mass spectrometry experiments addressed the effects of added gases (O/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/O) on the identities and abundances of trace element vapor species. Coincident with experimental studies, trace element vaporization behavior was evaluated by Gibbs energy minimization calculations. A data base including both solution and pure condensed and gaseous components was compiled. The behavior of Wyodak coal at 1 atm total pressure was evaluated over the temperature range 300--1800 K and the oxygen partial pressure range from 10/sup /minus/1/ to 10/sup /minus/25/ atm. Results were used to evaluate the effects on trace element volatility of several proposed strategies for containment removal. 13 refs., 23 figs., 23 tabs.

  3. Calculation of heat capacities of light and heavy water by path-integral molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Motoyuki; Shinoda, Wataru

    2005-10-01

    As an application of atomistic simulation methods to heat capacities, path-integral molecular dynamics has been used to calculate the constant-volume heat capacities of light and heavy water in the gas, liquid, and solid phases. While the classical simulation based on conventional molecular dynamics has estimated the heat capacities too high, the quantum simulation based on path-integral molecular dynamics has given reasonable results based on the simple point-charge/flexible potential model. The calculated heat capacities (divided by the Boltzmann constant) in the quantum simulation are 3.1 in the vapor H2O at 300 K, 6.9 in the liquid H2O at 300 K, and 4.1 in the ice Ih H2O at 250 K, respectively, which are comparable to the experimental data of 3.04, 8.9, and 4.1, respectively. The quantum simulation also reproduces the isotope effect. The heat capacity in the liquid D2O has been calculated to be 10% higher than that of H2O, while it is 13% higher in the experiment. The results demonstrate that the path-integral simulation is a promising approach to quantitatively evaluate the heat capacities for molecular systems, taking account of quantum-mechanical vibrations as well as strongly anharmonic motions.

  4. Equilibrium between a Droplet and Surrounding Vapor: A Discussion of Finite Size Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröster, Andreas; Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2018-01-10

    In a theoretical description of homogeneous nucleation one frequently assumes an "equilibrium" coexistence of a liquid droplet with surrounding vapor of a density exceeding that of a saturated vapor at bulk vapor-liquid two-phase coexistence. Thereby one ignores the caveat that in the thermodynamic limit, for which the vapor would be called supersaturated, such states will at best be metastable with finite lifetime, and thus not be well-defined within equilibrium statistical mechanics. In contrast, in a system of finite volume stable equilibrium coexistence of droplet and supersaturated vapor at constant total density is perfectly possible, and numerical analysis of equilibrium free energies of finite systems allows to obtain physically relevant results. In particular, such an analysis can be used to derive the dependence of the droplet surface tension γ(R) on the droplet radius R by computer simulations. Unfortunately, however, the precision of the results produced by this approach turns out to be seriously affected by a hitherto unexplained spurious dependence of γ(R) on the total volume V of the simulation box. These finite size effects are studied here for the standard Ising/lattice gas model in d = 2 dimensions and an Ising model on the face-centered cubic lattice with 3-spin interaction, lacking symmetry between vapor and liquid phases. There also the analogous case of bubbles surrounded by undersaturated liquid is treated. It is argued that (at least a large part of) the finite size effects result from the translation entropy of the droplet or bubble in the system. This effect has been shown earlier to occur also for planar interfaces for simulations in the slab geometry. Consequences for the estimation of the Tolman length are briefly discussed. In particular, we find clear evidence that in d = 2 the leading correction of the curvature-dependent interface tension is a logarithmic term, compatible with theoretical expectations, and we show that then the

  5. Vapor Cavitation in Dynamically Loaded Journal Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, B. O.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    High speed motion camera experiments were performed on dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length to diameter ratio of the bearing, the speed of the roller and the tube, the surface material of the roller, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. One hundred and thirty-four cases were filmed. The occurrence of vapor cavitation was clearly evident in the films and figures presented. Vapor cavitation was found to occur when the tensile stress applied to the oil exceeded the tensile strength of the oil or the binding of the oil to the surface. The physical situation in which vapor cavitation occurs is during the squeezing and sliding motion within a bearing. Besides being able to accurately capture the vapor cavitation on film, an analysis of the formation and collapse of the cavitation bubbles and characteristics of the bubble content are presented.

  6. External fuel vaporization study, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szetela, E. J.; Chiappetta, L.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to devise and evaluate techniques for the external vaporization of fuel for use in an aircraft gas turbine with characteristics similar to the Energy Efficient Engine (E(3)). Three vaporizer concepts were selected and they were analyzed from the standpoint of fuel thermal stability, integration of the vaporizer system into the aircraft engine, engine and vaporizer dynamic response, startup and altitude restart, engine performance, control requirements, safety, and maintenance. One of the concepts was found to improve the performance of the baseline E(3) engine without seriously compromising engine startup and power change response. Increased maintenance is required because of the need for frequent pyrolytic cleaning of the surfaces in contact with hot fuel.

  7. Impact vaporization: Late time phenomena from experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, P. H.; Gault, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    While simple airflow produced by the outward movement of the ejecta curtain can be scaled to large dimensions, the interaction between an impact-vaporized component and the ejecta curtain is more complicated. The goal of these experiments was to examine such interaction in a real system involving crater growth, ejection of material, two phased mixtures of gas and dust, and strong pressure gradients. The results will be complemented by theoretical studies at laboratory scales in order to separate the various parameters for planetary scale processes. These experiments prompt, however, the following conclusions that may have relevance at broader scales. First, under near vacuum or low atmospheric pressures, an expanding vapor cloud scours the surrounding surface in advance of arriving ejecta. Second, the effect of early-time vaporization is relatively unimportant at late-times. Third, the overpressure created within the crater cavity by significant vaporization results in increased cratering efficiency and larger aspect ratios.

  8. DMSP SSMT/2 - Atmospheric Water Vapor Profiler

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SSM/T-2 sensor is a five channel, total power microwave radiometer with three channels situated symmetrically about the 183.31 GHz water vapor resonance line and...

  9. Water Vapor Corrosion in EBC Constituent Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Benjamin; Fox, Dennis; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) materials are sought after to protect ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in high temperature turbine engines. CMCs are particularly susceptible to degradation from oxidation, Ca-Al-Mg-Silicate (CMAS), and water vapor during high temperature operation which necessitates the use of EBCs. However, the work presented here focuses on water vapor induced recession in EBC constituent materials. For example, in the presence of water vapor, silica will react to form Si(OH)4 (g) which will eventually corrode the material away. To investigate the recession rate in EBC constituent materials under high temperature water vapor conditions, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) is employed. The degradation process can then be modeled through a simple boundary layer expression. Ultimately, comparisons are made between various single- and poly-crystalline materials (e.g. TiO2, SiO2) against those found in literature.

  10. Static Water Vapor Feed Electrolyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a static vapor feed electrolyzer utilizing an advanced bipolar plate that produces sub-saturated H2 and O2 is proposed. This novel bipolar design can...

  11. GOES WATER VAPOR TRANSPORT V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GOES Water Vapor Transport CD contains nineteen months of geostationary satellite-derived products from the GOES-8 satellite spanning the 1987-1988 El Nino...

  12. Indoor Air Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Risk Management Research Laboratory has developed a technology transfer document regarding management and treatment of vapor intrusion into building structures. This document describes the range of mitigation technologies available.

  13. Arctic Water Vapor Characteristics from Rawinsondes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A gridded climatological monthly-mean data base of Arctic water vapor characteristics has been assembled by combining fixed station data with data from soundings...

  14. TO PURGE OR NOT TO PURGE? VOC CONCENTRATION CHANGES DURING LINE VOLUME PURGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil vapor surveys are commonly used as a screening technique to delineate volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminant plumes and provide information for soil sampling plans. Traditionally, three purge volumes of vapor are removed before a sample is collected. One facet of this s...

  15. Magnetic Field Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Calculator will calculate the total magnetic field, including components (declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, northerly intensity,...

  16. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIAAA College Materials Supporting Research Special Features CollegeAIM College Administrators Parents & Students Home > Special Features > Calculators > Alcohol Calorie Calculator Weekly Total 0 Calories Alcohol Calorie ...

  17. Numerical analysis of fragmentation mechanisms in vapor explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshizuka, Seiichi; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1998-01-01

    Fragmentation of molten metal is the key process in vapor explosions. However this process is so rapid that the mechanisms have not been clarified yet in the experimental studies. Besides, numerical simulation is difficult because we have to analyze water, steam and molten metal simultaneously with evaporation and fragmentation. The authors have been developing a new numerical method, the Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method, based on moving particles and their interactions. Grids are not necessary. Incompressible flows with fragmentation on free surfaces have been calculated successfully using the MPS method. In the present study numerical simulation of the fragmentation processes using the MPS method is carried out to investigate the mechanisms. A numerical model to calculate evaporation from water to steam is developed. In this model, new particles are generated on water-steam interfaces. Effect of evaporation is also investigated. Growth of the filament is not accelerated when the normal evaporation is considered. This is because the normal evaporation needs a longer time than the moment of the jet impingement, though the filament growth is decided in this moment. Next, rapid evaporation based on spontaneous nucleation is considered. The filament growth is markedly accelerated. This result is consistent with the experimental fact that the spontaneous nucleation temperature is a necessary condition of small-scale vapor explosions. (J.P.N.)

  18. Investigating the source, transport, and isotope composition of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Griffis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing atmospheric humidity and convective precipitation over land provide evidence of intensification of the hydrologic cycle – an expected response to surface warming. The extent to which terrestrial ecosystems modulate these hydrologic factors is important to understand feedbacks in the climate system. We measured the oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of water vapor at a very tall tower (185 m in the upper Midwest, United States, to diagnose the sources, transport, and fractionation of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer (PBL over a 3-year period (2010 to 2012. These measurements represent the first set of annual water vapor isotope observations for this region. Several simple isotope models and cross-wavelet analyses were used to assess the importance of the Rayleigh distillation process, evaporation, and PBL entrainment processes on the isotope composition of water vapor. The vapor isotope composition at this tall tower site showed a large seasonal amplitude (mean monthly δ18Ov ranged from −40.2 to −15.9 ‰ and δ2Hv ranged from −278.7 to −113.0 ‰ and followed the familiar Rayleigh distillation relation with water vapor mixing ratio when considering the entire hourly data set. However, this relation was strongly modulated by evaporation and PBL entrainment processes at timescales ranging from hours to several days. The wavelet coherence spectra indicate that the oxygen isotope ratio and the deuterium excess (dv of water vapor are sensitive to synoptic and PBL processes. According to the phase of the coherence analyses, we show that evaporation often leads changes in dv, confirming that it is a potential tracer of regional evaporation. Isotope mixing models indicate that on average about 31 % of the growing season PBL water vapor is derived from regional evaporation. However, isoforcing calculations and mixing model analyses for high PBL water vapor mixing ratio events ( >  25 mmol mol−1

  19. Investigating the source, transport, and isotope composition of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, Timothy J.; Wood, Jeffrey D.; Baker, John M.; Lee, Xuhui; Xiao, Ke; Chen, Zichong; Welp, Lisa R.; Schultz, Natalie M.; Gorski, Galen; Chen, Ming; Nieber, John

    2016-04-01

    Increasing atmospheric humidity and convective precipitation over land provide evidence of intensification of the hydrologic cycle - an expected response to surface warming. The extent to which terrestrial ecosystems modulate these hydrologic factors is important to understand feedbacks in the climate system. We measured the oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of water vapor at a very tall tower (185 m) in the upper Midwest, United States, to diagnose the sources, transport, and fractionation of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a 3-year period (2010 to 2012). These measurements represent the first set of annual water vapor isotope observations for this region. Several simple isotope models and cross-wavelet analyses were used to assess the importance of the Rayleigh distillation process, evaporation, and PBL entrainment processes on the isotope composition of water vapor. The vapor isotope composition at this tall tower site showed a large seasonal amplitude (mean monthly δ18Ov ranged from -40.2 to -15.9 ‰ and δ2Hv ranged from -278.7 to -113.0 ‰) and followed the familiar Rayleigh distillation relation with water vapor mixing ratio when considering the entire hourly data set. However, this relation was strongly modulated by evaporation and PBL entrainment processes at timescales ranging from hours to several days. The wavelet coherence spectra indicate that the oxygen isotope ratio and the deuterium excess (dv) of water vapor are sensitive to synoptic and PBL processes. According to the phase of the coherence analyses, we show that evaporation often leads changes in dv, confirming that it is a potential tracer of regional evaporation. Isotope mixing models indicate that on average about 31 % of the growing season PBL water vapor is derived from regional evaporation. However, isoforcing calculations and mixing model analyses for high PBL water vapor mixing ratio events ( > 25 mmol mol-1) indicate that regional evaporation can account

  20. Vapor phase transformer drying – Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Steeves, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    Vapor phase drying is the most effective method for drying transformer insulation in a manufacturing setting. The process does not lend itself well to transformer drying in the field for a variety of reasons, including the difficulty of removing residual kerosene which can cause a potential change in transformer oil flash point. Several techniques are available for transformer insulation drying in both the field and in manufacturing. Vapor phase drying as part of transformer manufacturing is ...

  1. Vapor phase transformer drying – Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Steeves, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    Vapor phase drying is the most effective method for drying transformer insulation in a manufacturing setting. The process does not lend itself well to transformer drying in the field for a variety of reasons, including the difficulty of removing residual kerosene which can cause a potential change in transformer oil flash point. Several techniques are available for transformer insulation drying in both the field and in manufacturing. Vapor phase drying as part of transformer manufacturing is ...

  2. Volatiles and Exsolved Vapor in Volcanic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Edmonds, Marie; Wallace, PJ

    2017-01-01

    The role of volatiles in magma dynamics and eruption style is fundamental. Magmatic volatiles partition between melt, crystal, and vapor phases and, in so doing, change magma properties. This has consequences for magma buoyancy and phase equilibria. An exsolved vapor phase, which may be distributed unevenly through reservoirs, contains sulfur and metals that are either transported into the atmosphere or into ore deposits. This article reviews the controls on volatile solubility and the method...

  3. Vapor-Induced Phase Transformations in Docetaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Tatini, Lakshmi Kumar; Krishna Reddy, K. V. S. R.; Someswara Rao, N.

    2012-01-01

    Vapor-induced transformations of docetaxel anhydrous (form DA) under ambient conditions have been studied using methanol, ethanol, and water as the solvent media. The online vapor-induced transformations were monitored by powder X-ray diffractometry. New solid forms (solvates/hydrates/anhydrous) of docetaxel anhydrous were obtained in stoichiometric ratios which were characterized completely using powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimeter, thermogravimetric analysis, and spe...

  4. Psychological performance and long-term exposure to mercury vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piikivi, L.; Haenninen, H.; Martelin, T.; Mantere, P.

    1984-02-01

    In a cross-sectional study the psychological test performances of a group of 36 male chlorine-alkali workers were compared with the level of exposure to mercury and to the corresponding results of referents. The mercury exposure had lasted for at least 10 years and had been controlled by regular health examinations and urine analyses. Several dose indicators were calculated. The more heavily exposed workers performed more poorly on the verbal intelligence test (Similarities) than the referents did. Impairments in the memory tests showed a statistically significant correlation with the actual exposure level, especially with the actual concentration of mercury in blood. The monitoring of mercury in blood can be useful in health surveillance programs. The level of mercury in the air was calculated from the dose indicators. The results support the recommended exposure limit of 25 micrograms/m/sub 3/ for metallic mercury vapor in the air as a level avoiding adverse effects in exposed workers.

  5. Optical monitor for water vapor concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebabian, Paul

    1998-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma.

