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Sample records for calculated respiratory tract

  1. Comparisons of calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles based on the NCRP/ITRI model and the new ICRP66 model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Phalen, R.F. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chang, I. [Lovelace Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in the United States and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been independently reviewing and revising respiratory tract dosimetry models for inhaled radioactive aerosols. The newly proposed NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model represents a significant change in philosophy from the old ICRP Task Group model. The proposed NCRP model describes respiratory tract deposition, clearance, and dosimetry for radioactive substances inhaled by workers and the general public and is expected to be published soon. In support of the NCRP proposed model, ITRI staff members have been developing computer software. Although this software is still incomplete, the deposition portion has been completed and can be used to calculate inhaled particle deposition within the respiratory tract for particle sizes as small as radon and radon progeny ({approximately} 1 nm) to particles larger than 100 {mu}m. Recently, ICRP published their new dosimetric model for the respiratory tract, ICRP66. Based on ICRP66, the National Radiological Protection Board of the UK developed PC-based software, LUDEP, for calculating particle deposition and internal doses. The purpose of this report is to compare the calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles using the NCRP/ITRI model and the ICRP66 model, under the same particle size distribution and breathing conditions. In summary, the general trends of the deposition curves for the two models were similar.

  2. Upper respiratory tract (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that secretes mucus. The mucus traps smaller particles like pollen or smoke. Hairlike structures called cilia line the mucous membrane ...

  3. Respiratory tract infection during Hajj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzeer Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infection during Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca is a common illness, and it is responsible for most of the hospital admissions. Influenza virus is the leading cause of upper respiratory tract infection during Hajj, and pneumonia can be serious. Taking into account the close contacts among the pilgrims, as well as the crowding, the potential for transmission of M. tuberculosis is expected to be high. These pilgrims can be a source for spreading infection on their return home. Although vaccination program for influenza is implemented, its efficacy is uncertain in this religious season. Future studies should concentrate on prevention and mitigation of these infections.

  4. The microbiota of the respiratory tract : Gatekeeper to respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, Wing Ho; De Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413982653; Bogaert, Debby|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/264105834

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts

  5. The microbiota of the respiratory tract: gatekeeper to respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wing Ho; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-05-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts as a gatekeeper that provides resistance to colonization by respiratory pathogens. The respiratory microbiota might also be involved in the maturation and maintenance of homeostasis of respiratory physiology and immunity. The ecological and environmental factors that direct the development of microbial communities in the respiratory tract and how these communities affect respiratory health are the focus of current research. Concurrently, the functions of the microbiome of the upper and lower respiratory tract in the physiology of the human host are being studied in detail. In this Review, we will discuss the epidemiological, biological and functional evidence that support the physiological role of the respiratory microbiota in the maintenance of human health.

  6. Therapy for respiratory tract infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J.; Kimpen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in infancy and young children. No effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (RSV-LRTI) exists. Ribavirin initially proved to be an effective anti-viral drug for RSV-LTRI.

  7. Therapy for respiratory tract infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J; Kimpen, J

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in infancy and young children. No effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (RSV-LRTI) exists. Ribavirin initially proved to be an effective anti-viral drug for RSV-LTRI.

  8. [Antibiotic prescribing in acute respiratory tract infections in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, S; Bjerrum, L; Feja, C; Lallana, M J; Poncel, A; Rabanaque, M J

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide threat to public health. Acute respiratory tract infections are the main reason for antibiotic prescribing in the Spanish paediatric population. The aim of the study was to describe the frequency of antibiotic prescription and their pattern of use in acute respiratory tract infections diagnosed in children in Primary Care in Aragón (Spain). A study was conducted over a 1-year period on children between 0 and 14 years-old, recording all episodes of acute otitis, acute pharyngotonsillitis, non-specific upper respiratory infection, and acute bronchitis. The proportion of episodes within each diagnosis receiving an antibiotic prescription was calculated, and the prescribing pattern was determined. Half (50%) of the children in Aragón were diagnosed with a respiratory tract infection during the study period. Non-specific upper respiratory infection was the most frequent diagnosis. An antibiotic was prescribed in 75% of pharyngotonsillitis episodes, 72% of otitis, 27% of bronchitis, and 16% of non-specific upper respiratory infections. Broad spectrum antibiotics, mainly amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic, were predominantly prescribed. Antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections in children was generally high, and the choice of antibiotics was probably inappropriate in a high percentage of cases. Therefore an improvement in antibiotic prescribing in children appears to be needed. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus load normalized by cell quantification as predictor of acute respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Novo, Miriam; Boga, José A; Álvarez-Argüelles, Marta E; Rojo-Alba, Susana; Fernández, Ana; Menéndez, María J; de Oña, María; Melón, Santiago

    2018-01-05

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a common cause of respiratory infections. The main objective is to analyze the prediction ability of viral load of HRSV normalized by cell number in respiratory symptoms. A prospective, descriptive and analytical study was performed. From 7307 respiratory samples processed between December 2014 to April 2016, 1019 HRSV-positive samples, were included in this study. Low respiratory tract infection was present in 729 patients (71.54%). Normalized HRSV load was calculated by quantification of HRSV genome and human β-globin gene and expressed as log10 copies/1000 cells. HRSV mean loads were 4.09 ± 2.08 and 4.82 ± 2.09 log10 copies/1000 cells in the 549 pharyngeal and 470 nasopharyngeal samples, respectively (p respiratory tract infection and 4.22 ± 2.28 log10 copies/1000 cells with upper respiratory tract infection or febrile syndrome (p < 0.05). A possible cut off value to predict LRTI evolution was tentatively established. Normalization of viral load by cell number in the samples is essential to ensure an optimal virological molecular diagnosis avoiding that the quality of samples affects the results. A high viral load can be a useful marker to predict disease progression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Exercise, immunology and upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, E M

    1997-03-01

    The literature reveals a paradoxical response of the immune and host defense systems to endurance exercise apparent stimulation following long-term regular training and suppression in response to acute exposure to exhaustive endurance exercise. Several epidemiological surveys have confirmed a clinical manifestation of immunosuppression in the form of increased incidence of upper respiratory tract infection symptoms following participation in competitive marathon and ultramarathon running events. Prerace training status and racing intensity have been related to the incidence of this symptomatology during the postrace fortnight. Nutritional intervention studies have shown the antioxidant nutrient, vitamin C, to be effective in reducing the incidence of upper respiratory tract infection symptoms following competitive distance events. Laboratory studies have revealed this vitamin to be the first line of defense in neutralizing the auto-oxidative activity of phagocytes. It is hypothesized that exercise-induced neuroendocrine stimulation of the oxidative burst in neutrophils increases the rate of release of reactive oxygen species and that these are, in turn, neutralized by high plasma ascorbate levels. Enhancing intrinsic antioxidant defense by increasing exogenous antioxidant intake is thus theorized to be of long-term benefit to serious endurance athletes engaged in heavy training and competition.

  11. Management of respiratory tract infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul SP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Siba Prosad Paul,1 Rachel Wilkinson,2 Christine Routley3 1Southmead Hospital, Bristol, 2St Richard's Hospital, Chichester, 3Paediatric Services, Yeovil District Hospital, Yeovil, UK Abstract: Respiratory tract infections (RTIs in children are one of the most common reasons for parents consulting health professionals. Most RTIs are self-limiting viral illnesses that will resolve with time and supportive management. However, it is important for the health professional to identify any RTI that may have more serious implications for the child and require medical intervention. Diagnosis can usually be made from the history and presenting symptoms such as cough, wheeze, tachypnea, fever, or stridor. Exclusion of "red flag" symptoms will enable health professionals to appropriately reassure parents and advise symptomatic management with antipyretics and adequate fluid administration. With the expanding role of nurses in ambulatory settings, many children are now being seen by health professionals other than doctors, (eg, advanced nurse practitioners, some of whom are trained in pediatrics while others have limited knowledge of nursing sick children. It is therefore vital that these professionals remain aware of any risk factors and that they can recognize "red flags" in a sick child rapidly and escalate further management appropriately. Some children will require admission to hospital for respiratory support and other therapies, such as intravenous antibiotics and fluids. With advancement of the "non-medical prescriber" within the nursing profession, awareness of when to give or not give antibiotic therapy needs careful consideration, especially in light of the problems that may arise from overuse of antibiotic treatment. Nurses have a vital role, not only in administering medications and supporting other medical interventions, but also in supporting the child and family over the period of illness. The education of the parents and the child, in some

  12. The management of upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, C L; Shajahan, Y; Khoo, E M; Nurjahan, I; Leong, K C; Yap, T G

    2001-06-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections are the commonest reason for consultation in primary care. Group A beta-haemolytic Streptococcus (GABHS), the most important bacterial pathogen in this condition, can be cultured from about 30% of patients, more so in children than adults. Clinical features that are predictive of positive GABHS culture are absence of cough, fever, cervical adenopathy, tonsillar enlargement and tonsillar exudate. Use of a sore throat score can help in the detection of streptococcal throat infection. Symptomatic therapies which are useful include anticholinergic, antihistamine, decongestant, humified hot air and Vitamin C. Antibiotics are universally over-prescribed in this condition as a result of high patient expectation and faulty clinical decision making. Oral Penicillin V for 10 days is the drug of choice. Effective intervention to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescription probably require a multifaceted approach targeted at both the patients and the prescribers.

  13. Cost Analysis of Medications Used in Upper Respiratory Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To conduct a cost analysis, a narrow cost-utility study, for upper respiratory tract infection medications in University Sans Malaysia's clinics. Methods: Retrospective analysis was done for all medical claims of upper respiratory tract infections in the period 2008 - 2009. The study was done in the clinics under ...

  14. Bovine coronaviruses from the respiratory tract: Antigenic and genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine corona viruses (BoCV) isolated from respiratory tract, nasal swab and broncho alveolar washing fluid samples were evaluated for genetic and antigenic differences. These BoCV from the respiratory tract of healthy and clinically ill cattle with BRD signs were compared to reference and vaccine ...

  15. Activity of Bryophyllum pinnatum S. Kurz extracts on respiratory tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The activity of this plant's extracts against the test bacteria coupled with the various phytochemical compounds present in the fractions is a pointer to the plant's potential as a source of drugs that can be used against respiratory tract pathogens. Keywords: Bryophyllum pinnatum, respiratory tract pathogens, phytochemical ...

  16. Viral coinfection in childhood respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Roig, A; Salvadó, M; Caballero-Rabasco, M A; Sánchez-Buenavida, A; López-Segura, N; Bonet-Alcaina, M

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of molecular techniques has enabled better understanding of the etiology of respiratory tract infections in children. The objective of the study was to analyze viral coinfection and its relationship to clinical severity. Hospitalized pediatric patients with a clinical diagnosis of respiratory infection were studied during the period between 2009-2010. Clinical and epidemiological data, duration of hospitalization, need for oxygen therapy, bacterial coinfection and need for mechanical ventilation were collected. Etiology was studied by multiplex PCR and low-density microarrays for 19 viruses. A total of 385 patients were positive, 44.94% under 12 months. The most frequently detected viruses were RSV-B: 139, rhinovirus: 114, RSV-A: 111, influenza A H1N1-2009: 93 and bocavirus: 77. Coinfection was detected in 61.81%, 36.36% with 2 viruses, 16.10% and 9.35% with 3 to 4 or more. Coinfection was higher in 2009 with 69.79 vs. 53.88% in 2010. Rhinovirus/RSV-B on 10 times and RSV-A/RSV-B on 5 times were the most detected coinfections. Hospitalization decreased with greater number of viruses (Prespiratory disease and its correlation with the clinical severity. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Adenovirus Respiratory Tract Infections in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampuero, Julia S.; Ocaña, Víctor; Gómez, Jorge; Gamero, María E.; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding human adenovirus (HAdv) circulation in Andean regions of South America. To address this shortcoming, we report the clinical, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdv respiratory tract infection from a large sentinel surveillance study conducted among adults and children in Peru. Methods/Principal Findings Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture. In addition, molecular characterization was performed on 226 randomly selected HAdv samples. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 26,375 participants with influenza-like illness (ILI) or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) were enrolled in the study. HAdv infection was identified in 2.5% of cases and represented 6.2% of all viral pathogens. Co-infection with a heterologous virus was found in 15.5% of HAdv cases. HAdv infection was largely confined to children under the age of 15, representing 88.6% of HAdv cases identified. No clinical characteristics were found to significantly distinguish HAdv infection from other respiratory viruses. Geographically, HAdv infections were more common in sites from the arid coastal regions than in the jungle or highland regions. Co-circulation of subgroups B and C was observed each year between 2006 and 2010, but no clear seasonal patterns of transmission were detected. Conclusions/Significance HAdv accounted for a significant fraction of those presenting with ILI and SARI in Peru and tended to affect the younger population disproportionately. Longitudinal studies will help better characterize the clinical course of patients with HAdv in Peru, as well as determine the role of co-infections in the evolution of illness. PMID:23056519

  18. Equal virulence of rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in infants hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, J.C.; Goossens, L.K.; Hendrix, R.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Lusthusz, A.; Thio, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus (RV) are predominant viruses associated with lower respiratory tract infection in infants. We compared the symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection caused by RSV and RV in hospitalized infants. RV showed the same symptoms as RSV, so on clinical

  19. Fluorescence diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Kate C.; Inada, Natalia M.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    The pharyngitis and laryngitis are respiratory tract infections highly common. Pharyngitis can be accompanied by fever, especially if caused by a systemic infection. Laryngitis is an inflammation of your voice box (larynx) from irritation or infection. The conventional treatment is the antibiotics administration, which may be responsible by an increase of identification of bacterial strains resistant to drug. This fact associated to high incidence of these infections become important to develop new technologies for diagnosis. This study aims to evaluate the use of widefield fluorescence imaging for the characterization of oropharynx infections, in order to diagnose the bacteria colonization. The imaging system for wide field fluorescence visualization is Evince® (MMOptics, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) coupled to an Apple iPhone® cell phone device. The system consists of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) operating in the violet blue region centered at green-red spectrum 450 nm and optical filters that allow viewing of fluorescence. A tongue depressor was adapted to Evince® for mouth opening. The same images were captured with white light and fluorescence with an optical system. The red fluorescence may be a bacterial marker for physiological monitoring of oropharynx infection processes. The bacterial biofilm on tissue were assigned to the presence of protoporphyrin IX. This work indicates that the autofluorescence of the tissue may be used as a non-invasive technique to aid in the oropharynx infection diagnostic.

  20. Severe respiratory tract infections with human bocavirus in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halise Akça, Nilden Tuygun, Emine Polat, Can Demir Karacan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory tract infection remains a major cause of childhood hospitalization and mortality in young children. Human bocavirus (HBoV is a virus belonging to the Parvoviridae family, which has been newly discovered to be associated with respiratory tract infection in children. Human bocavirus infection is usually seen as form of co-infection. The frequent associations of HBoV with other respiratory viruses might be explained by the persistence of HBoV in the respiratory tract. HBoV primary events generally associated with mild respiratory illness. Here, we reported three patients who developed an extremely severe acute life-threatening respiratory failure due to HBoV infection. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016; 6(3: 145-147

  1. [Risk Factors for Post-operative Respiratory Failure and Respiratory Tract Infections Following Cardiovascular Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, Yui; Morimoto, Yosuke; Yano, Yudai; Tawara, Yuichi; Sato, Shuntaro; Tanigawa, Kazuyoshi; Eishi, Kiyoyuki; Kozu, Ryo

    2017-12-01

    Respiratory failure and respiratory tract infections are frequently observed as post-operative pulmonary complications, and significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality. However, the risk factors of post-operative respiratory failure and respiratory tract infections are controversial, and how these factors affect on incidence of complications is still unclear. To identify risk factors of post-operative respiratory failure and respiratory tract infections, and evaluate its impact on incidences after cardiovascular surgery. From June 2013 to May 2015, adult patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery in the department of cardiovascular surgery and post-operative rehabilitation of Nagasaki University Hospital (Nagasaki, Japan) were retrospectively investigated. Fifty-two of 416 patients(12.5%)suffered from post-operative respiratory failure and respiratory tract infections. Identified risk stratification indicates the relevant operative factors were more important than pre-operative factors. The operative time (OR 1.696, 95% CI 1.302~2.211), post-operative water balance( OR 1.025, 95% CI 1.004~1.046)and emergency operation( OR 3.607, 95% CI 1.492~8.716)were significant independent risk factors in the development of post-operative respiratory failure and respiratory tract infections. These results indicated that the operative factors are more important as onset of post-operative respiratory failure and respiratory tract infections after cardiovascular surgery.

  2. The respiratory tract microbial biogeography in alcohol use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Derrick R; Burnham, Ellen L; Maffei, Vincent J; Vandivier, R William; Blanchard, Eugene E; Shellito, Judd E; Luo, Meng; Taylor, Christopher M; Welsh, David A

    2018-01-01

    Individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are at an increased risk of pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Data of the lung microbiome in the setting of AUDs are lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the microbial biogeography of the upper and lower respiratory tract in individuals with AUDs compared with non-AUD subjects. Gargle, protected bronchial brush, and bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected during research bronchoscopies. Bacterial 16S gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis was performed, and the alterations to the respiratory tract microbiota and changes in microbial biogeography were determined. The microbial structure of the upper and lower respiratory tract was significantly altered in subjects with AUDs compared with controls. Subjects with AUD have greater microbial diversity [ P respiratory tract displayed greater similarity in subjects with AUDs. Alcohol use is associated with an altered composition of the respiratory tract microbiota. Subjects with AUDs demonstrate convergence of the microbial phylogeny and taxonomic communities between distinct biogeographical sites within the respiratory tract. These results support a mechanistic pathway potentially explaining the increased incidence of pneumonia and lung diseases in patients with AUDs.

  3. Pediatric recurrent respiratory tract infections: when and how to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pediatric recurrent respiratory tract infections: when and how to explore the immune system? (About 53 cases). Mohammed El-Azami-El-Idrissi, Mounia Lakhdar-Idrissi, Sanae Chaouki, Samir Atmani, Abdelhak Bouharrou, Moustapha Hida ...

  4. Enabling factors for antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Radzeviciene Jurgute, Ruta; Bjerrum, Lars

    2013-01-01

    for political leadership to encourage clinically grounded antibiotic use; over-the-counter sale of antibiotics; designation of antibiotics as reimbursable medications; supervision by external oversight institutions; lack of guidelines for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections; and pharmaceutical...

  5. Vitamin D, innate immunity and upper respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, J

    2010-05-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, ultraviolet light was successfully used to treat tuberculosis of the skin. Upper respiratory tract infections had been inversely associated with sun exposure. During the last decade, basic scientific research demonstrated that vitamin D has an important anti-infective role. Review of the relevant literature on the influence of vitamin D on innate immunity and respiratory tract infection. Vitamin D is involved in the production of defensins and cathelicidin - antimicrobial peptides that provide a natural defence against potential microbiological pathogens. Vitamin D supplementation increases cathelicidin production. Low vitamin D levels are associated with an increased incidence of upper respiratory tract infections. Vitamin D appears to play an important role in the regulation of innate immunity in the upper respiratory tract. Optimal vitamin D levels and appropriate dosing schedules have yet to be determined.

  6. Respiratory tract infections and concomitant pericoronitis of the wisdom teeth.

    OpenAIRE

    Meurman, J. H.; Rajasuo, A.; Murtomaa, H.; Savolainen, S.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To discover if there is an association between respiratory tract infections and pericoronitis of erupting third molars in young adults. DESIGN--Data from male military conscripts' medical records were collected over five years and the incidence of respiratory tract infection before and after acute pericoronitis (191 cases) and before and after standard (722 cases) and operative (741) extractions compared with that in controls (n = 703) who had no infections in the third molar regio...

  7. Vaccinations against respiratory tract infections at Hajj.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, A S; Rashid, H; Heywood, A E

    2015-02-01

    The transmission of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) is very high among the Hajj congregation in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. Despite recommendations for vaccinations, pilgrims remain at increased risk of RTIs. In this paper we systematically reviewed available studies assessing the uptake and effectiveness of vaccinations against RTIs among Hajj pilgrims and enumerated important demographic factors, if described, associated with vaccine uptake. Of the 42 included studies, 29 reported on the uptake and effectiveness of influenza vaccine among pilgrims, eight studies reported the uptake of other vaccines, notably pneumococcal, diphtheria and bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccines, and the remaining five studies described both influenza and non-influenza vaccines. The uptake of seasonal influenza vaccine ranged from 0.7% to 100% across the study populations, with coverage highest in the elderly and those with pre-existing co-morbidities. The effectiveness of influenza vaccine was variable across studies but was significantly effective against laboratory-confirmed influenza (risk ratio 0.56; 95% CI 0.41-0.75; p Hajj pilgrims found the presence of pre-Hajj immunity to be significantly protective against disease. Despite favourable evidence of effectiveness, our review shows variable uptake of vaccines across a number of studies with few data available on the uptake of non-influenza vaccines. Mixed-method studies are needed to gauge knowledge, attitudes and practices of Hajj pilgrims regarding vaccination, and randomized controlled trials are required to confirm the efficacy of vaccines and improve uptake in this vulnerable travelling population. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ethnic variations in morbidity and mortality from lower respiratory tract infections: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Colin R; Steiner, Markus Fc; Cezard, Genevieve; Bansal, Narinder; Fischbacher, Colin; Douglas, Anne; Bhopal, Raj; Sheikh, Aziz

    2015-10-01

    There is evidence of substantial ethnic variations in asthma morbidity and the risk of hospitalisation, but the picture in relation to lower respiratory tract infections is unclear. We carried out an observational study to identify ethnic group differences for lower respiratory tract infections. A retrospective, cohort study. Scotland. 4.65 million people on whom information was available from the 2001 census, followed from May 2001 to April 2010. Hospitalisations and deaths (any time following first hospitalisation) from lower respiratory tract infections, adjusted risk ratios and hazard ratios by ethnicity and sex were calculated. We multiplied ratios and confidence intervals by 100, so the reference Scottish White population's risk ratio and hazard ratio was 100. Among men, adjusted risk ratios for lower respiratory tract infection hospitalisation were lower in Other White British (80, 95% confidence interval 73-86) and Chinese (69, 95% confidence interval 56-84) populations and higher in Pakistani groups (152, 95% confidence interval 136-169). In women, results were mostly similar to those in men (e.g. Chinese 68, 95% confidence interval 56-82), although higher adjusted risk ratios were found among women of the Other South Asians group (145, 95% confidence interval 120-175). Survival (adjusted hazard ratio) following lower respiratory tract infection for Pakistani men (54, 95% confidence interval 39-74) and women (31, 95% confidence interval 18-53) was better than the reference population. Substantial differences in the rates of lower respiratory tract infections amongst different ethnic groups in Scotland were found. Pakistani men and women had particularly high rates of lower respiratory tract infection hospitalisation. The reasons behind the high rates of lower respiratory tract infection in the Pakistani community are now required. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  9. Association between HIV and proven viral lower respiratory tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    range of respiratory viruses. Virally infected patients can now be diagnosed early and more accurately in the acute phase of illness. Objectives. To examine the association between HIV status and mortality in children with viral lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and to delineate the profile of identified viruses. Methods.

  10. [Manifestations of sarcoidosis in the upper respiratory tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-García, J; de la Torre-Lima, J; Prada-Pardal, J L

    2006-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease having unknown cause, characterized by non-caseating granulomatous inflammation of the organs involved. It predominantly affects the respiratory tract, with preference for the lower tract and less frequently affects the upper respiratory tract (nose, paranasal sinuses and larynx). It manifests non-specifically, with symptoms secondary to the obstruction of the airway. It can be confused with other more common disorders in our setting, such as tuberculosis. We conduct a review, fundamentally focusing on the diagnosis and treatment due to their difficulty.

  11. Antiviral effects of bovine interferons on bovine respiratory tract viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Downing, M M; Cummins, J M

    1984-01-01

    The antiviral effects of bovine interferons on the replication of bovine respiratory tract viruses were studied. Bovine turbinate monolayer cultures were treated with bovine interferons and challenged with several bovine herpesvirus 1 strains, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, goat respiratory syncytial virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine adenovirus type 7, or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with bovine interferons reduced viral yield for each of the...

  12. Quantitation of respiratory viruses in relation to clinical course in children with acute respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Rogier R.; Schinkel, Janke; dek, Irene; Koekkoek, Sylvie M.; Visser, Caroline E.; de Jong, Menno D.; Molenkamp, Richard; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2010-01-01

    Quantitation of respiratory viruses by PCR could potentially aid in clinical interpretation of PCR results. We conducted a study in children admitted with acute respiratory tract infections to study correlations between the clinical course of illness and semiquantitative detection of 14 respiratory

  13. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  14. Respiratory tract infections and concomitant pericoronitis of the wisdom teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurman, J H; Rajasuo, A; Murtomaa, H; Savolainen, S

    1995-04-01

    To discover if there is an association between respiratory tract infections and pericoronitis of erupting third molars in young adults. Data from male military conscripts' medical records were collected over five years and the incidence of respiratory tract infection before and after acute pericoronitis (191 cases) and before and after standard (722 cases) and operative (741) extractions compared with that in controls (n = 703) who had no infections in the third molar regions. 14,500 male military conscripts aged 20. Garrisons in Valkeala and Kouvola, Finland. The incidence of respiratory tract infection was significantly higher during the two weeks before acute pericoronitis was diagnosed compared with that in controls. The highest incidence was observed in the three days before pericoronitis (odds ratio 6.8; 95% confidence interval 3.0 to 15.0). The incidence was also increased in the first week after pericoronitis (odds ratio 3.7; 1.6 to 8.4) and three days before (odds ratio 2.6; 0.9 to 7.5) and during the first week after extraction of third molars (odds ratio 2.6; 1.3 to 5.3). Respiratory tract infection may precipitate and occur concomitantly with acute pericoronitis. Third molar surgery for pericoronitis, on the other hand, may trigger respiratory tract infection.

  15. Consultation expectations among patients with respiratory tract infection symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun Lauridsen, Gitte; Sejr Sørensen, Mette; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotic resistance is a growing threat to public health, and antibiotic prescribing increases. About 90% of antibiotics are prescribed in general practice, mostly for acute respiratory tract infections. It is well known that patient expectations and general practitioners’ misinter......­pretation of patients’ expectations are associated with antibiotic overuse. The aim of this study was to explore Danish patients’ expectations when consulting a general prac­titioner with symptoms of acute respiratory tract infection, and to determine predictors for these expectations. Methods: A questionnaire survey...... was conducted in Danish primary care during 2014. Patients aged ≥ 18 years were asked about their expectations to the consultation when consulting with symptoms of acute respiratory tract infections. Associations between socio-demographic characteristics, self-reported antibiotic prescription and patients...

  16. Consultation expectations among patients with respiratory tract infection symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Gitte Bruun; Sørensen, Mette Sejr; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Antibiotic resistance is a growing threat to public health, and antibiotic prescribing increases. About 90% of antibiotics are prescribed in general practice, mostly for acute respiratory tract infections. It is well known that patient expectations and general practitioners......' misinterpretation of patients' expectations are associated with antibiotic overuse. The aim of this study was to explore Danish patients' expectations when consulting a general practitioner with symptoms of acute respiratory tract infection, and to determine predictors for these expectations. METHODS......: A questionnaire survey was conducted in Danish primary care during 2014. Patients aged ≥ 18 years were asked about their expectations to the consultation when consulting with symptoms of acute respiratory tract infections. Associations between socio-demographic characteristics, self-reported antibiotic...

  17. Lower respiratory tract viral infections: Diagnostic role of exfoliative cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Girón, Rafael; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2017-07-01

    Viral lower respiratory tract infections (VLRTI) remain one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. For many years, the diagnosis of VLRTI was based on laboratory techniques such as viral isolation in cell culture, antigen detection by direct fluorescent antibody staining, and rapid enzyme immunoassay. Radiological imaging and morphology also play an important role in diagnosing these infections. Exfoliative cytology provides a simple, rapid, inexpensive, and valuable means to diagnose and manage VLRTI. Here we review viral-associated cytomorphological changes seen in exfoliated cells of the lower respiratory tract. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:614-620. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Antibiotics in respiratory tract infections in hospital pediatric emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Molina, Claudia; Rodríguez-Belvís, Marta Velasco; Coroleu Bonet, Albert; Vall Combelles, Oriol; García-Algar, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract infections are one of the most frequent problems in pediatric clinics and generate an elevated prescription of antibiotics. The aim of this study was to find out the standard of care practice about antibiotic use in these infections in a pediatric emergency department and to evaluate compliance with clinical guidelines. A pediatric emergency department database was reviewed from July 2005 to October 2007 under the category "respiratory infection", including variables such as age, antibiotic prescription and compliance with current clinical recommendations. Out of the 23,114 reviewed reports, 32.7% (7,567) were upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) (cold, acute otitis media [AOM], sinusitis and tonsillopharyngitis) or lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) (laryngitis, bronchitis, bronchiolitis and pneumonia). Children under the age of 2 were the most represented age group. Amongst URTI, rhinopharyngitis was the most frequent infection, while bronchitis was the most frequent among LRTI. Antibiotic therapy (mainly amoxicillin) was prescribed in 30.8% of URTI (5.7% rhinopharyngitis, 96.5% AOM, and 36.7% tonsillopharyngitis) and in 12.4% of LRTI. The percentage of respiratory tract infections was similar to previous studies and the antibiotic prescriptions followed current guidelines, except for cases diagnosed with AOM. Prescription compliance and clinical course of the cases should be monitored. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Mucosal immunity of the respiratory tract in chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtyak B.M.; Maslyanko R.P.; Levkivsky D.M.; Pundyak T.O.; Sobko G.V.

    2014-01-01

    This review article presents fundamental mechanisms of the local mucosal immunity m selected regions of the respiratory tract in healthy birds and in some pathological conditions. The respiratory system whose mucosa come into direct contact with microorganisms contaminating inhaled an, has some associated structures, such as Harderian gland (HG), conjunctive-associated lymphoid tissue (CALT) and paranasal glands (PG), whose participation in local mechanisms of the mucosal immunity has been co...

  20. Structure, material characteristics and function of the upper respiratory tract of the pygmy sperm whale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, John; Cotter, Liz; Rogan, Emer; Kelliher, Denis; Murphy, Colm

    2013-12-15

    Cetaceans are neckless, so the trachea is very short. The upper respiratory tract is separate from the mouth and pharynx, and the dorsal blowhole connects, via the vestibular and nasopalatine cavities, directly to the larynx. Toothed cetaceans (Odontoceti) are capable of producing sounds at depth, either for locating prey or for communication. It has been suggested that during dives, air from the lungs and upper respiratory tract can be moved to the vestibular and nasal cavities to permit sound generation to continue when air volume within these cavities decreases as ambient pressure rises. The pygmy sperm whale, Kogia breviceps, is a deep diver (500-1000 m) that is known to produce hunting clicks. Our study of an immature female shows that the upper respiratory tract is highly asymmetrical: the trachea and bronchi are extremely compressible, whereas the larynx is much more rigid. Laryngeal and tracheal volumes were established. Calculations based on Boyle's Law imply that all air from the lungs and bronchi would be transferred to the larynx and trachea by a depth of 270 m and that the larynx itself could not accommodate all respiratory air mass at a depth of 1000 m. This suggests that no respiratory air would be available for vocalisation. However, the bronchi, trachea and part of the larynx have a thick vascular lining featuring large, thin-walled vessels. We propose that these vessels may become dilated during dives to reduce the volume of the upper respiratory tract, permitting forward transfer of air through the larynx.

  1. Lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus : current management and new therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazur, Natalie; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Baraldi, Eugenio; Fauroux, Brigitte; Greenough, Anne; Heikkinen, Terho; Manzoni, Paolo; Mejias, Asuncion; Nair, Harish; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Polack, Fernando P.; Ramilo, Octavio; Sharland, Mike; Stein, Renato; Madhi, Shabir A.; Bont, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age. Evidence-based management guidelines suggest that there is no effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and that supportive care, ie, hydration and

  2. Seasonality of long term wheezing following respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, L; Steijn, M; van Aalderen, WMC; Brus, F; Draaisma, JMT; Van Diemen-Steenvoorde, RAAM; Pekelharing-Berghuis, M; Kimpen, JLL

    Background: It is well known that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is associated with subsequent wheezing episodes, but the precise natural course of wheezing following RSV LRTI is not known. This study aimed to determine the continuous development of

  3. Microbial flora variations in the respiratory tract of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cangemi de Gutierrez Rosa

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A stable microbial system in the respiratory tract acts as an important defense mechanism against pathogenic microorganisms. Perturbations in this system may allow pathogens to establish. In an ecological environment such as the respiratory tract, there are many diverse factors that play a role in the establishment of the indigenous flora. In the present work we studied the normal microbial flora of different areas of the respiratory tract of mice and their evolution from the time the mice were born. Our interest was to know which were the dominant groups of microorganisms in each area, which were the first capable of colonizing and which dominated over time to be used as probiotic microorganisms. Our results show that Gram negative facultatively anaerobic bacilli and strict anaerobic microorganisms were the last ones to appear in the bronchia, while aerobic and Gram positive cocci were present in all the areas of the respiratory tract. The number of facultative aerobes and strict anaerobes were similar in the nasal passage, pharynx instilled and trachea, but lower in bronchia. The dominant species were Streptococcus viridans and Staphylococcus saprophyticcus, followed by S. epidermidis, Lactobacilli and S. cohnii I which were present on every studied days but at different proportions. This paper is the first part of a research topic investigating the protective effect of the indigenous flora against pathogens using the mice as an experimental model.

  4. Tetratrichomonads from the oral cavity and respiratory tract of humans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutišová, K.; Kulda, J.; Čepička, I.; Flegr, J.; Koudela, Břetislav; Teras, J.; Tachezy, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 1 (2005), s. 1-11 ISSN 0031-1820 Grant - others:Grantová agentura Karlovy univerzity v Praze(CZ) 264/1999 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Tetratrichomonas spp. * human respiratory tract * oral cavity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.703, year: 2005

  5. Aetiology of Lower Respiratory Tract Infection in Benin City, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with respiratory tract infections (RTI), Pneumonia inclusive account for a large proportion of a primary care physicians (PCP) work load and a frequent cause for prescription of antibacterial agents. The study was aimed at analyzing the various isolated organisms obtained from sputum and to test their susceptibility ...

  6. Bacterial aetiology in lower respiratory tract infections : Relevance in outpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teepe, J.

    2017-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is one of the leading reasons for consulting in primary care. Today, a general practitioner faces the challenge of distinguishing between patients with a mild self-limiting disease to whom antibiotics would do more harm than good and those who would benefit

  7. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piters, Wouter A. A. de Steenhuijsen; Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; Wyllie, Anne L.; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R.; Veenhoven, Reinier H.; Wang, Xinhui; Trzcinski, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J.; Rossen, John W. A.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Bogaert, Debby

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently

  8. Knowledge of Upper Respiratory Tract Infection In Elementary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann-Sanford, Thurma; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This study assessed elementary school students' knowledge of upper respiratory tract infection and correlated it with parental socioeconomic status, ethnic background, and school absences. Schools chosen for the study represented different socioeconomic and ethnic populations. Students had a general knowledge of the etiology, symptoms, treatment,…

  9. Prescription status of Respiratory tract infection – a survey report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    strengthened. Keywords: Respiratory tract infection, prescription, self-medication, patient counseling, role of pharmacist. [Afr J Health Sci. ... nutrition, lack of rest, alcohol use, smoking, inhaling saliva from infected persons, shaking .... care system and improve the quality of life, through which he can realize the dream of WHO ...

  10. Prescription status of Respiratory tract infection – a survey report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of the key person for prevention of communicable and non-communicable diseases and also improving patient compliance. These types of problems can be prevented by patient education should be strengthened. Keywords: Respiratory tract infection, prescription, self-medication, patient counseling, role of pharmacist.

  11. Childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections in Northern Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... than five years worldwide in 2010, infectious diseases caused 68 percent (5·970 million), with the largest ... lower respiratory tract infection was diagnosed in a child with history of fever, cough, fast or difficult breathing, ..... Another earlier report found vitamin D deficiency in infants exclusively breast fed29.

  12. Consultation expectations among patients with respiratory tract infection symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Gitte Bruun; Sørensen, Mette Sejr; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup

    2017-01-01

    : A questionnaire survey was conducted in Danish primary care during 2014. Patients aged ≥ 18 years were asked about their expectations to the consultation when consulting with symptoms of acute respiratory tract infections. Associations between socio-demographic characteristics, self-reported antibiotic...

  13. Management of upper respiratory tract infections in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peat JK, Keena V, Harakeh Z, Marks G. Parental smoking and respiratory tract infections in children. Paediatr Respir Rev 2001;2(3):207–13. 39. Sharma S. Nicotine addiction. In: EMedicine; 2006. More info needed. 40. Fiore AE, Shay DK, Haber P, et al. Prevention and control of influenza: Recommendations of the advisory ...

  14. Acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Upper respiratory tract infections (UTRIs), which may be complicated by acute otitis media (AOM), account for a large number of visits to the primary physician especially in the developed world. Materials and Methods: This study aims to determine the knowledge and treatment outcomes of UTRIs complicated ...

  15. Diabetes and Risk of Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, and Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W.; Mor, Anil

    2013-01-01

    increase for hospitalization with pneumonia associated with diabetes. The increase of risk for tuberculosis is of similar magnitude in highly developed countries, and possibly higher in low-income countries. Poor glycemic control and long diabetes duration predict higher risk for both pneumonia...... and tuberculosis. Limited data is available for diabetes and influenza, yet both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is recommended in patients with diabetes. Urinary tract infections: The risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis is 1.5 to 2 times increased in diabetes patients, while their risk......This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) risk...

  16. Limited Evidence on the Management of Respiratory Tract Infections in Down's Syndrome : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manikam, Logan; Reed, Kate; Venekamp, Roderick P; Hayward, Andrew; Littlejohns, Peter; Schilder, Anne; Lakhanpaul, Monica

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To systematically review the effectiveness of preventative and therapeutic interventions for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in people with Down's syndrome. METHODS: Databases were searched for any published and ongoing studies of respiratory tract diseases in children and adults with

  17. Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Reduces Vitamin D3 in the Blood Stream and Respiratory Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood stream and respiratory tract Share | Exposure to cigarette smoke reduces vitamin D3 in the blood stream and respiratory tract Published Online: April 2, 2014 Cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke have long ...

  18. Effectiveness of adenoidectomy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections: open randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardweg, M.T. van den; Boonacker, C.W.; Rovers, M.M.; Hoes, A.W.; Schilder, A.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of adenoidectomy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections. DESIGN: Open randomised controlled trial. SETTING: 11 general hospitals and two academic centres. PARTICIPANTS: 111 children aged 1-6 with recurrent upper respiratory tract

  19. Significance of Moraxella catarrhalis as a causative organism of lower respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Ramadan

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: This study shows that when microbiological and clinical criteria are met, M. catarrhalis when isolated should be considered as a pathogen causing lower respiratory tract infections. M. catarrhalis, lower respiratory tract infections.

  20. Assessment of the humoral immune system in adults with respiratory tract disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, D.A. van; Rijkers, G.T.; Zanen, P.

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory tract infections are a common problem, and can have various causes, including an underlying immunodeficiency. This thesis investigates the value of humoral immune status assessment in patients with respiratory tract infections, lung transplant candidates/recipients and the

  1. The Antioxidant System in the Respiratory Tract The Intracellular Antioxidant Protection in the Respiratory Tract (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Ye. Abaturov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The literature review presents modern data on the intracellular antioxidant protection in the respiratory tract. The induction of the enzyme synthesis of antioxidant system is described. The article details the characteristics of the intracellular forms of superoxide dismutases. The induction of the synthesis, catalytic loop and physiological function of superoxide dismutases are presented.

  2. Do children's upper respiratory tract infections benefit from probiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Rigante, Donato; Principi, Nicola

    2014-04-10

    The microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract have profound influence at multiple levels, even on the development and maintenance of lung immunity and inflammation. Aim of this review is to evaluate the current knowledge about the specific impact on children's respiratory tract infections from probiotics, live microbes with the power to modify intestinal microbial populations and exert subsequent benefits for the host. The role of probiotics in gastrointestinal and allergic diseases has been largely assessed, but the number of studies performed so far in the field of respiratory tract infections is small, though some data show that probiotic administration might display clinical advantages. Probiotic strain identity and host genetic differences may account for differential modulation of immune responses by probiotics. Current laboratory and clinical data regarding the possibility of the role of probiotics on preventing the development of respiratory tract infections are contradictory, and are somewhat insufficient to recommend strongly their routine use. Further study of gastrointestinal-respiratory interactions is likely to yield important insights into the pathogenesis of different pulmonary diseases, and improve our knowledge in the prophylactic role of probiotics in children affected by recurrent upper respiratory tract infections. A better understanding of the effects of different probiotic strains and a deeper insight into their mechanisms of action are needed for the validation of specific strains carrying a potential to modify the frequency and severity of RTIs in infants and children. No data have been collected in pediatric patients with chronic underlying diseases, and yet there are no published data concerning treatment of RTIs with probiotics. The very few studies published so far do not indicate which micro-organism or administration regimen might exert beneficial effects as a prevention tool of RTIs both in healthy children and in those with recurrent

  3. Do pollution and climate influence respiratory tract infections in children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Duarte Passos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To review if pollution and climate changes can influence respiratory tract infections in children. Data source: articles published on the subject in PubMed, SciELO, Bireme, EBSCO and UpTodate were reviewed. The following inclusion criteria were considered: scientific papers between 2002 and 2012, study design, the pediatric population, reference documents such as the CETESB and World Health Organization Summary of the data: We analyzed research that correlated respiratory viruses and climate and/or pollution changes. Respiratory syncytial virus has been the virus related most to changes in climate and humidity. Other "old and new" respiratory viruses such as Human Bocavirus, Metapneumovirus, Parechovirus and Parainfuenza would need to be investigated owing to their clinical importance. Although much has been studied with regard to the relationship between climate change and public health, specific studies about its influence on children's health remain scarce.

  4. Aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, John W.; Jones, Donald L.; Mu-tian, Bi

    1984-04-01

    Rising sulfur dioxide emissions from increased coal combustion present risks, not only of acid rain, but also to health by inhalation of the SO 2 and acid to the lung. We are investigating human inhalation of ppm SO 2 concentrations mixed with aerosol of submicrometer aqueous salt droplets to determine the effects on lung function and body chemistry. Unlike some investigators, we emphasize ammonium sulfate and trace element aerosol composition which simulates ambient air; aerosol pH, relative humidity, and temperature control to reveal gas-particle reaction mechanisms; and dose estimates from length of exposure, SO 2 concentration, and a direct measurement of respiratory deposition of aerosol as a function of particle size by cascade impactor sampling and elemental analysis by PIXE. Exposures, at rest or during exercise, are in a walk-in chamber at body temperature and high humidity to simulate Florida's summer climate. Lung function measurement by spirometry is carried out immediately after exposure. The results are significant in relating air quality to athletic performance and to public health in the southeastern United States.

  5. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwofie Theophilus B

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2% were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3% patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%, Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3 in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8% and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3. Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36 of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  6. Composition and immunological significance of the upper respiratory tract microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Louis Patrick; Surette, Michael G; Bowdish, Dawn M E

    2016-11-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for nutrient acquisition, immune development, and exclusion of invading pathogens. The upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiota is less well studied and does not appear to abide by many of the paradigms of the gastrointestinal tract. Decades of carriage studies in children have demonstrated that microbe-microbe competition and collusion occurs in the URT. Whether colonization with common pathogens (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae) alters immune development or susceptibility to respiratory conditions is just beginning to be understood. Herein, we discuss the biogeography of the URT microbiota, the succession and evolution of the microbiota through the life course, and discuss the evidence for microbe-microbe interactions in colonization and infection. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Evaluating the child with recurrent lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Paul L P; Hoving, M F Paulien; de Groot, Eric P

    2012-09-01

    We review the limited available evidence on underlying causes of recurrent pneumonia in children, supplemented by our own clinical experience. Diagnosing recurrent pneumonia in children is difficult. Diagnostic confusion is possible with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections and asthma. In our series of children with recurrent pneumonia, we never identified asthma as an underlying cause. Because the frequency or severity of recurrent pneumonia does not always justify additional invasive investigations, the diagnostic work-up may be incomplete in a number of cases. This may help to explain why an underlying cause for recurrent pneumonia cannot be found in approximately 30% of cases. Finally, the paradigm that recurrent pneumonia in the same lung lobe has a differential diagnosis different from those recurring in multiple lobes was not borne out in our case series. A stepwise and pragmatic approach to evaluating children with recurrent lower respiratory tract infections is recommended. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Breastfeeding and the risk of respiratory tract infections after infancy: The Generation R Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, Ilse; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica; Raat, Hein; Jaddoe, Vincent; Franco, Oscar; Hofman, Albert; de Jongste, Johan; Moll, Henriëtte

    2017-01-01

    The protection of breastfeeding against respiratory tract infections in the first year of life has often been suggested. Few studies examined the effect of breastfeeding on respiratory tract infections after infancy. To examine the association between breastfeeding with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) and upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) after infancy up to 4 years of age (n = 5322). This study was embedded in The Generation R study, a Dutch population-based prospective cohort study from fetal life until young adulthood. Information on breastfeeding duration (never; respiratory tract infections persist after infancy therefore supporting current recommendations for breastfeeding for at least 6 months.

  9. Vitamin D and respiratory tract infections in childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, S.; Lelii, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) remain among of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality among children. Several studies have associated vitamin D deficiency with an increased risk of RTIs, and vitamin D supplementation has been proposed as a possible preventive measure against RTIs in children. The main aim of this review is to summarize the current evidence from the literature about the link between vitamin D and RTIs in children. Discussion Several recent studies...

  10. Vitamin C and sex differences in respiratory tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Hemilä, Harri

    2008-01-01

    In their systematic review of sex differences in respiratory tract infections (RTIs), Falagas et al. concluded that males develop RTIs more frequently than females, in particular lower RTIs, and the course of the infection is often more severe in males than in females. ... It is obvious that the findings of the common cold trials with British males and pneumonia trials with males cannot be extrapolated to the general population of the western countries. Nevertheless, further vitamin C trials ...

  11. A population-based study of childhood respiratory morbidity after severe lower respiratory tract infections in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Shelagh M; Gooch, Katherine L; Korol, Ellen E; Bradt, Pamela; Mitchell, Ian; Vo, Pamela; Levy, Adrian R

    2014-07-01

    To estimate the risk of childhood chronic respiratory morbidity among those hospitalized for severe lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in early childhood, and to determine whether severe LRTI is an independent predictor. The population-based Régie de l'Assurance Maladie du Québec datasets were used to identify LRTI hospitalizations before age 2 years in a birth cohort from 1996-1997 and a comparison cohort of children without an LRTI hospitalization. The incidence rate and incidence rate ratio of chronic respiratory morbidity before age 10 years were calculated, and multivariable logistic regression was performed to estimate the impact of LRTI hospitalization on chronic respiratory morbidity. Population-attributable risks of chronic respiratory morbidity due to severe LRTI were estimated, and similar analyses were performed for respiratory syncytial virus LRTI. Among the birth cohort, 7104 patients (4.9%) were hospitalized for LRTI before age 2 years. By age 10 years, 52.5% of the LRTI cohort and 27.9% of the nonhospitalized cohort had developed chronic respiratory morbidity; the incidence rate ratio was 1.81 (95% CI, 1.76-1.86) for males and 1.91 (95% CI, 1.84-1.99) for females. The OR for chronic respiratory morbidity based on LRTI hospitalization before age 2 years was 2.79 (95% CI, 2.66-2.93). The population-attributable risk of chronic respiratory morbidity due to any LRTI was approximately 25%, and that for respiratory syncytial virus LRTI was similar. Hospitalization of young children for LRTIs is associated with two-fold increased risk of childhood chronic respiratory morbidity, demonstrating the ongoing impact of LRTI in infancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Metagenomic analysis of viral diversity in respiratory samples from patients with respiratory tract infections in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, Nada; Al-Nakib, Widad; Mustafa, Abu Salim; Habibi, Nazima

    2018-03-01

    A metagenomic approach based on target independent next-generation sequencing has become a known method for the detection of both known and novel viruses in clinical samples. This study aimed to use the metagenomic sequencing approach to characterize the viral diversity in respiratory samples from patients with respiratory tract infections. We have investigated 86 respiratory samples received from various hospitals in Kuwait between 2015 and 2016 for the diagnosis of respiratory tract infections. A metagenomic approach using the next-generation sequencer to characterize viruses was used. According to the metagenomic analysis, an average of 145, 019 reads were identified, and 2% of these reads were of viral origin. Also, metagenomic analysis of the viral sequences revealed many known respiratory viruses, which were detected in 30.2% of the clinical samples. Also, sequences of non-respiratory viruses were detected in 14% of the clinical samples, while sequences of non-human viruses were detected in 55.8% of the clinical samples. The average genome coverage of the viruses was 12% with the highest genome coverage of 99.2% for respiratory syncytial virus, and the lowest was 1% for torque teno midi virus 2. Our results showed 47.7% agreement between multiplex Real-Time PCR and metagenomics sequencing in the detection of respiratory viruses in the clinical samples. Though there are some difficulties in using this method to clinical samples such as specimen quality, these observations are indicative of the promising utility of the metagenomic sequencing approach for the identification of respiratory viruses in patients with respiratory tract infections. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Severity of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Lower Respiratory Tract Infection With Viral Coinfection in HIV-Uninfected Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazur, Natalie I; Bont, Louis; Cohen, Adam L; Cohen, Cheryl; von Gottberg, Anne; Groome, Michelle J; Hellferscee, Orienka; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mekgoe, Omphile; Naby, Fathima; Moyes, Jocelyn; Tempia, Stefano; Treurnicht, Florette K; Venter, Marietje; Walaza, Sibongile; Wolter, Nicole; Madhi, Shabir A

    2017-01-01

    Background.: Molecular diagnostics enable sensitive detection of respiratory viruses, but their clinical significance remains unclear in pediatric lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). We aimed to determine whether viral coinfections increased life-threatening disease in a large cohort.

  14. Concurrent bacterial infection and prolonged mechanical ventilation in infants with respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, MCJ; van Oud-Alblas, HB; van Vliet, M; Uiterwaal, CSPM; Kimpen, JLL; van Vught, AJ

    Objective: To identify demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables predictive for a concurrent bacterial pulmonary infection in ventilated infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) and investigate antimicrobial drug use. Design and setting:

  15. The antioxidant system of the respiratory tract. The intracellular antioxidant protection in the respiratory tract (part 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature review presents the current data about peroxiredoxin system in the functioning of the intracellular antioxidant protection in the respiratory tract. We present a model of the molecular structure of certain peroxiredoxins. The peroxiredoxin-dependent oxidation reactions, antiapoptotic action and other physiological effects of peroxiredoxins system are considered in detail. Model of the molecular structure and biological function of the antioxidant factors with an indirect effect (APEX nuclease 1/Ref-1 are described.

  16. Rhinovirus genome variation during chronic upper and lower respiratory tract infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Tapparel

    Full Text Available Routine screening of lung transplant recipients and hospital patients for respiratory virus infections allowed to identify human rhinovirus (HRV in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, including immunocompromised hosts chronically infected with the same strain over weeks or months. Phylogenetic analysis of 144 HRV-positive samples showed no apparent correlation between a given viral genotype or species and their ability to invade the lower respiratory tract or lead to protracted infection. By contrast, protracted infections were found almost exclusively in immunocompromised patients, thus suggesting that host factors rather than the virus genotype modulate disease outcome, in particular the immune response. Complete genome sequencing of five chronic cases to study rhinovirus genome adaptation showed that the calculated mutation frequency was in the range observed during acute human infections. Analysis of mutation hot spot regions between specimens collected at different times or in different body sites revealed that non-synonymous changes were mostly concentrated in the viral capsid genes VP1, VP2 and VP3, independent of the HRV type. In an immunosuppressed lung transplant recipient infected with the same HRV strain for more than two years, both classical and ultra-deep sequencing of samples collected at different time points in the upper and lower respiratory tracts showed that these virus populations were phylogenetically indistinguishable over the course of infection, except for the last month. Specific signatures were found in the last two lower respiratory tract populations, including changes in the 5'UTR polypyrimidine tract and the VP2 immunogenic site 2. These results highlight for the first time the ability of a given rhinovirus to evolve in the course of a natural infection in immunocompromised patients and complement data obtained from previous experimental inoculation studies in immunocompetent volunteers.

  17. Rhinovirus Genome Variation during Chronic Upper and Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapparel, Caroline; Farinelli, Laurent; Van Belle, Sandra; Soccal, Paola M.; Aubert, John-David; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Kaiser, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Routine screening of lung transplant recipients and hospital patients for respiratory virus infections allowed to identify human rhinovirus (HRV) in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, including immunocompromised hosts chronically infected with the same strain over weeks or months. Phylogenetic analysis of 144 HRV-positive samples showed no apparent correlation between a given viral genotype or species and their ability to invade the lower respiratory tract or lead to protracted infection. By contrast, protracted infections were found almost exclusively in immunocompromised patients, thus suggesting that host factors rather than the virus genotype modulate disease outcome, in particular the immune response. Complete genome sequencing of five chronic cases to study rhinovirus genome adaptation showed that the calculated mutation frequency was in the range observed during acute human infections. Analysis of mutation hot spot regions between specimens collected at different times or in different body sites revealed that non-synonymous changes were mostly concentrated in the viral capsid genes VP1, VP2 and VP3, independent of the HRV type. In an immunosuppressed lung transplant recipient infected with the same HRV strain for more than two years, both classical and ultra-deep sequencing of samples collected at different time points in the upper and lower respiratory tracts showed that these virus populations were phylogenetically indistinguishable over the course of infection, except for the last month. Specific signatures were found in the last two lower respiratory tract populations, including changes in the 5′UTR polypyrimidine tract and the VP2 immunogenic site 2. These results highlight for the first time the ability of a given rhinovirus to evolve in the course of a natural infection in immunocompromised patients and complement data obtained from previous experimental inoculation studies in immunocompetent volunteers. PMID:21713005

  18. Frequent respiratory pathogens of respiratory tract infections in children attending daycare centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfim, Caroline M; Nogueira, Maurício L; Simas, Paulo Vítor M; Gardinassi, Luis Gustavo A; Durigon, Edison L; Rahal, Paula; Souza, Fátima Pereira

    2011-01-01

    To identify and characterize respiratory viruses that infect children from daycare centers with symptoms of respiratory infection and to evaluate the association of clinical and epidemiological disease data with the identified virus. We conducted a study between 2003 and 2005 in 176 children with respiratory infection symptoms attending a municipal daycare center. Samples from nasopharyngeal secretion were tested by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and positive samples for picornavirus were sequenced. All 782 collected samples were analyzed and 31.8% were positive for at least one of the studied respiratory viruses. Respiratory infections were characterized by the presence of mild symptoms of the upper respiratory tract, the most common of which were runny nose and cough. In the 2 years of study, most cases of infection occurred in autumn and winter, but respiratory viruses were detected throughout all the study period. Respiratory viruses and respiratory infections caused by them are part of the daily life of children attending daycare centers. Our results show the great impact that respiratory infections have on these children and suggest that more attention must be paid to viral pathogens.

  19. Respiratory syncytial virus: co-infection and paediatric lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Suzuki, Motoi; Nguyen, Hien Anh; Le, Minh Nhat; Dinh Vu, Thiem; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Nguyen, Thi Thuy Ai; Le, Huu Tho; Morimoto, Konosuke; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki; Dang, Duc Anh; Ariyoshi, Koya

    2013-08-01

    Comprehensive population-based data on the role of respiratory viruses in the development of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) remain unclear. We investigated the incidence and effect of single and multiple infections with respiratory viruses on the risk of LRTIs in Vietnam. Population-based prospective surveillance and a case-control study of hospitalised paediatric patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) were conducted from April 2007 through to March 2010. Healthy controls were randomly recruited from the same community. Nasopharyngeal samples were collected and tested for 13 respiratory viruses using multiplex PCRs. 1992 hospitalised ARI episodes, including 397 (19.9%) with LRTIs, were enrolled. Incidence of hospitalised LRTIs among children aged respiratory syncytial virus (20.1%) and influenza A virus (12.0%) were the most common and 9.5% had multiple-viral infections. Respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus infections independently increased the risk of LRTIs. Respiratory syncytial virus further increased the risk, when co-infected with human rhinovirus, human metapneumovirus and parainfluenza virus-3 but not with influenza A virus. The case-control analysis revealed that respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus increased the risk of ARI hospitalisation but not human rhinovirus. Respiratory syncytial virus is the leading pathogen associated with risk of ARI hospitalisation and LRTIs in Vietnam.

  20. The penetration of ceftibuten into the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpe, P; Lin, C C; Radwanski, E; Cayen, M N; Affrime, M B

    1999-08-01

    To determine the penetration of ceftibuten into various respiratory tissues and fluids. Single-dose, open-label, pharmacokinetic study. Veterans Administration Medical Center. Twelve hospitalized men aged 34 to 75 years with a variety of noninfectious pulmonary symptoms/diseases. Patients received a single oral dose of ceftibuten, 200 mg, prior to undergoing diagnostic fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Plasma samples for the determination of ceftibuten concentrations were collected pretreatment and up to 12 h postdosing. Nasal secretions, tracheal secretions, BAL fluid, and lung tissue from a biopsy were obtained at bronchoscopy from 2 to 7 h postdosing. Mean pharmacokinetic parameters for ceftibuten in plasma were the following: maximum observed plasma concentration (Cmax), 8.77 microg/mL; time to reach Cmax, 2.2 h; area under the plasma concentration-time curve extraploated to infinity, 49.21 microg/h/mL; and terminal elimination half-life, 3.17 h. These parameters were similar to those obtained in studies using healthy volunteers. Mean penetration of ceftibuten into nasal, tracheal, and bronchial secretions was 47%, 50%, and 30%, respectively. Mean penetration into BAL fluid was 81%, whereas penetration into lung tissue was 39%. No patient experienced any adverse effects related to ceftibuten. Ceftibuten penetrates well into various tissues and fluids of the upper and lower respiratory tracts. The results support the activity of ceftibuten in the treatment of upper and lower respiratory tract infections.

  1. Early Fluid Overload Prolongs Mechanical Ventilation in Children With Viral-Lower Respiratory Tract Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingelse, Sarah A.; Wiegers, Hanke M. G.; Calis, Job C.; van Woensel, Job B.; Bem, Reinout A.

    2017-01-01

    Viral-lower respiratory tract disease is common in young children worldwide and is associated with high morbidity. Acute respiratory failure due to viral-lower respiratory tract disease necessitates PICU admission for mechanical ventilation. In critically ill patients in PICU settings, early fluid

  2. Risk Factors for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Pavić, Ivan; Jurković, Marija; Paštar, Zrinjka

    2012-01-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI) are the most common cause of childhood morbidity and an important public health problem. The aim of this study was to identify the significant risk factors for ARTI in children. The study took place in Ivankovo which is a rural area of Eastern Slavonia and with small socio-economic differences. The study population were 159 children who were 3–5 years old at the time of the study, and who were registrated at doctor’s office Ivankovo. The s...

  3. Respiratory syncytial virus infection of the lower respiratory tract: radiological findings in 108 children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, S.; Uhl, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Berner, R.; Schwoerer, T. [Dept. of Pediatrics, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Langer, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    For years the typical appearance of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced infection of the lower respiratory tract has been discussed. All available studies have led to different results. The aim of this study was to control these results, with 108 children. The age range was 1 day to 10 years (median 7 months). Within 72 h of admission, all children developed an RSV infection of the lower respiratory tract. Chest X-rays (pa-view) of 55 children under, and 53 children over, the age of 6 months (10/53>24 months) were evaluated. The diagnosis of RSV and the chest X-ray were mostly done on the same day. The major radiological findings of the two age-groups were compared by Wilcoxon's unpaired rank sum test. Major radiological findings were: normal chest X-ray (30%), central pneumonia (32%) or peribronchitis (26%). There was no statistical significance between the age-groups. Other findings were emphysema (11%), pleural effusion (6%), lobar- or broncho-pneumonia (each 6%), atelectasis (5%) or pneumothorax in one case. Therefore, the most common radiological findings in RSV-induced infection of the lower respiratory tract, supported by our results (RSV infection without bacterial superinfection) are central pneumonia, peribronchitis or normal chest X-ray. Thus an age-group separation into under or over 6 months is no longer necessary. (orig.)

  4. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p infected children required respiratory support. hMPV is present in young.......6%) ARTI episodes by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using primers targeting the hMPV N gene and the RSV L gene. Two children were co-infected with hMPV and RSV. They were excluded from statistical analysis. Hospitalization for ARTI caused by hMPV was restricted to very young...

  5. Role of vitamin D in children with respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, S; Baggi, E; Bianchini, S; Marchisio, P; Principi, N

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been shown that vitamin D (VitD) plays an important role in host defences, inflammation and immunity. We reviewed PubMed and selected all of the studies published over the last 15 years concerning VitD deficiency and VitD supplementation in children with respiratory tract infections. Our analysis showed that VitD seems to be very important because of its part in the complexity of the immune system. However, there are few pediatric studies and most have various limitations. First of all, the literature mainly refers to studies concerning the prevalence of VitD insufficiency and deficiency in specific pathologies. Secondly, it is extremely difficult to identify a common specific range of normal, insufficient and deficient VitD levels. Thirdly, the available studies of VitD supplementation often combined VitD with the use of other micronutrients, thus obscuring the role of VitD itself. Finally, different doses have been used for VitD supplementation. These observations clearly highlight the fact that further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of VitD deficiency and insufficiency in terms of the epidemiology and outcomes of pediatric respiratory tract infection, and whether VitD supplementation favours a positive outcome.

  6. Grepafloxacin Clinical Program for Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne C Rodloff

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper evaluates the clinical trial program in lower respiratory tract infections treated with a new fluoroquinolone antibiotic, grepafloxacin. Unlike older quinolones, grepafloxacin has excellent activity against Gram-positive organisms, which include Streptococcus pneumoniae and “atypical” pathogens Legionella species. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Grepafloxacin has a long half-life of 12 to 15 h, which allows once daily dosing. Six studies have been conducted regarding community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (LRTls, four about community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and two about acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (ABECB . In these studies, grepafloxacin demonstrated clinical equivalence with standard therapies. but, in patients with documented infections. grepafloxacin was statistically superior to amoxycillin in both CAP and ABECB. The new fluoroquinolone has a good safety profile, comparable with that of ciprofloxacin. The most common adverse effects of grepafloxacin were nausea and a metallic taste; however, these effects resulted in only a few discontinuations of therapy. With the increasing prevalence of resistance in pathogens isolated from community-acquired LRTIs, grepafloxacin offers a good alternative for monotherapy in these patients.