  6. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  7. Vapor phase lubrication of high temperature alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyaloglu, B.F.; Graham, E.E.; Oreskovic, T.; Hajj, C.G. [Cleveland State Univ., OH (United States)

    1995-06-01

    In a previous study, it was found that when a nickel-based superalloy IN750 was heated to high temperatures, a passive layer of aluminum oxide formed on the surface, preventing vapor phase lubrication. In this study, two nickel-chrome-iron alloys and a nickel-copper alloy were studied for high temperature lubrication to see if these alloys, which contained small amounts of aluminum, would exhibit similar behavior. It was found that under static conditions, all three alloys formed a lubricious nodular coating when exposed to a vapor of aryl phosphate. Under dynamic sliding conditions at 500{degrees}C, these alloys were successfully lubricated with a coefficient of friction of 0.1 and no detectable wear. In order to explain these results, a direct correlation between successful vapor phase lubrication and the composition of the alloys containing aluminum has been proposed. If the ratio of copper/aluminum or iron/aluminum is greater that 100 vapor phase, lubrication will be successful. If the ratio is less than 10, a passive aluminum oxide layer will prevent vapor phase lubrication. By selecting alloys with a high iron or copper content, vapor phase lubrication can provide excellent lubrication at high temperatures. 14 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Absorption of Irrigation Fluid During Thulium Laser Vaporization of the Prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllhaupt, Gautier; Abt, Dominik; Mordasini, Livio; Köhle, Olivia; Engeler, Daniel S; Lüthi, Andreas; Sauter, Rafael; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Schwab, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    To assess the prevalence and extent of irrigation fluid absorption during thulium laser vaporization of the prostate. Fifty-four patients undergoing thulium laser vaporization of the prostate were prospectively included into the trial at a tertiary referral center. Isotonic saline containing 1% ethanol was used for intraoperative irrigation. Absorption of irrigation fluid was measured periodically during the operation using the expired breath ethanol technique. Among others, intra- and postoperative changes in biochemical and hematological laboratory findings were assessed. Absorption of irrigation fluid was detected in 7 out of 54 (13%) patients with a median absorption volume of 265 mL (227-615). No significant differences of intra- and postoperative blood parameters were observed between absorbers and nonabsorbers. No risk factor (i.e., age, prostate size, surgery duration, applied energy, and amount of irrigation fluid) for the occurrence of fluid absorption could be identified. Absorption of irrigation fluid also occurs during thulium laser vaporization of the prostate and should be kept in mind, especially in patients at a high cardiovascular risk. However, compared with previously assessed resection and vaporization techniques, thulium vaporization might have a favorable safety profile regarding fluid absorption.

  9. Enthalpy Calculation for Pressurized Oxy- coal Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Weihong Wu; Jingli Huang

    2012-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is recognizing one of the most promising available technologies that zero emission accomplishment may be in the offing. With coal burned under the pressure of 6MPa and oxygen-enriched conditions, the high temperature and high pressure gaseous combustion product is composed of 95% CO2 and water-vapor, with the rest of O2, N2 and so on. However, once lauded as classic approach of resolving fuel gas enthalpy calculation pertaining to ideal gas at atmospheric pressure was rest...

  10. Inactivation of Mold Spores from Moist Carpet Using Steam Vapor: Contact Time and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kee-Hean; Emo, Brett; Lewis, Roger D; Kennedy, Jason; Thummalakunta, Laxmi N A; Elliott, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Steam vapor has been shown to reduce viable mold spores in carpet, but the minimal effective temperature and contact time has not been established. This study evaluated the effectiveness of steam vapor in reducing the number of viable mold spores in carpet as a function of temperature and contact time. Seventy carpet samples were inoculated with a liquid suspension of Cladosporium sphaerospermum and incubated over a water-saturated foam carpet pad for 24 hr. Steam was applied to the samples as the temperature was measured from the carpet backing. Contact time was closely monitored over seven time intervals: 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 sec. Following steam vapor treatment, mold spores were extracted from the carpet samples and the extract was plated on DG-18 plates at 1:1, 1:10, 1:100 dilutions followed by one week of incubation. Raw colony forming units were determined using an automated colony counter and adjusted based on dilution factor, extraction volume, and plated volume. Analysis of variance and linear regression were used to test for statistically significant relationships. Steam contact time exhibited a linear relationship to observed temperature of carpet backing (F = 90.176, R(2) = 0.609). Observed temperature of carpet backing had a positive relationship to percent reduction of mold (F = 76.605, R(2) = 0.569). Twelve seconds of steam vapor contact time was needed to achieve over 90% mold reduction on moist carpet.

  11. Vapor deposition on doublet airfoil substrates: Control of coating thickness and microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, Theron M.; Zhao, Hengbei; Wadley, Haydn N. G., E-mail: haydn@virginia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, 395 McCormick Rd., P.O. Box 400745, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Gas jet assisted vapor deposition processes for depositing coatings are conducted at higher pressures than conventional physical vapor deposition methods, and have shown promise for coating complex shaped substrates including those with non-line-of-sight (NLS) regions on their surface. These regions typically receive vapor atoms at a lower rate and with a wider incident angular distribution than substrate regions in line-of-sight (LS) of the vapor source. To investigate the coating of such substrates, the thickness and microstructure variation along the inner (curved) surfaces of a model doublet airfoil containing both LS and NLS regions has been investigated. Results from atomistic simulations and experiments confirm that the coating's thickness is thinner in flux-shadowed regions than in other regions for all the coating processes investigated. They also indicated that the coatings columnar microstructure and pore volume fraction vary with surface location through the LS to NLS transition zone. A substrate rotation strategy for optimizing the thickness over the entire doublet airfoil surface was investigated, and led to the identification of a process that resulted in only small variation of coating thickness, columnar growth angle, and pore volume fraction on all doublet airfoil surfaces.

  12. Potential harmful health effects of inhaling nicotine-free shisha-pen vapor: a chemical risk assessment of the main components propylene glycol and glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienhuis, Anne S; Soeteman-Hernandez, Lya G; Bos, Peter Mj; Cremers, Hans Wjm; Klerx, Walther N; Talhout, Reinskje

    2015-01-01

    A shisha-pen is an electronic cigarette variant that is advertised to mimic the taste of a water pipe, or shisha. The aim of this study was to assess the potential harmful health effects caused by inhaling the vapor of a nicotine-free shisha-pen. Gas chromatography analysis was performed to determine the major components in shisha-pen vapor. Risk assessment was performed using puff volumes of e-cigarettes and "normal" cigarettes and a 1-puff scenario (one-time exposure). The concentrations that reached the airways and lungs after using a shisha-pen were calculated and compared to data from published toxicity studies. The main components in shisha-pen vapor are propylene glycol and glycerol (54%/46%). One puff (50 to 70 mL) results in exposure of propylene glycol and glycerol of 430 to 603 mg/m(3) and 348 to 495 mg/m(3), respectively. These exposure concentrations were higher than the points of departure for airway irritation based on a human study (propylene glycol, mean concentration of 309 mg/m(3)) and a rat study (glycerol, no-observed adverse effect level of 165 mg/m(3)). Already after one puff of the shisha-pen, the concentrations of propylene glycol and glycerol are sufficiently high to potentially cause irritation of the airways. New products such as the shisha-pen should be detected and risks should be assessed to inform regulatory actions aimed at limiting potential harm that may be caused to consumers and protecting young people to take up smoking.

  13. Vapor flux and recrystallization during dry snow metamorphism under a steady temperature gradient as observed by time-lapse micro-tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Pinzer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dry snow metamorphism under an external temperature gradient is the most common type of recrystallization of snow on the ground. The changes in snow microstructure modify the physical properties of snow, and therefore an understanding of this process is essential for many disciplines, from modeling the effects of snow on climate to assessing avalanche risk. We directly imaged the microstructural changes in snow during temperature gradient metamorphism (TGM under a constant gradient of 50 K m−1, using in situ time-lapse X-ray micro-tomography. This novel and non-destructive technique directly reveals the amount of ice that sublimates and is deposited during metamorphism, in addition to the exact locations of these phase changes. We calculated the average time that an ice volume stayed in place before it sublimated and found a characteristic residence time of 2–3 days. This means that most of the ice changes its phase from solid to vapor and back many times in a seasonal snowpack where similar temperature conditions can be found. Consistent with such a short timescale, we observed a mass turnover of up to 60% of the total ice mass per day. The concept of hand-to-hand transport for the water vapor flux describes the observed changes very well. However, we did not find evidence for a macroscopic vapor diffusion enhancement. The picture of {temperature gradient metamorphism} produced by directly observing the changing microstructure sheds light on the micro-physical processes and could help to improve models that predict the physical properties of snow.

  14. Small-Volume Injections: Evaluation of Volume Administration Deviation From Intended Injection Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Matthew K; Chen, Michael I; Claure, Rebecca E; Drover, David R; Efron, Bradley; Fitch, William L; Hammer, Gregory B

    2017-10-01

    In the perioperative period, anesthesiologists and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses routinely prepare and administer small-volume IV injections, yet the accuracy of delivered medication volumes in this setting has not been described. In this ex vivo study, we sought to characterize the degree to which small-volume injections (≤0.5 mL) deviated from the intended injection volumes among a group of pediatric anesthesiologists and pediatric postanesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses. We hypothesized that as the intended injection volumes decreased, the deviation from those intended injection volumes would increase. Ten attending pediatric anesthesiologists and 10 pediatric PACU nurses each performed a series of 10 injections into a simulated patient IV setup. Practitioners used separate 1-mL tuberculin syringes with removable 18-gauge needles (Becton-Dickinson & Company, Franklin Lakes, NJ) to aspirate 5 different volumes (0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 mL) of 0.25 mM Lucifer Yellow (LY) fluorescent dye constituted in saline (Sigma Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) from a rubber-stoppered vial. Each participant then injected the specified volume of LY fluorescent dye via a 3-way stopcock into IV tubing with free-flowing 0.9% sodium chloride (10 mL/min). The injected volume of LY fluorescent dye and 0.9% sodium chloride then drained into a collection vial for laboratory analysis. Microplate fluorescence wavelength detection (Infinite M1000; Tecan, Mannedorf, Switzerland) was used to measure the fluorescence of the collected fluid. Administered injection volumes were calculated based on the fluorescence of the collected fluid using a calibration curve of known LY volumes and associated fluorescence.To determine whether deviation of the administered volumes from the intended injection volumes increased at lower injection volumes, we compared the proportional injection volume error (loge [administered volume/intended volume]) for each of the 5 injection volumes using a linear

  15. Oxidative vaporization kinetics of Cr2O3 in oxygen from 1000 to 1300 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 on preoxidized resistively heated chromium were determined in flowing oxygen at a pressure of 0.115 Torr for temperatures from 1000 to 1300 C. Reaction controlled rates were obtained from experimental rates by a gold calibration technique, and these rates were shown to agree with those predicted by thermochemical analysis. The activation energy obtained for the oxidative vaporization reaction corresponded numerically with the thermochemical enthalpy of the reaction. A theoretical equation is given for calculating the rate from thermodynamic data using boundary-layer theory.

  16. Oxidative vaporization kinetics of chromium (III) oxide in oxygen from 1270 to 1570 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 on preoxidized resistively heated chromium were determined in flowing oxygen at 0.115 torr for temperatures from 1270 to 1570 K. Reaction controlled rates were obtained from experimental rates by a gold calibration technique. These rates were shown to agree with those predicted by thermochemical analysis. The activation energy obtained for the oxidative vaporation reaction corresponded numerically with the thermochemical enthalpy of the reaction. A theoretical equation is given for calculating the rate from thermodynamic data by using boundary layer theory.

  17. Analysis on Characteristics of Radiosonde Bias Using GPS Precipitable Water Vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Geun Park

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available As an observation instrument of the longest record of tropospheric water vapor, radiosonde data provide upper-air pressure (geopotential height, temperature, humidity and wind. However, the data have some well-known elements related to inaccuracy. In this article, radiosonde precipitable water vapor (PWV at Sokcho observatory was compared with global positioning system (GPS PWV during each summertime of year 2007 and 2008 and the biases were calculated. As a result, the mean bias showed negative values regardless of the rainfall occurrence. In addition, on the basis of GPS PWV, the maximum root mean square error (RMSE was 5.67 mm over the radiosonde PWV.

  18. Desenvolvimento de um equipamento para avaliação do efeito do etanol na pressão de vapor e entalpia de vaporização em gasolinas automotivas Development of a device to valuate the effect of ethanol on the vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy of fuel gasolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Cataluña

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the gasoline utilized for fueling internal combustion engines with spark ignition is directly affected by the gasoline's properties. Thus, the fuel's properties must be in perfect equilibrium to allow the engine to perform optimally, not only insofar as fuel consumption is concerned, but also in order to reduce the emission of pollutants. Vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy are important properties of a gasoline determining the fuel's behavior under different operating conditions in internal combustion engines. The study reported here involved the development of a device to determine the vapor pressure and the vaporization enthalpy of formulations containing volumes of 5, 15 and 25% of ethanol in four base gasolines (G1, G2, G3 and G4. The chemical composition of these gasolines was determined using a gas chromatographer equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID.

  19. Impact of cuticle on calculations of the CO2 concentration inside leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, John S

    2015-12-01

    Water vapor over-estimates the CO 2 entering leaves during photosynthesis because the cuticle and epidermis transmit more water vapor than CO 2 . Direct measurements of internal CO 2 concentrations may be preferred. The CO2 concentration inside leaves (c i) is typically calculated from the relationship between water vapor diffusing out while CO2 diffuses in. Diffusion through the cuticle/epidermis is usually not considered. This study was undertaken to determine how much the calculations would be affected by including cuticle properties. Previous studies indicate that measurable amounts of CO2 and water vapor move through the cuticle, although much less CO2 than water vapor. The present experiments were conducted with sunflower (Helianthus annuus L) leaves in a gas exchange apparatus designed to directly measure c i, while simultaneously calculating c i. Results showed that, in normal air, calculated c i were always higher than directly measured ones, especially when abscisic acid was fed to the leaves to close the stomata and cause gas exchange to be dominated by the cuticle. The effect was attributed mostly to the reliance on the gas phase for the calculations without taking cuticle properties into account. Because cuticle properties are usually unknown and vary with the turgor of the leaf, which can stretch the waxes, it is difficult to include cuticle properties in the calculation. It was concluded that direct measurement of c i may be preferable to the calculations.

  20. Determination of inorganic and total mercury by vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry using different temperatures of the measurement cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, Luiz Eduardo [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Goldschmidt, Fabiane [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Paniz, Jose Neri Gottfried [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Moraes Flores, Erico Marlon de [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Dressler, Valderi Luiz [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: valdres@quimica.ufsm.br

    2005-06-30

    A simple and inexpensive laboratory-built flow injection vapor generation system coupled to atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-VG AAS) for inorganic and total mercury determination has been developed. It is based on the vapor generation of total mercury and a selective detection of Hg{sup 2+} or total mercury by varying the temperature of the measurement cell. Only the inorganic mercury is measured when the quartz cell is at room temperature, and when the cell is heated to 650 deg. C or higher the total Hg concentration is measured. The organic Hg concentration in the sample is calculated from the difference between the total Hg and Hg{sup 2+} concentrations. Parameters such as the type of acid (HCl or HNO{sub 3}) and its concentration, reductant (NaBH{sub 4}) concentration, carrier solution (HCl) flow rate, carrier gas flow rate, sample volume and quartz cell temperature, which influence FI-VG AAS system performance, were systematically investigated. The optimized conditions for Hg{sup 2+} and total Hg determinations were: 1.0 mol l{sup -1} HCl as carrier solution, carrier flow rate of 3.5 ml min{sup -1}, 0.1% (m/v) NaBH{sub 4}, reductant flow rate of 1.0 ml min{sup -1} and carrier gas flow rate of 200 ml min{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (RSD) is lower than 5.0% for a 1.0 {mu}g l{sup -1} Hg solution and the limit of quantification (LOQ, 10 s) is 55 ng g{sup -1}. Certified samples of dogfish muscle (DORM-1 and DORM-2) and non-certified fish samples were analyzed, using a 6.0 mol l{sup -1} HCl solution for analyte extraction. The Hg{sup 2+} and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} concentrations found were in agreement with certified ones.