  7. Microbiologic Methods in the Diagnostics of Upper Respiratory Tract Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompanikova, J; Zumdick, A; Neuschlova, M; Sadlonova, V; Novakova, E

    2017-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infection (URI) is a nonspecific term used to describe acute infections involving the nose, paranasal sinuses, pharynx, and larynx above the vocal cords. The aim of this study was to provide a summary of the most common pathogens of URI and to compare advantages and disadvantages of traditional and new rapid microbiological tests used to identify them. Blood samples were simultaneously examined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by the FilmArray Respiratory Panel for eight different pathogens in a total of 15 tests performed in nasopharyngeal swabs. The ELISA method is unable to identify the pathologic agent until the host's immune system elicits a response. The method is readily available in many laboratories at a low cost, which puts less strain on economic resources. The FilmArray ® Panel, on the other hand, is more expensive, but it is fast and exact in the identification of a broad spectrum etiologic agents. Nonetheless, since most repiratory tract infections are viral in origin and there is no treatment available, the diagnosis provided by the FilmArray Panel does not provide any additional clinical benefit and thus should be used only whenever necessary on the individual basis.

  8. Prevention of paediatric respiratory tract infections: emphasis on the role of OM-85

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. B. Schaad

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The burden of respiratory tract infections in paediatrics is extremely high, in both industrialised and developing countries. Because adequate diagnosis and causative therapies of these often recurrent respiratory tract infections bear substantial limits, preventive measures deserve priority. The mainstays are parent education, active immunisation strategies and nonspecific immunostimulation with bacterial products. This article summarises the five key studies on the use of the immunoactive agent OM-85 (Broncho-Vaxom for prevention of recurrent respiratory tract infections in children. Such bacterial immunostimulants are especially indicated for young infants and children who are known and/or expected to suffer from at least three respiratory tract infections per winter season.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes in the Human Respiratory Tract-Clearance Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Clearance of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT, diameter: 5 nm) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, diameter: 50 nm) in the respiratory tract was predicted for various age groups (infants, children, adolescents, and adults). The model was founded on the assumption that lung clearance takes place in three distinct phases: (i) fast mucociliary clearance, (ii) slow bronchial clearance, and (iii) alveolar clearance. To each of these phases a specific fraction of deposited particles was attributed, the amount of which depended on particles' geometry and particles' deposition sites in the respiratory system. Clearance velocities were expressed by respective clearance half-times ranging from several hours in the case of fast clearance to tens of days in the case of slow clearance. Results of the simulations clearly demonstrate that for the specific deposition scenario (sitting, nasal breathing) considered here fast clearance fraction exhibits a slight decrease with increasing age, but total clearance times (i.e. time spans, within which 100% of the deposited particulate mass are removed) are rather constant among the age groups. Nanotubes deposited in the respiratory bronchioles and alveoli are usually subject to a long-term storage in these structures and, thus, may trigger malignant transformations in adjacent cells and tissues. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  10. Burden and Seasonality of Viral Acute Respiratory Tract Infections among Outpatients in Southern Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, David; Bodinayake, Champica K; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kurukulasooriya, Ruvini; Hsiang, Jeremy; Nicholson, Bradley; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan; Østbye, Truls; Reller, Megan E; Woods, Christopher W; Tillekeratne, L Gayani

    2017-07-01

    In tropical and subtropical settings, the epidemiology of viral acute respiratory tract infections varies widely between countries. We determined the etiology, seasonality, and clinical presentation of viral acute respiratory tract infections among outpatients in southern Sri Lanka. From March 2013 to January 2015, we enrolled outpatients presenting with influenza-like illness (ILI). Nasal/nasopharyngeal samples were tested in duplicate using antigen-based rapid influenza testing and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for respiratory viruses. Monthly proportion positive was calculated for each virus. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify associations between sociodemographic/clinical information and viral detection. Of 571 subjects, most (470, 82.3%) were ≥ 5 years of age and 53.1% were male. A respiratory virus was detected by PCR in 63.6% ( N = 363). Common viral etiologies included influenza (223, 39%), human enterovirus/rhinovirus (HEV/HRV, 14.5%), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, 4.2%), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV, 3.9%). Both ILI and influenza showed clear seasonal variation, with peaks from March to June each year. RSV and hMPV activity peaked from May to July, whereas HEV/HRV was seen year-round. Patients with respiratory viruses detected were more likely to report pain with breathing (odds ratio [OR] = 2.60, P = 0.003), anorexia (OR = 2.29, P respiratory viruses detected. ILI showed clear seasonal variation in southern Sri Lanka, with most activity during March to June; peak activity was largely due to influenza. Targeted infection prevention activities such as influenza vaccination in January-February may have a large public health impact in this region.

  11. 'Recurrent lower respiratory tract infections' - going around in circles, respiratory medicine style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark L

    2012-09-01

    Recurrent lower respiratory tract infections are very common in childhood, particularly the pre-school years. The term lower respiratory tract infection [LTRI] is, as with many terms used in respiratory medicine, used very loosely and carries little more information than the often decried term 'chest infections'. LRTIs should more accurately be characterised by the type of infection [viral or bacterial], the site of infection [conducting airways, or respiratory compartment or both - bronchitis/pneumonia/bronchopneumonia], the nature of the episode [acute or acute on chronic (exacerbation)], the interaction with co-morbidities such as asthma. The limited nature of the responses of the lower airways to any insult whether it is infective or irritation due to inhaled or aspirated chemicals means that almost any aetiology can lead to cough, shortness of breath and noisy breathing. We lack good non-invasive techniques to study the nature of the inflammation in the lower airways and hence the cause of chronic and recurrent symptoms in patients is frequently mis-diagnosed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interference between respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus in respiratory tract infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, S; Toivonen, L; Schuez-Havupalo, L; Waris, M; Peltola, V

    2016-02-01

    An acute viral respiratory tract infection might prevent infections by other viruses because of the antiviral innate immune response. However, with the use of PCR methods, simultaneous detection of two or more respiratory viruses is frequent. We analysed the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the occurrence of simultaneous rhinovirus (RV) infection in children within a birth cohort study setting. We used PCR for virus detection in nasal swabs collected from children with an acute respiratory tract infection at the age of 0-24 months and from healthy control children, who were matched for age and date of sample collection. Of 226 children with RSV infections, 18 (8.0%) had co-infections with RV, whereas RV was detected in 31 (14%) of 226 control children (p 0.049 by chi-square test). Adjustment for sex, number of siblings and socio-economic status strengthened the negative association between RSV and RV (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.90; p 0.02). The median durations of symptoms (cough, rhinorrhoea, or fever) were 11 days in children with single RSV infections and 14 days in children with RSV-RV co-infections (p 0.02). Our results suggest that the presence of RSV reduces the probability of RV infection, but that, if a co-infection occurs, both viruses cause clinical symptoms. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Simultaneous influenza and respiratory syncytial virus infection in human respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinky, Lubna Jahan Rashid; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Studies have shown that simultaneous infection of the respiratory tract with at least two viruses is not uncommon in hospitalized patients, although it is not clear whether these infections are more or less severe than single infections. We use mathematical models to study the dynamics of simultaneous influenza (flu) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, two of the more common respiratory viruses, in an effort to understand simultaneous infections. We examine the roles of initial viral inoculum, relative starting time, and cell regeneration on the severity of the infection. We also study the effect of antiviral treatment on the course of the infection. This study shows that, unless treated with antivirals, flu always takes over the infection no matter how small the initial dose and how delayed it starts with respect to RSV.

  14. Current Antibiotic Treatment and Outcome for Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair P MacGowan

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of national guidelines have been published to aid the antimicrobial management of community-acquired pneumonia. However, data on prescriptions for lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI indicate considerable variation in the choice of first-line and subsequent therapy at national and local levels. Outcomes research in LRTI, whether based on clinical, economic or patient-focused criteria, is still evolving. Clinical outcomes are best studied for both pneumonia and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Economic evaluations often do not encompass all of the costs, for example, time off from work or the economic impact of antibacterial resistance. Duration of hospital stay is a good marker of costs for hospital providers and may be affected by age. marital status and comorbidities. Antibiotic choice may have an impact on the duration of hospital stay by increasing side effects, predisposing patients to hospitalacquired infection or reduced clinical efficacy. Patient expectation is largely unstudied in pulmonary infection.

  15. The clinical management of lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapikou, Adamantia; Torres, Antoni

    2016-03-16

    The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study reported that lower respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia, are the fourth most common cause of death globally. The etiology of acute bronchitis and asthma exacerbations is mostly viral and the therapy is symptomatic. Management decisions in community acquired pneumonia regarding site of care, extent of assessment, and level of treatment are based primarily on disease severity (outpatient, inpatient, ICU admission). Antibiotics are the main choice of treatment for patients with pneumonia, acute exacerbations (AE) of COPD (including increased sputum purulence and worsening shortness of breath) and AE of non-CF bronchiectasis. Inhaled antibiotics may represent a more optimal approach for the treatment and prevention of AE of non-CF bronchiectasis. Approved strategies for the prevention of exacerbations include smoking cessation and rehabilitation programs, drug therapy and vaccination.

  16. Considering Respiratory Tract Infections and Antimicrobial Sensitivity: An Exploratory Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin, R.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to observe the sensitivity and resistance of status of antibiotics for respiratory tract infection (RTI. Throat swab culture and sensitivity report of 383 patients revealed sensitivity profiles were observed with amoxycillin (7.9%, penicillin (33.7%, ampicillin (36.6%, co-trimoxazole (46.5%, azithromycin (53.5%, erythromycin (57.4%, cephalexin (69.3%, gentamycin (78.2%, ciprofloxacin (80.2%, cephradine (81.2%, ceftazidime (93.1%, ceftriaxone (93.1%. Sensitivity to cefuroxime was reported 93.1% cases. Resistance was found with amoxycillin (90.1%, ampicillin (64.1%, penicillin (61.4%, co-trimoxazole (43.6%, erythromycin (39.6%, and azithromycin (34.7%. Cefuroxime demonstrates high level of sensitivity than other antibiotics and supports its consideration with patients with upper RTI.

  17. CLINICAL EFFICACY OF IBUPROFEN IN THERAPY FOR VIRAL UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.O. Skugarevskaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of use of ibuprofen in cases of viral upper respiratory tract infections (Vuri in children of early childhood has proved its' safety and efficacy. This medical agent has not only terminate fever but also diminished some other symptoms of Vuri.Key words: ibuprofen, viral upper respiratory tract infections, children.

  18. An association between Helicobacter pylori and upper respiratory tract disease: Fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Shin; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major cause of chronic gastritis and gastric ulcers and considerable evidence supports the notion that infection with this bacterium is also associated with gastric malignancy in addition to various other conditions including pulmonary, vascular and autoimmune disorders. Gastric juice infected with H. pylori might play an important role in upper respiratory tract infection. Although direct and/or indirect mechanisms might be involved in the association between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the etiological role of H. pylori in upper respiratory tract disorders has not yet been fully elucidated. Although various studies over the past two decades have suggested a relationship between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the findings are inconsistent. The present overview describes the outcomes of recent investigations into the impact of H. pylori on upper respiratory tract and adjacent lesions. PMID:24587622

  19. Characterisation of antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory tract infections in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Saust, Laura Trolle

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is unclear...... if these recommendations are followed. We aimed to characterise the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions for patients diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infections, by means of electronic prescriptions, labeled with clinical indications, from Danish general practice. Acute respiratory tract infections accounted for 456...... prescription patterns for acute respiratory tract infections by data linkage of clinical indications. The findings confirm that penicillin V is the most commonly prescribed antibiotic agent for treatment of patients with an acute respiratory tract infection in Danish general practice. However, second...

  20. PRINCIPLES OF ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT OF OUT-OF-HOSPITAL UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Zaplatnikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Special features of etiology of respiratory tract bacterial infections in children in depending of localization of involvement are analyzed in this study. In the article the main principles of rational antibacterial therapy of infectious and inflammatory diseases of respiratory tract in paediatrician practice are discussed. The authors offer the algorithms of first-line antibiotics choosing according to various entities of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in children. There are also suggested the regimens of antibacterial agents dosing in out-patient clinics in children with bacterial respiratory infections.

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients: factors determining progression to lower respiratory tract disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yae-Jean; Guthrie, Katherine A; Waghmare, Alpana; Walsh, Edward E; Falsey, Ann R; Kuypers, Jane; Cent, Anne; Englund, Janet A; Boeckh, Michael

    2014-04-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease (LRD) is a life-threatening complication in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Lymphopenia has been associated with an increased risk of progression from upper respiratory tract infection (URI) to LRD. This study retrospectively analyzed the significance of lymphocyte engraftment dynamics, lung function, smoking history, corticosteroids, antiviral treatment, viral subtypes, and RSV-specific neutralizing antibodies for the progression to LRD in 181 HCT recipients with RSV URI. In multivariable models, smoking history, conditioning with high-dose total body irradiation, and an absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) ≤100/mm(3) at the time of URI onset were significantly associated with disease progression. No progression occurred in patients with ALCs of >1000/mm(3) at URI onset. Lymphocyte engraftment dynamics were similar in progressors and nonprogressors. Pre- and posttransplant donor and posttransplant recipient RSV subtype-specific neutralizing antibody levels, RSV viral subtypes, and corticosteroids also were not significantly associated with LRD progression. Host and transplant related factors appear to determine the risk of progression to LRD more than viral factors. Dysfunctional cell-mediated immunity appears to be important in the pathogenesis of progressive RSV disease after HCT. A characterization of RSV-specific T-cell immunity is warranted.

  2. Mannose binding lectin codon 54 polymorphism and susceptibility to recurrent respiratory tract infections in children: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atan, Ozlem; Kucukcelebi, Ahmet; Atik, Tahir; Ozkınay, Ferda

    2016-02-01

    There have been studies focused on mannose binding lectin (MBL) polymorphism and susceptibility to recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTI) with inconclusive results. This present study is a meta-analysis of possible MBL and RRTI association in children. A literature search was performed using Medline and PubMed and abstracts were reviewed for relevance. Any study was considered to be eligible for inclusion if it met the following criteria: the MBL gene polymorphism at codon 54 was determined, the outcome was recurrent respiratory tract infection in children and there were at least two comparison groups. The odds ratios(OR) of the genetic MBL polymorphisms were combined and calculated, and the forest plots of the OR value distributions were drawn. Chi-squared testing of heterogeneity was done (prespiratory tract infection in children. Summary of the article's main point Here are discrepancies regarding the importance of MBL polymorphism and its impact on recurrent respiratory tract infections. Our meta analysis did not find statistically significant association between MBL codon 54 polymorphism and recurrent respiratory tract infection in children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness of two types of intervention on antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections in Primary Care in Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carles; Cots, Josep Maria; Hernández, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of two types of intervention in reducing antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections (RTI).......To evaluate the effectiveness of two types of intervention in reducing antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections (RTI)....

  4. Aetiology of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Hospitalised Children in Cyprus

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Jan; Panayiotou, Christakis; Tryfonos, Christina; Koptides, Dana; Koliou, Maria; Kalogirou, Nikolas; Georgiou, Eleni; Christodoulou, Christina

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve clinical management and prevention of viral infections in hospitalised children improved etiological insight is needed. The aim of the present study was to assess the spectrum of respiratory viral pathogens in children admitted to hospital with acute respiratory tract infections in Cyprus. For this purpose nasopharyngeal swab samples from 424 children less than 12 years of age with acute respiratory tract infections were collected over three epidemic seasons and were analy...

  5. Upper respiratory tract diseases in workers exposed to chrysotile-asbestos dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostapkovich, E.V.

    A study of morbidity and temporary incapacity to work among workers exposed to chrysotile-asbestos dust combined with examinations of their upper respiratory tract provided the basis for developing scientifically based methods of effective monitoring and treatment for all persons working under dusty conditions. It was found that a 2 mg/m/sup 3/ concentration of chrysotile-asbestos dust causes development of pathologies of the upper respiratory tract in the first years of worker exposure and the pathological processes intensify according to the length of service. The study made it possible to classify workers according to findings from examination of the upper respiratory tract. The classification includes 1 group of workers with low risk of development of upper respiratory pathology from working under dusty conditions and 3 groups which had experienced specific changes in the upper respiratory tract. Group 2 includes persons with catarrhal processes in the upper respiratory tract, chronic tonsillitis and chronic sinusitis; group 3 includes workers with allergic and dystrophic processes in the upper respiratory tract and group 4 includes workers with diffuse hyperplasia (pre-cancerous processes) of the throat. Development of serious changes in the upper respiratory tract of workers exposed to dust must be considered to be an occupational disease, especially in workers with long service. 12 references.

  6. Neisseria models of infection and persistence in the upper respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyand, Nathan J

    2017-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacteria genus Neisseria includes both pathogenic and commensal species that are found primarily in the upper respiratory tract of humans and animals. The development of animal models to study neisserial pathogenesis has focused almost exclusively on two species that cause disease in humans. These include Neisseria meningitidis, an obligate commensal that can cause invasive disease, and N. gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea. Both pathogens can persist in the upper respiratory tract. This article will give a brief overview of the genus Neisseria. The anatomy of the upper respiratory tract and its use as a niche for bacteria will be discussed. Next, studies that provide insight about the first stage of upper respiratory tract infection, namely colonization, will be reviewed. Most studies of upper respiratory tract infection have focused on N. meningitidis infections of laboratory mice. This review will also discuss models of respiratory tract persistence by Neisseria species, including commensals, in mice, non-human primates and human volunteers. The article includes a section that discusses the future utility of upper respiratory tract models in informing the development of effective antimicrobial therapies. Such knowledge is needed to minimize the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance from respiratory reservoirs. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Impact of meteorological factors on lower respiratory tract infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonglin; Liu, Juan; Chen, Fenglian; Shamsi, Bilal Haider; Wang, Qiang; Jiao, Fuyong; Qiao, Yanmei; Shi, Yanhua

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate retrospectively the relationship between meteorological factors in Shenmu County, Yulin City, Shaanxi Province, China and the incidence of lower respiratory tract infections in children. Meteorological data (air temperature, atmospheric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunlight, wind speed and relative humidity) for Shenmu County and medical data from hospitalized patients aged ≤16 years were collected between January 2009 and December 2012. The association between meteorological factors and rate of hospitalization due to lower respiratory tract infections was investigated; the total hospitalization rate was compared with the rate of lower respiratory tract disease-related hospitalizations. The leading bacterial causes of lower respiratory tract infections were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type B; the main viral cause was respiratory syncytial virus. Lower respiratory tract infection hospitalization rate was significantly correlated with air temperature (R = -0.651), atmospheric pressure (R = 0.560), rainfall (R = -0.614) and relative humidity (R = -0.470), but not with hours of sunlight (R = -0.210) or wind speed (R = 0.258). Using multiple linear regression, lower respiratory tract infection hospitalization rate decreased with a gradual increase in air temperature (F = 38.30) and relative humidity (F = 15.58). Air temperature and relative humidity were major influencing meteorological factors for hospital admissions in children due to lower respiratory tract infections. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Evaluation of the BioFire FilmArray respiratory panel and the GenMark eSensor respiratory viral panel on lower respiratory tract specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Phyllis; McMillen, Tracy; Tang, Yi-Wei; Babady, N Esther

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the performance characteristics of the FilmArray respiratory panel and the eSensor respiratory viral panel on clinical and spiked lower respiratory tract specimens (LRTS). The overall agreement between the two methods was 89.5% (51/57). The lower limit of detection of both assays for all targets in LRTS was comparable to that for nasopharyngeal swab specimens.

  9. Differential expression of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus receptor in the upper respiratory tracts of humans and dromedary camels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Widagdo; V.S. Raj (Stalin); D. Schipper (Debby); K. Kolijn (Kimberley); G.J.H.L. Leenders (Geert); B.J. Bosch (Berend Jan); A. Bensaid (Albert); J. Segalés (Joaquim); W. Baumgärtner (Wolfgang); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); J.M.A. van den Brand (Judith); B.L. Haagmans (Bart)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMiddle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is not efficiently transmitted between humans, but it is highly prevalent in dromedary camels. Here we report that the MERS-CoV receptor-dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4)-is expressed in the upper respiratory tract epithelium of camels

  10. Local interferon-gamma levels during respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection are associated with disease severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, L; Heijnen, CJ; Kavelaars, A; van Aalderen, WMC; Brus, F; Draaisma, JMT; Pekelharing-Berghuis, M; van Diemen-Steenvoorde, RAAM; Kimpen, JLL

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the role of cell-mediated immunity during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, interferon (IFN)-gamma and interleukin (IL)-10 levels in nasopharyngeal secretions were measured in infants with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) caused by RSV. A novel technique was used to

  11. The burden of hospitalized lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus in rural Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M Fry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We describe the epidemiology of hospitalized RSV infections for all age groups from population-based surveillance in two rural provinces in Thailand. METHODS: From September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007, we enrolled hospitalized patients with acute lower respiratory tract illness, who had a chest radiograph ordered by the physician, from all hospitals in SaKaeo and Nakhom Phanom Provinces. We tested nasopharyngeal specimens for RSV with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assays and paired-sera from a subset of patients with IgG enzyme immunoassay. Rates were adjusted for enrollment. RESULTS: Among 11,097 enrolled patients, 987 (8.9% had RSV infection. Rates of hospitalized RSV infection overall (and radiographically-confirmed pneumonia were highest among children aged<1 year: 1,067/100,000 (534/100,000 radiographically-confirmed pneumonia and 1-4 year: 403/100,000 (222/100,000, but low among enrolled adults aged≥65 years: 42/100,000. Age<1 year (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=13.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.7, 22.5 and 1-4 year (aOR=8.3, 95% CI 5.0, 13.9 were independent predictors of hospitalized RSV infection. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of hospitalized RSV lower respiratory tract illness among children<5 years was high in rural Thailand. Efforts to prevent RSV infection could substantially reduce the pneumonia burden in children aged<5 years.

  12. Numerical simulation of migration behavior of uranium ore dust particles in the human respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yong-jun; Yin, An-song; Li, Zhi; Lei, Bo; Ding, De-xin

    2017-04-01

    There is a certain concentration of radioactive dust particles in the air of workplace of underground uranium mines. Some small diameter particles will pass through the masks and enter the respiratory tract which will cause radiation damage to the human body. In order to study deposition regularity of uranium dust in the human respiratory tract, in this paper, we firstly use the RNG turbulence model to simulate the gas flow field in the human respiratory tract Z0 ∼ Z3 level under different respiratory intensity. Then we use DPM discrete phase model to simulate the concentration, particle size distribution, deposition rate and deposition share of uranium dust particles after being filtered through the masks in the human respiratory tract Z0 to Z3 bronchus. According to the simulation results, we have got the following conclusions: the particles’ number concentration of uranium dust after being filtered through the mask in the human respiratory tract basically decreases with the increasing of particle size under different respiratory intensities on the environment of uranium mine. In addition, the intensity of respiration and the mass concentration of particles have an important influence on the deposition rate and the deposition of particles in the respiratory tract.

  13. Frequency and time to onset of community-acquired respiratory tract infections in patients receiving esomeprazole: a retrospective analysis of patient-level data in placebo-controlled studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estborn, L; Joelson, S

    2015-09-01

    Debate continues on whether a causal association exists between the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and the risk of respiratory tract infections, in particular pneumonia. To investigate the occurrence of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia, in patients receiving esomeprazole. A retrospective investigation of pooled data on adverse events related to respiratory tract infections, originally reported in 24 randomised, double-blind clinical studies, was conducted. The frequencies of respiratory tract infections and their relative risks were calculated retrospectively for the total patient population (9602 patients receiving esomeprazole and 5500 receiving placebo) and for sub-populations defined according to sex, age, esomeprazole dose, indication and geographical region. The cumulative frequency of first occurrence of events was calculated over 180 days. Frequencies of respiratory tract infections were similar in patients receiving esomeprazole and in those receiving placebo (any respiratory tract infection or signs/symptoms potentially indicating an respiratory tract infection, 0.278 and 0.296 patients per patient-year; lower respiratory tract infections, 0.048 and 0.058 per patient-year; pneumonia, 0.006 and 0.009 per patient-year, respectively). The relative risk for any respiratory tract infection in patients receiving esomeprazole compared with placebo was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.86-1.04). For lower respiratory tract infections, the relative risk was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.65-1.03) and for pneumonia, 0.66 (95% CI, 0.36-1.22). Sub-analyses by demographics, dose and indication yielded similar results to the overall analysis. The occurrence of respiratory tract infections was evenly distributed over time and similar in the esomeprazole and placebo groups. There is no causal association between treatment with esomeprazole and the occurrence of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Mathematical justification of the acoustic method for measuring the impedance of the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A V; Dragan, S P

    2015-01-01

    A new method for measuring a complex frequency-dependent acoustic impedance of the respiratory tract based on two-microphone method was developed. The measuring device consists of a waveguide connected through a mouthpiece to the patient's mouth. A sound field with a frequency range from 5 to 100 Hz is created in the waveguide. The impedance of the respiratory tract is determined at free respiration of the patient in the set frequency range; the duration of examination does not exceed 15 s. The criteria for the recognition of respiratory tract pathologies are proposed.

  15. Quality indicators for the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of acute respiratory tract infections in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saust, Laura Trolle; Bjerrum, Lars; Arpi, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To develop quality indicators for the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of acute respiratory tract infections, tailored to the Danish general practice setting. Design: A RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used. Setting: General practice. Subjects: A panel of nine experts, mainly...... general practitioners, was asked to rate the relevance of 64 quality indicators for the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of acute respiratory tract infections based on guidelines. Subsequently, a face-to-face meeting was held to resolve misinterpretations and to achieve consensus. Main outcome measures...... with acute respiratory tract infections and to identify where there is a need for future quality improvements....

  16. Providing evidence for use of Echinacea supplements in Hajj pilgrims for management of respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmehr, Mohammad Ali; Tafazoli, Ali

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate potential applicability of Echinacea use for management of respiratory tract infections in Hajj travelers. The PubMed database was explored with Mesh terms "Echinacea" and "Respiratory Tract Infections". A hundred journal articles were yielded but only 66 most relevant ones used for the review. There is a considerable amount of evidence that shows effectiveness of Echinacea products in prevention and treatment of respiratory tract infections in this setting. Although there are some controversial findings, utilization of standardized products with adequate dose or combinations with other immune-stimulants in controlled and well-designed trials will be highly encouraging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Huijskens, Elisabeth G W; Wyllie, Anne L; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Wang, Xinhui; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J; Rossen, John W A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently disease. We compared oropharyngeal microbiota of elderly pneumonia patients (n=100) with healthy elderly (n=91) by 16S-rRNA-based sequencing and verified our findings in young adult pneumonia patients (n=27) and young healthy adults (n=187). Microbiota profiles differed significantly between elderly pneumonia patients and healthy elderly (PERMANOVA, Ppneumonia patients and their healthy controls. Clustering resulted in 11 (sub)clusters including 95% (386/405) of samples. We observed three microbiota profiles strongly associated with pneumonia (Ppneumoniae (n=42). In contrast, three other microbiota clusters (in total n=183) were correlated with health (Ppneumonia patients from healthy individuals. These results suggest that pneumonia in elderly and young adults is associated with dysbiosis of the URT microbiome with bacterial overgrowth of single species and absence of distinct anaerobic bacteria. Whether the observed microbiome changes are a cause or a consequence of the development of pneumonia or merely coincide with disease status remains a question for future research. PMID:26151645

  18. Infections and respiratory tract disease as risk factors for idiopathic inflammatory myopathies: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, John; Holmqvist, Marie; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Arkema, Elizabeth V

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the association between infection or respiratory tract disease and future risk of developing idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM). A case-control study was performed using Swedish nationwide registers. Adults with newly diagnosed IIM were identified (2002-2011) from the National Patient Register (NPR) and the Swedish Rheumatology Register (n=957). Controls were matched by age, sex and place of residence (n=9476). Outpatient visits and hospitalisations preceding IIM diagnosis indicating infection or respiratory disease were identified from NPR. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate OR and 95% CI. Sensitivity analyses were performed by varying the exposure definition, adjusting for previous healthcare consumption and excluding individuals with connective tissue disease, IIM lung phenotype or IIM-associated cancer. Preceding infections were more common in IIM cases compared with controls (13% vs 9%) and were associated with an increased risk of IIM (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.9). Gastrointestinal and respiratory tract infections were associated with an increased risk of IIM while cutaneous infections were not.Preceding respiratory tract disease was present in 10% of IIM cases and 4% of controls (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.8 to 3.0). Both upper and lower respiratory tract diseases were associated with an increased risk of IIM.Variations in exposure and outcome definitions did not greatly affect the results. Infections and respiratory tract diseases are associated with an increased risk of IIM which suggests that the triggering of the immune system may take place outside the skeletal muscle. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Inappropriate antibiotic prescription for respiratory tract indications : most prominent in adult patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Anne R. J.; Verheij, Theo J. M.; van der Velden, Alike W.

    Background. Numerous studies suggest overprescribing of antibiotics for respiratory tract indications (RTIs), without really authenticating inappropriate prescription; the strict criteria of guideline recommendations were not taken into account as information on specific diagnoses, patient

  20. Antibiotics for respiratory, ear and urinary tract disorders and consistency among GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, D.S.Y.; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Dijk, L. van; Verheij, T.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To describe specific diagnoses for which systemic antibiotics are prescribed, to assess adherence of antibiotic choice to national guidelines and to assess consistency among general practitioners (GPs) in prescribed volumes of antibiotics for respiratory, ear and urinary tract disorders.

  1. Appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurðardóttir, Nanna Rún; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Munck, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in two countries with different prevalence of antimicrobial resistance: Denmark and Iceland. Design: A cross-sectional study. Settings and subjects. General practitioners (GPs...

  2. Antibiotic treatment and the diagnosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae in lower respiratory tract infections in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Jens; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the possible influence of antibiotic treatment on the results of different diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective cohort of 159 unselected adult immunocompetent patients...

  3. The effect of vitamin D on lower respiratory tract infections in children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Şişmanlar, Tuğba; Aslan, Ayşe Tana; Gülbahar, Özlem; Özkan, Seçil

    2016-01-01

    .... Vitamin D deficiency and lower respiratory tract infection are common health problems in children in our country and no clinical study investigating the relationship between these problems has been conducted so far...

  4. Psychosocial factors and susceptibility to or outcome of acute respiratory tract infections [Review article

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Falagas, M.E; Karamanidou, C; Kastoris, A.C; Karlis, G; Rafailidis, P.I

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review of the literature to assess the possible effect that psychosocial variables may have on the susceptibility and/or outcome of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs).METHODS...

  5. Probiotics for preventing acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiukui; Dong, Bi Rong; Wu, Taixiang

    2015-02-03

    Probiotics may improve a person's health by regulating their immune function. Some trials have shown that probiotic strains can prevent respiratory infections. Even though the previous version of our review showed benefits of probiotics for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), several new studies have been published. To assess the effectiveness and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose), compared with placebo, in the prevention of acute URTIs in people of all ages, at risk of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to July week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to July 2014), Web of Science (1900 to July 2014), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, which includes the China Biological Medicine Database (from 1978 to July 2014), the Chinese Medicine Popular Science Literature Database (from 2000 to July 2014) and the Masters Degree Dissertation of Beijing Union Medical College Database (from 1981 to July 2014). We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for completed and ongoing trials on 31 July 2014. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics with placebo to prevent acute URTIs. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of trials, and extracted data using the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 13 RCTs, although we could only extract data to meta-analyse 12 trials, which involved 3720 participants including children, adults (aged around 40 years) and older people. We found that probiotics were better than placebo when measuring the number of participants experiencing episodes of acute URTI (at least one episode: odds ratio (OR) 0.53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 0.76, P value Probiotics and placebo were similar when measuring the rate ratio of episodes of acute URTI (rate ratio 0.83; 95% CI 0.66 to 1.05, P value = 0.12, very low

  6. Prevention of paediatric respiratory tract infections: emphasis on the role of OM-85

    OpenAIRE

    Schaad, U B

    2005-01-01

    The burden of respiratory tract infections in paediatrics is extremely high, in both industrialised and developing countries. Because adequate diagnosis and causative therapies of these often recurrent respiratory tract infections bear substantial limits, preventive measures deserve priority. The mainstays are parent education, active immunisation strategies and nonspecific immunostimulation with bacterial products. This article summarises the five key studies on the use of the immunoactive a...

  7. Vitamin D for prevention of respiratory tract infections: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jaykaran Charan; Goyal, Jagdish P.; Deepak Saxena; Preeti Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Objectives : To explore the effect of vitamin D supplementation in prevention of respiratory tract infections on the basis of published clinical trials. Materials and Methods : Clinical trials were searched from various electronic databases. Five clinical trials were suitable for inclusion. Outcome was events of respiratory tract infections in vitamin D group and placebo group. Data was reported as odds ratio with 95% confidence interval. Both random and fixed model was used for analysis. Ana...

  8. Periodontitis and nosocomial lower respiratory tract infection: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Filho, Isaac Suzart; Santos, Carla M L; Cruz, Simone S; Passos, Johelle de S; Cerqueira, Eneida de M M; Costa, Maria da Conceição N; Santana, Teresinha C; Seymour, Gregory J; Santos, Carlos Antonio de S T; Barreto, Maurício L

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the possible association between periodontitis and nosocomial lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). A case-control study was conducted at a General Hospital in Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil. The sample consisted of 103 individuals: 22 cases (presence of nosocomial LRTI) and 81 controls (absence of nosocomial LRTI). The diagnosis of periodontitis was based on probing depth, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss and bleeding on probing. The diagnosis of nosocomial LRTI was made in accordance with established medical criteria. Invasive ventilation was much more frequent in cases (95.5%) than in controls (7.4%). An orotracheal tube was used in 81.8% of cases and in 7.4% of controls; bronchoaspiration was suspected in 81.8% of cases and in 6.2% of controls. There was no statistically significant difference in any of the clinical periodontal parameters between cases and controls. The crude odds ratio (OR) value for individuals with periodontitis having LRTI was not statistically significant [OR(crude)=1.70; 95% confidence interval:(0.60-4.87)]. After including age, smoking and duration of hospitalization in the logistic regression, the adjusted OR for individuals with periodontitis having LRTI was statistically significant [OR(adjusted)=3.67 (1.01-13.53); p=0.049]. A marginal association between periodontitis and LRTI was found when smoking, age and length of hospitalization were included as covariates. Patients with LRTI had a high frequency of suspected bronchoaspiration and this could explain the possible association of periodontal disease and LRTI found in this and other studies. Additional studies are needed to further clarify the possible relationship between periodontal disease and LRTI.

  9. Vitamin D and respiratory tract infections in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Lelii, Mara

    2015-10-28

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) remain among of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality among children. Several studies have associated vitamin D deficiency with an increased risk of RTIs, and vitamin D supplementation has been proposed as a possible preventive measure against RTIs in children. The main aim of this review is to summarize the current evidence from the literature about the link between vitamin D and RTIs in children. Several recent studies have shown that vitamin D has different immunomodulatory properties associated with the risk of RTIs in childhood. In this regard, it is very important to understand the definition of deficiency and insufficiency of vitamin D and when and how to treat this condition. Unfortunately, there is no consensus, although a level of at least 10 ng/mL 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25[OH]D) is thought to be necessary to promote bone mineralization and calcium homeostasis, and a concentration between 20 ng/mL and 50 ng/mL is considered adequate to provide an immunomodulatory effect. Available data support a role for vitamin D deficiency in the risk of pediatric tuberculosis, recurrent acute otitis media, and severe bronchiolitis, whereas further studies are needed to confirm an association in children with recurrent pharyngotonsillitis, acute rhinosinusitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Maintenance of adequate vitamin D status may be an effective and inexpensive prophylactic method against some RTIs, but the supplementation regimen has not been clearly defined. Further clinical trials are needed to determine the 25(OH)D concentrations associated with an increased risk of RTIs and optimal vitamin D supplementation regimen according to the type of RTI while also taking into consideration vitamin D receptor polymorphisms.

  10. Hospital admissions for lower respiratory tract infections among infants in the Canadian Arctic: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Anna; Panzov, Val; Young, Michael; Robinson, Joan; Lee, Bonita; Moraes, Theo; Mamdani, Muhammad; Giles, B Louise; Jiang, Depeng; Bisson, Danny; Dennis, Marguerite; Morel, Johanne; Hall, Judith; Hui, Charles; Paes, Bosco; Mahony, James B

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown whether this burden of disease of lower respiratory tract infections is comparable across the Canadian Arctic. The objectives of this surveillance study were to compare the rates of hospital admission for lower respiratory tract infection and the severity of infection across Arctic Canada, and to describe the responsible viruses. We performed a prospective multicentre surveillance study of infants less than 1 year of age admitted in 2009 with lower respiratory tract infection to all hospitals (5 regional, 4 tertiary) in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Nunavik to assess for regional differences. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were processed by means of a polymerase chain reaction respiratory viral panel, testing for 20 respiratory viruses and influenza A (H1N1). The role of coinfection was assessed by means of regression analysis for length of stay (short: 14 d). Outcomes compared included rates of lower respiratory tract infection, respiratory syncytial virus infection, transfer to tertiary hospital and severe lower respiratory tract infection (respiratory failure, intubation and mechanical ventilation, and/or cardiopulmonary resuscitation). There were 348 admissions for lower respiratory tract infection in the population of interest in 2009. Rates of admission per 1000 live births varied significantly, from 39 in the Northwest Territories to 456 in Nunavik (p respiratory tract infection per 1000 live births in the Northwest Territories were 5.6 and 1.4, respectively, compared to 55.9 and 17.1, respectively, in Nunavut and 52.0 and 20.0, respectively, in Nunavik (p ≤ 0.001). Respiratory syncytial virus was the most common virus identified (124 cases [41.6% of those tested]), and coinfection was detected in 51 cases (41.1%) of infection with this virus. Longer length of stay was associated with coinfection (odds ratio [OR] 2.64) and underlying risk factors (OR 4.39). Length of stay decreased by 32.2% for every 30-day increase in age (OR 0

  11. Viral etiology and epidemiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in Korean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, B Y; Kim, M R; Park, J Y; Choi, E H; Lee, H J; Yun, C K

    1995-12-01

    Viral etiologic agents of acute lower respiratory tract infections were studied from November, 1990, through April, 1994, in Korean children. From 712 children who visited or were admitted to Seoul National University Children's Hospital because of acute lower respiratory tract infections, 804 nasal aspirates were collected; viral agents were detected by virus isolation and virus antigen was detected by indirect immunofluorescent staining. One or more viral agents were identified in 369 (45.9%) cases; of which 3.3% were mixed infections. The pathogens identified were respiratory syncytial virus (27.2%), parainfluenza virus type 3 (7.8%), influenza A virus (3.9%), adenovirus (3.9%), parainfluenza virus type 1 (1.7%), influenza B virus (1.4%), parainfluenza virus type 2 (0.5%), measles virus (0.1%) and others (0.9%). The clinical patterns of viral lower respiratory tract included pneumonia (56.6%), bronchiolitis (35.2%), croup (6.5%) and tracheo-bronchitis (1.6%). Infections with respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus types 1 and 3 and influenza A and B virus occurred in epidemics, whereas adenovirus was isolated sporadically throughout the study period. The data expand our understanding of the epidemiology of acute viral lower respiratory tract infections in Korean children and may be helpful to the clinicians and researchers interested in the control of viral respiratory tract infections.

  12. Prevalence of respiratory syncytial virus infection among hospitalized children presenting with acute lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Soham; Shamsundar, Ranjani; Shet, Anita; Chawan, Rashmi; Srinivasa, Hiresave

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of RSV among hospitalized young children presenting with ALRI in Bangalore, India. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antigen detection was performed by direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) staining on 77 nasopharyngeal wash samples collected from hospitalized children below 2 years of age with a diagnosis of acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI). Out of 77 samples tested for RSV with DFA, 17 (22.1%) were found RSV-positive with a mean age of 8.24 ± 7.21 months (M:F = 1.8:1). Three children had congenital cardiac disease and one child had a history of prematurity. One child had re-infection within one month of primary infection. RSV-infected children were more likely to have a diagnosis of bronchiolitis than RSV-negative children (p infection is a significant cause of morbidity among children presenting with ALRI in southern India. In resource-limited settings, DFA can be used as an important tool for rapid detection of RSV and can potentially eliminate prolonged hospitalization and unnecessary use of antibiotics.

  13. Exploratory mixed methods study of respiratory physiotherapy for patients with lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, A; Marques, A

    2016-03-01

    To assess the outcomes of respiratory physiotherapy for patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). Parallel group mixed-methods study. Patients were recruited from a general hospital. Respiratory physiotherapy took place in a community setting. Fifty-four patients aged ≥18 years and diagnosed with LRTI completed the study. Twenty-seven patients were allocated to the control group {CG: 10 male, mean age 53.3 [standard deviation (SD) 17.4] years} and 27 patients were allocated to the experimental group [EG: 10 male, mean age 58.6 (SD 17.2) years]. The CG received conventional medical treatment and the EG received conventional medical treatment plus respiratory physiotherapy for 3 weeks. Patients in both groups undertook the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), modified Borg scale (MBS), modified Medical Research Council questionnaire (mMRC), and Breathlessness, Cough and Sputum scale (BCSS) before and after the intervention. A telephone follow-up survey was performed 3 months after the first hospital visit. Interviews were conducted immediately after the intervention in the EG. In the EG, the distance walked in the 6MWT increased by more than the minimally important difference (P=0.001), and significantly more than the CG {EG: mean change 76m [standard deviation (SD) 63], 95% confidence interval (CI) 51 to 101; CG: mean change 27m (SD 56), 95% CI 5 to 49; mean difference between groups: 49m 95% CI 16 to 82; partial η(2)=0.15}. No differences in the MBS, mMRC and BCSS were found between the two groups. The EG reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention (27/27; 100%) and with the physiotherapist (20/27; 74%). The intervention improved patients' symptoms (19/27; 70%) and their self-management skills to control/prevent future LRTI (19/27; 70%). Health service use was significantly less in the EG (P=0.04). Respiratory physiotherapy appears to be effective for the management of patients with LRTI. CLINICALTRIAL. NCT02053870. Copyright © 2015

  14. Vitamin D supplementation effective in preventing acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    Studies have consistently shown low levels of vitamin D make people more susceptible to respiratory infections. Acute respiratory infections are a major cause of ill health and mortality. Observational studies have shown that people with low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the major circulating vitamin D metabolite, are susceptible to respiratory infection.

  15. Is radiological appearance of lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus a predictor of clinical outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan Ozdemir, Senem; Ozer, Esra Arun; Pekcevik, Yeliz; Ilhan, Ozkan; Sutcuoglu, Sumer

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection is the most common viral infection in childhood. RSV-infected infants demonstrate various radiographic findings. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether assessment of radiological characteristics of lower tract infection due to RSV may be a predictor of clinical outcome in newborns. The study included 36 newborn infants hospitalized for lower tract infection. In order to detect RSV, RSV Respi-Strip (Coris Bioconcept Organization) test kits were used on admission. Chest X-rays and clinical characteristics of the study group were reviewed. Of 36 patients hospitalized for lower tract infection from October 2012 to April 2013, 18 (50%) newborns were infected with RSV. The study included 36 neonates. Patients with RSV-positive infants at admission had greater need for respiratory support, supplemental oxygen and prolonged stay in the NICU. Newborns with an atelectasis pattern on admission chest radiograph had greater at RSV-positive infants. Chest radiological patterns with lower respiratory tract infection in newborn infants due to RSV are a predictor of clinical outcome.

  16. Dual infections of PRRSV / influenza or PRRSV / Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in the respiratory tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, J.M.A.; Leengoed, van L.A.M.G.; Stockhofe, N.; Kok, G.; Wensvoort, G.

    1997-01-01

    To study the effect of a previous porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome-infection (PRRS) of the respiratory tract on influenza virus and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) infections, 3-week-old specific-pathogen-free (spf) piglets were intranasally infected with PRRS virus. One week

  17. Effects of ambient air pollution on respiratory tract complaints and airway inflammation in primary school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altug, Hicran; Gaga, Eftade O.; Dogeroglu, Tuncay; Brunekreef, Bert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; Hoek, Gerard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069553475; Van Doorn, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory health effects of ambient air pollution were studied in 605 school children 9 to 13 years in Eskisehir, Turkey. Each child performed a fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) measurement and a lung function test (LFT). Self-reported respiratory tract complaints (having cold, complaints of

  18. Comparison of the respiratory tract models of ICRP and US EPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Tao [China Institute for Radiation Protection, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China)

    2000-05-01

    An index for the integral characterization of risk is necessary for improving risk management, comparing the effects of various practices on the environment and keeping risk as low as reasonably achievable while allowing economic development. Public health risk has been used as an index to compare and combine the risks from the presence of a variety of contaminants. In 1994, International Commission on Radiological Protection published the Publication 66 'Human Respiratory Tract Model for Radiological Protection'. Meanwhile US EPA published 'Methods for Derivation of Inhalation Reference Concentrations and Application of Inhalation Dosimetry'. Basically the concept of Reference Concentration (RfC) is similar to that of DAC used in radiation protection. Both of them are derived from the deposited amount of interested contaminants in the respiratory tract. In an attempt to assess the public health risk by combining the ICRP model and the deposited amount corresponding to values of RfC, the main application, especially the fractional deposition, of the respiratory tract model of US EPA is compared with the new respiratory tract model of ICRP. For normal nose breather, when the AMADs of monodisperse aerosol are 0.5 {eta} m, 1 {eta} m, 2 {eta} m, 3 {eta} m, 5 {eta} m, 7 {eta} m and 10 {eta} m, minute volume is 1.2m{sup 3}/h (20L/mim), the corresponding total fractional depositions calculated by the model of the US EPA are 0.33, 0.50, 0.72, 0.85, 0.95, 0.97 and 0.93. With the same condition, the total fractional deposition calculated by the ICRP model is 0.35, 0.51, 0.70, 0.78, 0.82, 0.81 and 0.77. For polydisperse aerosol with default values of ICRP for occupational and environmental exposures, the fractional depositions calculated by US EPA model are 0.82 and 0.50 while that by ICRP are 0.82 and 0.47. In conclusion, (1) The ICRP model is more accurate than the US EPA model and has a wider application. (2) For monodisperse aerosol, when the AMAD of

  19. Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren‐Gash, Charlotte; Fragaszy, Ellen; Hayward, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Warren‐Gash et al. (2012) Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/irv.12015. Hand hygiene may be associated with modest protection against some acute respiratory tract infections, but its specific role in influenza transmission in different settings is unclear. We aimed to review evidence that improving hand hygiene reduces primary and secondary transmission of (i) influenza and (ii) acute respiratory tract infections in community settings. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health and Cochrane databases up to 13 February 2012 for reports in any language of original research investigating the effect of hand hygiene on influenza or acute respiratory tract infection where aetiology was unspecified in community settings including institutions such as schools, and domestic residences. Data were presented and quality rated across outcomes according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria. There was moderate to low‐quality evidence of a reduction in both influenza and respiratory tract infection with hand hygiene interventions in schools, greatest in a lower–middle‐income setting. There was high‐quality evidence of a small reduction in respiratory infection in childcare settings. There was high‐quality evidence for a large reduction in respiratory infection with a hand hygiene intervention in squatter settlements in a low‐income setting. There was moderate‐ to high‐quality evidence of no effect on secondary transmission of influenza in households that had already experienced an index case. While hand hygiene interventions have potential to reduce transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infections, their effectiveness varies depending on setting, context and compliance. PMID:23043518

  20. Assessment of a new algorithm in the management of acute respiratory tract infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ahmad Tabatabaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the practicability of a new algorithm in decreasing the rate of incorrect diagnoses and inappropriate antibiotic usage in pediatric Acute Respiratory Tract Infection (ARTI. Materials and Methods: Children between 1 month to15 years brought to outpatient clinics of a children′s hospital with acute respiratory symptoms were managed according to the steps recommended in the algorithm. Results: Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Lower Respiratory Tract Infection, and undifferentiated ARTI accounted for 82%, 14.5%, and 3.5% of 1 209 cases, respectively. Antibiotics were prescribed in 33%; for: Common cold, 4.1%; Sinusitis, 85.7%; Otitis media, 96.9%; Pharyngotonsillitis, 63.3%; Croup, 6.5%; Bronchitis, 15.6%; Pertussis-like syndrome, 82.1%; Bronchiolitis, 4.1%; and Pneumonia, 50%. Conclusion: Implementation of the ARTIs algorithm is practicable and can help to reduce diagnostic errors and rate of antibiotic prescription in children with ARTIs.

  1. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of viral lower respiratory tract infections in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berce, Vojko; Unuk, Sibila; Duh, Darja; Homšak, Matjaž; Vičič, Maja

    2015-12-01

    Viral lower respiratory tract infections are the leading cause of hospitalizations in preschool children. Clinical pictures of different viral causes are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to establish the differences in clinical and laboratory characteristics between the different viral causes of lower respiratory tract infections in preschool children. We included 278 preschool children hospitalized because of lower respiratory tract infection. White blood cell count and C-reactive protein values were determined and chest X-ray was performed in most patients. Polymerase chain reaction assay was used for the detection of viral pathogens from nasopharyngeal swab. Pneumonia was present in 71.4 % of all coronavirus infections, 35.1 % of all respiratory syncytial virus infections, and 13.0 % of all rhinovirus infections. Coronavirus (p = 0.03) and respiratory syncytial virus (p infections and in only 33.3 % of all adenovirus infections. Rhinovirus (p infections mean C-reactive protein value was 72.4 mg/L and white blood cell count 19.000/µl, both significantly higher than in other viruses (p respiratory tract infections significantly differ. With the advance of viral detection methods and increase of knowledge it becomes possible to characterize different respiratory viral infections and to improve the differential diagnosis.

  2. The effect of vitamin D on lower respiratory tract infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şişmanlar, Tuğba; Aslan, Ayşe Tana; Gülbahar, Özlem; Özkan, Seçil

    2016-06-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections including mainly pneumonia represent an important public health problem leading to high mortality and mobidity rates in children aged below five years in developing countries including our country. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with increased risk of rickets/osteomalacia, various cancers, autoimmune diseases, hyperproliferative skin diseases, cardiovascular system diseases and infectious diseases. Vitamin D has an important role in cellular and humoral immunity and pulmonary functions. Vitamin D deficiency and lower respiratory tract infection are common health problems in children in our country and no clinical study investigating the relationship between these problems has been conducted so far. In this case-control study, we aimed to assess the association between vitamin D level and lower respiratory tract infection in children. Sixty-three children aged between six months and five years with lower respiratory infections and 59 age-matched children who had no history of respiratory symptoms in the last month and no accompanying chronic disease were compared in terms of vitamin D levels. The children in the patient group were also evaluated by the clinical picture. No significant correlation was found between vitamin D levels and lower respiratory tract infection in terms of disease and its severity. However, it was found that vitamin D deficiency/ insufficiency was observed with a high rate in all children included in the study. Although no correlation was found between vitamin D level and lower respiratory tract infection, it is recommended that vitamin D level should be measured in children with lower respiratory tract infection and vitamin D supplementation should be given to all children especially in winter months based on the fact that the level of vitamin D was lower than normal in approximately half of the children included in the study and considering the effects of vitamin D on infections, pulmonary

  3. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes transient lower respiratory tract infection in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    De Wit, Emmie; Rasmussen, Angela L; Falzarano, Darryl; Bushmaker, Trenton; Feldmann, Friederike; Brining, Douglas L; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Chang, Jean; Scott, Dana; Arndt G. Benecke; Katze, Michael G.; Feldmann, Heinz; Munster, Vincent J.

    2013-01-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is the latest emerged coronavirus causing severe respiratory disease with a high case fatality rate in humans. To better understand the disease caused by MERS-CoV, we developed a rhesus macaque model. Infection of rhesus macaques with MERS-CoV resulted in the rapid development of a transient pneumonia, with MERS-CoV replication largely restricted to the lower respiratory tract. This affinity of MERS-CoV for the lungs partly explains ...

  4. Distribution of respiratory viruses which cause lower respiratory tract infection in pediatric age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Dereci

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the appropriate treatment regimen and the clinical course of the lower respiratory tract infections( RTI s and to detect the common viral causes of lower RTI s. Methods: The present study included a total of 255 pediatric patients aged less than 7 years old and admitted to the Department of Pediatrics of Rize Training and Research Hospital between January 2014 and January 2015 with clinical pre-diagnosis of lower RTI . Nasopharyngeal swab specimens collected from these patients were tested for viral pathogens by using multiplex RT- PCR kit the ResPlex II plus Panel PRE (Qiagen, Germany. Results: A total of 212 out of 255 (83.1% specimens revealed positive for one or more viral pathogens. The most common detected pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus ( RSV A/B in 110 samples (43.1%, rhinovirus in 51 samples (20.0%, adenovirus in 36 samples (14.1%, influenzae virus A in 32 samples (12.5%, and coronavirus in 24 samples (9.4%. In 76 samples (29.8%, more than one viral pathogen were detected. RSV was seen in more than 50% patients in the first 2 years. RSV was the most common pathogen in each year of the first 5 years but rhinovirus, influenza A and adenovirus were seen more than RSV after the fifth year. A total of 95.8% of the viral detections were seen between November and April without a significant peak amongst these months. The distribution of the pathogens by months of the year showed no significance. Conclusions: These findings can contribute to epidemiological data of Turkey. Detection of the viral pathogens causing lower RTIs can be critical in management of the disease, decrease inappropriate antibiotic treatment, and lower the morbidity and mortality rates in such diseases.

  5. Association between HIV and proven viral lower respiratory tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Acute viral respiratory infections are common within the paediatric population. Nucleic acid amplification tests can identify a wide range of respiratory viruses. Virally infected patients can now be diagnosed early and more accurately in the acute phase of illness. Objectives. To examine the association between ...

  6. Saline nasal irrigation for acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David; Mitchell, Ben; Williams, Christopher P; Spurling, Geoffrey K P

    2015-04-20

    Acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), including the common cold and rhinosinusitis, are common afflictions that cause discomfort and debilitation and contribute significantly to workplace absenteeism. Treatment is generally by antipyretic and decongestant drugs and sometimes antibiotics, even though most infections are viral. Nasal irrigation with saline is often employed as an adjunct treatment for URTI symptoms despite a relative lack of evidence for benefit in this clinical setting. This review is an update of the Cochrane review by Kassel et al, which found that saline was probably effective in reducing the severity of some symptoms associated with acute URTIs. To assess the effects of saline nasal irrigation for treating the symptoms of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 7), MEDLINE (1966 to July week 5, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to August 2014), CINAHL (1982 to August 2014), AMED (1985 to August 2014) and LILACS (1982 to August 2014). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing topical nasal saline treatment to other interventions in adults and children with clinically diagnosed acute URTIs. Two review authors (DK, BM) independently assessed trial quality with the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool and extracted data. We analysed all data using the Cochrane Review Manager software. Due to the large variability of outcome measures only a small number of outcomes could be pooled for statistical analysis. We identified five RCTs that randomised 544 children (three studies) and 205 adults (exclusively from two studies). They all compared saline irrigation to routine care or other nose sprays, rather than placebo. We included two new trials in this update, which did not contribute data of sufficient size or quality to materially change the original findings. Most trials were small and we judged them to be of low quality, contributing to an unclear risk of bias. Most outcome measures differed greatly between included studies and therefore could not be

  7. Emerging novel and antimicrobial-resistant respiratory tract infections: new drug development and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Memish, Ziad A; Maeurer, Markus; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Denning, David W; Hayden, Frederick G; Hui, David S

    2014-11-01

    The emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens for which diminishing treatment options are available is of major global concern. New viral respiratory tract infections with epidemic potential, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, swine-origin influenza A H1N1, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection, require development of new antiviral agents. The substantial rise in the global numbers of patients with respiratory tract infections caused by pan-antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and multiazole-resistant fungi has focused attention on investments into development of new drugs and treatment regimens. Successful treatment outcomes for patients with respiratory tract infections across all health-care settings will necessitate rapid, precise diagnosis and more effective and pathogen-specific therapies. This Series paper describes the development and use of new antimicrobial agents and immune-based and host-directed therapies for a range of conventional and emerging viral, bacterial, and fungal causes of respiratory tract infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thrombocytosis in pediatric patients is associated with severe lower respiratory tract inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlacha, Vasiliki; Feketea, Gavriela

    2006-08-01

    Secondary thrombocytosis is associated with a variety of clinical conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and to analyze the clinical significance and prognostic value of thrombocytosis in lower respiratory tract infection. A total of 102 pediatric patients were hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infection during a period of 30 months. Forty nine (48%) of those patients had platelet counts >500 x 10(9)/L. The median age of the thrombocytotic patients was 31 months as opposed to 61 months for the non-thrombocytotic ones. The patients with thrombocytosis had more serious illness. This is indicated by three factors: more severe clinical condition on admission, presence of respiratory distress and longer hospitalization. Sedimentation rate >70 mm/h was observed in 44.4% patients of the thrombocytotic group compared to only 27.7% of the non-thrombocytotic ones. Almost all patients with pleural effusion were thrombocytotic. The children with very high platelet counts >650 x 10(9)/L presented with respiratory distress on admission and required longer hospitalization time. No other significant clinical or laboratory differences were demonstrated between these patients and the remainder of the thrombocytotic patients. Thrombocytosis is a common finding among patients with lower respiratory tract infection. Thrombocytotic patients have a more severe clinical condition. Importantly, thrombocytosis occurs almost exclusively in patients with pleural effusion. The platelet count may be a useful clinical marker associated with the severity of the lower respiratory tract infection.

  9. Oral purified bacterial extracts in acute respiratory tract infections in childhood: a systematic quantitative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurer-Stey, Claudia; Lagler, Leonie; Straub, Daniel A; Steurer, Johann; Bachmann, Lucas M

    2007-04-01

    Recurrent acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI) are a common problem in childhood. Some evidence suggests a benefit regarding the prevention of ARTI in children treated with the immunomodulator OM-85 BV (Bronchovaxom). We summarised the evidence on the effectiveness of the immunomodulator OM-85 BV in the prevention of ARTI in children. We searched randomised comparisons of oral purified bacterial extracts against inactive controls in children with respiratory tract diseases in nine electronic databases and reference lists of included studies. We extracted salient features of each study, calculated relative risks (RR) or weighted mean differences (WMD) and performed meta-analyses using random-effects models. Thirteen studies (2,721 patients) of low to moderate quality tested OM-85 BV. Patients and outcomes differed substantially, which impeded pooling results of more than two trials. Two studies (240 patients) reporting on the number of patients with less than three infections over 6 month of follow-up in children not in day care showed a trend for benefit RR 0.82 (95% CI, 0.65-1.02). One out of two studies examining the number of children not in day care without infections over 4-6 month reported a significant RR of 0.42 (95% CI, 0.21-0.82) whereas the smaller, second study did not [RR 0.92 (95% CI, 0.58-1.46)]. Two studies reporting the number of antibiotic courses indicated a benefit for the intervention arm [WMD 2.0 (95% CI, 1.7-2.3)]. Two out of the three studies showed a reduction of length of episodes of 4-6 days whereas a third study showed no difference between the two groups. Evidence in favour of OM-85 BV in the prevention of ARTI in children is weak. There is a trend for fewer and shorter infections and a reduction of antibiotic use.

  10. Respiratory tract lung geometry and dosimetry model for male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2014-08-26

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague- Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  11. Respiratory Tract Lung Geometry and Dosimetry Model for Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2015-07-24

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague-Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  12. Quality indicators for diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plejdrup, Malene; Bjerrum, Lars; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    Objective: To develop a set of quality indicators focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice.  Material and methods: A modified 2-round Delphi study was conducted from April to July 2008. A panel of 27 experts (13 countries) comprising mainly general...... indicators focusing on the decision about antibiotic treatment and for 27 indicators focusing on the choice of antibiotics. Conclusion: This study resulted in a final set of 41 quality indicators concerning respiratory tract infections in general practice. These indicators may be used to strengthen general...... practitioners' focus on their management of patients with respiratory tract infections and to identify where it is possible to make improvements....

  13. Prevalence of antibiotic use for pediatric acute upper respiratory tract infections in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sun Mi; Shin, Ju-Young; Kim, Mi Hee; Lee, Shin Haeng; Choi, Sohyun; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-05-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of antimicrobial prescribing for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URI) among pediatric outpatients and to identify the national patterns of its use from 2009 to 2011 in Korea. Using National Patients Sample database from 2009 to 2011, we estimated the frequency of antibiotics prescribing for URI in pediatric outpatients with diagnoses of acute nasopharyngitis (common cold), acute sinusitis, acute pharyngitis, acute tonsillitis, acute laryngitis/tracheitis, acute obstructive laryngitis/epiglottitis, and acute upper respiratory infections of multiple and unspecified sites. The proportions of each antibiotic class were calculated by year and absolute and relative differences were estimated. Also, we investigated daily amount of prescribed antibiotics per defined population according to the type of medical care institution, physician specialty, and geographic region. The overall antibiotic prescribing proportion was 58.7% and its annual proportion slightly decreased (55.4% in 2011 vs. 60.5% in 2009; adjusted odds ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.83). Variations by the type of medical care institution were observed. Tertiary hospitals (45.0%) were less likely to prescribe antibiotics than primary care clinics (59.4%), hospitals (59.0%), and general hospitals (61.2%); they showed different tendencies in choosing antibiotics. Variations by physician specialty and region were also observed. Prevalence of antimicrobial prescribing for pediatric URI is still considered higher than that of western countries and varies by the type of medical care institution, physician specialty, and geographic region.