  1. Ricor's Nanostar water vapor compact cryopump: applications and model overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rodney S.; Nachman, Ilan; Tauber, Tomer; Kootzenko, Michael; Barak, Boris; Aminov, Eli; Gover, Dan

    2017-05-01

    Ricor Systems has developed a compact, single stage cryopump that fills the gap where GM and other type cryopumps can't fit in. Stirling cycle technology is highly efficient and is the primary cryogenic technology for use in IR, SWIR, HOT FPA, and other IR detector technology in military, security, and aerospace applications. Current GM based dual stage cryopumps have been the legacy type water vapor pumping system for more than 50 years. However, the typically large cryopanel head, compressor footprint, and power requirements make them not cost and use effective for small, tabletop evaporation / sputtering systems, portable analysis systems, and other systems requiring small volume vacuum creation from medium, high, and UHV levels. This single stage cryopump works well in-line with diffusion and molecular turbopumps. Studies have shown effective cooperation with non-evaporable getter technology as well for UHV levels. Further testing in this area are ongoing. Temperatures created by Stirling cycle cryogenic coolers develop a useful temperature range of 40 to 150K. Temperatures of approximately 100 K are sufficient to condense water and all hydrocarbons oil vapors.

  2. Digital calculations of engine cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Starkman, E S; Taylor, C Fayette

    1964-01-01

    Digital Calculations of Engine Cycles is a collection of seven papers which were presented before technical meetings of the Society of Automotive Engineers during 1962 and 1963. The papers cover the spectrum of the subject of engine cycle events, ranging from an examination of composition and properties of the working fluid to simulation of the pressure-time events in the combustion chamber. The volume has been organized to present the material in a logical sequence. The first two chapters are concerned with the equilibrium states of the working fluid. These include the concentrations of var

  3. Tank 241-BX-104 fourth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on April 7, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitroshkov, A.V.; Hayes, J.C.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-04 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.208% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.536% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  4. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BX-106 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on August 15, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Edwards, J.A.; Julya, J.L. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-106 (Tank BX-106) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan. Ammonia was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-106 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.031% of it lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.143% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  5. Tank 241-BY-108 fourth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on November 14, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B. [and others

    1997-07-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BY-108 (Tank BY-108) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected nonradioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit of 150 ppm specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BY-108 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 1.390% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <2.830% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  6. Vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, Levent; Bowles, Richard K.

    2013-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of miscible and partially miscible binary Lennard-Jones mixtures are used to study the dynamics and thermodynamics of vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop in the canonical ensemble. When the system volume is large, the driving force for condensation is low and only a submonolayer of the solvent is adsorbed onto the liquid drop. A small degree of mixing of the solvent phase into the core of the particles occurs for the miscible system. At smaller volumes, complete film formation is observed and the dynamics of film growth are dominated by cluster-cluster coalescence. Mixing into the core of the droplet is also observed for partially miscible systems below an onset volume suggesting the presence of a solubility transition. We also develop a non-volatile liquid drop model, based on the capillarity approximations, that exhibits a solubility transition between small and large drops for partially miscible mixtures and has a hysteresis loop similar to the one observed in the deliquescence of small soluble salt particles. The properties of the model are compared to our simulation results and the model is used to study the formulation of classical nucleation theory for systems with low free energy barriers.

  7. Vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inci, Levent; Bowles, Richard K., E-mail: richard.bowles@usask.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5C9 (Canada)

    2013-12-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of miscible and partially miscible binary Lennard–Jones mixtures are used to study the dynamics and thermodynamics of vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop in the canonical ensemble. When the system volume is large, the driving force for condensation is low and only a submonolayer of the solvent is adsorbed onto the liquid drop. A small degree of mixing of the solvent phase into the core of the particles occurs for the miscible system. At smaller volumes, complete film formation is observed and the dynamics of film growth are dominated by cluster-cluster coalescence. Mixing into the core of the droplet is also observed for partially miscible systems below an onset volume suggesting the presence of a solubility transition. We also develop a non-volatile liquid drop model, based on the capillarity approximations, that exhibits a solubility transition between small and large drops for partially miscible mixtures and has a hysteresis loop similar to the one observed in the deliquescence of small soluble salt particles. The properties of the model are compared to our simulation results and the model is used to study the formulation of classical nucleation theory for systems with low free energy barriers.

  8. Determination of Cannabinoid Vapor Pressures to Aid in Vapor Phase Detection of Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovestead, Tara M; Bruno, Thomas J

    2017-09-01

    The quest for a reliable means to detect cannabis intoxication with a breathalyzer is ongoing. To design such a device, it is important to understand the fundamental thermodynamics of the compounds of interest. The vapor pressures of two important cannabinoids, cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), are presented, as well as the predicted normal boiling temperature (NBT) and the predicted critical constants (these predictions are dependent on the vapor pressure data). The critical constants are typically necessary to develop an equation of state (EOS). EOS-based models can provide estimations of thermophysical properties for compounds to aid in designing processes and devices. An ultra-sensitive, quantitative, trace dynamic headspace analysis sampling called porous layered open tubular-cryoadsorption (PLOT-cryo) was used to measure vapor pressures of these compounds. PLOT-cryo affords short experiment durations compared to more traditional techniques for vapor pressure determination (minutes versus days). Additionally, PLOT-cryo has the inherent ability to stabilize labile solutes because collection is done at reduced temperature. The measured vapor pressures are approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than those measured for n-eicosane, which has a similar molecular mass. Thus, the difference in polarity of these molecules must be impacting the vapor pressure dramatically. The vapor pressure measurements are presented in the form of Clausius-Clapeyron (or van't Hoff) equation plots. The predicted vapor pressures that would be expected at near ambient conditions (25 °C) are also presented.

  9. Evidence of a sewer vapor transport pathway at the USEPA vapor intrusion research duplex

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of sewer lines as preferential pathways for vapor intrusion is poorly understood. Although the importance of sewer lines for volatile organic compound (VOC) transport has been documented at a small number of sites with vapor intrusion, sewer lines are not routinely sampl...

  10. Falcon series data report: 1987 LNG vapor barrier verification field trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.C.; Cederwall, R.T.; Chan, S.T.; Ermak, D.L.; Koopman, R.P.; Lamson, K.C.; McClure, J.W.; Morris, L.K.

    1990-06-01

    A series of five Liquefied Natural Gas Spills up to 66 m{sup 3} in volume were performed on water within a vapor barrier structure at Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site as a part of a joint government/industry study. This data report presents a description of the tests, the test apparatus, the instrumentation, the meteorological conditions, and the data from the tests. 16 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model. Volume 4: The AFDM heat- and mass-transfer solution algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, W. R.; Berthier, J.; Goutagny, L.; Schmuck, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report gives the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM) solution algorithm describing vaporization/condensation (V/C) and melting/freezing processes. The finite-difference equations used are derived from the general AFDM differential equations with convection ignored. In two-phase cells, V/C is determined by a simultaneous iterative solution. The objective is to retain stability and energy conservation with consistent interfacial and bulk conditions describing vapor/liquid densities and temperatures. Particular attention is given in the special cases required to obtain a solution. In single-phase cells, the heat transfer is determined first; then, a vapor composition is updated for the (alpha)(sub 0) volume based on the saturation pressures for the individual liquids. Melting/freezing rates are determined based on equilibrium considerations. Mass-transfer-induced velocity changes are calculated implicitly so as to conserve momentum. In addition to the treatment of the standard models, a description is provided on the energy transfers used for the simplified NOPHASE option.

  12. Production of sodium vapor from exposed regolith in the inner solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T. H.; Zook, H. A.; Potter, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    The likely supply of sodium to the lunar exosphere by impact vaporization, by charged particle sputtering, and by photon stimulated desorption has been calculated. These were each compared to the supply of sodium needed to maintain the observed sodium exosphere about the Moon. The two processes already known to act on the lunar regolith, impact vaporization and charged particle sputtering, appear to be sufficient to explain the observed column density of sodium in the lunar atmosphere. Photon-stimulated desorption, given the estimates for the yield of sodium due to this process available in the literature, would produce 100 to 1000 times more sodium than is observed. If impact vaporization is the main source of sodium to the atmosphere of Mercury, then sodium photo-ions in the exosphere of Mercury are efficiently recycled to the planet.

  13. Influence of monoterpene vapors on spruce spider mite,Oligonychus ununguis, adult females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, S P

    1992-09-01

    Adult female spruce spider mite,Oligonychus ununguis (Jacobi), were exposed to various concentrations of four host conifer monoterpene vapors (limonene,β-pinene,α-pinene, and Δ(3)-carene) for 24 hr to determine the lethal and sublethal effects. All four compounds were toxic to the mites. Further, at concentrations below the calculated LC50s, all four compounds decreased oviposition by the mites and three of the compounds (limonene,β-pinene, andα-pinene) influenced movement. WhereasO. ununguis populations may not normally be exposed to high concentrations of host monoterpenes, trees continuously emit some monoterpene vapors, and when trees are damaged or under stress, oleoresin may accumulate at points on the external surface of tree tissues thereby exposing mites to the influence of monoterpene vapors.

  14. Vapor-Phase Raman Spectra and the Barrier to Planarity of Cyclohexane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Hye Jin; Ocola, Esther J; Laane, Jaan

    2016-10-06

    The vapor-phase Raman spectra of an atmosphere of cyclohexane vapor heated to 90 and 110 °C collected over a large period of time and utilizing a high laser power of 4 W show hot band series starting at 380.8 cm-1 and corresponding to the v6(A1g) ring-inversion vibration. Fitting this data with a one-dimensional potential energy function allows the barrier to planarity of 8600 cm-1 (24.6 kcal/mol) to be calculated. Ab initio calculations (MP2/cc-pVTZ) predict a value of 10 377 cm-1 (29.7 kcal/mol), while DFT (B3LYP/cc-pVTZ) calculations predict 8804 cm-1 (25.2 kcal/mol).

  15. Application of water vapor sorption measurements for porosity characterization of hardened cement pastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    Water vapor sorption can be used to study important properties of porous materials including specific surface area and pore size distribution (PSD). However, the data analysis is somewhat inconsistent in literature. In this work, the important factors influencing the analyzed results using sorption...... data were reviewed. Water vapor sorption measurements were then applied to two hardened cement pastes and one model porous material MCM-41. The specific surface area was calculated based on different equations accounting for multilayer adsorption and the PSD was analyzed from both the absorption...... and the desorption isotherms for comparison: The calculated specific surface area was quite dependent on which equation is considered for multilayer adsorption. For the studied hardened cement pastes, three characteristic peaks were found in the calculated PSD curves from the desorption isotherms with corresponding...

  16. Influence of Soil Moisture on Soil Gas Vapor Concentration for Vapor Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Mathematical models have been widely used in analyzing the effects of various environmental factors in the vapor intrusion process. Soil moisture content is one of the key factors determining the subsurface vapor concentration profile. This manuscript considers the effects of soil moisture profiles on the soil gas vapor concentration away from any surface capping by buildings or pavement. The “open field” soil gas vapor concentration profile is observed to be sensitive to the soil moisture distribution. The van Genuchten relations can be used for describing the soil moisture retention curve, and give results consistent with the results from a previous experimental study. Other modeling methods that account for soil moisture are evaluated. These modeling results are also compared with the measured subsurface concentration profiles in the U.S. EPA vapor intrusion database. PMID:24170970

  17. Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, E.

    1996-05-01

    Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

  18. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  19. Correlation among Cirrus Ice Content, Water Vapor and Temperature in the TTL as Observed by CALIPSO and Aura-MLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, T.; Wu, D. L.; Read, W. G.

    2012-01-01

    Water vapor in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) has a local radiative cooling effect. As a source for ice in cirrus clouds, however, it can also indirectly produce infrared heating. Using NASA A-Train satellite measurements of CALIPSO and Aura/MLS we calculated the correlation of water vapor, ice water content and temperature in the TTL. We find that temperature strongly controls water vapor (correlation r =0.94) and cirrus clouds at 100 hPa (r = -0.91). Moreover we observe that the cirrus seasonal cycle is highly (r =-0.9) anticorrelated with the water vapor variation in the TTL, showing higher cloud occurrence during December-January-February. We further investigate the anticorrelation on a regional scale and find that the strong anticorrelation occurs generally in the ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone). The seasonal cycle of the cirrus ice water content is also highly anticorrelated to water vapor (r = -0.91) and our results support the hypothesis that the total water at 100 hPa is roughly constant. Temperature acts as a main regulator for balancing the partition between water vapor and cirrus clouds. Thus, to a large extent, the depleting water vapor in the TTL during DJF is a manifestation of cirrus formation.

  20. Preliminary characterization of an expanding flow of siloxane vapor MDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, A.; Cozzi, F.; Cammi, G.; Zocca, M.; Gaetani, P.; Dossena, V.; Guardone, A.

    2017-03-01

    The early experimental results on the characterization of expanding flows of siloxane vapor MDM (C8H24O2Si3, octamethyltrisiloxane) are presented. The measurements were performed on the Test Rig for Organic VApors (TROVA) at the CREA Laboratory of Politecnico di Milano. The TROVA test-rig was built in order to investigate the non-ideal compressible-fluid behavior of typical expanding flows occurring within organic Rankine cycles (ORC) turbine passages. The test rig implements a batch Rankine cycle where a planar converging-diverging nozzle replaces the turbine and represents a test section. Investigations related to both fields of non-ideal compressible-fluid dynamics fundamentals and turbomachinery are allowed. The nozzle can be operated with different working fluids and operating conditions aiming at measuring independently the pressure, the temperature and the velocity field and thus providing data to verify the thermo-fluid dynamic models adopted to predict the behavior of these flows. The limiting values of pressure and temperature are 50 bar and 400 °C respectively. The early measurements are performed along the nozzle axis, where an isentropic process is expected to occur. In particular, the results reported here refer to the nozzle operated in adapted conditions using the siloxane vapor MDM as working fluid in thermodynamic regions where mild to medium non-ideal compressible-fluid effects are present. Both total temperature and total pressure of the nozzle are measured upstream of the test section, while static pressure are measured along the nozzle axis. Schlieren visualizations are also carried out in order to complement the pressure measurement with information about the 2D density gradient field. The Laser Doppler Velocimetry technique is planned to be used in the future for velocity measurements. The measured flow field has also been interpreted by resorting to the quasi-one-dimensional theory and two dimensional CFD viscous calculation. In both cases

  1. Three dimensional ray tracing technique for tropospheric water vapor tomography using GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Aghajany, Saeid; Amerian, Yazdan

    2017-11-01

    Tropospheric water vapor has a key role in tropospheric processes and it is an important parameter in meteorology studies. Because of its non-uniform spatiotemporal distribution, modeling the spatiotemporal variations of water vapor is a challenging subject in meteorology. The GNSS tomography of the troposphere is a promising method to assess the spatiotemporal distribution of water vapor parameter in this layer. The tomography method efficiency is dependent on the ray tracing technique and GPS derived tropospheric slant wet delays. Implementing constraints and regularization methods are necessary in order to achieve the regularized solution in troposphere tomography. In this paper, the three dimensional (3D) ray tracing technique based on Eikonal equations and ERA-I data are used to perform the reconstruction the signal path, Iranian Permanent GPS Network (IPGN) measurements are used to calculate slant wet delays and the LSQR regularization technique is used to obtain a regularized tomographic solution for tropospheric water vapor. The modeled water vapor profiles are validated using radiosonde observations.

  2. Direct observation of metal nanoparticles as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated organic vapors: nucleation of size-selected aluminum nanoparticles in acetonitrile and n-hexane vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsayed, Victor; El-Shall, M Samy

    2014-08-07

    correlation is found between the seed nanoparticle's size and the degree of the supersaturation of the condensing vapor. This result and the agreement among the calculated Kelvin diameters and the size of the nucleating Al nanoparticles determined by transmission electron microscopy provide strong proof for the development of a new approach for the separation and characterization of heterogeneous nuclei formed in organic vapors. These processes can take place in the atmosphere by a combination of several organic species including polar compounds which could be very efficient in activating charged nanoparticles and cluster ions of atmospheric relevance.

  3. Test Your Calculator IQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.

    1981-01-01

    This short quiz for teachers is intended to help them to brush up on their calculator operating skills and to prepare for the types of questions their students will ask about calculator idiosyncracies. (SJL)

  4. Holmium laser enucleation versus photoselective vaporization for prostatic adenoma greater than 60 ml: preliminary results of a prospective, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmansy, Hazem; Baazeem, Abdulaziz; Kotb, Ahmed; Badawy, Hesham; Riad, Essam; Emran, Ashraf; Elhilali, Mostafa

    2012-07-01

    To our knowledge we report the first single center, prospective, randomized study comparing holmium laser enucleation and high performance GreenLight™ prostate photoselective vaporization as surgical treatment of prostatic adenomas greater than 60 ml. A total of 80 patients with a large prostatic adenoma were randomly assigned to surgical treatment with holmium laser enucleation or photoselective vaporization. International Prostate Symptom Score, International Index of Erectile Function-15, maximum flow rate, post-void residual urine, serum prostate specific antigen and transrectal ultrasound volume were recorded. Patient baseline characteristics were similar for holmium laser enucleation and photoselective vaporization. Operative time and catheter removal time were almost equal in the 2 groups (p = 0.7 and 0.2, respectively). Eight vaporization cases were converted to transurethral prostate resection or holmium laser enucleation intraoperatively due to bleeding. A significantly higher maximum flow rate and lower post-void residual urine were noted in holmium laser cases during the entire followup (at 1 year each p = 0.02). However, no significant difference in International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life or International Index of Erectile Function-15 was detected. Prostate volume and serum PSA decreased 78% and 88% in the holmium laser group, and 52% and 60% in the vaporization group, respectively. Holmium laser enucleation and photoselective vaporization are effective for lower urinary tract symptoms due to a large prostatic adenoma. Early subjective functional results (maximum flow rate and post-void residual urine) of holmium laser enucleation appear to be superior to those of photoselective vaporization. In our hands cases intended to be treated with photoselective vaporization were at 22% risk of conversion to another modality. This could reflect our determination to vaporize to the capsule in all vaporization cases. Copyright © 2012 American

  5. Tolman's length and limiting supersaturation of vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V.

    2018-01-01

    The classical Kelvin formula for the equilibrium vapor pressure over a droplet of radius R is extended to small radii and vapor non-ideality, from where the limiting supersaturation condition is obtained by relating the point R = 0 to the value of limiting (spinodal) supersaturation of vapor. The analysis of different dependences of the Tolman length on radius, δ (R) , obeying this condition suggests that (i) the value of δ (0) is positive and the function δ (R) decreases with increasing radius; (ii) the curvature effect (the dependence of surface tension on radius) in the nucleation region is determined by the value of δ (0) . At the same time, this effect is weakly sensitive to the form of the function δ (R) and insensitive to its asymptotic value δ∞ .

  6. Dynamic water vapor and temperature calibration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, F W; Primiano, F P; Saidel, G M

    1984-06-01

    The objective evaluation of thermal and humidification processes in the pulmonary system requires accurate dynamic measurements of temperature and water vapor concentration of a flowing gas mixture. The adequacy of instruments used for such measurements can only be determined by dynamic calibration techniques. We have developed a method of producing step changes in temperature and water vapor content of a gas mixture undergoing controlled steady flow. The system consists of two reservoirs and a slide valve that switches a test section between them. The inlet (usually a probe or catheter tip) of the device to be calibrated is positioned in the test section. The flow rate through the test section is minimally changed during the transition between gas from one reservoir to that of the other. The system has been used to analyze the response of a thermistor and a respiratory mass spectrometer to changes in gas temperature and water vapor.

  7. An optical waveguide acid vapor sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, D S; Callahan, D; Maclay, G J; Stetter, J R

    1992-12-01

    An optical waveguide sensor for the detection of acid vapors is described. The chemically sensitive reagent coating consists of bromothymol blue indicator suspended in a Nafion polymer film. The sensor uses a 562 nm LED source and a phototransistor detector. Response to hydrochloric acid and hydrogen sulphide vapours is both rapid and reversible, with an estimated detection limit for hydrogen sulphide of less than 15 ppm. The sensors exhibits generalized response to protonic acid vapours, but does not produce an indicator response to carbon dioxide, even at large concentrations (1100 mg/l.) in the presence of water vapor. The sensor exhibits a systematic interference from water vapor which may be corrected by a different approach, either using a reference sensor (Nafion/no indicator) or by monitoring sensor response at two wavelengths.

  8. Refraction of microwave signals by water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric water vapor causes a refractive path length effect which is typically 5-10% of the 'dry' tropospheric effect and as large as several meters at elevation angles below 5 deg. The vertical water vapor profile is quite variable, and measurements of intensive atmospheric parameters such as temperature and humidity limited to the surface do not adequately predict the refractive effect. It is suggested that a water vapor refraction model that is a function of the amount of precipitable water alone can be successful at low elevation angles. From an extensive study of numerical ray tracings through radiosonde balloon data, such a model has been constructed. The model predicts the effect at all latitudes and elevation angles between 2 and 10 deg to an accuracy of better than 4% (11 cm at 3 deg elevation angle).

  9. Calculating correct compilers

    OpenAIRE

    Bahr, Patrick; Hutton, Graham

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present a new approach to the problem of calculating compilers. In particular, we develop a simple but general technique that allows us to derive correct compilers from high- level semantics by systematic calculation, with all details of the implementation of the compilers falling naturally out of the calculation process. Our approach is based upon the use of standard equational reasoning techniques, and has been applied to calculate compilers for a wide range of language f...

  10. Applications of the SW96 formulation in the thermodynamic calculation of fluid inclusions and mineral-fluid equilibria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The SW96 formulation explicit in Helmholtz free energy proposed by Span and Wagner (1996 is the most accurate multifunction equation of state of CO2 fluid, from which all thermodynamic properties can be obtained over a wide temperature-pressure range from 216.592 to 1100 K and from 0 to 8000 bar with or close to experimental accuracy. This paper reports the applications of the SW96 formulation in fluid inclusions and mineral-fluid equilibria. A reliable and highly efficient algorithm is presented for the saturated properties of CO2 so that the formulation can be conveniently applied in the study of fluid inclusions, such as calculation of homogenization pressures, homogenization densities (or molar volumes, volume fractions of vapor phase and isochores. Meanwhile, the univariant curves of some typical decarbonation reactions of minerals are calculated with the SW96 formulation and relevant thermodynamic models of minerals. The computer code of the SW96 formulation can be obtained from the corresponding author.

  11. Performance Improvement of R 410A Room Air Conditioner by Vapor Injection Refrigeration Cycle Using Scroll Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Daisaka, Hisashi; Yokoyama, Hidenori; Nonaka, Masayuki; Saito, Kiyoshi

    The vapor injection refrigeration cycle using the scroll compressor driven by inverter was investigated to improve the performance of room air conditioner with R 410A. One injection hole was bored on a fixed scroll plate, and through this hole the vapor refrigeration is injected into two compression rooms of a scroll compressor at different time. Then the pressure change of the compression room and the performance of vapor injection refrigeration cycle are calculated. And the performance of the room air conditioner using vapor injection refrigeration cycle was measured. As the result, the cooling/heating compressor input was decreased to 7.4/3.2 % at capacity 4.0/5.9 kW, and the heating capacity at outdoor temperature -15 °C was increased to 11.9 %.

  12. SPARC-IGAC Symposium on Climate-Chemistry Interactions. Climate Feedback by Water Vapor in the Tropical Upper Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessler, A. E.; Minschwaner, K.

    2003-01-01

    The strong greenhouse forcing by atmospheric water vapor is expected to play an important role in shaping the direction of any future changes in climate. We present calculations that provide a new perspective on the sensitivity of upper tropospheric water vapor to changes in surface temperature. Equilibrium states of our atmospheric model show unambiguously that as the surface warms, changes in the vertical distribution and temperature of detraining air parcels from tropical convection lead to higher water vapor mixing ratios in the upper troposphere. However, the increase in mixing ratio is not as large as the increase in saturation mixing ratio due to warmer environmental temperatures, so that the relative humidity decreases. Our analysis suggests that models that maintain a fixed relative humidity are likely overestimating the magnitude of the water vapor feedback.

  13. A feasibility study of a microwave water vapor measurement from a space probe along an occultation path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbothum, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Stratospheric and mesospheric water vapor measurements were taken using the microwave lines at 22 GHz (22.235 GHz) and 183 GHz (183.31 GHz). The resonant cross sections for both the 22 GHz and the 183 GHz lines were used to model the optical depth of atmospheric water vapor. The range of optical depths seen by a microwave radiometer through the earth's limb was determined from radiative transfer theory. Radiometer sensitivity, derived from signal theory, was compared with calculated optical depths to determine the maximum height to which water vapor can be measured using the following methods: passive emission, passive absorption, and active absorption. It was concluded that measurements using the 22 GHz line are limited to about 50 km whereas the 183 GHz line enables measurements up to and above 100 km for water vapor mixing ratios as low as 0.1 ppm under optimum conditions.

  14. Autistic Savant Calendar Calculators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Paul J.

    This study identified 10 savants with developmental disabilities and an exceptional ability to calculate calendar dates. These "calendar calculators" were asked to demonstrate their abilities, and their strategies were analyzed. The study found that the ability to calculate dates into the past or future varied widely among these…

  15. Flexible Mental Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threlfall, John

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that strategy choice is a misleading characterization of efficient mental calculation and that teaching mental calculation methods as a whole is not conducive to flexibility. Proposes an alternative in which calculation is thought of as an interaction between noticing and knowledge. Presents an associated teaching approach to promote…

  16. Secondhand Exposure to Vapors From Electronic Cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czogala, Jan; Fidelus, Bartlomiej; Zielinska-Danch, Wioleta; Travers, Mark J.; Sobczak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are designed to generate inhalable nicotine aerosol (vapor). When an e-cigarette user takes a puff, the nicotine solution is heated and the vapor is taken into lungs. Although no sidestream vapor is generated between puffs, some of the mainstream vapor is exhaled by e-cigarette user. The aim of this study was to evaluate the secondhand exposure to nicotine and other tobacco-related toxicants from e-cigarettes. Materials and Methods: We measured selected airborne markers of secondhand exposure: nicotine, aerosol particles (PM2.5), carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an exposure chamber. We generated e-cigarette vapor from 3 various brands of e-cigarette using a smoking machine and controlled exposure conditions. We also compared secondhand exposure with e-cigarette vapor and tobacco smoke generated by 5 dual users. Results: The study showed that e-cigarettes are a source of secondhand exposure to nicotine but not to combustion toxicants. The air concentrations of nicotine emitted by various brands of e-cigarettes ranged from 0.82 to 6.23 µg/m3. The average concentration of nicotine resulting from smoking tobacco cigarettes was 10 times higher than from e-cigarettes (31.60±6.91 vs. 3.32±2.49 µg/m3, respectively; p = .0081). Conclusions: Using an e-cigarette in indoor environments may involuntarily expose nonusers to nicotine but not to toxic tobacco-specific combustion products. More research is needed to evaluate health consequences of secondhand exposure to nicotine, especially among vulnerable populations, including children, pregnant women, and people with cardiovascular conditions. PMID:24336346

  17. Secondhand exposure to vapors from electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czogala, Jan; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Fidelus, Bartlomiej; Zielinska-Danch, Wioleta; Travers, Mark J; Sobczak, Andrzej

    2014-06-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are designed to generate inhalable nicotine aerosol (vapor). When an e-cigarette user takes a puff, the nicotine solution is heated and the vapor is taken into lungs. Although no sidestream vapor is generated between puffs, some of the mainstream vapor is exhaled by e-cigarette user. The aim of this study was to evaluate the secondhand exposure to nicotine and other tobacco-related toxicants from e-cigarettes. We measured selected airborne markers of secondhand exposure: nicotine, aerosol particles (PM(2.5)), carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an exposure chamber. We generated e-cigarette vapor from 3 various brands of e-cigarette using a smoking machine and controlled exposure conditions. We also compared secondhand exposure with e-cigarette vapor and tobacco smoke generated by 5 dual users. The study showed that e-cigarettes are a source of secondhand exposure to nicotine but not to combustion toxicants. The air concentrations of nicotine emitted by various brands of e-cigarettes ranged from 0.82 to 6.23 µg/m(3). The average concentration of nicotine resulting from smoking tobacco cigarettes was 10 times higher than from e-cigarettes (31.60±6.91 vs. 3.32±2.49 µg/m(3), respectively; p = .0081). Using an e-cigarette in indoor environments may involuntarily expose nonusers to nicotine but not to toxic tobacco-specific combustion products. More research is needed to evaluate health consequences of secondhand exposure to nicotine, especially among vulnerable populations, including children, pregnant women, and people with cardiovascular conditions.

  18. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium in the Mixture Cyclohexene C6H10 + C6H12 Cyclohexane (EVLM1231, LB5705_E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes II' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'vapor-liquid Equilibrium in the Mixture Cyclohexene C6H10 + C6H12 Cyclohexane (EVLM1231, LB5705_E)' providing data from direct measurement of temperature and mole fraction in vapor phase at variable mole fraction in liquid phase and constant pressure.

  19. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium in the Mixture 3-Methylthiophene C5H6S + C6H12 Hex-1-ene (EVLM1131, LB5703_E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes II' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'vapor-liquid Equilibrium in the Mixture 3-Methylthiophene C5H6S + C6H12 Hex-1-ene (EVLM1131, LB5703_E)' providing data from direct measurement of pressure and mole fraction in vapor phase at variable mole fraction in liquid phase and constant temperature.

  20. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium in the Mixture 3-Methylthiophene C5H6S + C6H12 Cyclohexane (EVLM1131, LB5702_E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes II' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'vapor-liquid Equilibrium in the Mixture 3-Methylthiophene C5H6S + C6H12 Cyclohexane (EVLM1131, LB5702_E)' providing data from direct measurement of pressure and mole fraction in vapor phase at variable mole fraction in liquid phase and constant temperature.

  1. Flammability characteristics of combustible gases and vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabetakis, M. G. [Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1964-05-01

    This is a summary of the available limit of flammability, autoignition and burning-rate data for more than 200 combustible gases and vapors in air and other oxidants, as well as of empirical rules and graphs that can be used to predict similar data for thousands of other combustibles under a variety of environmental conditions. Spec$c data are presented on the paraffinic, unsaturated, aromatic, and alicyclic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, and sulfur compounds, and an assortment of fuels, fuel blends, hydraulic fluids, engine oils, and miscellaneous combustible gases and vapors.

  2. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  3. Drag Reduction by Leidenfrost Vapor Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2011-05-23

    We demonstrate and quantify a highly effective drag reduction technique that exploits the Leidenfrost effect to create a continuous and robust lubricating vapor layer on the surface of a heated solid sphere moving in a liquid. Using high-speed video, we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development of related energy saving technologies.

  4. Catalytic combustion with incompletely vaporized residual fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosfjord, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Catalytic combustion of fuel lean mixtures of incompletely vaporized residual fuel and air was investigated. The 7.6 cm diameter, graded cell reactor was constructed from zirconia spinel substrate and catalyzed with a noble metal catalyst. Streams of luminous particles exited the rector as a result of fuel deposition and carbonization on the substrate. Similar results were obtained with blends of No. 6 and No. 2 oil. Blends of shale residual oil and No. 2 oil resulted in stable operation. In shale oil blends the combustor performance degraded with a reduced degree of fuel vaporization. In tests performed with No. 2 oil a similar effect was observed.

  5. Raman lidar water vapor profiling over Warsaw, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Costa-Surós, Montserrat; Althausen, Dietrich

    2017-09-01

    Water vapor mixing ratio and relative humidity profiles were derived from the multi-wavelength Raman PollyXT lidar at the EARLINET site in Warsaw, using the Rayleigh molecular extinction calculation based on atmospheric temperature and pressure from three different sources: i) the standard atmosphere US 62, ii) the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) model output, and iii) the WMO 12374 radiosoundings launched at Legionowo. With each method, 136 midnight relative humidity profiles were obtained for lidar observations from July 2013 to August 2015. Comparisons of these profiles showed in favor of the latter method (iii), but it also indicated that the other two data sources could replace it, if necessary. Such use was demonstrated for an automated retrieval of water vapor mixing ratio from dusk until dawn on 19/20 March 2015; a case study related to an advection of biomass burning aerosol from forest fires over Ukraine. Additionally, an algorithm that applies thresholds to the radiosounding relative humidity profiles to estimate macro-physical cloud vertical structure was used for the first time on the Raman lidar relative humidity profiles. The results, based on a subset of 66 profiles, indicate that below 6 km cloud bases/tops can be successfully obtained in 53% and 76% cases from lidar and radiosounding profiles, respectively. Finally, a contribution of the lidar derived mean relative humidity to cloudy conditions within the range of 0.8 to 6.2 km, in comparison to clear-sky conditions, was estimated.