  14. Coronavirus Infections in the Central Nervous System and Respiratory Tract Show Distinct Features in Hospitalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Haipeng; Fan, Ruyan; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Jian; Cao, Xiaoying; Wang, Chengwu; Song, Zhanyi; Li, Shuochi; Li, Xiaojie; Lv, Xinjun; Qu, Xiaowang; Huang, Renbin; Liu, Wenpei

    2016-01-01

    Coronavirus (CoV) infections induce respiratory tract illnesses and central nervous system (CNS) diseases. We aimed to explore the cytokine expression profiles in hospitalized children with CoV-CNS and CoV-respiratory tract infections. A total of 183 and 236 hospitalized children with acute encephalitis-like syndrome and respiratory tract infection, respectively, were screened for anti-CoV IgM antibodies. The expression profiles of multiple cytokines were determined in CoV-positive patients. Anti-CoV IgM antibodies were detected in 22/183 (12.02%) and 26/236 (11.02%) patients with acute encephalitis-like syndrome and respiratory tract infection, respectively. Cytokine analysis revealed that the level of serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was significantly higher in both CoV-CNS and CoV-respiratory tract infection compared with healthy controls. Additionally, the serum level of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was significantly higher in CoV-CNS infection than in CoV-respiratory tract infection. In patients with CoV-CNS infection, the levels of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, and GM-CSF were significantly higher in their cerebrospinal fluid samples than in matched serum samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing a high incidence of CoV infection in hospitalized children, especially with CNS illness. The characteristic cytokine expression profiles in CoV infection indicate the importance of host immune response in disease progression. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Incidence of respiratory tract infections and antibiotic use in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Pietrzykowska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . Respiratory tract infections are of viral etiology in around 70% of cases. The most popular treatment method is the empirical approach based on a medical interview and a physical examination, using the doctor’s personal experience. Contrary to ecommendations, antibiotic overuse is prevalent. The excessive use of antibiotics is a major factor contributing to the growing antibiotic resistance of bacteria, leading to epidemiological risk. Objectives. This study aimed to establish the incidence of respiratory tract infection and analyze the structure of antibiotic prescription in primary health care (PHC . Material and methods. Retrospective medical records of 500 adult patients treated for respiratory tract infection in the first quarter of 2014, in a PHC facility in Pomeranian province were examined. The age median was 51 (range: 18 to 100. The study was focused on the incidence of disease diagnosis as classified by IC D-10 and on the treatment method used with respect to various antibiotic groups. Results . Acute upper respiratory tract infection with multiple or unspecified sites was diagnosed in 286 (57.2% patients. Acute bronchitis was the second most common diagnosis (10.2%. Two patients were diagnosed with influenza (0.4%. As many as 67.2% of all patients were treated with antibiotics. Semisynthetic penicillin – such as amoxicillin or amoxicillin with clavulanic acid – (46.43% in total and macrolides (36.31% were the most frequently prescribed. Conclusions . 1. Acute upper respiratory tract infection with multiple or unspecified sites was diagnosed most frequently. 2. Despite increasing awareness of the risks associated with the excessive use of antibiotics, antimicrobials were often prescribed. Semisynthetic penicillins and macrolides were used most often. 3. Implementation of uniform national standards for the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections is essential. 4. Systematic training in effective and

  16. Respiratory Tract Infections and its Preventive Measures among Hajj Pilgrims, 2010: A Nested Case Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Hassani, Ali Mohammad; Fateh, Mansooreh

    2013-09-01

    Respiratory tract infections are very common among the Hajj pilgrims. Some preventive measures including Influenza vaccination, using face mask and salt water gargling have been considered to control these infections and the reports show conflicting results about the effects of each one of these measures. This study is trying to assess the effects of these recommendations on respiratory tract infections. According to nested case-control design, in a cohort consisting of 338 Iranian pilgrims, the outcome examined, was all types of respiratory tract infections other than common colds. With occurrence of any patient in convoy, data collection form was completed for that person. On the same day, two people were randomly selected as control group from among pilgrims who have not affected so far. During Hajj, 32 pilgrims (9.5%) were affected by respiratory tract infections other than common colds. In univariable logistic regression analysis, salt water gargling (OR = 2.4, P = 0.08), existence of other patient in the room (OR = 2.14, P = 0.19), age over 60 years (OR = 1.84, P = 0.15) and the education more than or equal to 3 years (OR = 1.93, P = 0.16) were effective in the respiratory tract infections (P < 0.2). However, multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that none of the above mentioned factors are significantly associated with these infections. This study showed that measures such as seasonal influenza vaccination, use of face masks and personal prayer carpet have no effect on the incidence of respiratory tract infections. However, washing throat and mouth with salt water can be considered the most effective preventive measures.

  17. Early Fluid Overload Prolongs Mechanical Ventilation in Children With Viral-Lower Respiratory Tract Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelse, Sarah A; Wiegers, Hanke M G; Calis, Job C; van Woensel, Job B; Bem, Reinout A

    2017-03-01

    Viral-lower respiratory tract disease is common in young children worldwide and is associated with high morbidity. Acute respiratory failure due to viral-lower respiratory tract disease necessitates PICU admission for mechanical ventilation. In critically ill patients in PICU settings, early fluid overload is common and associated with adverse outcomes such as prolonged mechanical ventilation and increased mortality. It is unclear, however, if this also applies to young children with viral-lower respiratory tract disease induced acute respiratory failure. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relation of early fluid overload with adverse outcomes in mechanically ventilated children with viral-lower respiratory tract disease in a retrospective dataset. Retrospective cohort study. Single, tertiary referral PICU. One hundred thirty-five children (mechanical ventilation admitted to the PICU of the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam between 2008 and 2014. None. The cumulative fluid balance on day 3 of mechanical ventilation was compared against duration of mechanical ventilation (primary outcome) and daily mean oxygen saturation index (secondary outcome), using uni- and multivariable linear regression. In 132 children, the mean cumulative fluid balance on day 3 was + 97.9 (49.2) mL/kg. Higher cumulative fluid balance on day 3 was associated with a longer duration of mechanical ventilation in multivariable linear regression (β = 0.166; p = 0.048). No association was found between the fluid status and oxygen saturation index during the period of mechanical ventilation. Early fluid overload is an independent predictor of prolonged mechanical ventilation in young children with viral-lower respiratory tract disease. This study suggests that avoiding early fluid overload is a potential target to reduce duration of mechanical ventilation in these children. Prospective testing in a clinical trial is warranted to support this hypothesis.

  18. Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Fragaszy, Ellen; Hayward, Andrew C

    2013-09-01

    Hand hygiene may be associated with modest protection against some acute respiratory tract infections, but its specific role in influenza transmission in different settings is unclear. We aimed to review evidence that improving hand hygiene reduces primary and secondary transmission of (i) influenza and (ii) acute respiratory tract infections in community settings. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health and Cochrane databases up to 13 February 2012 for reports in any language of original research investigating the effect of hand hygiene on influenza or acute respiratory tract infection where aetiology was unspecified in community settings including institutions such as schools, and domestic residences. Data were presented and quality rated across outcomes according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria. There was moderate to low-quality evidence of a reduction in both influenza and respiratory tract infection with hand hygiene interventions in schools, greatest in a lower-middle-income setting. There was high-quality evidence of a small reduction in respiratory infection in childcare settings. There was high-quality evidence for a large reduction in respiratory infection with a hand hygiene intervention in squatter settlements in a low-income setting. There was moderate- to high-quality evidence of no effect on secondary transmission of influenza in households that had already experienced an index case. While hand hygiene interventions have potential to reduce transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infections, their effectiveness varies depending on setting, context and compliance. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Principles of judicious antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Adam L; Jackson, Mary Anne; Hicks, Lauri A

    2013-12-01

    Most upper respiratory tract infections are caused by viruses and require no antibiotics. This clinical report focuses on antibiotic prescribing strategies for bacterial upper respiratory tract infections, including acute otitis media, acute bacterial sinusitis, and streptococcal pharyngitis. The principles for judicious antibiotic prescribing that are outlined focus on applying stringent diagnostic criteria, weighing the benefits and harms of antibiotic therapy, and understanding situations when antibiotics may not be indicated. The principles can be used to amplify messages from recent clinical guidelines for local guideline development and for patient communication; they are broadly applicable to antibiotic prescribing in general.

  20. [Risk factors for acute respiratory syncytial virus infection of lower respiratory tract in hospitalized infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Liu, Lijuan; Shi, Peng; Jiang, Gaoli; Jia, Pin; Wang, Chuankai; Wang, Libo; Qian, Liling

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the clinical epidemiologic characteristics and analyze risk factors for acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in hospitalized infants with acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI). ALRI infants admitted to Children's Hospital of Fudan University from March 1st, 2011 to February 29th, 2012, were enrolled in this study. Patient information included demographic characteristics, feeding history, family status, clinical presentation, accessory examination, treatment and prognosis. According to the etiology of ALRI infants, we compared the seasonal distribution, demographic characteristics, household characteristics and underlying diseases between RSV-positive patients and RSV-negative patients. Univariate and multiple Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors that were associated with risk of RSV infection. Among 1 726 ALRI infants, there were 913 RSV-positive infants (52.9%). The occurrence of RSV infection had a seasonal variation, with a peak in winter (59.1%). The median (P25, P75) age of RSV infants was 64 (21-155) days. The gestational age (GA) and body weight (BW) was (37.5 ± 2.4) weeks and (3.07 ± 0.66) kg, respectively. The male/female ratio among these was 1.9: 1. RSV infection was more popular among infants in the families with smoking members, crowded living conditions, history of atopic mother. Differences of the proportion of patients with underlying disease between RSV-positive and negative groups were statistically significant (59.4% vs. 54.2%, P infection were: GAinfection (OR = 1.351, 95%CI: 1.024-1.783; OR = 1.713, 95%CI: 1.332-2.204). Multivariate logistic regression determined the factors increasing the risk of RSV infection were: underlying CHD (OR = 1.298, 95%CI: 1.002-1.681), mother with atopic diseases (OR = 1.766, 95%CI: 1.237-2.520), autumn or winter infection (OR = 1.481, 95%CI: 1.105-1.985; OR = 1.766, 95%CI: 1.358-2.296). The prevalence of RSV infection was the highest in winter, while

  1. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae invasion and persistence in the human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara eClementi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract and is a leading cause of respiratory infections in children and adults. NTHI is considered to be an extracellular pathogen, but has consistently been observed within and between human respiratory epithelial cells and macrophages, in vitro and ex vivo. Until recently, few studies have examined the internalization, trafficking, and fate of NTHI in host cells. It is important to clarify this interaction because of a possible correlation between intracellular NTHI and symptomatic infection, and because NTHI infections frequently persist and recur despite antibiotic therapy and the development of bactericidal antibodies, suggesting a possible intracellular state or reservoir for NTHI. How do NTHI enter host cells? Can NTHI survive intracellularly and, if so, for how long? Strides have been made in the identification of host receptors, signaling, endocytosis, and trafficking pathways involved in the entry and persistence of NTHI in the respiratory tract.

  2. [The response of the upper respiratory tract to the impact of atmospheric pollution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamadiev, R A; Ismagilov, Sh M

    2015-01-01

    The present literature review characterizes the environmental conditions in the Russian Federation in general and the Republic of Tatarstan in particular with special reference to the influence of atmospheric pollution on the development and the clinical picture of the diseases of the respiratory organs including pathology of the upper respiratory tract in the populations of the industrial centres and other environmentally unfriendly areas. The views of the domestic and foreign authors concerning the role of the environmental factors in the clinical picture of the upper respiratory tract disorders are described in detail. The authors emphasize the necessity of the further investigationsinto this problem and the development of the methods for the prevention of diseases of the upper respiratory react.

  3. Detection and genotyping of human respiratory viruses in clinical specimens from children with acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culebras, Esther; Betriu, Carmen; Vázquez-Cid, Emilia; López-Varela, Elisa; Rueda, Santiago; Picazo, Juan J

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory virus infections are a major health concern and represent the primary cause of testing consultation and hospitalization for young children. The application of nucleic acid amplification technology, particularly multiplex PCR coupled with fluidic or fixed microarrays, provides an important new approach for the detection of multiple respiratory viruses in a single test. The aim of this study was to analyze respiratory samples from children with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) using a commercial array-based method (CLART(®) PneumoVir Genomica, Coslada, Spain). These tests were used to identify viruses in 281 nasopharyngeal samples obtained from children affected by ARTI. Samples were obtained form October 2008 to April 2009. Viruses were identified in 80% of the studied ARTI providing useful information on clinical features and epidemiology of specific agents affecting children in cold months. Multiple viral infections were found in 33.45% of the specimens.

  4. Relationship between common viral upper respiratory tract infections and febrile seizures in children from Suzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jihong; Yan, Wenhua; Li, Yan; Zhang, Bingbing; Gu, Qing

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the potential predisposing factors for the development of febrile seizures among children with upper respiratory tract infection in the eastern Chinese region. Participants were individuals aged 6 months and 6 years (n = 189) who were diagnosed with febrile seizure, complicated with upper respiratory tract infection, and 174 age-matched children who had upper respiratory tract infection without seizures as controls. The viral antigens including influenza A and B, parainfluenza, adenovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus were detected from nasopharyngeal aspirates. The incidence of influenza A infection was much higher in patients with febrile seizure than controls, especially those children aged >36 months. Patients with influenza A infection had higher body temperatures at seizure occurrence, shorter seizure duration, and shorter fever duration before seizure onset. Influenza A infections are frequently associated with febrile seizure in children with upper respiratory tract infection. During an influenza epidemic, effective vaccination of children, especially those with a past history of febrile seizure, may minimize the development of febrile seizure. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Respiratory tract infections during the annual Hajj: potential risks and mitigation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Zumla, Alimuddin; Memish, Ziad A

    2013-05-01

    Mass gatherings such as religious pilgrimages, sporting events and music concerts are becoming larger and more frequent. The scale and frequency of large-scale international events pose substantial risks to the spread of infectious diseases. The available literature on respiratory tract infections at the Hajj pilgrimage - annually attended by 3 million pilgrims from all over the globe - are reviewed. The most common respiratory tract infection viruses are influenza and rhinovirus. Despite the occurrence of the Hajj during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic the available literature did not show an increased rate of infection. In hospitalized patients, pneumonia is a significant cause of admission accounting for 20-50% of such admissions. The use of masks may reduce exposure to droplet nuclei, the main mode of transmission of most respiratory tract infections. The practice of social distancing, hand hygiene, and contact avoidance was associated with reduced risk of respiratory illness. In addition, utilizing the recommended vaccines would decrease the risk of acquiring respiratory tract pathogens.

  6. Radiologic findings of childhood lower respiratory tract infection by influenza virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Taek; Park, Choong Ki; Shin, Hee Jung; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Hahm, Chang Kok; Hern, Ahn You [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    After the RS (respiratory syncytial) virus, the influenza virus is the most common cause of childhood lower respiratory tract infection. We assessed the radiologic findings of childhood lower respiratory tract infection by the influenza virus. A total of 105 pediatric patients (76 males and 29 females; mean age, 2.4 years) with symptoms of respiratory tract infection were examined between March 1997 and April 2000. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained and influenza virus infection was confirmed by direct or indirect immunofluorescent assays. Peribronchial infiltration, hyperinflation, atelectasis, pulmonary consolidation, and hilar lymphadenopathy were evaluated retrospectively at simple chest radiography. Bilateral perihiler peribronchial infiltration was noted in 78.1% of patients (n=82), hyperinflation in 63.8% (n=67), atelectasis in 3.8% (n=4, segmental 50%, lobar 50%), and pulmonary consolidation in 16.2% [n=17; segmental 70.6% (n=12), lobar 29.4% (n=5)]. Hilar lymphadenopathy was noted in one patient in whom there was no pleural effusion, and subglottic airway narrowing in 12 of 14 in whom the croup symptom complex was present. The major radiologic findings of influenza virus infection were bilateral perihilar peribronchial infiltration and hyperinflation. In some patients, upper respiratory tract infection was combined with subgolttic airway narrowing. Atelectasis or pleural effusion was rare.

  7. [The curative action of Monticelli Term's water in upper respiratory tract diseases (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, R; Jemmi, G; Barani, B

    1976-01-01

    The Authors study the action of the sodio bromide-iodic water of Monticelli Terme in upper respiratory tract disease and particularly assert that is not to neglect the organic ground on which establishes mucosa's disease. Therman treatment gives the best therapeutic results in every patient presenting chronic inflammatory processes of the upper respiratory trach alternating periods of quiescency and of activity, and poor therapeutic action in patients presenting chronic inveterate diseases with great alterations in vascular and glandular components of the mucosa.

  8. Risk factors for severe RSV-induced lower respiratory tract infection over four consecutive epidemics

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Giovanni A.; Medici, Maria Cristina; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Lanari, Marcello; Merolla, Rocco; Paparatti, Umberto Di Luzio; Silvestri, Michela; Pistorio, Angela; Chezzi, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Variability in severity among different respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) seasons may influence hospital admission rates for RSV-induced lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in young children. The aim of the present study was to identify through logistic regression analysis, risk factors associated with higher likelihood to acquire RSV-induced LRTI, in children with symptoms severe enough to lead to hospital admission. Over four consecutive RSV seasons (2000?2004), records from children

  9. Burden of Recurrent Respiratory Tract Infections in Children: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivonen, Laura; Karppinen, Sinikka; Schuez-Havupalo, Linnea; Teros-Jaakkola, Tamara; Vuononvirta, Juho; Mertsola, Jussi; He, Qiushui; Waris, Matti; Peltola, Ville

    2016-12-01

    The burden of recurrent respiratory infections is unclear. We identified young children with recurrent respiratory infections in order to characterize the clinical manifestations, risk factors and short-term consequences. In this prospective cohort study, 1089 children were followed from birth to 2 years of age for respiratory infections by a daily symptom diary. Nasal swabs taken during respiratory infections were analyzed for viruses from 714 children. Nasopharyngeal swabs collected at 2 months of age were cultured for bacteria. The 10% of children with the highest number of annual respiratory illness days were defined to have recurrent respiratory tract infections. The 90th percentile in the number of annual respiratory illness days was 98. Children above this limit (n = 109) had a median of 9.6 acute respiratory infections per year. Rhinovirus was detected in 58% of their infections. Of the children with recurrent infections, 60% were diagnosed with at least 3 episodes of acute otitis media, 73% received at least 3 antibiotic treatments and 21% were hospitalized for an acute respiratory infection. Tympanostomy was performed for 35% and adenoidectomy for 13% of the children. Asthma was diagnosed in 12% by 24 months of age. Older siblings increased the risk of recurrent respiratory infections. Early nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae was common in children who later developed recurrent infections. Children with recurrent respiratory infections frequently use health care services and antibiotics, undergo surgical procedures and are at risk for asthma in early life. Having older siblings increases the risk of recurrent infections.

  10. Vitamin A, D and zinc serum levels in children with and without acute respiratory tract infection in two university hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Javadi-Nia

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: According to finding in this trial, there is a correlation between lower levels of zinc in serum, and chance of respiratory tract infection in children. Future larger studies could provide the correlation between serum levels of vitamins A & D and chance of respiratory tract infection.

  11. OBSTRUCTION OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT DURING THE GENERAL ANESTHESIA AT CHILDRENS AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verica Djordjevic

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory complications before, during and after applying the generalanesthesia still represent -despicable the introduction of new anesthetics and new musclerelaxants, modern monitoring and treatment - an importanl potential causc ofmorbidilv and mortality. This particularly refers to the pediatric patients having highminulc ventilation with regard to the functional residual capacity coupled with greatoxygen use; it very quickly leads to hypoxemia. Thc causcs of the respiratorycomplications can be various, but in essence they involve venlilation depression.respiratory tract obstruction or an inadequate oxygen supplv. These sales appeareither individually or in any combination. The causcs of thc respiratory tractobstruction ore numerous and various: they can be divided into physiological andpathological.

  12. Clinical relevance of prevention of respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection in preterm infants born between 33 and 35 weeks gestational age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbonell-Estrany, X.; Bont, L.; Doering, G.; Gouyon, J-B; Lanari, M.

    2008-01-01

    Premature infants are vulnerable to severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) resulting in hospitalisation and the potential for longer-term respiratory morbidity. Whilst the severity and consequence of RSV LRTI are generally accepted and recognised in infants

  13. Influenza A (H10N7 Virus Causes Respiratory Tract Disease in Harbor Seals and Ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith M A van den Brand

    Full Text Available Avian influenza viruses sporadically cross the species barrier to mammals, including humans, in which they may cause epidemic disease. Recently such an epidemic occurred due to the emergence of avian influenza virus of the subtype H10N7 (Seal/H10N7 in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina. This epidemic caused high mortality in seals along the north-west coast of Europe and represented a potential risk for human health. To characterize the spectrum of lesions and to identify the target cells and viral distribution, findings in 16 harbor seals spontaneously infected with Seal/H10N7 are described. The seals had respiratory tract inflammation extending from the nasal cavity to bronchi associated with intralesional virus antigen in respiratory epithelial cells. Virus infection was restricted to the respiratory tract. The fatal outcome of the viral infection in seals was most likely caused by secondary bacterial infections. To investigate the pathogenic potential of H10N7 infection for humans, we inoculated the seal virus intratracheally into six ferrets and performed pathological and virological analyses at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. These experimentally inoculated ferrets displayed mild clinical signs, virus excretion from the pharynx and respiratory tract inflammation extending from bronchi to alveoli that was associated with virus antigen expression exclusively in the respiratory epithelium. Virus was isolated only from the respiratory tract. In conclusion, Seal/H10N7 infection in naturally infected harbor seals and experimentally infected ferrets shows that respiratory epithelial cells are the permissive cells for viral replication. Fatal outcome in seals was caused by secondary bacterial pneumonia similar to that in fatal human cases during influenza pandemics. Productive infection of ferrets indicates that seal/H10N7 may possess a zoonotic potential. This outbreak of LPAI from wild birds to seals demonstrates the risk of such occasions for mammals

  14. Views on respiratory tract symptoms and antibiotics of Dutch general practitioners, practice staff and patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, H.J. van; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Verheij, T.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore views on respiratory tract symptoms (cough, sore throat and earache) and antibiotics of GPs, practice staff, and patients. METHODS: In a nationwide study, 181 GPs, 204 practice staff members and 1250 patients from 90 practices participated by answering 14 items relating to

  15. Role of patients' and doctors' views on the management of respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, Huig Jacob van

    2006-01-01

    The vast majority of respiratory tract (RT) symptoms such as cough, sore throat and earache are self-limiting (viral) infections. Despite this self-limiting character, in the Netherlands antibiotics are prescribed in about one out of every three RT episodes. A further rationalisation of antibiotic

  16. Prediction of complicated lower respiratory tract infections in older patients with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venmans, Leonie M A J; Bont, Jettie; Gorter, Kees J; Verheij, Theo J M; Rutten, Guy E H M; Hak, Eelko

    BACKGROUND: Patients with diabetes have an elevated risk of developing complicated lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). However, up until now, GPs have not had the tools to assess individual risks. AIM: To assess the applicability of an existing prediction rule for complicated LRTI among

  17. Diagnosis of IgE-mediated allergy in the upper respiratory tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, G. J.; Flikweert, D. C.; Nauta, J. J.; Leezenberg, J. A.; Snel, A. M.; van der Baan, S.

    1991-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of data concerning diagnosis of IgE-mediated allergy in the upper respiratory tract in 292 patients. A study was made of: skin test, total and specific IgE (RAST), X-sinus, red blood investigation, and cytology of nasal smear. It appears that screening for the

  18. Disordered microbial communities in the upper respiratory tract of cigarette smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S Charlson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smokers have an increased risk of infectious diseases involving the respiratory tract. Some effects of smoking on specific respiratory tract bacteria have been described, but the consequences for global airway microbial community composition have not been determined. Here, we used culture-independent high-density sequencing to analyze the microbiota from the right and left nasopharynx and oropharynx of 29 smoking and 33 nonsmoking healthy asymptomatic adults to assess microbial composition and effects of cigarette smoking. Bacterial communities were profiled using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S sequence tags (803,391 total reads, aligned to 16S rRNA databases, and communities compared using the UniFrac distance metric. A Random Forest machine-learning algorithm was used to predict smoking status and identify taxa that best distinguished between smokers and nonsmokers. Community composition was primarily determined by airway site, with individuals exhibiting minimal side-of-body or temporal variation. Within airway habitats, microbiota from smokers were significantly more diverse than nonsmokers and clustered separately. The distributions of several genera were systematically altered by smoking in both the oro- and nasopharynx, and there was an enrichment of anaerobic lineages associated with periodontal disease in the oropharynx. These results indicate that distinct regions of the human upper respiratory tract contain characteristic microbial communities that exhibit disordered patterns in cigarette smokers, both in individual components and global structure, which may contribute to the prevalence of respiratory tract complications in this population.

  19. Detection of viral acute lower respiratory tract infection in hospitalized infants using real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassant Meligy

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: RV was the most commonly detected virus in children under 3 years admitted with acute lower respiratory tract infections. Coinfection was present in the majority of our patients; however it was not related significantly to parameters of disease severity.

  20. Neonatal total IgE and respiratory tract infections in children with intrauterine smoke exposure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruskamp, J.; Smit, H.; Rovers, M.M.; Hoekstra, M.O.; Schilder, A.G.M.; Brunekreef, B.; Wijga, A.; Kerkhof, M.; de Jongste, J.; Sanders, E.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is known to increase the risk of respiratory tract infections (RTI). Some children, however, may be more susceptible to the harmful effects of ETS than others. We examined whether early atopic status (defined by elevated neonatal total IgE

  1. Neonatal total IgE and respiratory tract infections in children with intrauterine smoke exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruskamp, Jopje; Smit, Henriette; Rovers, Maroeska; Hoekstra, Maarten; Schilder, Anne; Brunekreef, Bert; Wijga, Alet; Kerkhof, Marjan; de Jongste, Johan; Sanders, Elisabeth

    Background Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is known to increase the risk of respiratory tract infections (RTI). Some children, however, may be more susceptible to the harmful effects of ETS than others. We examined whether early atopic status (defined by elevated neonatal total IgE

  2. Effect of formaldehyde on the upper respiratory tract _ormal flora of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Formaldehyde is a chemical that is used to fix a tissue after death or removal from the body to prevent autolysis and putrefaction. Exposure to formaldehyde can occur as a result of occupation. Objective: To determine the effect of the formaldehyde on the throat and nasal flora of upper respiratory tract of rabbits ...

  3. CFD heat transfer simulation of the human upper respiratory tract for oronasal breathing condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Farahmand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries due to inhalation of hot gas are commonly encountered when dealing with fire and combustible material, which is harmful and threatens human life. In the literature, various studies have been conducted to investigate heat and mass transfer characteristics in the human respiratory tract (HRT. This study focuses on assessing the injury taking place in the upper human respiratory tract and identifying acute tissue damage, based on level of exposure. A three-dimensional heat transfer simulation is performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software to study the temperature profile through the upper HRT consisting of the nasal cavity, oral cavity, trachea, and the first two generations of bronchi. The model developed is for the simultaneous oronasal breathing during the inspiration phase with a high volumetric flow rate of 90 liters/minute and the inspired air temperature of 100 degrees Celsius. The geometric model depicting the upper HRT is generated based on the data available and literature cited. The results of the simulation give the temperature distribution along the center and the surface tissue of the respiratory tract. This temperature distribution will help to assess the level of damage induced in the upper respiratory tract and appropriate treatment for the damage. A comparison of nasal breathing, oral breathing, and oronasal breathing is performed. Temperature distribution can be utilized in the design of the respirator systems where inlet temperature is regulated favoring the human body conditions.

  4. Prescribing antibiotics for respiratory tract infections by GPs: management and prescriber characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Akkerman (Annemiek); M.M. Kuyvenhoven (Marijke); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans); T.J. Verheij

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Due to clinical and non-clinical factors, considerable variation exists in the prescribing of antibiotics for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) by GPs based in the Netherlands. AIM: To assess, in patients with RTIs in Dutch general practice: the

  5. External Validation of Prediction Models for Pneumonia in Primary Care Patients with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierenberg, Alwin; Minnaard, Margaretha C; Hopstaken, Rogier M

    2016-01-01

    for prediction of pneumonia in primary care were externally validated in the individual patient data (IPD) of previously performed diagnostic studies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: S&S models for diagnosing pneumonia in adults presenting to primary care with lower respiratory tract infection and IPD for validation were...

  6. Quality indicators for treatment of respiratory tract infections? An assessment by Danish general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Bjerrum, Lars; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2008, a set of 41 quality indicators for antibiotic treatment of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in general practice were developed in an international setting as part of the European project HAPPY AUDIT. Objectives: To investigate Danish general practitioners' (GPs') assessment...

  7. Prognosis of primary care patients aged 80 years and older with lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Nadort, Christiana; Smeets, Hugo M; Bont, Jettie; Zuithoff, N Peter A; Hak, Eelko; Verheij, Theo J M

    BACKGROUND: Predictors for a complicated course of a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) episode among patients aged > or =80 years are unknown. AIM: To determine prognostic factors for hospital admission or death within 30 days after first onset of LRTI among primary care patients aged > or

  8. Lower respiratory tract infections in the elderly: Prognostic studies in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, J.

    2008-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) are among the most common diseases presented in primary care. When the general practitioner (GP) diagnoses an LRTI he or she is confronted with important clinical dilemmas concerning treatment and prognosis. Especially elderly are of importance, as the

  9. The Mechanism of Activated Nitrogen-Containing Metabolites in the Respiratory Tract: Proinflammatory Effect (Part 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Ye. Abaturov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The literature review presents current data about modulating action of nitrogen monoxide on the inflammatory response and the apoptotic process depending on its concentration. There is demonstrated a dual action of nitric oxide in the respiratory tract — prevention of infection and strengthening the destruction of lung tissue.

  10. Predicting nosocomial lower respiratory tract infections by a risk index based system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yong; Shan, Xue; Zhao, Jingya; Han, Xuelin; Tian, Shuguang; Chen, Fangyan; Su, Xueting; Sun, Yansong; Huang, Liuyu; Grundmann, Hajo; Wang, Hongyuan; Han, Li

    2017-01-01

    Although belonging to one of the most common type of nosocomial infection, there was currently no simple prediction model for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). This study aims to develop a risk index based system for predicting nosocomial LRTIs based on data from a large point-prevalence

  11. Vitamin D for prevention of respiratory tract infections: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charan, Jaykaran; Goyal, Jagdish P; Saxena, Deepak; Yadav, Preeti

    2012-10-01

    To explore the effect of vitamin D supplementation in prevention of respiratory tract infections on the basis of published clinical trials. Clinical trials were searched from various electronic databases. Five clinical trials were suitable for inclusion. Outcome was events of respiratory tract infections in vitamin D group and placebo group. Data was reported as odds ratio with 95% confidence interval. Both random and fixed model was used for analysis. Analysis was done with the help of Comprehensive meta-analysis software 2. Events of respiratory tract infections were significantly lower in vitamin D group as compared to control group [Odds ratio = 0.582 (0.417 - 0.812) P = 0.001] according to random model. Results were similar in fixed model. On separate analysis of clinical trials dealing with groups of children and adults, beneficial effect of vitamin D was observed in both, according to fixed model [Odds ratio = 0.579 (0.416 - 0.805), P = 0.001 and Odd ratio = 0.653 (0.472 - 0.9040, P = 0.010 respectively]. On using random model beneficial effect persisted in children's group but became nonsignificant in adults group [Odds ratio = 0.579 (0.416 - 0.805), P = 0.001 and Odd ratio = 0.544 (0.278 - 1.063) P = 0.075 respectively]. Vitamin D supplementation decreases the events related to respiratory tract infections. There is need of more well conducted clinical trials to reach to a certain conclusion.

  12. Vitamin D3 Supplementation and Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in a Randomized, Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rees, Judy R.; Hendricks, Kristy; Barry, Elizabeth L.; Peacock, Janet L.; Mott, Leila A.; Sandler, Robert S.; Bresalier, Robert S.; Goodman, Michael; Bostick, Roberd M.; Baron, John A.

    2013-01-01

    In a trial substudy of 1000 IU vitamin D3 supplementation, 759 participants completed daily health diaries for up to 17 months. Supplementation provided no significant reduction in upper respiratory tract infections, colds, or influenza-like illness during winter or overall.

  13. Functional and genetic predisposition to rhinovirus lower respiratory tract infections in prematurely born infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drysdale, Simon B.; Alcazar, Mireia; Wilson, Theresa; Smith, Melvyn; Zuckerman, Mark; Hodemaekers, Hennie M.; Janssen, Riny; Bont, Louis; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Greenough, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Term born infants are predisposed to human rhinovirus (HRV) lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) by reduced neonatal lung function and genetic susceptibility. Our aim was to investigate whether prematurely born infants were similarly predisposed to HRV LRTIs or any other viral LRTIs. Infants

  14. Frequent respiratory tract infections in children. The role of environmental and genetic factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruskamp, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTI), presenting as common cold, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, acute otitis media, bronchitis or pneumonia are a major health problem in children. In this thesis common environmental and host factors, as well as plausible genetic factors were evaluated in a large birth

  15. Effectiveness of adenoidectomy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Aardweg, M.T.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314096922

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the effects of adenoidectomy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs).Despite being one of the most frequent operations performed in children, evidence for the effectiveness of adenoidectomy is scarce and guidance in particular for children with

  16. Risk Factors for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Under‑five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) constitute the major causes of mortality and morbidity among under‑five children of the developing world. The prevalence of ARIs is determined individually or collectively by a number of factors which may be prevalent in our environment. Aim: The present study is aimed ...

  17. Risk Factors for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Under-five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    Paediatrician, College of Clinical Medicine, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki, Nigeria. Abstract. Background: Acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) constitute the major causes of mortality and morbidity among under‑five children of the developing world. The prevalence of ARIs is determined individually or collectively by a ...

  18. Viral respiratory tract infections among patients with acute undifferentiated fever in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phuong, Hoang Lan; Nga, Tran T. T.; van Doornum, Gerard J.; Groen, Jan; Binh, Tran Q.; Giao, Phan T.; Hung, Le Q.; Nams, Nguyen V.; Kager, P. A.; de Vries, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the proportion of viral respiratory tract infections among acute undifferentiated fevers (AUFs) at primary health facilities in southern Vietnam during 2001-2005, patients with AUF not caused by malaria were enrolled at twelve primary health facilities and a clinic for malaria control

  19. Acute respiratory tract infections: a potential trigger for the acute coronary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, Ralf E.; van Ginkel, Margreet W.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) may be a risk factor for the acute coronary syndrome (ACS). ARTI is associated with an increased risk for ACS up to 2 weeks prior to a cardiac event. The mechanism that may underlie this association is unclear. Infections are

  20. Acute bacterial infections of the lower respiratory tract in children from low-income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, A; Wolf, B.H.M.

    Acute bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children and is responsible for 4 million childhood deaths each year. Most of these deaths are caused by pneumonia and occur in the youngest children in the poorest parts of the world. Severe

  1. Epidemiology of respiratory tract infections in Dutch general practice: a historical analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellevis, F.G.; Donker, G.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To describe time trends in the incidence of respiratory tract infections in general practice in the Netherlands and its relation to sex and age. Design and Methods: Data will be presented from several morbidity surveys conducted in general practices in the Netherlands: the Intermittent

  2. Mental health of Polish students and the occurrence of respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Sylwia; Teul-Swiniarska, Iwona; Dzieciolowska-Baran, Edyta; Lorkowski, Jacek; Gawlikowska-Sroka, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to examine the association between the psychological status and the occurrence of respiratory tract infections which constitute the most common group of disorders in the student population. The study comprised 500 Polish students aged 19-21. Two psychological scales were utilized: the Goldberg GHQ-12 scale to examine the general psychological status and the CES-D scale to evaluate the symptoms of depression. In addition a pro-health questionnaire in the examined group of students was performed. We found an increased stress level in 51% of students and the symptoms of depression in 22%. An association between distress and the occurrence of respiratory tract infections was found, based on statistical analyses. The highest stress level and related high distress index were observed in the students suffering from lower respiratory tract infections (7.1 scale value). This group self-evaluated their health status as poor, based on the pro-health questionnaire. In the same group of students, lack of sleep (5.4), lack of regular eating habits (4.2) and lack of physical activity (3.9) were also observed. The study shows that the Polish student population is exposed to increased stress level, which, in turn, increases the occurrence of respiratory tract infections.

  3. Randomized Trial of Probiotics and Calcium on Diarrhea and Respiratory Tract Infections in Indonesian Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agustina, R.; Kok, F.J.; Rest, van de O.; Fahmida, U.; Firmansyah, A.; Lukito, W.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Heuvel, van den E.G.H.M.; Albers, R.; Bovee-Oudenhoven, I.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of calcium and probiotics on the incidence and duration of acute diarrhea and acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in low-socioeconomic communities of Jakarta, Indonesia. METHODS: We conducted a 6-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 494

  4. [Mold hypersensitivity in children with frequent respiratory tract infection and prolonged cough attacks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ozlem Naciye; Yaprak, Pınar; Gülen, Figen; Perçin, Alp Korkut

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate pollen, mite and mold sensitivities among children with frequent respiratory tract infection living in damp apartments and to evaluate the effects of separated parents, education status, ethnicity, the presence of siblings, and their atopy status on the development of atopy. Between June 2012 and September 2013, 63 children (28 girls, 35 boys; mean age 80.2 years; range 24 to 97 years) who were admitted to Acıbadem Bodrum Hospital with at least six respiratory tract infection per year with mold exposure and prolonged cough attacks and underwent skin prick test (SPT) were included. Skin prick test-positive patients were further divided into groups according to the upper respiratory tract (URT) or lower respiratory tract (LRT) involvement and were assessed for mold, mite and pollen sensitivities. One-third of the patients were SPT positive. The parents of these patients had physician-diagnosed allergy (pmold sensitivity presented with LRT findings (pmolds than non-atopic children. Mold exposure may also cause inflammation at LRT without causing immunoglobulin E-dependent sensitization.

  5. [Viral respiratory tract infections in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Carrasco, E; Calvo, C; García-García, M L; Beato, M; Muñoz-Archidona, C; Pozo, F; Casas, I

    2015-04-01

    Viral respiratory infections cause major morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. We have performed a prospective study in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to determine the incidence of respiratory infections, their impact and the epidemiology and outcome in high risk neonates. From September 2011 to May 2013 a prospective study was conducted in all preterm infants respiratory symptoms a new NPA was collected in this moment. A clinical form was filled by the physician. A total of 60 infants were analyzed: 30 (50%) had a gestational age infection (2 patients had two different episodes with negative control between them). The most frequently identified virus was rhinovirus in (19) 79% of cases. The most frequent clinical data was the presence or increased of apneas (75%) and the needed of oxygenotherapy. HRV infections are prevalent in the NICU, and preterm infants have a high risk of infections with clinical relevance. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Vitamin E and respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Leka, Lynette S; Fine, Basil C; Dallal, Gerard E; Keusch, Gerald T; Singh, Maria Fiatarone; Hamer, Davidson H

    2004-08-18

    Respiratory tract infections are prevalent in elderly individuals, resulting in increased morbidity, mortality, and use of health care services. Vitamin E supplementation has been shown to improve immune response in elderly persons. However, the clinical importance of these findings has not been determined. To determine the effect of 1 year of vitamin E supplementation on respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted from April 1998 to August 2001 at 33 long-term care facilities in the Boston, Mass, area. A total of 617 persons aged at least 65 years and who met the study's eligibility criteria were enrolled; 451 (73%) completed the study. Vitamin E (200 IU) or placebo capsule administered daily; all participants received a capsule containing half the recommended daily allowance of essential vitamins and minerals. Incidence of respiratory tract infections, number of persons and number of days with respiratory tract infections (upper and lower), and number of new antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory tract infections among all participants randomized and those who completed the study. Vitamin E had no significant effect on incidence or number of days with infection for all, upper, or lower respiratory tract infections. However, fewer participants receiving vitamin E acquired 1 or more respiratory tract infections (60% vs 68%; risk ratio [RR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-1.00; P =.048 for all participants; and 65% vs 74%; RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.75-0.99; P =.04 for completing participants), or upper respiratory tract infections (44% vs 52%; RR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.69-1.00; P =.05 for all participants; and 50% vs 62%; RR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.66-0.96; P =.01 for completing participants). When common colds were analyzed in a post hoc subgroup analysis, the vitamin E group had a lower incidence of common cold (0.67 vs 0.81 per person-year; RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.68-1.01; P =.06 for all

  7. Prevalence of human coronaviruses in adults with acute respiratory tract infections in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lili; Gonzalez, Richard; Xu, Jin; Xiao, Yan; Li, Yongjun; Zhou, Hongli; Li, Jianguo; Yang, Qingqing; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Lan; Wang, Wei; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Jianwei

    2011-02-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are a common etiological agent of acute respiratory tract infections. HCoV infections, especially those caused by the two HCoVs identified most recently, NL63 and HKU-1, have not been characterized fully. To evaluate the prevalence and clinical presentations of HKU1 and NL63 in adults with acute respiratory tract infections, an investigation of HCoV infections in Beijing, China from 2005 to 2009 was performed by using reverse transcriptase PCR assays and sequencing analysis. Among 8,396 respiratory specimens studied, 87 (1%) clinical samples were positive for HCoVs, of which 50 samples (0.6% of the total) were positive for HCoV-OC43, 15 (0.2%) for HCoV-229E, 14 (0.2%) for HCoV-HKU1, and 8 (0.1%) for HCoV-NL63. The prevalence of HCoV infection in adults exhibited distinct seasonal fluctuations during the study period. In addition, patients positive for HCoV-229E infections were more likely to be co-infected with other respiratory viruses. Enterovirus, rhinovirus, and parainfluenza virus type 3 were the most common viruses found in patients with HCoV infections. The demographic and clinical data present in this study of HCoV infections in adults with acute respiratory tract infections should improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of HCoVs. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Epidemiology of Respiratory Pathogens in Children with Lower Respiratory Tract Infections in Shanghai, China, from 2013 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengcheng; Xu, Menghua; He, Leiyan; Su, Liyun; Wang, Aimin; Fu, Pan; Lu, Lijuan; Wang, Chuanqing; Xu, Jin

    2018-01-23

    This study aimed to explore the epidemiology of pathogens in children who were hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) at the Children's Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Children aged less than 18 years who were hospitalized with LRTIs were enrolled from January 2013 to December 2015. Respiratory specimens were collected for the detection of common respiratory viruses, atypical bacteria, and other bacteria using current laboratory diagnostic tests. The epidemiological characteristics of the respiratory pathogens were analyzed. Of the 10,123 specimens obtained from the patients, 5,966 (58.7%) were positive for at least 1 pathogen. Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M.pneumoniae) was the most commonly detected pathogen (15.7%), followed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (13.9%). Co-infections were found in 11.4% of patients. Of these co-infections, viral-bacterial co-infections were the most common. The detection rates for the respiratory pathogens varied considerably by age. RSV was the most common pathogen in children aged less than 24 months. Clear seasonal peaks were observed for RSV, M. pneumoniae, parainfluenza virus, human metapneumovirus, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Haemophilus influenza infections. Our findings demonstrate specific epidemiological patterns in children with LRTIs in Shanghai, China.

  9. Clinical significance of different virus load of human bocavirus in patients with lower respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wujun; Yin, Fang; Zhou, Weifang; Yan, Yongdong; Ji, Wei

    2016-02-01

    To assess the impact of human bocavirus (HBoV) virus load on epidemiologic and clinical characteristics in children with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). Clinical records of a total of 654 patients with HBoV infection during January 2013 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with high HBoV virus load infection had a similar age distribution with the total HBoV infection, which had a peak age group of 6-24 months. Patients with high virus load are significantly younger (P infection was found significantly more frequently among patients with low virus load than those with high virus load (57.0% vs 38.9%; P infections are found in an important proportion of the hospitalized children with respiratory illnesses (8.85% in our series). A high HBoV virus load could be an etiologic agent for LRTI, which may lead to more severe lower respiratory tract symptom and severe disease.

  10. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and respiratory tract infections in pre-school children – a cross-sectional study in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Bielska

    2015-09-01

    The majority of the 3-year-old children who had lower respiratory tract infections required antibiotics and hospitalization. Living in a home where no tobacco rules were established may cause an increase of respiratory tract infections.

  11. Unravelling the transcriptome profile of the Swine respiratory tract mycoplasmas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele Maboni Siqueira

    Full Text Available The swine respiratory ciliary epithelium is mainly colonized by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma flocculare and Mycoplasma hyorhinis. While colonization by M. flocculare is virtually asymptomatic, M. hyopneumoniae and M. hyorhinis infections may cause respiratory disease. Information regarding transcript structure and gene abundance provides valuable insight into gene function and regulation, which has not yet been analyzed on a genome-wide scale in these Mycoplasma species. In this study, we report the construction of transcriptome maps for M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis, which represent data for conducting comparative studies on the transcriptional repertory. For each species, three cDNA libraries were generated, yielding averages of 415,265, 695,313 and 93,578 reads for M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis, respectively, with an average read length of 274 bp. The reads mapping showed that 92%, 98% and 96% of the predicted genes were transcribed in the M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis genomes, respectively. Moreover, we showed that the majority of the genes are co-expressed, confirming the previously predicted transcription units. Finally, our data defined the RNA populations in detail, with the map transcript boundaries and transcription unit structures on a genome-wide scale.

  12. [Mycoplasma sp. in the respiratory tract of hospitalized children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, E; Gutiérrez, A G; Ortega-Palma, O; Pizarro-Suárez, E

    1993-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common bacteria causing respiratory diseases in other countries, specially in older children, adolescents and young adults and less frequently in the age group studied here, nevertheless the determination of its presence in this group was considered important. Two hundred and fifty throat swabs were taken from children, under five years of age, hospitalized with a diagnosis of acute respiratory infections (ARI) and to 50 children, same age, with no ARI (controls). The samples were placed in transport media and were incubated at 37 degrees C during 7 to 15 days. They were reinoculated in PPLO agar and typical colonies were looked for, 5 to 8 days later. The organisms were identified by biochemical tests. Eight Mycoplasma sp (3.2%) were obtained, five of them were M. pneumoniae (2.0%) and three M. hominis (1.2%). Only in 2 cases adenoviruses with M. hominis were found in the absence of other pathogens. It was shown that M. pneumoniae also infects children under five years old, so its present should be suspected, specially when the patient's health does not improve with the installed treatment. Some important suggestions for the isolation of mycoplasma are given.

  13. Do children’s upper respiratory tract infections benefit from probiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract have profound influence at multiple levels, even on the development and maintenance of lung immunity and inflammation. Aim of this review is to evaluate the current knowledge about the specific impact on children’s respiratory tract infections from probiotics, live microbes with the power to modify intestinal microbial populations and exert subsequent benefits for the host. Discussion The role of probiotics in gastrointestinal and allergic diseases has been largely assessed, but the number of studies performed so far in the field of respiratory tract infections is small, though some data show that probiotic administration might display clinical advantages. Probiotic strain identity and host genetic differences may account for differential modulation of immune responses by probiotics. Current laboratory and clinical data regarding the possibility of the role of probiotics on preventing the development of respiratory tract infections are contradictory, and are somewhat insufficient to recommend strongly their routine use. Further study of gastrointestinal-respiratory interactions is likely to yield important insights into the pathogenesis of different pulmonary diseases, and improve our knowledge in the prophylactic role of probiotics in children affected by recurrent upper respiratory tract infections. Summary A better understanding of the effects of different probiotic strains and a deeper insight into their mechanisms of action are needed for the validation of specific strains carrying a potential to modify the frequency and severity of RTIs in infants and children. No data have been collected in pediatric patients with chronic underlying diseases, and yet there are no published data concerning treatment of RTIs with probiotics. The very few studies published so far do not indicate which micro-organism or administration regimen might exert beneficial effects as a prevention tool of RTIs both in healthy

  14. Viral aetiology in adults with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Jinan, Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanqin; Tong, Jiabei; Pei, Fengyan; Yang, Yanping; Xu, Dong; Ji, Mingyu; Xing, Chunyan; Jia, Pingdong; Xu, Chao; Wang, Yunshan; Li, Gongchao; Chai, Zhenbin; Liu, Yan; Han, Jinxiang

    2013-01-01

    Our study investigated the epidemiology of respiratory viruses in adult patients with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) between August 2009 and September 2010 in Jinan, northern China. Nasal and throat swabs (n = 596) were collected from adult patients with URTIs. Nine respiratory-related viruses, including IFV, PIV, HRV, HMPV, HBoV, HCoV, ADV, RSV, and EV, were detected in all samples by conventional and reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions. Positive detection rate for respiratory virus was 38.76% and codetection rate was 4.70% in adults with acute respiratory tract infections. IFV (20.81%) was the dominant agent detected and IFVB had a higher incidence (12.58%) than IFVA (7.72%). Detection rates of 8.22%, 5.03%, 3.69%, and 2.52% were observed for HBoV, HRV, EV, and RSV, respectively. HCoV had the lowest detection rate of 0.50%. HBoV, HRV, EV, and ADV infection rates were higher in the 14-25-year-old group than in the 26-65-year-old group. Codetection rates were higher (7.52%) in the 14-25-year-old group than in the older age group (2.64%). The spectrum of respiratory virus infection in adult patients with URTIs was different in Jinan compared with other cities in China.

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus subtype ON1/NA1/BA9 predominates in hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ruyan; Fan, Chuping; Zhang, Jian; Wen, Bo; Lei, Yefei; Liu, Chan; Chen, Lijuan; Liu, Wenpei; Wang, Chuan; Qu, Xiaowang

    2017-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the leading cause of acute respiratory tract disease in children less than 5 years old. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the molecular properties and clinical characteristics of RSV infection. The study sample included 238 patients respiratory tract infection (URTI or LRTI) in the Pediatric Department at the First People's Hospital of Chenzhou, South China in 2014. We subjected nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) or nasal swab (NS) samples from the patients to indirect fluorescence assay screens. RSV G genes were amplified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and sequenced. Of the 238 patients screened, 64 (26.8%) were confirmed to have RSV infections. Of those 64 confirmed RSV infection cases, 39 (60.9%) had subtype BA9, 13 (20.3%) had the recently identified subtype ON1, 11 (17.2%) had subtype NA1, and 1 (1.6%) had subtype GB2. The predominant presentation was LRTI with coughing, sputum production, fever, and wheezing. RSV subtype NA1 and BA9 infections were found mostly in infants, whereas the age distribution of subtype ON1 infections was more uniform across the age bands. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that, compared with the prototype strain A2, all ON1 and most NA1 isolates had lost one potential N-glycosylation site at amino acid 251 and 249 due to T251K and N249Y substitution, respectively. These findings suggest that NA1, BA9, and ON1 are the dominant RSV subtypes causing respiratory tract infections in young children presenting to the hospital in South China. J. Med. Virol. 89:213-221, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Is there still room for novel viral pathogens in pediatric respiratory tract infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Taboada

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most frequent cause of respiratory disease in children. However, despite the advanced diagnostic methods currently in use, in 20 to 50% of respiratory samples a specific pathogen cannot be detected. In this work, we used a metagenomic approach and deep sequencing to examine respiratory samples from children with lower and upper respiratory tract infections that had been previously found negative for 6 bacteria and 15 respiratory viruses by PCR. Nasal washings from 25 children (out of 250 hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and nasopharyngeal swabs from 46 outpatient children (out of 526 were studied. DNA reads for at least one virus commonly associated to respiratory infections was found in 20 of 25 hospitalized patients, while reads for pathogenic respiratory bacteria were detected in the remaining 5 children. For outpatients, all the samples were pooled into 25 DNA libraries for sequencing. In this case, in 22 of the 25 sequenced libraries at least one respiratory virus was identified, while in all other, but one, pathogenic bacteria were detected. In both patient groups reads for respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus-OC43, and rhinovirus were identified. In addition, viruses less frequently associated to respiratory infections were also found. Saffold virus was detected in outpatient but not in hospitalized children. Anellovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus, as well as several animal and plant viruses were detected in both groups. No novel viruses were identified. Adding up the deep sequencing results to the PCR data, 79.2% of 250 hospitalized and 76.6% of 526 ambulatory patients were positive for viruses, and all other children, but one, had pathogenic respiratory bacteria identified. These results suggest that at least in the type of populations studied and with the sampling methods used the odds of finding novel, clinically relevant viruses, in pediatric respiratory infections are low.

  17. Man-made mineral fibers and the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Roser; Orriols, Ramon

    2012-12-01

    Man-made mineral fibers are produced using inorganic materials and are widely used as thermal and acoustic insulation. These basically include continuous fiberglass filaments, glass wool (fiberglass insulation), stone wool, slag wool and refractory ceramic fibers. Likewise, in the last two decades nanoscale fibers have also been developed, among these being carbon nanotubes with their high electrical conductivity, mechanical resistance and thermal stability. Both man-made mineral fibers and carbon nanotubes have properties that make them inhalable and potentially harmful, which have led to studies to assess their pathogenicity. The aim of this review is to analyze the knowledge that currently exists about the ability of these fibers to produce respiratory diseases. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Asymptomatic colonization of upper respiratory tract by potential bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Rupak; Sujatha, S; Parija, S C; Bhat, B V

    2010-07-01

    To screen for asymptomatic respiratory carriage of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and Group A Streptococcus (GAS) in children attending JIPMER, correlate carriage rate with different socio-demographic factors and to detect antimicrobial resistance among the isolates. Throat swabs were collected from both in patients and out patients (1 organism. Antibiotic resistance was highest in S. pneumoniae with 66.7% of strains resistant to penicillin. MDR strains were also encountered. Erythromycin resistance was observed in both H. influenzae (28.4%) and GAS (22%). No statistically significant association was found between the carriage rate of these organisms and different socio-demographic factors. S. pneumoniae carriage rate was comparatively higher in the Community and its antimicrobial resistance is an issue to address.

  19. The Nucleus of the Solitary Tract and the coordination of respiratory and sympathetic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B. Zoccal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that breathing introduces rhythmical oscillations in the heart rate and arterial pressure levels. Sympathetic oscillations coupled to the respiratory activity have been suggested as an important homeostatic mechanism optimizing tissue perfusion and blood gas uptake/delivery. This respiratory-sympathetic coupling is strengthened in conditions of blood gas challenges (hypoxia and hypercapnia as a result of the synchronized activation of brainstem respiratory and sympathetic neurons, culminating with the emergence of entrained cardiovascular and respiratory reflex responses. Studies have proposed that the ventrolateral region of the medulla oblongata is a major site of synaptic interaction between respiratory and sympathetic neurons. However, other brainstem regions also play a relevant role in the patterning of respiratory and sympathetic motor outputs. Recent findings suggest that the neurons of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, in the dorsal medulla, are essential for the processing and coordination of respiratory and sympathetic responses to hypoxia. The NTS is the first synaptic station of the cardiorespiratory afferent inputs, including peripheral chemoreceptors, baroreceptors and pulmonary stretch receptors. The synaptic profile of the NTS neurons receiving the excitatory drive from afferent inputs is complex and involves distinct neurotransmitters, including glutamate, ATP and acetylcholine. In the present review we discuss the role of the NTS circuitry in coordinating sympathetic and respiratory reflex responses. We also analyze the neuroplasticity of NTS neurons and their contribution for the development of cardiorespiratory dysfunctions, as observed in neurogenic hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic disorders.

  20. Human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa and upper respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Harrison P; McNiece, Kayla L; Duong, Angela A; Khan, Farhan

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are frequently detected in a variety of lesions in the oral mucosa and upper respiratory tract. The pathogenesis in these areas is not as clearly elucidated as in other anatomical regions, but most experts agree that HPVs are responsible for the commonly observed benign lesions, such as squamous papillomas, verruca vulgaris and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. Transformation of these benign lesions is well described, but it is not clear what role the virus plays, if any, in carcinogenesis. HPV types 6 and 11 are most frequently detected in oral cavity and respiratory tract lesions, though several other types have also been reported. Despite an opaque understanding of these lesions' pathogeneses, it is essential for the clinician to recognize these diseases, to provide appropriate treatment and to promote patient awareness of potential oral transmission. In this paper, we review the major HPV-associated diseases of the oral mucosa and upper respiratory tract, focusing specifically on clinical features, histopathological characteristics and disease management. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Evaluation of the prescriptions written for upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Serdar; Ozturk, Tuba Cimilli; Metiner, Yasin; Ak, Rohat; Ocal, Oktay

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to determine frequency of antibiotic use and retrospectively evaluate prescriptions written for the patients with diagnosis of acute pharyngitis, acute nasopharyngitis and acute tonsillitis by our hospital emergency department physicians in January 2014. Records of the patients who were admitted to the education and research hospital between January 1st, 2014 to January 31st 2014 were analyzed in this study. Records of all the patients with the diagnosis of acute nasopharyngitis (J.00), acute pharyngitis (J.02) and acute tonsillitis (J.03) were analyzed, and patients with a second diagnosis or haven't any prescription were excluded from the study. Frequency of antibiotic and other symptomatic medications use were analyzed in prescriptions of 5261 patients. Antibiotics were prescribed for 63.5% of the patients included in the study, and the most preferred antibiotics were penicilin and beta-lactamase combination (38.8%) and cephalosporins (26.2%). Combined preparations were the most preferred medications in symptomatic treatment (65.9%). Dexketoprofen was the most preferred among nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (63%). In each prescription, average number of 3.26 drugs were prescribed. Excessive and improrer use of antibiotics in the treatment of respiratuary tract infection is a global problem. The use of excess agents in symptomatic medication leads to polypharmacy. Training of physicians and patients on principles of rational drug use will contribute to the solution of this problem.

  2. The role and regulation of catalase in respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Mia M; Fan, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract bacterial pathogens are the etiologic agents of a variety of illnesses. The ability of these bacteria to cause disease is imparted through survival within the host and avoidance of pathogen clearance by the immune system. Respiratory tract pathogens are continually bombarded by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be produced by competing bacteria, normal metabolic function, or host immunological responses. In order to survive and proliferate, bacteria have adapted defense mechanisms to circumvent the effects of ROS. Bacteria employ the use of anti-oxidant enzymes, catalases and catalase-peroxidases, to relieve the effects of the oxidative stressors to which they are continually exposed. The decomposition of ROS has been shown to provide favorable conditions in which respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Legionella pneumophila, and Neisseria meningitidis are able to withstand exposure to highly reactive molecules and yet survive. Bacteria possessing mutations in the catalase gene have a decreased survival rate, yet may be able to compensate for the lack of catalatic activity if peroxidatic activity is present. An incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms by which catalase and catalase-peroxidases are regulated still persists, however, in some bacterial species, a regulatory factor known as OxyR has been shown to either up-regulate or down-regulate catalase gene expression. Yet, more research is still needed to increase the knowledge base in relation to this enzyme class. As with this review, we focus on major respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens in order to elucidate the function and regulation of catalases. The importance of the research could lead to the development of novel treatments against respiratory bacterial infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chloroquine-Azithromycin Combination Antimalarial Treatment Decreases Risk of Respiratory- and Gastrointestinal-Tract Infections in Malawian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliams, Elizabeth A.; Jumare, Jibreel; Claassen, Cassidy W.; Thesing, Phillip C.; Nyirenda, Osward M.; Dzinjalamala, Fraction K.; Taylor, Terrie; Plowe, Christopher V.; Tracy, LaRee A.; Laufer, Miriam K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chloroquine-azithromycin is being evaluated as combination therapy for malaria. It may provide added benefit in treating or preventing bacterial infections that occur in children with malaria. Objective. We aim to evaluate the effect of treating clinical malaria with chloroquine-azithromycin on the incidence of respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections compared to treatment with chloroquine monotherapy. Methods. We compared the incidence density and time to first events of respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections among children assigned to receive chloroquine-azithromycin or chloroquine for all symptomatic malaria episodes over the course of 1 year in a randomized longitudinal trial in Blantyre, Malawi. Results. The incidence density ratios of total respiratory-tract infections and gastrointestinal-tract infections comparing chloroquine-azithromycin to chloroquine monotherapy were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], .48, .94) and 0.74 (95% CI, .55, .99), respectively. The time to first lower-respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections were significantly longer in the chloroquine-azithromycin arm compared to the chloroquine arm (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). Conclusions. Children treated routinely with chloroquine-azithromycin had fewer respiratory and gastrointestinal-tract infections than those treated with chloroquine alone. This antimalarial combination has the potential to reduce the burden of bacterial infections among children in malaria-endemic countries. PMID:24652498

  4. Chloroquine-azithromycin combination antimalarial treatment decreases risk of respiratory- and gastrointestinal-tract infections in Malawian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliams, Elizabeth A; Jumare, Jibreel; Claassen, Cassidy W; Thesing, Phillip C; Nyirenda, Osward M; Dzinjalamala, Fraction K; Taylor, Terrie; Plowe, Christopher V; Tracy, LaRee A; Laufer, Miriam K

    2014-08-15

    Chloroquine-azithromycin is being evaluated as combination therapy for malaria. It may provide added benefit in treating or preventing bacterial infections that occur in children with malaria. We aim to evaluate the effect of treating clinical malaria with chloroquine-azithromycin on the incidence of respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections compared to treatment with chloroquine monotherapy. We compared the incidence density and time to first events of respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections among children assigned to receive chloroquine-azithromycin or chloroquine for all symptomatic malaria episodes over the course of 1 year in a randomized longitudinal trial in Blantyre, Malawi. The incidence density ratios of total respiratory-tract infections and gastrointestinal-tract infections comparing chloroquine-azithromycin to chloroquine monotherapy were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], .48, .94) and 0.74 (95% CI, .55, .99), respectively. The time to first lower-respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections were significantly longer in the chloroquine-azithromycin arm compared to the chloroquine arm (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). Children treated routinely with chloroquine-azithromycin had fewer respiratory and gastrointestinal-tract infections than those treated with chloroquine alone. This antimalarial combination has the potential to reduce the burden of bacterial infections among children in malaria-endemic countries. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Assessment of the role of microorganisms of respiratory tract in patients with progressive acute respiratory viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgasova О.А.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the review of literature for the period from 1987 till 2012. It has been shown that the spread of acute respiratory viral infections (ARI and the incidence of complications is of great social and economic importance worldwide. Therefore, the identification of etiological factors and associated development of ARI is an urgent task for practical health care. It is of great importance to determine both the type of pathogen and the presence of its pathogenic factors. The etiological agent of bacterial complications of ARI becomes Moraxella catarrhalis, featuring a large set of markers of virulence. In the development of the pathological process in the respiratory tract, adhesins, a number of enzymes and toxins produced by M.catarrhalis are important. It allows to persist and multiply in the body of the patient. Dangerous strains of M.catarrhalis, resistant to (3-lactam antibiotics and characterized by multiresistance greatly reduce the effectiveness of the therapy. Lack of laboratory studies in acute inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract leads to the reduction of the etiological interpretation of these diseases, inadequate etiotropic treatment and as a consequence — the development of complications that reduces the effectiveness of therapy. In conclusion it is necessary to improve the system of microbiological diagnostics and tactics of treatment of ARI patients.