  6. Dynamics of faceted thin films formation during vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun-Dar; Huang, Po-Yu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, an anisotropic phase-field model was established to simulate the growth of crystalline thin films during vapor deposition. The formation and evolution of characteristic surface with faceted morphologies were demonstrated, in accordance with the regularly obtained microstructure in the actual experiments. In addition, the influences of deposition parameters, such as the deposition rate and the interfacial energy, on the formation mechanism of the characteristic morphology were also illustrated. While a relatively low surface energy of substrate was regarded, the faceted islands were formed, owing to the anisotropic interfacial energy of thin films. In the condition of a high surface energy of substrate, the layered structures of deposited films were produced, which was corresponding to the Frank–van der Merwe growth mode. As various deposition rates were utilized in the numerical simulations, diverse surface morphologies were developed on the basis of the dominant mechanisms, correlating with the adatom diffusion and the deposition kinetics. According to the calculation results, it was observed that a surface character with flattened morphology was generally driven by the adatom diffusion, while the factor of the deposition kinetics was inclined to roughen the surface of thin films. These numerical simulations enhanced the knowledge of thin film growth and facilitated the progress of the vapor deposition technology for advanced applications.

  7. Nonequilibrium vapor-generation model for flashing flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, P.; Abuaf, N.; Wu, B. J.C.

    1981-01-01

    A nonequilibrium vapor generation model for flashing flows is presented. The model consists of a flashing inception point, a bubbly flow regime followed by a bubbly-slug regime, an annular or annular-mist regime, and finally a dispersed-droplet regime. Existence of superheated liquid at the inception point and beyond is recognized. The vapor generation rate in each flow regime is calculated from the estimates for interfacial area density and net interfacial heat flux. However, the bubble number density at the flashing inception point was varied to obtain optimum fits with the void fraction data taken in a vertical converging-diverging nozzle. The interfacial area density at the inception point, thus determined, showed a rapid increase with the decrease in the liquid superheat at that point. This trend is correct since in the limit of thermal equilibrium flow where the liquid superheat approaches zero, the interfacial area for heat and mass transfer should approach infinity. 32 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A dispersion safety factor for LNG vapor clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vílchez, Juan A. [TIPs – Trámites, Informes y Proyectos, SL, Llenguadoc 10, 08030 Barcelona (Spain); Villafañe, Diana [Centre d’Estudis del Risc Tecnològic (CERTEC), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Casal, Joaquim, E-mail: joaquim.casal@upc.edu [Centre d’Estudis del Risc Tecnològic (CERTEC), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► We proposed a new parameter: the dispersion safety factor (DSF). ► DSF is the ratio between the distance reached by the LFL and that reached by the visible cloud. ► The results for the DSF agree well with the evidence from large scale experiments. ► Two expressions have been proposed to calculate DSF as a function of H{sub R}. ► The DSF may help in indicating the danger of ignition of a LNG vapor cloud. -- Abstract: The growing importance of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to global energy demand has increased interest in the possible hazards associated with its storage and transportation. Concerning the event of an LNG spill, a study was performed on the relationship between the distance at which the lower flammability limit (LFL) concentration occurs and that corresponding to the visible contour of LNG vapor clouds. A parameter called the dispersion safety factor (DSF) has been defined as the ratio between these two lengths, and two expressions are proposed to estimate it. During an emergency, the DSF can be a helpful parameter to indicate the danger of cloud ignition and flash fire.

  9. Interpretation of TOVS Water Vapor Radiances Using a Random Strong Line Model

    CERN Document Server

    Soden, B J; Soden, Brian J.; Bretherton, Francis P.

    1995-01-01

    This study illustrates the application of a random strong line (RSL) model of radiative transfer to the interpretation of satellite observations of the upwelling radiation in the 6.3 micron water vapor absorption band. The model, based upon an assemblage of randomly overlapped, strongly absorbing, pressure broadened lines, is compared to detailed radiative transfer calculations of the upper (6.7 micron) tropospheric water vapor radiance and demonstrated to be accurate to within ~ 1.2 K. Similar levels of accuracy are found when the model is compared to detailed calculations of the middle (7.3 micron) and lower (8.3 micron) tropospheric water vapor radiance, provided that the emission from the underlying surface is taken into account. Based upon these results, the RSL model is used to interpret TOVS-observed water vapor radiances in terms of the relative humidity averaged over deep layers of the upper, middle, and lower troposphere. We then present near-global maps of the geographic distribution and climatolog...

  10. Effect of oil films on moisture vapor absorption on human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keis, K; Huemmer, C L; Kamath, Y K

    2007-01-01

    In this paper sorption and desorption of water vapor on hair fibers treated with various oils is investigated, using a dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) apparatus. Results show lower "equilibrium" sorption of moisture for various oil-treated samples compared to the untreated sample. Coconut oil-treated hair had a higher regain than mineral oil-treated hair. Although treating the hair samples with oil reduced moisture pickup, a considerable amount of moisture vapor was still able to penetrate into hair fibers. Calculated hysteresis plots show that the samples treated with different oils have slightly higher moisture retention at low relative humidities compared to that of the untreated sample, which suggests a beneficial effect. The calculated moisture diffusion coefficients for oil-treated samples were much lower compared to the untreated hair fibers, suggesting that surface oil films and penetrated oil molecules form a diffusion barrier. A moisture diffusion model is discussed in terms of the possible role of fiber swelling on restrictive narrowing of the cell membrane complexes (CMCs), which form the diffusion pathways in the fiber. The effect of film thickness on moisture absorption and the reverting of the sorption isotherm to that of the untreated hair after removal of the oil film shows that oil film is the main resistance to moisture diffusion. The lowering of the diffusion coefficient of water vapor by oil films will slow the loss of moisture, an effect similar to "moisturization" of hair.

  11. Photoselective vaporization prostatectomy: experience with a novel 180 W 532 nm lithium triborate laser and fiber delivery system in living dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Reza S; Kang, Hyun Wook; Peng, Yihlih Steven; Stinson, Douglas; Beck, Michael T; Koullick, Ed

    2011-02-01

    We studied vaporization parameters, and anatomical and histopathological outcomes of photoselective vaporization of the prostate with the novel GreenLight™ XPS™ 180 W, 532 nm lithium triborate laser and MoXy™ fiber in a survival model of living dogs. We compared these findings with those of the existing GreenLight HPS™ 120 W 532 nm lithium triborate laser photoselective vaporization of the prostate in living dogs. Eight dogs underwent antegrade photoselective vaporization of the prostate with the 180 W laser delivered through a new 750 μm (vs the existing 600 μm core diameter), 50% larger, spot sized, side firing fiber. Four dogs were sacrificed 3 hours and 8 weeks postoperatively, respectively. We recorded laser energy and time. Prostates were sectioned, measured and histologically analyzed after hematoxylin and eosin, triphenyltetrazolium chloride or Gomori trichrome staining and compared with a normal control. Photoselective vaporization of the prostate with the 180 W laser bloodlessly created a 76% larger cavity (mean 11.8 vs 6.7 cm(3), p = 0.014), vaporized tissue at a 77% higher rate (mean 2.3 vs 1.3 cm(3) per minute, p = 0.03) and did so in 37% less time per volume vaporized (0.5 vs 0.8 minutes per cm(3), p = 0.003). Hematoxylin and eosin, and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining histologically revealed a 33% thicker mean coagulation zone vs that of 120 W laser photoselective vaporization of the prostate (2.0 ± 0.4 vs 1.5 ± 0.3 mm, p vaporization of the prostate with the MoXy fiber has a significantly higher vaporization rate and speed with a deeper hemostatic coagulation zone but favorable tissue interaction and healing equal to those of HPS 120 W laser photoselective vaporization of the prostate in dogs. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  13. Synthesis of mullite coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulpuri, R.P.; Auger, M.; Sarin, V.K. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Mullite is a solid solution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with a composition of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{circ}2SiO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}-SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. With the aid of these diagrams and consideration of kinetic rate limiting factors, initial process parameters were determined. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  14. External fuel vaporization study, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szetela, E. J.; Chiappetta, L.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to evaluate the effect of variations in fuel properties on the design of an external fuel vaporizaton system. The fuel properties that were considered included thermal stability, critical temperature, enthalpy a critical conditions, volatility, and viscosity. The design parameters that were evaluated included vaporizer weight and the impact on engine requirement such as maintenance, transient response, performance, and altitude relight. The baseline fuel properties were those of Jet A. The variation in thermal stability was taken as the thermal stability variation for Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel. The results of the analysis indicate that a change in thermal stability equivalent to that of ERBS would increase the vaporization system weight by 20 percent, decrease oprating time between cleaning by 40 percent and make altitude relight more difficult. An increase in fuel critical temperature of 39 K would require a 40 percent increase in vaporization system weight. The assumed increase in enthalpy and volatility would also increase vaporizer weight by 40 percent and make altitude relight extremely difficult. The variation in fuel viscosity would have a negligible effect on the design parameters.

  15. Vapor Bubbles in Flow and Acoustic Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Hao, Yue; Sadhal, S.S

    2002-01-01

    A review of several aspects of the interaction of bubbles with acoustic and flow fields is presented. The focus of the paper is on bubbles in hot liquids, in which the bubble contains mostly vapor, with little or no permanent gas. The topics covered include the effect of translation on condensation

  16. Automated semiconductor vacuum chemical vapor deposition facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    A semiconductor vacuum chemical vapor deposition facility (totally automatic) was developed. Wafers arrived on an air track, automatically loaded into a furnace tube, processed, returned to the track, and sent on to the next operation. The entire process was controlled by a computer.

  17. Multilead, Vaporization-Cooled Soldering Heat Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, John

    1995-01-01

    Vaporization-cooled heat sink proposed for use during soldering of multiple electrical leads of packaged electronic devices to circuit boards. Heat sink includes compliant wicks held in grooves on edges of metal fixture. Wicks saturated with water. Prevents excessive increases in temperature at entrances of leads into package.

  18. Vaporization of atherosclerotic plaques by spark erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); C.E. Essed; J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); N. Bom (Klaas); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); G.T. Meester (Geert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAn alternative to the laser irradiation of atherosclerotic lesions has been developed. A pulsed electrocardiogram R wave-triggered electrical spark erosion technique is described. Controlled vaporization of fibrous and lipid plaques with minimal thermal side effects was achieved and

  19. New Medical Applications Of Metal Vapor Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert S.; McIntosh, Alexander I.

    1989-06-01

    The first medical application for metal vapor lasers has been granted marketing approval by the FDA. This represents a major milestone for this technology. Metalaser Technologies recently received this approval for its Vasculase unit in the treatment of vascular lesions such as port wine stains, facial telangiectasia and strawberry hemangiomas.

  20. Atomic lithium vapor laser isotope separation

    CERN Document Server

    Olivares, I E

    2002-01-01

    An atomic vapor laser isotope separation in lithium was performed using tunable diode lasers. The method permits also the separation of the isotopes between the sup 6 LiD sub 2 and the sup 7 LiD sub 1 lines using a self-made mass separator which includes a magnetic sector and an ion beam designed for lithium. (Author)

  1. Vaporization of synthetic fuels. Final report. [Thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirignano, W.A.; Yao, S.C.; Tong, A.Y.; Talley, D.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of transient droplet vaporization in a hot convective environment is examined. The main objective of the present study is to develop an algorithm for the droplet vaporization which is simple enough to be feasibly incorporated into a complete spray combustion analysis and yet will also account for the important physics such as liquid-phase internal circulation, unsteady droplet heating and axisymmetric gas-phase convection. A simplified liquid-phase model has been obtained based on the assumption of the existence of a Hill's spherical vortex inside the droplet together with some approximations made in the governing diffusion equation. The use of the simplified model in a spray situation has also been examined. It has been found that droplet heating and vaporization are essentially unsteady and droplet temperature is nonuniform for a significant portion of its lifetime. It has also been found that the droplet vaporization characteristic can be quite sensitive to the particular liquid-phase and gas-phase models. The results of the various models are compared with the existing experimental data. Due to large scattering in the experimental measurements, particularly the droplet diameter, no definite conclusion can be drawn based on the experimental data. Finally, certain research problems which are related to the present study are suggested for future studies.

  2. Vapor Intrusion Characterization Report (Revision 1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapor Intrusion Characterization Report (Revision 1) - February 5, 2015: This report, which was approved by the EPA on February 18, 2015, documents the results from implementation of the Final Vapor Intrusion Characterization Work Plan.

  3. Water vapor movement in freezing aggregate base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to 1) measure the extent to which water vapor movement results in : water accumulation in freezing base materials; 2) evaluate the effect of soil stabilization on water vapor movement : in freezing base materials;...

  4. Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond in Vapor of Methanol-Based Liquid Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tzeng, Yonhua

    2000-01-01

    .... An electrical discharge is generated by microwave power in a metal cavity in order to dissociate the vapor mixture from one of the liquid solutions, from which radicals such as OH, O, and H that etch...

  5. Large-volume sampling and preconcentration for trace explosives detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linker, Kevin Lane

    2004-05-01

    A trace explosives detection system typically contains three subsystems: sample collection, preconcentration, and detection. Sample collection of trace explosives (vapor and particulate) through large volumes of airflow helps reduce sampling time while increasing the amount of dilute sample collected. Preconcentration of the collected sample before introduction into the detector improves the sensitivity of the detector because of the increase in sample concentration. By combining large-volume sample collection and preconcentration, an improvement in the detection of explosives is possible. Large-volume sampling and preconcentration is presented using a systems level approach. In addition, the engineering of large-volume sampling and preconcentration for the trace detection of explosives is explained.

  6. Vaporization of fault water during seismic slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianye; Niemeijer, André R.; Fokker, Peter A.

    2017-06-01

    Laboratory and numerical studies, as well as field observations, indicate that phase transitions of pore water might be an important process in large earthquakes. We present a model of the thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical processes, including a two-phase mixture model to incorporate the phase transitions of pore water, occurring during fast slip (i.e., a natural earthquake) in order to investigate the effects of vaporization on the coseismic slip. Using parameters from typical natural faults, our modeling shows that vaporization can indeed occur at the shallow depths of an earthquake, irrespective of the wide variability of the parameters involved (sliding velocity, friction coefficient, gouge permeability and porosity, and shear-induced dilatancy). Due to the fast kinetics, water vaporization can cause a rapid slip weakening even when the hydrological conditions of the fault zone are not favorable for thermal pressurization, e.g., when permeability is high. At the same time, the latent heat associated with the phase transition causes the temperature rise in the slip zone to be buffered. Our parametric analyses reveal that the amount of frictional work is the principal factor controlling the onset and activity of vaporization and that it can easily be achieved in earthquakes. Our study shows that coseismic pore fluid vaporization might have played important roles at shallow depths of large earthquakes by enhancing slip weakening and buffering the temperature rise. The combined effects may provide an alternative explanation for the fact that low-temperature anomalies were measured in the slip zones at shallow depths of large earthquakes.

  7. Development of vapor phase hydrogenation and of catalysts immune to poison (abstract)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1942-10-16

    The development of catalysts immune to poison and the development of vapor-phase hydrogenation were closely connected and they were considered together. Catalysts used at high thruputs and high partial pressures showed rapid deterioration of their activity caused by deposition and condensation of high-molecular-weight substances on the surface of the catalysts. This phenomenon made it necessary to divide hydrogenation into two phases: the liquid phase and the vapor phase. The first of the vapor-phase operating catalysts was catalyst 3510, which consisted of zinc--magnesium molybdate. Development of catalyst 5058, which consisted of pure tungsten disulfide and was produced by decomposing ammonium--sulfotungstate in H/sub 2/ atmosphere, largely terminated development of vapor-phase catalysts. Maximum activity had been obtained. Compared to 3510, two to three times as much gasoline was produced per hour with a fixed volume of catalyst, besides being able to work at a temperature about 100/sup 0/C lower, and gasification losses were considerably smaller. In order to use 5058 in mass production, the dry catalyst powder had to be compressed into cylindrical shapes 10 mm in diameter. The demands for higher antiknock gasolines in the processing of certain paraffinic raw material could not be met by 5058 because of its strong hydrogenation effect, and the dilute catalyst 6434, consisting of 90% Fullers earth treated with HF and 10% WS/sub 2/, was developed for this. 3 tables.

  8. Formula for Calculating Maintenance Fluid Volumes in Low Birth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    2007-08-14

    Aug 14, 2007 ... such studies had shown that many factors do influence fluid balance in preterm babies. Such studies also showed that, unlike in adults, extra-cellular fluid (ECF) constitutes a large proportion of the fetal body composition; and reduces abruptly soon after birth, causing weight loss. In addition, it also showed ...

  9. Normalizing Oral Fluid Hydrocodone Data Using Calculated Blood Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Oneka T; Morris, Ayodele A; Enders, Jeffrey R; McIntire, Gregory L

    2016-09-01

    Oral fluid testing to assist in the assessment of treatment adherence for chronic pain patients is attractive for a number of reasons. However, efforts focused on interpreting patient results have been modest when compared to urine drug testing. This work details a retrospective approach developed to transform and normalize oral fluid testing results to provide a historical picture of patient values in this important test fluid. Using this approach, a model was developed using data from 6,800 independent patients who were both prescribed hydrocodone and tested positive (with limitations: reporting cutoff normalization of the oral fluid data. The crucial normalizing factor in oral fluids was found to be the CBV which parallels the use of creatinine to normalize drug concentration levels in urine and is consistent with the view that oral fluid samples reflect plasma concentrations of the respective drugs. The resulting near Gaussian distribution is dose independent and as such should be of value to physicians in quickly assessing whether their patient is consistent with this historical population in the broad terms of this model. While this comparison alone is not definitive for adherence with a treatment regimen, together with patient interviews, prescription history and other clinical criteria, it can add an idea of expected patient values from oral fluid testing. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Multiphase flow calculation software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-04-15

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  11. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  12. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  13. Electrical installation calculations advanced

    CERN Document Server

    Kitcher, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    All the essential calculations required for advanced electrical installation workThe Electrical Installation Calculations series has proved an invaluable reference for over forty years, for both apprentices and professional electrical installation engineers alike. The book provides a step-by-step guide to the successful application of electrical installation calculations required in day-to-day electrical engineering practiceA step-by-step guide to everyday calculations used on the job An essential aid to the City & Guilds certificates at Levels 2 and 3For apprentices and electrical installatio

  14. Evapotranspiration Calculator Desktop Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Evapotranspiration Calculator estimates evapotranspiration time series data for hydrological and water quality models for the Hydrologic Simulation Program - Fortran (HSPF) and the Stormwater Management Model (SWMM).

  15. Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator (EEBC) was developed to assist organizations in estimating the environmental benefits of greening their purchase,...

  16. Electrical installation calculations basic

    CERN Document Server

    Kitcher, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    All the essential calculations required for basic electrical installation workThe Electrical Installation Calculations series has proved an invaluable reference for over forty years, for both apprentices and professional electrical installation engineers alike. The book provides a step-by-step guide to the successful application of electrical installation calculations required in day-to-day electrical engineering practice. A step-by-step guide to everyday calculations used on the job An essential aid to the City & Guilds certificates at Levels 2 and 3Fo

  17. Q Conversion Factor Models for Estimating Precipitable Water Vapor for Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Ilke; Mekik, Cetin; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2015-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have recently proved to be one of the crucial tools for determining continuous and precise precipitable water vapor (GNSS-MET networks). GNSS, especially CORS networks such as CORS-TR (the Turkish Network-RTK), provide high temporal and spatial accuracy for the wet tropospheric zenith delays which are then converted to the precipitable water vapor due to the fact that they can operate in all weather conditions continuously and economically. The accuracy of wet tropospheric zenith delay highly depends on the accuracy of precipitable water vapor content in the troposphere. Therefore, the precipitable water vapor is an important element of the tropospheric zenith delay. A number of studies can be found in the literature on the determination of the precipitable water vapor from the tropospheric zenith delay. Studies of Hogg showed that when the precipitable water vapor is known, the tropospheric zenith delay can be computed. Askne and Nodius have developed fundamental equations between the wet tropospheric zenith delay and the precipitable water vapor from the equation of the index of refraction in the troposphere. Furthermore, Bevis have developed a linear regression model to determine the weighted mean temperature (Tm) depending on the surface temperature (Ts) in Askne and Nodius studies. For this reason, nearly 9000 radiosonde profiles in USA were analyzed and the coefficients calculated. Similarly, there are other studies on the calculation of those coefficients for different regions: Solbrig for Germany, Liou for Taiwan, Jihyun for South Korea, Dongseob for North Korea, Suresh Raju for India, Boutiouta and Lahcene for Algeria, Bokoye for Canada, Baltink for Netherlands and Baltic, Bock for Africa. It is stated that the weighted mean temperature can be found with a root mean square error of ±2-5 K. In addition, there are studies on the calculation of the coefficients globally. Another model for the determination of

  18. Vapor condensation behind the shock wave in vapor-liquid two-phase media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syoji, Chiharu; Oshiro, Naoto

    Laser extinction, schlieren photography, and in situ pressure measurements are used to characterize vapor condensation behind a shock wave in a diaphragm shock tube with a low-pressure chamber filled with ethanol, water, or freon-11 vapor. The experimental setup is briefly described, and the results are presented graphically and discussed in detail. Condensation, lasting a few hundred microsec before reevaporation sets in, is found to decrease the intensity of the shock front and lower the pressure behind it.

  19. Prostate heating patterns comparing electrosurgical transurethral resection and vaporization: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A; Fuchs, G J; Gutiérrez-Aceves, J; Ryan, T P

    1997-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to determine if transurethral electrosurgical vaporization of the prostate is associated with unseen heat damage to vital periprostatic structures compared to conventional loop resection. In addition, energy consumption and its relationship to observed tissue temperature at the prostate periphery were evaluated for each treatment. Patients with moderate to severe symptoms of benign prostatic bladder outflow obstruction and objective evidence of diminished flow or acute urinary retention were randomized to undergo either transurethral loop resection or electrosurgical vaporization after stratification for gland volume. Instrumentation was standardized for both groups except for the monopolar electrode used. The radiofrequency power source in the study was a new computer controlled generator with a constant power delivery feature. Regional tissue heating patterns were evaluated with optical fiber probes in real time. Four stationary sites were chosen for temperature measurements, namely the lateral lobe of the prostate, neurovascular bundle beside the prostatic apex at the level of the external sphincter, and anterior rectal wall at the level of the prostatic base and apex. A pull back technique was used to search for hot points in the long axis of the probe (3-dimensional temperature mapping) in 2 patients from each group. Incident generator panel power settings for the electrosurgical vaporization treatments were equivalent to those commonly used for loop resection (150 watts) and were adjusted up or down as needed. Prostate electrosurgical vaporization was possible at generator panel settings that were nearly equivalent to those for transurethral resection of the prostate (130 to 190 watts). No significant rectal or sphincteric heating was detected with either procedure. Conductive cooling of the neurovascular bundles was observed in 2 patients in each group toward the end of the operation. More energy was used per minute of

  20. The Calculation Of Ngancar Batuwarna Reservoir, Wonogiri, Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azura Ulfa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of reservoir capacity is needed to find out how big the effective volume change of Ngancar Reservoir from the beginning of measurement until 2016. The purpose of this research is measuring volume of Ngancar Reservoir using bathymetry method with echosounder and calculating the remaining relative age of Ngancar Reservoir. Measurement topography of Ngancar Reservoir is done by bathymetry method of aquatic systematic random sampling method through certain path using echosounder. Analysis of reservoir capacity is done by calculating the volumes of Ngancar Reservoir and calculating the residual life of the reservoir relative. Fluctuation analysis of volume change was done by calculating the effective volume of reservoirs 1946-2016 and graphs. The calculation of the volume of the Ngancar Reservoir from the topographic map produces an effective volume value of 2016 is 1269905 m3 and the effective puddle area is 1393416 m2. An increase in sedimentation volume from 2011-2016 amounted to 296119.75 m3 with sedimentation rate was 59223.95 / year. With the assumption that the same landuse and sedimentation rate tend to be stable then the remaining age of Ngancar Reservoir is 21 years and 95 years old.

  1. Kinetics of laser pulse vaporization of uranium dioxide by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.

    1981-11-01

    Safety analyses of nuclear reactors require knowledge of the evaporation behavior of UO/sub 2/ at temperatures well above the melting point of 3140 K. In this study, rapid transient heating of a small spot on a UO/sub 2/ specimen was accomplished by a laser pulse, which generates a surface temperature excursion. This in turn vaporizes the target surface and the gas expands into vacuum. The surface temperature transient was monitored by a fast-response automatic optical pyrometer. The maximum surface temperatures investigated range from approx. 3700 K to approx. 4300 K. A computer program was developed to simulate the laser heating process and calculate the surface temperature evolution. The effect of the uncertainties of the high temperature material properties on the calculation was included in a sensitivity study for UO/sub 2/ vaporization. The measured surface temperatures were in satisfactory agreements.

  2. Estimation of Equilibrated Vapor Concentrations Using the UNIFAC Model for the Tetrachloroethylene-Chlorobenzene System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishidao, Toru; Ishimatsu, Sumiyo; Hori, Hajime

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrated vapor concentrations at 25°C of the tetrachloroethylene-chlorobenzene system were obtained in the presence of air to establish a method for estimating vapor concentrations in work environments where multicomponent organic solvents are used. The experimental data were correlated by introducing activity coefficients calculated by the UNIFAC (Universal Quasichemical Functional Group Activity Coefficient) model. There were four interaction parameters between groups in this solution system, and three had already been determined.However, the fourth parameter--the interaction parameter between ACCl and Cl-(C=C) groups--remains unknown. Therefore, this parameter was determined by a nonlinear least-squares method to obtain the best fit for the experimental data. The calculated values were found to be in good agreement with the experimental values.

  3. Chemical calculations and chemicals that might calculate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Michael P.

    I summarize some applications of symbolic calculation to the evaluation of molecular integrals over Slater orbitals, and discuss some spin-offs of this work that have wider potential. These include the exploration of the mechanized use of analogy. I explain the methods that I use to do this, in relation to mathematical proofs and to modeling step by step processes such as organic syntheses and NMR pulse sequences. Another spin-off relates to biological information processing. Some challenges and opportunities in the information infrastructure of interdisciplinary research are discussed.

  4. CALCULATING PARTITION COEFFICIENTS OF ORGANIC VAPORS IN UNSATURATED SOIL AND CLAYS. (R825433)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. Motion of liquid plugs between vapor bubbles in capillary tubes: a comparison between fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertossi, Rémi; Ayel, Vincent; Mehta, Balkrishna; Romestant, Cyril; Bertin, Yves; Khandekar, Sameer

    2017-11-01

    Pulsating heat pipes (PHP) are now well-known devices in which liquid/vapor slug flow oscillates in a capillary tube wound between hot and cold sources. In this context, this paper focuses on the motion of the liquid plug, trapped between vapor bubbles, moving in capillary tubes, to try to better understand the thermo-physical phenomena involved in such devices. This study is divided into three parts. In the first part, an experimental study presents the evolution of the vapor pressure during the evaporation process of a liquid thin film deposited from a liquid plug flowing in a heated capillary tube: it is found that the behavior of the generated and removed vapor can be very different, according to the thermophysical properties of the fluids. In the second part, a transient model allows to compare, in terms of pressure and duration, the motion of a constant-length liquid plug trapped between two bubbles subjected to a constant difference of vapor pressure: the results highlight that the performances of the four fluids are also very different. Finally, a third model that can be considered as an improvement of the second one, is also presented: here, the liquid slug is surrounded by two vapor bubbles, one subjected to evaporation, the pressure in both bubbles is now a result of the calculation. This model still allows comparing the behaviors of the fluid. Even if our models are quite far from a complete model of a real PHP, results do indicate towards the applicability of different fluids as suitable working fluids for PHPs, particularly in terms of the flow instabilities which they generate.

  6. 21 CFR 888.4220 - Cement monomer vapor evacuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement monomer vapor evacuator. 888.4220 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4220 Cement monomer vapor evacuator. (a) Identification. A cement monomer vapor evacuator is a device intended for use during surgery to contain or remove...

  7. 33 CFR 157.132 - Cargo tanks: Hydrocarbon vapor emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cargo tanks: Hydrocarbon vapor... § 157.132 Cargo tanks: Hydrocarbon vapor emissions. Each tank vessel having a COW system under § 157.10a... must have— (a) A means to discharge hydrocarbon vapors from each cargo tank that is ballasted to a...

  8. 40 CFR 52.787 - Gasoline transfer vapor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline transfer vapor control. 52.787... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.787 Gasoline transfer vapor control. (a) Gasoline means any petroleum distillate having a Reid vapor pressure of 4 pounds or greater...

  9. 40 CFR 52.255 - Gasoline transfer vapor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline transfer vapor control. 52.255... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.255 Gasoline transfer vapor control. (a) “Gasoline” means any petroleum distillate having a Reid vapor pressure of 4 pounds or greater...

  10. 33 CFR 154.810 - Vapor line connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.810 Vapor... the OCIMF International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals (incorporated by reference; see § 154.106). (h) A vapor collection system fitted with an enriching system that operates at a positive...

  11. Packed-bed catalytic cracking of oak derived pyrolytic vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapors derived from oak was carried out using a fixed-bed catalytic column at 425 deg C. The vapors were drawn by splitting a fraction from the full stream of vapors produced at 500 deg C in a 5 kg/hr bench-scale fast pyrolysis reactor system downstream the cyclone s...

  12. Membrane-assisted vapor stripping: energy efficient hybrid distillation-vapor permeation process for alcohol-water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Energy efficient alternatives to distillation for alcohol recovery from dilute solution are needed to improve biofuel sustainability. A process integrating steam stripping with a vapor compression step and a vapor permeation membrane separation step is proposed. The...

  13. Vapor Compression and Thermoelectric Heat Pump Heat Exchangers for a Condensate Distillation System: Design and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Lisa R.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing the reuse of wastewater while minimizing the use of consumables is critical in long duration space exploration. One of the more promising methods of reclaiming urine is the distillation/condensation process used in the cascade distillation system (CDS). This system accepts a mixture of urine and toxic stabilizing agents, heats it to vaporize the water and condenses and cools the resulting water vapor. The CDS wastewater flow requires heating and its condensate flow requires cooling. Performing the heating and cooling processes separately requires two separate units, each of which would require large amounts of electrical power. By heating the wastewater and cooling the condensate in a single heat pump unit, mass, volume, and power efficiencies can be obtained. The present work describes and compares two competing heat pump methodologies that meet the needs of the CDS: 1) a series of mini compressor vapor compression cycles and 2) a thermoelectric heat exchanger. In the paper, the system level requirements are outlined, the designs of the two heat pumps are described in detail, and the results of heat pump performance tests are provided. A summary is provided of the heat pump mass, volume and power trades and a selection recommendation is made.

  14. Vapor Compression and Thermoelectric Heat Pumps for a Cascade Distillation Subsystem: Design and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Lisa R.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2012-01-01

    Humans on a spacecraft require significant amounts of water for drinking, food, hydration, and hygiene. Maximizing the reuse of wastewater while minimizing the use of consumables is critical for long duration space exploration. One of the more promising consumable-free methods of reclaiming wastewater is the distillation/condensation process used in the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS). The CDS heats wastewater to the point of vaporization then condenses and cools the resulting water vapor. The CDS wastewater flow requires heating for evaporation and the product water flow requires cooling for condensation. Performing the heating and cooling processes separately would require two separate units, each of which would demand large amounts of electrical power. Mass, volume, and power efficiencies can be obtained by heating the wastewater and cooling the condensate in a single heat pump unit. The present work describes and compares two competing heat pump methodologies that meet the needs of the CDS: 1) a series of mini compressor vapor compression cycles and 2) a thermoelectric heat exchanger. In the paper, the CDS system level requirements are outlined, the designs of the two heat pumps are described in detail, and the results of heat pump analysis and performance tests are provided. The mass, volume, and power requirement for each heat pump option is compared and the advantages and disadvantages of each system are listed.