  6. Salivary Blockade Protects the Lower Respiratory Tract of Mice from Lethal Influenza Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivinson, Karen; Deliyannis, Georgia; McNabb, Leanne; Grollo, Lara; Gilbertson, Brad; Jackson, David; Brown, Lorena E

    2017-07-15

    It is possible to model the progression of influenza virus from the upper respiratory tract to the lower respiratory tract in the mouse using viral inoculum delivered in a restricted manner to the nose. In this model, infection with the A/Udorn/307/72 (Udorn) strain of virus results ultimately in high viral titers in both the trachea and lungs. In contrast, the A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) strain causes an infection that is almost entirely limited to the nasal passages. The factors that govern the progression of virus down the respiratory tract are not well understood. Here, we show that, while PR8 virus grows to high titers in the nose, an inhibitor present in the saliva blocks further progression of infection to the trachea and lungs and renders an otherwise lethal dose of virus completely asymptomatic. In vitro, the salivary inhibitor was capable of potent neutralization of PR8 virus and an additional 20 strains of type A virus and two type B strains that were tested. The exceptions were Udorn virus and the closely related H3N2 strains A/Port Chalmers/1/73 and A/Victoria/3/75. Characterization of the salivary inhibitor showed it to be independent of sialic acid and other carbohydrates for its function. This and other biochemical properties, together with its virus strain specificity and in vivo function, indicate that the mouse salivary inhibitor is a previously undescribed innate inhibitory molecule that may have evolved to provide pulmonary protection of the species from fatal influenza virus infection.IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus occasionally jumps from aquatic birds, its natural host, into mammals to cause outbreaks of varying severity, including pandemics in humans. Despite the laboratory mouse being used as a model to study influenza virus pathogenesis, natural outbreaks of influenza have not been reported in the species. Here, we shed light on one mechanism that might allow mice to be protected from influenza in the wild. We show that virus deposited in the

  7. Factors influencing the development of otitis media among Sicilian children affected by upper respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Martines

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Upper respiratory tract infection is a nonspecific term used to describe an acute infection involving the nose, paranasal sinuses, pharynx and larynx. Upper respiratory tract infections in children are often associated with Eustachian tube dysfunction and complicated by otitis media, an inflammatory process within the middle ear. Environmental, epidemiologic and familial risk factors for otitis media (such as sex, socioeconomic and educational factors, smoke exposure, allergy or duration of breastfeeding have been previously reported, but actually no data about their diffusion among Sicilian children with upper respiratory tract infections are available. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the main risk factors for otitis media and their prevalence in Sicilian children with and without upper respiratory tract infections. METHODS: A case-control study of 204 children with upper respiratory tract infections who developed otitis media during a 3 weeks monitoring period and 204 age and sex-matched healthy controls. Seventeen epidemiologically relevant features were inventoried by means of standardized questionnaires and skin tests were performed. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to examine the association between risk factors and occurrence of otitis media. RESULTS: Otitis media resulted strongly associated to large families, low parental educational attainment, schooling within the third years of life (p < 0.05; children were more susceptible to develop otitis media in the presence of asthma, cough, laryngopharyngeal reflux disease, snoring and apnea (p < 0.05. Allergy and urban localization increased the risk of otitis media in children exposed to smoke respectively of 166% and 277% (p < 0.05; the joint effect of asthma and presence of pets in allergic population increased the risk of recurrence of 11%, while allergy, cough and runny nose together increased this risk of 74%. CONCLUSIONS

  8. Etiology, seasonality, and clinical characteristics of respiratory viruses in children with respiratory tract infections in Eastern India (Bhubaneswar, Odisha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Swagatika; Mohakud, Nirmal Kumar; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Kumar, Subrat

    2017-03-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in young children in low and middle income countries. To analyse the overall burden of respiratory viruses responsible for ARTIs in paediatrics population in eastern India, this study was performed. Clinical information, demographic information and nasal/oral swabs were collected from 332 paediatric patients (aged from 1 month to 12 years old) with the symptoms of ARTI, enrolled from the outpatient department from Nov 2012 to Oct 2014. Multiplex PCR was performed to detect eight respiratory viral pathogens. Seasonal, as well as age-wise prevalence of respiratory viruses was analysed. Of these 332 cases, 32.53% (108/332) were positive for at least one pathogen. Human rhinovirus (HRV) was the most frequently detected pathogen (24.7%, 82/332) followed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (4.22%, 14/332), PIV (2.11%, 7/332), and hMPV (2.11%, 7/332). Single infection was detected in 92.6% (100/108) of positive cases. Respiratory virus infections showed seasonal variation, with peaks during the rainy season followed by winter season, and were most common in patients under 1 year of age. Phylogenetic analysis of HMPV positive samples confirmed the circulation of A2 subgroup in the study area. The present study is first of its kind and adds to our knowledge of the epidemiological characteristics of these common respiratory viruses among patients with ARTIs in the study area. J. Med. Virol. 89:553-558, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Profiling acute respiratory tract infections in children from Assam, India

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    Farzana Islam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory infections (ARI are leading global cause of under-five mortality and morbidity. Objective: To elicit the prevalence and risk factors associated with ARI among under-five children. Materials and Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was undertaken in 21 registered urban slums of Guwahati in Assam to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with ARI among 370 under-five children from 184 households and 370 families. Results: The prevalence of ARI was found to be 26.22%; infants and female children were more affected. Majority of the ARI cases were from nuclear families (84.54%, living in kutcha houses (90.72% with inadequate ventilation (84.54%, overcrowded living condition (81.44%, with kitchen attached to the living room (65.98% and using biomass fuel for cooking (89.69%. ARI was significantly associated with ventilation, location of kitchen in household; presence of overcrowding, nutritional status, and primary immunization status also had impacts on ARI. Conclusion: The present study had identified a high prevalence of the disease among under-fives. It also pointed out various socio-demographic, nutritional, and environmental modifiable risk factors which can be tackled by effective education of the community.

  10. Cod liver oil, young children, and upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linday, Linda A

    2010-12-01

    Cod liver oil contains long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, as well as vitamins D and A. It was a traditional source of vitamin D in the United States and was used to prevent and treat rickets. In our clinical research, we used liquid cod liver oil of adequate purity and acceptable taste for infants and young children, as well as a children's multivitamin/mineral supplement with selenium and other trace metals. In a cluster-randomized study of pediatric visits for upper respiratory illness during the winter and early spring, these nutritional supplements decreased mean visits/subject/month by 36%-58%. Cod liver oil is culturally valued and has been used as a folk remedy by many low-income minorities in the United States. Nutritional supplements cannot be purchased with SNAP benefits (formerly called food stamps). Inclusion of cod liver oil in state Medicaid formularies would make it available to low-income children, whose families may not be able to pay for it out-of-pocket.

  11. Human bocavirus infection as a cause of severe acute respiratory tract infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesker, F M; van Kampen, J J A; van der Eijk, A A; van Rossum, A M C; de Hoog, M; Schutten, M; Smits, S L; Bodewes, R; Osterhaus, A D M E; Fraaij, P L A

    2015-10-01

    In 2005 human bocavirus (HBoV) was discovered in respiratory tract samples of children. The role of HBoV as the single causative agent for respiratory tract infections remains unclear. Detection of HBoV in children with respiratory disease is frequently in combination with other viruses or bacteria. We set up an algorithm to study whether HBoV alone can cause severe acute respiratory tract infection (SARI) in children. The algorithm was developed to exclude cases with no other likely cause than HBoV for the need for admission to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with SARI. We searched for other viruses by next-generation sequencing (NGS) in these cases and studied their HBoV viral loads. To benchmark our algorithm, the same was applied to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-positive patients. From our total group of 990 patients who tested positive for a respiratory virus by means of RT-PCR, HBoV and RSV were detected in 178 and 366 children admitted to our hospital. Forty-nine HBoV-positive patients and 72 RSV-positive patients were admitted to the PICU. We found seven single HBoV-infected cases with SARI admitted to PICU (7/49, 14%). They had no other detectable virus by NGS. They had much higher HBoV loads than other patients positive for HBoV. We identified 14 RSV-infected SARI patients with a single RSV infection (14/72, 19%). We conclude that our study provides strong support that HBoV can cause SARI in children in the absence of viral and bacterial co-infections. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnosis of Upper and Lower Respiratory Tract Bacterial Infections with the Use of Multiplex PCR Assays

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    Jenny Kourea-Kremastinou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of respiratory infections by molecular techniques provides important information about the epidemiology of respiratory disease, especially during the post-vaccination era. The objective of the present study was the detection of bacterial pathogens directly in clinical samples from patients with upper and lower respiratory tract infections using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays developed in our laboratory. Clinical samples taken over a three-year period (2007–2009 and obtained from 349 patients (adults (n = 66; children (n = 283 with signs and symptoms of certain upper or lower respiratory tract infections, consisted of: bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL, n = 83, pleural fluids (n = 29, and middle-ear aspirates (n = 237. Overall, 212 samples (61% were confirmed by culture and/or PCR. Among the positive samples, Streptococcus pneumoniae (mainly serotype 3 was predominant (104/212; 49.0%, followed by non-typable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi 59/212; 27.8% and Streptococcus pyogenes (47/212; 22%. Haemophilus influenzae type b was detected in only three samples. The underlying microbiology of respiratory infections is gradually changing in response to various selective pressures, such as vaccine use and antibiotic consumption. The application of multiplex PCR (mPCR assays is particularly useful since it successfully identified the microorganisms implicated in acute otitis media or lower respiratory tract infections in nearly 75% of patients with a positive result compared to conventional cultures. Non-culture identification of the implicated pneumococcal serotypes is also an important issue for monitoring pneumococcal infections in the era of conjugate pneumococcal vaccines.

  13. Non-specific immune stimulation in respiratory tract infections. Separating the wheat from the chaff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feleszko, Wojciech; Ruszczyński, Marek; Zalewski, Bartłomiej Mateusz

    2014-06-01

    Parents of children suffering from recurrent respiratory infections can be persuaded by advertisements to pressure their family physicians and pediatricians for "immune-stimulating enhancements". However, the evidence base behind these immune stimulants is usually lacking. Often there is no peer-reviewed studies available that support claims made by "immune-booster" supplements. In this review, we critically analyze most of the marketed immuno-active drugs (including vitamin preparations, dietary supplements, homeopathic remedies, Ecchinacea, bacterial lysates, and probiotics) and identify the necessity to exclude an immunodeficiency in every child suffering from recurrent respiratory tract infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. NASAL-Geom, a free upper respiratory tract 3D model reconstruction software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercos-Pita, J. L.; Cal, I. R.; Duque, D.; de Moreta, G. Sanjuán

    2018-02-01

    The tool NASAL-Geom, a free upper respiratory tract 3D model reconstruction software, is here described. As a free software, researchers and professionals are welcome to obtain, analyze, improve and redistribute it, potentially increasing the rate of development, and reducing at the same time ethical conflicts regarding medical applications which cannot be analyzed. Additionally, the tool has been optimized for the specific task of reading upper respiratory tract Computerized Tomography scans, and producing 3D geometries. The reconstruction process is divided into three stages: preprocessing (including Metal Artifact Reduction, noise removal, and feature enhancement), segmentation (where the nasal cavity is identified), and 3D geometry reconstruction. The tool has been automatized (i.e. no human intervention is required) a critical feature to avoid bias in the reconstructed geometries. The applied methodology is discussed, as well as the program robustness and precision.

  15. Cigarette smoking and mechanisms of susceptibility to infections of the respiratory tract and other organ systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2013-09-01

    The predisposition of cigarette smokers for development of oral and respiratory infections caused by microbial pathogens is well recognised, with those infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) at particularly high risk. Smoking cigarettes has a suppressive effect on the protective functions of airway epithelium, alveolar macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer (NK) cells and adaptive immune mechanisms, in the setting of chronic systemic activation of neutrophils. Cigarette smoke also has a direct effect on microbial pathogens to promote the likelihood of infective disease, specifically promotion of microbial virulence and antibiotic resistance. In addition to interactions between smoking and HIV infection, a number of specific infections/clinical syndromes have been associated epidemiologically with cigarette smoking, including those of the upper and lower respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, central nervous and other organ systems. Smoking cessation benefits patients in many ways, including reduction of the risk of infectious disease. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Isolated from Respiratory Tract Infections in Dakar, Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhtar Camara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is one of the major causes of respiratory tract infections. The objectives of this study were to identify isolates of S. pyogenes obtained from respiratory tract infections, and to assess their susceptibility to several antibiotics. A total of 40 strains were isolated and their susceptibility to 17 antibiotics was tested using a standard disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs were determined using the E-test. All isolates were sensitive to β-lactam antibiotics including penicillin, amoxicillin, and cephalosporins. Macrolides remain active with the exception of spiramycin, which showed reduced susceptibility. Out of the 40 isolates, 100% of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Interestingly, isolates were sensitive to chloramphenicol, teicoplanin, vancomycine, and levofloxacin, providing potential alternative choices of treatment against infections with S. pyogenes.

  17. Molecular epidemiology of WU polyomavirus in hospitalized children with acute respiratory tract infection in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Teng; Lu, Qing-Bin; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Wo, Ying; Zhuang, Lu; Zhang, Pan-He; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Wei, Wei; Liu, Wei

    2017-05-01

    To explore the molecular epidemiology and clinical characteristics of Washington University polyomavirus (WUPyV) infection in pediatric patients with acute respiratory tract infections in China. A laboratory surveillance was performed to recruit pediatric patients with acute respiratory tract infections. WUPyV was detected using real-time PCR and complete genome was sequenced for randomly selected positive nasopharyngeal aspirate. Altogether 122 (7.5%) of 1617 children found to be infected with WUPyV and 88 (72.1%) were coinfected with other viruses during 2012-2015. The phylogenetic analysis showed that 14 strains from our study formed two new clusters (Id and IIIc) within the Branch I and Branch III, respectively. WUPyV is persistently circulating in China. Surveillance on WUPyV infection in wider areas and long persistence is warranted.

  18. IL-2 and IL-10 gene polymorphisms are associated with respiratory tract infection and may modulate the effect of vitamin E on lower respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents1234

    OpenAIRE

    Belisle, Sarah E.; Hamer, Davidson H.; Leka, Lynette S.; Dallal, Gerard E; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Fine, Basil C; Jacques, Paul F.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Vitamin E supplementation may be a potential strategy to prevent respiratory tract infections (RIs) in the elderly. The efficacy of vitamin E supplementation may depend on individual factors including specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at immunoregulatory genes.

  19. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of human respiratory syncytial virus in Chinese adults with acute respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zichun; Gonzalez, Richard; Ren, Lili; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Lan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Yang, Qingqing; Li, Jianguo; Zhou, Hongli; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Jianwei

    2013-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of respiratory tract illnesses worldwide. Although the prevalence and clinical manifestations of the two subtypes, RSV-A and RSV-B, have been studied in some detail in infants and young children, they have not been determined in adults. To evaluate the prevalence of the RSV subtypes and disease severity between RSV-A and RSV-B infections in adults, nasal and throat swabs that were collected from patients ≥15 years old who sought medical care for acute respiratory infections at the Fever Clinic of the Peking Union Medical College Hospital in Beijing, China between May 2005 and April 2010. The samples were tested for RSV infection using PCR and sequencing analysis. RSV was detected in 95 (1%) of the adult patients, of whom 53 (55.8%) were positive for RSV-A and 42 (44.2%) for RSV-B. The incidence of RSV infections increased with age (χ(2) = 37.17, P = 1.66E-07). Demographic data and clinical manifestations of RSV-A were similar to those of RSV-B. Although RSV-A and RSV-B co-circulated during the 2005-2006 and 2008-2009 seasons, RSV-A was predominant in the 2006-2008 seasons, whereas RSV-B was predominant in the 2009-2010 season. Upper respiratory tract infections were diagnosed in most RSV-infected patients (n = 80, 84.2%), and three patients suffered from pulmonary infection. This is the first study to provide data on the prevalence and clinical manifestations of RSV subgroups among Chinese adults with fever and acute illness, over five successive epidemic seasons. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Interventions to improve adherence to first-line antibiotics in respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Monedero, María José; García, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    intervention (II), aimed to improve the adherence to recommendations on first-line antibiotics in patients with respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Methods: General practitioners (GPs) from different regions of Spain were offered two different interventions on antibiotic prescribing. They registered all.......8-26%), respectively. Conclusion: Multifaceted interventions targeting GPs can improve adherence to recommendations for first-line antibiotic prescribing in patients with RTI, with intensive interventions that include point-of-care testing being more effective....

  1. Vitamin D deficiency and recurrent lower respiratory tract infections: a case based discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Aypak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI are among the most prevalent infectious diseases.Vitamin D deficiency has been found to be a risk factor for LRTI. We here report a case with the diagnosis of recurrent LRTI treated safely by empirical antibiotherapy and vitamin D supplementation in order to underline the importance of assessment and treatment of vitamin D deficiency in pediatric patients with the diagnosis of LRTI.

  2. Haemophilus haemolyticus: A Human Respiratory Tract Commensal to Be Distinguished from Haemophilus influenzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, T.F.; Brauer, A.L.; Sethi, S.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Haemophilus influenzae is a common pathogen in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a prospective study, selected isolates of apparent H. influenzae had an altered phenotype. We tested the hypothesis that these variant strains were genetically different from ty...... distinguish H. haemolyticus from H. influenzae. H. haemolyticus is a respiratory tract commensal. The recognition that some strains of apparent H. influenzae are H. haemolyticus substantially strengthens the association of true H. influenzae with clinical infection....

  3. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections in healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Sabetta

    Full Text Available Declining serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D seen in the fall and winter as distance increases from the equator may be a factor in the seasonal increased prevalence of influenza and other viral infections. This study was done to determine if serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations correlated with the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections.In this prospective cohort study serial monthly concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured over the fall and winter 2009-2010 in 198 healthy adults, blinded to the nature of the substance being measured. The participants were evaluated for the development of any acute respiratory tract infections by investigators blinded to the 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations. The incidence of infection in participants with different concentrations of vitamin D was determined. One hundred ninety-five (98.5% of the enrolled participants completed the study. Light skin pigmentation, lean body mass, and supplementation with vitamin D were found to correlate with higher concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Concentrations of 38 ng/ml or more were associated with a significant (p<0.0001 two-fold reduction in the risk of developing acute respiratory tract infections and with a marked reduction in the percentages of days ill.Maintenance of a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentration of 38 ng/ml or higher should significantly reduce the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections and the burden of illness caused thereby, at least during the fall and winter in temperate zones. The findings of the present study provide direction for and call for future interventional studies examining the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in reducing the incidence and severity of specific viral infections, including influenza, in the general population and in subpopulations with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, such as pregnant women, dark skinned individuals, and the obese.

  4. Macrolide overuse for treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinnerskov, Mette; Therkildsen, Julie Maria; Cordoba, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    High consumption of macrolides has been linked to increased macrolide resistance in the common pathogens of respiratory tract infections (RTIs). According to Danish recommendations, penicillin is the first-choice treatment for RTIs and macrolides should only be prescribed when a patient is allergic...... to penicillin or for treatment of mycoplasma pneumonias. The aim of the present study was to explore the prescription of macrolides for different RTIs to patients without penicillin allergy in general practice in Denmark....

  5. Enteral nutrition volume is not correlated with lower respiratory tract infection in patients on mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomar, A; Guardiola, B; Llompart-Pou, J A; Ayestarán, I; Rodríguez-Pilar, J; Ferreruela, M; Raurich, J M

    To evaluate the effect of enteral nutrition volume, gastrointestinal function and the type of acid suppressive drug upon the incidence of lower respiratory tract infections in critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation (MV). A retrospective secondary analysis was carried out. The Intensive Care Unit of a University Hospital. Patients≥18-years-old expected to need MV for more than four days, and receiving enteral nutrition by nasogastric tube within 24h of starting MV. We correlated enteral nutrition volume administered during the first 10 days, gastrointestinal function and the type of acid suppressive therapy with the episodes of lower respiratory tract infection up until day 28. Cox proportional hazards ratios in univariate and adjusted multivariate models were used. Statistical significance was considered for p<0.05. Lower respiratory tract infection episodes. Sixty-six out of 185 patients (35.7%) had infection; 27 patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia; and 39 presented ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. Uninfected and infected groups were similar in terms of enteral nutrition volume (54±12 and 54±9mL/h; p=0.94) and caloric intake (19.4±4.9 and 19.6±5.2kcal/kg/d; p=0.81). The Cox proportional hazards model showed neurological indication of MV to be the only independent variable related to infection (p=0.001). Enteral nutrition volume, the type of acid suppressive therapy, and the use of prokinetic agents were not significantly correlated to infection. Enteral nutrition volume and caloric intake, gastrointestinal dysfunction and the type of acid suppressive therapy used were not associated to lower respiratory tract infection in patients on MV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  6. Public Health and Budget Impact of Probiotics on Common Respiratory Tract Infections: A Modelling Study

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Lenoir-Wijnkoop; Laetitia Gerlier; Jean-Louis Bresson; Claude Le Pen; Gilles Berdeaux

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Two recent meta-analyses by the York Health Economics Consortium (YHEC) and Cochrane demonstrated probiotic efficacy in reducing the duration and number of common respiratory tract infections (CRTI) and associated antibiotic prescriptions. A health-economic analysis was undertaken to estimate the public health and budget consequences of a generalized probiotic consumption in France. Methods A virtual age- and gender-standardized population was generated using a Markov microsimulati...

  7. Severity of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Lower Respiratory Tract Infection With Viral Coinfection in HIV-Uninfected Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Natalie I; Bont, Louis; Cohen, Adam L; Cohen, Cheryl; von Gottberg, Anne; Groome, Michelle J; Hellferscee, Orienka; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mekgoe, Omphile; Naby, Fathima; Moyes, Jocelyn; Tempia, Stefano; Treurnicht, Florette K; Venter, Marietje; Walaza, Sibongile; Wolter, Nicole; Madhi, Shabir A

    2017-02-15

    Molecular diagnostics enable sensitive detection of respiratory viruses, but their clinical significance remains unclear in pediatric lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). We aimed to determine whether viral coinfections increased life-threatening disease in a large cohort. Molecular testing was performed for respiratory viruses in nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from children aged respiratory illness (SARI) hospitalization conducted in South Africa during February 2009-December 2013. The primary outcome was life-threatening disease, defined as mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit admission, or death. Of 2322 HIV-uninfected children with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated LRTI, 1330 (57.3%) had RSV monoinfection, 38 (1.6%) had life-threatening disease, 575 (24.8%) had rhinovirus, 347 (14.9%) had adenovirus (ADV), and 30 (1.3%) had influenza virus. RSV and any other viral coinfection was not associated with severe disease (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], OR, 0.74; 95% CI, .39-1.4), ADV coinfection had increased odds of life-threatening disease (adjusted OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.6-7.2; P = .001), and influenza coinfection had increased odds of life-threatening disease and prolonged length of stay (adjusted OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.0-4.5; P = .05) compared with RSV monoinfection. RSV coinfection with any respiratory virus is not associated with more severe disease when compared to RSV alone in this study. However, increased life-threatening disease in RSV-ADV and RSV-influenza coinfection warrants further study.

  8. Airway CD8(+) T Cells Are Associated with Lung Injury during Infant Viral Respiratory Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Thomas J; Ravindranath, Thyyar M; Bickham, Kara L; Gordon, Claire L; Zhang, Feifan; Levin, Bruce; Baird, John S; Farber, Donna L

    2016-06-01

    Infants and young children are disproportionately susceptible to severe complications from respiratory viruses, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Recent studies show that the T cell response in the lung is important for protective responses to respiratory infections, although details on the infant/pediatric respiratory immune response remain sparse. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the local versus systemic immune response in infants and young children with respiratory failure from viral respiratory tract infections and its association to disease severity. Daily airway secretions were sampled from infants and children 4 years of age and younger receiving mechanical ventilation owing to respiratory failure from viral infection or noninfectious causes. Samples were examined for immune cell composition and markers of T cell activation. These parameters were then correlated with clinical disease severity. Innate immune cells and total CD3(+) T cells were present in similar proportions in airway aspirates derived from infected and uninfected groups; however, the CD8:CD4 T cell ratio was markedly increased in the airways of patients with viral infection compared with uninfected patients, and specifically in infected infants with acute lung injury. T cells in the airways were phenotypically and functionally distinct from those in blood with activated/memory phenotypes and increased cytotoxic capacity. We identified a significant increase in airway cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in infants with lung injury from viral respiratory tract infection that was distinct from the T cell profile in circulation and associated with increasing disease severity. Airway sampling could therefore be diagnostically informative for assessing immune responses and lung damage.

  9. USE OF A NEW FORM OF IBUPROFEN IN CHILDREN WITH FEVER AND ACUTE RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Lokshina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study clinical efficacy, tolerance and safety of a new pelleted ibuprofen form for children in treatment of fever in patients with acute respiratory tract infection. Patients and methods: children aged from 6 to 12 years old with clinical manifestation of respiratory tract infections and requiring antipyretic treatment were included into the study. Children (n = 50 were administered ibuprofen at a single dose of 5–10 mg/kg of body weight, not more than 3–4 times per day. The efficacy assessment included time needed for temperature decrease (assessment was performed in 15, 30 and 60 minutes and duration of the antipyretic effect (assessment in 6, 8 and 12 hours. Rapidity of analgesic effect in children with ear ache, headache and myalgias was performed in 15, 30, 60 minutes and 6, 8 and 12 hours after the drug intake. Results: antipyretic effect of pelleted ibuprofen for children begins in 15 minutes after its intake. Stable temperature decrease during the first 6 hours was observed in 58% of children (the mean temperature was 37,1 ± 0,3 and maintained up for 12 hours. Relief of pain intensity was established in 62,1% of patients during the first 3 hours, and in 37,9% the pain syndrome was arrested completely. Conclusions: the new pelleted form of ibuprofen for children was proved to have high clinical efficacy and safety in treatment of fever in children with acute respiratory tract infections.

  10. Inhalation of uranium nanoparticles: respiratory tract deposition and translocation to secondary target organs in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitot, Fabrice; Lestaevel, Philippe; Tourlonias, Elie; Mazzucco, Charline; Jacquinot, Sébastien; Dhieux, Bernadette; Delissen, Olivia; Tournier, Benjamin B; Gensdarmes, François; Beaunier, Patricia; Dublineau, Isabelle

    2013-03-13

    Uranium nanoparticles (nuclear fuel cycle and during remediation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Explosions and fires in nuclear reactors and the use of ammunition containing depleted uranium can also produce such aerosols. The risk of accidental inhalation of uranium nanoparticles by nuclear workers, military personnel or civilian populations must therefore be taken into account. In order to address this issue, the absorption rate of inhaled uranium nanoparticles needs to be characterised experimentally. For this purpose, rats were exposed to an aerosol containing 10⁷ particles of uranium per cm³ (CMD=38 nm) for 1h in a nose-only inhalation exposure system. Uranium concentrations deposited in the respiratory tract, blood, brain, skeleton and kidneys were determined by ICP-MS. Twenty-seven percent of the inhaled mass of uranium nanoparticles was deposited in the respiratory tract. One-fifth of UO₂ nanoparticles were rapidly cleared from lung (T(½)=2.4 h) and translocated to extrathoracic organs. However, the majority of the particles were cleared slowly (T(½)=141.5 d). Future long-term experimental studies concerning uranium nanoparticles should focus on the potential lung toxicity of the large fraction of particles cleared slowly from the respiratory tract after inhalation exposure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of biofilm in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzari, E; Torretta, S; Pignataro, L; Marchisio, P; Esposito, S

    2015-03-01

    Recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs) are very common in children and a major challenge for pediatricians. In the last few years, bacterial biofilms have been linked to RRTIs and antibiotic resistance, and have raised serious concerns regarding the therapeutic management of recurrent middle ear diseases, chronic rhinosinusitis, and recurrent pharyngotonsillitis. This paper aims to review the new insights into biofilm-related upper respiratory tract infections in children and possible therapeutic strategies. It focuses on the clinical implications for recurrent disease and on studies in pediatric patients. Analysis of the literature showed that the involvement of bacterial biofilm in recurrent upper airway tract infections is an emerging problem that may lead to serious concerns about infection control. Despite the large amount of research within this field, detailed insight into the complex structure of bacterial biofilms and the ultrastructural and biochemical mechanisms responsible for its evasion of the immune system and resistance to treatments is currently lacking. In the future, additional emphasis should be placed on biofilm management as a component of therapeutic strategies. This goal can be attained by finding feasible methods for detecting biofilms in vivo and identifying effective methods for administering treatments that eradicate preexisting bacterial biofilms or hinder bacterial adhesion to respiratory cells.

  12. [Patient adherence in respiratory tract infections: ceftibuten versus other antibiotics (PARTICULAR study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardas, P; Ratajczyk-Pakalska, E

    2001-06-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate patient compliance to antibiotic therapy in respiratory tract infections. The main aim of the study was to establish whether dosing frequency (1 vs 2 or 3 times daily) and other factors influence compliance. Patients aged 18 and over attending selected primary health facilities in Lódź region were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to receive ceftibuten, 400 mg once daily or other antibiotic on physician's choice with 2 or 3 times daily dosing. On the 5th day during the home visit the questionnaire study was performed and the compliance was measured by a pill count. Four hundred and six patients (205 in ceftibuten and 201 in other antibiotics group, respectively) were fully evaluable. Overall compliance was 76.6% with 97.6% for ceftibuten, 66.0% for antibiotics with b.i.d. dosing and 23.5% for antibiotics with t.i.d. dosing. Using a logistic regression analysis with a stepwise variable selection, dosing frequency was found to be a major variable associated with patient compliance (p = 0.00000, odds ratio 0.09, 95% confidence interval 0.057-0.165). Non-compliance with antibiotics is a common phenomenon in respiratory tract infections therapy. Once-daily antibiotic dosing leads to the best possible compliance in such circumstances. Due to its once-daily dosing and rare side effects, ceftibuten ensures nearly perfect compliance in respiratory tract infections therapy.

  13. Association of residential dampness and mold with respiratory tract infections and bronchitis: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Eliseeva, Ekaterina A.; Mendell, Mark J.

    2010-11-15

    Dampness and mold have been shown in qualitative reviews to be associated with a variety of adverse respiratory health effects, including respiratory tract infections. Several published meta-analyses have provided quantitative summaries for some of these associations, but not for respiratory infections. Demonstrating a causal relationship between dampness-related agents, which are preventable exposures, and respiratory tract infections would suggest important new public health strategies. We report the results of quantitative meta-analyses of published studies that examined the association of dampness or mold in homes with respiratory infections and bronchitis. For primary studies meeting eligibility criteria, we transformed reported odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) to the log scale. Both fixed and random effects models were applied to the log ORs and their variances. Most studies contained multiple estimated ORs. Models accounted for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed. One set of analyses was performed with all eligible studies, and another set restricted to studies that controlled for age, gender, smoking, and socioeconomic status. Subgroups of studies were assessed to explore heterogeneity. Funnel plots were used to assess publication bias. The resulting summary estimates of ORs from random effects models based on all studies ranged from 1.38 to 1.50, with 95% CIs excluding the null in all cases. Use of different analysis models and restricting analyses based on control of multiple confounding variables changed findings only slightly. ORs (95% CIs) from random effects models using studies adjusting for major confounding variables were, for bronchitis, 1.45 (1.32-1.59); for respiratory infections, 1.44 (1.31-1.59); for respiratory infections excluding nonspecific upper respiratory infections, 1.50 (1.32-1.70), and for respiratory infections in children or infants, 1.48 (1.33-1.65). Little effect of publication

  14. Respiratory and allergic diseases: from upper respiratory tract infections to asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Raja

    2002-06-01

    patient, mind-body interventions such as yoga, hypnosis, and biofeedback-assisted relaxation and breathing exercises are beneficial for stress reduction in general and may be helpful in further controlling asthma. Encouraging parents to learn how to massage their asthmatic children may appeal to some parents and provide benefits for parents and children alike. Acupuncture and chiropractic treatment cannot be recommended at this time, although some patients may derive benefit because of the placebo effect. For patients with allergic rhinitis, there are no good clinical research data on the use of quercetin and vitamin C. Similarly, freeze-dried stinging nettle leaves may be tried, but the applicable research evidence also is poor. Further studies are needed to assess the efficacy of these supplements and herbs. Homeopathic remedies based on extreme dilutions of the allergen may be beneficial in allergic rhinitis but require collaboration with an experienced homeopath. There are no research data on constitutional homeopathic approaches to asthma and allergic rhinitis. Patients with COPD are helped by exercise, pulmonary rehabilitation, and increased caloric protein and fat intake. Vitamin C and n-3 supplements are safe and reasonable; however, studies are needed to establish their efficacy in COPD. On the other hand, there are convincing data in favor of N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation for the patient with COPD at doses ranging between 400 and 1200 mg daily. Red blood cell magnesium levels may guide the use of magnesium replacement. The use of L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 in patients with COPD needs further study. The addition of essential oils to the dietary regimen of patients with chronic bronchitis is worth exploring. Patients with upper respiratory tract infections can expect a shorter duration of symptoms by taking high doses of vitamin C (2 g) with zinc supplements, preferably the nasal zinc gel, at the onset of their symptoms. Adding an herb such as echinacea or

  15. Azithromycin does not improve disease course in hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease : A randomized equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Woensel, Job B. M.; Uijtendaal, Esther; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Kimpen, Jan L. L.

    Background: Nearly halt of all hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) are treated with (parenteral) antibiotics. The present study was designed to test our hypothesis that the use of antibiotics would not lead to a reduced duration of

  16. Pressing Issues of Rational Antibiotic Therapy for Inflammatory Diseases of the Lower Respiratory Tract in Pediatric Practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ye.N. Okhotnikova; Ye.V. Ponochevnaia; Ye.V. Sharikadze; Ye.I. Usova

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, high incidence of acute lower respiratory tract infections of bacterial origin, primarily pneumonia and bronchitis, treatment of which under the spread of antibiotic resistance...

  17. Continued high rates of antibiotic prescribing to adults with respiratory tract infection : survey of 568 UK general practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulliford, Martin C; Dregan, Alex; Moore, Michael V; Ashworth, Mark; Staa, Tjeerd van|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304827762; McCann, Gerard; Charlton, Judith; Yardley, Lucy; Little, Paul; McDermott, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Overutilisation of antibiotics may contribute to the emergence of antimicrobial drug resistance, a growing international concern. This study aimed to analyse the performance of UK general practices with respect to antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) among young

  18. MODULAR APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL MODELS OF INHALED REACTIVE GAS DOSIMETRY FOR RISK ASSESSMENT OF RESPIRATORY TRACT TOXICITY: CHLORINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhaled reactive gases typically cause respiratory tract toxicity with a prominent proximal to distal lesion pattern. This pattern is largely driven by airflow and interspecies differences between rodents and humans result from factors such as airway architecture, ventilation ra...

  19. Intensive care unit patients with lower respiratory tract nosocomial infections: the ENIRRIs project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro De Pascale

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of intensive care unit (ICU patients may be complicated by a large spectrum of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI, defined by specific epidemiological, clinical and microbiological aspects. A European network for ICU-related respiratory infections (ENIRRIs, supported by the European Respiratory Society, has been recently established, with the aim at studying all respiratory tract infective episodes except community-acquired ones. A multicentre, observational study is in progress, enrolling more than 1000 patients fulfilling the clinical, biochemical and radiological findings consistent with a LRTI. This article describes the methodology of this study. A specific interest is the clinical impact of non-ICU-acquired nosocomial pneumonia requiring ICU admission, non-ventilator-associated LRTIs occurring in the ICU, and ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. The clinical meaning of microbiologically negative infectious episodes and specific details on antibiotic administration modalities, dosages and duration are also highlighted. Recently released guidelines address many unresolved questions which might be answered by such large-scale observational investigations. In light of the paucity of data regarding such topics, new interesting information is expected to be obtained from our network research activities, contributing to optimisation of care for critically ill patients in the ICU.

  20. Intensive care unit patients with lower respiratory tract nosocomial infections: the ENIRRIs project

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascale, Gennaro; Nseir, Saad; Chastre, Jean; Welte, Tobias; Antonelli, Massimo; Navalesi, Paolo; Garofalo, Eugenio; Bruni, Andrea; Coelho, Luis Miguel; Skoczynski, Szymon; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Grimaldi, David; Salzer, Helmut J.F.; Lange, Christoph; Froes, Filipe; Artigas, Antoni; Díaz, Emili; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Panigada, Mauro; Comellini, Vittoria; Fasano, Luca; Soave, Paolo M.; Spinazzola, Giorgia; Luyt, Charles-Edouard; Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Marin, Judith; Masclans, Joan Ramon; Chiumello, Davide; Pezzi, Angelo; Schultz, Marcus; Mohamed, Hafiz; Van Der Eerden, Menno; Hoek, Roger A.S.; Gommers, D.A.M.P.J.; Pasquale, Marta Di; Civljak, Rok; Kutleša, Marko; Bassetti, Matteo; Dimopoulos, George; Nava, Stefano; Rios, Fernando; Zampieri, Fernando G.; Povoa, Pedro; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    The clinical course of intensive care unit (ICU) patients may be complicated by a large spectrum of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), defined by specific epidemiological, clinical and microbiological aspects. A European network for ICU-related respiratory infections (ENIRRIs), supported by the European Respiratory Society, has been recently established, with the aim at studying all respiratory tract infective episodes except community-acquired ones. A multicentre, observational study is in progress, enrolling more than 1000 patients fulfilling the clinical, biochemical and radiological findings consistent with a LRTI. This article describes the methodology of this study. A specific interest is the clinical impact of non-ICU-acquired nosocomial pneumonia requiring ICU admission, non-ventilator-associated LRTIs occurring in the ICU, and ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. The clinical meaning of microbiologically negative infectious episodes and specific details on antibiotic administration modalities, dosages and duration are also highlighted. Recently released guidelines address many unresolved questions which might be answered by such large-scale observational investigations. In light of the paucity of data regarding such topics, new interesting information is expected to be obtained from our network research activities, contributing to optimisation of care for critically ill patients in the ICU. PMID:29164144

  1. [Application of FilmArray assay for detection of respiratory tract infections in immunocompromised persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Przybylski, Maciej; Sulowska, Agata; Rynans, Sylwia; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Swoboda-Kopec, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    A variety of viruses and bacteria are responsible for acute upper and lower respiratory tract infections worldwide. Severe and even fatal disease can occur especially in group ofimmunocompromised individuals. Accurate pathogen identification allows clinicians to determine the need for ancillary diagnostic testing, antibacterial and/or antiviral therapy and can motivate decisions regarding hospitalization and infection control measures. We compared the diagnostic performance of FilmArray Respiratory Panel highly multiplexed nucleic acid amplification test with previous used direct immunofluorescence assay. Both assays were performed on a panel of 6 nasopharyngeal-secretion specimens and 6 BALF samples, collected from 12 patients, subjected to allogeneic haematological stem cells transplantation, with lower respiratory tract symptoms. Among viruses detectable by both assays were especially influenzaA virus, parainfluenza viruses type 3 and respiratory syncytial virus. In conclusion, the FilmArray assay is rapid and extremely user-friendly system, with results available in just over one hour with almost no labor involved. In few laboratories its low throughput and qualitative results may be a disadvantage in some clinical settings.

  2. Asthma exacerbations: Understanding role of viral respiratory tract infections and possible treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Sekhri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is common, affecting around 500 billion people worldwide. It is a complex disease influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Upper respiratory tract infections with viruses commonly precipitate severe and sustained asthma exacerbations (AEs. Exacerbations are responsible for the enormous amount of emotional and economic stress apart from imposing risk of hospitalization and even death. Hence, agents targeting these infections can contribute toward decreasing asthma morbidity and associated financial burden. Over the past years novel, pharmacological therapies are evolved for the treatment of asthma, but their exact role in exacerbations is still unclear. This article reviews the role of respiratory viral infections in AEs and discusses role of new therapeutic approaches to overcome it. Medline, Medscape, EMBASE, Cochrane database, Scopus and clinicaltrials.gov were searched using terms such as "asthma," "AE" and "viral respiratory infections." Journal articles published from 2000 to 2013 describing AEs were screened.

  3. Factors influencing the development of otitis media among Sicilian children affected by upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martines, Francesco; Salvago, Pietro; Ferrara, Sergio; Messina, Giuseppe; Mucia, Marianna; Plescia, Fulvio; Sireci, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infection is a nonspecific term used to describe an acute infection involving the nose, paranasal sinuses, pharynx and larynx. Upper respiratory tract infections in children are often associated with Eustachian tube dysfunction and complicated by otitis media, an inflammatory process within the middle ear. Environmental, epidemiologic and familial risk factors for otitis media (such as sex, socioeconomic and educational factors, smoke exposure, allergy or duration of breastfeeding) have been previously reported, but actually no data about their diffusion among Sicilian children with upper respiratory tract infections are available. To investigate the main risk factors for otitis media and their prevalence in Sicilian children with and without upper respiratory tract infections. A case-control study of 204 children with upper respiratory tract infections who developed otitis media during a 3 weeks monitoring period and 204 age and sex-matched healthy controls. Seventeen epidemiologically relevant features were inventoried by means of standardized questionnaires and skin tests were performed. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to examine the association between risk factors and occurrence of otitis media. Otitis media resulted strongly associated to large families, low parental educational attainment, schooling within the third years of life (potitis media in the presence of asthma, cough, laryngopharyngeal reflux disease, snoring and apnea (potitis media in children exposed to smoke respectively of 166% and 277% (potitis media are common childhood diseases strongly associated with low parental educational attainment (p=0.0001), exposure to smoke (p=0.0001), indoor exposure to mold (p=0.0001), laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (p=0.0002) and the lack of breast-feeding (p=0.0014); an increased risk of otitis media recurrences was observed in the presence of allergy, persistent cough and runny nose (p=0

  4. NORMAL NASOPHARYNGEAL MICROFLORA AS A RESERVOIR OF MULTIRESISTANT STRAINS OF UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minukhin V.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nasopharinheal carriage of bacteria may play a central role in the development and spread of respiratory infections. In addition, so-called "healthy" carriage is often transformed under the influence of various factors into an active infection.It is necessary to take into account not only the range of possible pathogens, but also trends in the development of antibiotic resistance of leading etiologic agents while choosing tactics of antimicrobial therapy. The investigation was designed to study the role of normal microflora of the nasopharynx as a reservoir of resistant strains of respiratory infections. Materials and Methods. Fifty three healthy individuals and 168 patients with acute upper respiratory tract infections who had been treated in CEHC "Kharkiv Municipal Clinical Hospital № 30" were examined. Microbiological study included isolation and identification of pathogens in accordance with the Order of the Ministry of Health Care № 535 from 22.04.1985., determination of the sensitivity of microorganisms to antibiotics by diffusion method according to the Order of the Ministry of Health Care of Ukraine № 167 from 05.04.2007. Results and discussion. Bacteriological study of nasal swabs of healthy people showed that the composition of the microflora of the nasopharynx contained potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Among the isolated microorganisms essential place was occupied by S. epidermidis and S. aureus, both in monoculture and association. Epidermal staphylococcus was isolated in 36 % and Staphylococcus aureus in 27% of cases. Pneumococcus and hemolytic streptococcus of group A were isolated in 23 and 14% of cases, respectively. One hundred and eighty strains of opportunistic microorganisms were isolated in the study of nasopharyngeal microflora of patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection. The leading role belonged to S. pyogenes (40.5% and S.epidermidis (33,3%. S. aureus (12,8% and S.pneumoniae (10,6% were next

  5. Respiratory tract infections in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals are linked with serum surfactant protein-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawed, Shireen; Saeed, Marium; Parveen, Naila

    2015-11-01

    To find out the rate of respiratory tract infections in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals and their relation with surfactant protein D. The cross-sectional study was conducted at Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from September 2011 to April 2012, and comprised subjects of both genders between ages of 30 and 60 years. The subjects were divided into four groups: diabetic obese, non-diabetic obese, diabetic non-obese, and non-diabetic-non-obese. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information about respiratory tract infections. Serum surfactant protein D levels were analysed using human surfactant protein D enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 16. Of the 90 subjects, there were 20(22.2%) diabetic obese, 30(33.3%) non-diabetic obese, 10(11.1%) diabetic non-obese, and 30(33.3%) non-diabetic-non-obese. The overall mean age was 36.6±103 years. Among the diabetic obese, 15(75%) had respiratory tract infections which was higher than the other study groups, and patients having respiratory tract infections had lower surfactant protein D levels than those who did not have infections (p=0.01). Diabetic obese subjects had greater rate of recurrent respiratory tract infections and had lower concentration of serum surfactant protein D compared to subjects without respiratory tract infections.

  6. Mammalian Cell-Derived Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Like Particles Protect the Lower as well as the Upper Respiratory Tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramila Walpita

    Full Text Available Globally, Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is a leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children less than one year of age and in USA alone, between 85,000 and 144,000 infants are hospitalized every year. To date, there is no licensed vaccine. We have evaluated vaccine potential of mammalian cell-derived native RSV virus-like particles (RSV VLPs composed of the two surface glycoproteins G and F, and the matrix protein M. Results of in vitro testing showed that the VLPs were functionally assembled and immunoreactive, and that the recombinantly expressed F protein was cleaved intracellularly similarly to the virus-synthesized F protein to produce the F1 and F2 subunits; the presence of the F1 fragment is critical for vaccine development since all the neutralizing epitopes present in the F protein are embedded in this fragment. Additional in vitro testing in human macrophage cell line THP-1 showed that both virus and the VLPs were sensed by TLR-4 and induced a Th1-biased cytokine response. Cotton rats vaccinated with RSV VLPs adjuvanted with alum and monophosphoryl lipid A induced potent neutralizing antibody response, and conferred protection in the lower as well as the upper respiratory tract based on substantial virus clearance from these sites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first VLP/virosome vaccine study reporting protection of the lower as well as the upper respiratory tract: Prevention from replication in the nose is an important consideration if the target population is infants < 6 months of age. This is because continued virus replication in the nose results in nasal congestion and babies at this age are obligate nose breathers. In conclusion, these results taken together suggest that our VLPs show promise to be a safe and effective vaccine for RSV.

  7. Mammalian Cell-Derived Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Like Particles Protect the Lower as well as the Upper Respiratory Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpita, Pramila; Johns, Lisa M.; Tandon, Ravi; Moore, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children less than one year of age and in USA alone, between 85,000 and 144,000 infants are hospitalized every year. To date, there is no licensed vaccine. We have evaluated vaccine potential of mammalian cell-derived native RSV virus-like particles (RSV VLPs) composed of the two surface glycoproteins G and F, and the matrix protein M. Results of in vitro testing showed that the VLPs were functionally assembled and immunoreactive, and that the recombinantly expressed F protein was cleaved intracellularly similarly to the virus-synthesized F protein to produce the F1 and F2 subunits; the presence of the F1 fragment is critical for vaccine development since all the neutralizing epitopes present in the F protein are embedded in this fragment. Additional in vitro testing in human macrophage cell line THP-1 showed that both virus and the VLPs were sensed by TLR-4 and induced a Th1-biased cytokine response. Cotton rats vaccinated with RSV VLPs adjuvanted with alum and monophosphoryl lipid A induced potent neutralizing antibody response, and conferred protection in the lower as well as the upper respiratory tract based on substantial virus clearance from these sites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first VLP/virosome vaccine study reporting protection of the lower as well as the upper respiratory tract: Prevention from replication in the nose is an important consideration if the target population is infants virus replication in the nose results in nasal congestion and babies at this age are obligate nose breathers. In conclusion, these results taken together suggest that our VLPs show promise to be a safe and effective vaccine for RSV. PMID:26172453

  8. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and the Incidence of Acute Viral Respiratory Tract Infections in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabetta, James R.; DePetrillo, Paolo; Cipriani, Ralph J.; Smardin, Joanne; Burns, Lillian A.; Landry, Marie L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Declining serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D seen in the fall and winter as distance increases from the equator may be a factor in the seasonal increased prevalence of influenza and other viral infections. This study was done to determine if serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations correlated with the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections. Methodology/Findings In this prospective cohort study serial monthly concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured over the fall and winter 2009–2010 in 198 healthy adults, blinded to the nature of the substance being measured. The participants were evaluated for the development of any acute respiratory tract infections by investigators blinded to the 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations. The incidence of infection in participants with different concentrations of vitamin D was determined. One hundred ninety-five (98.5%) of the enrolled participants completed the study. Light skin pigmentation, lean body mass, and supplementation with vitamin D were found to correlate with higher concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Concentrations of 38 ng/ml or more were associated with a significant (prespiratory tract infections and with a marked reduction in the percentages of days ill. Conclusions/Significance Maintenance of a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentration of 38 ng/ml or higher should significantly reduce the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections and the burden of illness caused thereby, at least during the fall and winter in temperate zones. The findings of the present study provide direction for and call for future interventional studies examining the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in reducing the incidence and severity of specific viral infections, including influenza, in the general population and in subpopulations with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, such as pregnant women, dark skinned individuals, and the obese. PMID:20559424

  9. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabetta, James R; DePetrillo, Paolo; Cipriani, Ralph J; Smardin, Joanne; Burns, Lillian A; Landry, Marie L

    2010-06-14

    Declining serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D seen in the fall and winter as distance increases from the equator may be a factor in the seasonal increased prevalence of influenza and other viral infections. This study was done to determine if serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations correlated with the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections. In this prospective cohort study serial monthly concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured over the fall and winter 2009-2010 in 198 healthy adults, blinded to the nature of the substance being measured. The participants were evaluated for the development of any acute respiratory tract infections by investigators blinded to the 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations. The incidence of infection in participants with different concentrations of vitamin D was determined. One hundred ninety-five (98.5%) of the enrolled participants completed the study. Light skin pigmentation, lean body mass, and supplementation with vitamin D were found to correlate with higher concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Concentrations of 38 ng/ml or more were associated with a significant (prespiratory tract infections and with a marked reduction in the percentages of days ill. Maintenance of a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentration of 38 ng/ml or higher should significantly reduce the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections and the burden of illness caused thereby, at least during the fall and winter in temperate zones. The findings of the present study provide direction for and call for future interventional studies examining the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in reducing the incidence and severity of specific viral infections, including influenza, in the general population and in subpopulations with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, such as pregnant women, dark skinned individuals, and the obese.

  10. Detection of respiratory viruses and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B S; Kurz, S; Weber, K; Balzer, H-J; Hartmann, K

    2014-09-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) is an acute, highly contagious disease complex caused by a variety of infectious agents. At present, the role of viral and bacterial components as primary or secondary pathogens in CIRD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine influenza virus (CIV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine herpes virus-1 (CHV-1), canine distemper virus (CDV) and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with CIRD and to compare the data with findings in healthy dogs. Sixty-one dogs with CIRD and 90 clinically healthy dogs from Southern Germany were prospectively enrolled in this study. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from all dogs and were analysed for CPIV, CAV-2, CIV, CRCoV, CHV-1, CDV, and B. bronchiseptica by real-time PCR. In dogs with acute respiratory signs, 37.7% tested positive for CPIV, 9.8% for CRCoV and 78.7% for B. bronchiseptica. Co-infections with more than one agent were detected in 47.9% of B. bronchiseptica-positive, 82.6% of CPIV-positive, and 100% of CRCoV-positive dogs. In clinically healthy dogs, 1.1% tested positive for CAV-2, 7.8% for CPIV and 45.6% for B. bronchiseptica. CPIV and B. bronchiseptica were detected significantly more often in dogs with CIRD than in clinically healthy dogs (P infections with several pathogens were common. In conclusion, clinically healthy dogs can carry respiratory pathogens and could act as sources of infection for susceptible dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [A three-year review of acute respiratory tract infections caused by Streptococcus milleri group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Rei; Kawayama, Tomotaka; Rikimaru, Toru; Oizumi, Kotaro

    2002-03-01

    The objective of our study is to understand the clinical features of patients with acute respiratory tract infection associated with Streptococcus milleri group (SMG). Fifteen patients with SMG respiratory tract infection visited our hospital from July, 1997 through May, 2000. There were seven cases of pneumonia, two pulmonary abscess, three thoracic empyema and three acute bronchitis. The mean age of the patients was 57.8 years (range 16-87), twelve were males, and seven were smokers. The moderately to severe underlying diseases existed in thirteen patients (86.7%) and included the following: respiratory diseases (20.0%), history of the esophageal or gastric surgery (26.7%), central nerve system diseases (13.3%), alcohol intake (60.0%), hepatitis and pancreatitis (33.3%), diabetes mellitus (13.3%) and malignancy (6.7%). The species of SMG detected were as follows: S. constellatus, 8, S. anginosus, 6 and S. intermedius, 1. Anaerobic organism and other microorganisms were detected in five patients. A patient with SMG nosocominal pneumonia who previously had thoracic surgery for esophageal cancer died. Antibiotics therapy with carbapenem or combination therapy, drainage and no surgery, were successful in 14 of the 15 cases (93.3%). The number of intermediately or complete resistant strains against penicillin G, ampicillin and cefmetazole were 5 (33.3%), 8 (53.3%) and 12 (80.0%), respectively in this series. Recently, it is seemed that acute respiratory tract infections caused by SMG are increasing in the patients with moderately to severe underlying diseases, and several clinical strains of SMG are acquiring a tolerance to antibiotics.

  12. Cefditoren in upper and lower community-acquired respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Soriano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Soriano1, María-José Giménez1,2, Lorenzo Aguilar1,21PRISM-AG, Madrid, Spain; 2Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid, SpainAbstract: This article reviews and updates published data on cefditoren in the evolving scenario of resistance among the most prevalent isolates from respiratory tract infections in the community (Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. By relating the in vitro activity of cefditoren (in national and multinational surveillance and against isolates with emerging resistant genotypes/phenotypes to its pharmacokinetics, the cefditoren pharmacodynamic activity predicting efficacy (in humans, animal models, and in vitro simulations is analyzed prior to reviewing clinical studies (tonsillopharyngitis, sinusitis, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and community-acquired pneumonia and the relationship between bacterial eradication and clinical efficacy. The high in vitro activity of cefditoren against the most prevalent respiratory isolates in the community, together with its pharmacokinetics (enabling a twice daily regimen leading to adequate pharmacodynamic indexes covering all S. pyogenes, H. influenzae, and at least 95% S. pneumoniae isolates, makes cefditoren an antibiotic that will play a significant role in the treatment of respiratory tract infections in the community. In the clinical setting, studies carried out with cefditoren showed that treatments with the 400 mg twice daily regimen were associated with high rates of bacteriological response, even against penicillin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, with good correlation between bacteriological efficacy/response and clinical outcome.Keywords: cefditoren, Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, community-acquired respiratory tract infections

  13. A Systematic Review of Antibiotic Prescription Associated With Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in China

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    Li, Jing; Song, Xingyue; Yang, Tingting; Chen, Yawen; Gong, Yanhong; Yin, Xiaoxv; Lu, Zuxun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Overuse of antibiotics among patients with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) is a worldwide problem, and the problem is especially serious in developing countries, such as China. This systematic review is aimed at summarizing previous findings on outpatient prescriptions of antibiotics associated with URTI in China in order to help policymakers and the public understand and tackle the problem. We systematically searched and reviewed studies of antibiotic prescribing patterns for outpatients with URTI in China that were published in Chinese or English before December 31, 2014. The study quality was assessed, and the overall rates of URTI cases prescribed antibiotics were calculated by using random-effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed to explore the potential sources of heterogeneity among studies. We included 45 eligible studies with a total of 52,072 URTI outpatients. The overall percentage of URTI outpatients prescribed antibiotics was 83.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 80.6%–86.4%). Of the URTI outpatients prescribed antibiotics, 79.7% (95% CI: 72.8%–85.2%) were prescribed 1 antibiotic, 18.4% (95% CI: 13.6%–24.5%) prescribed 2 antibiotics, and 1.1% (95% CI: 0.7%–1.6%) prescribed 3 or more antibiotics. The rates of antibiotic prescription varied greatly across hospitals and showed a downward trend over time. An extremely high percentage of URTI patients in China were prescribed antibiotics and, the overuse is especially problematic in lower-level hospitals. Although there appears a downward trend, likely attributable to China's recent efforts in curbing antibiotic abuse, greater efforts are needed to promote the rational use of antibiotics. PMID:27175658

  14. A Systematic Review of Antibiotic Prescription Associated With Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Song, Xingyue; Yang, Tingting; Chen, Yawen; Gong, Yanhong; Yin, Xiaoxv; Lu, Zuxun

    2016-05-01

    Overuse of antibiotics among patients with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) is a worldwide problem, and the problem is especially serious in developing countries, such as China. This systematic review is aimed at summarizing previous findings on outpatient prescriptions of antibiotics associated with URTI in China in order to help policymakers and the public understand and tackle the problem.We systematically searched and reviewed studies of antibiotic prescribing patterns for outpatients with URTI in China that were published in Chinese or English before December 31, 2014. The study quality was assessed, and the overall rates of URTI cases prescribed antibiotics were calculated by using random-effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed to explore the potential sources of heterogeneity among studies.We included 45 eligible studies with a total of 52,072 URTI outpatients. The overall percentage of URTI outpatients prescribed antibiotics was 83.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 80.6%-86.4%). Of the URTI outpatients prescribed antibiotics, 79.7% (95% CI: 72.8%-85.2%) were prescribed 1 antibiotic, 18.4% (95% CI: 13.6%-24.5%) prescribed 2 antibiotics, and 1.1% (95% CI: 0.7%-1.6%) prescribed 3 or more antibiotics. The rates of antibiotic prescription varied greatly across hospitals and showed a downward trend over time.An extremely high percentage of URTI patients in China were prescribed antibiotics and, the overuse is especially problematic in lower-level hospitals. Although there appears a downward trend, likely attributable to China's recent efforts in curbing antibiotic abuse, greater efforts are needed to promote the rational use of antibiotics.

  15. [Prevalence and seasonal distribution of respiratory viruses in patients with acute respiratory tract infections, 2002-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiçek, Candan; Arslan, Ayşe; Karakuş, Haydar Soydaner; Yalaz, Mehmet; Saz, Eylem Ulaş; Pullukçu, Hüsnü; Çok, Gürsel

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and seasonal distribution of respiratory viruses in pediatric and adult outpatients and inpatients who were admitted to hospital with the symptoms of upper and lower respiratory tract infections, during a 12-year period. A total of 5102 clinical samples (4372 nasopharyngeal swabs, 316 bronchoalveolar lavages, 219 transtracheal aspirates, 163 nasopharyngeal aspirates, 20 sputum, 10 nasal swabs) examined in our laboratory between January 1st 2002 and July 17th 2014, were evaluated retrospectively. Of the specimens, 1107 (21.7%) were obtained from outpatients and 3995 (78.3%) from hospitalized patients. Of the patients, 2851 (55.9%) were male and 2251 (44.1%) were female, while 1233 (24.2%) were adults and 3869 (75.8%) were children (age range: 1 day - 93 years; median: 3 years). Respiratory samples were investigated for the presence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus type A and B (INF-A, INF-B), adenovirus (AdV), parainfluenza viruses (PIV types 1-4), human rhinoviruses (HRV), human coronaviruses (HCoV), human metapneumovirus (HMPV) and human bocavirus (HBoV). All specimens were tested by both direct immunofluorescence antibody (DFA) and shell vial cell culture (SVCC) methods. In DFA assay the samples were initially screened by fluorescent-labeled polyclonal antibodies, and the positive ones were typed by using monoclonal antibodies (Light Diagnostics, Merck Millipore, USA). In SVCC, HEp-2, MDCK, A-549 and Vero cell lines were used for the isolation of viruses. In addition to these methods, real-time multiplex PCR methods (RealAccurate®, Respiratory RT PCR, PathoFinder, Netherlands and Seeplex® RV15 ACE Detection, Seegene, South Korea) were used for the detection of respiratory viruses in samples (n= 2104) obtained from 2007 to 2014. Respiratory viruses were detected in a total of 1705 (33.4%) patients, of them 967 (19%) were male and 738 (14.4%) were female. Three hundred and eighteen (18

  16. [Pharmacological effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the respiratory tract. (I). Quantitative and qualitative changes in respiratory tract fluid and sputum (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, K; Saito, T; Kasé, Y; Hitoshi, T

    1981-06-01

    The following three experiments were performed to determine the effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on the quantity and quality of respiratory tract fluid (RTF) and sputum. All drugs used were administered into the stomach through a gastric tube. 1) Indirect measurement of bronchial secretion in rats, which was expressed by the amounts of dye excreted into the respiratory tract, was carried out according the the Sakuno's method, with some modification. Some expectorants of the secretomotor type, such as bromhexine and pilocarpine, significantly increased the secretion, even at low doses. On the other hand, mucolytic agents such as NAC augmented the secretion only in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg. 2)As a direct method of measurements, Kasé's modification of Perry and Boyd's method was used to collect RTF, quantitatively, from rabbits. The RTF of healthy rabbits was colorless and watery. The administration of NAC in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg augmented the output volume and RTF became slightly turbid, probably due to an increase in the viscous mucus. 3) Rabbits with subacute bronchitis were prepared by long-term exposure to air contaminated with SO2 gas and sputa were collected before and after administration of NAC, respectively, according to the Kase's method. The sputa were opalescent and viscous gel included nodular masses. The administration of NAC, 1000 and 1500 mg/kg resulted in a dose dependent decrease in the relative viscosity. The percent-decreased in viscosity with NAC was statistically correlated with that in amounts of dry matter, those in protein and polysaccharide in the sputa. From the results described above, it was concluded that NAC given into the stomach can liquefy sputum by splitting mucoprotein disulphide linkages, that is, altering the rheological characteristics of sputum to facilitate expectoration.

  17. Assessment of Mother's Practice toward Their ‎Children with Upper Respiratory Tract ‎Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmahdi A. Hasan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The findings of the study have proved that there is a high significant positive relationship between the mothers' practice and their demographic variables (age, educational level, occupation, residential area. In general, practice of mothers related to upper respiratory tract diseases was low however, the mothers applied preventive practices towards their children with upper respiratory tract diseases..A quasi-experimental study was conducted in one of pediatric teaching hospital in Babylon city from the end of December 2013 till the beginning of March 2014, in order to identify mothers' practice of their children with upper respiratory tract diseases. Aims of the study: To assess the practice of mothers toward upper respiratory disease under five years of age, it is aimed to find out demographic characteristics of mothers like age, level of education and occupation, and to find out demographic characteristic of child regarding age and the type of feeding. Methodology: Purposive sample of (50 mothers' who accompanied their children with upper respiratory disease have been selected. The reliability of the instrument was determined through test and the validity through a panel of experts.  The data were analyzed through the application of descriptive statistical analysis that include (frequency, the mean, the mean of scores, and percentage . Results: According to the interpretation and discussion of the study findings, the following conclusions were found (40% of mothers their age between (18-23 years.(40% of mothers are within the level of education from primary school.(84% of child age are less than one year. 40% of child are with mixture feeding, (85% of mothers use household herbs for their children with cough. (70% of mothers don't use of woolen clothing rather than clothing to keep from cold for their children with obstruction of nose and (88% of mothers do not measure the  body temperature for their children . Recommendations : Health

  18. Differential expression of the MERS-coronavirus receptor in the upper respiratory tract of humans and dromedary camels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widagdo, W; Raj, V Stalin; Schipper, Debby; Kolijn, Kimberley; van Leenders, Geert J L H; Bosch, Berend J; Bensaid, Albert; Segalés, Joaquim; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Koopmans, Marion P; van den Brand, Judith M A; Haagmans, Bart L

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is not efficiently transmitted between humans, but it is highly prevalent in dromedary camels. Here we report that the MERS-CoV receptor - dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) - is expressed in the upper respiratory tract epithelium of camels but not

  19. Use of MMP-8 and MMP-9 to assess disease severity in children with viral lower respiratory tract infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, K.H.; Ahout, I.M.L.; Groot, R. de; Warris, A.; Ferwerda, G.; Hermans, P.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in respiratory inflammatory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It was hypothesized that MMP-8 and MMP-9 may function as biological markers to assess disease severity in viral lower respiratory tract infections

  20. Bacteraemic urinary tract infections may mimic respiratory infections: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, E; Martis, N; Guillouet-de Salvador, F; Demonchy, E; Degand, N; Carles, K; Roger, P-M

    2016-10-01

    Daily practice suggests that respiratory signs may be observed in bacteraemic urinary infections (BUI). Our objective was to search for an association between the presence of respiratory symptoms and the bacteraemic nature of urinary tract infections (UTI). A nested case-control study was carried out based on our computerised dashboard from January 2011 to June 2015. Cases were defined as patients with a BUI due to Enterobacteriaceae species, identified in blood and urine cultures. Controls had fever and a positive urinary sample but sterile blood cultures (NBUI) and a final diagnosis of urinary infection. Patients from the BUI group were 1:1 matched to the NBUI group according to four parameters: age, gender, cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbid conditions. Subjects with cognitive impairment limiting clinical accuracy and those with healthcare-associated infections were excluded. We compared systematically recorded respiratory and urinary symptoms between groups: signs on auscultation, dyspnoea, chest pain, cough and sputum, dysuria with burning, pollakiuria, flank or costovertebral angle tenderness and ischuria. One hundred BUI were compared to 100 NBUI, both groups exhibiting a similar rate for all considered comorbid conditions. In the BUI group, 58 % showed at least one respiratory sign vs. 20 % in the NBUI group, p respiratory signs, which overshadowed urinary symptoms, compared to those with non-bacteraemic UTI. Such observations impact clinical decision-making.

  1. The Role of Human Parainfluenza Virus Infections in the Immunopathology of the Respiratory Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełczyk, Malgorzata; Kowalski, Marek Leszek

    2017-03-01

    Viral infections are leading causes of both upper and lower airway acute illness in all age groups of healthy persons, and have also been implicated in the acute exacerbations of chronic respiratory disorders like asthma and COPD. Human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus and coronavirus have been considered as the most important respiratory pathogens and relatively little attention has been paid to the role of parainfluenza viruses (hPIVs). Human parainfluenza viruses are single-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the paramyxovirus family that may evoke lower respiratory infections in infants, children and immunocompromised individuals. Among non-immune compromised adults, hPIV infection typically causes mild disease manifested as upper respiratory tract symptoms and is infrequently associated with severe croup or pneumonia. Moreover, hPIV infection may be associated with viral exacerbations of chronic airway diseases, asthma or COPD or chronic rhinosinusitis. In this review, we summarized the basic epidemiology and immunology of hPIVs and addressed the more recent data implicating the role of parainfluenza viruses in the exacerbation of chronic airway disorders.

  2. Antimicrobial Resistance Trends among Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Pathogens in Greece, 2009–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Maraki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance trends of respiratory tract pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTIs in Crete, Greece, over a 4-year period (2009–2012. A total of 588 community-acquired respiratory pathogens were isolated during the study period. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common organism responsible for 44.4% of CARTIs, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (44.2% and Moraxella catarrhalis (11.4%. Among S. pneumoniae, the prevalence of isolates with intermediate- and high-level resistance to penicillin was 27.2% and 12.3%, respectively. Macrolide resistance slightly decreased from 29.4% over the period 2009-2010 to 28.8% over the period 2011-2012. Multiresistance was observed among 56 (54.4% penicillin nonsusceptible isolates. A nonsignificant increase in resistance of H. influenzae isolates was noted for β-lactams, cotrimoxazole, and tetracycline. Among the 67 M. catarrhalis tested, 32 produced beta-lactamase and were resistant to ampicillin. Macrolide resistance decreased over the study period. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, and the fluoroquinolones. Although a decreasing trend in the prevalence of resistance of the three most common pathogens involved in CARTIs was noted, continuous surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility at the local and national level remains important, in order to guide appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy.

  3. [The express diagnostic of microorganisms affecting respiratory tract of patients with mucoviscidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, O L; Kunda, M S; Aksenova, E I; Orlova, A A; Chernukha, M Iu; Lunin, V G; Amelina, E L; Chuchalin, A G; Gintsburg, A L

    2013-11-01

    The shared bacteria Burkholderia capacia complex and Achromobacter sp. infect the respiratory tract of patients with mucoviscidosis brining on disorders of respiratory patency. Burkholderia capacia complex is characterized by transmissivity and higher lethality of patients infected by Burkholderia. Hence, the importance of differentiation of these phenotypically similar microorganisms is obvious. The developed express technique of diagnostic includes the separation of DNA from phlegm amplification and sequenation was fragments of genes recA, gltB, gyrB, 16S rDNA. The evaluation of products of amplification of genes recA, gltB makes it possible to differentiate Burkholderia capacia complex and Achromobacter sp. The analysis of successions of recA, gltB, gyrB makes it possible to identify genotype of Burkholderia capacia complex on the basis of data of allele profiles of strains of Burkholderia capacia complex circulating in Russia. The succession of gene 16S rDNA makes it possible to determine the taxonomic position of microorganism dominating in phlegm and not belonging to Burkholderia capacia complex or Achromobacter sp. The real time polymerase chain reaction in presence of intercalating dye Sybr Green I, DMSO and D(+)-trehalose makes it possible to differentiate Burkholderia capacia complex from other microorganisms infecting respiratory tract of patients with mucoviscidosis. This approach provides additional reduction of diagnostic duration and decrease possibility of contamination.

  4. [STRENUOUS AND PROLONGED EXERCISE AND UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTION - TREATMENT OR THREAT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atias-Varon, Danit; Heled, Yuval

    2017-11-01

    Prolonged and strenuous exercise may lead to changes in the immune system function and to temporary suppression in defense against pathogens. These changes likely increase the risk of those engaging in prolonged and strenuous physical activity to develop upper respiratory tract infection and to reduce the level of performance. On the other hand, it appears that moderate physical activity reduces the risk of upper respiratory tract infection. Various populations, such as professional athletes and soldiers in combat units, who engage in daily strenuous exercise, may therefore be a high risk group. Integration of additional stress factors, such as sleep deprivation, emotional stress, nutritional deprivation, and dehydration also affect the immune system and may worsen the effect. On the other hand, there are those who claim that upper respiratory symptoms are due to non-infection inflammation causes such as allergy, asthma etc. Hence the effects of strenuous exercise on the immune system during training and competitions are not sufficiently clear. This review article will focus on the known effects of strenuous and prolonged exercise on the immune system, the possible mechanisms leading to these changes and their clinical impacts with applied emphasis to active populations such as athletes and soldiers.

  5. [Genotypes of rhinoviruses in children and adults patients with acute respiratory tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkan, Eda; Kırdar, Sevin; Ceylan, Emel; Yenigün, Ayşe; Kurt Ömürlü, İmran

    2017-10-01

    Rhinovirus (RV) is one of the most frequent causative agent of acute respiratory tract infections in the world. The virus may cause a mild cold, as well as more serious clinical symptoms in patients with immune system deficiency or comorbidities. Rhinoviruses have been identified by molecular methods under three types: RV-A, RV-B and RV-C. In most of the cases, it was reported that RV-A and RV-C were related with lower respiratory tract infections and asthma exacerbations, while RV-B was rarely reported in lower respiratory tract infections. The main objective of this study was to investigate RV species by sequence analysis in nasopharyngeal samples in pediatric and adult patients who were admitted to hospital with acute respiratory tract infections and to establish the relationship between species and age, gender and clinical diagnosis of the patients. Secondly, it was planned to emphasize the efficiency of the sequence analysis method in the determination of RV species. One hundred twenty seven patients (children and adults) who were followed up with acute respiratory tract infections in our university hospital were evaluated between January 2014 and January 2016. Viral loads were determined by quantitative real-time PCR in RV positive patients detected by a commercial kit in nasopharyngeal swab specimens. Thirty-one samples whose viral loads could not be determined were excluded from the study. The remaining 96 samples (50 children and 46 adults) were retested by conventional PCR using the target of VP4/VP2 gene region. A total of 65 samples (32 adults and 33 children) with the bands (549 bp) corresponding to the VP4/VP2 gene regions after the conventional PCR were analyzed by DNA sequencing. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the neighbour-joining method. After sequence analysis it was determined that 28 (43.07%) were RV-A, 7 (10.76%) were RV-B and 28 (43.07%) were RV-C; and moreover one of each enterovirus (EV) species EV-D68 (1.53%) and EV-C (1

  6. Drug resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections: role for an emerging antibacterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Aguilar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorenzo Aguilar1, María-José Giménez1, José Barberán21Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid; 2Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The nasopharynx is the ecological niche where evolution towards resistance occurs in respiratory tract isolates. Dynamics of different bacterial populations in antibiotic-free multibacterial niches are the baseline that antibiotic treatments can alter by shifting the competitive balance in favor of resistant populations. For this reason, antibiotic resistance is increasingly being considered to be an ecological problem. Traditionally, resistance has implied the need for development of new antibiotics for which basic efficacy and safety data are required prior to licensing. Antibiotic development is mainly focused on demonstrating clinical efficacy and setting susceptibility breakpoints for efficacy prediction. However, additional information on pharmacodynamic data predicting absence of selection of resistance and of resistant subpopulations, and specific surveillance on resistance to core antibiotics (to detect emerging resistances and its link with antibiotic consumption in the community are valuable data in defining the role of a new antibiotic, not only from the perspective of its therapeutic potential but also from the ecologic perspective (countering resistances to core antibiotics in the community. The documented information on cefditoren gleaned from published studies in recent years is an example of the role for an emerging oral antibacterial facing current antibiotic resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections.Keywords: respiratory tract infection, antibiotic resistance, cefditoren, community

  7. Respiratory tract isolation of Mycobacterium europaeum following influenza infection in an immunocompromised patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelippeau, Michael; Delord, Marion; Drancourt, Michel; Brouqui, Philippe

    2014-12-25

    Mycobacterium europaeum, a slow-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria belonging to the Mycobacterium simiae complex, was described after the seminal characterization of five isolates collected from three sputum specimens and a jaw gland biopsy in Italy, Greece and Sweden. Five respiratory tract isolates were further reported in Iran. Here, we report the first isolation of M. europaeum in France, in the respiratory tract of a patient co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus. A 49-year-old Caucasian woman with a 26-year history of human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis C virus co-infection was admitted for significant influenza-like syndrome in a context of repetitive exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Significant biological parameters included lymphocytes of 1.6G/L including 237/mm3 T4 lymphocytes, a human immunodeficiency virus viral load of 1.6 log and a hepatitis C virus viral load of 6 log. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction of her nasopharyngeal aspiration confirmed influenza A H1N1. Three sputum specimens lacked acid-fast bacilli but one grew mycobacteria identified by using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry as M. europaeum with a 1.56 log score. A 1,482-bp 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene sequence yielded 99% similarity with both Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum ATCC BAA-614 and M. europaeum DSM 45397T and partial rpoB polymerase chain reaction-sequencing yielded a 725-bp sequence exhibiting 100% similarity with M. europaeum strain DSM 45397T. We report the first isolation of M. europaeum in France, in the respiratory tract of a patient co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus. M. europaeum warrants further attention in immunosuppressed patients with influenza, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry and rpoB partial sequencing as tools for its accurate identification.

  8. Chlamydiae in febrile children with respiratory tract symptoms and age-matched controls, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bühl

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Chlamydiales order are obligate intracellular pathogens causing acute and chronic infectious diseases. Chlamydiaceae are established agents of community- and zoonotically acquired respiratory tract infections, and emerging pathogens among the Chlamydia-related bacteria have been implicated in airway infections. The role of both in airway infections in Africa is underexplored. We performed a case -control study on the prevalence of Chlamydiaceae and Chlamydia-related emerging pathogens in children with febrile respiratory tract infections in West Africa, Ghana. Using a pan-Chlamydiales broad-range real-time PCR, we detected chlamydial DNA in 11 (1.9% of 572 hospitalized febrile children with respiratory tract symptoms and in 24 (4.3% of 560 asymptomatic age-matched controls (p 0.03. Chlamydiaceae were found to be common among both symptomatic and healthy Ghanaian children, with Chlamydia pneumoniae being the most prevalent species. Parachlamydiaceae were detected in two children without symptoms but not in the symptomatic group. We identified neither Chlamydia psittaci nor Simkania negevensis but a member of a new chlamydial family that shared 90.2% sequence identity with the 16S rRNA gene of the zoonotic pathogen Chlamydia pecorum. In addition, we found a new Chlamydia-related species that belonged to a novel family sharing 91.3% 16S rRNA sequence identity with Candidatus Syngnamydia venezia. The prevalence and spectrum of chlamydial species differed from previous results obtained from children of other geographic regions and our study indicates that both, Chlamydiaceae and Chlamydia-related bacteria, are not clearly linked to clinical symptoms in Ghanaian children.

  9. Protective Mechanisms of Respiratory Tract Streptococci against Streptococcus pyogenes Biofilm Formation and Epithelial Cell Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Tomas; Riani, Catur; Koczan, Dirk; Standar, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci [GAS]) encounter many streptococcal species of the physiological microbial biome when entering the upper respiratory tract of humans, leading to the question how GAS interact with these bacteria in order to establish themselves at this anatomic site and initiate infection. Here we show that S. oralis and S. salivarius in direct contact assays inhibit growth of GAS in a strain-specific manner and that S. salivarius, most likely via bacteriocin secretion, also exerts this effect in transwell experiments. Utilizing scanning electron microscopy documentation, we identified the tested strains as potent biofilm producers except for GAS M49. In mixed-species biofilms, S. salivarius dominated the GAS strains, while S. oralis acted as initial colonizer, building the bottom layer in mixed biofilms and thereby allowing even GAS M49 to form substantial biofilms on top. With the exception of S. oralis, artificial saliva reduced single-species biofilms and allowed GAS to dominate in mixed biofilms, although the overall two-layer structure was unchanged. When covered by S. oralis and S. salivarius biofilms, epithelial cells were protected from GAS adherence, internalization, and cytotoxic effects. Apparently, these species can have probiotic effects. The use of Affymetrix array technology to assess HEp-2 cell transcription levels revealed modest changes after exposure to S. oralis and S. salivarius biofilms which could explain some of the protective effects against GAS attack. In summary, our study revealed a protection effect of respiratory tract bacteria against an important airway pathogen and allowed a first in vitro insight into local environmental processes after GAS enter the respiratory tract. PMID:23241973

  10. PROPHYLAXIS OF RECURRENT RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ALLERGIC DISEASES OF RESPIRATORY TRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Kaznacheeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections of airways are one of significant causes of morbidity in children. Approximately 70% of infections affect upper airways, ear, nose and throat. The problem is special for children with allergic pathology because any intercurrent virus disease can cause exacerbation of allergy. Open uncontrolled study of effectiveness of pidotimod in children with combined forms of allergy (bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and severe acute respiratory disease was performed in 2008–2010 in Novosibirsk. Pidotimod as a component of complex treatment decreased trigger role of infections and eased clinical course of main disease. This drug decreased the rate of relapses and load of medications in patients. Key words: children with frequent diseases, immunomudulators, pidotimod.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(5:64-66

  11. Anaerobic bacteria in upper respiratory tract and head and neck infections: microbiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Anaerobes are the predominant components of oropharyngeal mucous membranes bacterial flora, and are therefore a common cause of bacterial infections of endogenous origin of upper respiratory tract and head and neck. This review summarizes the aerobic and anaerobic microbiology and antimicrobials therapy of these infections. These include acute and chronic otitis media, mastoiditis and sinusitis, pharyngo-tonsillitis, peritonsillar, retropharyngeal and parapharyngeal abscesses, suppurative thyroiditis, cervical lymphadenitis, parotitis, siliadenitis, and deep neck infections including Lemierre Syndrome. The recovery from these infections depends on prompt and proper medical and when indicated also surgical management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of cattle and goats in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusiluka, L.J.M.; Ojeniyi, B.; Friis, N.F.

    2000-01-01

    A microbiological study of the mycoplasma flora in the respiratory tracts of cattle and goats in selected regions of Tanzania is described. In the examination of cattle, mycoplasmas were isolated from 60 (17.8%) of the 338 examined lung samples, 8 (47.1%) of the 17 lymph nodes, 4 (13.3%) of the 30...... from samples originating from Dodoma, Iringa, Mbeya, Morogoro and Shinyanga regions where outbreaks of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia had been reported. In the examination of goats, mycoplasmas were isolated from 54 (34.0%) of the 159 examined lung samples, 41 (18.1%) of the 226 nasal swabs and 4...

  13. Upper Respiratory Tract Symptoms, Renal Involvement and Vasculitis: A Case Report and Review of Wegener Granulomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Mohd Shahrir Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Wegener’s Granulomatosis is a condition associated with systemic vasculitis which can present with upper respiratory tract symptoms initially. On September 2001, a 15-year-old girl presented with symptoms of nasal block for 3 weeks. She later developed joint pains and worsening renal status requiring dialysis. A renal biopsy was performed which showed pauci-immune cresentric glomerulonephritis. Her cANCA levels were positive. She was treated with oral cyclophosphamide and steroids and later responded. Keywords Wegener granulomatosis; Young girl; Cyclophophamide; cANCA PMID:21629538

  14. Appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurðardóttir, Nanna Rún; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Munck, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) in two countries with different prevalence of antimicrobial resistance: Denmark and Iceland. Design: A cross-sectional study. Settings and subjects. General practitioners (GPs...... antibiotics (Iceland = 75.8% vs. Denmark = 59.3%), but Danish GPs had a higher percentage of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for sinusitis, and Icelandic GPs for pharyngotonsillitis. No differences were found for acute otitis media (AOM). The different antibiotic prescribing patterns between Denmark...

  15. Role of Ureaplasma Respiratory Tract Colonization in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Pathogenesis: Current Concepts and Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscardi, Rose Marie; Kallapur, Suhas G

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory tract colonization with the genital mycoplasma species Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum in preterm infants is a significant risk factor for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Recent studies of the ureaplasmal genome, animal infection models, and human infants have provided a better understanding of specific virulence factors, pathogen-host interactions, and variability in genetic susceptibility that contribute to chronic infection, inflammation, and altered lung development. This review provides an update on the current evidence supporting a causal role of ureaplasma infection in BPD pathogenesis. The current status of antibiotic trials to prevent BPD in Ureaplasma-infected preterm infants is also reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Primary pneumocystis infection in infants hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Hans Henrik; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Lundgren, Bettina

    2007-01-01

    with 431 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection (RTI) by using a real-time PCR assay. In 68 episodes in 67 infants, P. jirovecii was identified. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of a positive signal compared with the first quartile of age (7-49 days) was 47.4 (11.0-203), 8.7 (1......Acquisition of Pneumocystis jirovecii infection early in life has been confirmed by serologic studies. However, no evidence of clinical illness correlated with the primary infection has been found in immunocompetent children. We analyzed 458 nasopharyngeal aspirates from 422 patients hospitalized...

  17. [Different species of human rhinovirus infection in children with acute respiratory tract infections in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ming-hui; Zhao, Lin-qing; Qian, Yuan; Zhu, Ru-nan; Deng, Jie; Wang, Fang; Sun, Yu; Tian, Run

    2013-12-01

    To understand the clinical characteristics of different groups human rhinovirus (HRV)-A, B and C infection in children with acute respiratory tract infections (ARI) in Beijing. Respiratory tract specimens (n = 1412) collected from children with ARI during Jan. 2011 to Dec. 2012 were tested for HRV by using semi-nested PCR. Gene fragments of VP4/VP2 capsid protein amplified from HRV positive specimens were sequenced for HRV genotype confirmation. Then epidemiological characteristics of these HRV-positive cases were analyzed. Among these 1412 specimens tested, 103 (7.3%) were HRV positive, including 54 (52.4%) positive for HRV-A, 14 (13.6%) for HRV-B, 35 (34.0%) for HRV-C determined by sequence analysis. The positive rates of HRV-A, B and C (2.5%, 16/638; 0.3%, 2/638 and 1.3%, 8/638) in children with acute upper respiratory tract infections (URI) were lower than those (5.8%, 36/623; 1.8%, 11/623 and 3.9%, 24/623) in children with acute lower respiratory tract infections (LRI) (P = 0.003, 0.011, 0.003). In children with LRI, the positive rates of HRV-A, C were similar to each other (P = 0.112), and both were higher than that of HRV-B (P = 0.000, P = 0.026). The severity of ARI among children positive for different groups HRV showed no significant difference evaluated by Kruskal-Wallis H test (Hc = 0.044, P > 0.05), as well as that between children co-infected with HRV and other viruses and those infected with HRV only evaluated by Wilcoxon rank sum test (Zc = 0.872, P > 0.05). HRV is one of important pathogens for children with ARI, especially LRI in Beijing. The positive rates of HRV-A and HRV-C are similar to each other, and both are higher than that of HRV-B. No significant difference was shown among children with different HRV genotypes by evaluation of the severity of ARI, and co-infections of HRV with other viruses do not significantly increase the severity of ARI.

  18. Aetiology and prediction of pneumonia in lower respiratory tract infection in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anette; Nexoe, Joergen; Bistrup, Lene A

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of predominant pathogens and their association with outcome are of importance for the management of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). As antibiotic therapy is indicated in pneumonia and not in acute bronchitis, a predictor of pneumonia is needed. AIM: To describe....... Primary outcome measure was hospitalisation within 4 weeks. RESULTS: Pneumonia was radiographically verified in 48 of 364 patients (13%). Bacterial infection was seen more often in patients with pneumonia (33% versus 17%, Pinfection more often in non-pneumonic patients (26% versus 13......%, Pinfection compared with patients without pneumococcal infection (26 versus 4%, P = 0.001). The positive predictive value of GPs' diagnosis...

  19. Antibiotic prescriptions for suspected respiratory tract infection in primary care in South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba, Gloria; Caballero, Lidia; Sandholdt, Håkon

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe and compare antibiotic prescribing patterns for primary care patients with respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in four South American countries. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study. General practitioners (GPs) from Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay......%) of these received an antibiotic prescription. There was a wide variation across countries in the use and selection of antibiotics. For example, 94% of patients with acute bronchitis were prescribed antibiotics in Bolivia, while in Uruguay only 21% received antibiotics. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed...

  20. The potential of methylxanthine-based therapies in pediatric respiratory tract diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñatibia-Astibia, Ainhoa; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Franco, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Caffeine, theophylline and theobromine are the most known methylxanthines as they are present in coffee, tea and/or chocolate. In the last decades, a huge experimental effort has been devoted to get insight into the variety of actions that these compounds exert in humans. From such knowledge it is known that methylxanthines have a great potential in prevention, therapy and/or management of a variety of diseases. The benefits of methylxanthine-based therapies in the apnea of prematurity and their translational potential in pediatric affections of the respiratory tract are here presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Post-market outcome of an extract of traditional Cretan herbs on upper respiratory tract infections: a pragmatic, prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasaki, Marilena; Bertsias, Antonios; Pirintsos, Stergios A; Castanas, Elias; Lionis, Christos

    2017-09-21

    The beneficial effects of traditional herbs of Crete, Greece for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections have been reported in observational and laboratory studies. Following a published, double blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial, this study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an extract of three Cretan herbs on the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections, upon its market release. An observational study was conducted in Heraklion, Crete, Greece. Participants were patients presenting at selected pharmacies with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection, choosing to receive the extract for their treatment. Patients' symptoms (local, general, total) where recorded at three time points within 1 week, using a questionnaire developed based on the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory System Survey. For each patient, symptoms were scored on a 0-7 Likert scale and three indexes were calculated: the score of local symptoms, the score of general symptoms and the total score of symptoms. Effectiveness was assessed by examining the reduction in these indexes over the 1-week observation period. Mean score of general symptoms was 19.1 (SE: 0.9) in day 1, dropping to 8.6 (SE: 0.6) and 3.1 (SE: 0.4) in days 4 and 7 respectively. Mean score of local symptoms declined from 7.9 (SE: 0.5) in day 1 to 2.3 (SE: 0.3) in day 4 and to 0.5 (SE: 0.1) in day 7. Total score of symptoms reached 27.0 (SE: 1.2) in day 1, decreasing to 10.9 (SE: 0.8) in day 4 and to 3.5 (SE: 0.5) in day 7. The percentage of participants reporting fever was 82.1% at baseline, 8.0% in day 4 and 2.0% in day 7 (p respiratory tract infection symptoms.

  2. The significance of Candida in the human respiratory tract: our evolving understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Kathryn M; Huffnagle, Gary B; Dickson, Robert P

    2017-04-01

    Candida is an opportunistic pathogen and the most commonly isolated fungal genus in humans. Though Candida is often detected in respiratory specimens from humans with and without lung disease, its significance remains undetermined. While historically considered a commensal organism with low virulence potential, the status of Candida as an innocent bystander has recently been called into question by both clinical observations and animal experimentation. We here review what is currently known and yet to be determined about the clinical, microbiological and pathophysiological significance of the detection of Candida spp. in the human respiratory tract. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Phylogenetically distinct equine influenza viruses show different tropism for the swine respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrono, Livia V; Bonfante, Francesco; Zanardello, Claudia; Terregino, Calogero; Capua, Ilaria; Murcia, Pablo R

    2015-05-01

    Influenza A viruses circulate in a wide range of animals. H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV) is an avian-origin virus that has established in dogs as canine influenza virus (CIV) and has also been isolated from camels and pigs. Previous work suggests that mutations acquired during EIV evolution might have played a role in CIV emergence. Given the potential role of pigs as a source of human infections, we determined the ability of H3N8 EIVs to replicate in pig cell lines and in respiratory explants. We show that phylogenetically distinct EIVs display different infection phenotypes along the pig respiratory tract, but not in cell lines. Our results suggest that EIV displays a dynamic host range along its evolutionary history, supporting the view that evolutionary processes play important roles in host range and tropism and also underscoring the utility of using explant cultures to study influenza pathogenesis. © 2015 The Authors.

  4. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  5. Antibiotic treatment failure when consulting patients with respiratory tract infections in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordado Sköld, Margrethe; Aabenhus, Rune; Guassora, Ann Dorrit

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prescribing antibiotics for acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs) is common in primary healthcare although most of these infections are of viral origin and antibiotics may not be helpful. Some of these prescriptions will not be associated with a quick recovery, and might be regarded...... definition of ATF. Studies describing patients’ views are still missing. General practitioners’ experiences and views on antibiotic treatment failure in acute respiratory infections or its effects on the doctor–patient relationship have not been studied previously....... as cases of antibiotic treatment failure (ATF). Objectives: We studied antibiotic treatment failure in patients with acute RTIs from a general practitioner (GP) perspective, aiming to explore (i) GPs’ views of ATF in primary care; (ii) how ATF influences the doctor-patient relationship; and (iii) GPs...

  6. Procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment of respiratory tract infections in a primary care setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Jensen, Jens Ulrik Stæhr

    2011-01-01

    Clinical signs of infection do not allow for correct identification of bacterial and viral aetiology in acute respiratory infections. A valid tool to assist the clinician in identifying patients who will benefit from antibiotic therapy, as well as patients with a potentially serious infection......, could greatly improve patient care and limit excessive antibiotic prescriptions. Procalcitonin is a new marker of suspected bacterial infection that has shown promise in guiding antibiotic therapy in acute respiratory tract infections in hospitals without compromising patient safety. Procalcitonin...... concentrations in primary care are low and can be used primarily to rule out serious infection. However, procalcitonin measurement should not be used as the sole basis for clinical decisions; clinical skills are prerequisites for the correct use of this new tool in practice. At present there is no point...

  7. Mucosal immunity and upper respiratory tract symptoms in recreational endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihalainen, Johanna K; Schumann, Moritz; Häkkinen, Keijo; Mero, Antti A

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of a 12-week endurance-training intervention on salivary proteins and upper respiratory tract symptoms (URS) in 25 young men. Saliva samples of 25 recreational male endurance runners (age 34.6 years, body mass index = 23.8 kg·m(-2), peak aerobic capacity = 47.2 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) were collected before (PRE) and after (POST) the training intervention, in a fasting state, as well as both before and after a maximal incremental treadmill run. The training consisted of both continuous and interval training sessions, 4-6 times per week based on the polarized training approach. Participants filled in Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 and were retrospectively divided into 2 groups according to whether they reported URS (URS group, n = 13) or not (HEALTHY group, n = 12). Basal salivary immunoglobulin A (sa-sIgA) levels were significantly higher (+70%, p runners.

  8. Duration of rhinovirus shedding in the upper respiratory tract in the first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffelholz, Michael J; Trujillo, Rocio; Pyles, Richard B; Miller, Aaron L; Alvarez-Fernandez, Pedro; Pong, Dan L; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2014-12-01

    Current molecular diagnostic methods have detected rhinovirus RNA in a high proportion of asymptomatic infants and children, raising the question of the clinical significance of these findings. This study investigates the prevalence of prolonged rhinovirus RNA presence in the upper respiratory tract of infants during the first year of life. In a longitudinal study, infants were followed from birth up to 12 months. Nasopharyngeal specimens were collected monthly (months 1-6 and month 9) and during an upper respiratory infection. Rhinoviruses were detected by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Presence of repeated rhinovirus RNA was evaluated by nucleotide sequence analysis. A total of 2153 specimens from 362 infants were studied; 341 distinct rhinovirus infections in 216 infants were identified. Follow-up specimens were available within 30 days for 179 infections, creating the sample set to assess prolonged rhinovirus presence. Of the 179 infections, 46 involved the detection of the same rhinovirus strain in repeated specimens, including 8 events of prolonged presence of the same strain (detected in specimens collected >30 days apart), representing 4.5% of the evaluable rhinovirus infections. There were 26 events in which a rhinovirus strain was replaced by a different strain within a 30-day interval, representing 14.5% of the 179 infections. Although rhinovirus infections are common in healthy infants, prolonged presence of rhinovirus RNA in the respiratory tract after an upper respiratory infection was uncommon (rhinovirus RNA in an infant most likely represents an infection within a 30-day period. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. The hidden ‘mycobacteriome’ of the human healthy oral cavity and upper respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macovei, Lilia; McCafferty, Jon; Chen, Tsute; Teles, Flavia; Hasturk, Hatice; Paster, Bruce J.; Campos-Neto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of opportunistic non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections has increased considerably in the past decades causing an array of infections, including respiratory and soft-tissue infections. NTM are ubiquitous and can be found in numerous environments, including households and water plants. However, NTM have not been reported to be associated with the healthy human oral microbiome. Since the oral cavity and upper respiratory track are the main ports of entry of microorganisms into the human body, elucidating NTM diversity and prevalence will assist in the assessment of the potential risks of infection elicited by these opportunistic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of a ‘non-tuberculous mycobacteriome’ in healthy individuals. We employed a modified DNA extraction procedure in conjunction with mycobacterial-specific primers to screen niches in the oral cavity (buccal mucosa and dental plaque) and upper respiratory tract (nostrils and oropharynx) of 10 healthy subjects. A total of 50 prevalent operational taxonomic units sequenced on MiSeq (Illumina) using 16S rRNA V3–V4 region were detected across all screened niches, showing the presence of diverse NTM communities. NTM DNA was detected in the nostrils of all 10 subjects, in buccal mucosa of 8 subjects, in the oropharynx of 7 subjects, and in the dental plaques of 5 subjects. Results from quantitative PCR showed each individual harbored 103–104 predicted NTM per each screened niche. The modification of standard DNA isolation methods to increase sensitivity toward mycobacterial species represents an important step to advance the knowledge of the oral as well as the overall human microbiome. These findings clearly reveal for the first time that healthy individuals harbor a ‘non-tuberculous mycobacteriome’ in their oral cavity and upper respiratory tract and may have important implications in our understanding of infections caused by NTM. PMID:25683180

  10. The hidden ‘mycobacteriome’ of the human healthy oral cavity and upper respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Macovei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of opportunistic non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM infections has increased considerably in the past decades causing an array of infections, including respiratory and soft-tissue infections. NTM are ubiquitous and can be found in numerous environments, including households and water plants. However, NTM have not been reported to be associated with the healthy human oral microbiome. Since the oral cavity and upper respiratory track are the main ports of entry of microorganisms into the human body, elucidating NTM diversity and prevalence will assist in the assessment of the potential risks of infection elicited by these opportunistic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of a ‘non-tuberculous mycobacteriome’ in healthy individuals. We employed a modified DNA extraction procedure in conjunction with mycobacterial-specific primers to screen niches in the oral cavity (buccal mucosa and dental plaque and upper respiratory tract (nostrils and oropharynx of 10 healthy subjects. A total of 50 prevalent operational taxonomic units sequenced on MiSeq (Illumina using 16S rRNA V3–V4 region were detected across all screened niches, showing the presence of diverse NTM communities. NTM DNA was detected in the nostrils of all 10 subjects, in buccal mucosa of 8 subjects, in the oropharynx of 7 subjects, and in the dental plaques of 5 subjects. Results from quantitative PCR showed each individual harbored 103–104 predicted NTM per each screened niche. The modification of standard DNA isolation methods to increase sensitivity toward mycobacterial species represents an important step to advance the knowledge of the oral as well as the overall human microbiome. These findings clearly reveal for the first time that healthy individuals harbor a ‘non-tuberculous mycobacteriome’ in their oral cavity and upper respiratory tract and may have important implications in our understanding of infections caused by NTM.

  11. Viruses as Sole Causative Agents of Severe Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesker, Fleur M; van Kampen, Jeroen J A; van Rossum, Annemarie M C; de Hoog, Matthijs; Koopmans, Marion P G; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fraaij, Pieter L A

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A viruses are known to cause severe acute respiratory tract infections (SARIs) in children. For other viruses like human rhinoviruses (HRVs) this is less well established. Viral or bacterial co-infections are often considered essential for severe manifestations of these virus infections. The study aims at identifying viruses that may cause SARI in children in the absence of viral and bacterial co-infections, at identifying disease characteristics associated with these single virus infections, and at identifying a possible correlation between viral loads and disease severities. Between April 2007 and March 2012, we identified children (acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) (controls). Data were extracted from the clinical and laboratory databases of our tertiary care paediatric hospital. Patient specimens were tested for fifteen respiratory viruses with real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assays and we selected patients with a single virus infection only. Typical bacterial co-infections were considered unlikely to have contributed to the PICU or MC admission based on C-reactive protein-levels or bacteriological test results if performed. We identified 44 patients admitted to PICU with SARI and 40 patients admitted to MC with ARTI. Twelve viruses were associated with SARI, ten of which were also associated with ARTI in the absence of typical bacterial and viral co-infections, with RSV and HRV being the most frequent causes. Viral loads were not different between PICU-SARI patients and MC-ARTI patients. Both SARI and ARTI may be caused by single viral pathogens in previously healthy children as well as in children with a medical history. No relationship between viral load and disease severity was identified.

  12. Epidemiology of respiratory syncytial virus-associated acute lower respiratory tract infection hospitalizations among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected South African children, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Jocelyn; Cohen, Cheryl; Pretorius, Marthi; Groome, Michelle; von Gottberg, Anne; Wolter, Nicole; Walaza, Sibongile; Haffejee, Sumayya; Chhagan, Meera; Naby, Fathima; Cohen, Adam L; Tempia, Stefano; Kahn, Kathleen; Dawood, Halima; Venter, Marietjie; Madhi, Shabir A

    2013-12-15

    There are limited data on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection among children in settings with a high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We studied the epidemiology of RSV-associated acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRTI) hospitalizations among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children in South Africa. Children aged infection among HIV-infected and uninfected children were examined. The relative risk of hospitalization in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children was calculated in 1 site with population denominators. Of 4489 participants, 4293 (96%) were tested for RSV, of whom 1157 (27%) tested positive. With adjustment for age, HIV-infected children had a 3-5-fold increased risk of hospitalization with RSV-associated ALRTI (2010 relative risk, 5.6; [95% confidence interval (CI), 4.5-6.4]; 2011 relative risk, 3.1 [95% CI, 2.6-3.6]). On multivariable analysis, HIV-infected children with RSV-associated ALRTI had higher odds of death (adjusted odds ratio. 31.1; 95% CI, 5.4-179.8) and hospitalization for >5 days (adjusted odds ratio, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.5-10.6) than HIV-uninfected children. HIV-infected children have a higher risk of hospitalization with RSV-associated ALRTI and a poorer outcome than HIV-uninfected children. These children should be targeted for interventions aimed at preventing severe RSV disease.

  13. Atypical presentation of human bocavirus: Severe respiratory tract infection complicated with encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akturk, Hacer; Sık, Guntulu; Salman, Nuran; Sutcu, Murat; Tatli, Burak; Ciblak, Meral Akcay; Erol, Oguz Bulent; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Citak, Agop; Somer, Ayper

    2015-11-01

    Human bocavirus (HBOV) has been reported as a worldwide distributed respiratory pathogen. It has also been associated with encephalitis recently by detection of the virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients presented with encephalitis. This retrospective study aimed to present clinical features of HBOV infections in children with respiratory symptoms and describe unexplained encephalopathy in a subgroup of these patients. Results of 1,143 pediatric nasal samples from mid-December 2013 to July 2014 were reviewed for detection of HBOV. A multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction assay was used for viral detection. Medical records of the patients were retrospectively analyzed. HBOV was detected in 30 patients (2.6%). Median age was 14 months (5-80). Clinical diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (n = 10), bronchopneumonia (n = 9), acute bronchiolitis (n = 5), pneumonia (n = 4), acute bronchitis (n = 1), and asthma execarbation (n = 1). Hospitalization was required in 16 (53.3%) patients and 10 (62.5%) of them admitted to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Noninvasive mechanical ventilation modalities was applied to four patients and mechanical ventilation to four patients. Intractable seizures developed in four patients while mechanically ventilated on the 2nd-3rd days of PICU admission. No specific reason for encephalopathy was found after a thorough investigation. No mortality was observed, but two patients were discharged with neurological sequela. HBOV may lead to respiratory infections in a wide spectrum of severity. This report indicates its potential to cause severe respiratory infections requiring PICU admission and highlights possible clinical association of HBOV and encephalopathy, which developed during severe respiratory infection. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Indoor air quality risk factors for severe lower respiratory tract infections in Inuit infants in Baffin Region, Nunavut: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesi, T; Creery, D; Gilbert, N L; Dales, R; Fugler, D; Thompson, B; Randhawa, N; Miller, J D

    2006-08-01

    Inuit infants have extremely high rates of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), but the causes for this are unclear. The aims of this study were to assess, in young Inuit children in Baffin Region, Nunavut, the feasibility of an epidemiologic study of the association between indoor air quality (IAQ) and respiratory health; to obtain data on IAQ in their housing; and to identify and classify risk factors for LRTI. Twenty houses in Cape Dorset, Nunavut with children below 2 years of age, were evaluated using a structured housing inspection and measurement of IAQ parameters, and a respiratory health questionnaire was administered. Twenty-five percent of the children had, at some time, been hospitalized for chest illness. Houses were very small, and had a median of six occupants per house. Forty-one percent of the houses had a calculated natural air change rate risk factors related to IAQ for viral LRTI in Inuit infants were observed in this study, including reduced air exchange and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Severe lower respiratory tract infection is common in Inuit infants. We found reduced air change rates and high occupancy levels in houses in Cape Dorset, which may increase the risk of respiratory infections. This suggests the measures to promote better ventilation or more housing may be beneficial. Further health benefits may be obtained by reducing bed sharing by infants and greater turnover of mattresses, which were found to have high levels of fungi.

  15. Comparative in vitro activity of sitafloxacin against bacteria isolated from Thai patients with urinary tract infections and lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiengrim, Surapee; Phiboonbanakit, Danabhand; Thunyaharn, Sudaluck; Tantisiriwat, Woraphot; Santiwatanakul, Somchai; Susaengrat, Wattanachai; Srisurat, Nuttiya; Malithong, Amnat; Srisangchan, Praphatsorn; Thamlikitkul, Visanu

    2012-02-01

    To determine comparative in vitro activity of sitafloxacin against clinical isolates of bacteria from Thai patients with urinary tract infection and those with lower respiratory tract infection. 1,255 clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus spp, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis isolated from different Thai patients with urinary tract infection and those with lower respiratory tract infection in 2010 were included. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of sitafloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, imipenem, amikacin, ampicillin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, penicillin, piperacillin/tazobactam, vancomycin, azithromycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole were determined by standard agar dilution method. The MIC50 and MIC90 values of sitafloxacin against all tested bacteria were lowest when compared with those of levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Sitafloxacin was active against 51% of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates. The activity of sitafloxacin against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria, such as, extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli and K. pneumomiae, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii was comparable to or more than that of some beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors, cephalosporins or carbapenems. Sitafloxacin is more active than levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin against isolated bacteria from Thai patients with urinary tract and lower respiratory infections including antibiotic resistant bacteria, such as MRSA, ESBL-producing Gram-negatives, carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii.

  16. Outcome of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus related acute lower respiratory tract infection among hospitalized newborns: a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan, Serdar; Erdeve, Omer; Cakir, Ufuk; Akduman, Hasan; Zenciroglu, Aysegul; Akcakus, Mustafa; Tunc, Turan; Gokmen, Zeynel; Ates, Can; Atasay, Begum; Arsan, Saadet

    2016-01-01

    To determine the incidence and outcomes of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-related acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI) including morbidity, nosocomial infection and mortality among newborn infants who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). A multicenter, prospective study was conducted in newborns who were hospitalized with community acquired or nosocomial RSV infection in 44 NICUs throughout Turkey. Newborns with ALRI were screened for RSV infection by Respi-Strip®-test. Main outcome measures were the incidence of RSV-associated admissions in the NICUs and morbidity, mortality and epidemics results related to these admissions. The incidence of RSV infection was 1.24% (n: 250) and RSV infection constituted 19.6% of all ALRI hospitalizations, 226 newborns (90.4%) had community-acquired whereas 24 (9.6%) patients had nosocomial RSV infection in the NICUs. Of the 250 newborns, 171 (68.4%) were full-term infants, 183 (73.2%) had a BW >2500 g. RSV-related mortality rate was 1.2%. Four NICUs reported seven outbreaks on different months, which could be eliminated by palivizumab prophylaxis in one NICU. RSV-associated ALRI both in preterm and term infants accounts an important percent of hospitalizations in the season, and may threat other high-risk patients in the NICU.

  17. [Evaluation of clinical and laboratory findings of pediatric patients with adenovirus-associated respiratory tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biçer, Suat; Küçük, Oznur; Giray, Tuba; Cöl, Defne; Ciler Erdağ, Gülay; Gürol, Yeşim; Yılmaz, Gülden; Vitrinel, Ayça

    2013-04-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections caused by adenoviruses present long lasting fever for five days and elevated acute phase reactant levels. They are generally misdiagnosed as bacterial infections and are mistreated with antibiotics. The diagnosis of adenovirus infections mainly depends on direct antigen tests, virus isolation and detection of viral DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory findings of the children diagnosed as adenoviral respiratory tract infection by multiplex PCR (mPCR). A total of 27 children (18 male, 9 female; age range: 1-7 years, mean age: 4.4 years) whose nasopharyngeal swab samples were found positive for adenovirus DNA with a commercial mPCR method (Seeplex® RV15 ACE Detection Kit, Seegene Inc, Korea) were included in the study. The throat cultures of the patients revealed no bacterial pathogens and EBV VCA-IgM antibodies were negative. The clinical and laboratory data of the children with long lasting high fever diagnosed as adenovirus infection were evaluated retrospectively in terms of their complaints on admission, symptoms detected in physical examination, laboratory findings and therapy protocols. The patients were categorized according to hospitalization period ( 2) and the presence of upper or lower respiratory tract findings were evaluated if there were a difference by means of hospitalization rate and period. The most common complaint of the patients with adenoviral respiratory diseases was fever (27/27; 100%), and the most common admittance season was april-may-june period (20/27; 74%). The mean temperature was 38.4°C (range: 38-39.8°C) and the fever continued for 1-5 days after hospitalization. The most common physical examination finding was tonsillary hyperemia and hypertrophy (63%), followed by lower respiratory tract disease symptoms (37%), otitis media (14.8%), conjunctivitis (7.4%), and rash (3.7%). Laboratory tests could be performed for 24 cases and

  18. Respiratory syncytial virus shedding by children hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyama, Aya; Hashimoto, Koichi; Sato, Masatoki; Kawashima, Ryoko; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-06-01

    Children with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection shed virus for variable periods. The aim of this study was to quantify the viral load in nasopharyngeal aspirates of children with RSV throughout their hospitalization. This study included 37 children who were admitted with a diagnosis of RSV infection based on a positive rapid diagnostic test. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from patients every day, from admission to discharge. Viral detection and quantification were performed using quantitative real-time PCR. Of the 37 patients, RSV-A was detected in 29 and RSV-B in 6. Two patients were PCR-negative for any type of RSV. RSV-A was detected in 12 of 16 patients (75%) 6 days after admission. These patients shed detectable virus from days 1 to 12, and for a significantly longer period (mean 5.7 days) than RSV-B (mean 3.8 days) patients. Half of the RSV-A patients were also positive on day 14 following onset. RSV-A was detected in patients infection. To prevent nosocomial RSV infections in hospital wards, healthcare workers must take appropriate infection control measures and provide adequate guidance on hand washing to the family of the patient. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Epidemiology of human respiratory viruses in children with acute respiratory tract infections in Jinan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanqin; Wang, Shifu; Zhang, Lehai; Xu, Chao; Bian, Cuirong; Wang, Zhaoxia; Ma, Yanhui; Wang, Ke; Ma, Lixia; Meng, Chen; Ni, Caiyun; Tong, Jiabei; Li, Gongchao; Han, Jinxiang

    2013-01-01

    The viral etiologies of UTRIs and LTRIs in children in Jinan city were investigated between July 2009 and June 2010. Nasal and throat swabs were collected from 397 children with URTIs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens were collected from 323 children with LRTIs. RT-PCR/PCR was used to examine all samples for IFV, PIV, RSV, RV, hMPV, HBoV, CoV, ADV, RSV, and EV. Viral pathogens were detected in 47.10% of URTI samples and 66.57% samples, and the incidence of viral coinfection was 5.29% and 21.05%, respectively. IFV was the most common virus in URTIs, with a detection rate of 19.40%, followed by PIV (10.83%), RV (10.58%), and EV (6.30%). For LRTIs, PIV and RV were both detected in 27% of samples, followed by RSV (9.91%), HBoV (8.36%), IFV (5.57%), and hMPV (5.57%). RSV and HBoV were more prevalent in the youngest children of no more than six months. Meanwhile, RV, PIV, and RSV were the most frequent viruses combined with bacterial pathogens in LRTIs. In conclusion, the spectrum of respiratory virus infections in URTIs and LRTIs differed in terms of the most common pathogens, seasonal distribution, and coinfection rate.

  20. Epidemiology of Human Respiratory Viruses in Children with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Jinan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqin Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The viral etiologies of UTRIs and LTRIs in children in Jinan city were investigated between July 2009 and June 2010. Nasal and throat swabs were collected from 397 children with URTIs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens were collected from 323 children with LRTIs. RT-PCR/PCR was used to examine all samples for IFV, PIV, RSV, RV, hMPV, HBoV, CoV, ADV, RSV, and EV. Viral pathogens were detected in 47.10% of URTI samples and 66.57% samples, and the incidence of viral coinfection was 5.29% and 21.05%, respectively. IFV was the most common virus in URTIs, with a detection rate of 19.40%, followed by PIV (10.83%, RV (10.58%, and EV (6.30%. For LRTIs, PIV and RV were both detected in 27% of samples, followed by RSV (9.91%, HBoV (8.36%, IFV (5.57%, and hMPV (5.57%. RSV and HBoV were more prevalent in the youngest children of no more than six months. Meanwhile, RV, PIV, and RSV were the most frequent viruses combined with bacterial pathogens in LRTIs. In conclusion, the spectrum of respiratory virus infections in URTIs and LRTIs differed in terms of the most common pathogens, seasonal distribution, and coinfection rate.

  1. 158 Efficacy of Immnunotherapy with an Oral Bacterial Lysate and Vitamin C in the Primary Prevention of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Socci, Miguel; Slullitel, Pablo; Cortigiani, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    Background Airway infections are of great importance worldwide and nearly half of the pediatric consultations in industrialized countries are caused by respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are among the main causes of morbidity and mortality in children and recurrent infections of the respiratory tract are the most frequent cause of pharmacotherapy in pediatric practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of immunothe...

  2. Procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy and hospitalization in patients with lower respiratory tract infections: a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henzen Christoph

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Lower respiratory tract infections like acute bronchitis, exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and community-acquired pneumonia are often unnecessarily treated with antibiotics, mainly because of physicians' difficulties to distinguish viral from bacterial cause and to estimate disease-severity. The goal of this trial is to compare medical outcomes, use of antibiotics and hospital resources in a strategy based on enforced evidence-based guidelines versus procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy in patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Methods and design: We describe a prospective randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with an open intervention. We aim to randomize over a fixed recruitment period of 18 months a minimal number of 1002 patients from 6 hospitals in Switzerland. Patients must be >18 years of age with a lower respiratory tract infections Discussion: Use of and prolonged exposure to antibiotics in lower respiratory tract infections is high. The proposed trial investigates whether procalcitonin-guidance may safely reduce antibiotic consumption along with reductions in hospitalization costs and antibiotic resistance. It will additionally generate insights for improved prognostic assessment of patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Trial registration: ISRCTN95122877

  3. Rapid point of care diagnostic tests for viral and bacterial respiratory tract infections--needs, advances, and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Enne, Virve I; Kidd, Mike; Drosten, Christian; Breuer, Judy; Muller, Marcel A; Hui, David; Maeurer, Markus; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Al-Hakeem, Rafaat; Gray, Gregory; Gautret, Philippe; Al-Rabeeah, Abdullah A; Memish, Ziad A; Gant, Vanya

    2014-11-01

    Respiratory tract infections rank second as causes of adult and paediatric morbidity and mortality worldwide. Respiratory tract infections are caused by many different bacteria (including mycobacteria) and viruses, and rapid detection of pathogens in individual cases is crucial in achieving the best clinical management, public health surveillance, and control outcomes. Further challenges in improving management outcomes for respiratory tract infections exist: rapid identification of drug resistant pathogens; more widespread surveillance of infections, locally and internationally; and global responses to infections with pandemic potential. Developments in genome amplification have led to the discovery of several new respiratory pathogens, and sensitive PCR methods for the diagnostic work-up of these are available. Advances in technology have allowed for development of single and multiplexed PCR techniques that provide rapid detection of respiratory viruses in clinical specimens. Microarray-based multiplexing and nucleic-acid-based deep-sequencing methods allow simultaneous detection of pathogen nucleic acid and multiple antibiotic resistance, providing further hope in revolutionising rapid point of care respiratory tract infection diagnostics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF BACTERIAL AGENTS OF THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT IN SOUTH INDIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kousalya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at determining bacterial agents of the upper respiratory tract and the susceptibility patterns of isolates to antibiotics. The throat swab samples from 250 patients suspected of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI were obtained from the General Medicine outpatient department of a Rural Health Centre of Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital (RMMC and H, Annamalai University, Chidambaram, Tamilnadu, India and inoculated in the culture medium. The bacterial infection was confirmed only in 228 patients. The organisms isolated on medium were identified by their cultural, morphological and biochemical characteristics. Staphylococcus aureus was identified as the most prevalent bacterial isolate (45.61% followed by β hemolytic streptococci (22.81%. Thirty four strains (14.91% were identified as Klebsiella penumoniae, 19 (8.33% as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the rest belonged to α hemolytic streptococci, Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. All Staphylococcus spp. were resistant to penicillin, ampicillin and co-trimoxazole. All the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic. The overall resistance rates were generally low for gentamicin, cefixime and ceftazidime respectively.

  5. [Dirithromycin in the treatment of infections of the lower respiratory tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousov, Iu B; Bykov, A V; Komirova, V P; Malikov, V E; Minaev, V I

    1995-07-01

    Good results of the treatment of patients with lower respiratory tract infections with dirithromycin (Eli Lilly, USA), a new semisynthetic macrolide, were recorded. The trial included 15 patients: 6 with acute bronchitis (AB) and 9 with exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (AB) and 9 with exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (ECB). The antibiotic was administered orally in a single dose of 500 mg once a day for 7 days. The treatment efficacy was estimated by the clinical results and laboratory findings. The sputum specimens were investigated bacteriologically with testing the microflora for the drug susceptibility by using the diffusion disks. 50 per cent of the patients with AB isolated Streptococcus viridans with low (the diameter of the growth inhibition zones treatment in another 2 patients with ECB. In all the other patients the pathogen was shown to be eradicated. In the patients isolating the new pathogen the symptomatic recovery was stated in the posttherapeutic period. Therefore, diritromycin proved to be efficient in 13 out of the 15 patients with lower respiratory tract infections. It should be noted that the drug tolerance was excellent. None of the patients showed any adverse reactions.

  6. Randomized comparative study of ceftibuten versus cefaclor in the treatment of acute lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammer, R B; Ress, R

    1991-01-01

    In a randomized, single-blind trial, ceftibuten in doses of 200 mg and 300 mg administered b.i.d., was compared with cefaclor 500 mg t.i.d. in acute lower respiratory tract infections. A total 545 patients were enrolled, of which 263 were evaluable for efficacy. All patients were adults with a diagnosis of either bacterial pneumonia or bronchitis. The infective organism was eliminated in 83% of the patients in the ceftibuten 200-mg b.i.d. treatment group and in 85% of patients in the 300-mg b.i.d. treatment group. The organisms were eliminated in 79% of cefaclor-treated patients. Satisfactory clinical responses were obtained in 91% of patients in the ceftibuten 200-mg b.i.d. treatment group and in 92% of patients in the ceftibuten 300-mg b.i.d. group. Satisfactory clinical responses were obtained in 91% of cefaclor-treated patients. Predominant pathogens isolated were Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis, and strains of Enterobacteriaceae. Adverse experiences reported were similar for the ceftibuten and cefaclor treatment groups. Gastrointestinal side effects occurred in 6% of patients treated with ceftibuten 200 mg BID, 9% in those treated with 300 mg BID, and 7% of cefaclor-treated patients. Ceftibuten 200 and 300 mg twice daily was as effective as cefaclor bacteriologically and clinically in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections.

  7. [Effectiveness of ceftibuten++ in the sequential therapy of respiratory and urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, E; Ludwig, E

    1999-07-25

    A prospective, comparative, multicentre trial was performed to study the efficacy and safety of ceftibuten in respiratory and complicated urinary tract infections. Patients (n = 152) requiring parenteral 2nd or 3rd generation cephalosporine therapy were randomly assigned to continue parenteral therapy (Group A) or to receive oral ceftibuten 400 mg, or 9 mg/kgbw/day (Group B) from the 3.-5. days on. The patients, whose conditions have not improved significantly at day 3-5, were omitted from the study, so the number of evaluated patients was 131. In Group A, out of 59 patients 51 were clinically cured, the bacteriological eradication rate was 47/54. In Group B, out of 72 patients 67 were cured and 62 out of 66 pathogens were eradicated. The cost of step-down therapy was 44.3% less than the parenteral one. No adverse effect was observed that could surely be attributed to ceftibuten. According to these data, ceftibuten can be used in step-down therapy in respiratory and urinary tract infections requiring parenteral therapy at first and that offers a safe and less expensive therapeutic approach.

  8. Bacterial prevalence and antimicrobial prescribing trends for acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronman, Matthew P; Zhou, Chuan; Mangione-Smith, Rita

    2014-10-01

    Antimicrobials are frequently prescribed for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI), although many are viral. We aimed to determine bacterial prevalence rates for 5 common childhood ARTI - acute otitis media (AOM), sinusitis, bronchitis, upper respiratory tract infection, and pharyngitis- and to compare these rates to nationally representative antimicrobial prescription rates for these ARTI. We performed (1) a meta-analysis of English language pediatric studies published between 2000 and 2011 in Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library to determine ARTI bacterial prevalence rates; and (2) a retrospective cohort analysis of children age prevalence was 64.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50.5%-77.7%); Streptococcus pyogenes prevalence during pharyngitis was 20.2% (95% CI, 15.9%-25.2%). No URI or bronchitis studies met inclusion criteria, and 1 sinusitis study met inclusion criteria, identifying bacteria in 78% of subjects. Based on these condition-specific bacterial prevalence rates, the expected antimicrobial rescribing rate for ARTI overall was 27.4% (95% CI, 26.5%-28.3%). However, antimicrobial agents were prescribed in NAMCS during 56.9% (95% CI, 50.8%-63.1%) of ARTI encounters, representing an estimated 11.4 million potentially preventable antimicrobial prescriptions annually. An estimated 27.4% of US children who have ARTI have bacterial illness in the post-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era. Antimicrobials are prescribed almost twice as often as expected during outpatient ARTI visits, representing an important target for ongoing antimicrobial stewardship interventions. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Enrichment of immunoregulatory proteins in the biomolecular corona of nanoparticles within human respiratory tract lining fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhinav; Bicer, Elif Melis; Morgan, Anna Babin; Pfeffer, Paul E; Monopoli, Marco; Dawson, Kenneth A; Eriksson, Jonny; Edwards, Katarina; Lynham, Steven; Arno, Matthew; Behndig, Annelie F; Blomberg, Anders; Somers, Graham; Hassall, Dave; Dailey, Lea Ann; Forbes, Ben; Mudway, Ian S

    2016-05-01

    When inhaled nanoparticles deposit in the lungs, they transit through respiratory tract lining fluid (RTLF) acquiring a biomolecular corona reflecting the interaction of the RTLF with the nanomaterial surface. Label-free snapshot proteomics was used to generate semi-quantitative profiles of corona proteins formed around silica (SiO2) and poly(vinyl) acetate (PVAc) nanoparticles in RTLF, the latter employed as an archetype drug delivery vehicle. The evolved PVAc corona was significantly enriched compared to that observed on SiO2 nanoparticles (698 vs. 429 proteins identified); however both coronas contained a substantial contribution from innate immunity proteins, including surfactant protein A, napsin A and complement (C1q and C3) proteins. Functional protein classification supports the hypothesis that corona formation in RTLF constitutes opsonisation, preparing particles for phagocytosis and clearance from the lungs. These data highlight how an understanding of the evolved corona is necessary for the design of inhaled nanomedicines with acceptable safety and tailored clearance profiles. Inhaled nanoparticles often acquire a layer of protein corona while they go through the respiratory tract. Here, the authors investigated the identity of these proteins. The proper identification would improve the understanding of the use of inhaled nanoparticles in future therapeutics. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  11. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1-4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A-F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011-2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12-24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV-Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV-bocavirus / bocavirus-influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12-24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis.

  12. Human Coronavirus in the 2014 Winter Season as a Cause of Lower Respiratory Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu Yeun; Han, Song Yi; Kim, Ho Seong; Cheong, Hyang Min; Kim, Sung Soon; Kim, Dong Soo

    2017-01-01

    During the late autumn to winter season (October to December) in the Republic of Korea, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common pathogen causing lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Interestingly, in 2014, human coronavirus (HCoV) caused not only upper respiratory infections but also LRTIs more commonly than in other years. Therefore, we sought to determine the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, outcomes, and severity of illnesses associated with HCoV infections at a single center in Korea. We retrospectively identified patients with positive HCoV respiratory specimens between October 2014 and December 2014 who were admitted to Severance Children's Hospital at Yonsei University Medical Center for LRTI. Charts of the patients with HCoV infection were reviewed and compared with RSV infection. During the study period, HCoV was the third most common respiratory virus and accounted for 13.7% of infections. Coinfection was detected in 43.8% of children with HCoV. Interestingly, one patient had both HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63. Mild pneumonia was most common (60.4%) with HCoV, and when combined with RSV, resulted in bronchiolitis. Two patients required care in the intensive care unit. However, compared with that of RSV infection, the disease course HCoV was short. Infections caused by HCoVs are common, and can cause LRTIs. During an epidemic season, clinicians should be given special consideration thereto. When combined with other medical conditions, such as neurologic or cardiologic diseases, intensive care unit (ICU) care may be necessary.

  13. S. mansoni bolsters anti-viral immunity in the murine respiratory tract.

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    Sebastian Scheer

    Full Text Available The human intestinal parasite Schistosoma mansoni causes a chronic disease, schistosomiasis or bilharzia. According to the current literature, the parasite induces vigorous immune responses that are controlled by Th2 helper cells at the expense of Th1 helper cells. The latter cell type is, however, indispensable for anti-viral immune responses. Remarkably, there is no reliable literature among 230 million patients worldwide describing defective anti-viral immune responses in the upper respiratory tract, for instance against influenza A virus or against respiratory syncitial virus (RSV. We therefore re-examined the immune response to a human isolate of S. mansoni and challenged mice in the chronic phase of schistosomiasis with influenza A virus, or with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM, a mouse virus to model RSV infections. We found that mice with chronic schistosomiasis had significant, systemic immune responses induced by Th1, Th2, and Th17 helper cells. High serum levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-13, IL-2, IL-17, and GM-CSF were found after mating and oviposition. The lungs of diseased mice showed low-grade inflammation, with goblet cell hyperplasia and excessive mucus secretion, which was alleviated by treatment with an anti-TNF-α agent (Etanercept. Mice with chronic schistosomiasis were to a relative, but significant extent protected from a secondary viral respiratory challenge. The protection correlated with the onset of oviposition and TNF-α-mediated goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus secretion, suggesting that these mechanisms are involved in enhanced immune protection to respiratory viruses during chronic murine schistosomiasis. Indeed, also in a model of allergic airway inflammation mice were protected from a viral respiratory challenge with PVM.

  14. Modeling of indoor 222Rn distribution in ventilated room and resulting radiation doses measured in the respiratory tract

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    R. Rabi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of radiation hazard of indoor radon is largely due to the radon progenies, which are inhaled and deposited in the human respiratory tract. It is therefore important to understanding the distribution of radon and their progeny in indoor environment helps in calculating the inhalation doses due to them. This paper focuses on effects of exhalation from different sources (wall, floor and ceiling and the ventilation profile on distribution of the concentrations of radon and their progeny indoor. The radon exhalation rate from walls, floor and ceiling, and ventilation rate were measured as a part of this study and are used as input in Finite Volume Method (FVM simulation. The findings show that the radon concentration which is distributed in a non-homogeneous way in the room is due to the difference in the radon concentration of different sources (wall, floor and ceiling. Moreover, the radon concentration is much larger near walls, and decreases in the middle of the room because of the effect of air velocity. It has also been found that the distributions of unattached and attached fraction of 218Po, 214Pb and 214Po radionuclides are similar to that of 222Rn. In addition, equilibrium fraction F and the unattached fraction ( fj  of 218Po, 214Pb and 214Po radionuclides for different values of the attachment rate were evaluated. The committed equivalent doses due to 218Po and 214Po radon short-lived progeny were evaluated in different tissues of the respiratory tract of workers from the inhalation of indoor air.

  15. Vitamin D3 supplementation in patients with frequent respiratory tract infections: a randomised and double-blind intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Peter; Norlin, Anna-Carin; Hansen, Susanne; Rekha, Rokeya Sultana; Agerberth, Birgitta; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Ekström, Lena; Lindh, Jonatan D; Andersson, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Low serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) are associated with an increased risk of respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Clinical trials with vitamin D(3) against various infections have been carried out but data are so far not conclusive. Thus, there is a need for additional randomised controlled trials of effects of vitamin D(3) on infections. To investigate if supplementation with vitamin D(3) could reduce infectious symptoms and antibiotic consumption among patients with antibody deficiency or frequent RTIs. A double-blind randomised controlled trial. Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge. 140 patients with antibody deficiency (selective IgA subclass deficiency, IgG subclass deficiency, common variable immune disorder) and patients with increased susceptibility to RTIs (>4 bacterial RTIs/year) but without immunological diagnosis. Vitamin D(3) (4000 IU) or placebo was given daily for 1 year. The primary endpoint was an infectious score based on five parameters: symptoms from respiratory tract, ears and sinuses, malaise and antibiotic consumption. Secondary endpoints were serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3), microbiological findings and levels of antimicrobial peptides (LL-37, HNP1-3) in nasal fluid. The overall infectious score was significantly reduced for patients allocated to the vitamin D group (202 points) compared with the placebo group (249 points; adjusted relative score 0.771, 95% CI 0.604 to 0.985, p=0.04). A single study centre, small sample size and a selected group of patients. The sample size calculation was performed using p=0.02 as the significance level whereas the primary and secondary endpoints were analysed using the conventional p=0.05 as the significance level. Supplementation with vitamin D(3) may reduce disease burden in patients with frequent RTIs.