  15. [Understanding dosage calculations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlahouès, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The calculation of dosages in paediatrics is the concern of the whole medical and paramedical team. This activity must generate a minimum of risks in order to prevent care-related adverse events. In this context, the calculation of dosages is a practice which must be understood by everyone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of uncertainty in model predictions of individual tree volume on large area volume estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald E. McRoberts; James A. Westfall

    2014-01-01

    Forest inventory estimates of tree volume for large areas are typically calculated by adding model predictions of volumes for individual trees. However, the uncertainty in the model predictions is generally ignored with the result that the precision of the large area volume estimates is overestimated. The primary study objective was to estimate the effects of model...

  17. Working fluids selection for fishing boats waste heat powered organic Rankine-vapor compression ice maker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xianbiao; Wang, Lingbao; Li, Huashan

    2014-10-01

    To utilize waste heat from fishing boats, an organic Rankine cycle/vapor compression cycle system was employed for ice making and a thermodynamic model was developed. Six working fluids were selected and compared in order to identify suitable working fluids which may yield high system efficiencies. The calculated results show that R600a is most suitable working fluid through comprehensive comparison of efficiency, size parameter, pressure ratio, coefficient of performance, system pressure and safety.

  18. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  19. Three-dimensional kinetic and fluid dynamic modeling and three iterative algorithms for side-pumped alkali vapor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Binglin; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2017-11-01

    Combining the kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in static and flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers, a comprehensive physical model with three cyclically iterative algorithms for simulating the three-dimensional pump and laser intensities as well as temperature distribution in the vapor cell of side-pumped alkali vapor lasers is established. Comparison with measurement of a static side-pumped cesium vapor laser with a diffuse type hollow cylinder cavity, and with classical and modified models is made. Influences of flowed velocity and pump power on laser power are calculated and analyzed. The results have demonstrated that for high-power side-pumped alkali vapor lasers, it is necessary to take into account the three-dimensional distributions of pump energy, laser energy and temperature in the cell to simultaneously obtain the thermal features and output characteristics. Therefore, the model can deepen the understanding of the complete kinetic and fluid dynamic mechanisms of a side-pumped alkali vapor laser, and help with its further experimental design.

  20. Chemical agent simulant release from clothing following vapor exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Robert J

    2010-02-01

    Most ambulatory victims of a terrorist chemical attack will have exposure to vapor only. The study objective was to measure the duration of chemical vapor release from various types of clothing. A chemical agent was simulated using methyl salicylate (MeS), which has similar physical properties to sulfur mustard and was the agent used in the U.S. Army's Man-In-Simulant Test (MIST). Vapor concentration was measured with a Smiths Detection Advanced Portable Detector (APD)-2000 unit. The clothing items were exposed to vapor for 1 hour in a sealed cabinet; vapor concentration was measured at the start and end of each exposure. Clothing was then removed and assessed every 5 minutes with the APD-2000, using a uniform sweep pattern, until readings remained 0. Concentration and duration of vapor release from clothing varied with clothing composition and construction. Lightweight cotton shirts and jeans had the least trapped vapor; down outerwear, the most. Vapor concentration near the clothing often increased for several minutes after the clothing was removed from the contaminated environment. Compression of thick outerwear released additional vapor. Mean times to reach 0 ranged from 7 minutes for jeans to 42 minutes for down jackets. This simulation model of chemical vapor release demonstrates persistent presence of simulant vapor over time. This implies that chemical vapor may be released from the victims' clothing after they are evacuated from the site of exposure, resulting in additional exposure of victims and emergency responders. Insulated outerwear can release additional vapor when handled. If a patient has just moved to a vapor screening point, immediate assessment before additional vapor can be released from the clothing can lead to a false-negative assessment of contamination.

  1. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-103: Results from samples collected on 06/12/96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L. [and others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-103 (Tank S-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  2. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Tank 241-TY-102: Results from samples collected on 04/12/96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L. [and others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-TY-102 (Tank TY-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to`characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes, and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  3. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-C-204: Results from samples collected on 07/02/96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H. [and others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-C-204 (Tank C-204) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  4. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Tank 241-B-105: Results from samples collected on 07/30/96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L. [and others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-B-105 (Tank B-105) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  5. A thermodynamic study of glucose and related oligomers in aqueous solution: Vapor pressures and enthalpies of mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, S.A.; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Westh, Peter

    2002-01-01

    -mentioned systems at 318.15 K. A theoretical model is examined in which existing interaction parameters, calculated for the water + 1,2-ethanediol system by using a molecular mechanical approach, are incorporated into the UNIQUAC equation to describe the vapor pressures of the aforementioned series of saccharides...

  6. Electron transport in mercury vapor: cross sections, pressure and temperature dependence of transport coefficients and NDC effects★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirić, Jasmina; Simonović, Ilija; Petrović, Zoran Lj.; White, Ronald D.; Dujko, Saša

    2017-11-01

    In this work we propose a complete and consistent set of cross sections for electron scattering in mercury vapor. The set is validated through a series of comparisons between swarm data calculated using a multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulations, and the available experimental data. Other sets of cross sections for electron scattering in mercury vapor were also used as input in our numerical codes with the aim of testing their completeness, consistency and accuracy. The calculated swarm parameters are compared with measurements in order to assess the quality of the cross sections in providing data for plasma modeling. In particular, we discuss the dependence of transport coefficients on the pressure and temperature of mercury vapor, and the occurrence of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in the limit of lower values of E/N. We have shown that the phenomenon of NDC is induced by the presence of mercury dimers and that can be controlled by varying either pressure or temperature of mercury vapor. The effective inelastic cross section for mercury dimers is estimated for a range of pressures and temperatures. It is shown that the measured and calculated drift velocities agree very well only if the effective inelastic cross section for mercury dimers and thermal motion of mercury atoms are carefully considered and implemented in numerical calculations. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  7. [Greenlight-XPS laser vaporization, the new standard of treatment in men with myasthenia gravis and benign prostatic obstruction]?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husillos-Alonso, Adrián; Simón-Rodríguez, Carlos; Bolufer-Moragues, Eduardo; López-Martín, Leticia; Carbonero-García, Manuel; González-Enguita, Carmen

    2015-05-01

    Patients with Benign Prostatic Obstruction (BPO) and Myasthenia Gravis (MG) treated with Transurethral Resection of the prostate (TURP) show a high incidence of urinary incontinence due to unnoticed damage to muscle fibres of the external sphincter. Photoselective laser vaporization could be an alternative treatment based on the hypothesis that using Laser as energy source in the treatment of BPH prevents sphincter damage because the energy is not transmitted outside the fiber tip. We report the case of a man diagnosed of MG and symptomatic BPO treated satisfactorily with photoselective laser vaporization (GreenLight-XPS). Patient did not experienced postoperative secondary incontinence. Laser photoselective vaporization (GreenLight-XPS) could be the standard treatment for men with MG and BPO, whose prostate volume is less than 60 cc who are candidates for surgical treatment. Despite the extremely low incidence of these cases, further investigations are needed to confirm this affirmation.

  8. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank 241-C-202: Results from samples collected on 06/25/96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-C-202 (Tank C-202) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, on sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  9. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank 241-C-201: Results from samples collected on 06/19/96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-C-201 (Tank C-201) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, on sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary, of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  10. Experimental study of external fuel vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szetela, E. J.; Tevelde, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The fuel properties used in the design of a flash vaporization system for aircraft gas turbine engines were evaluated in experiments using a flowing system to determine critical temperature and pressure, boiling points, dew points, heat transfer coefficients, deposit formation rates, and deposit removal. Three fuels were included in the experiments: Jet-A, an experimental referree broad specification fuel, and a premium No. 2 diesel fuel. Engine conditions representing a NASA Energy Efficient Engine at sea-level take-off, cruise, and idle were simulated in the vaporization system and it was found that single phase flow was maintained in the heat exchanger and downstream of the throttle. Deposits encountered in the heat exchanger represented a thermal resistance as high as 1300 sq M K/watt and a deposit formation rate over 1000 gC/sq cm hr.

  11. Experimental vaporization of the Holbrook chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J. L.; Muenow, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The vapor phase composition obtained by heating samples of the Holbrook L6 chondrite to 1300 C was determined quantitatively by Knudsen cell-quadrupole mass spectrometry. Maximum observed vapor pressures, produced at 1200 C, are reported for Na, K, Fe, and Ni, and the implications of the Na/K ratio are considered. The Fe and Ni data are discussed with attention to their migration in individual equilibrated chondrites. S2 (with minor SO2), H2O, and CO2 were also present in the high-temperature gas phase. Vesicles formed by the release of intrinsically derived volatiles are compared with vesicles in the Ibitira eucrite. Chondrite evolution is briefly discussed.

  12. Quenching Phase Separation by Vapor Deposition Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ran; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2015-03-01

    Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) is a solventless, free radical technique predominately used to deposit homogeneous films of linear and crosslinked polymers directly from gas phase feeds. We report a template-free method to fabricate continuous-phase porous polymer films by simultaneous phase separation during iCVD. Phase separation during film growth is achieved by condensing an inert porogen, along with initiator, monomer, and crosslinker. When the vapor mixture transports to the cooled substrate, phase separation occurs along with polymerization and crosslinking, which quench the state of phase separation. The kinetics of spontaneously phase separation can be qualitatively understood on the basis of Cahn-Hilliard theory. A series of films were grown by varying monomer and porogen's degree of saturation. Deposited films were studied by electron microscopy and spectroscopic techniques.

  13. The toxicity of inhaled methanol vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavet, R; Nauss, K M

    1990-01-01

    Methanol could become a major automotive fuel in the U.S., and its use may result in increased exposure of the public to methanol vapor. Nearly all of the available information on methanol toxicity in humans relates to the consequences of acute, rather than chronic, exposures. Acute methanol toxicity evolves in a well-understood pattern and consists of an uncompensated metabolic acidosis with superimposed toxicity to the visual system. The toxic properties of methanol are rooted in the factors that govern both the conversion of methanol to formic acid and the subsequent metabolism of formate to carbon dioxide in the folate pathway. In short, the toxic syndrome sets in if formate generation continues at a rate that exceeds its rate of metabolism. Current evidence indicates that formate accumulation will not challenge the metabolic capacity of the folate pathway at the anticipated levels of exposure to automotive methanol vapor.

  14. Gradient Solvent Vapor Annealing of Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Julie; Bogart, Timothy; Lewis, Ronald; Epps, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    The development of block copolymer materials for emerging nanotechnologies requires an understanding of how surface energy/chemistry and annealing conditions affect thin film self-assembly. Specifically, in solvent vapor annealing (SVA), the use of solvent mixtures and the manipulation of solvent vapor concentration are promising approaches for obtaining a desired morphology or nanostructure orientation. We designed and fabricated solvent-resistant devices to produce discrete SVA gradients in composition and/or concentration to efficiently explore SVA parameter space. We annealed copolymer films containing poly(styrene), poly(isoprene), and/or poly(methyl methacrylate) blocks, monitored film thicknesses during annealing, and characterized film morphologies with atomic force microscopy. Morphological changes across the gradients such as the transformation from parallel cylinders to spheres with increasing solvent selectivity provided insight into thin film self-assembly, and the gradient device has enabled us to determine transition compositions and/or concentrations.

  15. Vapor-induced phase transformations in docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatini, Lakshmi Kumar; Krishna Reddy, K V S R; Someswara Rao, N

    2012-06-01

    Vapor-induced transformations of docetaxel anhydrous (form D(A)) under ambient conditions have been studied using methanol, ethanol, and water as the solvent media. The online vapor-induced transformations were monitored by powder X-ray diffractometry. New solid forms (solvates/hydrates/anhydrous) of docetaxel anhydrous were obtained in stoichiometric ratios which were characterized completely using powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimeter, thermogravimetric analysis, and spectroscopic ((13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic spectroscopy, solution (1)H NMR, and Fourier transform infrared) techniques. The new forms namely methanol solvate (D(M)), ethanol solvate (D(E)), monohydrate (D(MH)), trihydrate (D(TH)), and anhydrous (D(AN-I) and D(AN-II)) were identified through structural analysis.

  16. Water vapor weathering of Taurus-Littrow orange soil - A pore-structure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenhead, D. A.; Mikhail, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A pore-volume analysis was performed on water vapor adsorption data previously obtained on a fresh sample of Taurus-Littrow orange soil, and the analysis was repeated on the same sample after its exposure to moist air for a period of approximately six months. The results indicate that exposure of an outgassed sample to high relative pressures of water vapor can result in the formation of substantial micropore structure, the precise amount being dependent on the sample pretreatment, particularly the outgassing temperature. Micropore formation is explained in terms of water penetration into surface defects. In contrast, long-term exposure to moist air at low relative pressures appears to reverse the process with the elimination of micropores and enlargement of mesopores possibly through surface diffusion of metastable adsorbent material. The results are considered with reference to the storage of lunar samples.

  17. Modeling Two-Phase Flow and Vapor Cycles Using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda D.; Majumdar, Alok K.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents three new applications for the general purpose fluid network solver code GFSSP developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: (1) cooling tower, (2) vapor-compression refrigeration system, and (3) vapor-expansion power generation system. These systems are widely used across engineering disciplines in a variety of energy systems, and these models expand the capabilities and the use of GFSSP to include fluids and features that are not part of its present set of provided examples. GFSSP provides pressure, temperature, and species concentrations at designated locations, or nodes, within a fluid network based on a finite volume formulation of thermodynamics and conservation laws. This paper describes the theoretical basis for the construction of the models, their implementation in the current GFSSP modeling system, and a brief evaluation of the usefulness of the model results, as well as their applicability toward a broader spectrum of analytical problems in both university teaching and engineering research.

  18. Quantifying liquid boundary and vapor distributions in a fuel spray by rainbow schlieren deflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber Wanstall, C; Agrawal, Ajay K; Bittle, Joshua A

    2017-10-20

    The rainbow schlieren deflectometry (RSD) technique is used to determine the liquid boundary and the fuel volume fraction distributions in the vapor region of a high-pressure fuel spray. Experiments were conducted in a constant pressure flow vessel, whereby a customized single-hole common-rail diesel injector is used to introduce n-heptane fuel into a coflow of low-speed ambient air at two different test conditions. Only the quasi-steady period of the fuel spray is considered, and multiple injections are performed to acquire statistically significant data at an image acquisition rate of 20 kHz. An algorithm to identify the liquid boundary using intensity recorded by the RSD images is presented. The results are compared against measurements obtained by the Mie scattering technique. Results demonstrate that the RSD can be a powerful optical diagnostics technique to simultaneously quantify both the vapor and liquid regions in the high-pressure fuel sprays.