  16. Daycare attendance and respiratory tract infections: a prospective birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuez-Havupalo, Linnea; Toivonen, Laura; Karppinen, Sinikka; Kaljonen, Anne; Peltola, Ville

    2017-09-05

    We explored the burden of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in young children with regard to day-care initiation. Longitudinal prospective birth cohort study. We recruited 1827 children for follow-up until the age of 24 months collecting diary data on RTIs and daycare. Children with continuous daycare type and complete data were divided into groups of centre-based daycare (n=299), family day care (FDC) (n=245) and home care (n=350). Using repeated measures variance analyses, we analysed days per month with symptoms of respiratory tract infection, antibiotic treatments and parental absence from work for a period of 6 months prior to and 9 months after the start of daycare. We documented a significant effect of time and type of daycare, as well as a significant interaction between them for all outcome measures. There was a rise in mean days with symptoms from 3.79 (95% CI 3.04 to 4.53) during the month preceding centre-based daycare to 10.57 (95% CI 9.35 to 11.79) at 2 months after the start of centre-based daycare, with a subsequent decrease within the following 9 months. Similar patterns with a rise and decline were observed in the use of antibiotics and parental absences. The start of FDC had weaker effects. Our findings were not changed when taking into account confounding factors. Our study shows the rapid increase in respiratory infections after start of daycare and a relatively fast decline in the course of time with continued daycare. It is important to support families around the beginning of daycare. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. [Antibiotic prescribing patterns for pediatric inpatients with acute respiratory tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escorihuela Esteban, R; Fernández Merchán, J A; Millán Jiménez, A; Carrión Mera, T; Gadea Gironés, I

    2000-02-01

    Children with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) represent an important target group for efforts aimed at reducing unnecessary antibiotic use. To present the epidemiological data and evaluate the effect of clinical, laboratory, radiological and microbiological data on the decision to prescribe antibiotics to pediatric patients with ARTI as well as to seek criteria that would justify antibiotic use. A retrospective review was made of the clinical histories of 147 previously healthy children, consecutively admitted to our hospital with ARTI for 1 year (May 1996-April 1997). Patients were divided in two groups: those not treated with antibiotics (n = 92) and those treated (n = 55). Data from the two groups were compared with a statistical computer program (R-Sigma). Of the 147 patients studied, mean age was 2.5 years (range 0-14 years) and 85 (58%) males. One-hundred-and-five patients (72%) had previously been attended to in the emergency room, and 45 patients (30%) had been treated with antibiotics. Upper respiratory tract infection was diagnosed in 81 patients (54%), bronchitis in 28 (18%), bronchiolitis in 23 (15%) and pneumonia in 15 (10%). Ninety-seven patients (66%) had viral infection and only two (1%) had bacterial infection. Syncytial respiratory virus was isolated in 41 patients (28%) and adenovirus in 30 (20%). In the untreated group, the longer duration of symptoms before admission, lymphocytosis, clinical diagnosis of bronchiolitis and normal thorax X-ray, were statistically significant. In the treated group, fever, leukocytosis, neutrophilia and a diagnosis of pneumonia were statistically significant. Length of stay was longer in this group than in the untreated group. It is difficult to prescribe antibiotics on the basis of bacteriologic data. Laboratory, analytic and radiological data can be helpful in the rational use of antibiotics.

  18. Limited Evidence on the Management of Respiratory Tract Infections in Down's Syndrome: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikam, Logan; Reed, Kate; Venekamp, Roderick P; Hayward, Andrew; Littlejohns, Peter; Schilder, Anne; Lakhanpaul, Monica

    2016-10-01

    To systematically review the effectiveness of preventative and therapeutic interventions for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in people with Down's syndrome. Databases were searched for any published and ongoing studies of respiratory tract diseases in children and adults with Down's syndrome. These databases were searched for controlled trials, cohort studies and controlled before-after studies. Trial registries were searched for ongoing studies. Initially, all study types were included to provide a broad overview of the existing evidence base. However, those with a critical risk of bias were excluded using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. A total of 13,575 records were identified from which 5 studies fulfilled the eligibility criteria and 3 fulfilled our criteria for data extraction. One randomized controlled trial of moderate risk of bias compared zinc therapy with placebo. Outcome data were only reported for 50 (78%) children who presented with extreme symptoms; no benefit of zinc therapy was found. One non-randomized controlled trial with serious risk of bias included 26 children and compared pidotimod (an immunostimulant) with no treatment; pidotimod was associated with fewer upper RTI recurrences compared with no treatment (1.43 vs. 3.82). A prospective cohort study with moderate risk of bias compared 532 palivizumab treated children with 233 untreated children and found that children treated with palivizumab had fewer respiratory syncytial virus-related hospitalization (23 untreated and 8 treated), but the same number of overall RTI-related hospitalizations (73 untreated and 74 treated) in the first 2 years of life. The evidence base for the management of RTIs in people with Down's syndrome is incomplete; current studies included children only and carry a moderate to serious risk of bias. Methodologic rigorous studies are warranted to guide clinicians in how best to prevent and treat RTIs in children with Down's syndrome.

  19. Limited Evidence on the Management of Respiratory Tract Infections in Down’s Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kate; Venekamp, Roderick P.; Hayward, Andrew; Littlejohns, Peter; Schilder, Anne; Lakhanpaul, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To systematically review the effectiveness of preventative and therapeutic interventions for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in people with Down’s syndrome. Methods: Databases were searched for any published and ongoing studies of respiratory tract diseases in children and adults with Down’s syndrome. These databases were searched for controlled trials, cohort studies and controlled before–after studies. Trial registries were searched for ongoing studies. Initially, all study types were included to provide a broad overview of the existing evidence base. However, those with a critical risk of bias were excluded using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Results: A total of 13,575 records were identified from which 5 studies fulfilled the eligibility criteria and 3 fulfilled our criteria for data extraction. One randomized controlled trial of moderate risk of bias compared zinc therapy with placebo. Outcome data were only reported for 50 (78%) children who presented with extreme symptoms; no benefit of zinc therapy was found. One non-randomized controlled trial with serious risk of bias included 26 children and compared pidotimod (an immunostimulant) with no treatment; pidotimod was associated with fewer upper RTI recurrences compared with no treatment (1.43 vs. 3.82). A prospective cohort study with moderate risk of bias compared 532 palivizumab treated children with 233 untreated children and found that children treated with palivizumab had fewer respiratory syncytial virus-related hospitalization (23 untreated and 8 treated), but the same number of overall RTI-related hospitalizations (73 untreated and 74 treated) in the first 2 years of life. Conclusions: The evidence base for the management of RTIs in people with Down’s syndrome is incomplete; current studies included children only and carry a moderate to serious risk of bias. Methodologic rigorous studies are warranted to guide clinicians in how best to prevent and treat RTIs in children with Down

  20. Glass fibers and vapor phase components of cigarette smoke as cofactors in experimental respiratory tract carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feron, V.J.; Kuper, C.F.; Spit, B.J.; Reuzel, P.G.; Woutersen, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Syrian golden hamsters were given intratracheal instillations of glass fibers with or without BP suspended in saline, once a fortnight for 52 weeks; the experiment was terminated at week 85. No tumors of the respiratory tract were observed in hamsters treated with glass fibers alone. There was no indication that glass fibers enhanced the development of respiratory tract tumors induced by BP. In another study Syrian golden hamsters were exposed to fresh air or to a mixture of 4 major vapor phase components of cigarette smoke, viz. isoprene (800----700 ppm), methyl chloride (1000----900 ppm), methyl nitrite (200----190 ppm) and acetaldehyde (1400----1200 ppm) for a period of at most 23 months. Some of the animals were also given repeated intratracheal instillations of BP or norharman in saline. Laryngeal tumors were found in 7/31 male and 6/32 female hamsters exposed only to the vapor mixture, whereas no laryngeal tumors occurred in controls. The tumor response of the larynx most probably has to be ascribed entirely to the action of acetaldehyde. Simultaneous treatment with norharman or BP did not affect the tumor response of the larynx. Acetaldehyde may occur in the vapor phase of cigarette smoke at levels up to 2000 ppm. Chronic inhalation exposure of rats to acetaldehyde at levels of 0 (controls), 750, 1500 or 3000----1000 ppm resulted in a high incidence of nasal carcinomas, both squamous cell carcinomas of the respiratory epithelium and adenocarcinomas of the olfactory epithelium. It was discussed that acetaldehyde may significantly contribute to the induction of bronchogenic cancer by cigarette smoke in man.

  1. Risk factors and features of recurrent bacterial complications of upper respiratory tract viral infections in children

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    Karpenko A.V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine risk factors for recurrent bacterial complications of the upper respiratory tract viral infection (URTI in children, as well as the clinical and immunological features of the course of such complications. We enrolled 214 children aged 3-18 years with URTIs complicated with acute otitis media or acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Frequency of bacterial complications of URI in 128 children was low (group I and in 86 children it met the criteria of recurrent course (group II. In addition to the standard examination, lysozyme levels in the oropharyngeal secretion were determined three times during the disease. It was found that children of group II were characterized by an early debut of respiratory morbidity (at the age of 6.00 (4.00, 12.00 months against 13.00 (4.50, 16.00 months in children of group I (p<0,0001, as well as a longer duration of catarrhal and intoxication syndromes in similar forms of the disease. The most significant risk factors for the formation of the recurring complication pattern were maternal smoking (OR=2.73, 95% CI [1.34, 5.48], along with gastroenterological pathology and frequent URTI in the mother and a shortened period of breastfeeding. In children with recurrent bacterial complications of URTI, there was an impaired local resistance of the upper respiratory tract mucous membranes (as a decrease in the concentrations of lysozyme in all periods of the disease, which persisted after recovery.

  2. Respiratory Tract Deposition of HFA-Beclomethasone and HFA-Fluticasone in Asthmatic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Chet L; Kuehl, Philip J; Chand, Ramesh; McDonald, Jacob D

    2016-04-01

    The asthmatic patient's respiratory tract deposition of HFA fluticasone (Flovent HFA(™)) has not been established. There is a known large particle size difference with another commercial inhaled HFA steroid (QVAR(™)). This study compared the 2D and 3D respiratory tract deposition of each inhaled steroid. This study was an open label, crossover study in eight patients diagnosed with asthma. The regional respiratory and oropharyngeal deposition of the two steroids were compared and contrasted using planar and SPECT imaging following delivery of the (99m)Tc-radiolabeled drug in each product. The SPECT images were merged with computed tomography images to quantify regional deposition within the patients. Two-dimensional (2D) planar images indicated that 24% of the Flovent HFA dose and 55% of the QVAR dose deposited in the lungs. 2D oropharyngeal deposition indicated that 75% of the Flovent HFA dose was deposited in the oropharynx, while 42% of the QVAR dose deposited in the oropharynx. Three-dimensional (3D) SPECT data indicated that 22% of the Flovent HFA dose and 53% of the QVAR dose deposited in the lungs. 3D oropharyngeal and gut deposition indicated 78% of the Flovent HFA dose was deposited in the oropharynx, while 47% of the QVAR dose deposited in the oropharynx. The increased lung deposition and decreased oropharynx deposition for both 2D and 3D image data of QVAR were statistically different from Flovent HFA. QVAR exhibited a significant increase in lung delivery compared to Flovent HFA. Conversely, QVAR delivered a significantly lower dose to the oropharynx than Flovent HFA. The findings were presumed to be driven by the smaller particle size of QVAR (0.7 microns MMAD) compared with Flovent HFA (2.0 microns MMAD).

  3. Prevalence of adenovirus in children with acute respiratory tract infection in Lanzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yu; Zhang, Rong-fang; Xie, Zhi-ping; Yan, Kun-long; Gao, Han-chun; Song, Jing-rong; Yuan, Xin-Hui; Hou, Yun-de; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2013-08-29

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) is an important agent causing respiratory tract infection in children. Information on the epidemiological and clinical features of HAdV is limited in children with acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in China, especially those of a novel genotype, Ad55. In total, 1169 nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children younger than 14 years with ARTIs between November 2006 and November 2009. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen HAdVs. All PCR-positive products were sequenced. 74 of 1169 (6.33%) specimens were positive for HAdVs. Among positive cases, AdV3 (58/74) was detected most frequently, followed by AdV11 (10/74), AdV2 (2/74), AdV7 (2/69), AdV6 (1/74), and AdV1 (1/74). AdV55 was found in one case. The incidence of HAdV infection peaked in children aged 3-7 years. The most common clinical diagnosis was upper respiratory infection, and the most common syndrome was fever and cough.The comparison of HAdV and RSV group revealed that Children infected with group AdV were significant older than children infected with group RSV, had more fever but less frequently wheezing, and cough, crackles, and cyanosis, The duration of hospitalization between the AdV group and RSV group was not significant, but a greater frequency of LRTIs was observed in RSV group. HAdV is an important viral agent in children with ARTIs in Lanzhou City, China. Multiple HAdV serotypes co-circulated with Ad3, which was predominant in this 3-year study. The novel AdV55 genotype was found in one case. No fixed seasonal rhythm could be identified.

  4. CLINICAL PROFILE OF ACUTE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN BETWEEN 2MONTHS TO 5 YEARS

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    Amitoj Singh Chhina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Acute respiratory infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in under - five children in developing countries. Hence, the present study was undertaken to study the various risk factors, clinical profile and outcome of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI in children aged 2 month to 5 years. OBJECTIVE : clinical features, laborato ry assessment and morbidity and mortality pattern associated with acute lower respiratory tract infections in children aged 2 months to 5 years. METHODS: 100 ALRI cases fulfilling WHO criteria for pneumonia, in the age group of 2 month to 5 years were evaluated for clinical profile as per a predesigned proforma in a rural medical college. RESULTS : Of cases 61% were infants and remaining 39%12 - 60 months age group, males outnumbered females with sex ratio of 1.3;1. Elevated total leukocyte counts for age were observed in only 22% of cases, of these 3% were having pneumonia, 9% severe pneumonia and 10% very severe pneumonia. Significant association was found between leukocytosis and ALRI severity (p= 0.0001 Positive blood culture was obtained in 8% of cases and was significantly associated with ALRI severity (p=. 0.027. Among the ALRI cases, 84% required oxygen supplementation at any time during the hospital stay and 8% required mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 1%; with 99% of cases recovering and getting discharged uneventfully. CONCLUSION : Among the clinical variables, the signs and symptoms of ALRI as per the WHO ARI Control Programme were found in almost all cases. Regarding the laboratory profile, leukocytosis and blood culture positivity w ere observed in a small percentage, but significant association with ALRI severity was observed for both. Thus, clinical signs, and not invasive blood tests are a better diagnostic tools, though the latter may provide additional therapeutic and prognostic information in severe disease

  5. Influence of systemic fluoroquinolone administration on the presence of Pasteurella multocida in the upper respiratory tract of clinically healthy calves

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    Kehrenberg Corinna

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The influence of enrofloxacin administration (5 mg/kg for five consecutive days on the occurrence of Pasteurella multocida in the upper respiratory tract of two healthy calves was monitored over a 10-day period. From nasal swabs of two additional healthy control calves, which received a placebo saline administration, P. multocida was isolated throughout the study period. In the enrofloxacin treated calves, P. multocida was not demonstrated in the nasopharynx from 48 h after the first injection until two days after the last administration, when P. multocida reappeared and proved to be clonal in nature to the original isolates. During the experiment, no change in minimal inhibitory concentration for enrofloxacin of the P. multocida isolates was detected (MIC ≤ 0.015 μg/mL. Enrofloxacin concentrations were determined in the plasma by a high-performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection. The PK/PD indices AUC/MIC and Cmax/MIC ratio were calculated and found to be 1157.7 and 129.8, respectively. Remarkably, the respiratory pathogen Arcanobacterium pyogenes became the predominant recovered organism in the nasopharynx of one animal following enrofloxacin therapy throughout the remaining of the experiment.

  6. Pitfalls in interpretation of CT-values of RT-PCR in children with acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishaupt, Jérôme O; Ploeg, Tjeerd van der; Smeets, Leo C; Groot, Ronald de; Versteegh, Florens G A; Hartwig, Nico G

    2017-05-01

    The relation between viral load and disease severity in childhood acute respiratory tract infections (ARI) is not fully understood. To assess the clinical relevance of the relation between viral load, determined by cycle threshold (CT) value of real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays and disease severity in children with single- and multiple viral ARI. 582 children with ARI were prospectively followed and tested for 15 viruses. Correlations were calculated between CT values and clinical parameters. In single viral ARI, statistically significant correlations were found between viral loads of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and hospitalization and between viral loads of Human Coronavirus (HCoV) and a disease severity score. In multiple-viral ARI, statistically significant correlations between viral load and clinical parameters were found. In RSV-Rhinovirus (RV) multiple infections, a low viral load of RV was correlated with a high length of hospital stay and a high duration of extra oxygen use. The mean CT value for RV, HCoV and Parainfluenza virus was significantly lower in single- versus multiple infections. Although correlations between CT values and clinical parameters in patients with single and multiple viral infection were found, the clinical importance of these findings is limited because individual differences in host-, viral and laboratory factors complicate the interpretation of statistically significant findings. In multiple infections, viral load cannot be used to differentiate between disease causing virus and innocent bystanders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adenovirus infection in children with acute lower respiratory tract infections in Beijing, China, 2007 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyan; Xiao, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Ren, Lili; Li, Jianguo; Xie, Zhengde; Xu, Baoping; Yang, Yan; Qian, Suyun; Wang, Jianwei; Shen, Kunling

    2015-10-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV) play a significant role in pediatric respiratory tract infections. To date, over 60 types of HAdV have been identified. Here, HAdV types are characterized in children in the Beijing area with acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTIs) and the clinical features and laboratory findings of hospitalized HAdV-infected cases are described. Respiratory specimens were collected from pediatric patients with ALRTIs in the emergency department or from those admitted to Beijing Children's Hospital between March 2007 and December 2012. Infections with common respiratory viruses were determined by PCR or RT-PCR. HAdV positive samples were further typed by PCR and sequencing. Among 3356 patients with ALRTIs, 194 (5.8 %) were found to have HAdV infection. HAdV infection was primarily confined to children (88.35 %) less than 5 years of age. A total of 11 different types of HAdV were detected throughout the study period, with HAdV-B7 (49.0 %) and HAdV-B3 (26.3 %) as the most prevalent types, followed by HAdV-C2 (7.7 %) and HAdVC1 (4.6 %). Newly emerging and re-emergent types or variants, HAdV-B55 (n = 5), HAdV-C57 (n = 3), and HAdV-B14p1 (n = 1), were identified. Results also included the reported first case of co-infection with HAdV-C2 and HAdV-C57. Clinical entities of patients with single HAdV infection (n = 49) were similar to those with mixed HAdV/respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections (n = 41). Patients with HAdV-B7 infection had longer duration of fever and higher serum levels of muscle enzymes than HAdV-B3-infected patients. During the study period, HAdV-B7 and HAdV-B3 were the predominant types identified in pediatric ALRTIs. HAdV-B7 infection tends to have more severe clinical consequences. The presence of newly emerging types or variants and co-infection with different types of HAdV highlights the need for constant and close surveillance of HAdV infection.

  8. An association of serum vitamin D concentrations respiratory tract infection in young Finnish men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaksi, Ilkka; Ruohola, Juha-Petri; Tuohimaa, Pentti; Auvinen, Anssi; Haataja, Riina; Pihlajamäki, Harri; Ylikomi, Timo

    2007-09-01

    The effects of vitamin D in regulating bone mineralization are well documented. The action of vitamin D as a key link between Toll-like receptor activation and antibacterial responses in innate immunity has recently been shown. The data suggest that differences in the ability of human populations to produce vitamin D may contribute to susceptibility to microbial infection. We aimed to explore whether an association exists between vitamin D insufficiency and acute respiratory tract infection in young Finnish men. Young Finnish men (n = 800) serving on a military base in Finland were enrolled for this study. Their serum 25-hydroxyvitamin [25(OH)D] concentrations were measured in July 2002. They were followed for 6 mo, and the number of days of absence from duty due to respiratory infection were counted. The mean (+/- SD) serum 25(OH)D concentrations were 80.2 +/- 29.3 nmol/L (n = 756). Subjects with serum 25(OH)D concentrations respiratory infection (median: 4; quartile 1-quartile 3: 2-6) than did control subjects (2; 0-4; n = 628; incidence rate ratio 1.63; 95% CI: 1.15, 2.24). We found a significant (P = 0.004) association between serum 25(OH)D concentrations and the amount of physical exercise before induction into military service. We also found significantly (P vitamin D supplementation are needed to investigate whether it enhances immunity to microbial infections.

  9. Deciphering upper respiratory tract microbiota complexity in healthy calves and calves that develop respiratory disease using shotgun metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, Natália C; Lima, Svetlana F; Teixeira, Andre G; Ganda, Erika K; Oikonomou, Georgios; Gregory, Lilian; Bicalho, Rodrigo C

    2017-02-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a multifactorial disorder responsible for severe economic losses in dairy and feedlot herds. Advances in next-generation sequencing mean that microbial communities in clinical samples, including non-culturable bacteria, can be characterized. Our aim was to evaluate the microbiota of the upper respiratory tract of healthy calves and calves with BRD using whole-genome sequencing (shotgun metagenomics). We performed deep nasopharyngeal swabs on 16 Holstein heifer calves (10 healthy and 6 diagnosed with BRD during the study) at 14 and 28 d of life in 1 dairy herd near Ithaca, New York. Total DNA was extracted, and whole-genome sequencing was performed using the MiSeq Illumina platform (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Samples included 5 predominant phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Tenericutes. At the genus level, we observed differences between groups for Pseudomonas spp. At the species level, Mannheimia haemolytica was the most abundant bacterium detected. We detected significant differences between groups of calves in the relative abundance of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Pasteurella multocida was among the 20 most abundant species, and Moraxella catarrhalis, commonly associated with pneumonia in humans, was detected in all groups. Analysis of resistance to antibiotics and compounds profiling revealed differences in cobalt-zinc-cadmium resistance. Further research to elucidate the role of Moraxella catarrhalis in BRD is warranted. Genes that were resistant to cobalt-zinc-cadmium, observed mostly in calves with BRD, might be associated with difficulties in antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Respiratory Tract Infection Clinical Trials from 2007 to 2012. A Systematic Review of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruopp, Marcus; Chiswell, Karen; Thaden, Joshua T; Merchant, Kunal; Tsalik, Ephraim L

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory tract infections are highly prevalent and variable, and confer considerable morbidity and mortality. There is a growing need for new treatments for such infections, particularly in the setting of worsening antibacterial resistance. We analyzed data from ClinicalTrials.gov to summarize activity in respiratory infection trials, identify gaps in research activity, and inform efforts to address disparities between antimicrobial resistance and development of new antibacterial drugs. We examined 69,779 interventional trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov from 2007 to 2012, focusing on study conditions and interventions to identify respiratory infection-related trials. Programmatic identification with manual confirmation yielded 6,253 infectious disease trials, 1,377 respiratory infection trials, and 270 lower respiratory tract infection trials for analysis. The 1,377 respiratory infection trials accounted for 2% of all trials and 22% of infectious diseases trials. Such trials (54.8%) were more likely than either nonrespiratory infectious diseases trials (48.1%) or noninfectious disease trials (42.8%) to receive industry funding. Stratification of respiratory infection trials by registration year demonstrated declining industry funding: 181 (64.9%) in 2007-2008 to 110 (46.0%) in 2011-2012. Respiratory infection trials more frequently evaluated vaccines (52.7 vs. 15.5% of nonrespiratory tract infection trials). Lower respiratory tract infection trials (excluding tuberculosis) focused primarily on bacterial pathogens (78.5%) followed by viral (12.6%), fungal (5.6%), and nontuberculous mycobacterial (3.0%) pathogens. Approximately 40% of 120 lower respiratory tract infection trials that were completed or terminated published results in the literature. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, a treatment focus was associated with decreased odds of publishing results (odds ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.82; P = 0.02). There were also

  11. Immune parameters, symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections, and training-load indicators in volleyball athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rodrigo Dias1, Anelena Bueno Frollini1, Diego Trevisan Brunelli1, André Katayama Yamada1, Richard Diego Leite4, Ricardo Adamoli Simões1, Guilherme Souza Lobo Salles1, Débora Trevisan1, Idico Luiz Pellegrinotti1, Marcelo de Castro César1, Silvia Cristina Crepaldi Alves1, Rozangela Verlengia1, João Paulo Borin2, Jonato Prestes2,3, Claudia Regina Cavaglieri21Núcleo de Performance Humana, Mestrado em Educação Física, Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brasil; 2Faculdade de Educação Física (FEF Universidade Estadual de Campinas – UNICAMP, Campinas, Brasil; 3Programa de Mestrado e Doutorado em Educação Física, Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasília, Brasil; 4Laboratório de Pesquisa Clínica e Experimental em Biologia Vascular (BioVasc, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrasilBackground: The control of immunological alterations becomes important during in-season training, as a result of increased incidence of infectious diseases, and may assist in avoiding interruptions to training due to illness.Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate 28 weeks of chronic immune modulations in female volleyball athletes.Methods: The sample was composed of twelve athletes aged 19.47 ± 2.49 years, height 1.78 ± 0.08 cm, and body mass 66.77 ± 7.8 kg. Leukocytes, individual immune cell count, interleukin (IL-2, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α plasma cytokines were measured during the competitive period.Results: Results revealed that immune variables were correlated with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections and training-load indicators, indicating a possible marker of immune status. There was a statistically significant increase in total leukocytes, neutrophils, and monocyte count, a decrease in lymphocytes, and an increase in upper respiratory tract infection symptoms, with no change

  12. Human metapneumovirus found in clinical materials of children with respiratory tract diseases

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    Katarina Logar

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human metapneumovirus (hMPV was first recognized in the Netherlands in 2001. Since then, it has been documented all over the world as a cause of human respiratory infections in all age groups. The objective of this study was to introduce and optimize an assay for detecting hMPV in clinical material of our patients. To date, there has not been a report that describes the detection of this virus in Slovenia.Methods: A total of 58 specimens, randomly collected during 2003/2004 from the patients ≤ 19 years old with respiratory disease and 20 specimens collected in 1997 were tested for hMPV. Extraction of RNA from frozen specimens and subsequent single-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR were performed. Human metapneumovirus amplicons were determined by electrophoresis in a 2 % (w/v agarose gel.Results: Human metapneumovirus was detected in 13/58 (22 % specimens; 10/40 (25 % specimens were from the upper and 3/18 (17 % from the lower respiratory tract. The mean age of infected patients was 3.2 ± 2.2 years. Out of 13 of the hMPV-positive specimens, 9 were positive also for another respiratory virus. Two of 20 (10 % archival specimens were hMPV-positive.Conclusions: This study is the first report about hMPV in Slovenia. Human metapneumovirus was detected as the second most frequent virus after RSV in children < 3 years of age. The virus was not found in the specimens from the children younger than 2 months. Based on the hMPV-positive results in archival clinical material, it is suggested that hMPV had circulated in Slovenia before the time it was discovered.

  13. Functional and genetic predisposition to rhinovirus lower respiratory tract infections in prematurely born infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Simon B; Alcazar, Mireia; Wilson, Theresa; Smith, Melvyn; Zuckerman, Mark; Hodemaekers, Hennie M; Janssen, Riny; Bont, Louis; Johnston, Sebastian L; Greenough, Anne

    2016-12-01

    Term born infants are predisposed to human rhinovirus (HRV) lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) by reduced neonatal lung function and genetic susceptibility. Our aim was to investigate whether prematurely born infants were similarly predisposed to HRV LRTIs or any other viral LRTIs. Infants born less than 36 weeks of gestational age were recruited. Prior to neonatal/maternity unit discharge, lung function (functional residual capacity by helium gas dilution and multiple breath washout, lung clearance index and compliance (Crs), and resistance (Rrs) of the respiratory system) was assessed and DNA samples assessed for eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven genes: ADAM33, IL10, MMP16 NFκB1A,SFTPC, VDR, and NOS2A. Infants were prospectively followed until 1 year corrected age. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were sent whenever an infant developed a LRTI and tested for 13 viruses. One hundred and thirty-nine infants were included in the analysis. Infants who developed HRV LRTIs had reduced Crs (1.6 versus 1.2 mL/cmH2O/kg, p = 0.044) at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. A SNP in the gene coding for the vitamin D receptor was associated with the development of HRV LRTIs and any viral LRTIs (p = 0.02). Prematurely born infants may have both a functional and genetic predisposition to HRV LRTIs. What is Known: • Term born infants are predisposed to rhinovirus lower respiratory tract (HRV LRTIs) infection by reduced neonatal lung function. • Term born infants requiring hospitalisation due to HRV bronchiolitis were more likely to have single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the IL-10 gene. What is New: • Prematurely born infants who developed a HRV LRTI had lower C rs before maternity unit discharge. • A SNP in the gene coding for the vitamin D receptor was associated with the development of HRV LRTIs and overall respiratory viral LRTIs in prematurely born infants.

  14. Bacteria etiological agents causing respiratory tract infections in children and their resistance patterns to a panel of ten antibiotics

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    Nweze EI

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the bacteria etiological agents of respiratory tract infection among 280 school children in South East Nigeria, and to determine their antimicrobial resistance patterns to a panel of ten antibiotics. Methods: Throat swabs (280 were collected from students in four boarding schools located in Enugu and Onitsha metropolis. Standard microbiological procedures were used to screen these swabs to determine the prevalence of respiratory pathogens while the disc diffusion test was used to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns of the recovered isolates. Results: Of the 280 samples screened, 57.1% were positive. Haemophilus influenzae was the most prevalent (16.1%, followed by Streptococcus pyogenes (13.9%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (12.5%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (6.8%, Staphylococcus aureus (5.4% and Corynebacterium diphtheriae (2.5%. More isolates were recovered in the two male schools investigated. However, there was no significant difference in the overall prevalence of isolates according to sex or school location of the subjects. Greater number of isolates (56% was recovered from those aged 11-14 years. This was statistically significant (P<0.05, compared to the other two age groups (15-18 years and 19-23 years. The pattern of resistance varied according to the bacteria species. There were multi-resistant isolates. Since these students stand the risk of contracting respiratory tract infection particularly from reservoirs among them, there is need to increase surveillance and develop better strategies to curb the increasing prevalence of respiratory tract infection in this and other similar regions of Africa. Conclusions: The spectrum of bacteria causing respiratory tract infection is still wide in Nigeria. Many isolates showed appreciable levels of antibiotic resistance apparently due to antibiotic abuse. Development of new strategies to curb this increasing prevalence of respiratory tract infection is warranted.

  15. Pteropine orthoreovirus infection among out-patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Kenny; Tan, Yeh Fong; Leong, Pooi Pooi; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Gunnasekaran, Rajasekaran; Ujang, Kamsiah; Chua, Kaw Bing; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the incidence rate of Pteropine orthreovirus (PRV) infection in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a suburban setting in Malaysia, where bats are known to be present in the neighborhood. Using molecular detection of PRVs directly from oropharyngeal swabs, our study demonstrates that PRV is among one of the common causative agents of acute URTI with cough and sore throat as the commonest presenting clinical features. Phylogenetic analysis on partial major outer and inner capsid proteins shows that these PRV strains are closely related to Melaka and Kampar viruses previously isolated in Malaysia. Further study is required to determine the public health significance of PRV infection in Southeast Asia, especially in cases where co-infection with other pathogens may potentially lead to different clinical outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. CERTAIN ASPECTS OF RESPIRATORY AND DIGESTIVE TRACT INVOLVEMENT IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Vasil’eva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis is one of the severe childhood disorders with early manifestation of multiple organ involvement. The respiratory and digestive tracts are suffered the most, the prognosis of disease course depends on the degree of the impairment of these systems.   The results of the analysis of cystic fibrosis prevalence in Primorsky Krai according to the neonatal immunoreactive trypsin screening in 102 251 newborn are shown in the article. The age, sex, clinical and severity structure of cystic fibrosis was studied in 71 children. The prevalence of 13 mutations of transmembrane regulator conductance gene in 41 patients was determined. Correlations between time of pulmonary complications manifestation, P. Aeruginosa infection development, chronic hypoxemia degree, malnutrition, genetic status and severity of the disease were found.

  17. Behavioral Effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Illnesses: A Consideration of Possible Underlying Cognitive Mechanisms

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    Andrew P. Smith

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that both experimentally induced upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTIs and naturally occurring URTIs influence mood and performance. The present study investigated possible cognitive mechanisms underlying the URTI-performance changes. Those who developed a cold (N = 47 had significantly faster, but less accurate, performance than those who remained healthy (N = 54. Illness had no effect on manipulations designed to influence encoding, response organisation (stimulus-response compatilibility or response preparation. Similarly, there was no evidence that different components of working memory were impaired. Overall, the present research confirms that URTIs can have an effect on performance efficiency. Further research is required to identify the physiological and behavioral mechanisms underlying these effects.

  18. Intensified microbiological investigations in adult patients admitted to hospital with lower respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Jens; Rasmussen, TR; Sommer, T

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the diagnostic yield of a programme with intensified microbiological investigations in immunocompetent adult patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). Patients in the study group were included prospectively and consecutively from...... lavage (BAL). Only 7% in the historic control group were discharged with an aetiological diagnosis of their infections; while the diagnostic yield in the study group increased to 51% of patients. In the study group the presence of new infiltrates on chest X-ray increased the detection...... of a microbiological aetiology from 37% with no infiltrates to 62% with infiltrates and recent antibiotic therapy reduced the detection of a microbiological cause of infection from 61% in 36 patients who had not received antibiotic therapy to 39% in 31 patients who had received recent antibiotic therapy prior...

  19. Quantitative culture of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, TR; Korsgaard, Jens; Møller, Jens Kjølseth

    2001-01-01

    were investigated. Results were compared to the findings in eight healthy control persons investigated in February 1998. There was no difference between study patients and control persons when quantitative culture of total cumulative bacterial findings or bacteria categorized as members...... a primary bronchial washing was compared to a secondary sampling from the same bronchus in the control group. Twenty-four (36%) of 67 patients were cultured as positive in the study group while all control persons were cultured as negative for bacteria categorized as potential pathogens. With a threshold......To evaluate the diagnostic value of quantitative bacterial culture of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid obtained by fibreoptic bronchoscopy, 67 consecutive immunocompetent adult patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections from September 1997 to May 1998...

  20. NEW TECHNOLOGIES IN CRYOSURGERY ENDOSCOPIC TREATMENT OF TUMORS OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Sokolov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the history of the development of the cryosurgery method from antiquity to the present day, materials of the clinical use of cryosurgery for endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of tumors of respiratory tract at the present stage, features of modern equipment for cryosurgery. Also the article presents the first clinical experience of using cryorecanalization in stenosing tumors of the tracheobronchial tree inRussiawith the help of the medical device of the latest generation ERBECRYO 2. Three clinical examples of cryorecanalization are given. Preliminary results of clinical studies show that, in comparison with cryosurgery on older devices, cryorecanalization using the latest generation of m edical eq uipment and a new cryosondond model is an effective method of recanalization to restore airway patency, which can be used in combination with electrodestruction, argon-plasma And laser coagulation.

  1. Maternal smoking location at home and hospitalization for respiratory tract infections among children in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Michiyo; Yorifuji, Takashi; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-02

    We examined the effects of maternal smoking location at home on hospitalization for respiratory tract infections among young children in Japan. We used the large nationwide population-based longitudinal survey and restricted study participants to children born after 37 gestational weeks and singleton births (n = 43,851). We evaluated the associations among children between the ages of 6 and 18 months and between the ages of 18 and 30 months, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, both maternal outdoor and indoor smoking were associated with the elevated risk. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of maternal outdoor and indoor smoking (vs nonsmoking mothers) were 1.21 (1.01-1.44) and 1.18 (1.04-1.33), respectively, in children between the ages of 6 and 18 months. We thus encourage a smoke-free home policy to protect children from second- and third-hand smoke exposure.

  2. Infant Respiratory Tract Infections or Wheeze and Maternal Vitamin D in Pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nikolas; Søndergaard, Jens; Fisker, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in young children and can be associated with wheeze. Vitamin D can have a protective role against RTI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic search of Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane library was performed. Titles...... and abstracts were evaluated and selected articles were reviewed by two authors. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy on RTIs or wheeze in children of 5 years of age or younger. Observational studies on the association between...... serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) during pregnancy, or at birth, and RTIs and/or wheeze were included. The protocol was registered on PROSPERO (Registration No. CRD42015019183). RESULTS: Of four RCTs, one showed a protective effect of a high daily dose (2,000IU) of vitamin D during pregnancy...

  3. Anatomy of the lower respiratory tract in domestic birds, with emphasis on respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteleyn, C; Cornillie, P; Van Cruchten, S; Van den Broeck, W; Van Ginneken, C; Simoens, P

    2017-12-17

    This manuscript describes the anatomy of the lower respiratory tract in domestic bird species including the chicken and pigeon. The here described anatomical structures play a major role avian respiration, which is fundamentally different from respiration in mammals. During inspiration and expiration, a continuous caudocranial airflow is present within the tertiary bronchi of the Paleopulmo, while the Neopulmo, which is only present in phylogenetically recent species, is characterized by tidal respiration. Various anatomical structures and aerodynamic mechanisms have been described in an attempt to explain the proposed mechanism of respiration. The air sac system that is essential for avian respiration usually comprises an unpaired clavicular air sac and paired cervical, cranial and caudal thoracic, and abdominal air sacs. The latter are by far the larger and are interwoven with the abdominal organs. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Maternal agency influences the prevalence of diarrhea and acute respiratory tract infections among young Indonesian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustina, Rina; Shankar, Anita V; Ayuningtyas, Azalea; Achadi, Endang L; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationship between measures of mother's caretaking, practice and individual agency on acute diarrhea and respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) of Indonesian children. Using population-based household data from the Indonesian Demographic Health Surveys for 2002-2003 (n = 9,151 children) and 2007 (n = 9,714 children), we selected 28 indicators related to mother' caretaking, and applied principal component analysis to derive indices for access to care, practice and experience, and agency. The association between index quartiles (level 1-4) and the prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in the youngest child prevalence in children prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in younger children. Interventions specifically designed to promote maternal autonomy and decision-making may lead to improved child health.

  5. Beneficial therapeutic effects of vitamin C on recurrent respiratory tract infections in children: preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Pietro; Ianniello, Francesca; Bianchi, Virginia; Quintarelli, Fabio; Cammerata, Michela; Quattrocchi, Enrica; Terranova, Gloria M; Miggiano, Giacinto A; Casale, Manuele

    2016-11-17

    To demonstrate whether supplementation of vitamin C has a beneficial effect in the prevention of recurrent respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children. Moreover, we evaluate the main risk factors that predispose to the development of this disease. Sixty children have been enrolled in the study and randomized into two groups: the control group (G1 n = 33) and the group at risk of recurrent RTIs (G2 n = 27). To G2 group was administered every day 100% orange juice with the content of vitamin C 70 mg. Significant reduction in the incidence rate of RTIs (episodes pre-treatment: 182-6.75 episodes/child, after-treatment: 71-2.62 episodes/child, P vitamin C had a beneficial effect in our group of children with recurrent RTIs, reducing the number of infective episodes.

  6. Vitamin C, neutrophil function, and upper respiratory tract infection risk in distance runners: the missing link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Futre, E M

    1997-01-01

    Moderate submaximal exercise results in neutrophilia and enhanced phagocytic and oxidative capacity of neutrophils. It has been hypothesized, however, that during intensive exercise and periods of intensive training this pro-oxidative effect becomes suppressive. Vitamin C is widely recognized for its antioxidant function in extracellular fluid, and it has been shown to neutralize O2-, HOCl, and .OH and to attenuate the suppression of phagocytic function. Clinical manifestation of reduced neutrophil function following participation in ultramarathon races has, however, not been observed. Although neutrophils constitute 50-60% of leukocytes and although they are the first line of defense to bacteriological invasion, postrace episodes of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) are not correlated with a decrement in the function of this individual parameter of immune function. The efficacy of Vitamin C supplements in reducing the incidence of postrace URTI symptoms, therefore, cannot be fully explained at this stage.

  7. Effects of kiwifruit on innate and adaptive immunity and symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Margot A; Bentley-Hewitt, Kerry; Rosendale, Douglas; Naoko, Suzuki; Pernthaner, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of an adequate and properly regulated immune system is essential for health and well-being. Components in food may modulate immune responses in a positive way (immunonutrition), and some of these components are present in kiwifruit. Kiwifruit contains vitamin C, carotenoids, polyphenols, and dietary fiber, and these are all potentially beneficial to the immune system. Research that has contributed to our understanding of the beneficial effects that kiwifruit may have on immune responses spans from in vitro studies using cell lines and human blood cells, to using animal models targeting both mucosal and systemic immunity. Some limited human intervention trials have been undertaken and are described, in which kiwifruit has been shown to influence a number of biomarkers of oxidative stress and beneficial immune responses, to reduce the incidence and severity of symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections and potentially be more beneficial than supplementation with vitamin C alone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Compliance with Recommendations on Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing for Respiratory Tract Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; Bjerrum, Lars; Feja, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic use in primary care, such as in Respiratory Tract Infections (RTIs), is an important cause of bacterial resistance. This study aimed at describing the current pattern of outpatient antibiotic use in acute RTIs in Spain and evaluating adherence to national recommendations......, and adherence to recommendations for antibiotic prescribing was assessed. One third of patients with a RTI were prescribed an antibiotic, with young adults (aged 15-64 years) being the most treated. High prescribing rates were observed in patients with acute otitis, sinusitis and acute tonsillitis (about 70......%), whereas low rates were found in acute bronchitis (50%) and non-specific upper RTIs (24%) episodes. A high prescription of broad-spectrum agents and antibiotics not recommended as first choice was observed. In accordance with Spanish guidelines, there exists a potential over-prescribing of antibiotics...

  9. The impact of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia on the upper respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lucy C; Birman, Catherine S

    2016-03-01

    Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive genetic condition affecting the function of motile cilia. The upper respiratory tract is lined with ciliated epithelium and hence a hallmark of PCD is the development, from the neonatal period onwards, of persisting secretion retention and suppurative infection in the middle ear, nose and facial sinuses [1]. This review aims to remind the clinician involved in the care of a patient with PCD of the complexities of making the diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and chronic otitis media with effusion (ChOME), the morbidity associated with CRS and ChOME and of current evidence of best practice for the management of these conditions. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A HYBRID CFD-PBPK MODEL OF INHALED CHLORINE GAS UPTAKE AND TISSUE DOSIMETRY IN THE ISOLATED UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT (URT) OF F344 RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorine (Cl2), an important commercial gas, is highly reactive in water, causing irritant effects in the respiratory tract on inhalation. Nasal extraction of Cl2 is high and resultant lesions in the respiratory tract show a proximal to distal distribution ...

  11. Food allergy is associated with recurrent respiratory tract infections during childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Woicka-Kolejwa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : To find out whether children with food allergy have an increased risk of recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections and of asthma. Aim: To describe the clinical profile of children diagnosed with food allergy referred to the Allergy Clinic. Material and methods : We conducted a retrospective study to assess the patients’ demographic, anthropometric and clinical data. The analysis included data of all children by the age of 10 years (registered with the Allergy Clinic between 2012 and 2013 in whom IgE mediated food allergy had been diagnosed during 18 months of observation. Results : We included 280 children into the analysis. Recurrent respiratory tract infections (rRTI, asthma and gastrointestinal (GI symptoms were observed in 153 (54.6%, 96 (34.3%, 39 (13.9%, respectively, with a significant increasing trend across age-subgroups. In children from 1 to 2 years old, sensitization to -lactoglobulin increased the risk of rRTI (OR = 3.91; 95% CI: 1.03–14.87. In older children sensitization to allergens other than milk or egg decreases the risk of rRTI (OR = 0.25; 95% CI: 0.10–0.62; sensitization to egg decreased the risk of asthma diagnosis (OR = 0.09; 95% CI: 0.01–0.75. We did not identify food allergens which change the risk of GI symptoms in children. This finding was consistent throughout all age-subgroups. Conclusions : Sensitization to -lactoglobulin increased the risk of rRTI in children under 2 years of age nearly four times. The presence of sensitization to food allergens above 3 years of age did not increase the risk of developing clinical presentation of food allergy other than atopic dermatitis.

  12. A mixed methods study to understand patient expectations for antibiotics for an upper respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaarslev, Christina; Yee, Melissa; Chan, Georgi; Fletcher-Lartey, Stephanie; Khan, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a public health challenge supplemented by inappropriate prescribing, especially for an upper respiratory tract infection in primary care. Patient/carer expectations have been identified as one of the main drivers for inappropriate antibiotics prescribing by primary care physicians. The aim of this study was to understand who is more likely to expect an antibiotic for an upper respiratory tract infection from their doctor and the reasons underlying it. This study used a sequential mixed methods approach: a nationally representative cross sectional survey ( n  = 1509) and four focus groups. The outcome of interest was expectation and demand for an antibiotic from a doctor when presenting with a cold or flu. The study found 19.5 % of survey respondents reported that they would expect the doctor to prescribe antibiotics for a cold or flu. People younger than 65 years of age, those who never attended university and those speaking a language other than English at home were more likely to expect or demand antibiotics for a cold or flu. People who knew that 'antibiotics don't kill viruses' and agreed that 'taking an antibiotic when one is not needed means they won't work in the future' were less likely to expect or demand antibiotics. The main reasons for expecting antibiotics were believing that antibiotics are an effective treatment for a cold or flu and that they shortened the duration and potential deterioration of their illness. The secondary reason centered around the value or return on investment for visiting a doctor when feeling unwell. Our study found that patients do not appear to feel they have a sufficiently strong incentive to consider the impact of their immediate use of antibiotics on antimicrobial resistance. The issue of antibiotic resistance needs to be explained and reframed as a more immediate health issue with dire consequences to ensure the success of future health campaigns.

  13. ANTIBACTERIAL THERAPY IN OUTPATIENT TREATMENT OF RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Turchina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at analyzing prescriptions of antibacterial drugs for outpatient treatment of respiratory tract infections in children. Patients and methods. The study involved patients with acute respiratory tract infections: 158 children were undergoing outpatient treatment, whereas 30 children were being treated at the polyclinic day hospital. The children aged from 3 months to 15 years. Acute rhinopharyngitis, acute laryngitis, acute bronchitis, tonsillitis and pneumonia were registered in 66.5, 2.6, 18.1, 11.7 and 1.1% of cases. We appraised indications for antibacterial therapy, prescription terms, therapy duration and choice of an antibacterial drug. Results. Antibacterial therapy prescription was found unreasonable in 44.0% of acute rhinopharyngitis cases, 41.1% of acute bronchitis cases and 60.0% of acute laryngitis cases. In the first day of diagnosis establishment, antibiotics were prescribed in 63.8 and 100% of cases at pediatric divisions and day hospitals, respectively. The unreasonable antibiotic prescription rate in infants was 66.7% - significantly higher than in 1-7-year-old children (p < 0.05. The most frequently (66.4% prescribed class of antibacterial drugs at pediatric divisions was penicillins (amoxicillin, amoxicillin clavulanate; at day hospitals, they were prescribed in 23.3% of cases (p < 0.01. Use of cephalosporin antibiotics as the initial therapy was significantly higher at day hospitals than at pediatric divisions (P < 0.01; the drug was administered parenterally in 90% of cases. Antibiotic prescription courses did not exceed 5 days in most cases (60.1%. Conclusions. We revealed high rate of unreasonable antibiotic use for outpatient treatment of acute rhinopharyngitis, laryngitis and acute bronchitis, especially at day hospitals and in infants. 

  14. Clinical efficacy of florfenicol in the treatment of calf respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, V; Maden, M; Erganis, O; Birdane, F M; Corlu, M

    2002-02-01

    This paper reports on a study of the aetiology of calf pneumonia and the clinical efficacy of florfenicol, a new antibiotic in Turkey. Twenty-seven weaned and unweaned calves (13 males and 14 females) between 1 and 16 months of age brought to the clinics of Selçuk University, Faculty of Veterinary Science. Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples were taken from the animals diagnosed to have upper respiratory tract infection associated with bronchitis (N=2), bronchitis (N=5), bronchopneumonia (N=4), pneumonia (N=3), pleuropneumonia (N=11), bronchopneumonia plus pulmonary oedema (N=2) based on the results of the clinical and laboratory examinations. Then microbiological isolation and antibiotic culturing were performed. The animals were treated with 1 ml/15 kg (20 mg/kg) florfenicol (Nuflor, DIF) twice within 48 hours via intramuscular injection. At the end of the treatment, 23 of the weaned and unweaned calves were completely healed, 1 calf had died and 3 calves showed no healing. The results of BAL samples and microbiological examinations of the 3 calves that did not respond to the treatment indicated that these cases were affected by mixed infections of yeasts, fungi, and bacteria. Widespread pleuropneumonia was observed. According to the results of the microbiological examination of the BAL samples, Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica had the highest isolation rate (25%) compared with the other isolated bacteria, namely, Klebsiella pneumonia (20%), Actinomyces pyogenes (15%), beta-hemolytic streptococci. (10%), Staphylococcus spp. (5%), and E. coli (5%). The study also revealed fungi [Penicillum spp. (5%) and Aspergillus spp. (5%)] and two calves (10%) had a yeast infection.. We conclude that florfenicol has a high bacteriological and clinical efficacy (100% and 96% respectively) in the treatment of calf respiratory tract diseases.

  15. Prevalence and susceptibility patterns of bacteria causing respiratory tract infections in North Waziristan, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Said Nasir; Ullah, Bait; Basit, Abdul; Begum, Asia; Tabassum, Anum; Zafar, Shaista; Saleha, Shamim

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are the most common infectious diseases in humans and are the major cause of mortality and morbidity in Pakistan. These infections are the leading causes of consultations in primary care in Pakistan. Therefore, this study was aimed at determining bacterial pathogens of respiratory tract infections and the susceptibility patterns of bacterial isolates to antibiotics. The study was conducted between February, 2013 and March, 2014 in North Waziristan region of Pakistan. Sputum specimens were collected aseptically from 227 patients and cultured on the appropriate bacteriological media. Bacterial isolates were identified by biochemical tests and their antibiotics susceptibility patterns were determined by standard methods. Out of 227, various species of bacteria were isolated from 152 (75%) specimens. The prevalence of bacteria species isolated were as follows Pseudomonas aeruginosa (42.8%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (26.7%), Corynebacterium diphtheria (10.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (5.9%), Proteus vulgaris (4.6%), Micrococcus species (3.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (2.6%) and Bacillus species (2.6%). The susceptibility patterns varied among bacterial species depending on the antibiotics. For the susceptibility test 11 commercially available antibiotics against bacterial isolates were used. The results revealed that generally the bacterial isolates were susceptible to gentamicin (80.9%), meropenem (75 %), ceftazidime (62.5%), cefotaxime (57.9%) and ceftriazone (57.9%) and resistant to penicillin (84.9%) and doxycycline (78.9%). The antibiotics gentamicin (100%) meropenem (100%), ceftriaxone (58.5%), ciprofloxacin (60%) trimethoprim (60%), ceftazidime (66.2%) and cefotaxime (64.6%) were observed effective against the P. aeruginosa isolates. The findings of our study provide significant information for empiric therapy of patients with RTIs in North Waziristan region of Pakistan.

  16. Accuracy of an Extubation Readiness Test in Predicting Successful Extubation in Children With Acute Respiratory Failure From Lower Respiratory Tract Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, Edward Vincent S; Gedeit, Rainer; Schwarz, Adam J; Asaro, Lisa A; Wypij, David; Curley, Martha A Q

    2017-01-01

    Identifying children ready for extubation is desirable to minimize morbidity and mortality associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation and extubation failure. We determined the accuracy of an extubation readiness test (Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure extubation readiness test) in predicting successful extubation in children with acute respiratory failure from lower respiratory tract disease. Secondary analysis of data from the Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure clinical trial, a pediatric multicenter cluster randomized trial of sedation. Seventeen PICUs in the intervention arm. Children 2 weeks to 17 years receiving invasive mechanical ventilation for lower respiratory tract disease. Extubation readiness test in which spontaneously breathing children with oxygenation index less than or equal to 6 were placed on FIO2 of 0.50, positive end-expiratory pressure of 5 cm H2O, and pressure support. Of 1,042 children, 444 (43%) passed their first extubation readiness test. Of these, 295 (66%) were extubated within 10 hours of starting the extubation readiness test, including 272 who were successfully extubated, for a positive predictive value of 92%. Among 861 children who were extubated for the first time within 10 hours of performing an extubation readiness test, 788 passed their extubation readiness test and 736 were successfully extubated for a positive predictive value of 93%. The median time of day for extubation with an extubation readiness test was 12:15 hours compared with 14:54 hours for extubation without an extubation readiness test within 10 hours (p respiratory failure from lower respiratory tract disease, an extubation readiness test, as described, should be considered at least daily if the oxygenation index is less than or equal to 6. If the child passes the extubation readiness test, there is a high likelihood of successful extubation.

  17. The use of household cleaning products during pregnancy and lower respiratory tract infections and wheezing during early life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casas, L.; Zock, J.P.; Carsin, A.E.; Fernández-Somoano, A.; Esplugues, A.; Santa-Marina, L.; Tardón, A.; Ballester, F.; Basterrechea, M.; Sunyer, J.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of household use of cleaning products during pregnancy on infant wheezing and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). In four prospective Spanish birth cohorts (n = 2,292), pregnant women reported the use of household cleaning products. When infants were 12-18 months old,

  18. In utero exposure to 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of childhood asthma, wheeze, and respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Haixia; Xun, Pengcheng; Pike, Katharine C

    2017-01-01

    venous blood and risk of offspring's asthma, wheeze, and respiratory tract infections. METHODS: Data were derived from PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, references from relevant articles, and de novo results from published studies until December 2015. A random-effects meta-analysis was conducted among 16...

  19. Increased risk of respiratory tract infections in children with Down syndrome: the consequence of an altered immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemers, B.; Broers, C.J.M.; Bont, L.; Weijerman, M.E.; Gemke, R.J.B.J.; van Furth, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common chromosomal abnormality among live-born infants. Respiratory tract infections are the most important cause of mortality in individuals with DS at all ages. In recent decades several studies have been performed to elucidate abnormalities of the immune system in

  20. Heat and moisture exchange capacity of the upper respiratory tract and the effect of tracheotomy breathing on endotracheal climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, R.J.; Muller, S.H.; Vincent, A.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess the heat and moisture exchange (HME) capacity of the upper respiratory tract and the effect of tracheotomy breathing on endotracheal climate in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods. We plotted the subglottic temperature and humidity measurements

  1. HEAT AND MOISTURE EXCHANGE CAPACITY OF THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT AND THE EFFECT OF TRACHEOTOMY BREATHING ON ENDOTRACHEAL CLIMATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, Renske J.; Muller, Sara H.; Vincent, Andrew; Hilgers, Frans J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess the heat and moisture exchange (HME) capacity of the upper respiratory tract and the effect of tracheotomy breathing on endotracheal climate in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods. We plotted the subglottic temperature and humidity measurements

  2. Patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections in older residents of long-term care facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: To describe patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) among elderly residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). DESIGN: Data from a prospective, randomized, controlled study conducted from April 1998 through August 2001 to investigate the effect of vitamin ...

  3. Management of upper respiratory tract infections in Dutch general practice: antibiotic prescribing rates and incidences in 1987 and 2001.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuyvenhoven, M.; Essen, G. van; Schellevis, F.; Verheij, T.

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim: This study aims to assess differences in antibiotic prescribing and incidence of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections (URTIs) between 1987 and 2001, before (1987) and after (2001) publication of Dutch guidelines on URTIs. Design, setting and method: Data were collected in two

  4. Quality indicators for diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice: a modified Delphi study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Bjerrum, Lars; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2010-01-01

    , clinical microbiologists, and clinical pharmacologists were asked to rate the relevance of 59 quality indicators for diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections with regard to reducing antimicrobial resistance and improving patient health. A thorough literature review was carried out to ensure...

  5. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of NAD-dependent Pasteurellaceae from the respiratory tract of pigs and their possible pathogenetic importance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielstein, P.; Wuthe, H.H.; Angen, Øystein

    2001-01-01

    . In the present study, 107 of these NAD-dependent isolates from the porcine respiratory tract, primarily from lungs with pathological changes, were investigated. On the basis of phenotypic criteria, such as haemolysis, urease, catalase, and indole formation as well as other fermentative activities, 50...

  6. Effects of vitamin A and [beta]-carotene on respiratory tract carcinogenesis in hamsters : in vivo and in vitro studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterbeek, A.P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Summary
    Respiratory tract cancer is the leading cause of death by cancer in 'Western' countries. The greater part of lung cancers are caused by smoking. Furthermore, environmental air pollution and occupational exposure contribute to the high incidence of lung

  7. College Students, Shared Decision Making, and the Appropriate Use of Antibiotics for Respiratory Tract Infections: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyer, Kristina; Hulton, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This systematic review examines shared decision making to promote the appropriate use of antibiotics for college students with respiratory tract infections. Participants/Methods: CINAL, Cochrane, PubMed, EBSCO, and PsycNET were searched in October 2014 using the following criteria: English language, human subjects, peer-reviewed, shared…

  8. MECHANISMS OF IMMUNE DISBALANCE FORMING IN PATIENTS WITH VIRAL INFECTIONS OF RESPIRATORY TRACT, AND NEW OPPORTUNITIES OF IMMUNOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Khoroshilova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the leading etiological factor of recurrent infections of respiratory tract. Experimental trials showed that influenza, respiratory syncytial and rhinovirus render toxic action on the elements of inborn and acquired immunity, resulting in hyperproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines with damaging effect on tissues and organs. According to this fact application of immunomodulator treatment seems to be quite actually. At the present times, there’s only one immunomodulator, recommended by WHO for the treatment of patients with recurrent respiratory infections. It is pidotimod (Imunorix. The article presents data from experimental clinical trials, studying influence of pidotimod on parameters of inborn and acquired immunity and, accordingly, on the clinical course of respiratory infections in children’s and adults. Different double-blinded placebo-controlled studies showed that pidotimod decreases a severity and duration of respiratory infections, improves functional state of respiratory epithelium. Thus, pidotimod is perspective immunomodulator for the prophylaxis and treatment of respiratory tract.Key words: children, pidotimod, viral infections, prophylaxis, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(5:56-61

  9. Treatment of upper respiratory tract infections in primary care: a randomized study using aromatic herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Dudai, Nativ; Eini, Anat; Torem, Moshe; Schiff, Elad; Rakover, Yoseph

    2011-01-01

    This study is a prospective randomized double-blind controlled trial whose aim was to investigate the clinical effects of aromatic essential oils in patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The trial was conducted in six primary care clinics in northern Israel. A spray containing aromatic essential oils of five plants (Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Mentha piperita, Origanum syriacum, and Rosmarinus officinalis) as applied 5 times a day for 3 days and compared with a placebo spray. The main outcome measure was patient assessment of the change in severity of the most debilitating symptom (sore throat, hoarseness or cough). Sixty patients participated in the study (26 in the study group and 34 in the control group). Intention-to-treat analysis showed that 20 minutes following the spray use, participants in the study group reported a greater improvement in symptom severity compared to participants in the placebo group (P = .019). There was no difference in symptom severity between the two groups after 3 days of treatment (P = .042). In conclusion, spray application of five aromatic plants reported in this study brings about significant and immediate improvement in symptoms of upper respiratory ailment. This effect is not significant after 3 days of treatment.

  10. The Bordetella Bps polysaccharide is critical for biofilm development in the mouse respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Gina Parise; Love, Cheraton F; Sukumar, Neelima; Mishra, Meenu; Deora, Rajendar

    2007-11-01

    Bordetellae are respiratory pathogens that infect both humans and animals. Bordetella bronchiseptica establishes asymptomatic and long-term to life-long infections of animal nasopharynges. While the human pathogen Bordetella pertussis is the etiological agent of the acute disease whooping cough in infants and young children, it is now being increasingly isolated from the nasopharynges of vaccinated adolescents and adults who sometimes show milder symptoms, such as prolonged cough illness. Although it has been shown that Bordetella can form biofilms in vitro, nothing is known about its biofilm mode of existence in mammalian hosts. Using indirect immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy, we examined nasal tissues from mice infected with B. bronchiseptica. Our results demonstrate that a wild-type strain formed robust biofilms that were adherent to the nasal epithelium and displayed architectural attributes characteristic of a number of bacterial biofilms formed on inert surfaces. We have previously shown that the Bordetella Bps polysaccharide encoded by the bpsABCD locus is critical for the stability and maintenance of three-dimensional structures of biofilms. We show here that Bps is essential for the formation of efficient nasal biofilms and is required for the colonization of the nose. Our results document a biofilm lifestyle for Bordetella in mammalian respiratory tracts and highlight the essential role of the Bps polysaccharide in this process and in persistence of the nares.

  11. PROPHYLAXIS OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT BRONCHOPULMONARY DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Simonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most urgent problems of Russian pediatrics — high prevalence of acute respiratory infections — is analyzed in this article. The author characterizes a special group of «frequently ill children». Patients of this group are the most prone to recurrent bronchopulmonary diseases, due to special features of their immunological statuses. The article also contains a short literature review on pidotimod trials, which have proved this drug to be effective and safe in acute and recurrent bronchopulmonary diseases as well as in bronchial asthma. In the patients who were administered pidotimod the frequency of relapses of acute respiratory tract infections decreased, the duration of the disease course shortened significantly, as well as these patients required antibacterial and antifebrile agents more rarely and did not have complications of allergic diseases. Children with recurrent bronchopulmonary diseases and bronchial asthma receiving pidotimod were shown to have lower rate of relapses and normalization of immunological characteristics. It is important to mention that pidotimod do not affect results of peak flowmetry and improve results of «Asthma Control Test». Pidotimod usage during vaccination guaranteed uneventful course of post-vaccination period and stimulation of immune response. Long-term study of clinical efficacy and safety of pidotimod allowed to recommend this drug as preventive and medicinal measure in pediatric practice.

  12. Detection of bocavirus in children suffering from acute respiratory tract infections in Saudi Arabia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S Abdel-Moneim

    Full Text Available Human bocavirus (HBoV was recently discovered in children with respiratory distress and/or diarrhea. To our knowledge, no previous study has reported the existence of bocavirus in Saudi Arabia. Swabs samples from 80 children with respiratory tract infections were examined for the presence of HBoV. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used as a sensitive method to detect the HBoV. Direct gene sequencing was used to determine the genotype of the detected virus isolates. HBoV was detected in 22.5% of the examined patients. The NP1 partial gene sequence from all patients showed that the circulated strains were related to HBoV-1 genotype. Most of HBoV infected patients showed evidence of mixed coinfection with other viral pathogens. The current study clearly demonstrated that genetically conserved HBoV1 circulates in Saudi Arabia. Interestingly, most of the HBoV1 infected cases were associated with high rates of co-infections with other viruses.

  13. [Molecular biology in the diagnosis of acute bacterial infection of the respiratory tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimón, José María; Cilla, Gustavo; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio

    2008-07-01

    The bacteriological methods traditionally used in the diagnosis of acute respiratory infections (ARI) have limited sensitivity (culture, direct antigen detection, etc.) or require long periods to obtain results (appearance of antibodies). In the last few years, nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAAT) have been developed that allow pathogen-specific genetic targets to be detected in clinical samples. These techniques have been proven to be more sensitive than culture or direct detection and, unlike serological tests, are effective in the acute phase of the infection. However, NAAT also have certain limitations, such as the occasional presence of amplification inhibitors in clinical samples, the persistence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae or Chlamydophila pneumoniae in the mucosa of some individuals, and the lack of discrimination between pathogen infection and colonization in bacteria forming part of normal respiratory tract flora (Streptococcus pneumoniae). Recently developed real-time NAAT have raised expectations that some of these obstacles will be resolved, since these techniques allow bacterial load to be quantified. In the etiological diagnosis of ARI due to S. pneumoniae, the use of NAAT is still in an experimental phase. In M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae, combining NAAT with serological tests could potentially improve diagnosis. NAAT show good sensitivity and specificity in the detection of Legionella; however, the practical utility of these techniques should be weighed against that of antigenuria. NAAT provide advantages over other techniques in Bordetella pertussis. At present, these techniques are not useful in the diagnosis of Coxiella burnetii acute infections.

  14. Factors influencing parental decision to consult for children with upper respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chirk-Jenn; Chia, Yook-Chin; Teng, Cheong-Lieng; Nik-Sherina, Hanafi

    2008-04-01

    This study aimed to determine which factors could influence (i) parents' decision to seek medical consultatin and (ii) their preference for either public or private medical service in children with upper respiratory tract infection. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Gombak district, which is an urban area in Malaysia. We randomly selected parents of kindergarten children aged 4-5 years to participate in this questionnaire survey. The main outcome measures were predictors of early medical consultation and type of service utilisation (public versus private). We achieved a response rate of 84.5% (n = 1033/1223). 64.1% sought early medical consultation and 70.9% preferred to consult a private doctor. Early consultation was predicated by the parent gender being male (OR 1.50; 95% CI 1.09, 2.05), non-Chinese (OR 1.75%; 95% CI 1.10, 2.79), and those who preferred child specialists (OR 2.02; 95% CI 1.27, 3.23). Lower income group (OR 4.28; 95% CI 2.30, 7.95) and not having a regular doctor (OR 4.99%; 95% CI 3.19, 7.80) were predictors of using the public health services. Parent's gender, ethnicity and income influenced their decision to seek early medical consultation for their children's respiratory illness while income and having a regular doctor could predict their choice of healthcare services.

  15. Impacts of upper respiratory tract disease on olfactory behavior of the Mojave desert tortoise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Jennifer; Van Zerr, Vanessa E.; Esque, Todd C.; Nussear, Ken E.; Lamberski, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) caused by Mycoplasma agassizii is considered a threat to desert tortoise populations that should be addressed as part of the recovery of the species. Clinical signs can be intermittent and include serous or mucoid nasal discharge and respiratory difficulty when nares are occluded. This nasal congestion may result in a loss of the olfactory sense. Turtles are known to use olfaction to identify food items, predators, and conspecifics; therefore, it is likely that URTD affects not only their physical well-being but also their behavior and ability to perform necessary functions in the wild. To determine more specifically the impact nasal discharge might have on free-ranging tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), we compared the responses of tortoises with and without nasal discharge and both positive and negative for M. agassizii antibodies to a visually hidden olfactory food stimulus and an empty control. We found that nasal discharge did reduce sense of smell and hence the ability to locate food. Our study also showed that moderate chronic nasal discharge in the absence of other clinical signs did not affect appetite in desert tortoises.

  16. A case of lower respiratory tract infection caused by Neisseria weaveri and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagea, S; Bijoux, R; Corkill, J E; Al Rashidi, F; Hart, C A

    2002-02-01

    Neisseria weaveri (formerly CDC [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] group M-5 is part of the normal canine oral flora. Infections in humans are usually associated with dog bite wounds. Very rarely the organism has been isolated from sites other than wounds, or from deep seated infections. A 60-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of an acute exacerbation of his bronchiectasis. Gram stain of bronchial washings and expectorated sputum showed numerous polymorphs and Gram-negative bacilli. Routine bacterial culture yielded a heavy pure growth of a Gram-negative rod-shaped organism that was strongly oxidase and catalase positive, indole negative, non-motile and did not ferment carbohydrates. The organism was identified as N. weaveri by using 16S rRNA sequencing. The patient was treated with a 3 weeks course of ofloxacin and had a good response. Sputum culture after treatment yielded normal respiratory flora only. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of lower respiratory tract infection caused by N. weaveri. Copyright 2002 The British Infection Society.

  17. The etiology of lower respiratory tract infections in people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klekotka, Renata Barbara; Mizgała, Elżbieta; Król, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are likely to develop many types of infections, which affect the transport of glucose into tissues. Diabetes increases the susceptibility to different kinds of respiratory infections, is often identified as an independent risk factor for developing lower respiratory tract infections. Pulmonary infections caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative bacteria and fungi may occur with an increased frequency, whereas infections due to Streptococcus pneumonia or influenza virus may be associated with increased morbidity and mortality. During lung infection, there are changes in the local and ciliary epithelial lining. Increased susceptibility to pneumococcal infection by people with diabetes is the result of reduced defense capability of antibodies to protein antigens. The relationship between diabetes and pulmonary tuberculosis is well known, and the incidence of tuberculosis in diabetic individuals is 4-5 times greater than among the non-diabetic population. It is thought that malfunction of monocytes in patients with diabetes may contribute to the increased susceptibility to tuberculosis and/or a worse prognosis. Hospitalization of patients with diabetes due to influenza virus or flu-like infections is up to 6 times more likely to occur compared to healthy individuals, also diabetic patients are more likely to be hospitalized due to infection complications. Immunization with influenza and anti-pneumococcal vaccines is recommended to reduce hospitalizations, deaths, and medical expenses. Diabetes, especially the uncontrolled one, predisposes to fungal infection, the most common candidiasis and mucormycosis.

  18. An update on the pharmacotherapeutic management of lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, Mario; Rogliani, Paola; Aliberti, Stefano; Blasi, Francesco; Matera, Maria Gabriella

    2017-07-01

    Our knowledge about lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) has improved substantially in the last years, but the management of respiratory infections is still a challenge and we are still far from using precision medicine in their treatment. Areas covered: The approaches developed in recent years to improve the pharmacotherapeutic management of LRTIs, such as novel diagnostic assays to facilitate medical decision-making, attempts for selecting an optimal empiric antibiotic regimen, and the role of new and possibly unproven adjunctive therapies, are described. Expert opinion: Early and appropriate antibiotics remain the cornerstone in the treatment of LRTIs. The updated trend is to apply antimicrobial stewardship principles and initiatives to optimize both the management and the outcomes of LTRIs. Biomarkers, mainly C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT), can improve the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of LRTIs and aid to guide antibiotic therapy. The widespread use of antimicrobial agents has greatly contributed to faster development of antibiotic resistance and the emergence of opportunistic pathogens, which substitute the indigenous microbiota. However, very few new antibiotics in development to overcome existing resistance and ensure continued success in the treatment of LRTIs have been approved, likely because antibiotic stewardship programs discourage the use of new agents.

  19. Risk factors for severe RSV-induced lower respiratory tract infection over four consecutive epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giovanni A; Medici, Maria Cristina; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Lanari, Marcello; Merolla, Rocco; Paparatti, Umberto Di Luzio; Silvestri, Michela; Pistorio, Angela; Chezzi, Carlo

    2007-12-01

    Variability in severity among different respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) seasons may influence hospital admission rates for RSV-induced lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in young children. The aim of the present study was to identify through logistic regression analysis, risk factors associated with higher likelihood to acquire RSV-induced LRTI, in children with symptoms severe enough to lead to hospital admission. Over four consecutive RSV seasons (2000-2004), records from children <4 years of age admitted for RSV-induced LRTI ("cases") were compared with those from children with LRTI not due to RSV and not requiring hospitalization ("controls"). 145 "case-patients" and 295 "control-patients" were evaluated. Independent from the severity of the four epidemic seasons, seven predictors for hospitalization for RSV infection were found in the bivariate analysis: number of children in the family, chronological age at the onset of RSV season, birth weight and gestational age, birth order, daycare attendance, previous RSV infections. In the logistic regression analysis, only three predictors were detected: chronological age at the beginning of RSV season [aOR =8.46; 95% CI:3.09-23.18]; birth weight category [aOR =7.70; 95% CI:1.29-45.91]; birth order (aOR =1.92; 95% CI:1.21-3.06). Independent from the RSV seasonality, specific host/environmental factors can be used to identify children at greatest risk for hospitalization for RSV infection.

  20. Treatment of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Primary Care: A Randomized Study Using Aromatic Herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Ben-Arye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is a prospective randomized double-blind controlled trial whose aim was to investigate the clinical effects of aromatic essential oils in patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The trial was conducted in six primary care clinics in northern Israel. A spray containing aromatic essential oils of five plants (Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Mentha piperita, Origanum syriacum, and Rosmarinus officinalisas applied 5 times a day for 3 days and compared with a placebo spray. The main outcome measure was patient assessment of the change in severity of the most debilitating symptom (sore throat, hoarseness or cough. Sixty patients participated in the study (26 in the study group and 34 in the control group. Intention-to-treat analysis showed that 20 minutes following the spray use, participants in the study group reported a greater improvement in symptom severity compared to participants in the placebo group (=.019. There was no difference in symptom severity between the two groups after 3 days of treatment (=.042. In conclusion, spray application of five aromatic plants reported in this study brings about significant and immediate improvement in symptoms of upper respiratory ailment. This effect is not significant after 3 days of treatment.

  1. Management of respiratory tract infections in young children-A qualitative study of primary care providers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biezen, Ruby; Brijnath, Bianca; Grando, Danilla; Mazza, Danielle

    2017-03-07

    Respiratory tract infections in young children are the most common cause of general practice visits in Australia. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines, the treatment and management of respiratory tract infections in young children is inconsistent. The aim of the study was to explore the management of respiratory tract infections in young children from a multi-disciplinary perspective using across-sectional qualitative research design based on the theoretical domains framework and the Capability, Opportunity and Motivation-B model. In-depth interviews were conducted with 30 primary care providers to explore their knowledge, views and management of respiratory tract infections in young children. Interviews focused on symptomatic management, over-the-counter medications and antibiotic use, and data were thematically analysed. Our findings showed that factors such as primary care providers' time constraints, parental anxiety, general practitioners' perception of what parents want, perceived parental pressure, and fear of losing patients were some of the reasons why primary care providers did not always adhere to guideline recommendations. Primary care providers also provided conflicting advice to parents concerning over-the-counter medications and when children should resume normal activities. Overall, this study showed that complex interactions involving emotional and psychological factors influenced the decision making process of primary care providers' management of respiratory tract infections in young children. A team care approach with consistent advice, and improved communication between primary care providers and parents is vital to overcome some of these barriers and improve guideline adherence. The findings of this research will inform the development of interventions to better manage respiratory tract infections in young children. CLINICIANS SWAYED BY PARENTAL ANXIETY AND PRESSURE: The emotions and psychology of both parents and

  2. Characterisation of antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory tract infections in Danish general practice: a retrospective registry based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Saust, Laura Trolle; Bjerrum, Lars

    2017-05-19

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is unclear if these recommendations are followed. We aimed to characterise the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions for patients diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infections, by means of electronic prescriptions, labeled with clinical indications, from Danish general practice. Acute respiratory tract infections accounted for 456,532 antibiotic prescriptions issued between July 2012 and June 2013. Pneumonia was the most common indication with 178,354 prescriptions (39%), followed by acute tonsillitis (21%) and acute otitis media (19%). In total, penicillin V accounted for 58% of all prescriptions, followed by macrolides (18%) and amoxicillin (15%). The use of second-line agents increased with age for all indications, and comprised more than 40% of the prescriptions in patients aged >75 years. Women were more often prescribed antibiotics regardless of clinical indication. This is the first Danish study to characterise antibiotic prescription patterns for acute respiratory tract infections by data linkage of clinical indications. The findings confirm that penicillin V is the most commonly prescribed antibiotic agent for treatment of patients with an acute respiratory tract infection in Danish general practice. However, second-line agents like macrolides and amoxicillin with or without clavulanic acid are overused. Strategies to improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing especially for pneumonia, acute otitis media and acute rhinosinusitis are warranted. TRACKING THE OVERUSE OF ANTIBIOTICS: Better adherence to guidelines for prescribing antibiotics for different respiratory tract infections are warranted in Danish general practice. The over-use of antibiotics, particularly so

  3. Epidemiology of viral respiratory tract infections in a prospective cohort of infants and toddlers attending daycare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchok, Mary P; Martin, Emily T; Chambers, Susan; Kuypers, Jane; Behrens, Melinda; Braun, Loranee E; Englund, Janet A

    2010-09-01

    The epidemiology of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in a daycare cohort has not been explored using molecular techniques. (1) Determine the overall incidence of RTIs in a daycare cohort using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). (2) Determine the relative incidence and impact of specific respiratory viruses, and characterize and compare clinical features associated with these pathogens. In this prospective cohort study conducted from February 2006 to April 2008, nasal swabs were obtained from symptomatic children ages 0-30 months enrolled in fulltime daycare. RT-PCR was performed to detect respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus (MPV), influenza (Flu) viruses A and B, parainfluenza (PIV), adenovirus (AdV), human coronaviruses (CoV) and rhinovirus (RhV). Symptom diaries were completed for each illness. We followed 119 children (mean age 10 months; range 2-24 months) for 115 child years. The mean annual incidence of RTI per child was 4.2 the first year and 1.2 the second year of the study. At least 1 virus was identified in 67% RTIs. Co-infections were common (27% RTIs), with RhV, CoV, and AdV the most common co-pathogens. PIV was identified in 12% of RTIs with a high incidence of PIV4. The viruses with the greatest impact on our population were RSV, RhV and AdV. Using molecular techniques, viruses were identified in approximately twice as many RTIs as previously reported in a daycare cohort. Infections with newly identified viruses, such as HMPV and CoV subtypes were less frequent and severe than infections with RSV, AdV and RhV. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The effect of N-acetylcysteine on biofilms: Implications for the treatment of respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Francesco; Page, Clive; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Pallecchi, Lucia; Matera, Maria Gabriella; Rogliani, Paola; Cazzola, Mario

    2016-08-01

    In airway infections, biofilm formation has been demonstrated to be responsible for both acute and chronic events, and constitutes a genuine challenge in clinical practice. Difficulty in eradicating biofilms with systemic antibiotics has led clinicians to consider the possible role of non-antibiotic therapy. The aim of this review is to examine current evidence for the use of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in the treatment of biofilm-related respiratory infections. Electronic searches of PUBMED up to September 2015 were conducted, searching for 'biofilm', 'respiratory tract infection', 'N-acetylcysteine', 'cystic fibrosis', 'COPD', 'bronchiectasis', 'otitis', and 'bronchitis' in titles and abstracts. Studies included for review were primarily in English, but a few in Italian were also selected. Biofilm formation may be involved in many infections, including ventilator-associated pneumonia, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, bronchitis, and upper respiratory airway infections. Many in vitro studies have demonstrated that NAC is effective in inhibiting biofilm formation, disrupting preformed biofilms (both initial and mature), and reducing bacterial viability in biofilms. There are fewer clinical studies on the use of NAC in disruption of biofilm formation, although there is some evidence that NAC alone or in combination with antibiotics can decrease the risk of exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and rhinosinusitis. However, the usefulness of NAC in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis is still matter of debate. Most of the studies published to date have used oral or intramuscular NAC formulations. Evidence from in vitro studies indicates that NAC has good antibacterial properties and the ability to interfere with biofilm formation and disrupt biofilms. Results from clinical studies have provided some encouraging findings that need to be confirmed and expanded using other routes of administration of NAC such as

  5. Pentraxin 3 as a clinical marker in children with lower respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwan Soo; Won, Sulmui; Lee, Eu Kyoung; Chun, Yoon Hong; Yoon, Jong-Seo; Kim, Hyun Hee; Kim, Jin Tack

    2016-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX-3) is an acute-phase protein that increases in the plasma during inflammation. We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of PTX-3 as a clinical marker in children with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and examine the correlation of PTX-3 with other biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT). We enrolled 117 consecutive patients admitted to Seoul St. Mary's Hospital with LRTI using the WHO criteria. We recorded data on fever duration and peak temperature before admission, duration of fever after admission, respiratory rate, heart rate, oxygen saturation upon admission, duration of oxygen supplementation, and duration of hospital stay. Upon admission, white blood cell (WBC) count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, CRP level were measured. Multiplex respiratory virus polymerase chain reaction was performed using nasal swabs. PTX-3, PCT, and various cytokines were measured after the study had been completed. We found that there was no significant difference in the level of PTX-3 according to the type of viral infection. PTX-3 levels showed a significant correlation with PCT levels, but not with levels of CRP. The level of PTX-3 showed a significant correlation with peak temperature and duration of fever before admission as well as interleukin (IL)-6 levels. PCT levels showed a significant correlation with IL-6 and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor levels, peak temperature, and duration of fever before admission, and duration of hospital stay. CRP levels showed a significant correlation with duration of fever before admission, total WBC count, and neutrophil count. PCT levels significantly predicted a hospital stay of 7 days or more. PTX-3, PCT, and CRP levels showed no correlation with any other clinical features. PTX-3 reflected disease severity but failed to predict length of hospital stay. Further studies evaluating the use of PTX-3 as a biomarker in mild LRTI would be useful. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Some viral and bacterial respiratory tract infections of dairy cattle during the summer season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kale M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, dairy cattle with respiratory system problems that were brought to a private slaughterhouse in Burdur province were investigated for viral and bacterial infections present in the summer season. The blood samples were collected from 56 animals. The samples were tested for antibodies against bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3 and bovine adenovirus 3 (BAV-3 by ELISA. Bacteriological cultivation was carried out from lung samples taken after cutting the same animals. The seropositivity rates which were determined for 5 viruses in cattle (BoHV- 1, BVDV, BRSV, BPIV-3 and BAV-3 were 7.14%, 50%, 94.64%, 94.64% and 82.14% respectively. The presence of antibodies against the viruses was as follows; 5.36% of cattle had antibodies against only one virus, 14.29% against two, 30.36% against three, 44.64% against four and 5.36% against five viruses. A total of 36 bacterial agents were isolated from 30 out of 56 lung samples. From the lung samples, only one bacterium was isolated from 39.3% (22/56 samples, and more than one bacterium from 14.3% (8/56. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus spp. were detected as the most often isolated agents. Compared to bacteria, the rates of viral infections associated with Escherichia coli (BRSV+BPIV-3+BAV- 3+Escherichia coli; 8.92% and BRSV+BPIV-3+Escherichia coli; 5.35% were higher. As a consequence, it was thought that primary agents which were the viruses and bacteria may have attended as secondary factors in respiratory tract infections of dairy cattle.

  7. The myocardium functional reserve indicators in junior children with recurrent acute upper respiratory tract infection

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    L.S. Ovcharenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. The problem of early diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases in children is relevant throughout the world and in Ukraine, as in childhood the health and quality of life of an adult are formed. The psychoemotional stress in junior children as well as increasingly complicating school curriculum, information overload with electronic gadgets, increased frequency of colds in children cause physical inactivity. In addition, infectious agents have a toxic effect on the myocardium, altering its functional state. All these together adversely affect the formation and development of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems of children. The aim was to study the functional reserve of the myocardium in junior children, depending on the frequency of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI. Materials and methods. The study examined 1109 children aged 6 to 9 years old. The URTI incidence was analyzed depending on the age. In the study, the children were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of the children with URTI — 210. Group 2 involved the children with occasional URTI — 899. Results. Among 210 surveyed children with upper respiratory infections 171 schoolboys (81.4 % had reduced functional reserve of the myocardium, which is consistent with findings from other studies. In children aged 7 and 9 years old, the number of reduced functional reserve of the myocardium varies from 70 to 82 % in seven-year children, among the schoolboys aged 6 and 8 years old the incidence of reduced functional reserve of the myocardium increased from 83 to 100 % in six-year children. Conclusions. Children with URTI have a reduced functional reserve of the myocardium. Children with episodic URTI have higher rates of functional reserve of the myocardium, therefore reducing the incidence of URTI will lead to the improvement of the myocardium functional state.

  8. Immunostimulation with oral vaccines for prevention and treatment of respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Szamborski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory system is susceptible to unfavourable effects of biological and non-biological factors. In the protection against infectious agents, the immune system plays a crucial role thanks to close cooperation of specific (acquired and non-specific (natural, innate immune mechanisms. A non-specific response actively supports specific response mechanisms. This enables effective protection of our body against infections, both at the stage when pathogens reach the organism and after their penetration into tissues. A stimulation with microbial antigens leads to the activation of specific immunity mechanisms: humoral and cell-mediated responses. In the humoral response, specific immunoglobulins of various classes are involved to protect from recurrent infections. The knowledge of immunity development enables immune system stimulation with pharmaceutical products. The most common immunostimulants are non-specific and specific bacterial vaccines. The main goal of vaccines is the protection of healthy individuals against infections. Conventional prophylactic vaccines are immunogenic products. They contain a combination of extracts of various bacteria, usually ones that are aetiological factors of upper respiratory tract infections. Non-specific vaccines are administered to provoke a specific immune response towards antigens contained in the vaccine. They are bacterial immunostimulants acting mainly by stimulation and mobilisation of host defensive mechanisms. They improve antibacterial serum properties by increasing the level of natural antibodies. If needed, these reactions should be easily stimulated by a pathogen present in nature and should effectively neutralize or limit the disease. In patients who have been treated with a non-specific vaccine, decreased numbers of episodes of respiratory tract infections as well lower antibiotic intake were noted.

  9. [Etiological analysis and establishment of a discriminant model for lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y S; Lin, X H; Li, H R; Hua, Z D; Lin, M Q; Huang, W S; Yu, T; Lyu, H Y; Mao, W P; Liang, Y Q; Peng, X R; Chen, S J; Zheng, H; Lian, S Q; Hu, X L; Yao, X Q

    2017-12-12

    Objective: To analyze the pathogens of lower respiratory tract infection(LRTI) including bacterial, viral and mixed infection, and to establish a discriminant model based on clinical features in order to predict the pathogens. Methods: A total of 243 hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections were enrolled in Fujian Provincial Hospital from April 2012 to September 2015. The clinical data and airway (sputum and/or bronchoalveolar lavage) samples were collected. Microbes were identified by traditional culture (for bacteria), loop-mediated isothermal amplification(LAMP) and gene sequencing (for bacteria and atypical pathogen), or Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Real-time PCR)for viruses. Finally, a discriminant model was established by using the discriminant analysis methods to help to predict bacterial, viral and mixed infections. Results: Pathogens were detected in 53.9% (131/243) of the 243 cases.Bacteria accounted for 23.5%(57/243, of which 17 cases with the virus, 1 case with Mycoplasma pneumoniae and virus), mainly Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and Klebsiella Pneumonia. Atypical pathogens for 4.9% (12/243, of which 3 cases with the virus, 1 case of bacteria and viruses), all were mycoplasma pneumonia. Viruses for 34.6% (84/243, of which 17 cases of bacteria, 3 cases with Mycoplasma pneumoniae, 1 case with Mycoplasma pneumoniae and bacteria) of the cases, mainly Influenza A virus and Human Cytomegalovirus, and other virus like adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, human boca virus were also detected fewly. Seven parameters including mental status, using antibiotics prior to admission, complications, abnormal breath sounds, neutrophil alkaline phosphatase (NAP) score, pneumonia severity index (PSI) score and CRUB-65 score were enrolled after univariate analysis, and discriminant analysis was used to establish the discriminant model by applying the identified pathogens as the

  10. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in upper respiratory tract mucosa in a group of pre-school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw Szydłowski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction[/b]. Human Papillomavirus (HPV is a group of DNA viruses which is an etiological factor of many benign and malignant diseases of the upper respiratory tract mucosa, female genital tract and the skin. HPV infection is considered a sexually-transmitted infection, but can also be transmitted by non-sexual routes, including perinatal vertical transmission, physical contact, iatrogenic infection and autoinoculation. Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (RRP in children is connected with HPV infection transmitted vertically from mother to child during the passage of the foetus through an infected birth canal. [b]objective. [/b]The aim of this study was to establish the level of Human Papillomaviruses carrier state in upper respiratory tract mucosa in healthy pre-school children, and to identify potential risk factors for HPV infection. [b]materials and method[/b]. After obtaining consent from their parents, 97 pre-school children were examined – 51 girls and 46 boys between the ages of 3 – 5 years; average age – 4 years and 5 months. 68 children were urban dwellers and 29 came from a rural environment. A questionnaire with detailed history was taken including parents’ and child`s personal data, as well as perinatal risk factors in pregnancy. Socio-demographic information was also obtained, including the standard of living, and chosen environmental factors. Routine ENT examination was performed. Exfoliated oral squamous cells were collected from swabs and analysed for the presence of DNA papillomaviruses by polymerase chain reaction. [b]results.[/b] The presence of HPV in the respiratory tract in children was detected in 19.6% cases. ‘High oncogenic potential’ HPVs, such as HPV-16 and HPV-18, were not observed in squamous cell mucosa of the respiratory tract in the children. No significant differences were observed between the HPV carrier state in urban and rural inhabitants.

  11. [Relationship between viral load of human bocavirus and clinical characteristics in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Bing; Zhong, Li-Li; Xie, Le-Yun; Xiao, Ni-Guang

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence of human bocavirus (HBoV) in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection and to explore the relationship between the viral load of HBoV and the clinical characteristics of acute lower respiratory tract infection in children. A total of 1 554 nasopharyngeal aspirates from children who were hospitalized due to acute lower respiratory tract infection between March 2011 and March 2014 were collected. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect 12 RNA and 2 DNA viruses, adenovirus (ADV) and HBoV, and to measure the viral load of HBoV in HBoV-positive children. A comprehensive analysis was performed with reference to clinical symptoms and indicators. In the 1 554 specimens, 1 212 (77.99%) were positive for viruses, and 275 (17.70%) were HBoV-positive. In HBoV-positive cases, 94.9% were aged infection, and 230 (83.64%) had mixed infection. There was no significant difference in viral load between children with single infection and mixed infection (P>0.05). The patients with fever had a significantly higher viral load than those without fever (Pacute lower respiratory tract infection (P>0.05). HBoV is one of the important pathogens of acute lower respiratory tract infection in children. Children with a higher viral load of HBoV are more likely to experience symptoms such as fever and wheezing. However, the severity of disease and mixed infection are not significantly related to viral load.

  12. The effectiveness of systematic perioperative oral hygiene in reduction of postoperative respiratory tract infections after elective thoracic surgery in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Larsen, Palle; Håkonsen, Sasja Jul

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nosocomial infections are a significant contributor to patient morbidity and mortality. Nosocomial infections significantly increase hospital length of stay and total hospital costs. Thoracic surgery, mechanical ventilation and/or admission to an intensive care unit are known...... to increase patients' risk for nosocomial respiratory tract infection. OBJECTIVES: To identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of systematic perioperative oral hygiene in the reduction of postoperative respiratory airway infections in adult patients undergoing...... or plaques and/or systematic use of mouth rinse) performed by patients themselves or by healthcare staff (such as nurses).Randomized controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies.Nosocomial infections, specifically respiratory tracts infections, and surgical site infections SEARCH STRATEGY: Multiple...

  13. Inclusion of thin target and source regions in alimentary and respiratory tract systems of mesh-type ICRP adult reference phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Sung; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Tat Nguyen, Thang; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Lee, Jai Ki; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik; Qiu, Rui; Eckerman, Keith; Chung, Beom Sun

    2017-03-01

    It is not feasible to define very small or complex organs and tissues in the current voxel-type adult reference computational phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), which limit dose coefficients for weakly penetrating radiations. To address the problem, the ICRP is converting the voxel-type reference phantoms into mesh-type phantoms. In the present study, as a part of the conversion project, the micrometer-thick target and source regions in the alimentary and respiratory tract systems as described in ICRP Publications 100 and 66 were included in the mesh-type ICRP reference adult male and female phantoms. In addition, realistic lung airway models were simulated to represent the bronchial (BB) and bronchiolar (bb) regions. The electron specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for the alimentary and respiratory tract systems were then calculated and compared with the values calculated with the stylized models of ICRP Publications 100 and 66. The comparisons show generally good agreement for the oral cavity, oesophagus, and BB, whereas for the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, extrathoracic region, and bb, there are some differences (e.g. up to ~9 times in the large intestine). The difference is mainly due to anatomical difference in these organs between the realistic mesh-type phantoms and the simplified stylized models. The new alimentary and respiratory tract models in the mesh-type ICRP reference phantoms preserve the topology and dimensions of the voxel-type ICRP phantoms and provide more reliable SAF values than the simplified models adopted in previous ICRP Publications.

  14. Inclusion of thin target and source regions in alimentary and respiratory tract systems of mesh-type ICRP adult reference phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Sung; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Nguyen, Thang Tat; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Lee, Jai Ki; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E; Lee, Choonsik; Qiu, Rui; Eckerman, Keith; Chung, Beom Sun

    2017-03-21

    It is not feasible to define very small or complex organs and tissues in the current voxel-type adult reference computational phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), which limit dose coefficients for weakly penetrating radiations. To address the problem, the ICRP is converting the voxel-type reference phantoms into mesh-type phantoms. In the present study, as a part of the conversion project, the micrometer-thick target and source regions in the alimentary and respiratory tract systems as described in ICRP Publications 100 and 66 were included in the mesh-type ICRP reference adult male and female phantoms. In addition, realistic lung airway models were simulated to represent the bronchial (BB) and bronchiolar (bb) regions. The electron specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for the alimentary and respiratory tract systems were then calculated and compared with the values calculated with the stylized models of ICRP Publications 100 and 66. The comparisons show generally good agreement for the oral cavity, oesophagus, and BB, whereas for the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, extrathoracic region, and bb, there are some differences (e.g. up to ~9 times in the large intestine). The difference is mainly due to anatomical difference in these organs between the realistic mesh-type phantoms and the simplified stylized models. The new alimentary and respiratory tract models in the mesh-type ICRP reference phantoms preserve the topology and dimensions of the voxel-type ICRP phantoms and provide more reliable SAF values than the simplified models adopted in previous ICRP Publications.

  15. Respiratory Tract Infection and Risk of Hospitalization in Children with Congenital Heart Defects During Season and Off-Season: A Swedish National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granbom, Elin; Fernlund, Eva; Sunnegårdh, Jan; Lundell, Bo; Naumburg, Estelle

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTI) are common among young children, and congenital heart defect (CHD) is a risk factor for severe illness and hospitalization. This study aims to assess the relative risk of hospitalization due to RTI in winter and summer seasons for different types of CHD. All children born in Sweden and under the age of two, in 2006-2011, were included. Heart defects were grouped according to type. Hospitalization rates for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and RTI in general were retrieved from the national inpatient registry. The relative risk of hospitalization was calculated by comparing each subgroup to other types of CHD and otherwise healthy children. The relative risk of hospitalization was increased for all CHD subgroups, and there was a greater increase in risk in summer for the most severe CHD. This included RSV infection, as well as RTI in general. The risk of hospitalization due to RTI is greater for CHD children. Prophylactic treatment with palivizumab, given to prevent severe RSV illness, is only recommended during winter. We argue that information to healthcare staff and parents should include how the risk of severe infectious respiratory tract illnesses, RSV and others, is present all year round for children with CHD.

  16. Dexamethasone for treatment of patients mechanically ventilated for lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, JBM; van Aalderen, WMC; de Weerd, W; Jansen, NJG; van Gestel, JPJ; Markhorst, DG; van Vught, AJ; Bos, AP; Kimpen, JLL

    Background: A study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of dexamethasone in patients mechanically ventilated for lower respiratory infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV-LRTI). Methods: In a multicentre randomised controlled trial patients were randomised to receive either

  17. [Multicenter prospective epidemiological studies on Haemophilus influenzae infection among hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Wang, Xiaolei; Ai, Tao; Xie, Xiaoping; Liu, Xiaoyun; Liu, Huawei; Yang, Lili; Li, Hua; Yang, Taoyi; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Li; Yang, Zhao; Deng, Quanmin

    2016-02-01

    To understand epidemiological characteristics of Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) infection in hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in west Sichuan China. The multicenter prospective cross-sectional design was used; four hospitals in west Sichuan China were chosen as research field, sputum bacterial culture was done and biological typing, PCR identification and drug sensitivity test of Hi epidemic strains were carried out among 0-17y hospitalized patients with LRTI in four hospitals located in west Sichuan China. Totally 5 748 cases with LRTI in four hospitals were investigated in west Sichuan from Nov. 2013 to April 2014 and the rate of sputum culture was 46.96% (2,699/5 748). The total pathogenic bacteria positive rate of sputum culture was 43.53% (1,175/2 699), and 279 Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) strain in 272 cases were isolated, the Hi positive rate was 10.08% (272/2 699). All the strains (100%) were non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi ) indentified by PCR. The main biotype of 279 strains was type Ⅰ with 39.07% (109/279) and type Ⅳ with 50.90% (142/279) ; 272 cases were enrolled in this survey, 12.50% (34/272) had broncheolitis, the rest of lower respiratory infection was 87.50 % (238/272), and 2.57% (7/272) was neonatal pneumonia, 2.21%(6/272)was pneumonia complicated with sepsis; in four hospitals the overall positive rate of Hi in inpatients with lower respiratory infection was 10.21%, 28.96%, 4.80%, 10.21% (χ(2) = 112.561, P = 0.000) and the positive rate of Hi inpatients with broncheolitis was 11.92%, 20.93%, 4.76%, and 66.67% (Fisher exact probability P = 0.001), with the rest lower respiratory infection was 9.96%, 30.90%, 4.81%, 9.85% (χ(2) =108.876, P = 0.000); 2.87% (8/279) bacterial strains of β-lactamase-nonproducing-ampicillin-intermediary (BLNAI) distributed in four hospitals, and 1.79% (5/279) bacterial strains of β-lactamase-nonproducing-ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR), 0.72% (2/279) bacterial strains of

  18. Single detection of human bocavirus 1 with a high viral load in severe respiratory tract infections in previously healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lili; Zheng, Shouyan; Xiao, Qiuyan; Ren, Luo; Xie, Xiaohong; Luo, Jian; Wang, Lijia; Huang, Ailong; Liu, Wei; Liu, Enmei

    2014-07-30

    Human bocavirus is a newly discovered parvovirus. Multiple studies have confirmed the presence of human bocavirus1 (HBoV1) in respiratory tract samples of children. The viral load, presentation of single detection and its role as a causative agent of severe respiratory tract infections have not been thoroughly elucidated. We investigated the presence of HBoV1 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens from 1229 children hospitalized for respiratory tract infections. The samples were analyzed for 15 respiratory viruses by PCR and 7 respiratory viruses by viral culture. At least one virus was detected in 652 (53.1%) of 1229 children, and two or more viruses were detected in 266 (21.6%) children. HBoV1 was detected in 127 children (10.3%), in which 66/127 (52%) of the cases were the only HBoV1 virus detected. Seasonal variation was observed with a high HBoV1 infection rate in summer. A cutoff value of 107 copies/mL was used to distinguish high and low HBoV1 viral loads in the nasopharyngeal aspirates. High viral loads of HBoV1 were noted predominantly in the absence of other viral agents (28/39, 71.8%) whereas there was primarily co-detection in cases of low HBoV1 viral loads (50/88, 56.8%). There were no differences in the clinical symptoms and severity between HBoV1 single detection and co-detection. In cases of HBoV1 single detection, the high viral load group was more prevalent among children with dyspnea and wheezing than was the low viral load group (42.9% vs. 23.7%, P = 0.036; 60.7% vs. 31.6%, P = 0.018). In clinical severity, a significant difference was recorded (25.0% vs. 5.3%, P = 0.003) between high viral load and low viral load groups. Of the HBoV1 positive patients associated with severe respiratory tract infections, 10/18 (55.6%) patients belonged to the HBoV1 high viral load group, and 7/10 (70%) patients had cases of HBoV1 single detection. HBoV1 at a high viral load is not frequently found in co

  19. Oral Astragalus (Huang qi) for preventing frequent episodes of acute respiratory tract infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guobin; Chen, Xiankun; Liu, Zhuangzhu; Yang, Lihong; Zhang, La; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia; Wen, Zehuai; Guo, Xinfeng; Qin, Xindong; Liang, Jueyao; Liu, Xusheng

    2016-12-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are common in children and can involve both upper and lower airways. Many children experience frequent ARTI episodes or recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs) in early life, which creates challenges for paediatricians, primary care physicians, parents and carers of children.In China, Astragalus (Huang qi), alone or in combination with other herbs, is used by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioners in the form of a water extract, to reduce the risk of ARTIs; it is believed to stimulate the immune system. Better understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of Astragalus may provide insights into ARTI prevention, and consequently reduced antibiotic use. To assess the effectiveness and safety of oral Astragalus for preventing frequent episodes of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in children in community settings. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 12, 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid) (1946 to 31 December 2015), Embase (Elsevier) (1974 to 31 December 2015), AMED (Ovid) (1985 to 31 December 2015), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1979 to 31 December 2015) and Chinese Scientific Journals full text database (CQVIP) (1989 to 31 December 2015), China Biology Medicine disc (CBM 1976 to 31 December 2015) and Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform (WanFang) (1998 to 31 December 2015). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing oral Astragalus as a sole Chinese herbal preparation with placebo to prevent frequent episodes of ARTIs in children. We used standard Cochrane methodological procedures for this review. We assessed search results to identify relevant studies. We planned to extract data using standardised forms. Disagreements were to be resolved through discussion. Risk of bias was to be assessed using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool. We planned to use mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) for continuous data and risk

  20. Distribution patterns of influenza virus receptors and viral attachment patterns in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of seven avian species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Taiana

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study assessed the presence of sialic acid α-2,3 and α-2,6 linked glycan receptors in seven avian species. The respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, golden pheasant, ostrich, and mallard were tested by means of lectin histochemistry, using the lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinin II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, which show affinity for α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors, respectively. Additionally, the pattern of virus attachment (PVA was evaluated with virus histochemistry, using an avian-origin H4N5 virus and a human-origin seasonal H1N1 virus. There was a great variation of receptor distribution among the tissues and avian species studied. Both α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors were present in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, and golden pheasant. In ostriches, the expression of the receptor was basically restricted to α-2,3 in both the respiratory and intestinal tracts and in mallards the α-2,6 receptors were absent from the intestinal tract. The results obtained with the lectin histochemistry were, in general, in agreement with the PVA. The differential expression and distribution of α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors among various avian species might reflect a potentially decisive factor in the emergence of new viral strains.

  1. Clinical utility of bronchoalveolar lavage and respiratory tract biopsies in diagnosis and management of suspected invasive respiratory fungal infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Surabhi; Li, Betty; Underhill, Nicole; Maloney, Rebekah; Katz, Ben Z; Hijiya, Nobuko

    2015-09-01

    Bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and respiratory tract biopsies are important tools for diagnosing fungal infections in children with cancer and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of BAL and respiratory tract biopsies on the management of suspected fungal infections in oncology and HSCT patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of oncology and HSCT patients with possible, probable, or proven fungal infection of the respiratory tract and determined whether BAL or biopsy following computed tomography (CT) prompted a change in management. Among 101 patients (0.5-29 years of age), 24 underwent a BAL and 31 had biopsies (27 lung and 4 sinus). The remaining 46 patients had CT scans only. Of these, there were radiographic findings suggestive of a fungal infection in 38 patients (83%). Thirty of these 38 patients (79%) had a change in management. BAL provided a diagnosis in 6 of 24 patients (25%). There was a change in management in 2 of the 6 (33%). Respiratory tract biopsy provided a diagnosis in 12 of 31 patients (39%). Biopsy results led to a change in management in 4 of the 12 patients (33%). Significant postoperative morbidity attributed to biopsy occurred in 3 of 31 patients (10%); 2 patients had pneumothorax requiring chest tube and intubation and a patient had prolonged intubation. BAL and biopsy in children with an oncological diagnosis or those undergoing HSCT only infrequently lead to changes in management in the era of empiric therapy with broad-spectrum anti-fungal agents. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs for pneumonia in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

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    Hopstaken, R.M. E-mail: rogier.hopstaken@hag.unimaas.nl; Witbraad, T.; Engelshoven, J.M.A. van; Dinant, G.J

    2004-08-01

    AIM: To assess inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs of individuals with pneumonia versus those without pneumonia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Chest radiographs of out-patients with a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) were assessed for the presence of infiltrates by radiologists from three local hospitals and were reassessed by one university hospital radiologist. Various measures of inter-observer agreement were calculated. RESULTS: The observed proportional agreement was 218 in 243 patients (89.7%). Kappa was 0.53 (moderate agreement) with a 95% confidence interval of 0.37 to 0.69. The observed positive agreement (59%) was much lower than for negative agreement (94%). Kappa was considerably lower, if chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was present ({kappa}=0.20) or Streptococcus pneumoniae ({kappa}=-0.29) was the infective agent. CONCLUSION: The overall inter-observer agreement adjusted for chance was moderate. Inter-observer agreement in cases with pneumonia was much worse than the agreement in negative (i.e. non-pneumonia) cases. A general practitioner's selection of patients with a higher chance of having pneumonia for chest radiography would thus not improve the observer agreement.

  3. Immunostimulation using bacterial antigens – mechanism ofaction and clinical practice inviral respiratory tract infections

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    Wojciech Feleszko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent respiratory tract infections constitute a significant problem in the practice of a general practitioner and paediatrician. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial strains, which has been growing for years, prompts the search for alternative ways of combating pathogens. One of them is the usage of preparations based on cell lysis of various bacterial strains. Bacterial lysates have been available in Europe for many years. In preclinical trials, they are characterised by the capability of reducing infections caused by bacteria and viruses that are not the components of the preparations. A range of clinical trials have demonstrated their usefulness in reducing the frequency of seasonal respiratory tract infections and antibiotic use. Moreover, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease gain an additional advantage in the form of the reduction of the risk of hospitalization due to disease exacerbations and a positive influence on the survival curve. The action of bacterial lysates is based on oral immunostimulation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, which results in increased antibody production. Moreover, they activate a range of mucosal mechanisms of non-specific immunity, mainly by enhancing the activity of TLR-dependent mechanisms. The efficacy of this group of drugs has been confirmed in a range of clinical trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Recent studies also indicate their immunoregulatory potential, suggesting that they might be used in the future in preventing allergies, asthma and autoimmune diseases. To conclude, physicians (paediatricians, laryngologists, pulmonologists should consider reducing the use of antibiotics in their daily practice. Instead, they should offer preparations that promote the immune system, thus controlling infections in a better way.

  4. Roles of Clinician, Patient, and Community Characteristics in the Management of Pediatric Upper Respiratory Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaeger, Jeffrey P; Temte, Jonathan L; Hanrahan, Lawrence P; Martinez-Donate, P

    2015-11-01

    Prior studies have evaluated factors predictive of inappropriate antibiotic prescription for upper respiratory tract infections (URIs). Community factors, however, have not been examined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of patient, clinician, and community factors in predicting appropriate management of URIs in children. We used a novel database exchange, linking electronic health record data with community statistics, to identify all patients aged 3 months to 18 years in whom URI was diagnosed in the period from 2007 to 2012. We followed the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) quality measurement titled "Appropriate treatment for children with upper respiratory infection" to determine the rate of appropriate management of URIs. We then stratified data across individual and community characteristics and used multiple logistic regression modeling to identify variables that independently predicted antibiotic prescription. Of 20,581 patients, the overall rate for appropriate management for URI was 93.5%. Family medicine clinicians (AOR = 1.5; 95% CI 1.31, 1.71; reference = pediatric clinicians), urgent care clinicians (AOR = 2.23; 95% CI 1.93, 2.57; reference = pediatric clinicians), patients aged 12 to 18 years (AOR = 1.44; 95% CI 1.25, 1.67; reference = age 3 months to 4 years), and patients of white race/ ethnicity (AOR = 1.83; 95% CI 1.41, 2.37; reference = black non-Hispanic) were independently predictive of antibiotic prescription. No community factors were independently predictive of antibiotic prescription. Results correlate with prior studies in which non-pediatric clinicians and white race/ethnicity were predictive of antibiotic prescription, while association with older patient age has not been previously reported. Findings illustrate the promise of linking electronic health records with community data to evaluate health care disparities. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  5. Local effects in the respiratory tract: relevance of subjectively measured irritation for setting occupational exposure limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Josje H E; de Heer, Cees; Woutersen, Ruud A

    2006-04-01

    Chemosensory effects of stimulation by a chemical can either be irritating (trigeminal stimulation) or odorous (olfactory stimulation) or both. For odorous irritants, a clear-cut distinction between odour and irritation is difficult to make. The differences in the lowest concentration found to be irritating to the respiratory tract in humans when compared to experimental animals has brought much debate in the process of setting occupational exposure limits (OELs) for such chemicals. In this paper it will be discussed as to how far subjectively measured sensory irritation threshold levels can be used to establish OELs. Data on respiratory irritation of four odorous irritants were retrieved from public literature and discussed, viz. acetone, formaldehyde, furfural and sulphur dioxide. Objective measures of irritation yielded results that differed from subjective evaluations. Important factors modulating the reported levels of irritation and health symptoms include the perception of odour intensity, exposure history and the individual's bias to report irritation on the basis of his/her prejudice or knowledge of the compound. Subjective measures alone are less appropriate for establishing sensory irritation thresholds of odorous irritants and are, therefore, less suitable to establish OELs without supporting evidence. Objectively measured irritation in humans, the Alarie assay (an experimental animal test assessing the concentration that results in a 50% reduction of the breathing frequency) and repeated exposure studies in animals may be of help to study objective irritation. If subjective measurements are used to study sensory irritation, the study design should at least include: measurement of both incidence and severity determined at several concentrations, an appropriate (0 ppm) control condition, preferably a non-irritant odorant control exposure, validated questionnaires and correct concentration measurements.

  6. A linear, time-varying simulation of the respiratory tract system

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    Hernandez, Oscar [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1992-11-01

    These results show that regional deposition efficiencies of inhaled particles are highly dependent on the level of physical activity in all the spectrum of thermodynamic and aerodynamic aerosol particle sizes; also it was shown that for particles in the aerodynamic size range, the values of regional deposition efficiencies at the inner regions of the lung are highly dependent on age. In addition, the shape of regional deposition efficiency curves as a function of particle size have a similar behavior for all ages; thus, any variation of the airway geometry and respiratory physiological parameters such as tidal volumes and breathing frequencies due to age difference do not cause a change in the fundamental mechanisms of deposition. Thus, for all the cases of physical activity and age dependency, the deposition of ultrafine aerosol particles is highly enhanced by diffusive processes in all regions of the respiratory tract, and for very large aerosol size particles this behavior is repeated again due to impaction and sedimentation mechanisms. Although the results presented at this work, are the result of computer simulations based on different sources of experimental data, the structure of the computer simulation code BIODEP is flexible enough to the acquisition of any kind of new experimental information in terms of biokinetic analysis and regional deposition parameters. In addition, since the design of BIODEP was intended for easy access to the users, then with exception of the subroutine DIVPAG, at this moment, the modular design of BIODEP using FORTRAN 77 allows the implementation of all the subroutines of BIODEP to be used in a interactive mode with any microcomputer.

  7. BACTERIAL PROFILE, ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY AND RESISTANCE OF LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN UPPER EGYPT

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    Gamal Agmy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI account for a considerable proportion of morbidity and antibiotic use. We aimed to identify the causative bacteria, antibiotic sensitivity and resistance of hospitalized adult patients due to LRTI in Upper Egypt. METHODS: A multicentre prospective study was performed at 3 University Hospitals for 3 years. Samples included sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL for staining and culture, and serum for serology. Samples were cultured on 3 bacteriological media (Nutrient, Chocolate ,MacConkey's agars.Colonies were identified via MicroScan WalkAway-96. Pneumoslide IgM kit was used for detection of atypical pathogens via indirect immunofluorescent assay. RESULTS: The predominant isolates in 360 patients with CAP were S.pneumoniae (36%, C. pneumoniae (18%, and M. pneumoniae (12%. A higher sensitivity was recorded for moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, macrolides, and cefepime. A higher of resistance was recorded for doxycycline, cephalosporins, and β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitors. The predominant isolates in 318 patients with HAP were, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; MRSA (23%, K. pneumoniae (14%, and polymicrobial in 12%. A higher sensitivity was recorded for vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, and moxifloxacin. Very high resistance was recorded for β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitors and cephalosporins. The predominant organisms in 376 patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (AECOPD were H. influnzae (30%, S. pneumoniae (25%, and M. catarrhalis(18%. A higher sensitivity was recorded for moxifloxacin, macrolides and cefepime. A higher rate of resistance was recorded for aminoglycosides and cephalosporins CONCLUSIONS: The most predominant bacteria for CAP in Upper Egypt are S. pneumoniae and atypical organisms, while that for HAP are MRSA and Gram negative bacteria. For acute exacerbation of COPD,H.influnzae was the commonest organism. Respiratory quinolones

  8. Risk factors for severe RSV-induced lower respiratory tract infection over four consecutive epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Lanari, Marcello; Merolla, Rocco; Paparatti, Umberto Di Luzio; Silvestri, Michela; Pistorio, Angela; Chezzi, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Variability in severity among different respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) seasons may influence hospital admission rates for RSV-induced lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in young children. The aim of the present study was to identify through logistic regression analysis, risk factors associated with higher likelihood to acquire RSV-induced LRTI, in children with symptoms severe enough to lead to hospital admission. Over four consecutive RSV seasons (2000–2004), records from children <4 years of age admitted for RSV-induced LRTI (“cases”) were compared with those from children with LRTI not due to RSV and not requiring hospitalization (“controls”). 145 “case-patients” and 295 “control-patients” were evaluated. Independent from the severity of the four epidemic seasons, seven predictors for hospitalization for RSV infection were found in the bivariate analysis: number of children in the family, chronological age at the onset of RSV season, birth weight and gestational age, birth order, daycare attendance, previous RSV infections. In the logistic regression analysis, only three predictors were detected: chronological age at the beginning of RSV season [aOR = 8.46; 95% CI:3.09–23.18]; birth weight category [aOR = 7.70; 95% CI:1.29–45.91]; birth order (aOR = 1.92; 95% CI:1.21–3.06). Conclusions: Independent from the RSV seasonality, specific host/environmental factors can be used to identify children at greatest risk for hospitalization for RSV infection. PMID:17308898

  9. Study of nebulization delivery of aerosolized fluorescent microspheres to the avian respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, Lisa A; Stephens, Kimberly; Teague, Stephen V; Pinkerton, Kent E; Raabe, Otto G

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the delivery of an aerosol of monodisperse microspheres to the respiratory tract of birds following aerosol exposure. Adult domestic pigeons (Columbia livia domestica, n = 5 birds per timed treatment) were exposed to an aerosol of fluorescent 1.0 microm diameter carboxylate microspheres for 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 hr. During the aerosolization period, the birds were free-standing in a plexiglass treatment chamber and the aerosol was delivered using a commercial nebulizer. Immediately following aerosol exposure, the birds were euthanatized and the carcasses were intravenously infused with a modified paraformaldehyde/gluteraldehyde fixative. Evaluation of microsphere distribution was performed using a stereoscopic microscope with an epifluorescent module. The results from this study revealed that the amount of aerosolized particles delivered using a commercial nebulizer was proportional to exposure periods. Aerosol exposure periods of 0.5 hr or 1 hr did not result in a readily observable distribution of 1.0 microm fluorescent microspheres to the cranial thoracic, caudal thoracic, or abdominal air sac membranes. This was partly attributed to the relatively low concentration of the individual monodisperse microspheres in the aerosolized suspension. The 2- and 4-hr exposure periods resulted in readily observable deposition of the 1.0 mirom fluorescent microspheres in the cranial thoracic, caudal thoracic, or abdominal air sac membranes, with the 4-hr exposure period resulting in the greatest number of particles on the membrane surfaces. For each of the exposure periods, there was individual animal variation regarding the distribution and relative number of spheres deposited. This study demonstrates the widespread deposition of particles that had an aerodynamic equivalent diameter of approximately 1 microm and provides a better understanding of particle deposition efficiency within the respiratory system following aerosol exposure in birds.

  10. Association of vitamin D deficiency with acute lower respiratory tract infections in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinlen, Nurdan; Zenciroglu, Aysegul; Beken, Serdar; Dursun, Arzu; Dilli, Dilek; Okumus, Nurullah

    2016-03-01

    To determine the association between serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and acute respiratory tract infections (ALRTI) in newborns. The study group consisted of 30 term newborns with ALRTI who were admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit. Controls were 30 healthy newborns with the same age as the study group. Newborns and their mothers were tested for serum 25(OH)D levels, with a low level defined as ≤15 ng/mL. The groups were similar in gestational week, birthweight, postnatal age and gender. Forty-three of the 60 infants (including study and control) had low 25(OH)D levels. The median 25(OH)D levels were lower [9.5 ng/mL (IQR = 7.9-12.2)] in the study group than those of the control group [15.5 ng/mL (IQR: 12-18)] (p = 0.0001). The median serum 25(OH)D levels in the mothers of the study group were also lower than those in the mothers of the control group [11.6 ng/mL (IQR = 9.4-15.8) and 17.3 ng/mL (IQR = 13.7-20.6), respectively] (p = 0.0001). Lower blood 25(OH)D levels might be associated with increased risk of ALRTI in term newborn babies. Appropriate vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy and early childhood may enhance newborns' respiratory health.

  11. Vitamin D status and hospitalisation for childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Patience; Babaniyi, I B; Yusuf, K K; Dodd, Caitlin; Langdon, Gretchen; Steinhoff, Mark; Dawodu, Adekunle

    2015-05-01

    Acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRTI) is the leading cause of childhood deaths in most developing countries, including Nigeria. Vitamin D is associated with innate immunity and may play a role in the control of infections. Case-control studies, including a small study from Nigeria, show inconsistent results for the association between vitamin D status and risk of ALRTI. To examine the relationship between vitamin D status and hospitalization for ALRTI in Nigerian children. Fifty children aged 2-60 months hospitalised with ALRTI were studied prospectively. ALRTI was diagnosed on the basis of modified WHO criteria. Each patient was matched with controls for age and gender. The controls were enrolled either from children attending well-child clinics or general clinics without evidence of respiratory infection or admitted to the hospital for elective surgery. A structured questionnaire collected data on demography, health, diet, duration of exposure to sunlight and percentage of body surface exposed to sunlight (according to type of clothing) while outdoors, and potential risk factors for ALRTI. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration was measured using a chemiluminescenceimmuno-assay. The differences between cases and controls in serum 25(OH)D concentrations, association between vitamin D status and ALRTI and risk factors for vitamin D deficiency were assessed. Mean (SD) 25(OH)D concentrations in patients and controls were similar [61·5 (25·8) vs 63·1 (22·9) nmol/L,P = 0·95].25% of all 100 subjects studied had serum 25(OH)Dvitamin D supplement use (P = 0·009) were independent determinants of vitamin D deficiency in the overall study population. ALRTI was not associated with vitamin D status, but was associated with less exposure to sunlight. Exposure to sunlight and vitamin D supplementation contributed to vitamin D status in this population.

  12. Role of Vitamin D in Hospitalized Children With Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Justicia, Antonio; Redondo, Lorenzo; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Martínez-Padilla, María Del Carmen; Giménez-Sánchez, Francisco; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2016-03-01

    Vitamin D is known to have modulatory actions in the immune system. Its influence on the severity of lower tract acute respiratory infections (LT-ARIs) is unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of vitamin D on LT-ARI in paediatric patients. Children admitted to hospital with LT-ARI were prospectively recruited through the GENDRES network (March 2009-May 2013). The 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) levels were measured by immunoassay. The severity of the illness was evaluated according to clinical scales, length of hospital stay, ventilatory requirements, and pediatric intensive care unit admission. A total of 347 patients with a median (interquartile range) age of 8.4 (2.6-21.1) months were included. The mean (SD) 25-OHD levels in our series were 27.1 (11.3) ng/mL. In this study, a cutoff value of ≥30 ng/mL was considered optimal vitamin status. Patients with 25-OHD levels respiratory difficulties (OR 5.065, 95% confidence interval 1.998-12.842; P = 0.001) than patients with normal values, and had a 117% higher risk of oxygen necessity and 217% higher risk of ventilatory requirement than those patients with normal values. An inverse correlation was found between 25-OHD levels and the severity in the evaluated scales. 25-OHD levels did not influence PICU admission rate or length of hospital stay. 25-OHD levels of children admitted because of a LT-ARI are infection needs further evaluation.

  13. Infants with recurrent lower respiratory tract symptoms – who benefits of extensive investigations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kotaniemi-Syrjänen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available There is limited information on lung function and exhaled nitric oxide fraction (FeNO in infants with recurrent lower respiratory tract symptoms. In 2000–2003, 201 recurrently symptomatic infants were referred to a tertiary center for further investigation. As part of the clinical investigation, whole-body plethysmography, tidal FeNO measurements, and skin prick tests were performed. In addition, 77 (38% of the children underwent bronchoscopy. Increased work of breathing in clinical examination (in 22%, and abnormal chest radiograph (in 30%, were associated with decreased airway conductance (sGaw z-score –1.65 (p<0.001 and p = 0.048, respectively and hyperinflation of the lungs (FRC z-score 1.65(p = 0.004 and p = 0.038, respectively. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS was associated with FeNO 40 ppb (p = 0.009. Increased work of breathing, sGaw z-score –1.65, and FRC z-score 1.65, were associated with low FeNO (p = 0.002, p = 0.005, p = 0.026, respectively. A definitive diagnosis was made in 184 (92% children; asthma was diagnosed in 149 (74%, infection in 23 (11%, and a structural abnormality in 12 (6%. Abnormal findings in clinical examination predicted the diagnosis of asthma or a structural abnormality in 96% of cases, whereas in children with underlying respiratory infection or no definitive diagnosis, clinical examination was normal in 92% (p<0.001. In conclusion, clinical findings of bronchial obstruction predict well lung function and the diagnosis of asthma in recurrently symptomatic infants. FeNO is affected by ETS exposure, clinical state of the child, and the used methods, and the information obtained should be interpreted with care.

  14. Pressing Issues of Rational Antibiotic Therapy for Inflammatory Diseases of the Lower Respiratory Tract in Pediatric Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.N. Okhotnikova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 30 years, high incidence of acute lower respiratory tract infections of bacterial origin, primarily pneumonia and bronchitis, treatment of which under the spread of antibiotic resistance is often a difficult task, cause alarm. Bronchitis — one of the most common respiratory diseases in childhood after acute respiratory viral infections. Application of antibiotics for acute bronchitis in children is not recommended, but they are prescribed for severe intoxication and prolonged hyperthermia (over 3 days, especially in infants, children with poor premorbid background and high risk of pneumonia. Antibiotic therapy is considered as the only science-based treatment of pneumonia. Taking into account the broad spectrum of modern antibiotics, monotherapy is most suitable. If it is necessary to extend their effect, combination of amoxicillin/clavulanate with macrolides, to which all the major respiratory pathogens are sensitive, is preferred.

  15. Effect of tidal volume and respiratory rate on the power of breathing calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalini, G; Marchesini, M; Tessadrelli, A; Rosano, A; Candiani, A; Bernardini, A

    2005-05-01

    The power of breathing (PoB) is used to estimate the mechanical workload of the respiratory system. Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different tidal volume-respiratory rate combinations on the PoB when the elastic load is constant. In order to assure strict control of the experimental conditions, the PoB was calculated on an airway pressure-volume curve in mechanically ventilated patients. Ten patients received three different tidal volume-respiratory rate combinations while minute ventilation was constant. Respiratory mechanics, PoB and its elastic and resistive components were calculated. Alternative methods to estimate the elastic workload were assessed: elastic work of breathing per litre per minute, elastic workload index (the square root of elastic work of breathing multiplied by respiratory rate) and elastic double product of the respiratory system (the elastic pressure multiplied by respiratory rate). Despite constant elastance and minute ventilation, the elastic PoB showed an increment greater than 200% from the lower to the greater tidal volume, accounting for approximately 80% of the whole PoB increment. On the contrary, elastic work of breathing per litre per minute, elastic workload index and elastic double product did not change. Changes in breathing pattern markedly affect the PoB despite constant mechanical load. Other indexes could assess the elastic workload without tidal volume dependence. Power of breathing use should be avoided to compare different mechanical loads or efficiencies of the respiratory muscles when tidal volume is variable.