  19. Liquid marble formation and solvent vapor treatment of the biodegradable polymers polylactic acid and polycaprolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmücker, Christoph; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2018-03-15

    Liquid Marbles were produced by rolling aqueous droplets on a powder bed of biodegradable polymers, namely polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL) and blends of these. Solvent vapor treatment was subsequently applied with dichloromethane (DCM). This treatment aligned the polymer chains in order to form a smooth polymeric shell with enhanced mechanical and barrier properties. Whilst a wide range of potential applications for Liquid Marbles exists, the aim here is to encapsulate a solution containing a fertilizer, i.e. urea to produce a controlled release fertilizer. The influences of droplet volume, polymer particle size and solvent vapor treatment time on the liquid marble properties were investigated. Crystallinity and thermal properties were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), surface characteristics and shell thickness by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mechanical strength and elasticity by compression tests and evaporation rates by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Heat transfer during pseudo-dropwise condensation of water-ethanol vapor mixture on horizontal finned tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindyakov, A. A.; Smirnov, Yu B.; Mikhailova, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    In the present work experimental data on heat transfer are obtained for the condensation of almost immobile pure steam and water-ethanol vapor mixture on three copper horizontal finned tubes with a cooled length of 100 mm. The fins are rectangular in shape, their height and thickness are 1 mm, and the spacing between fins 1.3, 2.0 and 3.0 mm. The experiments were carried out at pressures of 0.12…0.15 MPa, the vapor-to-surface temperature difference varied from 5 to 35 K. The mass concentration of ethanol in the vapor phase varied from 8.7 to 14.5%. The experimental data are presented in the form of the dependences of heat transfer coefficient on the vapor-to-wall temperature difference. The heat transfer coefficients for the condensation of pure steam are in good agreement with the calculations by the method of Srinivasan et al. According to experimental data for the condensation of the vapor mixture, diffusion thermal resistance and thermal resistance of the liquid phase at various ethanol concentrations and the spacing between fins were calculated.

  1. Flow Characterization of Vapor Phase of Geothermal Fluid in Pipe Using Isotope 85Kr and Residence Time Distribution Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sugiharto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of vapor flow in geothermal pipe faces great challenges due to fast fluids flow in high-temperature and high-pressure environment. In present study the flow rate measurement has been performed to characterization the geothermal vapor flow in a pipe. The experiment was carried out in a pipe which is connected to a geothermal production well, KMJ-14. The pipe has a 10” outside diameter and contains dry vapor at a pressure of 8 kg/cm2 and a temperature of 170 oC. Krypton-85 gas isotope (85Kr has been injected into the pipe. Three collimated radiation detectors positioned respectively at 127, 177 and 227m from injection point were used to obtain experimental data which represent radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD in the pipe. The last detector at the position of 227 m did not respond, which might be due to problems in cable connections. Flow properties calculated using mean residence time (MRT shows that the flow rate of the vapor in pipe is 10.98 m/s, much faster than fluid flow commonly found in various industrial process plants. Best fitting evaluated using dedicated software developed by IAEA expert obtained the Péclet number Pe as 223. This means that the flow of vapor of geothermal fluids in pipe is plug flow in character. The molecular diffusion coefficient is 0.45 m2/s, calculated from the axial dispersion model.

  2. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant: Niles Station Boiler No. 2. Volume 1, Sampling/results/special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This study was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE-PETC) during 1993. The motivation for those assessments was the mandate in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments that a study be made of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electrical utilities. The results of this study will be used by the US Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate whether regulation of HAPs emissions from utilities is warranted. This report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1: Sampling/Results/Special Topics describes the sampling effort conducted as the basis for this study, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in the several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations conducted with those data. The Special Topics section of Volume 1 reports on issues such as comparison of sampling methods and vapor/particle distributions of toxic chemicals. Volume 2: Appendices include field sampling data sheets, quality assurance results, and uncertainty calculations. The chemicals measured at Niles Boiler No. 2 were the following: five major and 16 trace elements, including mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, arsenic, beryllium, and nickel; acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate); ammonia and cyanide; elemental carbon; radionuclides; volatile organic compounds (VOC); semivolatile compounds (SVOC) including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and polychlorinated dioxins and furans; and aldehydes.

  3. Detailed Field Investigation of Vapor Intrusion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    will be conducted and respiratory protective equipment used as needed, as described below. • Eating, drinking, smoking, gum chewing and oral tobacco use...FINAL REPORT Detailed Field Investigation of Vapor Intrusion Processes ESTCP Project ER-0423 September 2008 Thomas E. McHugh, Ph ...Thomas E. McHugh, Ph D. Tim N. Nickels 5d. PROJECT NUMBER ER-0423 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  4. Making Ceramic Fibers By Chemical Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Vithal V. S.; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1994-01-01

    Research and development of fabrication techniques for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of ceramic fibers presented in two reports. Fibers of SiC, TiB2, TiC, B4C, and CrB2 intended for use as reinforcements in metal-matrix composite materials. CVD offers important advantages over other processes: fibers purer and stronger and processed at temperatures below melting points of constituent materials.

  5. Chemical vapor infiltration in single fiber bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Barbero, R.S.; Currier, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) in single fiber bundles is studied under isothermal conditions. Understanding infiltration dynamics in single bundles is essential to process design and modeling efforts. Deposition of pyrolytic carbon in carbon-fiber bundles is chosen as the experimental system, with densification data obtained from thermogravimetric analysis. Data are then compared to predictions from a recently proposed CVI model for fiber bundle densification. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Quality and Control of Water Vapor Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor imagery from the geostationary satellites such as GOES, Meteosat, and GMS provides synoptic views of dynamical events on a continual basis. Because the imagery represents a non-linear combination of mid- and upper-tropospheric thermodynamic parameters (three-dimensional variations in temperature and humidity), video loops of these image products provide enlightening views of regional flow fields, the movement of tropical and extratropical storm systems, the transfer of moisture between hemispheres and from the tropics to the mid- latitudes, and the dominance of high pressure systems over particular regions of the Earth. Despite the obvious larger scale features, the water vapor imagery contains significant image variability down to the single 8 km GOES pixel. These features can be quantitatively identified and tracked from one time to the next using various image processing techniques. Merrill et al. (1991), Hayden and Schmidt (1992), and Laurent (1993) have documented the operational procedures and capabilities of NOAA and ESOC to produce cloud and water vapor winds. These techniques employ standard correlation and template matching approaches to wind tracking and use qualitative and quantitative procedures to eliminate bad wind vectors from the wind data set. Techniques have also been developed to improve the quality of the operational winds though robust editing procedures (Hayden and Veldon 1991). These quality and control approaches have limitations, are often subjective, and constrain wind variability to be consistent with model derived wind fields. This paper describes research focused on the refinement of objective quality and control parameters for water vapor wind vector data sets. New quality and control measures are developed and employed to provide a more robust wind data set for climate analysis, data assimilation studies, as well as operational weather forecasting. The parameters are applicable to cloud-tracked winds as well with minor

  7. Inhalation of Alcohol Vapor: Measurement and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Robert Ross; Valentine, Gerald W; Jatlow, Peter I; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2017-02-01

    Decades of alcohol research have established the health risks and pharmacodynamic profile of oral alcohol consumption. Despite isolated periods of public health concern, comparatively less research has evaluated exposure to alcohol vapor. Inhaled alcohol initially bypasses first-pass metabolism and rapidly reaches the arterial circulation and the brain, suggesting that this route of administration may be associated with pharmacological effects that increase the risk of addiction. However, detailed reviews assessing the possible effects of inhaled alcohol in humans are lacking. A comprehensive, systematic literature review was conducted using Google Scholar and PubMed to examine manuscripts studying exposure to inhaled alcohol and measurement of biomarkers (biochemical or functional) associated with alcohol consumption in human participants. Twenty-one publications reported on alcohol inhalation. Fourteen studies examined inhalation of alcohol vapor associated with occupational exposure (e.g., hand sanitizer) in a variety of settings (e.g., naturalistic, laboratory). Six publications measured inhalation of alcohol in a controlled laboratory chamber, and 1 evaluated direct inhalation of an e-cigarette with ethanol-containing "e-liquid." Some studies have reported that inhalation of alcohol vapor results in measurable biomarkers of acute alcohol exposure, most notably ethyl glucuronide. Despite the lack of significantly elevated blood alcohol concentrations, the behavioral consequences and subjective effects associated with repeated use of devices capable of delivering alcohol vapor are yet to be determined. No studies have focused on vulnerable populations, such as adolescents or individuals with alcohol use disorder, who may be most at risk of problems associated with alcohol inhalation. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  8. Vaporization of atherosclerotic plaques by spark erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Slager, Cornelis J.; Essed, Catharina E.; Schuurbiers, Johan C.H.; Bom, Nicolaas; Serruys, Patrick W.; Meester, Geert T.

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAn alternative to the laser irradiation of atherosclerotic lesions has been developed. A pulsed electrocardiogram R wave-triggered electrical spark erosion technique is described. Controlled vaporization of fibrous and lipid plaques with minimal thermal side effects was achieved and documented histologically in vitro from 30 atherosclerotic segments of six human aortic autopsy specimens. Craters with a constant area and a depth that varied according to the duration of application ...

  9. Water Vapor Effects on Silica-Forming Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, E. J.; Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Silica-forming ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 are proposed for applications in combustion environments. These environments contain water vapor as a product of combustion. Oxidation of silica-formers is more rapid in water vapor than in oxygen. Parabolic oxidation rates increase with the water vapor partial pressure with a power law exponent value close to one. Molecular water vapor is therefore the mobile species in silica. Rapid oxidation rates and large amounts of gases generated during the oxidation reaction in high water vapor pressures may result in bubble formation in the silica and nonprotective scale formation. It is also shown that silica reacts with water vapor to form Si(OH)4(g). Silica volatility has been modeled using a laminar flow boundary layer controlled reaction equation. Silica volatility depends on the partial pressure of water vapor, the total pressure, and the gas velocity. Simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions have been modeled with paralinear kinetics.

  10. Nuclear vapor thermal reactor propulsion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maya, I.; Diaz, N.J.; Dugan, E.T.; Watanabe, Y. (Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)); McClanahan, J.A.; Wen-Hsiung Tu; Carman, R.L. (Rocketdyne Division/Rockwell International Corporation, P.O. Box 7922, Canoga Park, California 91309-7922 (United States))

    1993-01-20

    The conceptual design of a nuclear rocket based on the vapor core reactor is presented. The Nuclear Vapor Thermal Rocket (NVTR) offers the potential for a specific impulse of 1000 to 1200 s at thrust-to-weight ratios of 1 to 2. The design is based on NERVA geometry and systems with the solid fuel replaced by uranium tetrafluoride (UF[sub 4]) vapor. The closed-loop core does not rely on hydrodynamic confinement of the fuel. The hydrogen propellant is separated from the UF[sub 4] fuel gas by graphite structure. The hydrogen is maintained at high pressure ([similar to]100 atm), and exits the core at 3,100 K to 3,500 K. Zirconium carbide and hafnium carbide coatings are used to protect the hot graphite from the hydrogen. The core is surrounded by beryllium oxide reflector. The nuclear reactor core has been integrated into a 75 klb engine design using an expander cycle and dual turbopumps. The NVTR offers the potential for an incremental technology development pathway to high performance gas core reactors. Since the fuel is readily available, it also offers advantages in the initial cost of development, as it will not require major expenditures for fuel development.

  11. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-02-03

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  12. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonská, Jana, E-mail: jana.jablonska@vsb.cz; Kozubková, Milada, E-mail: milada.kozubkova@vsb.cz [VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Hydromechanics and Hydraulic Equipment, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-30

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ε model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  13. Droplet vaporization in a supercritical microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, E. W.; Farrell, P. V.

    A model has been developed for non-convective vaporization of liquid fuel droplets in an environment above the liquid critical pressure and near or above the liquid critical temperature. The model employs conservation of mass, energy and chemical species, along with transport properties which vary with temperature and species concentration. The liquid interface is assumed to be in thermodynamic equilibrium. The interface problem is solved using the Gibbs-Duhem relationship, and evaluating mixture fugacities using a modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state for the mixture. Due to the limited range of this equation, a curve-fit equation of state suitable for conditions far from the liquid critical point was applied. Results are presented for an n-octane liquid drop in nitrogen gas. For two gas conditions, several droplet sizes are modeled. Results include droplet size histories, surface temperature histories, and liquid and gas phase temperature profiles. The liquid vaporization rate is increased significantly for supercritical conditions compared to subcritical conditions. Using the specified equation of state for the ambient conditions tested, the droplet is completely vaporized before the liquid surface is heated to the liquid critical temperature.

  14. Marketing practices of vapor store owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Marshall; Gowin, Mary; Wann, Taylor Franklin

    2015-06-01

    We examined the marketing strategies for local vapor stores in a large metropolitan area in Oklahoma. Vapor store owners or managers (n = 33) participated in individual interviews regarding marketing practices in 2014. We asked owners about their marketing strategies and the groups they targeted. We transcribed the interviews and analyzed them for themes. Store owners used a variety of marketing strategies to bring new customers to their stores and keep current customers coming back. These marketing strategies showed many parallels to tobacco industry strategies. Most owners engaged in some form of traditional marketing practices (e.g., print media), but only a few used radio or television advertising because of budget constraints. Owners used social media and other forms of electronic communication, pricing discounts and specials, and loyalty programs. Owners also had booths at local events, sponsored community events, and hosted them in their stores. Owners attempted to target different groups of users, such as college students and long-term smokers. Local vapor store marketing practices closely resemble current and former tobacco industry marketing strategies. Surveillance of marketing practices should include local and Web-based strategies.

  15. Marketing Practices of Vapor Store Owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowin, Mary; Wann, Taylor Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the marketing strategies for local vapor stores in a large metropolitan area in Oklahoma. Methods. Vapor store owners or managers (n = 33) participated in individual interviews regarding marketing practices in 2014. We asked owners about their marketing strategies and the groups they targeted. We transcribed the interviews and analyzed them for themes. Results. Store owners used a variety of marketing strategies to bring new customers to their stores and keep current customers coming back. These marketing strategies showed many parallels to tobacco industry strategies. Most owners engaged in some form of traditional marketing practices (e.g., print media), but only a few used radio or television advertising because of budget constraints. Owners used social media and other forms of electronic communication, pricing discounts and specials, and loyalty programs. Owners also had booths at local events, sponsored community events, and hosted them in their stores. Owners attempted to target different groups of users, such as college students and long-term smokers. Conclusions. Local vapor store marketing practices closely resemble current and former tobacco industry marketing strategies. Surveillance of marketing practices should include local and Web-based strategies. PMID:25880960

  16. Characterization of a Compact Water Vapor Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ajay; Selina, Rob

    2018-01-01

    We report on laboratory test results of the Compact Water Vapor Radiometer (CWVR) prototype for the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), a five-channel design centered around the 22 GHz water vapor line. Fluctuations in perceptible water vapor cause fluctuations in atmospheric brightness emission, which are assumed to be proportional to phase fluctuations of the astronomical signal seen by an antenna. The design is intended to support empirical radiometric phase corrections for each baseline in the array.The dynamic range, channel isolation, and gain stability of the device were characterized. The device has a useful dynamic range of order 18 dB after calibration, and the CWVR channel isolation requirement of 102.6 sec. With temperature corrections, the single channel and channel difference gain stability per channel is < 2 x 10-4 over τ = 2.5 - 103 sec, which meets the < 2 x 10-4 requirement. The observable gain stability is < 2.5 x 10-4 over τ = 2.5 - 103 sec, which meets the < 2.5 x 10-4 requirement.Overall, the test results indicate that the CWVR meets required specifications for dynamic range, channel isolation, and gain stability in order to proceed with testing on a pair of VLA antennas.

  17. Calculativeness and trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Williamson’s characterisation of calculativeness as inimical to trust contradicts most sociological trust research. However, a similar argument is found within trust phenomenology. This paper re-investigates Williamson’s argument from the perspective of Løgstrup’s phenomenological theory of trust....... Contrary to Williamson, however, Løgstrup’s contention is that trust, not calculativeness, is the default attitude and only when suspicion is awoken does trust falter. The paper argues that while Williamson’s distinction between calculativeness and trust is supported by phenomenology, the analysis needs...... to take actual subjective experience into consideration. It points out that, first, Løgstrup places trust alongside calculativeness as a different mode of engaging in social interaction, rather conceiving of trust as a state or the outcome of a decision-making process. Secondly, the analysis must take...

  18. Unit Cost Compendium Calculations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Unit Cost Compendium (UCC) Calculations raw data set was designed to provide for greater accuracy and consistency in the use of unit costs across the USEPA...

  19. Magnetic Field Grid Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Properties Calculator will computes the estimated values of Earth's magnetic field(declination, inclination, vertical component, northerly...

  20. National Stormwater Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s National Stormwater Calculator (SWC) is a desktop application that estimates the annual amount of rainwater and frequency of runoff from a specific site anywhere in the United States (including Puerto Rico).