  16. Prevalence of human rhinovirus in children admitted to hospital with acute lower respiratory tract infections in Changsha, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Sai-Zhen; Xiao, Ni-Guang; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Xie, Guang-Cheng; Zhong, Li-Li; Wang, Juan; Huang, Han; Zhang, Bing; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is a causative agent of acute respiratory tract infections. This study analyzed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of three HRV groups (HRV-A, -B, and -C) among 1,165 children aged 14 years or younger who were hospitalized with acute lower respiratory tract infection in China. PCR or reverse transcription-PCR was performed to detect 14 respiratory viruses in nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from September 2007 to August 2008 in Changsha, China. HRV was detected in 202 (17.3%) of the 1,165 children; 25.3% of the HRV-positive children were 13-36 months of age (χ(2)  = 22.803, P = 0.000). HRV was detected year round and peaked between September and December. Fifty-three percent of the HRV-positive samples were also positive for other respiratory viruses; respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was the most common secondary virus. Phylogenetic analysis using the VP4/VP2 region grouped the HRV-positive strains as follows: 101 HRV-A (50.0%), 21 HRV-B (10.4%), and 80 HRV-C (39.6%). HRV-A infections occurred predominantly in spring and autumn, and the peak prevalence of HRV-C was in early winter and late autumn. HRV-B infections were less common in spring (χ(2)  = 31.914, P = 0.000). No significant difference in clinical severity or presentation was found between patients with HRV single infection and HRV co-detections. Furthermore, the clinical characterizations did not differ among the three HRV species. These results suggest that HRV-C is an important viral agent along with HRV-A and HRV-B and that among hospitalized children with acute lower respiratory tract infection in China, the three HRV genotypes have similar clinical characteristics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Viral and bacterial upper respiratory tract infection in hospital health care workers over time and association with symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina MacIntyre, C; Chughtai, Abrar Ahmad; Zhang, Yi; Seale, Holly; Yang, Peng; Chen, Joshua; Pan, Yang; Zhang, Daitao; Wang, Quanyi

    2017-08-09

    Bacterial colonisation of the respiratory tract is commonly described and usually thought to be of no clinical significance. The aim of this study was to examine the presence and significance of bacteria and viruses in the upper respiratory tract of healthcare workers (HCWs), and association with respiratory symptoms. A prospective cohort study was conducted in China and 223 HCWs were recruited from fever clinics and respiratory, paediatric, emergency/Intensive medication wards. Participants were followed over 4 weeks (7th May 2015 to 4th June 2015) for development of clinical respiratory illness (CRI). Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained at baseline and at the end of the study. The primary endpoints were laboratory-confirmed bacterial colonisation and viral respiratory infection. Rates of the following infections in symptomatic and asymptomatic participants were compared at the start or end of the study; 1) all bacterial/viral infections, 2) bacterial infection and bacterial-viral co-infections, excluding virus only infections, and 3) only bacterial infections. Bacterial colonisation was identified in 88% (196/223) of participants at the start or end of the study. Among these participants, 66% (148/223) had only bacterial colonisation while 22% (48/223) had co-infection with a virus. Bacteria were isolated from 170 (76.2%) participants at baseline and 127 (57%) participants at the end of the study. Laboratory confirmed viral infections were identified in 53 (23.8%) participants - 35 (15.7%) at the baseline and 20 (9.0%) at the end of the study. CRI symptoms were recorded in 12 participants (4.5%) and all had a positive bacterium isolation at baseline (n = 11) or end of the study (n = 1). Among asymptomatic participants, 187 (87%) had bacterial colonisation or bacterial/viral co-infection at baseline or end of the study. Viruses were also isolated from 5 (2.4%) asymptomatic cases. Rates of all infection outcomes were higher in symptomatic participants, however

  18. Study on doctor shopping behavior: insight from patients with upper respiratory tract infection in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Jye; Lin, Shu-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Based on the actual medical records of ambulatory care visits, this study analyzed patients' healthcare seeking behavior and doctor shopping behavior (DSB), and investigated the underlying factors and the impact on the depletion of the healthcare resources for health policy makers to build a better health delivery system. Among a cohort comprised of 200,000 patients randomly chosen from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan in 2004, only the patients seeking ambulatory care visits for upper respiratory tract infection (URI) were analyzed. Among the 45,951 URI patients, 2875 of them exhibited DSB (prevalence 6.3%). The DSB showed a reverse U-shaped relationship with the patient age (the highest DSB in age 18-34 years). The episodes of the URI had a negative impact on the DSB. The odds ratios of gender and the frequency of consultation versus DSB were 1.10 and 4.72, respectively, and the depletion of days of medication and repeat prescription increased with doctor shopping. Health education to raise DSB awareness is necessary, especially for female's age 18-34 years. Implementing a proper referral system with efficient data exchange, setting up control parameters in the IC cards, and strengthening the integrated care plan could reduce the unnecessary waste of the healthcare resources.

  19. STUDY ON CAMPHOR-FREE NATURAL TOPICAL MEDICINE FOR UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubair Ali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Upper respiratory tract infections (URTI are the most common acute illnesses that are often of viral origin. Cough and chest congestion are the common symptoms of this disease. Children are prescribed with drugs that are considered to relive the symptoms of this disease. The topical medications contain vegetable camphor for more than a century that relieve chest congestion and cough caused by URTI. The use of camphor in such products remains questionable especially in children who are more sensitive to its side effects. Herbion “Chest Rub” for children is a camphor-free formulation that contains eucalyptus oil mixture, menthol,turpentine and clove oils and is used to relieve symptoms of URTI.The objective of the present investigationwas to determine the effectiveness of the chest rub inchildren suffering with congestion and cough caused by URTI. The study compared the results of the chest rub applied to a group of infected children with a placebo group. Patients were selected randomly on the basis of the criteria set for the study. The results indicated that the chest rub was quite effective in majority of the cases in relieving the symptoms of URTI as compared to the placebo group.

  20. Characterisation of Candida within the Mycobiome/Microbiome of the Lower Respiratory Tract of ICU Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Krause

    Full Text Available Whether the presence of Candida spp. in lower respiratory tract (LRT secretions is a marker of underlying disease, intensive care unit (ICU treatment and antibiotic therapy or contributes to poor clinical outcome is unclear. We investigated healthy controls, patients with proposed risk factors for Candida growth in LRT (antibiotic therapy, ICU treatment with and without antibiotic therapy, ICU patients with pneumonia and antibiotic therapy and candidemic patients (for comparison of truly invasive and colonizing Candida spp.. Fungal patterns were determined by conventional culture based microbiology combined with molecular approaches (next generation sequencing, multilocus sequence typing for description of fungal and concommitant bacterial microbiota in LRT, and host and fungal biomarkes were investigated. Admission to and treatment on ICUs shifted LRT fungal microbiota to Candida spp. dominated fungal profiles but antibiotic therapy did not. Compared to controls, Candida was part of fungal microbiota in LRT of ICU patients without pneumonia with and without antibiotic therapy (63% and 50% of total fungal genera and of ICU patients with pneumonia with antibiotic therapy (73% (p<0.05. No case of invasive candidiasis originating from Candida in the LRT was detected. There was no common bacterial microbiota profile associated or dissociated with Candida spp. in LRT. Colonizing and invasive Candida strains (from candidemic patients did not match to certain clades withdrawing the presence of a particular pathogenic and invasive clade. The presence of Candida spp. in the LRT rather reflected rapidly occurring LRT dysbiosis driven by ICU related factors than was associated with invasive candidiasis.

  1. Smoke-free legislation reduces hospital admissions for childhood lower respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So Lun; Wong, Wilfred Hing Sang; Lau, Yu Lung

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies showed reduction of hospital admissions for asthma after implementation of comprehensive smoke-free legislation. We aimed to evaluate the impact of comprehensive smoke-free legislation implemented in Hong Kong in 2007 on hospital admissions for childhood lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). We obtained data on 75 870 hospital admissions for LRTI among children ≤18 years of age between January 2004 and December 2012 from all Hospital Authority hospitals. Using a negative binomial regression model, we assessed the impact of smoke-free legislation on admission counts. After legislation implementation, there was an immediate effect with a change in the admission count of -33.5% (95% CI -36.4% to -30.5%), and a change in time trend to -13.9% per year (95% CI -16.0% to -11.7%). Overall, the legislation was associated with a net 47.4% reduction in admission counts in the first year. We estimated that the legislation was associated with a reduction of 13 635 admissions in the first 6 years after implementation. The immediate reduction and change in time trend was more apparent among school-age than preschool children. Implementation of comprehensive smoke-free legislation was associated with a significant reduction in hospital admissions for childhood LRTI. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Mycoplasmosis and upper respiratory tract disease of tortoises: a review and update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Elliott R.; Brown, Mary B.; Wendland, Lori; Brown, Daniel R.; Klein, Paul A.; Christopher, Mary M.; Berry, Kristin H.

    2014-01-01

    Tortoise mycoplasmosis is one of the most extensively characterized infectious diseases of chelonians. A 1989 outbreak of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in free-ranging Agassiz's desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) brought together an investigative team of researchers, diagnosticians, pathologists, immunologists and clinicians from multiple institutions and agencies. Electron microscopic studies of affected tortoises revealed a microorganism in close association with the nasal mucosa that subsequently was identified as a new species, Mycoplasma agassizii. Over the next 24 years, a second causative agent, Mycoplasma testudineum, was discovered, the geographic distribution and host range of tortoise mycoplasmosis were expanded, diagnostic tests were developed and refined for antibody and pathogen detection, transmission studies confirmed the pathogenicity of the original M. agassizii isolate, clinical (and subclinical) disease and laboratory abnormalities were characterized, many extrinsic and predisposing factors were found to play a role in morbidity and mortality associated with mycoplasmal infection, and social behavior was implicated in disease transmission. The translation of scientific research into management decisions has sometimes led to undesirable outcomes, such as euthanasia of clinically healthy tortoises. In this article, we review and assess current research on tortoise mycoplasmosis, arguably the most important chronic infectious disease of wild and captive North American and European tortoises, and update the implications for management and conservation of tortoises in the wild.

  3. Medication use in European primary care patients with lower respiratory tract infection: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamoen, Marleen; Broekhuizen, Berna DL; Little, Paul; Melbye, Hasse; Coenen, Samuel; Goossens, Herman; Butler, Chris C; Francis, Nick A; Verheij, Theo JM

    2014-01-01

    Background It is largely unknown what medication is used by patients with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). Aim To describe the use of self-medication and prescribed medication in adults presenting with LRTI in different European countries, and to relate self-medication to patient characteristics. Design and setting An observational study in 16 primary care networks in 12 European countries. Method A total of 2530 adult patients presenting with LRTI in 12 European countries filled in a diary on any medication used before and after a primary care consultation. Patient characteristics related to self-medication were determined by univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results The frequency and types of medication used differed greatly between European countries. Overall, 55.4% self-medicated before consultation, and 21.5% after consultation, most frequently with paracetamol, antitussives, and mucolytics. Females, non-smokers, and patients with more severe symptoms used more self-medication. Patients who were not prescribed medication during the consultation self-medicated more often afterwards. Self-medication with antibiotics was relatively rare. Conclusion A considerable amount of medication, often with no proven efficacy, was used by adults presenting with LRTI in primary care. There were large differences between European countries. These findings should help develop patient information resources, international guidelines, and international legislation concerning the availability of over-the-counter medication, and can also support interventions against unwarranted variations in care. In addition, further research on the effects of symptomatic medication is needed. PMID:24567621

  4. Signs and symptoms that differentiate acute sinusitis from viral upper respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Nader; Hoberman, Alejandro; Kearney, Diana H; Colborn, D Kathleen; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Jeong, Jong H; Haralam, Mary Ann; Bowen, A'Delbert; Flom, Lynda L; Wald, Ellen R

    2013-10-01

    Differentiating acute bacterial sinusitis from viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI) is challenging; 20% to 40% of children diagnosed with acute sinusitis based on clinical criteria likely have an uncomplicated URI. The objective of this study was to determine which signs and symptoms could be used to identify the subgroup of children who meet current clinical criteria for sinusitis but who nevertheless have a viral URI. We obtained sinus radiographs in consecutive children meeting a priori clinical criteria for acute sinusitis. We considered the subgroup of children with completely normal sinus radiographs to have an uncomplicated URI despite meeting the clinical diagnostic criteria for sinusitis. We examined the utility of signs and symptoms in identifying children with URI. Of 258 children enrolled, 54 (20.9%) children had completely normal radiographs. The absence of green nasal discharge, the absence of disturbed sleep and mild symptoms were associated with a diagnosis of URI. No physical exam findings were particularly helpful in distinguishing between children with normal versus abnormal radiographs. Among children meeting current criteria for the diagnosis of acute sinusitis, those with mild symptoms are significantly more likely to have a URI than those with severe symptoms. In addition to assessing overall severity of symptoms, practitioners should ask about sleep disturbance and green nasal discharge when assessing children with suspected sinusitis; their absence favors a diagnosis of URI.

  5. Recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTI) in the elderly: A late onset mild immunodeficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vosse, Esther; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, Monique M; Vermaire, René; Verhard, Els M; Waaijer, Jacqueline L; Bakker, Jaap A; Bernards, Sandra T; Eibel, Hermann; van Tol, Maarten J; van Dissel, Jaap T; Haverkamp, Margje H

    2017-07-01

    Elderly with late-onset recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTI) often have specific anti-polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD). We hypothesized that late-onset RRTI is caused by mild immunodeficiencies, such as SPAD, that remain hidden through adult life. We analyzed seventeen elderly RRTI patients and matched controls. We determined lymphocyte subsets, expression of BAFF receptors, serum immunoglobulins, complement pathways, Pneumovax-23 vaccination response and genetic variations in BAFFR and MBL2. Twelve patients (71%) and ten controls (59%) had SPAD. IgA was lower in patients than in controls, but other parameters did not differ. However, a high percentage of both patients (53%) and controls (65%) were MBL deficient, much more than in the general population. Often, MBL2 secretor genotypes did not match functional deficiency, suggesting that functional MBL deficiency can be an acquired condition. In conclusion, we found SPAD and MBL deficiency in many elderly, and conjecture that at least the latter arises with age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Seroprevalence of anti-Chlamydia trachomatis IgM in neonatal respiratory tract infections in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, Eszter; Donders, Gilbert G G; Petrovay, Fruzsina; Urbán, Edit

    2017-08-04

    To determine the seroprevalence of specific IgM indicative of respiratory tract infection (RTI) due to Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) among symptomatic infants. A descriptive study was conducted on young infants up to 5 months old at the Bacterial Sexually Transmitted Infections Reference Laboratory, National Centre for Epidemiology, Budapest, covering the period 2008-2016. Serum samples from infants suffering from RTIs were screened with a micro-immunofluorescence test (Focus, Cypress, USA) for the presence of anti-Chlamydia trachomatis-specific IgM. A parallel Bordetella pertussis screening was performed by an indirect immunofluorescence test (Euroimmun, Lübeck, Germany) that detected specific IgM. The CT-specific serum IgM was highly reactive in 50 (19.1 %) of the 262 neonates with RTIs, while all proved negative for Bordetella pertussis-specific IgM. Vertically transmitted C. trachomatis must be regarded as a common pathogen among symptomatic neonates with RTIs in Hungary. Routine screening and treatment of pregnant women could be one option to help prevent these conditions. Focused laboratory testing based on raised clinical awareness should enable early diagnosis and appropriate therapy for symptomatic infants.

  7. Burden of respiratory tract infections at post mortem in Zambian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Matthew; Shibemba, Aaron; Mudenda, Victor; Chimoga, Charles; Tembo, John; Kabwe, Mwila; Chilufya, Moses; Hoelscher, Michael; Maeurer, Markus; Sinyangwe, Sylvester; Mwaba, Peter; Kapata, Nathan; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2016-07-01

    Autopsy studies are the gold standard for determining cause-of-death and can inform on improved diagnostic strategies and algorithms to improve patient care. We conducted a cross-sectional observational autopsy study to describe the burden of respiratory tract infections in inpatient children who died at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. Gross pathology was recorded and lung tissue was analysed by histopathology and molecular diagnostics. Recruitment bias was estimated by comparing recruited and non-recruited cases. Of 121 children autopsied, 64 % were male, median age was 19 months (IQR, 12-45 months). HIV status was available for 97 children, of whom 34 % were HIV infected. Lung pathology was observed in 92 % of cases. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was the most common pathology (50 %) undiagnosed ante-mortem in 69 % of cases. Other pathologies included interstitial pneumonitis (17 %), tuberculosis (TB; 8 %), cytomegalovirus pneumonia (7 %) and pneumocystis Jirovecii pneumonia (5 %). Comorbidity between lung pathology and other communicable and non-communicable diseases was observed in 80 % of cases. Lung tissue from 70 % of TB cases was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis by molecular diagnostic tests. A total of 80 % of TB cases were comorbid with malnutrition and only 10 % of TB cases were on anti-TB therapy when they died. More proactive testing for bacterial pneumonia and TB in paediatric inpatient settings is needed.

  8. [Lower respiratory tract infections related to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Acinetobacter baumannii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranzelli, A; Wallyn, F; Nseir, S

    2013-10-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Acinetobacter baumannii are both non-fermenting ubiquitous Gram-negative bacilli. The incidence of lower respiratory tract infections related to these microorganisms is increasing, especially in intensive care units. Their capacity to acquire resistance against several antimicrobials is challenging for clinicians and microbiologists. Despite their low virulence, these pathogens are responsible for colonization and infection in patients with comorbidities, immunosuppression, and critically ill patients. S. maltophilia and A. baumannii are mainly identified in nosocomial infections: ventilator-associated pneumonia, bacteremia and surgical wound infection. Infections related to these microorganism are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole and carbapenem are the first line treatment for infections related to S. maltophilia and A. baumannii respectively. However, the increasing rate of resistance against these agents results in difficulties in treating patients with infections related to these pathogens. New antimicrobial agents and further randomized studies are needed to improve the treatment of these infections. Prevention of spared of these multidrug-resistant bacteria is mandatory, including hand-hygiene, environment cleaning, and limited usage of large spectrum antibiotics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Characteristics of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Colonizing Upper Respiratory Tract of Healthy Preschool Children in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Korona-Glowniak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistant and invasive pneumococci may spread temporally and locally in day care centers (DCCs. We examined 267 children attending four DCCs located in the same city and 70 children staying at home in three seasons (autumn, winter, and spring to determine prevalence, serotype distribution, antibiotic resistance patterns, and transmission of pneumococcal strains colonizing upper respiratory tract of healthy children without antipneumococcal vaccination. By pheno- and genotyping, we determined clonality of pneumococci, including drug-resistant strains. The average carriage of pneumococci in three seasons was 38.2%. 73.4% and 80.4% of the isolates belonged to serotypes present in 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine, respectively. Among the pneumococcal strains, 33.3% were susceptible to all antimicrobial tested and 39.2% had decreased susceptibility to penicillin. Multidrug resistance was common (35.7%; 97.5% of drug-resistant isolates represented serotypes included to 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine. According to BOX-PCR, clonality definitely was observed only in case of serotype 14. Multivariate analysis determined DCC attendance as strongly related to pneumococcal colonization in all three seasons, but important seasonal differences were demonstrated. In children attending DCCs, we observed dynamic turnover of pneumococcal strains, especially penicillin nonsusceptible and multidrug resistant, which were mostly distributed among serotypes included to available pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

  10. Effect of upper respiratory tract infection on AIR inhaled insulin pharmacokinetics and glucodynamics in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gern, J E; Stone, C K; Nakano, M; Muchmore, D B; de la Peña, A; Park, S; Suri, A; Tibaldi, F; Soon, D; Busse, W W

    2008-02-01

    The suitability of employing AIR Inhaled Insulin (AIR Insulin; AIR is a registered trademark of Alkermes) during acute upper respiratory tract infection (URI) has not been determined. Twenty-one healthy, non-diabetic subjects were enrolled in a single-sequence, two-period, euglycemic clamp study. Subjects received a single 12 U-equivalent dose of AIR Insulin before rhinovirus (RV16) inoculation and during symptomatic infection. Spirometry was used to evaluate pulmonary safety. AIR Insulin exposure (the area under the immunoreactive insulin (IRI) concentration vs time curve from time zero until the IRI concentrations returned to the predose baseline value (AUC(0-t'))) and glucodynamic response (total amount of glucose infused (G(tot))) were comparable before and during RV infection (AUC(0-t') 46,300 vs 52,600 pmol min/l, P=0.21; G(tot) 61,800 vs 68,700 mg, P=0.42, respectively). Variability of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters did not change during URI; either did the number or intensity of adverse events. No significant change in forced expiratory volume or forced vital capacity was observed following AIR Insulin administration or during URI. The AIR Insulin system provides similar pharmacokinetic and glucodynamic responses under conditions of an experimentally induced RV infection and is regarded as suitable for use in diabetic patients during URIs.

  11. Risk factors for levofloxacin resistance in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia from respiratory tract in a regional hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pien, Chien-Jung; Kuo, Han-Yueh; Chang, Shu-Wen; Chen, Pei-Ru; Yeh, Hui-Wen; Liu, Chih-Chin; Liou, Ming-Li

    2015-06-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a bacterial pathogen associated with health-care associated infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Members of the fluoroquinolone drug class are frequently used to treat S. maltophilia infection; however, S. maltophilia resistance to fluoroquinolones, especially levofloxacin, has been increasing. We sought to identify risk factors associated with levofloxacin resistance using a case-control study. We examined sputum from 76 S. maltophilia-positive patients admitted to our hospital between January 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011. Case groups were defined as patients who had S. maltophilia infections resistant to levofloxacin, and control groups were defined as patients who had S. maltophilia infections susceptible to levofloxacin treatment. Patient information including demographics, previous antibiotic use, and other traits were recorded. In addition, S. maltophilia isolates from patient sputum were assessed for antibiotic resistance as well as for the presence of genes associated with drug resistance. Previous antibiotic treatment with first- or second-generation cephalosporin was found more often in the levofloxacin-susceptible group; by contrast, previous piperacillin/tazobactam treatment occurred more often in the levofloxacin-resistant group. Three genes associated with drug resistance, including SmeA, SmeD, and SpgM were not significantly different between these groups. Piperacillin/tazobactam treatment is associated with subsequent isolation of levofloxacin-resistant S. maltophilia from the respiratory tract. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Improved characterization of medically relevant fungi in the human respiratory tract using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittinger, Kyle; Charlson, Emily S; Loy, Elizabeth; Shirley, David J; Haas, Andrew R; Laughlin, Alice; Yi, Yanjie; Wu, Gary D; Lewis, James D; Frank, Ian; Cantu, Edward; Diamond, Joshua M; Christie, Jason D; Collman, Ronald G; Bushman, Frederic D

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are important pathogens but challenging to enumerate using next-generation sequencing because of low absolute abundance in many samples and high levels of fungal DNA from contaminating sources. Here, we analyze fungal lineages present in the human airway using an improved method for contamination filtering. We use DNA quantification data, which are routinely acquired during DNA library preparation, to annotate output sequence data, and improve the identification and filtering of contaminants. We compare fungal communities and bacterial communities from healthy subjects, HIV+ subjects, and lung transplant recipients, providing a gradient of increasing lung impairment for comparison. We use deep sequencing to characterize ribosomal rRNA gene segments from fungi and bacteria in DNA extracted from bronchiolar lavage samples and oropharyngeal wash. Comparison to clinical culture data documents improved detection after applying the filtering procedure. We find increased representation of medically relevant organisms, including Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus, in subjects with increasingly severe pulmonary and immunologic deficits. We analyze covariation of fungal and bacterial taxa, and find that oropharyngeal communities rich in Candida are also rich in mitis group Streptococci,a community pattern associated with pathogenic polymicrobial biofilms. Thus, using this approach, it is possible to characterize fungal communities in the human respiratory tract more accurately and explore their interactions with bacterial communities in health and disease.

  13. A Computer Model for the Simulation of Nonspherical Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sturm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study presented here deposition of spheres and nonspherical particles with various aspect ratios (0.01–100 in the human respiratory tract was theoretically modeled. Shape of the nonspherical particles was considered by the application of the latest aerodynamic diameter concepts. Particle deposition was predicted by using a stochastic model of the lung geometry and simulating particle transport trajectories according to the random-walk algorithm. Concerning fibers total deposition is significantly enhanced with respect to that of spheres for μm-sized particles, whereby at normal breathing conditions peripheral lung compartments serve as primary deposition targets. In the case of oblate disks, total deposition becomes mostly remarkable for submicron particles, with the bronchioli and alveoli being targeted to a high extent. Enhancement of the aerodynamic diameter and/or flow rate generally causes a displacement of deposition maxima from peripheral to more proximal lung regions. From these findings, it can be concluded that these particle classes may represent tremendous occupational hazards, especially if they are attached with radioactive elements or heavy metals.

  14. Dietary intake and supplement use of vitamins C and E and upper respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondell, Elinor; Bälter, Olle; Rothman, Kenneth J; Bälter, Katarina

    2011-08-01

    Antioxidants are regulators of immune function and may play a role in upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). We investigated the potential effects of dietary intake from food and supplement use of vitamins C and E on the risk of self-reported URTI. We conducted a population-based cohort study of 1509 Swedish men and women ages 20 to 60 with a follow-up period of 4 months. Participants reported a total of 1181 occurrences of URTI. Poisson regression model was used to control for age, sex, and other confounding factors. Among women, we found that the incidence rate ratio (IRR) for high intake of vitamin C (>200 mg/d) from food was 0.69 (95% CI 0.49-0.98) compared with low intake (vitamin C (>150 mg/d) compared with low intake (vitamin E from food among either men or women, but a possible protective effect of vitamin C and E supplement use among men (vitamin C, 0.69 [95% CI 0.47-1.02]; vitamin E, 0.56 [95% CI 0.33-0.95]), although not among women. The present study is the first observational study to suggest that intake of vitamin C from food is sufficient to lower the risk of URTI among women. In addition, it appears that supplement use of vitamin E and vitamin C may reduce the risk of URTI among men, who overall had a lower intake of vitamin C from food than women.

  15. [Detection and Analysis of Human Parainfluenza Virus Infection in Hospitalized Adults with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-Qiao; Liu, Xue-Wei; Zhou, Tao; Pei, Xiao-Fang

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the prevalence and gene characteristics of different groups of human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) infection in hospitalized adults with acute respiratory tract infections (ARI). RT-PCR was used to detect HPIV hemagglutinin (HA) DNA,which was extracted from sputum samples of 1 039 adult patients with ARI from March,2014 to June,2016. The HA gene amplified from randomly selected positive samples were sequenced to analyze the homology and variation. 10.6% (110/1 039) of these samples were positive for HPIV,including 8 cases of HPIV-1,22 cases of HPIV-2,46 cases of HPIV-3 and 34 cases of HPIV-4. Detectable rate varied among different groups of HPIV according to seasons of the year and ages of patients. No significant differences were found between the positive samples and the reference sequences. Compared with different reference strains of different regions,the genetic distance of nucleotide is the smallest between the strains tested in this study and the reference strains of other provinces and cities in China. In Chengdu region,HPIV virus is highly detected in ARI,all subtypes were detected with HPIV-3 being the main subtype.

  16. Connections between voice ergonomic risk factors and voice symptoms, voice handicap, and respiratory tract diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Leena M; Hakala, Suvi J; Holmqvist, Sofia; Sala, Eeva

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the connections between voice ergonomic risk factors found in classrooms and voice-related problems in teachers. Voice ergonomic assessment was performed in 39 classrooms in 14 elementary schools by means of a Voice Ergonomic Assessment in Work Environment--Handbook and Checklist. The voice ergonomic risk factors assessed included working culture, noise, indoor air quality, working posture, stress, and access to a sound amplifier. Teachers from the above-mentioned classrooms reported their voice symptoms, respiratory tract diseases, and completed a Voice Handicap Index (VHI). The more voice ergonomic risk factors found in the classroom the higher were the teachers' total scores on voice symptoms and VHI. Stress was the factor that correlated most strongly with voice symptoms. Poor indoor air quality increased the occurrence of laryngitis. Voice ergonomics were poor in the classrooms studied and voice ergonomic risk factors affected the voice. It is important to convey information on voice ergonomics to education administrators and those responsible for school planning and taking care of school buildings. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. General practitioner management of upper respiratory tract infections: when are antibiotics prescribed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroll, B; Goodyear-Smith, F

    2000-11-24

    To assess General Practice (GP) description and management of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), including conditions under which they prescribe antibiotics. A telephone survey of a randomised sample of Auckland GPs. There was a 61% response rate. 82 of the 100 GPs interviewed agreed that most patients presenting with URTI expected antibiotics. Persistent symptoms and indication of specific infection (tonsillitis, otitis media, sinusitis, pharyngitis, purulent sputum) were common reasons for prescribing. Patients travelling overseas, expecting or requesting antibiotics and prior use of over-the-counter (OTC) medications increased antibiotic prescribing-rates. Most GPs (95%) issued as-needed prescriptions on occasion; 13% did this often. Amoxicillin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were most commonly used. Despite wide-ranging antibiotic use for URTI (0 to 90%), only 6% of GPs felt they prescribed more antibiotics than others. The results suggest over-prescription is common-place, but use of as-needed prescriptions to reduce antibiotic use is encouraging. Exploration of patient expectations in the consultation may assist in decreasing prescribing rates.

  18. [THE PATHOGENIC POTENTIAL OF MORAXELLA CATARRHALIS AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS EPIDERMIDIS UNDER INFLAMMATORY PROCESSES OF UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeva, L A; Burgasova, O A; Kunilova, E S; Petrova, I S; Tseneva, G Ya; Bespalova, G L

    2015-11-01

    The frequent isolation from biological material of Moraxella catarrhalis under bronchitis and pneumonia and Staphilococcus epidermidis under rhinitis and sinusitis requires profound investigation offactors ofpathogenicity ofthe mentioned microorganisms. The genetic and phenotypic markers of virulence of strains M. catarrhalis and S. epidermidis are examined. Their etiologic role in development of infection processes of respiratory tract and middle ear is determined The most of M catarrhalis strains isolated under bronchitis and pneumonia have gene mcaP responsiblefor production ofprotein McaP that provides adhesion to epithelium cell of host and lipolitic activity of bacteria. The strains isolated from patients with pneumonia had the most adhesive activity. The cluster of genes ICA with leading role of gene icaA is responsible for for availability offactors of intercellular adhesion in Staphilococci strains. In the clinical samples from patients with sinusitis this gene is detected 5 times more frequently than from healthy individuals. In phenotypic tests, expression of gene icaA in S. epidermidis isolated from patients is three times higher than in strains isolated from healthy individuals. To establish etiologic role of M. catarrhalis and S. epidermidis and to develop tactic of therapy of patients with bronchitis, pneumonia and sinusitis complex approach is needed, including detection of genetic and phenotypic markers of virulence in isolated microorganisms.

  19. Dornase alpha inhalations as a treatment option for recurrent lower respiratory tract infections in a child with Sotos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickhoff, Philipp; Fazekas, Tamas; Wank, Hans; Kastner, Ulrike

    2014-07-01

    Recurrent episodes of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are a rare complication of muscular hypotonia in patients with Sotos syndrome. We report on a male child suffering from repeated LRTIs including bronchitis, pneumonia, and atelectasis during infancy despite inhalations with salbutamol and fluticasone combined with manual chest percussion therapy. After initiation of dornase alpha inhalations in addition to the current treatment, we observed an improvement in the respiratory symptoms as well as a reduction in the rate of hospitalizations and in the occurrence of LRTIs. We assume that dornase alpha inhalations, in combination with airway clearance techniques, reduced the viscosity of airway secretions and by this improved mucociliary clearance and coughing efficiency.

  20. Application of the physiological and morphological parameters of the brazilian population sample to the mathematical model of the human respiratory tract; Aplicacao dos parametros fisiologicos e morfologicos de uma amostra da populacao brasileira no modelo matematico do trato respiratorio humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Arlene Alves dos

    2005-07-01

    The Human Respiratory Tract Model proposed by the ICRP Publication 66 accounts for the morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract. The characteristics of air drawn into the lungs and exhaled are greatly influenced by the morphology of the respiratory tract, which causes numerous changes in pressure, flow rate, direction and humidity as air moves into and out of the lungs. Concerning the respiratory physiological parameters the breathing characteristics influence the volume, the inhalation rate of air and the portion that enters through the nose and the mouth. These characteristics are important to determine the fractional deposition. The model uses morphological and physiological parameters from the Caucasian man to establish deposition fractions in the respiratory tract regions. It is known that the morphology and physiology are influenced by environmental, occupational and economic conditions. The ICRP recommends, for a reliable evaluation of the regional deposition, the use of parameters from a local population when information is available. The main purpose of this study is to verify the influence in using the morphology and physiology parameters representative of a sample of the Brazilian population on the deposition model of the ICRP Publication 66. The morphological and physiological data were obtained from the literature. The software EXCEL for Windows (version 2000) was used in order to implement the deposition model and also to allow the changes in parameters of interest. Initially, the implemented model was checked using the parameters defined by the ICRP and the results of the fraction deposition in the respiratory tract compartments were compared. Finally, morphological and physiological parameters from Brazilian adult male were applied and the fractional deposition calculated. The results suggest a significant variation in fractional deposition when Brazilian parameters are applied in the model. (author)

  1. [Analysis of actual effects of combining xiyanping injection with vitamin C injection in treatment of upper respiratory tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Fei; Huo, Jian; Xie, Yan-Ming

    2013-09-01

    To investigate whether Xiyanping injection associated with vitamin C injection will improve the cure rate of upper respiratory tract infection compared to treatment with Xiyanping injection alone. The analysis was based on hospital information system (HIS) data. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether he or she accepted the addition of vitamin C to treatment with Xiyanping injection. We used the propensity score to balance confounding factors, and made confounding factors which cannot be balanced by the propensity score to act as covariate variables. Then Logistic regression was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the two groups. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups. Compared with Xiyanping injection alone, using vitamin C in combination does not improve the treatment effectiveness of upper respiratory tract infection.

  2. Measurement of the deposited activity of the short-lived radon progeny in the human respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vezzu, G.; Butterweck-Dempewolf, G.; Schuler, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland). Div. for Radiation Protection and Waste Management

    1998-12-31

    Volunteers were exposed in the radon chamber at Paul Scherrer Institut to an atmosphere enriched with highly unattached radon progeny. The deposited radon progeny activity in the respiratory tract of the volunteers was determined using a low level in-vivo counter. The detector arrangement and its calibration for the measurement of deposited radon progeny activity is described and the results for a mouth and a nose breathing volunteer are presented. For the nose breathing volunteer 55% of the deposited radon progeny activity was located in the head and the remaining 45% in the chest whereas for the mouth breathing volunteer 25% was located in the head and the remaining 75% in the chest. A mean clearance half-life for the deposited radon progeny from the respiratory tract of (2{+-}1) h was obtained from the analyses of the temporal behaviour of the deposited radon progeny activity in the head. (orig.)

  3. Associations Between Enteral Colonization With Gram-Negative Bacteria and Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Infections and Colonization of the Respiratory Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frencken, Jos F; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Plantinga, Nienke L; Spitoni, Cristian; van de Groep, Kirsten; Cremer, Olaf L; Bonten, Marc J M

    2017-09-16

    Enteral and respiratory tract colonization with gram-negative bacteria may lead to subsequent infections in critically ill patients. We aimed to clarify the interdependence between gut and respiratory tract colonization and their associations with intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired infections in patients receiving selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD). Colonization status of the rectum and respiratory tract was determined using twice-weekly microbiological surveillance in mechanically ventilated subjects receiving SDD between May 2011 and June 2015 in a tertiary medical-surgical ICU in the Netherlands. Acquisition of infections was monitored daily by dedicated observers. Marginal structural models were used to determine the associations between gram-negative rectal colonization and respiratory tract colonization, ICU-acquired gram-negative infection, and ICU-acquired gram-negative bacteremia. Among 2066 ICU admissions, 1157 (56.0%) ever had documented gram-negative carriage in the rectum during ICU stay. Cumulative incidences of ICU-acquired gram-negative infection and bacteremia were 6.0% (n = 124) and 2.1% (n = 44), respectively. Rectal colonization was an independent risk factor for both respiratory tract colonization (cause-specific hazard ratio [CSHR], 2.93 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 2.02-4.23]) and new gram-negative infection in the ICU (CSHR, 3.04 [95% CI, 1.99-4.65]). Both rectal and respiratory tract colonization were associated with bacteremia (CSHR, 7.37 [95% CI, 3.25-16.68] and 2.56 [95% CI, 1.09-6.03], respectively). Similar associations were observed when Enterobacteriaceae and glucose nonfermenting gram-negative bacteria were analyzed separately. Gram-negative rectal colonization tends to be stronger associated with subsequent ICU-acquired gram-negative infections than gram-negative respiratory tract colonization. Gram-negative rectal colonization seems hardly associated with subsequent ICU-acquired gram-negative respiratory tract

  4. A population-based prospective cohort study examining the influence of early-life respiratory tract infections on school-age lung function and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meel, Evelien R; den Dekker, Herman T; Elbert, Niels J; Jansen, Pauline W; Moll, Henriëtte A; Reiss, Irwin K; de Jongste, Johan C; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Duijts, Liesbeth

    2017-11-03

    Early-life respiratory tract infections could affect airway obstruction and increase asthma risk in later life. However, results from previous studies are inconsistent. We examined the associations of early-life respiratory tract infections with lung function and asthma in school-aged children. This study among 5197 children born between April 2002 and January 2006 was embedded in a population-based prospective cohort study. Information on physician-attended upper and lower respiratory tract infections until age 6 years (categorised into ≤3 and >3-6 years) was obtained by annual questionnaires. Spirometry measures and physician-diagnosed asthma were assessed at age 10 years. Upper respiratory tract infections were not associated with adverse respiratory outcomes. Compared with children without lower respiratory tract infections ≤3 years, children with lower respiratory tract infections ≤3 years had a lower FEV1, FVC, FEV1:FVC and forced expiratory flow at 75% of FVC (FEF75) (Z-score (95% CI): ranging from -0.22 (-0.31 to -0.12) to -0.12 (-0.21 to -0.03)) and an increased risk of asthma (OR (95% CI): 1.79 (1.19 to 2.59)). Children with lower respiratory tract infections >3-6 years had an increased risk of asthma (3.53 (2.37 to 5.17)) only. Results were not mediated by antibiotic or paracetamol use and not modified by inhalant allergic sensitisation. Cross-lagged modelling showed that results were not bidirectional and independent of preschool wheezing patterns. Early-life lower respiratory tract infections ≤3 years are most consistently associated with lower lung function and increased risk of asthma in school-aged children. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy and risk of lower respiratory tract infections, wheezing, and asthma in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Eva; Romieu, Isabelle; Guerra, Stefano; Ballester, Ferrán; Rebagliato, Marisa; Vioque, Jesús; Tardón, Adonina; Rodriguez Delhi, Cristina; Arranz, Leonor; Torrent, Maties; Espada, Mercedes; Basterrechea, Mikel; Sunyer, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Adequate vitamin D status in mothers during pregnancy may influence the health status of the child later in life. We assessed whether maternal circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations in pregnancy are associated with risk of lower respiratory tract infections, wheezing, and asthma in the offspring. Data were obtained from 1724 children of the INfancia y Medio Ambiente (INMA) Project, a population-based birth cohort study. Maternal circulating 25(OH)D concentrations were measured in pregnancy (mean gestational age = 12.6 [SD = 2.5] weeks). When the child was age 1 year, parents were asked if their child had a physician-confirmed history of lower respiratory tract infections or a history of wheezing. The questions about wheezing were repeated annually thereafter. Asthma was defined as parental report of doctor diagnosis of asthma or receiving treatment at the age of 4-6 years or wheezing since the age of 4 years. The median maternal circulating 25(OH)D concentration in pregnancy was 29.5 ng/mL (interquartile range, 22.5-37.1 ng/mL). After multivariable adjustment, there was a trend for an independent association between higher levels of maternal circulating 25(OH)D levels in pregnancy and decreased odds of lower respiratory tract infections in offspring (for cohort- and season-specific quartile Q4 vs. Q1, odds ratio = 0.67 [95% confidence interval = 0.50-0.90]; test for trend, P = 0.016). We found no association between 25(OH)D levels in pregnancy and risk of wheezing at age 1 year or 4 years, or asthma at age 4-6 years. Higher maternal circulating 25(OH)D concentrations in pregnancy were independently associated with lower risk of lower respiratory tract infections in offspring in the first year of life but not with wheezing or asthma in childhood.

  6. Progress in Pediatrics in 2012: choices in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses

    OpenAIRE

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the progresses in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses that have been published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2012. The induction of Treg activity by probiotics might be effective for promoting tolerance towards food allergens. Nasal cytology is useful in patients with rhinitis for diagnosing chronic non-allergic non-infectious diseases. Atopic eczema is associated...

  7. Association between respiratory tract diseases and secondhand smoke exposure among never smoking flight attendants: a cross-sectional survey

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    Murawski Judith

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about long-term adverse health consequences experienced by flight attendants exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS during the time smoking was allowed on airplanes. We undertook this study to evaluate the association between accumulated flight time in smoky airplane cabins and respiratory tract diseases in a cohort of never smoking flight attendants. Methods We conducted a mailed survey in a cohort of flight attendants. Of 15,000 mailed questionnaires, 2053 (14% were completed and returned. We excluded respondents with a personal history of smoking (n = 748 and non smokers with a history of respiratory tract diseases before the age of 18 years (n = 298. The remaining 1007 respondents form the study sample. Results The overall study sample was predominantly white (86% and female (89%, with a mean age of 54 years. Overall, 69.7% of the respondents were diagnosed with at least one respiratory tract disease. Among these respondents, 43.4% reported a diagnosis of sinusitis, 40.3% allergies, 30.8% bronchitis, 23.2% middle ear infections, 13.6% asthma, 13.4% hay fever, 12.5% pneumonia, and 2.0% chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. More hours in a smoky cabin were observed to be significantly associated with sinusitis (OR = 1.21; p = 0.024, middle ear infections (OR = 1.30; p = 0.006, and asthma (OR = 1.26; p = 0.042. Conclusion We observed a significant association between hours of smoky cabin exposure and self-reported reported sinusitis, middle ear infections, and asthma. Our findings suggest a dose-response between duration of SHS exposure and diseases of the respiratory tract. Our findings add additional evidence to the growing body of knowledge supporting the need for widespread implementation of clean indoor air policies to decrease the risk of adverse health consequences experienced by never smokers exposed to SHS.

  8. The influence of Streptococcus pneumoniae nasopharyngeal colonization on the clinical outcome of the respiratory tract infections in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraitiene, Sigita; Alasevicius, Tomas; Staceviciene, Indre; Vaiciuniene, Daiva; Kacergius, Tomas; Usonis, Vytautas

    2015-09-30

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (SPn) is an important pathogen causing a variety of clinical manifestations. The effects of SPn nasopharyngeal colonization on respiratory tract infections are poorly studied. We evaluated the association of SPn colonization with features of respiratory tract infections. Children under the age of 6 years who visited a primary care physician because of respiratory tract infections were enrolled in the study. History was taken, children were clinically assessed by the physician, and nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained and cultured for SPn. Positive samples were serotyped. Associations of SPn colonization with clinical signs and symptoms, recovery duration, absence from day care centre, frequencies of specific diagnoses, and treatment with antimicrobials were evaluated. In total 900 children were enrolled. The prevalence of SPn colonization was 40.8 % (n = 367). There were minor differences between male and female subjects (199 of 492, 40.4 % vs 168 of 408, 41.2 %, p = 0.825). Children with and without siblings had similar colonization rates (145 of 334, 43.4 % vs 219 of 562, 39.0 %, p = 0.187). Clinical signs and symptoms were not associated with SPn colonization. Children colonized with SPn had longer recovery duration compared to non-colonized children (114 of 367, 31.1 % vs 98 of 533, 18.4 %, p respiratory tract infection, likely because of SPn being the cause of the disease or a complicating factor. It is also associated with and may be responsible for higher frequencies of bronchitis, pneumonia, acute otitis media, sinusitis and the need of antimicrobial treatment.

  9. Probiotics and vitamin C for the prevention of respiratory tract infections in children attending preschool: a randomised controlled pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Garaiova, I.; Muchová, J; Nagyová, Z; Wang, Duolao; Li, J. V.; Országhová, Z; Michael, D. R.; Plummer, S.F.; Ďuračková, Z

    2014-01-01

    Background:\\ud This pilot study investigates the efficacy of a probiotic consortium (Lab4) in combination with vitamin C on the prevention of respiratory tract infections in children attending preschool facilities.\\ud \\ud Subjects/methods:\\ud In a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled pilot study with children aged 3–6 years, 57 received 1.25 × 1010 colony-forming units of Lactobacillus acidophilus CUL21 (NCIMB 30156), Lactobacillus acidophilus CUL60 (NCIMB 30157), Bifidobacterium bifi...

  10. Vitamin D3 and gargling for the prevention of upper respiratory tract infections: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Goodall, Emma C; Granados, Andrea C; Luinstra, Kathy; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Coleman, Brenda L; Loeb, Mark; Smieja, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Background We undertook a 2X2 factorial, randomized controlled trial (RCT) to assess whether vitamin D3 supplementation (10,000 international units per week) versus placebo and gargling versus no gargling could prevent viral, clinical upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in university students. Methods We randomized 600 students into 4 treatment arms: 1) vitamin D3 and gargling, 2) placebo and gargling, 3) vitamin D3 and no gargling, and 4) placebo and no gargling. Students completed week...

  11. Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory tract infections: systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, Adrian R; Jolliffe, David A; Hooper, Richard L; Greenberg, Lauren; Aloia, John F; Bergman, Peter; Dubnov-Raz, Gal; Esposito, Susanna; Ganmaa, Davaasambuu; Ginde, Adit A; Goodall, Emma C; Grant, Cameron C; Griffiths, Christopher J; Janssens, Wim; Laaksi, Ilkka; Manaseki-Holland, Semira; Mauger, David; Murdoch, David R; Neale, Rachel; Rees, Judy R; Simpson, Steve; Stelmach, Iwona; Kumar, Geeta Trilok; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Camargo, Carlos A

    2017-02-15

    Objectives  To assess the overall effect of vitamin D supplementation on risk of acute respiratory tract infection, and to identify factors modifying this effect. Design  Systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data (IPD) from randomised controlled trials. Data sources  Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials Number registry from inception to December 2015. Eligibility criteria for study selection  Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trials of supplementation with vitamin D 3 or vitamin D 2 of any duration were eligible for inclusion if they had been approved by a research ethics committee and if data on incidence of acute respiratory tract infection were collected prospectively and prespecified as an efficacy outcome. Results  25 eligible randomised controlled trials (total 11 321 participants, aged 0 to 95 years) were identified. IPD were obtained for 10 933 (96.6%) participants. Vitamin D supplementation reduced the risk of acute respiratory tract infection among all participants (adjusted odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 0.96; P for heterogeneity acute respiratory tract infection overall. Patients who were very vitamin D deficient and those not receiving bolus doses experienced the most benefit. Systematic review registration  PROSPERO CRD42014013953. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Optimum use of selective plated media in primary processing of respiratory tract specimens from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Doern, G V; Brogden-Torres, B

    1992-01-01

    A total of 258 respiratory tract specimens from patients with cystic fibrosis were inoculated onto nine different plated media, and the rates of recovery of potential pathogens were compared. Media included sheep blood agar, enriched chocolate agar, MacConkey agar for gram-negative bacilli, chocolate agar containing bacitracin for Haemophilus spp., bromcresol green agar for yeasts, cetrimide agar for Pseudomonas spp., sheep blood agar containing colistin and nalidixic acid for gram-positive c...

  13. Evaluation the Antibacterial Effects of Two Commercial Products of Eucalyptus globulus Against Common Microbial Causes of Respiratory Tract Infections

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    Mohammadreza Nahaei, Mahsa Kalejahi 1, Parisa Rahbarfam 1, Solmaz Maleki Dizaj 2, Farzaneh Lotfipour *

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, antimicrobial activity of medicinal plants have attained once more importance due to drug resistance of microbial isolates to common antibiotics as well as fewer side effects and low cost of herbal products comparing to chemical drugs. Eucalyptus globules (E. globulus has been widely applied as a natural remedy in respiratory tract infections. The present study focused on the evaluation of antibacterial effect of two commercial products of E. globulus against common microbial causes of respiratory tract infections. To this end, two commercial products of E. globules including inhaler and oral soft capsule with standard expiration date, (in three different batch numbers were purchased from the pharmacy stores of Tabriz city. Methods: The antibacterial efficiency of these products were investigated using Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC, Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC and disk diffusion methods against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Pseudomona aeruginosa. Results: Based on the obtained results, these commercial products of E. globules showed significant inhibitory effects against Gram-positive bacteria. The findings also indicated that the Eucalyptus inhaler products had more inhibitory effects than Eucalyptus oral soft capsule, however batch to batch variations were of concern. Conclusion: This research presents optimistic result on using the Eucalyptus as an alternative antibacterial agent against respiratory tract pathogenic microorganisms.

  14. INFLUENCE OF LACTOBACILLUS SPP. ON COLONIZATION AND ANTI-INFECTIOUS RESISTANCE OF THE MUCOUS MEMBRANES OF THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

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    S. V. Kalinichenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lactobacilli are very important for the formation of colonization resistance and have pronounced antagonistic effect against a wide range of microorganisms. That is why the lactobacilli have extensive use as a component of classic probiotic agents that are widely used to prevent and treat dysbiotic conditions of digestive and genital systems of people. Objective. The aim of the research was to study the effect of lactobacilli on anti-infectious resistance of mucous membranes of upper respiratory tract. Methods. The colonization degree (lg CFU / g of nasal mucosal membranes by Lactobacillus spp. and S. aureus was determined in all carriers before the experiment. Also, the level of lysozyme and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA in nasal secretions cavities was identified. Results. It was established a clear dysfunction of anti-infectious resistance in carriers of Staphylococcus aureus - a decrease of colonization resistance and local immunity of mucous membranes of upper respiratory tract. As for the anti-infectious resistance of nasal mucosal of S. aureus carriers, the level of lysozyme and secretory immunoglobulin A gradually increased after the application of probiotic strain L. rhamnosus GG, and in 21 days it reached rates of healthy individuals. Conclusions. It was found out that probiotics for nasal passages sanitation in Staphylococcus aureus carriers lead to gradual eradication of the pathogen (S. aureus with restoration of colonization and anti-infectious resistance, mucous membranes and upper respiratory tract.

  15. Prevalence and Phylogenetic Characterization of Enterovirus D68 in Pediatric Patients with Acute Respiratory Tract Infection in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongpan, Ilada; Wanlapakorn, Nasamon; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Linsuwanon, Piyada; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Payungporn, Sunchai; Poovorawan, Yong

    2016-09-21

    Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is associated with severe lower respiratory tract infection and neurological abnormalities including acute myelitis and cranial nerve dysfunction. To determine whether an increased incidence of EV-D68 occurs in Southeast Asia, we retrospectively tested specimens collected from Thai pediatric patients who were less than 5 years of age and presented with acute respiratory tract infections between 2012 and 2014. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing of the 5'-UTR/VP2 region were used to identify EV-D68. We also examined the epidemiological pattern of EV-D68 since 2009, when it was first identified in Thailand, and compiled records of clinical manifestations in children with confirmed EV-D68 infection. From 837 samples, 5 samples (0.6%) tested positive for EV-D68. All patients presented with viral pneumonia and required hospitalization. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP4/VP2 regions revealed that EV-D68 strains circulating in Thailand between 2012 and 2014 were closely related to strains reported in Japan, United Kingdom, China, and France. Continued surveillance of probable EV-D68-associated severe respiratory tract infection and the development of a rapid diagnostic test for EV-D68 are essential in supporting awareness and facilitating disease prevention and control.

  16. Seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air and resulting radiation dose to human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.A. Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of radiation hazard of indoor radon is largely due to the radon progenies, which are inhaled and deposited in the human respiratory tract. It is essential to evaluate aerodynamic characteristics of the radon progenies, which are either attached or unattached to aerosol particles, because the dose is strongly dependent on the location of deposition in respiratory tract and hence on the aerodynamic characteristics of the aerosol particles. This paper presents the seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air under domestic conditions at Nagoya University, Japan. A low pressure cascade impactor as an instrument for classifying aerosol sizes and imaging plate as a radiation detector have been employed to characterize the activity size distribution of short-lived radon decay products. In parallel, radon and its progenies concentrations were measured. Taking into account the progeny characteristics, the inhalation dose in the different seasons was also estimated based on a lung dose model with the structure that is related to the ICRP66 respiratory tract model. The result evident that, the highest dose 0.22 mSvy−1 was observed during the winter where the highest value of equilibrium equivalent concentration of radon (EEC and lowest value of the activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD were found in this season; whereas, the dose in spring appeared to be lowest 0.02 mSvy−1.

  17. Optimum use of selective plated media in primary processing of respiratory tract specimens from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doern, G V; Brogden-Torres, B

    1992-10-01

    A total of 258 respiratory tract specimens from patients with cystic fibrosis were inoculated onto nine different plated media, and the rates of recovery of potential pathogens were compared. Media included sheep blood agar, enriched chocolate agar, MacConkey agar for gram-negative bacilli, chocolate agar containing bacitracin for Haemophilus spp., bromcresol green agar for yeasts, cetrimide agar for Pseudomonas spp., sheep blood agar containing colistin and nalidixic acid for gram-positive cocci, mannitol salt agar for Staphylococcus aureus, and oxidation-fermentation agar containing 300 U of polymyxin B per ml and 2 U of bacitracin per ml (OF-PBL medium) for Pseudomonas cepacia. With two exceptions, all of these media proved useful in recovering potential pathogens from respiratory tract specimens from patients with cystic fibrosis. The two exceptions were cetrimide agar and colistin-nalidixic acid-supplemented sheep blood agar, which were found to be superfluous. In addition, the results of this study further delineated the prevalence of selected bacteria and fungi in respiratory tract secretions from patients with cystic fibrosis. In rank order of frequency of isolation, we recovered isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Candida albicans, S. aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, molds, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, yeasts other than Candida albicans, miscellaneous gram-negative bacilli, beta-hemolytic streptococci, P. cepacia, and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  18. Detection of Mycoplasma fermentans in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid specimens from AIDS patients with lower respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, J G; Clarke, J; Lipman, M; Mitchell, D; Taylor-Robinson, D

    2000-10-01

    To investigate the role of Mycoplasma fermentans in lower respiratory tract disease of HIV-positive patients. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect M. fermentans in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from 78 hospitalized HIV-positive patients with lower respiratory tract disease (the index group). BAL specimens were also assessed from two control groups; 25 HIV-positive patients without respiratory symptoms and 46 patients with a respiratory illness who did not have risk factors for HIV. Seventy-one (91%) of the 78 patients who comprised the index group had AIDS. Sixty-one patients provided BAL and PBMC specimens; 16 provided a BAL specimen and one only a PBMC specimen; 15 (25%) of the 61 patients had M. fermentans positive BAL fluid, of whom 10 (67%) also had a positive PBMC specimen. In contrast, of the 46 patients who had a negative BAL fluid, only three (6.4%) had a positive PBMC sample (P fermentans positive BAL fluid. Of these positive patients, 16 also had another microorganism in the BAL fluid and for five patients M. fermentans was detected alone. Compared with patients in the index group, none of the 46 BAL fluid specimens from patients at low risk of HIV infection was M. fermentans positive (P fermentans positive BAL fluid, positivity that was also statistically different from the index group (P = 0.045, chi2 4.01). M. fermentans frequently invades the lower respiratory tract of AIDS patients as an opportunist and may cause disease in some.

  19. Treatment of adults with community-acquired respiratory tract infections: results of a multicentric clinical trial with gatifloxacin

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    Medeiros Eduardo Alexandrino Servolo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections have an important clinical and economic impact and they are the most common indication for antibiotic use in outpatient practice. This prospective, multicenter non-controlled trial assessed the efficacy and safety of gatifloxacin in the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Patients were treated with a daily oral dose of gatifloxacin 400 mg for 7-14 days. The diagnosis of respiratory infection was made based on the clinical condition and/or radiologic findings. A total of 5,044 adult patients with community-acquired respiratory infections was treated with gatifloxacin in different centers in Brazil between March 1, 2001, and October 31, 2001. Among the 5,044 patients treated, 1,501 patients (29.76% had community-acquired pneumonia, 756 (14.99% had acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis and 2,787 (55.25% had acute sinusitis. Of the total of patients treated, 3,607 (71.51% were considered cured, 1,261 (25% progressed with some clinical improvement, 28 (0.56% presented a relapse, 56 (1.11% failed to treatment and 92 (1.82% were unable to be evaluated. Adverse events were described in 634 (12.57% patients. The most common adverse events were: nausea (2.24%; dyspepsia (1.86%; diarrhea (0.79%; change in taste (0.46%; insomnia and irritability (0.22%; dizziness (0.77%; headache (0.42%; allergic reaction (0.18%; Central Nervous System alterations - insomnia, agitation, anxiety - (0.46%. This study showed that the treatment of respiratory tract infections with gatifloxacin was safe and efficient and had a low incidence of adverse events.

  20. Lower respiratory tract infections associated with rhinovirus during infancy and increased risk of wheezing during childhood. A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan-Gordo, Cristina; Bassat, Quique; Díez-Padrisa, Núria; Morais, Luis; Machevo, Sónia; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Quintó, Llorenç; Alonso, Pedro L; Roca, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Although association between respiratory syncytial virus infection and later asthma development has been established, little is known about the role of other respiratory viruses. Rhinovirus was considered a mild pathogen of the upper respiratory tract but current evidence suggests that rhinovirus is highly prevalent among children with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). The aim of the study was to evaluate whether LRTI hospitalization associated with rhinovirus during infancy was associated with an increased risk of wheezing - a proxy measure of asthma - during childhood. During a 12 months period, all infants rhinovirus. The study cohort was passively followed-up at the Manhiça District Hospital for up to 4 years and 9 months to evaluate the association between LRTI associated with rhinovirus in infancy and wheezing during childhood. A total of 220 infants entered the cohort; 25% of them had rhinovirus detected during the LRTI episode as opposed to 75% who tested negative for rhinovirus. After adjusting for sex and age and HIV infection at recruitment, infants hospitalized with LRTI associated with rhinovirus had higher incidence of subsequent visits with wheezing within the year following hospitalization [Rate ratio=1.68, (95% confidence interval=1.02-2.75); Wald test p-value = 0.039]. No evidence of increased incidence rate of visits with wheezing was observed for the remaining follow-up period. Our data suggest a short term increased risk of wheezing after an initial episode of LRTI with RV.

  1. Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and phthalates and childhood respiratory tract infections and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascon, Mireia; Casas, Maribel; Morales, Eva; Valvi, Damaskini; Ballesteros-Gómez, Ana; Luque, Noelia; Rubio, Soledad; Monfort, Núria; Ventura, Rosa; Martínez, David; Sunyer, Jordi; Vrijheid, Martine

    2015-02-01

    There is growing concern that prenatal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, which are widely used in consumer products, might affect susceptibility to infections and the development of allergy and asthma in children, but there are currently very few prospective studies. We sought to evaluate whether prenatal exposure to BPA and phthalates increases the risk of respiratory and allergic outcomes in children at various ages from birth to 7 years. We measured BPA and metabolites of high-molecular-weight phthalates, 4 di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites (Σ4DEHP) and mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP), and 3 low-molecular-weight phthalate (LMWP) metabolites (Σ3LMWP) in urine samples collected during the first and third trimesters in pregnant women participating in the Infancia y Medio Ambiente-Sabadell birth cohort study. The occurrence of chest infections, bronchitis, wheeze, and eczema in children was assessed at ages 6 and 14 months and 4 and 7 years through questionnaires given to the mothers. Atopy (specific IgE measurement) and asthma (questionnaire) were assessed at ages 4 and 7 years, respectively. The relative risks (RRs) of wheeze (RR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.03-1.40; P = .02), chest infections (RR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.00-1.32; P = .05), and bronchitis (RR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.01-1.37; P = .04) at any age increased for each doubling in concentration of maternal urinary BPA. Σ4DEHP metabolites were associated with the same outcomes (wheeze: RR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.04-1.50, P = .02; chest infections: RR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.97-1.35; P = .11; bronchitis: RR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.43; P = .04). MBzP was associated with higher risk of wheeze (RR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.00-1.33; P = .05). The risk of asthma at age 7 years was also increased with increasing prenatal BPA, Σ4DEHP, and MBzP exposure. There were no other exposure-outcome associations. Prenatal exposure to BPA and high-molecular-weight phthalates might increase the risk of asthma symptoms and respiratory tract

  2. Effect of high-dose vs standard-dose wintertime Vitamin D supplementation on viral upper respiratory tract infections in young healthy children

    OpenAIRE

    Aglipay, M.; Birken, CS; Parkin, PC; Loeb, MB; Thorpe, K.; Chen, Y.; Laupacis, A; Mamdani, M.; Macarthur, C; Hoch, JS; Mazzulli, T; Maguire, JL

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. IMPORTANCE Epidemiological studies support a link between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and a higher risk of viral upper respiratory tract infections. However, whether winter supplementation of vitamin D reduces the risk among children is unknown. OBJECTIVE To determine whether high-dose vs standard-dose vitamin D supplementation reduces the incidence of wintertime upper respiratory tract infections in young children. DESIGN, SETTING,...

  3. Upper respiratory tract tumors in Cpb:WU (Wistar random) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, V J; Woutersen, R A; van Garderen-Hoetmer, A; Dreef-van der Meulen, H C

    1990-01-01

    A survey is given of upper respiratory tract tumors in Cpb:WU (Wistar random) rats. Data were collected from ten 24- to 30-month toxicity/carcinogenicity studies and from one 12-month study. Nasal tumors may lead to dyspnea, mouth breathing, and nasal discharge. These clinical signs mainly occurred in rats bearing squamous cell carcinomas. The large nasal tumors were often osteolytic, they invaded the subcutis over the premaxilla, resulting in swellings on the back of the nose, and extended into the brain. The incidence of nasal tumors in untreated male controls was 1.1% (7/661), the tumors invariably being squamous cell carcinomas. There were no nasal tumors found in untreated female controls. The type of compound-induced nasal tumor most frequently observed was adenocarcinoma (of the olfactory epithelium) followed, in order of decreasing incidence, by squamous cell carcinoma, carcinoma in situ, polypoid adenoma, Schwannoma, and carcinosarcoma. It was proposed that adenocarcinomas of the olfactory epithelium should be classified as neuroepitheliomas. It was also suggested that squamous cell carcinomas, seen in association with necrotizing inflammation of an incisor tooth, should be considered as part of the malocclusion syndrome. No spontaneous tracheal tumors were observed, and only one out of 422 untreated female controls (0.2%) was seen to have a laryngeal tumor, an adenoma. Induced laryngeal tumors included carcinoma in situ, squamous cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma was the only type of treatment-related tracheal tumor found. The incidences of induced laryngeal and tracheal tumors were very low, and in no case were these tumors statistically significantly different from the respective incidences in controls. Images PLATE 1. PLATE 2. PLATE 3. PLATE 4. PLATE 5. PLATE 6. PLATE 7. PLATE 8. PLATE 9. PLATE 10. PLATE 11. PLATE 12. PLATE 13. PLATE 14. PLATE 15. PMID:2384064

  4. Streptococcus himalayensis sp. nov., isolated from the respiratory tract of Marmota himalayana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Lina; Lu, Shan; Lai, Xin-He; Hu, Shoukui; Chen, Cuixia; Zhang, Gui; Yang, Jing; Jin, Dong; Wang, Yi; Lan, Ruiting; Lu, Gang; Xie, Yingping; Ye, Changyun; Xu, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Five strains of Gram-positive-staining, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped, chain-forming organisms isolated separately from the respiratory tracts of five Marmota himalayana animals in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau of China were subjected to phenotypic and molecular taxonomic analyses. Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that these singular organisms represent a new member of the genus Streptococcus, being phylogenetically closest to Streptococcus marmotae DSM 101995T (98.4 % similarity). The groEL, sodA and rpoB sequence analysis showed interspecies similarity values between HTS2T and Streptococcus. marmotae DSM 101995T, its closest phylogenetic relative based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, of 98.2, 78.8 and 93.7 %, respectively. A whole-genome phylogenetic tree built from 82 core genes of genomes from 16 species of the genus Streptococcus validated that HTS2T forms a distinct subline and exhibits specific phylogenetic affinity with S. marmotae. In silico DNA-DNA hybridization of HTS2T showed an estimated DNA reassociation value of 40.5 % with Streptococcus. marmotae DSM 101995T. On the basis of their phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic findings, it is proposed that the five isolates be classified as representatives of a novel species of the genus Streptococcus, Streptococcus himalayensis sp. nov. The type strain is HTS2T (=DSM 101997T=CGMCC 1.15533T). The genome of Streptococcus himalayensis sp. nov. strain HTS2T contains 2195 genes with a size of 2 275 471 bp and a mean DNA G+C content of 41.3 mol%.